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Sample records for cord transection effects

  1. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Buzoianu-Anguiano, Vinnitsa; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; García-Vences, Elisa; Caballero-Chacón, Sara; Guizar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Chavez-Sanchez, Luis; Grijalva, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN) and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC) transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG), TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model. PMID:26634157

  2. Collagen-omental graft in experimental spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, J C; Goldsmith, H S

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cord transection was induced in 3 groups of cats. The gap was surgically reconstructed using a collagen matrix bridge (Group COL), collagen matrix + pedicled omentum graft (Group COM), or gelfoam (Group GEF). After a variable observation period, animals underwent distal cord horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) injections, somatosensory evoked potentials recordings and polarographic measurement of local spinal cord blood flow (1SCBF) using the hydrogen clearance technique. The cord tissue was removed for histologic and immunohistochemical analysis. Results showed retrograde HRP labelling of proximal segmental cord neurons and somatosensory evoked potentials were present in group COM but not in COL or GEF treated animals. Local SCBF was 66% and 87% higher in COM than COL or GEF animals respectively but this increase could be reversed if flow from the pedicled omentum was clamped-off. Histologic examination of cord tissue after 45 days revealed the presence of catecholaminergic axons distal to the transection site in COM but not COL or GEF groups. Moreover, after 90 days, the rate and density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-IR) axons was 10-fold higher in COM than COL group and this was accompanied by a proportionate increase in the vascular density between the two groups. GEF treated animals showed no regeneration of transected fibers and poor blood flow pattern. These findings indicate that the placement of a pedicled omentum on a collagen matrix bridge results in near restoration of normal SCBF to the reconstructed cord region and is associated with marked regeneration of axons below the lesion site. PMID:2336984

  3. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on glucose uptake in the presence and absence of lactate in the frog dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rigon, F; Horst, A; Kucharski, L C; Silva, R S M; Faccioni-Heuser, M C; Partata, W A

    2014-08-01

    Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms because the simplicity of their nervous tissue and the phylogenetic aspect of this question. One of these models is the sciatic nerve transection (SNT), which mimics the clinical symptoms of "phantom limb", a condition that arises in humans after amputation or transverse spinal lesions. In mammals, the SNT increases glucose metabolism in the central nervous system, and the lactate generated appears to serve as an energy source for nerve cells. An answerable question is whether there is elevated glucose uptake in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after peripheral axotomy. As glucose is the major energy substrate for frog nervous tissue, and these animals accumulate lactic acid under some conditions, bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeianus were used to demonstrate the effect of SNT on DRG and spinal cord 1-[14C] 2-deoxy-D-glucose (14C-2-DG) uptake in the presence and absence of lactate. We also investigated the effect of this condition on the formation of 14CO2 from 14C-glucose and 14C-L-lactate, and plasmatic glucose and lactate levels. The 3-O-[14C] methyl-D-glucose (14C-3-OMG) uptake was used to demonstrate the steady-state tissue/medium glucose distribution ratio under these conditions. Three days after SNT, 14C-2-DG uptake increased, but 14C-3-OMG uptake remained steady. The increase in 14C-2-DG uptake was lower when lactate was added to the incubation medium. No change was found in glucose and lactate oxidation after SNT, but lactate and glucose levels in the blood were reduced. Thus, our results showed that SNT increased the glucose metabolism in the frog DRG and spinal cord. The effect of lactate on this uptake suggests that glucose is used in glycolytic pathways after SNT. PMID:25627385

  4. Complete rat spinal cord transection as a faithful model of spinal cord injury for translational cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lukovic, Dunja; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Lopez-Mocholi, Eric; Rodriguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva; Oria, Marc; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Erceg, Slaven

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in neural loss and consequently motor and sensory impairment below the injury. There are currently no effective therapies for the treatment of traumatic SCI in humans. Various animal models have been developed to mimic human SCI. Widely used animal models of SCI are complete or partial transection or experimental contusion and compression, with both bearing controversy as to which one more appropriately reproduces the human SCI functional consequences. Here we present in details the widely used procedure of complete spinal cord transection as a faithful animal model to investigate neural and functional repair of the damaged tissue by exogenous human transplanted cells. This injury model offers the advantage of complete damage to a spinal cord at a defined place and time, is relatively simple to standardize and is highly reproducible. PMID:25860664

  5. Panax notoginseng saponins improve recovery after spinal cord transection by upregulating neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Yu; Li, Xuan-Peng; Li, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng are neuroprotective, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In the present study, we established a rat model of thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection, and injected Panax notoginseng saponins (100 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes after injury. Locomotor functions were assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale from 1 to 30 days after injury, and immunohistochemistry was carried out in the ventral horn of the spinal cord at 1 and 7 days to determine expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our results show that at 7-30 days post injury, the BBB score was higher in rats treated with Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. Furthermore, at 7 days, more NGF- and BDNF-immunoreactive neurons were observed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord of rats that had received Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. These results indicate that Panax notoginseng saponins caused an upregulation of NGF and BDNF in rats with spinal cord transection, and improved hindlimb motor function. PMID:26487862

  6. Anatomical and functional recovery following spinal cord transection in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, I; Oppenheim, R W; O'Brien, M; Shneiderman, A

    1990-09-01

    Following complete transection of the thoracic spinal cord at various times during embryonic development, chick embryos and posthatched animals exhibited various degrees of anatomical and functional recovery depending upon the age of injury. Transection on embryonic day 2 (E2), when neurogenesis is still occurring and before descending or ascending fiber tracts have formed, produced no noticeable behavioral or anatomical deficits. Embryos hatched on their own and were behaviorally indistinguishable from control hatchlings. Similar results were found following transection on E5, an age when neurogenesis is complete and when ascending and descending fiber tracts have begun to project through the thoracic region. Within 48 h following injury on E5, large numbers of nerve fibers were observed growing across the site of transection. By E8, injections of horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) administered caudal to the lesion, retrogradely labelled rostral spinal and brainstem neurons. Embryos transected on E5 were able to hatch and could stand and locomote posthatching in a manner that was indistinguishable from controls. Following spinal cord transections on E10, anatomical recovery of the spinal cord at the site of injury was not quite as complete as after E5 transection. Nonetheless, anatomical continuity was restored at the site of injury, axons projected across this region, and rostral spinal and brainstem neurons could be retrogradely labelled following HRP injections administered caudal to the lesion. At least part of this anatomical recovery may be mediated by the regeneration or regrowth of lesioned axons. Although none of the embryos transected on E10 that survived to hatching were able to hatch on their own, because several sham-operated embryos were also unable to hatch, we do not attribute this deficit to the spinal transection. When E10-transected embryos were aided in escaping from the shell, they were able to support their own weight, could stand, and locomote

  7. Full spinal cord regeneration after total transection is not possible due to entropy change.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, P; Sokal, P

    2016-09-01

    Transected spinal cord regeneration is a main challenge of regenerative medicine. The mainstream of research is focused on the promotion of spinal axons growth, which is strongly inhibited in mammals. Assuming that the inhibition of the axonal growth may be ever overcome, the complexity of neural reconnections may be the second serious stand to overcome. Peripheral nerve axons regeneration seem to form a random pattern of their targets reconnections. The hypothesis is that due to the laws of entropy or irreversible information loss the full spinal cord restoration after the transection is not possible. The hypothesis is discussed based on several assumptions. Simplifying the dissertation spinal cord is represented by 2millions of pyramidal axons. After the transection each of these axons has to make a growth and reconnect with exactly matching targets below the transection, in the same number. Axons are guided by neurotrophic factors and afterwards reconnected with neuroplasticity mechanisms. Assuming random reconnections, there are 2,000,000! permutations [Formula: see text] , therefore the chance of ideally random but correct reconnection of pyramidal axons with adequate targets is 1/2,000,000!. Apart from pyramidal axons, there are other axons, like extrapyramidal, sensory and associative. Empirical data and analysis of neurotrophic factors and organogenesis mechanisms may seem to slightly contradict the hypothesis, but strictly adhering to the second law of thermodynamics and entropy laws the full restoration of the transected cord may never be possible. PMID:27515203

  8. Spinal Cord Transection-Induced Allodynia in Rats – Behavioral, Physiopathological and Pharmacological Characterization

    PubMed Central

    M'Dahoma, Saïd; Bourgoin, Sylvie; Kayser, Valérie; Barthélémy, Sandrine; Chevarin, Caroline; Chali, Farah; Orsal, Didier; Hamon, Michel

    2014-01-01

    In humans, spinal cord lesions induce not only major motor and neurovegetative deficits but also severe neuropathic pain which is mostly resistant to classical analgesics. Better treatments can be expected from precise characterization of underlying physiopathological mechanisms. This led us to thoroughly investigate (i) mechanical and thermal sensory alterations, (ii) responses to acute treatments with drugs having patent or potential anti-allodynic properties and (iii) the spinal/ganglion expression of transcripts encoding markers of neuronal injury, microglia and astrocyte activation in rats that underwent complete spinal cord transection (SCT). SCT was performed at thoracic T8–T9 level under deep isoflurane anaesthesia, and SCT rats were examined for up to two months post surgery. SCT induced a marked hyper-reflexia at hindpaws and strong mechanical and cold allodynia in a limited (6 cm2) cutaneous territory just rostral to the lesion site. At this level, pressure threshold value to trigger nocifensive reactions to locally applied von Frey filaments was 100-fold lower in SCT- versus sham-operated rats. A marked up-regulation of mRNAs encoding ATF3 (neuronal injury) and glial activation markers (OX-42, GFAP, P2×4, P2×7, TLR4) was observed in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia at T6-T11 levels from day 2 up to day 60 post surgery. Transcripts encoding the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were also markedly but differentially up-regulated at T6–T11 levels in SCT rats. Acute treatment with ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p.), morphine (3–10 mg/kg s.c.) and tapentadol (10–20 mg/kg i.p.) significantly increased pressure threshold to trigger nocifensive reaction in the von Frey filaments test, whereas amitriptyline, pregabalin, gabapentin and clonazepam were ineffective. Because all SCT rats developed long lasting, reproducible and stable allodynia, which could be alleviated by drugs effective in humans, thoracic cord transection might be a

  9. Transplanted oligodendrocytes and motoneuron progenitors generated from human embryonic stem cells promote locomotor recovery after spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Oria, Marc; Roselló, Mireia García; Aragó, Maria Amparo Pérez; Lopez, Maria Gomez; Radojevic, Ivana; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Francisco-Javier; Bhattacharya, Shom Shanker; Cordoba, Juan; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) hold great promise for the treatment of patients with many neurodegenerative diseases particularly those arising from cell loss or neural dysfunction including spinal cord injury. This study evaluates the therapeutic effects of transplanted hESC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPC) and/or motoneuron progenitors (MP) on axonal remyelination and functional recovery of adult rats after complete spinal cord transection. OPC and/or MP were grafted into the site of injury in the acute phase. Based on Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores recovery of locomotor function was significantly enhanced in rats treated with OPC and/or MP when compared with control animals. When transplanted into the spinal cord immediately after complete transection, OPC and MP survived, migrated, and differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes and neurons showing in vivo electrophysiological activity. Taken together, these results indicate that OPC and MP derived from hESC could be a useful therapeutic strategy to repair injured spinal cord. PMID:20665739

  10. Transplanted Oligodendrocytes and Motoneuron Progenitors Generated from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Promote Locomotor Recovery After Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Oria, Marc; García Roselló, Mireia; Aragó, Maria Amparo Pérez; Lopez, Maria Gomez; Radojevic, Ivana; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Francisco-Javier; Shanker Bhattacharya, Shom; Cordoba, Juan; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) hold great promise for the treatment of patients with many neurodegenerative diseases particularly those arising from cell loss or neural dysfunction including spinal cord injury. This study evaluates the therapeutic effects of transplanted hESC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPC) and/or motoneuron progenitors (MP) on axonal remyelination and functional recovery of adult rats after complete spinal cord transection. OPC and/or MP were grafted into the site of injury in the acute phase. Based on Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores recovery of locomotor function was significantly enhanced in rats treated with OPC and/or MP when compared with control animals. When transplanted into the spinal cord immediately after complete transection, OPC and MP survived, migrated, and differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes and neurons showing in vivo electrophysiological activity. Taken together, these results indicate that OPC and MP derived from hESC could be a useful therapeutic strategy to repair injured spinal cord. Stem Cells 2010; 28:1541–1549. PMID:20665739

  11. Functional Regeneration Following Spinal Transection Demonstrated in the Isolated Spinal Cord of the Larval Sea Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, A. H.; Mackler, S. A.; Selzer, M. E.

    1986-04-01

    Axons in the larval sea lamprey can regenerate across the site of a spinal cord transection and form functioning synapses with some of their normal target neurons. The animals recover normal-appearing locomotion, but whether the regenerating axons and their synaptic connections are capable of playing a functional role during this behavior is unknown. To test this, ``fictive'' swimming was induced in the isolated spinal cord by the addition of D-glutamate to the bathing solution. Ventral root discharges of segments above and below a healed transection showed a high degree of phase-locking. This strongly suggests that the behavioral recovery is mediated by regenerated functional synaptic connections subserving intersegmental coordination of the central pattern generator for locomotion.

  12. Spinal transection induces widespread proliferation of cells along the length of the spinal cord in a weakly electric fish

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Antiño R.; Smith, G. Troy

    2013-01-01

    The ability to regenerate spinal cord tissue after tail amputation has been well studied in several species of teleost fish. The present study examined proliferation and survival of cells following complete spinal cord transection rather than tail amputation in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. To quantify cell proliferation along the length of the spinal cord, fish were given a single bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) injection immediately after spinal transection or sham surgery. Spinal transection significantly increased the density of BrdU+ cells along the entire length of the spinal cord at 1 day post transection (dpt), and most newly generated cells survived up to 14 dpt. To examine longer term survival of the newly proliferated cells, BrdU was injected for 5 days after the surgery, and fish were sacrificed 14 or 30 dpt. Spinal transection significantly increased proliferation and/or survival, as indicated by an elevated density of BrdU+ cells in the spinal cords of spinally transected compared to sham-operated and intact fish. At 14 dpt, BrdU+ cells were abundant at all levels of the spinal cord. By 30 dpt, the density of BrdU+ cells decreased at all levels of the spinal cord except at the tip of the tail. Thus, newly generated cells in the caudal-most segment of the spinal cord survived longer than those in more rostral segments. Our findings indicate that spinal cord transection stimulates widespread cellular proliferation; however, there were regional differences in the survival of the newly generated cells. PMID:23147638

  13. Characterization of dendritic morphology and neurotransmitter phenotype of thoracic descending propriospinal neurons after complete spinal cord transection and GDNF treatment.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lingxiao; Ruan, Yiwen; Chen, Chen; Frye, Christian Corbin; Xiong, Wenhui; Jin, Xiaoming; Jones, Kathryn; Sengelaub, Dale; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-03-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), poor regeneration of damaged axons of the central nervous system (CNS) causes limited functional recovery. This limited spontaneous functional recovery has been attributed, to a large extent, to the plasticity of propriospinal neurons, especially the descending propriospinal neurons (dPSNs). Compared with the supraspinal counterparts, dPSNs have displayed significantly greater regenerative capacity, which can be further enhanced by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In the present study, we applied a G-mutated rabies virus (G-Rabies) co-expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) to reveal Golgi-like dendritic morphology of dPSNs. We also investigated the neurotransmitters expressed by dPSNs after labeling with a retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG). dPSNs were examined in animals with sham injuries or complete spinal transections with or without GDNF treatment. Bilateral injections of G-Rabies and FG were made into the 2nd lumbar (L2) spinal cord at 3 days prior to a spinal cord transection performed at the 11th thoracic level (T11). The lesion gap was filled with Gelfoam containing either saline or GDNF in the injury groups. Four days post-injury, the rats were sacrificed for analysis. For those animals receiving G-rabies injection, the GFP signal in the T7-9 spinal cord was visualized via 2-photon microscopy. Dendritic morphology from stack images was traced and analyzed using a Neurolucida software. We found that dPSNs in sham injured animals had a predominantly dorsal-ventral distribution of dendrites. Transection injury resulted in alterations in the dendritic distribution with dorsal-ventral retraction and lateral-medial extension. Treatment with GDNF significantly increased the terminal dendritic length of dPSNs. The density of spine-like structures was increased after injury, and treatment with GDNF enhanced this effect. For the group receiving FG injections, immunohistochemistry for glutamate, choline

  14. Serotonergic drugs and spinal cord transections indicate that different spinal circuits are involved in external urethral sphincter activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Yi; Cheng, Chen-Li; Chen, Jia-Jin J.; de Groat, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Lower urinary tract function is regulated by spinal and supraspinal reflexes that coordinate the activity of the urinary bladder and external urethral sphincter (EUS). Two types of EUS activity (tonic and bursting) have been identified in rats. This study in urethane-anesthetized female rats used cystometry, EUS electromyography, spinal cord transection (SCT) at different segmental levels, and analysis of the effects of 5-HT1A receptor agonist (8-OH-DPAT) and antagonist (WAY100635) drugs to examine the origin of tonic and bursting EUS activity. EUS activity was elicited by bladder distension or electrical stimulation of afferent axons in the pelvic nerve (pelvic-EUS reflex). Tonic activity evoked by bladder distension was detected in spinal cord-intact rats and after acute and chronic T8–9 or L3–4 SCT but was abolished after L6–S1 SCT. Bursting activity was abolished by all types of SCT except chronic T8–9 transection. 8-OH-DPAT enhanced tonic activity, and WAY100635 reversed the effect of 8-OH-DPAT. The pelvic-EUS reflex consisted of an early response (ER) and late response (LR) when the bladder was distended in spinal cord-intact rats. ER remained after acute or chronic T8–9 and L3–4 SCT, but was absent after L6–S1 SCT. LR occurred only in chronic T8–9 SCT rats where it was enhanced or unmasked by 8-OH-DPAT. The results indicate that spinal serotonergic mechanisms facilitate tonic and bursting EUS activity. The circuitry for generating different patterns of EUS activity appears to be located in different segments of the spinal cord: tonic activity at L6–S1 and bursting activity between T8–9 and L3–4. PMID:17047164

  15. Neural reconnection in the transected spinal cord of the freshwater turtle Trachemys dorbignyi.

    PubMed

    Rehermann, María Inés; Marichal, Nicolás; Russo, Raúl E; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar

    2009-07-10

    This paper provides the first evidence that freshwater turtles are able to reconnect their completely transected spinal cords, leading to some degree of recovery of the motor functions lost after injury. Videographic analysis showed that some turtles (5 of 11) surviving more than 20 days after injury were able to initiate stepping locomotion. However, the stepping movements were slower than those of normal animals, and swimming patterns were not restored. Even though just 45% of the injured turtles recovered their stepping patterns, all showed axonal sprouting beyond the lesion site. Immunocytochemical and electron microscope images revealed the occurrence of regrowing axons crossing the severed region. A major contingent of the axons reconnecting the cord originated from sensory neurons lying in dorsal ganglia adjacent to the lesion site. The axons bridging the damaged region traveled on a cellular scaffold consisting of brain lipid-binding protein (BLBP)- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells and processes. Serotonergic varicose nerve fibers and endings were found at early stages of the healing process at the epicenter of the lesion. Interestingly, the glial scar commonly found in the damaged central nervous system of mammals was absent. In contrast, GFAP- and BLBP-positive processes were found running parallel to the main axis of the cord accompanying the crossing axons. PMID:19418545

  16. NEURAL RECONNECTION IN THE TRANSECTED SPINAL CORD OF THE FRESH-WATER TURTLE Trachemys dorbignyi

    PubMed Central

    Rehermann, María Inés; Marichal, Nicolás; Russo, Raúl E.; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides the first evidence that fresh water turtles are able to reconnect their completely transected spinal cord leading to some degree of recovery of the motor functions lost after injury. Videographic analysis showed that some turtles (5 out of 11) surviving more than 20 days after injury were able to initiate stepping locomotion. However the stepping movements were slower than those of normal animals and swimming patterns were not restored. Even though just 45% of the injured turtles recovered their stepping patterns, all showed axonal sprouting beyond the lesion site. Immunocytochemical and electron microscope images revealed the occurrence of regrowing axons crossing the severed region. A major contingent of the axons reconnecting the cord originated from sensory neurons lying in dorsal ganglia adjacent to the lesion site. The axons bridging the damaged region traveled on a cellular scaffold consisting of BLBP and GFAP positive cells and processes. Serotonergic varicose nerve fibers and endings were found at early stages of the healing process at the epicenter of the lesion. Interestingly, the glial scar commonly found in the damaged central nervous system of mammals was absent. In contrast GFAP and BLBP positive processes were found running parallel to the main axis of the cord accompanying the crossing axons. PMID:19418545

  17. An ultrastructural study on the reactive oligodendrocytes, myeloclasts, and myelophages in transected dog spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Chang, L W; Kao, C C

    1980-01-01

    As early as 1 to 3 hr after cord transection, proliferation of many reactive oligodendrocytes was observed. Bundles of microfilaments and microtubules were observed in those cells that sent out long, complex pseudopodlike processes near the area of injury. These reactive oligodendrocytes may be comparable to Vaughn's multipotential glia cells. Between 1 day and 1 wk, hypertrophy of the oligodendrocytes was observed. These hypertrophied oligodendrocytes also became hyperactive and infiltrated into the axons within the myelin sheath. These infiltrating hyperactive oligodendrocytes had a scanty fibrillary cytoplasm and are believed to correspond to Jakob's "myeloclasts". The infiltration of macrophages into the nerve fibers and myelin sheaths was also observed. These macrophages were found to be very active in phagocytosis and removal of degenerated debris within the nerve fiber and are believed to represent the "myelophages" described by Jakob in 1913. PMID:6107880

  18. Passive exercise of the hind limbs after complete thoracic transection of the spinal cord promotes cortical reorganization.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Alessandro; Foffani, Guglielmo; Knudsen, Eric B; Shumsky, Jed; Moxon, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise promotes neural plasticity in the brain of healthy subjects and modulates pathophysiological neural plasticity after sensorimotor loss, but the mechanisms of this action are not fully understood. After spinal cord injury, cortical reorganization can be maximized by exercising the non-affected body or the residual functions of the affected body. However, exercise per se also produces systemic changes - such as increased cardiovascular fitness, improved circulation and neuroendocrine changes - that have a great impact on brain function and plasticity. It is therefore possible that passive exercise therapies typically applied below the level of the lesion in patients with spinal cord injury could put the brain in a more plastic state and promote cortical reorganization. To directly test this hypothesis, we applied passive hindlimb bike exercise after complete thoracic transection of the spinal cord in adult rats. Using western blot analysis, we found that the level of proteins associated with plasticity - specifically ADCY1 and BDNF - increased in the somatosensory cortex of transected animals that received passive bike exercise compared to transected animals that received sham exercise. Using electrophysiological techniques, we then verified that neurons in the deafferented hindlimb cortex increased their responsiveness to tactile stimuli delivered to the forelimb in transected animals that received passive bike exercise compared to transected animals that received sham exercise. Passive exercise below the level of the lesion, therefore, promotes cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury, uncovering a brain-body interaction that does not rely on intact sensorimotor pathways connecting the exercised body parts and the brain. PMID:23349859

  19. In vivo longitudinal Myelin Water Imaging in rat spinal cord following dorsal column transection injury.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Piotr; Rosicka, Paulina; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew C; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2014-04-01

    Longitudinal Myelin Water Imaging was carried out in vivo to characterize white matter damage following dorsal column transection (DC Tx) injury at the lumbar level L1 of rat spinal cords. A transmit-receive implantable coil system was used to acquire multiple spin-echo (MSE) quantitative T2 data from the lumbar spinal cords of 16 rats at one week pre-injury as well as 3 and 8weeks post-injury (117 microns in-plane resolution and 1.5mm slice thickness). In addition, ex vivo MSE and DTI data were acquired from cords fixed and excised at 3 or 8weeks post injury using a solenoid coil. The MSE data were used to generate Myelin Water Fractions (MWFs) as a surrogate measure of myelin content, while DTI data were acquired to study damage to the axons. Myelin damage was assessed histologically with Eriochrome cyanine (EC) and Myelin Basic Protein in degenerated myelin (dgen-MBP) staining, and axonal damage was assessed by neurofilament-H in combination with neuron specific beta-III-tubulin (NF/Tub) staining. These MRI and histological measures of injury were studied in the dorsal column at 5mm cranial and 5mm caudal to injury epicenter. MWF increased significantly at 3weeks post-injury at both the cranial and caudal sites, relative to baseline. The values on the cranial side of injury returned to baseline at 8weeks post-injury but remained elevated on the caudal side. This trend was found in both in vivo and ex vivo data. This MWF increase was likely due to the presence of myelin debris, which were cleared by 8 weeks on the cranial, but not the caudal, side. Both EC and dgen-MBP stains displayed similar trends. MWF showed significant correlation with EC staining (R=0.63, p=0.005 in vivo and R=0.74, p=0.0001 ex vivo). MWF also correlated strongly with the dgen-MBP stain, but only on the cranial side (R=0.64, p=0.05 in vivo; R=0.63, p=0.038 ex vivo). This study demonstrates that longitudinal MWI in vivo can accurately characterize white matter damage in DC Tx model of injury

  20. Structural remodeling of the heart and its premotor cardioinhibitory vagal neurons following T5 spinal cord transection

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Midthoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with enhanced cardiac sympathetic activity and reduced cardiac parasympathetic activity. The enhanced cardiac sympathetic activity is associated with sympathetic structural plasticity within the stellate ganglia, spinal cord segments T1–T4, and heart. However, changes to cardiac parasympathetic centers rostral to an experimental SCI are relatively unknown. Importantly, reduced vagal activity is a predictor of high mortality. Furthermore, this autonomic dysregulation promotes progressive left ventricular (LV) structural remodeling. Accordingly, we hypothesized that midthoracic spinal cord injury is associated with structural plasticity in premotor (preganglionic parasympathetic neurons) cardioinhibitory vagal neurons located within the nucleus ambiguus as well as LV structural remodeling. To test this hypothesis, dendritic arborization and morphology (cholera toxin B immunohistochemistry and Sholl analysis) of cardiac projecting premotor cardioinhibitory vagal neurons located within the nucleus ambiguus were determined in intact (sham transected) and thoracic level 5 transected (T5X) rats. In addition, LV chamber size, wall thickness, and collagen content (Masson trichrome stain and structural analysis) were determined. Midthoracic SCI was associated with structural changes within the nucleus ambiguus and heart. Specifically, following T5 spinal cord transection, there was a significant increase in cardiac parasympathetic preganglionic neuron dendritic arborization, soma area, maximum dendritic length, and number of intersections/animal. This parasympathetic structural remodeling was associated with a profound LV structural remodeling. Specifically, T5 spinal cord transection increased LV chamber area, reduced LV wall thickness, and increased collagen content. Accordingly, results document a dynamic interaction between the heart and its parasympathetic innervation. PMID:24610530

  1. Iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic field exposure promote functional recovery by attenuating free radical-induced damage in rats with spinal cord transection

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Ajay; Singh, Anand; Nag, Tapas C; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Mathur, Rashmi; Jain, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) can attenuate oxidative stress in a neutral pH environment in vitro. In combination with an external electromagnetic field, they can also facilitate axon regeneration. The present study demonstrates the in vivo potential of IONPs to recover functional deficits in rats with complete spinal cord injury. Methods The spinal cord was completely transected at the T11 vertebra in male albino Wistar rats. Iron oxide nanoparticle solution (25 μg/mL) embedded in 3% agarose gel was implanted at the site of transection, which was subsequently exposed to an electromagnetic field (50 Hz, 17.96 μT for two hours daily for five weeks). Results Locomotor and sensorimotor assessment as well as histological analysis demonstrated significant functional recovery and a reduction in lesion volume in rats with IONP implantation and exposure to an electromagnetic field. No collagenous scar was observed and IONPs were localized intracellularly in the immediate vicinity of the lesion. Further, in vitro experiments to explore the cytotoxic effects of IONPs showed no effect on cell survival. However, a significant decrease in H2O2-mediated oxidative stress was evident in the medium containing IONPs, indicating their free radical scavenging properties. Conclusion These novel findings indicate a therapeutic role for IONPs in spinal cord injury and other neurodegenerative disorders mediated by reactive oxygen species. PMID:23818782

  2. Quantitative anatomical and behavioral analyses of regeneration and collateral sprouting following spinal cord transection in the nurse shark (ginglymostoma cirratum).

    PubMed

    Gelderd, J B

    1979-01-01

    The spinal cord was transected at the mid-thoracic level in 32 nurse sharks. Four animals per group were sacrificed at intervals of 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 and 90 days postoperative. Two groups of fish underwent a subsequent spinla1 cord retransection at the same site at 90 days and were sacrificed 10 and 20 days later. Three sections of spinal cord were removed from each shark for histological analysis. Behaviorally, timed trials for swimming speed and a strength test for axial musculature contraction caudal to the lesion site were performed at 5 day postoperative intervals. Histological analysis showed little regeneration (9-13 percent) of two descending tracts 90 days following the lesion and no return of rostrally controlled movements caudal to the lesion. However, synaptic readjustment did occur caudal to the lesion. This phenomenon was attributed to local segmental sprouting of adjacent, intact nerve fibers. A close correlation was shown between this synaptic readjustment and the strength of uncontrollable undulatory movements seen caudal to the lesion site following spinal cord transection. The relationship of regeneration and collateral sprouting to quantitative behavioral changes is discussed. PMID:543459

  3. The molecular cloning of glial fibrillary acidic protein in Gekko japonicus and its expression changes after spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dehong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Yan; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong; Li, Zhengli

    2010-12-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an astrocyte-specific member of the class III intermediate filament proteins. It is generally used as a specific marker of astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). We isolated a GFAP cDNA from the brain and spinal cord cDNA library of Gekko japonicus, and prepared polyclonal antibodies against gecko GFAP to provide useful tools for further immunochemistry studies. Both the real-time quantitative PCR and western blot results revealed that the expression of GFAP in the spinal cord after transection increased, reaching its maximum level after 3 days, and then gradually decreased over the rest of the 2 weeks of the experiment. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the increase in GFAP-positive labeling was restricted to the white matter rather than the gray matter. In particular, a slight increase in the number of GFAP positive star-shaped astrocytes was detected in the ventral and lateral regions of the white matter. Our results indicate that reactive astrogliosis in the gecko spinal cord took place primarily in the white matter during a short time interval, suggesting that the specific astrogliosis evaluated by GFAP expression might be advantageous in spinal cord regeneration. PMID:20711818

  4. Spontaneous development of full weight-supported stepping after complete spinal cord transection in the neonatal opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Benjamin J; Callaway, Jennifer K; Ek, C Joakim; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Saunders, Norman R

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord trauma in the adult nervous system usually results in permanent loss of function below the injury level. The immature spinal cord has greater capacity for repair and can develop considerable functionality by adulthood. This study used the marsupial laboratory opossum Monodelphis domestica, which is born at a very early stage of neural development. Complete spinal cord transection was made in the lower-thoracic region of pups at postnatal-day 7 (P7) or P28, and the animals grew to adulthood. Injury at P7 resulted in a dense neuronal tissue bridge that connected the two ends of the cord; retrograde neuronal labelling indicated that supraspinal and propriospinal innervation spanned the injury site. This repair was associated with pronounced behavioural recovery, coordinated gait and an ability to use hindlimbs when swimming. Injury at P28 resulted in a cyst-like cavity encased in scar tissue forming at the injury site. Using retrograde labelling, no labelled brainstem or propriospinal neurons were found above the lesion, indicating that detectable neuronal connectivity had not spanned the injury site. However, these animals could use their hindlimbs to take weight-supporting steps but could not use their hindlimbs when swimming. White matter, demonstrated by Luxol Fast Blue staining, was present in the injury site of P7- but not P28-injured animals. Overall, these studies demonstrated that provided spinal injury occurs early in development, regrowth of supraspinal innervation is possible. This repair appears to lead to improved functional outcomes. At older ages, even without detectable axonal growth spanning the injury site, substantial development of locomotion was still possible. This outcome is discussed in conjunction with preliminary findings of differences in the local propriospinal circuits following spinal cord injury (demonstrated with fluororuby labelling), which may underlie the weight bearing locomotion observed in the apparent absence of

  5. The linear-ordered collagen scaffold-BDNF complex significantly promotes functional recovery after completely transected spinal cord injury in canine.

    PubMed

    Han, Sufang; Wang, Bin; Jin, Wei; Xiao, Zhifeng; Li, Xing; Ding, Wenyong; Kapur, Meghan; Chen, Bing; Yuan, Baoyu; Zhu, Tiansheng; Wang, Handong; Wang, Jing; Dong, Qun; Liang, Weibang; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is still a worldwide clinical challenge for which there is no viable therapeutic method. We focused on developing combinatorial methods targeting the complex pathological process of SCI. In this study, we implanted linear-ordered collagen scaffold (LOCS) fibers with collagen binding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) by tagging a collagen-binding domain (CBD) (LOCS + CBD-BDNF) in completely transected canine SCI with multisystem rehabilitation to validate its potential therapeutic effect through a long-term (38 weeks) observation. We found that LOCS + CBD-BDNF implants strikingly promoted locomotion and functional sensory recovery, with some dogs standing unassisted and transiently moving. Further histological analysis showed that administration of LOCS + CBD-BDNF reduced lesion volume, decreased collagen deposits, promoted axon regeneration and improved myelination, leading to functional recovery. Collectively, LOCS + CBD-BDNF showed striking therapeutic effect on completely transected canine SCI model and it is the first time to report such breakthrough in the war with SCI. Undoubtedly, it is a potentially promising therapeutic method for SCI paralysis or other movement disorders caused by neurological diseases in the future. PMID:25522968

  6. Electro-acupuncture promotes survival, differentiation of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as well as functional recovery in the spinal cord-transected rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Yan, Qing; Ruan, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Yan-Qing; Li, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Li, Yan; Dong, Hongxin; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the potential tools for treatment of the spinal cord injury; however, the survival and differentiation of MSCs in an injured spinal cord still need to be improved. In the present study, we investigated whether Governor Vessel electro-acupuncture (EA) could efficiently promote bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) survival and differentiation, axonal regeneration and finally, functional recovery in the transected spinal cord. Results The spinal cords of adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were completely transected at T10, five experimental groups were performed: 1. sham operated control (Sham-control); 2. operated control (Op-control); 3. electro-acupuncture treatment (EA); 4. MSCs transplantation (MSCs); and 5. MSCs transplantation combined with electro-acupuncture (MSCs+EA). After 2-8 weeks of MSCs transplantation plus EA treatment, we found that the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), cAMP level, the differentiation of MSCs, the 5-HT positive and CGRP positive nerve fibers in the lesion site and nearby tissue of injured spinal cord were significantly increased in the MSCs+EA group as compared to the group of the MSCs transplantation or the EA treated alone. Furthermore, behavioral test and spinal cord evoked potentials detection demonstrated a significantly functional recovery in the MSCs +EA group. Conclusion These results suggest that EA treatment may promote grafted MSCs survival and differentiation; MSCs transplantation combined with EA treatment could promote axonal regeneration and partial locomotor functional recovery in the transected spinal cord in rats and indicate a promising avenue of treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:19374777

  7. Age-Dependent Changes in the Proteome Following Complete Spinal Cord Transection in a Postnatal South American Opossum (Monodelphis domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Natassya M.; Steer, David L.; Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Ek, C. Joakim; Truettner, Jessie S.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Richardson, Samantha J.; Smith, A. Ian; VandeBerg, John L.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2011-01-01

    Recovery from severe spinal injury in adults is limited, compared to immature animals who demonstrate some capacity for repair. Using laboratory opossums (Monodelphis domestica), the aim was to compare proteomic responses to injury at two ages: one when there is axonal growth across the lesion and substantial behavioural recovery and one when no axonal growth occurs. Anaesthetized pups at postnatal day (P) 7 or P28 were subjected to complete transection of the spinal cord at thoracic level T10. Cords were collected 1 or 7 days after injury and from age-matched controls. Proteins were separated based on isoelectric point and subunit molecular weight; those whose expression levels changed following injury were identified by densitometry and analysed by mass spectrometry. Fifty-six unique proteins were identified as differentially regulated in response to spinal transection at both ages combined. More than 50% were cytoplasmic and 70% belonged to families of proteins with characteristic binding properties. Proteins were assigned to groups by biological function including regulation (40%), metabolism (26%), inflammation (19%) and structure (15%). More changes were detected at one than seven days after injury at both ages. Seven identified proteins: 14-3-3 epsilon, 14-3-3 gamma, cofilin, alpha enolase, heart fatty acid binding protein (FABP3), brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) and ubiquitin demonstrated age-related differential expression and were analysed by qRT-PCR. Changes in mRNA levels for FABP3 at P7+1day and ubiquitin at P28+1day were statistically significant. Immunocytochemical staining showed differences in ubiquitin localization in younger compared to older cords and an increase in oligodendrocyte and neuroglia immunostaining following injury at P28. Western blot analysis supported proteomic results for ubiquitin and 14-3-3 proteins. Data obtained at the two ages demonstrated changes in response to injury, compared to controls, that were different for

  8. Knockdown of α-synuclein in cerebral cortex improves neural behavior associated with apoptotic inhibition and neurotrophin expression in spinal cord transected rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-Cui; Feng, Guo-Ying; Xia, Qing-Jie; Hu, Yue; Xu, Yang; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Hang-Ping; Wang, Ting-Hua; Zhou, Xue

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often causes severe functional impairment with poor recovery. The treatment, however, is far from satisfaction, and the mechanisms remain unclear. By using proteomics and western blot, we found spinal cord transection (SCT) resulted in a significant down-regulation of α-synuclein (SNCA) in the motor cortex of SCT rats at 3 days post-operation. In order to detect the role of SNCA, we used SNCA-ORF/shRNA lentivirus to upregulate or knockdown SNCA expression. In vivo, SNCA-shRNA lentivirus injection into the cerebral cortex motor area not only inhibited SNCA expression, but also significantly enhanced neurons' survival, and attenuated neuronal apoptosis, as well as promoted motor and sensory function recovery in hind limbs. While, overexpression SNCA exhibited the opposite effects. In vitro, cortical neurons transfected with SNCA-shRNA lentivirus gave rise to an optimal neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth, while it was accompanied by reverse efficiency in SNCA-ORF group. In molecular level, SNCA silence induced the upregulation of Bcl-2 and the downregulation of Bax, and the expression of NGF, BDNF and NT3 was substantially upregulated in cortical neurons. Together, endogenous SNCA play a crucial role in motor and sensory function regulation, in which, the underlying mechanism may be linked to the regulation of apoptosis associated with apoptotic gene (Bax, Bcl2) and neurotrophic factors expression (NGF, BDNF and NT3). These finds provide novel insights to understand the role of SNCA in cerebral cortex after SCT, and it may be as a novel treatment target for SCI repair in future clinic trials. PMID:26822976

  9. Local Delivery of High-Dose Chondroitinase ABC in the Sub-Acute Stage Promotes Axonal Outgrowth and Functional Recovery after Complete Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chu-Hsun; Lin, Chi-Te; Lee, Meng-Jen; Tsai, May-Jywan; Huang, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ming-Chao; Lin, Yi-Lo; Chen, Ching-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are glial scar-associated molecules considered axonal regeneration inhibitors and can be digested by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to promote axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI). We previously demonstrated that intrathecal delivery of low-dose ChABC (1 U) in the acute stage of SCI promoted axonal regrowth and functional recovery. In this study, high-dose ChABC (50 U) introduced via intrathecal delivery induced subarachnoid hemorrhage and death within 48 h. However, most SCI patients are treated in the sub-acute or chronic stages, when the dense glial scar has formed and is minimally digested by intrathecal delivery of ChABC at the injury site. The present study investigated whether intraparenchymal delivery of ChABC in the sub-acute stage of complete spinal cord transection would promote axonal outgrowth and improve functional recovery. We observed no functional recovery following the low-dose ChABC (1 U or 5 U) treatments. Furthermore, animals treated with high-dose ChABC (50 U or 100 U) showed decreased CSPGs levels. The extent and area of the lesion were also dramatically decreased after ChABC treatment. The outgrowth of the regenerating axons was significantly increased, and some partially crossed the lesion site in the ChABC-treated groups. In addition, retrograde Fluoro-Gold (FG) labeling showed that the outgrowing axons could cross the lesion site and reach several brain stem nuclei involved in sensory and motor functions. The Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) open field locomotor scores revealed that the ChABC treatment significantly improved functional recovery compared to the control group at eight weeks after treatment. Our study demonstrates that high-dose ChABC treatment in the sub-acute stage of SCI effectively improves glial scar digestion by reducing the lesion size and increasing axonal regrowth to the related functional nuclei, which promotes locomotor recovery. Thus, our results will aid in

  10. Age-Dependent Transcriptome and Proteome Following Transection of Neonatal Spinal Cord of Monodelphis domestica (South American Grey Short-Tailed Opossum)

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Norman R.; Noor, Natassya M.; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Steer, David L.; Ek, C. Joakim; Habgood, Mark D.; Wakefield, Matthew J.; Lindsay, Helen; Truettner, Jessie; Miller, Robert D.; Smith, A. Ian; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a combined transcriptome and proteome analysis of Monodelphis domestica response to spinal cord injury at two different postnatal ages. Previously we showed that complete transection at postnatal day 7 (P7) is followed by profuse axon growth across the lesion with near-normal locomotion and swimming when adult. In contrast, at P28 there is no axon growth across the lesion, the animals exhibit weight-bearing locomotion, but cannot use hind limbs when swimming. Here we examined changes in gene and protein expression in the segment of spinal cord rostral to the lesion at 24 h after transection at P7 and at P28. Following injury at P7 only forty genes changed (all increased expression); most were immune/inflammatory genes. Following injury at P28 many more genes changed their expression and the magnitude of change for some genes was strikingly greater. Again many were associated with the immune/inflammation response. In functional groups known to be inhibitory to regeneration in adult cords the expression changes were generally muted, in some cases opposite to that required to account for neurite inhibition. For example myelin basic protein expression was reduced following injury at P28 both at the gene and protein levels. Only four genes from families with extracellular matrix functions thought to influence neurite outgrowth in adult injured cords showed substantial changes in expression following injury at P28: Olfactomedin 4 (Olfm4, 480 fold compared to controls), matrix metallopeptidase (Mmp1, 104 fold), papilin (Papln, 152 fold) and integrin α4 (Itga4, 57 fold). These data provide a resource for investigation of a priori hypotheses in future studies of mechanisms of spinal cord regeneration in immature animals compared to lack of regeneration at more mature stages. PMID:24914927

  11. Regeneration of descending spinal axons after transection of the thoracic spinal cord during early development in the North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana.

    PubMed

    Martin, G F; Terman, J R; Wang, X M

    2000-11-15

    Opossums are born in an immature, fetal-like state, making it possible to lesion their spinal cord early in development without intrauterine surgery. When the thoracic spinal cord of the North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana, is transected on postnatal day 5, and injections of Fast Blue (FB) are made caudal to the lesion site 30-40 days or 6 months later, neurons are labeled in all of the spinal and supraspinal areas that are labeled after comparable injections in age-matched, unlesioned controls. Double-labeling studies document that regeneration of cut axons contributes to growth of axons through the lesion site and behavioral studies show that animals lesioned on postnatal day 5 use their hindlimbs in normal appearing locomotion as adults. The critical period for developmental plasticity of descending spinal axons extends to postnatal day 26, although axons which grow through the lesion site become fewer in number and more restricted as to origin with increasing age. Animals lesioned between postnatal day 12 and 26 use the hindlimbs better than animals lesioned as adults, but hindlimb function is markedly abnormal and uncoordinated with that of the forelimbs. We conclude that restoration of anatomical continuity occurs after transection of the spinal cord in developing opossums, that descending axons grow through the lesion site, that regeneration of cut axons contributes to such growth, and that animals lesioned early enough in development have relatively normal motor function as adults. PMID:11165803

  12. Tissue-engineered regeneration of completely transected spinal cord using induced neural stem cells and gelatin-electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Huang, Yong; Pang, Mao; Yang, Yang; Li, Shangfu; Liu, Linshan; Shu, Tao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Rong, Limin; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has brought new possibilities for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Two important components for tissue engineering of the spinal cord include a suitable cell source and scaffold. In our study, we investigated induced mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) directly reprogrammed into neural stem cells (iNSCs), as a cell source. Three-dimensional (3D) electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) nanofiber scaffolds were used for iNSCs adhesion and growth. Cell growth, survival and proliferation on the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclei staining were used to assess cell growth on the scaffolds. Scaffolds with iNSCs were then transplanted into transected rat spinal cords. Two or 8 weeks following transplantation, immunofluorescence was performed to determine iNSC survival and differentiation within the scaffolds. Functional recovery was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) Scale. Results indicated that iNSCs showed similar morphological features with wild-type neural stem cells (wt-NSCs), and expressed a variety of neural stem cell marker genes. Furthermore, iNSCs were shown to survive, with the ability to self-renew and undergo neural differentiation into neurons and glial cells within the 3D scaffolds in vivo. The iNSC-seeded scaffolds restored the continuity of the spinal cord and reduced cavity formation. Additionally, iNSC-seeded scaffolds contributed to functional recovery of the spinal cord. Therefore, PLGA-PEG scaffolds seeded with iNSCs may serve as promising supporting transplants for repairing spinal cord injury (SCI). PMID:25803031

  13. Graft of a Tissue-Engineered Neural Scaffold Serves as a Promising Strategy to Restore Myelination after Rat Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Bi-Qin; Wang, Jun-Mei; Ling, Eng-Ang; Wu, Jin-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Remyelination remains a challenging issue in spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we cocultured Schwann cells (SCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) with overexpression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its high affinity receptor tyrosine kinase receptor type 3 (TrkC), respectively, in a gelatin sponge (GS) scaffold. This was aimed to generate a tissue-engineered neural scaffold and to investigate whether it could enhance myelination after a complete T10 spinal cord transection in adult rats. Indeed, many NT-3 overexpressing SCs (NT-3-SCs) in the GS scaffold assumed the formation of myelin. More strikingly, a higher incidence of NSCs overexpressing TrkC differentiating toward myelinating cells was induced by NT-3-SCs. By transmission electron microscopy, the myelin sheath showed distinct multilayered lamellae formed by the seeded cells. Eighth week after the scaffold was transplanted, some myelin basic protein (MBP)-positive processes were observed within the transplantation area. Remarkably, certain segments of myelin derived from NSC-derived myelinating cells and NT-3-SCs were found to ensheath axons. In conclusion, we show here that transplantation of the GS scaffold promotes exogenous NSC-derived myelinating cells and SCs to form myelins in the injury/transplantation area of spinal cord. These findings thus provide a neurohistological basis for the future application or transplantation using GS neural scaffold to repair SCI. PMID:24325427

  14. Operative management of traumatic cervical spine distraction and complete cord transection in a 3-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Davern, Monica Salazar; Garg, Sumeet; Hankinson, Todd C

    2015-02-01

    This report describes the presentation and operative treatment of a 3-year-old boy who survived a motor vehicle accident that resulted in a C6-7 distraction injury, complete avulsion of the spinal cord, and gross spinal instability. Only 5%-10% of all spinal cord and vertebral column injuries occur in children. Survival after such an injury is exceptionally rare in very young patients and is associated with severe neurological deficits. The authors discuss the substantial ethical challenges involved in the care of a patient with this injury. To their knowledge, only two other cases of survival have been reported in pediatric patients following motor vehicle trauma resulting in complete injury to the lower cervical spinal cord. PMID:25415253

  15. The effect of brain transection on the response to forced submergence in ducks.

    PubMed

    Gabbott, G R; Jones, D R

    1991-10-01

    The effect of brain transection at two levels on cardiovascular responses to forced submergence has been investigated in ducks. Compared with intact ducks, neither decerebration nor brain stem transection at the rostral mesencephalic (RM) level had any effect on development of diving bradycardia, or heart rate at the end of two-min dives. Arterial blood pressure was maintained in brain transected ducks as well as in intact ducks. Furthermore, end-dive arterial blood gases and pH were also similar in intact and brain transected ducks confirming that the oxygen sparing cardiovascular adjustments, involving a massive increase in total peripheral resistance, were unimpaired by brain transection. In this respect, ducks with RM transections tolerated four-min dives. However, the increase in post-dive VE seen in intact and decerebrated ducks was prevented by RM transection. We conclude that control of the circulatory response to diving resides in the lower brainstem, is reflexogenic in nature, and does not depend on the cognitive perception of 'fearful' stimuli. PMID:1753065

  16. Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells enhances infiltration and survival of CNP and Schwann cells to promote axonal sprouting following complete transection of spinal cord in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Peng; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Jinkun; Xue, Liping

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the roles of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in promoting axonal regeneration after complete transection of spinal cord in adult rats. Transplantation was done 9 days after injury. Only a few BMSCs were detected at the injury site 8 weeks after transplantation, yet there was robust growth of axons. The scarcity of surviving BMSCs may attribute to the adverse conditions in their ambient environment. In this connection, the immediate accumulation of a large number of macrophages/reactive microglia following BMSCs transplantation and subsequent cavitation of tissues may be detrimental to their survival. An unexpected finding following BMSCs transplantation was the marked increase in the nestin, GFAP, NF200, olig 3 and CNP positive cells at the injury site. Immunoelectron microscopy showed CNP cells were oval or fibroblast-like and had multiple perineurial-like compartments with long extending filopodia. The spatial relationship between regenerating axons and CNP-positive cells was also confirmed by double immunofluorescence staining. Our results suggest that transplantation of BMSCs elicits the influx and survival of local cells including CNP positive cells and Schwann cells into injury site, which provide structural support for the axon regeneration and remyelination after spinal cord injury. PMID:24936216

  17. Autocrine fibronectin from differentiating mesenchymal stem cells induces the neurite elongation in vitro and promotes nerve fiber regeneration in transected spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Ma, Yuan-Huan; Chen, Yuan-Feng; Qiu, Xue-Cheng; Wu, Jin-Lang; Ling, Eng-Ang; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) expression is temporally and spatially regulated during the development of stem cells. We reported previously that fibronectin (FN) secreted by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was deposited on the surface of gelatin sponge (GS) soon after culture. In this study, we aimed to assess the function of accumulated FN on neuronal differentiating MSCs as induced by Schwann cells (SCs) in three dimensional transwell co-culture system. The expression pattern and amount of FN of differentiating MSCs was examined by immunofluorescence, Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy. The results showed that FN accumulated inside GS scaffold, although its mRNA expression in MSCs was progressively decreased during neural induction. MSC-derived neuron-like cells showed spindle-shaped cell body and long extending processes on FN-decorated scaffold surface. However, after blocking of FN function by application of monoclonal antibodies, neuron-like cells showed flattened cell body with short and thick neurites, together with decreased expression of integrin β1. In vivo transplantation study revealed that autocrine FN significantly facilitated endogenous nerve fiber regeneration in spinal cord transection model. Taken together, the present results showed that FN secreted by MSCs in the early stage accumulated on the GS scaffold and promoted the neurite elongation of neuronal differentiating MSCs as well as nerve fiber regeneration after spinal cord injury. This suggests that autocrine FN has a dynamic influence on MSCs in a three dimensional culture system and its potential application for treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1902-1911, 2016. PMID:26991461

  18. The distribution of C-Fos protein immunolabeled cells in the spinal cord of the rat after electrical and noxious thermal stimulation following sciatic nerve crush, or transection and repair.

    PubMed

    Hongpaisan, J; Molander, C

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of stimulus evoked Fos protein-like immunoreactivity in spinal cord neurons was studied in adult rats at different survival times after sciatic nerve crush or transection and epineural repair. Fos protein-like immunoreactivity was induced either by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve central to the injury, at C-fiber strength, at 21, 39, and 92 days post-lesion, or by noxious heat applied to the skin of the hind paw 92 days post-lesion. The contralateral uninjured side served as control. The results with electrical stimulation showed, with some exceptions, that the distribution of c-fos expressing cells in the spinal cord on the normal and on the previously injured side were similar after both crush and transection with repair. The main finding was an up-regulation of the number of Fos protein immunoreactive neurons in the inner portion of Rexed's lamina II. The results following heat stimulation 92 days post-lesion showed a decrease in the number of labeled neurons in most laminae after both types of injury. This was more pronounced in cases with sciatic nerve transection with repair compared to cases with crush. The results indicate time-dependent alterations in the distribution of stimulus evoked c-fos expression in spinal cord neurons during regeneration after nerve injury. Furthermore, the results from heat stimulation may indicate a slower and perhaps more incomplete restoration process after transection with repair than after crush. PMID:21551711

  19. Differential effects of low versus high amounts of weight supported treadmill training in spinally transected rats.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Ray D; See, Pamela A; Chow, Cheryl H T

    2011-06-01

    Intensive weight-supported treadmill training (WSTT) improves locomotor function following spinal cord injury. Because of a number of factors, undergoing intensive sessions of training may not be feasible. Whether reduced amounts of training are sufficient to enhance spinal plasticity to a level that is necessary for improving function is not known. The focus of the present study was to assess differences in recovery of locomotor function and spinal plasticity as a function of the amount of steps taken during WSTT in a rodent model of spinal cord injury. Rats were spinally transected at 5 days of age. When they reached 28 days of age, a robotic system was used to implement a weight-supported treadmill training program of either 100 or 1000 steps/training session daily for 4 weeks. Antibodies for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, and the pre-synaptic marker, synaptophysin, were used to examine the expression of these proteins in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord. Rats that received weight-supported treadmill training performed better stepping relative to untrained rats, but only the rats that received 1000 steps/training session recovered locomotor function that resembled normal patterns. Only the rats that received 1000 steps/training session recovered normal levels of synaptophysin immunoreactivity around motor neurons. Weight-supported treadmill training consisting of either 100 or 1000 steps/training session increased BDNF immunoreactivity in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord. TrkB expression in the ventral horn was not affected by spinal cord transection or weight-supported treadmill training. Synaptophysin expression, but not BDNF or TrkB expression was correlated with the recovery of stepping function. These findings suggested that a large amount of weight-supported treadmill training was necessary for restoring synaptic connections to motor neurons within the locomotor generating circuitry. Although a large amount of training

  20. Evidence that dorsal locus coeruleus neurons can maintain their spinal cord projection following neonatal transection of the dorsal adrenergic bundle in rats.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, B B

    1989-01-01

    In adult rats, locus coeruleus neurons which extend axons to the spinal cord are found only at mid-rostrocaudal levels of the nucleus, where they are essentially confined to its ventral, wedge-shaped half (Satoh et al. 1980; Westlund et al. 1983; Loughlin et al. 1986). However, during early postnatal development, coeruleospinal cells are found throughout the locus coeruleus (Cabana and Martin 1984; Chen and Stanfield 1987). This developmental restriction of the distribution of coeruleospinal neurons is due to axonal elimination rather than to cell death, since neurons retrogradely labeled through their spinal axons perinatally are still present in the dorsal portion of the locus coeruleus at survival periods beyond the age at which these cells lose their spinal projection (Chen and Stanfield 1987). I now report that if axons ascending from the locus coeruleus are cut by transecting the dorsal adrenergic bundle on the day of birth, a more widespread distribution of coeruleospinal neurons is retained beyond the perinatal period. These results not only indicate that the absence of the normally maintained collateral of a locus coeruleus neuron is sufficient to prevent the elimination of a collateral which would otherwise be lost, but also may imply that during normal postnatal development the presence of the maintained collateral is somehow causally involved in the elimination of the transient collateral. PMID:2612596

  1. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  2. Volume effects in Rhesus monkey spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E. ); Stephens, L.C.; Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Peters, L.J. )

    1994-04-30

    An experiment was conducted to test for the existence of a volume effect in radiation myelopathy using Rhesus monkeys treated with clinically relevant field sizes and fractionation schedules. Five groups of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated using 2.2 Gy per fraction to their spinal cords. Three groups were irradiated with 8 cm fields to total doses of 70.4, 77, and 83.6 Gy. Two additional groups were irradiated to 70.4 Gy using 4 and 16 cm fields. The incidence of paresis expressed within 2 years following the completion of treatment was determined for each group. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to determine parameters of a logistic dose response function. The volume effect was modeled using the probability model in which the probability of producing a lesion in an irradiated volume is governed by the probability of the occurrence of independent events. This is a two parameter model requiring only the estimates of the parameters of the dose-response function for the reference volume, but not needing any additional parameters for describing the volume effect. The probability model using a logistic dose-response function fits the data well with the D[sub 50] = 75.8 Gy for the 8-cm field. No evidence was seen for a difference in sensitivities for different anatomical levels of the spinal cord. Most lesions were type 3, combined white matter parenchymal and vascular lesions. Latent periods did not differ significantly from those of type 3 lesions in humans. The spinal cord exhibits a volume effect that is well described by the probability model. Because the dose response function for radiation myelopathy is steep, the volume effect is modest. The Rhesus monkey remains the animal model most similar to humans in dose response, histopathology, and latency for radiation myelopathy. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Effective therapy of transected quadriceps muscle in rat: Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Staresinic, Mario; Petrovic, Igor; Novinscak, Tomislav; Jukic, Ivana; Pevec, Damira; Suknaic, Slaven; Kokic, Neven; Batelja, Lovorka; Brcic, Luka; Boban-Blagaic, Alenka; Zoric, Zdenka; Ivanovic, Domagoj; Ajduk, Marko; Sebecic, Bozidar; Patrlj, Leonardo; Sosa, Tomislav; Buljat, Gojko; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    We report complete transection of major muscle and the systemic peptide treatment that induces healing of quadriceps muscle promptly and then maintains the healing with functional restoration. Initially, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL-10, PLD-116, PL 14736 Pliva, Croatia; in trials for inflammatory bowel disease; wound treatment; no toxicity reported; effective alone without carrier) also superiorly accelerates the healing of transected Achilles tendon. Regularly, quadriceps muscle completely transected transversely 1.0 cm proximal to patella presents a definitive defect that cannot be compensated in rat. BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg) is given intraperitoneally, once daily; the first application 30 min posttransection, the final 24 h before sacrifice. It consistently improves muscle healing throughout the whole 72-day period. Improved are: (i) biomechanic (load of failure increased); (ii) function (walking recovery and extensor postural thrust/motor function index returned toward normal healthy values); (iii) microscopy/immunochemistry [i.e., mostly muscle fibers connect muscle segments; absent gap; significant desmin positivity for ongoing regeneration of muscle; larger myofibril diameters on both sides, distal and proximal (normal healthy rat-values reached)]; (iv) macroscopic presentation (stumps connected; subsequently, atrophy markedly attenuated; finally, presentation close to normal noninjured muscle, no postsurgery leg contracture). Thus, posttransection healing-consistently improved-may suggest this peptide therapeutic application in muscle disorders. PMID:16609979

  4. The effect of animal movement on line transect estimates of abundance.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Richard; Buckland, Stephen T; Thomas, Len

    2015-01-01

    Line transect sampling is a distance sampling method for estimating the abundance of wild animal populations. One key assumption of this method is that all animals are detected at their initial location. Animal movement independent of the transect and observer can thus cause substantial bias. We present an analytic expression for this bias when detection within the transect is certain (strip transect sampling) and use simulation to quantify bias when detection falls off with distance from the line (line transect sampling). We also explore the non-linear relationship between bias, detection, and animal movement by varying detectability and movement type. We consider animals that move in randomly orientated straight lines, which provides an upper bound on bias, and animals that are constrained to a home range of random radius. We find that bias is reduced when animal movement is constrained, and bias is considerably smaller in line transect sampling than strip transect sampling provided that mean animal speed is less than observer speed. By contrast, when mean animal speed exceeds observer speed the bias in line transect sampling becomes comparable with, and may exceed, that of strip transect sampling. Bias from independent animal movement is reduced by the observer searching further perpendicular to the transect, searching a shorter distance ahead and by ignoring animals that may overtake the observer from behind. However, when animals move in response to the observer, the standard practice of searching further ahead should continue as the bias from responsive movement is often greater than that from independent movement. PMID:25799206

  5. Curcumin protects against ischemic spinal cord injury: The pathway effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhua; Wei, Hao; Lin, Meimei; Chen, Chunmei; Wang, Chunhua; Liu, Maobai

    2013-12-25

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been shown to participate in nerve cell injury during spinal cord ischemia. This study observed a protective effect of curcumin on ischemic spinal cord injury. Models of spinal cord ischemia were established by ligating the lumbar artery from the left renal artery to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. At 24 hours after model establishment, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with curcumin. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after spinal cord ischemia, inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression significantly increased. However, curcumin significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic spinal cord. Tarlov scale results showed that curcumin significantly improved motor function of the rat hind limb after spinal cord ischemia. The results demonstrate that curcumin exerts a neuroprotective fect against ischemic spinal cord injury by decreasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression. PMID:25206661

  6. Effects of Bladder Function by Early Tamsulosin Treatment in a Spinal Cord Injury Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Keun; Lee, Moon Young; Han, Dong Yeop; Jung, Hee Jong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of early tamsulosin treatment on changes in bladder characteristics after a spinal cord injury. Methods We divided 45 rats into three groups: the control (CON) group, the spinal cord injury (SCI) group, and the SCI+tamsulosin treatment (SCI+TAM) group. Spinal cord transection was performed in the SCI and SCI+TAM groups. Tamsulosin was injected for 7 days in the SCI+TAM group. Intravesical and intra-abdominal catheters were implanted before cord injury. Basal pressure (BP), maximal vesical pressure (MVP), micturition volume (MV), and voiding interval time (VIT) were measured at 7 days after SCI. The bladder was then removed and used for an in vitro organ bath study and Western blot analysis. The percentage changes in contractility from baseline after acetylcholine alone, pretreatment with a muscarinic 2 (M2) receptor blocker (AQ-RA741), and pretreatment with a M3 receptor blocker (4-DAMP) were compared among the groups. Western blot analyses were performed to determine expression levels of pERK1/2 and rho-kinase. Results In cystometry, MVP, BP, MV, and VIT showed changes in the SCI and SCI+TAM groups versus the CON group (p<0.05). In the organ bath study, acetylcholine-induced contractility in the three groups differed significantly (p<0.05). Additionally, acetylcholine-induced contractility with 4-DAMP pretreatment was reduced significantly in the SCI+TAM group versus the SCI group. In Western blotting, pERK1/2 expression was stronger (p<0.05) and rho-kinase expression was weaker in the SCI+TAM group than the SCI group (p<0.05). Conclusion These results suggest that the bladder contraction due to acetylcholine after SCI can be decreased by tamsulosin in the acute stage and this involves changes in pERK1/2 and rho-kinase. PMID:25229021

  7. Effects of vestibular nerve transection on the calcium incorporation of fish otoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anken, Ralf H.; Edelmann, Elke; Rahmann, Hinrich

    2001-08-01

    Previous investigations revealed that the growth of fish inner ear otoliths (otolith size and calcium-incorporation) depends on the amplitude and the direction of gravity, suggesting the existence of a (negative) feedback mechanism. In search for the regulating unit, the vestibular nerve was transected unilaterally in neonate swordtail fish ( Xiphophorus helleri) which were subsequently incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin-complexone. Calcium incorporation ceased on the transected head sides, indicating that calcium uptake is neurally regulated.

  8. Effect of cord blood processing on transplantation outcomes after single myeloablative umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; Logan, Brent R; Laughlin, Mary J; He, Wensheng; Ambruso, Daniel R; Armitage, Susan E; Beddard, Rachel L; Bhatla, Deepika; Hwang, William Y K; Kiss, Joseph E; Koegler, Gesine; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nagler, Arnon; Oh, David; Petz, Lawrence D; Price, Thomas H; Quinones, Ralph R; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Rizzo, J Douglas; Sazama, Kathleen; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Schuster, Michael W; Sender, Leonard S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Spellman, Stephen R; Sutton, Millicent; Weitekamp, Lee Ann; Wingard, John R; Eapen, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Variations in cord blood manufacturing and administration are common, and the optimal practice is not known. We compared processing and banking practices at 16 public cord blood banks (CBB) in the United States and assessed transplantation outcomes on 530 single umbilical cord blood (UCB) myeloablative transplantations for hematologic malignancies facilitated by these banks. UCB banking practices were separated into 3 mutually exclusive groups based on whether processing was automated or manual, units were plasma and red blood cell reduced, or buffy coat production method or plasma reduced. Compared with the automated processing system for units, the day 28 neutrophil recovery was significantly lower after transplantation of units that were manually processed and plasma reduced (red cell replete) (odds ratio, .19; P = .001) or plasma and red cell reduced (odds ratio, .54; P = .05). Day 100 survival did not differ by CBB. However, day 100 survival was better with units that were thawed with the dextran-albumin wash method compared with the "no wash" or "dilution only" techniques (odds ratio, 1.82; P = .04). In conclusion, CBB processing has no significant effect on early (day 100) survival despite differences in kinetics of neutrophil recovery. PMID:25543094

  9. Effect of Cord Blood Processing on Transplant Outcomes after Single Myeloablative Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ballen, Karen K.; Logan, Brent R.; Laughlin, Mary J.; He, Wensheng; Ambruso, Daniel R.; Armitage, Susan E.; Beddard, Rachel L.; Bhatla, Deepika; Hwang, William Y.K.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Koegler, Gesine; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nagler, Arnon; Oh, David; Petz, Lawrence D.; Price, Thomas H.; Quinones, Ralph R.; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Sazama, Kathleen; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Schuster, Michael W.; Sender, Leonard S.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Sutton, Millicent; Weitekamp, Lee Ann; Wingard, John R.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Variations in cord blood manufacturing and administration are common, and the optimal practice, not known. We compared processing and banking practices at 16 public cord blood banks (CBB) in the United States, and assessed transplant outcomes on 530 single umbilical cord blood (UCB) myeloablative transplantations for hematologic malignancies, facilitated by these banks. UCB banking practices were separated into three mutually exclusive groups based on whether processing was automated or manual; units were plasma and red blood cell reduced or buffy coat production method or plasma reduced. Compared to the automated processing system for units, the day-28 neutrophil recovery was significantly lower after transplantation of units that were manually processed and plasma reduced (red cell replete) (odds ratio [OR] 0.19 p=0.001) or plasma and red cell reduced (OR 0.54, p=0.05). Day-100 survival did not differ by CBB. However, day-100 survival was better with units that were thawed with the dextran-albumin wash method compared to the “no wash” or “dilution only” techniques (OR 1.82, p=0.04). In conclusion, CBB processing has no significant effect on early (day 100) survival despite differences in kinetics of neutrophil recovery. PMID:25543094

  10. Behavioral effects of corpus callosum transection and environmental enrichment in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Miu, Andrei C; Heilman, Renata M; Paşca, Sergiu P; Stefan, Catrinel A; Spânu, Florina; Vasiu, Renata; Olteanu, Adrian I; Miclea, Mircea

    2006-09-15

    A common assumption about the corpus callosum transection (CCX) is that it only affects behaviors heavily relying on interhemispheric communication. However, cerebral laterality is ubiquitous across motor and perceptual, cognitive and emotional domains, and the corpus callosum is important for its establishment. Several recent studies showed that the partial denervation of the sensorimotor isocortex through CCX derepressed neural growth processes that were sensitive to motor demand (experience-dependent neural plasticity). We investigated whether the facilitatory effects of CCX on cortical neural plasticity, shaped by differential housing, extended beyond the motor domain. Adult rats were housed in enriched (EE), standard (SE) or impoverished environments (IE) for 10 weeks, that is, 2 weeks before they underwent CCX or sham surgery, and, then, 8 weeks throughout the experiments. After they recovered from surgery, the behavioral performance of rats was tested using open-field, spontaneous alternation in the T-maze, paw preference, Morris water maze, and tone fear conditioning. The results indicated that the effects of CCX and housing on open-field behavior were independent, with CCX increasing the time spent in the center of the field at the beginning of the observation (i.e., emotionality), and EE and IE increasing rearing (emotionality) and reducing teeth-chattering (habituation), respectively. CCX reduced the frequency of spontaneous alternation, denoting spatial working memory deficits, while housing did not influence this performance. Neither CCX, nor housing significantly affected paw preference lateralization, although CCX was associated with a leftward bias in paw preference. In the Morris water maze, housing had effects on spatial acquisition, while CCX reduced activity, without interfering with spatial memory. CCX did not influence tone fear conditioning, but context fear conditioning seemed to benefit from EE. We conclude that CCX in adult rats has subtle

  11. Neuroprotective Effect of Ginsenoside Rd in Spinal Cord Injury Rats.

    PubMed

    Cong, Lin; Chen, Wenting

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rd (GS Rd) were evaluated in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Rats in SCI groups received a T8 laminectomy and a spinal contusion injury. GS Rd 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg were administered intraperitoneally 1 hr before the surgery and once daily for 14 days. Dexamethasone 1 mg/kg was administered as a positive control. Locomotor function was evaluated using the BBB score system. H&E staining and Nissl staining were performed to observe the histological changes in the spinal cord. The levels of MDA and GSH and the activity of SOD were assessed to reflect the oxidative stress state. The production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-1 was assessed using ELISA kits to examine the inflammatory responses in the spinal cord. TUNEL staining was used to detect the cell apoptosis in the spinal cord. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins and MAPK proteins. The results demonstrated that GS Rd 25 and 50 mg/kg significantly improved the locomotor function of rats after SCI, reduced tissue injury and increased neuron survival in the spinal cord. Mechanically, GS Rd decreased MDA level, increased GSH level and SOD activity, reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prevented cell apoptosis. The effects were equivalent to those of dexamethasone. In addition, GS Rd effectively inhibited the activation of MAPK signalling pathway induced by SCI, which might be involved in the protective effects of GS Rd against SCI. In conclusion, GS Rd attenuates SCI-induced secondary injury through reversing the redox-state imbalance, inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue. PMID:26833867

  12. Effect of Dipsaci radix on hind limb muscle atrophy of sciatic nerve transected rats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyuk-Sang; Noh, Chung-Ku; Ma, Sun-Ho; Hong, Eun Ki; Sohn, Nak-Won; Kim, Yoon-Bum; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sohn, Youngjoo

    2009-01-01

    It was reported that Dipsaci radix (DR) has a reinforcement effect on the bone-muscle dysfunction in the oriental medical classics and the experimental animal studies. The muscle atrophy was induced by unilateral transection of the sciatic nerve of the rats. Water-extract of DR was used as treatment once a day for 12 days. The muscle weights of the hind limb, atrophic changes, glycogen contents, compositions and cross-section areas of muscle fiber types in soleus and medial gastrocnemius were investigated. Muscle fiber type was classified to type-I and type-II with MHCf immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, Bax and Bcl-2 expressions were observed with immunohistochemiatry. DR treatment significantly increased muscle weights of soleus, medial gastrocnemius, lateral gastrocnemius, and posterior tibialis of the damaged hind limb. DR treatment reduced apoptotic muscle nuclei and hyaline-degenerated muscle fibers in soleus and medial gastrocnemius of the damaged hind limb. DR treatment also significantly increased glycogen contents in medial gastrocnemius of the damaged hind limb. DR treatment significantly attenuated the slow-to-fast shift in soleus of the damaged hind limb but not in medial gastrocnemius. DR treatment significantly increased cross-section areas of type-I and type-II fibers in soleus and medial gastrocnemius of the damaged hind limb. In soleus and medial gastrocnemius, DR treatment significantly reduced Bax positive muscle nuclei in the damaged hind limb. These results suggest that DR treatment has an anti-atrophic effect and an anti-apoptotic effect against myonuclear apoptosis induced by the peripheral nerve damage. PMID:19938217

  13. Chorda Tympani Nerve Transection at Different Developmental Ages Produces Differential Effects on Taste Bud Volume and Papillae Morphology in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sollars, Suzanne I.

    2016-01-01

    Chorda tympani nerve transection (CTX) results in morphological changes to fungiform papillae and associated taste buds. When transection occurs during neonatal development in the rat, the effects on fungiform taste bud and papillae structure are markedly more severe than observed following a comparable surgery in the adult rat. The present study examined the potential “sensitive period” for morphological modifications to tongue epithelium following CTX. Rats received unilateral transection at 65, 30, 25, 20, 15, 10, or 5 days of age. With each descending age at the time of transection, the effects on the structural integrity of fungiform papillae were more severe. Significant losses in total number of taste buds and filiform-like papillae were observed when transection occurred 5–30 days of age. Significant reduction in the number of taste pores was indicated at every age of transection. Another group of rats received chorda tympani transection at 10, 25, or 65 days of age to determine if the time course of taste bud degeneration differed depending on the age of the rat at the time of transection. Taste bud volumes differed significantly from intact sides of the tongue at 2, 8, and 50 days posttransection after CTX at 65 days of age. Volume measurements did not differ 2 days posttransection after CTX at 10 or 25 days of age, but were significantly reduced at the other time points. Findings demonstrate a transitional period throughout development wherein fungiform papillae are highly dependent upon the chorda tympani for maintenance of morphological integrity. PMID:15898061

  14. Graft of the gelatin sponge scaffold containing genetically-modified neural stem cells promotes cell differentiation, axon regeneration, and functional recovery in rat with spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Du, Bao-Ling; Zeng, Xiang; Ma, Yuan-Huan; Lai, Bi-Qin; Wang, Jun-Mei; Ling, Eng-Ang; Wu, Jin-Lang; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2015-04-01

    Biological materials combined with genetically-modified neural stem cells (NSCs) are candidate therapy targeting spinal cord injury (SCI). Based on our previous studies, here we performed gelatin sponge (GS) scaffold seeded with neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its receptor TrkC gene modifying NSCs for repairing SCI. Eight weeks later, compared with other groups, neurofilament-200 and 5-hydroxytryptamine positive nerve fibers were more in the injury site of the N+T-NSCs group. Immunofluorescence staining showed the grafted NSCs could differentiate into microtubule associated protein (Map2), postsynaptic density (PSD95), and mouse oligodendrocyte special protein (MOSP) positive cells. The percentage of the Map2, PSD95, and MOSP positive cells in the N+T-NSCs group was higher than the other groups. Immuno-electron microscopy showed the grafted NSCs making contact with each other in the injury site. Behavioral analysis indicated the recovery of hindlimbs locomotion was better in the groups receiving cell transplant, the best recovery was found in the N+T-NSCs group. Electrophysiology revealed the amplitude of cortical motor evoked potentials was increased significantly in the N+T-NSCs group, but the latency remained long. These findings suggest the GS scaffold containing genetically-modified NSCs may bridge the injury site, promote axon regeneration and partial functional recovery in SCI rats. PMID:25046856

  15. Competition effects in the dynamics of tumor cords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Sansone, B. Capogrosso; Benati, C.; Condat, C. A.

    2002-05-01

    A general feature of cancer growth is the cellular competition for available nutrients. This is also the case for tumor cords, neoplasms forming cylindrical structures around blood vessels. Experimental data show that, in their avascular phase, cords grow up to a limit radius of about 100 μm, reaching a quasi-steady-state characterized by a necrotized area separating the tumor from the surrounding healthy tissue. Here we use a set of rules to formulate a model that describes how the dynamics of cord growth is controlled by the competition of tumor cells among themselves and with healthy cells for the acquisition of essential nutrients. The model takes into account the mechanical effects resulting from the interaction between the multiplying cancer cells and the surrounding tissue. We explore the influence of the relevant parameters on the tumor growth and on its final state. The model is also applied to investigate cord deformation in a region containing multiple nutrient sources and to predict the further complex growth of the tumor.

  16. Does the intrathecal propofol have a neuroprotective effect on spinal cord ischemia?

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Murat; Gullu, Huriye; Peker, Kemal; Sayar, Ilyas; Binici, Orhan; Yildiz, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of propofol have been confirmed. However, it remains unclear whether intrathecal administration of propofol exhibits neuroprotective effects on spinal cord ischemia. At 1 hour prior to spinal cord ischemia, propofol (100 and 300 µg) was intrathecally administered in rats with spinal cord ischemia. Propofol pre-treatment greatly improved rat pathological changes and neurological function deficits at 24 hours after spinal cord ischemia. These results suggest that intrathecal administration of propofol exhibits neuroprotective effects on spinal cord structural and functional damage caused by ischemia. PMID:26807119

  17. Effect of stimulating the lumbar skin caudal to a complete spinal cord injury on hindlimb locomotion.

    PubMed

    Hurteau, Marie-France; Thibaudier, Yann; Dambreville, Charline; Desaulniers, Corinne; Frigon, Alain

    2015-01-15

    Sensory feedback is a potent modulator of the locomotor pattern generated by spinal networks. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of cutaneous inputs from the back on the spinal-generated locomotor pattern. The spinal cord of six adult cats was transected at low thoracic levels. Cats were then trained to recover hindlimb locomotion. During experiments, the skin overlying lumbar vertebrae L2 to L7 was mechanically stimulated by a small calibrated clip or by manual pinching. Trials without and with cutaneous stimulation were performed at a treadmill speed of 0.4 m/s. Although manually pinching the skin completely stopped hindlimb locomotion and abolished weight support, cutaneous stimulation with the calibrated clip produced smaller effects. Specifically, more focalized cutaneous stimulation with the clip reduced flexor and extensor muscle activity and led to a more caudal positioning of the paw at contact and liftoff. Moreover, cutaneous stimulation with the clip led to a greater number of steps with improper nonplantigrade paw placements at contact and paw drag at the stance-to-swing transition. The most consistent effects on the hindlimb locomotor pattern were observed with cutaneous stimulation at midlumbar levels, from L3 to L5. The results indicate that cutaneous stimulation of the skin modulates the excitability of spinal circuits involved in generating locomotion and weight support, particularly at spinal segments thought to be critical for rhythm generation. PMID:25339715

  18. Neuroprotective Effects of Perflurocarbon (Oxycyte) after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Adly; Hajec, Marygrace C.; Stanger, Richard; Wan, Wen; Young, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in irreversible and permanent neurological deficits and long-term disability. Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels create an ischemic environment at the site of contusive or compressive SCI and initiate the secondary injury cascades leading to progressive tissue damage and severely decreased functional outcome. Although the initial mechanical destructive events cannot be reversed, secondary injury damage occurs over several hours to weeks, a time frame during which therapeutic intervention could be achieved. One essential component of secondary injury cascade is the reduction in spinal cord blood flow with resultant decrease in oxygen delivery. Our group has recently shown that administration of fluorocarbon (Oxycyte) significantly increased parenchymal tissue oxygen levels during the usual postinjury hypoxic phase, and fluorocarbon has been shown to be effective in stroke and head injury. In the current study, we assessed the beneficial effects of Oxycyte after a moderate-to-severe contusion SCI was simulated in adult Long-Evans hooded rats. Histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis showed that the administration of 5 mL/kg of Oxycyte perfluorocarbon (60% emulsion) after SCI dramatically reduced destruction of spinal cord anatomy and resulted in a marked decrease of lesion area, less cell death, and greater white matter sparing at 7 and 42 days postinjury. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining showed a significant reduced number of apoptotic cells in Oxycyte-treated animals, compared to the saline group. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential neuroprotective effect of Oxycyte treatment after SCI, and its beneficial effects may be, in part, a result of reducing apoptotic cell death and tissue sparing. Further studies to determine the most efficacious Oxycyte dose and its mechanisms of protection are warranted. PMID:24025081

  19. Effect of Locally Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Survival of Transected and Repaired Adult Sheep Facial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Al Abri, Rashid; Kolethekkat, Arif Ali; Kelleher, Michael O.; Myles, Lynn M.; Glasby, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective to determine whether the administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) at the site of repaired facial nerve enhances regeneration in the adult sheep model. Methods Ten adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: control and study group (CNTF group). In the CNTF group, the buccal branch of the facial nerve was transected and then repaired by epineural sutures. CNTF was injected over the left depressor labii maxillaris muscle in the vicinity of the transected and repaired nerve for 28 days under local anesthesia. In the CNTF group, the sheep were again anesthetized after nine months and the site of facial nerve repair was exposed. Detailed electrophysiological, tension experiments and morphometric studies were carried out and then analyzed statistically. Results The skin CV min, refractory period, Jitter and tension parameters were marginally raised in the CNTF group than the control but the difference was statistically insignificant between the two groups. Morphometric indices also did not show any significant changes in the CNTF group. Conclusion CNTF has no profound effect on neuronal regeneration of adult sheep animal model. Keywords CNTF; Neurtrophic factors; Sheep; Facial nerve; Regeneration. PMID:24936272

  20. Effect of the artificial somato-autonomic neuroanastomosis on defecation after spinal cord injury and its underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fengyin; Chen, Min; Li, Wencheng; Xiao, Chuanguo

    2010-08-01

    A new artificial somatic-autonomic neuroanastomosis has been established in male rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). Anorectal manometry and neural retrograde tracing were conducted in this animal model to analyze the mechanisms and the effects on recovery of anorectal function. The left L4 ventral root (L4VR) was intradurally micro-anastomosed to the L6 ventral root (L6VR) to establish the new regenerated neural pathway. Three months later the spinal cord was completely transected at the T9-10 level. Eight weeks later the model rats were randomly divided into two groups. The rats in the group 1 (n=8) were applied for anorectal manometry, and those in the group 2 (n=4) were used for neural retrograde tracing study with fluorogold (FG) and dextran tetramethylrhodamine (TMR). The results of anorectal manometry showed the new reflex pathway could induce rectum to contract and simultaneously electric activity of external anal sphincter (EAS) to become weak or disappearing (indicating synergetic relaxation of EAS). FG and TMR dual labeled neurons with round and elliptical shape were mainly observed in L4 angulus anterior of model rats. The regenerated neural pathways were effective to improve the rectum external sphincter synergetic status and restore the anorectal function. PMID:20714876

  1. Neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane after contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Andrea L; Mountney, Andrea; Hurtado, Andres; Bryan, Kelley E; Schnaar, Ronald L; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Talalay, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to oxidative stress, calcium mobilization, glutamate toxicity, the release of proinflammatory factors, and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) at the site of injury. Induction of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway can alleviate neurotoxicity by protecting against GSH depletion, oxidation, intracellular calcium overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, and excitotoxicity. Sulforaphane (SF), an isothiocyanate derived from broccoli, is a potent naturally-occurring inducer of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway, leading to upregulation of genes encoding cytoprotective proteins such as NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1, and GSH-regulatory enzymes. Additionally, SF can attenuate inflammation by inhibiting the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, and the enzymatic activity of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF). Our study examined systemic administration of SF in a rat model of contusion SCI, in an effort to utilize its indirect antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to decrease secondary injury. Two doses of SF (10 or 50 mg/kg) were administered at 10 min and 72 h after contusion SCI. SF (50 mg/kg) treatment resulted in both acute and long-term beneficial effects, including upregulation of the phase 2 antioxidant response at the injury site, decreased mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., MMP-9) in the injured spinal cord, inactivation of urinary MIF tautomerase activity, enhanced hindlimb locomotor function, and an increased number of serotonergic axons caudal to the lesion site. These findings demonstrate that SF provides neuroprotective effects in the spinal cord after injury, and could be a candidate for therapy of SCI. PMID:22853439

  2. Effect of Aspirin on Spinal Cord Injury: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Kermani, Hamed Reihani; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Fatahian, Reza; Najar, Ahmad Gholamhosseinian

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is an anti-inflammatory drug, peroxyl radical scavenger, and antioxidant agent that inhibits phospholipases, nitric oxide synthetases, and cyclooxygenase enzymes. The existing literature contains no studies on the effects of various doses of aspirin on spinal cord injury (SCI). Therefore, we sought to investigate the putative effects of aspirin on experimental SCI. The weight-drop injury model was used to produce SCI in 100 albino Wistar rats. The animals were allocated to five groups: a control group, where the rats did not undergo any surgical or medical intervention except for anesthesia; a sham-treated group, where laminectomy was performed without SCI and no further therapy was administered; and three other groups, where the rats with SCI received low-dose aspirin [20 mg/kg], high-dose aspirin [80 mg/kg], and a vehicle, respectively. Half of the rats were sacrificed 24 hours later, and their spinal cords were excised for biochemical studies. The other rats were subjected to Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scoring once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Aspirin decreased lipid peroxidation following SCI as the mean (± standard error) catalase level was significantly higher in the high-dose aspirin group (46.10±12.01) than in the sham-treated group (16.07±2.42) and the vehicle-treated group (15.31±3.20) (P<0.05; P<0.05, respectively). Both of the groups treated with high-dose and low-dose aspirin demonstrated a higher mean BBB score than did the control group (P<0.001) and the sham-treated group (P<0.001). Our data provide evidence in support of the potential effects of aspirin in biochemical and neurobehavioral recovery after SCI. PMID:27217606

  3. Mathematical modelling of the Warburg effect in tumour cords.

    PubMed

    Astanin, Sergey; Preziosi, Luigi

    2009-06-21

    The model proposed here links together two approaches to describe tumours: a continuous medium to describe the movement and the mechanical properties of the tissue, and a population dynamics approach to represent internal genetic inhomogeneity and instability of the tumour. In this way one can build models which cover several stages of tumour progression. In this paper we focus on describing transition from aerobic to purely glycolytic metabolism (the Warburg effect) in tumour cords. From the mathematical point of view this model leads to a free boundary problem where domains in contact are characterized by different sets of equations. Accurate stitching of the solution was possible with a modified ghost fluid method. Growth and death of the cells and uptake of the nutrients are related through ATP production and energy costs of the cellular processes. In the framework of the bi-population model this allowed to keep the number of model parameters relatively small. PMID:19232360

  4. Detrimental effects of antiapoptotic treatments in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cittelly, Diana M; Nesic, Olivera; Johnson, Kathia; Hulsebosch, Claire; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2008-04-01

    Long-term functional impairments due to spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat result from secondary apoptotic death regulated, in part, by SCI-induced decreases in protein levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. We have shown that exogenous administration of Bcl-xL spares neurons 24 h after SCI. However, long-term effects of chronic application of Bcl-xL have not been characterized. To counteract SCI-induced decreases in Bcl-xL and resulting apoptosis, we used the TAT protein transduction domain fused to the Bcl-xL protein (Tat-Bcl-xL), or its antiapoptotic domain BH4 (Tat-BH4). We used intrathecal delivery of Tat-Bcl-xL, or Tat-BH4, into injured spinal cords for 24 h or 7 days, and apoptosis, neuronal death and locomotor recovery were assessed up to 2 months after injury. Both, Tat-Bcl-xL and Tat-BH4, significantly decreased SCI-induced apoptosis in thoracic segments containing the site of injury (T10) at 24 h or 7 days after SCI. However, the 7-day delivery of Tat-Bcl-xL, or Tat-BH4, also induced a significant impairment of locomotor recovery that lasted beyond the drug delivery time. We found that the 7-day administration of Tat-Bcl-xL, or Tat-BH4, significantly increased non-apoptotic neuronal loss and robustly augmented microglia/macrophage activation. These results indicate that the antiapoptotic treatment targeting Bcl-xL shifts neuronal apoptosis to necrosis, increases the inflammatory response and impairs locomotor recovery. Our results suggest that a combinatorial treatment consisting of antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory agents may be necessary to achieve tissue preservation and significant improvement in functional recovery after SCI. PMID:18302959

  5. Immunomodulatory effects of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shawki, Shereen; Gaafar, Taghrid; Erfan, Hadeel; El Khateeb, Engy; El Sheikhah, Ahmad; El Hawary, Rabab

    2015-06-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is of great interest as a source of stem cells for use in cellular therapies. The immunomodulatory effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) originating from bone marrow, adipose tissue and amniotic membrane has previously been reported. In this study, MSCs were isolated from UCB with the aim of evaluating their immunomodulatory effects on proliferation of PB lymphocytes by two different techniques; namely, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine ELISA and a carboxy fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester flow cytometric technique. MSCs were isolated from UCB, propagated until Passage four, and then characterized for cell surface markers by flow cytometry and ability to differentiate towards osteocytes and adipocytes. Immunosuppressive effects on PB lymphocytes were examined by co-culturing mitomycin C-treated UCB MSCs with mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes for 72 hr. Thereafter, proliferation of lymphocytes was detected by CFSE flow cytometry and colorimetric ELISA. The titers of cytokines in cell culture supernatant were also assayed to clarify possible mechanisms of immunomodulation. UCB MSCs suppressed mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, which occurs via both cell-cell contact and cytokine secretion. Titers of transforming growth factor beta and IL 10 increased, whereas that of IFN-γ decreased in the supernatants of co-cultures. Thus, UCB MSCs suppress the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. However further in vivo studies are required to fully evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of UCB MSCs. PMID:25869421

  6. Abiotic effects on effluent dissolved organic nitrogen along an estuarine transect.

    PubMed

    Funkey, Carolina P; Latour, Robert J; Bronk, Deborah A

    2015-03-01

    Biological nutrient removal is a process commonly used in water resource recovery facilities to reduce dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations in effluent; this process is less effective at removing all of the effluent dissolved organic nitrogen (EDON). The goal of this study was to investigate the fate of EDON after it undergoes the disinfection process and enters receiving waters. The authors quantified the abiotic effects of effluent exposure to sunlight, increased salinity, and a combination of the two factors. Effluent dissolved organic nitrogen showed significant breakdown during the disinfection process (UV and chlorine) and when exposed to sunlight and increasing salinity. Approximately 7% of the EDON was transformed to DIN and dissolved primary amines after exposure to 9 hours of sunlight and a salinity increase from 0 to 33. The production of DIN and primary amines should be taken into account when considering sources of labile nitrogen to aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25842537

  7. [Effect of stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome in rats after sciatic nerve transection].

    PubMed

    Osipov, A V; Kukushkin, M L

    1993-05-01

    Effect of immobilization and painful stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome, appeared after sciatic nerve section, has been studied in Wistar rats. It has been determined that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pain syndrome in rats without clinical signs of pain syndrome up to the moment of stress influence. There has been made a conclusion that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pathologic algic system, which is the basis of pain syndrome. The fact that stress can cause analgesia in normal animals in contrast to those with potential pain syndrome is explained to different mechanisms of physiological and pathological pain. PMID:8043822

  8. Comparative cardiovascular effects of four fishery anesthetics in spinally transected rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredricks, K.T.; Gingerich, W.H.; Fater, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    1. We compared the effects of four anesthetics on heart rate, dorsal and ventral aortic blood pressure, and electrocardiograms of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). 1. Exposure to the local anesthetics tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) and benzocaine hydrochloride (BZH) produced minimal cardiovascular alterations. Mean dorsal aortic pressure (DAP) decreased during exposure to MS-222, and mean DAP and mean ventral aortic pressure (VAP) increased 15% during recovery from BZH. 3. Exposure to the general anesthetic 2-phenoxyethanol (2-PE) or the hypnotic agent etomidate (ET) dramatically decreased heart rate and blood pressures and altered EKG patterns. 4. During recovery, VAP and DAP increased above baseline for an extended period. Heart rate and EKG patterns rapidly returned to normal.

  9. Effective repair of traumatically injured spinal cord by nanoscale block copolymer micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunzhou; Kim, Sungwon; Huff, Terry B.; Borgens, Richard B.; Park, Kinam; Shi, Riyi; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in immediate disruption of neuronal membranes, followed by extensive secondary neurodegenerative processes. A key approach for repairing injured spinal cord is to seal the damaged membranes at an early stage. Here, we show that axonal membranes injured by compression can be effectively repaired using self-assembled monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactic acid) di-block copolymer micelles. Injured spinal tissue incubated with micelles (60 nm diameter) showed rapid restoration of compound action potential and reduced calcium influx into axons for micelle concentrations much lower than the concentrations of polyethylene glycol, a known sealing agent for early-stage spinal cord injury. Intravenously injected micelles effectively recovered locomotor function and reduced the volume and inflammatory response of the lesion in injured rats, without any adverse effects. Our results show that copolymer micelles can interrupt the spread of primary spinal cord injury damage with minimal toxicity.

  10. Equal effects of typical environmental and specific social enrichment on posttraumatic cognitive functioning after fimbria-fornix transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Gajhede Gram, Marie; Gade, Louise; Wogensen, Elise; Mogensen, Jesper; Malá, Hana

    2015-12-10

    Enriched environment (EE) has been shown to have beneficial effects on cognitive recovery after brain injury. Typical EE comprises three components: (i) enlarged living area providing physical activation, (ii) sensory stimulation, and (iii) social stimulation. The present study assessed the specific contribution of the social stimulation. Animals were randomly divided into groups of (1) a typical EE, (2) pure social enrichment (SE), or (3) standard housing (SH) and subjected to either a sham operation or transection of the fimbria-fornix (FF). The effect of these conditions on acquisition of a delayed alternation task in a T-maze was assessed. The sham control groups were not affected by housing conditions. In the lesioned groups, both typical EE and SE improved the task acquisition, compared to SH. A baseline one-hour activity measurement confirmed an equal level of physical activity in the EE and SE groups. After delayed alternation testing, pharmacological challenges (muscarinergic antagonist scopolamine and dopaminergic antagonist SKF-83566) were used to assess cholinergic and dopaminergic contributions to task solution. Scopolamine led to a marked impairment in all groups. SKF-83566 significantly enhanced the performance of the lesioned group subjected to SE. The results demonstrate that housing in a typical as well as atypical EE can enhance cognitive recovery after mechanical injury to the hippocampus. The scopolamine challenge revealed a cholinergic dependency during task performance in all groups, regardless of lesion and housing conditions. The dopaminergic challenge revealed a difference in the neural substrates mediating recovery in the lesioned groups exposed to different types of housing. PMID:26499260

  11. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2010-03-01

    Dose-volume data for myelopathy in humans treated with radiotherapy (RT) to the spine is reviewed, along with pertinent preclinical data. Using conventional fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy/fraction to the full-thickness cord, the estimated risk of myelopathy is <1% and <10% at 54 Gy and 61 Gy, respectively, with a calculated strong dependence on dose/fraction (alpha/beta = 0.87 Gy.) Reirradiation data in animals and humans suggest partial repair of RT-induced subclinical damage becoming evident about 6 months post-RT and increasing over the next 2 years. Reports of myelopathy from stereotactic radiosurgery to spinal lesions appear rare (<1%) when the maximum spinal cord dose is limited to the equivalent of 13 Gy in a single fraction or 20 Gy in three fractions. However, long-term data are insufficient to calculate a dose-volume relationship for myelopathy when the partial cord is treated with a hypofractionated regimen.

  12. "Low-intensity laser therapy effect on the recovery of traumatic spinal cord injury".

    PubMed

    Paula, Alecsandra Araujo; Nicolau, Renata Amadei; Lima, Mario de Oliveira; Salgado, Miguel Angel Castillo; Cogo, José Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Scientific advances have been made to optimize the healing process in spinal cord injury. Studies have been developed to obtain effective treatments in controlling the secondary injury that occurs after spinal cord injury, which substantially changes the prognosis. Low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) has been applied in neuroscience due to its anti-inflammatory effects on biological tissue in the repairing process. Few studies have been made associating LILT to the spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the LILT (GaAlAs laser-780 nm) on the locomotor functional recovery, histomorphometric, and histopathological changes of the spinal cord after moderate traumatic injury in rats (spinal cord injury at T9 and T10). Thirty-one adult Wistar rats were used, which were divided into seven groups: control without surgery (n = 3), control surgery (n = 3), laser 6 h after surgery (n = 5), laser 48 h after surgery (n = 5), medullar lesion (n = 5) without phototherapy, medullar lesion + laser 6 h after surgery (n = 5), and medullar lesion + laser 48 h after surgery (n = 5). The assessment of the motor function was performed using Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale and adapted Sciatic Functional Index (aSFI). The assessment of urinary dysfunction was clinically performed. After 21 days postoperative, the animals were euthanized for histological and histomorphometric analysis of the spinal cord. The results showed faster motor evolution in rats with spinal contusion treated with LILT, maintenance of the effectiveness of the urinary system, and preservation of nerve tissue in the lesion area, with a notorious inflammation control and increased number of nerve cells and connections. In conclusion, positive effects on spinal cord recovery after moderate traumatic spinal cord injury were shown after LILT. PMID:24858233

  13. Combined Effect of Bilateral Ovariectomy and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection With Medial Meniscectomy on the Development of Osteoarthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the combined effect of bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) and anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MM) on the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Twenty female 15-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Five rats in each group underwent bilateral OVX (OVX group), bilateral ACLT with MM (ACLT with MM group), bilateral OVX plus ACLT with MM (OVX plus ACLT with MM group), and sham surgery (SHAM group). All the rats were subjected to treadmill running for 4 weeks. The behavioral evaluation for induction of OA used the number of rears method, and this was conducted at 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-surgery. Bone mineral density (BMD) was calculated with micro-computerized tomography images and the modified Mankin's scoring was used for the histological changes. Results The number of rears in the OVX plus ACLT with MM group decreased gradually and more rapidly in the ACLT with MM group. Histologically, the OVX plus ACLT with MM group had a significantly higher modified Mankin's score than the OVX group (p=0.008) and the SHAM group (p=0.008). BMDs of the OVX plus ACLT with MM group were significantly lower than the SHAM group (p=0.002), and the ACLT with MM group (p=0.003). Conclusion We found that bilateral OVX plus ACLT with MM induced definite OA change in terms of histology and BMD compared to bilateral OVX and ACLT with MM alone. Therefore, OVX and ACLT with MM was an appropriate degenerative OA rat model. PMID:27606264

  14. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A.; da-Silva, C.A.; Defino, H.L.A.; Bel, E.A.Del

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury. PMID:23579633

  15. Comments on transect methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, L.L.

    1980-02-01

    One of the outcomes of the recent spate of attention to environmental problems is the realization that we do not have suitable methods to census non-game species. Since marking is expensive and time-consuming, investigators have tended to look for methods that involve only visual techniques. One of the leading candidates thus becomes the line transect method. The purpose here is to briefly describe some of the available transect methods, and to comment on some aspects that may be of particular interest and importance.

  16. Effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Da-Sheng; Jing, Jue-Hua; Qian, Jun; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration in rats with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] A rat model of spinal cord injury was constructed by using the Allen weight-drop method. These rats were randomly divided into normal, spinal cord injury, and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation groups. The experimental group received the intervention with oscillating electrical field stimulation, and the control group received the intervention with an electrical field stimulator without oscillating electrical field stimulation. Each group was then randomly divided into seven subgroups according to observation time (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score and inclined plate test score evaluation, motor evoked potential detection, and histological observation were performed. [Results] In the first 2 weeks of oscillating electrical field stimulation, the oscillating electrical field stimulation and inclined plate test scores of spinal cord injury group and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group were not significantly different. In the fourth week, the scores of the spinal cord injury group were significantly lower than those of the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group. The motor evoked potential incubation period in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group at the various time points was shorter than that in the spinal cord injury group. In the sixth week, the relative area of myelin in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group was evidently larger than that in the spinal cord injury group. [Conclusion] Oscillating electrical field stimulation could effectively improve spinal cord conduction function and promote motor function recovery in rats with spinal cord injury, as well as promote myelin

  17. Effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Da-Sheng; Jing, Jue-Hua; Qian, Jun; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration in rats with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] A rat model of spinal cord injury was constructed by using the Allen weight-drop method. These rats were randomly divided into normal, spinal cord injury, and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation groups. The experimental group received the intervention with oscillating electrical field stimulation, and the control group received the intervention with an electrical field stimulator without oscillating electrical field stimulation. Each group was then randomly divided into seven subgroups according to observation time (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score and inclined plate test score evaluation, motor evoked potential detection, and histological observation were performed. [Results] In the first 2 weeks of oscillating electrical field stimulation, the oscillating electrical field stimulation and inclined plate test scores of spinal cord injury group and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group were not significantly different. In the fourth week, the scores of the spinal cord injury group were significantly lower than those of the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group. The motor evoked potential incubation period in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group at the various time points was shorter than that in the spinal cord injury group. In the sixth week, the relative area of myelin in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group was evidently larger than that in the spinal cord injury group. [Conclusion] Oscillating electrical field stimulation could effectively improve spinal cord conduction function and promote motor function recovery in rats with spinal cord injury, as well as promote myelin

  18. The Neuroprotective Effect of Kefir on Spinal Cord Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Tarik; Yener, Ali Umit; Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Yuksel, Yasemin; Cosar, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The main causes of spinal cord ischemia are a variety of vascular pathologies causing acute arterial occlusions. We investigated neuroprotective effects of kefir on spinal cord ischemia injury in rats. Methods Rats were divided into three groups : 1) sham operated control rats; 2) spinal cord ischemia group fed on a standard diet without kefir pretreatment; and 3) spinal cord ischemia group fed on a standard diet plus kefir. Spinal cord ischemia was performed by the infrarenal aorta cross-clamping model. The spinal cord was removed after the procedure. The biochemical and histopathological changes were observed within the samples. Functional assessment was performed for neurological deficit scores. Results The kefir group was compared with the ischemia group, a significant decrease in malondialdehyde levels was observed (p<0.05). Catalase and superoxide dismutase levels of the kefir group were significantly higher than ischemia group (p<0.05). In histopathological samples, the kefir group is compared with ischemia group, there was a significant decrease in numbers of dead and degenerated neurons (p<0.05). In immunohistochemical staining, hipoxia-inducible factor-1α and caspase 3 immunopositive neurons were significantly decreased in kefir group compared with ischemia group (p<0.05). The neurological deficit scores of kefir group were significantly higher than ischemia group at 24 h (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study revealed that kefir pretreatment in spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion reduced oxidative stress and neuronal degeneration as a neuroprotective agent. Ultrastructural studies are required in order for kefir to be developed as a promising therapeutic agent to be utilized for human spinal cord ischemia in the future. PMID:26113960

  19. Immunoglobulin-secreting cells in cord blood: effects of Epstein-Barr virus and interleukin-4.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, K O; Thorsteinsson, L; Gudmundsson, S; Haraldsson, A

    1999-07-01

    The contribution of cord blood B lymphocytes to the immune response has been under considerable investigation. Cord blood B cells produce almost no antibodies except of the immunoglobulin (Ig)M isotype, indicating immaturity of the cells or the environment they reside in. The aim of this study was to investigate the number of circulating IgA-, IgM-, IgG-, and IgE-producing cells in cord blood in comparison to adult peripheral blood using the ELISPOT method. Moreover, we studied the effect of transformation with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) on the proportion of cells producing different isotypes with or without interleukin (IL)-4. Cord blood had IgM-producing cells circulating predominantly, but also some IgA- and IgG-producing cells, whereas adult peripheral blood contained high amounts of circulating IgA-producing cells and some IgM- and IgG-producing cells. No circulating IgE-producing cells were found in either group. Transformation by EBV caused significant expansion of IgA-, IgM-, and IgG-producing cells in adult peripheral blood, but almost only of IgM-producing cells in cord blood. A low but detectable expansion of IgA- and IgG-producing cells was found. Cells producing IgE were still not found, even after EBV transformation. However, EBV transformation in the presence of IL-4 increased the numbers of IgE-producing cells significantly both in cord blood and adult peripheral blood. These findings indicate that cord blood contains some circulating IgA- and IgG-producing cells that are expanded to some extent after EBV infection. They also indicate that cord blood B cells have a similar capacity for IgE production to adult peripheral blood B cells when appropriately stimulated. PMID:10404047

  20. Beneficial effects of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemlou, Nader; Bouhy, Delphine; Yang, Jingxuan; López-Vales, Rubèn; Haber, Michael; Thuraisingam, Thusanth; He, Guoan; Radzioch, Danuta; Ding, Aihao

    2010-01-01

    Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor is a serine protease inhibitor produced by various cell types, including neutrophils and activated macrophages, and has anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown to promote wound healing in the skin and other non-neural tissues, however, its role in central nervous system injury was not known. We now report a beneficial role for secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor after spinal cord injury. After spinal cord contusion injury in mice, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor is expressed primarily by astrocytes and neutrophils but not macrophages. We show, using transgenic mice over-expressing secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, that this molecule has an early protective effect after spinal cord contusion injury. Furthermore, wild-type mice treated for the first week after spinal cord contusion injury with recombinant secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor exhibit sustained improvement in locomotor control and reduced secondary tissue damage. Recombinant secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor injected intraperitoneally localizes to the nucleus of circulating leukocytes, is detected in the injured spinal cord, reduces activation of nuclear factor-κB and expression of tumour necrosis factor-α. Administration of recombinant secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor might therefore be useful for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury. PMID:20047904

  1. Effect of hemoglobin adjustment on the precision of mercury concentrations in maternal and cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Mi; Choi, Anna L.; Ha, Eun-Hee; Pedersen, Lise; Nielsen, Flemming; Weihe, Pal; Hong, Yun-Chul; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Grandjean, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The cord-blood mercury concentration is usually considered the best biomarker in regard to developmental methylmercury neurotoxicity. However, the mercury concentration may be affected by the binding of methylmercury to hemoglobin and perhaps also selenium. As cord-blood mercury analyses appear to be less precise than suggested by laboratory quality data, we studied the interrelationships of mercury concentrations with hemoglobin in paired maternal and cord blood samples from a Faroese birth cohort (N = 514) and the Mothers and Children’s Environmental Health study in Korea (n=797). Linear regression and structural equation model (SEM) analyses were used to ascertain interrelationships between the exposure biomarkers and the possible impact of hemoglobin as well as selenium. Both methods showed a significant dependence of the cord-blood concentration on hemoglobin, also after adjustment for other exposure biomarkers. In the SEM, the cord blood measurement was a less imprecise indicator of the latent methylmercury exposure variable than other exposure biomarkers available, and the maternal hair concentration had the largest imprecision. Adjustment of mercury concentrations both in maternal and cord blood for hemoglobin improved their precision, while no significant effect of the selenium concentration in maternal blood was found. Adjustment of blood-mercury concentrations for hemoglobin is therefore recommended. PMID:24853977

  2. Effect of local administration of platelet-derived growth factor B on functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration: A sciatic nerve transection model

    PubMed Central

    Golzadeh, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effects of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty-five male, white Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), and PDGF-B treated group (SIL/PDGF). In NC group, left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In the SIL group, the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 μL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PDGF group, the silicon conduit was filled with 10 μL PDGF-B (0.5 ng/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five and were studied in 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Results: Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass, and histomorphometric studies showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PDGF than in SIL group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Local administration of PDGF-B combined with silicon grafting could accelerate functional recovery and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection. PMID:27274342

  3. Effect of Pregnancy on Vocal Cord Histology: An Animal Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Köybaşı Şanal, Serap; Biçer, Yusuf Özgür; Kükner, Aysel; Tezcan, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Voice may be affected during the period of pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the phonatory changes have not yet uncovered. Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the possible histological changes in the vocal cords of the pregnant rats in three separate trimesters. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Twenty-five Wistar-Albino female rats were divided into four groups: control group, pregnancy day 7 (Group 1), pregnancy day 14 (Group 2) and pregnancy day 20 (Group 3). The laryngeal specimens were obtained under general anesthesia. Histological assessment was performed using Hematoxylin-eosin and toluidine blue. A stereological analysis of vocal cord tissue was performed using a NIS-Elements D32 Imaging Software. Results: Lamina propria was observed to be edematous, and the lamina propria area was thickened starting from the second trimester. Glycosaminoglycans were observed to increase in the second trimester. Although none was encountered in the control, mast cells were observed in the lamina propria layer of the vocal cord starting in the muscular layer in the first trimester proceed to the subepithelial region as degranulated just before term. The covering epithelium remained unchanged throughout pregnancy. Conclusion: Lamina propria thickening may be attributed to both edema and increased glycosaminoglycans. The presence of mast cells in the cordal tissue may induce edema during pregnancy in rats. PMID:27606142

  4. Beneficial effects of αB-crystallin in spinal cord contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Klopstein, Armelle; Santos-Nogueira, Eva; Francos-Quijorna, Isaac; Redensek, Adriana; David, Samuel; Navarro, Xavier; López-Vales, Rubèn

    2012-10-17

    αB-crystallin is a member of the heat shock protein family that exerts cell protection under several stress-related conditions. Recent studies have revealed that αB-crystallin plays a beneficial role in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, brain ischemia, and Alexander disease. Whether αB-crystallin plays a role in modulating the secondary damage after CNS trauma is not known. We report here that αB-crystallin mediates protective effects after spinal cord injury. The levels of αB-crystallin are reduced in spinal cord tissue following contusion lesion. In addition, administration of recombinant human αB-crystallin for the first week after contusion injury leads to sustained improvement in locomotor skills and amelioration of secondary tissue damage. We also provide evidence that recombinant human αB-crystallin modulates the inflammatory response in the injured spinal cord, leading to increased infiltration of granulocytes and reduced recruitment of inflammatory macrophages. Furthermore, the delivery of recombinant human αB-crystallin promotes greater locomotor recovery even when the treatment is initiated 6 h after spinal cord injury. Our findings suggest that administration of recombinant human αB-crystallin may be a good therapeutic approach for treating acute spinal cord injury, for which there is currently no effective treatment. PMID:23077034

  5. Time-related effects of general functional training in spinal cord-injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Taisa Amoroso Bortolato; Vicente, Juliana Mendes Yule; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Morya, Edgard; do Valle, Angela Cristina

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This prospective, randomized, experimental study with rats aimed to investigate the influence of general treatment strategies on the motor recovery of Wistar rats with moderate contusive spinal cord injury. METHODS: A total of 51 Wistar rats were randomized into five groups: control, maze, ramp, runway, and sham (laminectomy only). The rats underwent spinal cord injury at the T9-T10 levels using the NYU-Impactor. Each group was trained for 12 minutes twice a week for two weeks before and five weeks after the spinal cord injury, except for the control group. Functional motor recovery was assessed with the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan Scale on the first postoperative day and then once a week for five weeks. The animals were euthanized, and the spinal cords were collected for histological analysis. RESULTS: Ramp and maze groups showed an earlier and greater functional improvement effect than the control and runway groups. However, over time, unexpectedly, all of the groups showed similar effects as the control group, with spontaneous recovery. There were no histological differences in the injured area between the trained and control groups. CONCLUSION: Short-term benefits can be associated with a specific training regime; however, the same training was ineffective at maintaining superior long-term recovery. These results might support new considerations before hospital discharge of patients with spinal cord injuries. PMID:22892926

  6. Ariel's transecting valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This highest-resolution Voyager 2 view of Ariel's terminator shows a complex array of transecting valleys with super-imposed impact craters. Voyager obtained this clear-filter, narrow-angle view from a distance of 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles) and with a resolution of about 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Particularly striking to Voyager scientists is the fact that the faults that bound the linear valleys are not visible where they transect one another across the valleys. Apparently these valleys were filled with deposits sometime after they were formed by tectonic processes, leaving them flat and smooth. Sinuous rilles (trenches) later formed, probably by some flow process. Some type of fluid flow may well have been involved in their evolution. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  7. Iso-effect table for radiation tolerance of the human spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.; Creditor, M.

    1981-07-01

    Available literature on radiation injury to the human spinal cord was collected into a comprehensive data set relating the incidence of myelopathy to dosage, number of fractions and total treatment time. The data was analyzed using a search program (RAD3) to derive best-fitting cell kinetic parameters on the assumption that radiation myelopathy arises from cellular depletion in the irradiated tissues. From these parameters iso-effect tables were constructed for a wide range of treatment schedules, including daily treatment as well as fractionation at longer intervals. The tables provide a set of limiting doses, above which the risk of radiation injury to the spinal cord becomes substantial. General application of NSD tolerance limits could lead to systematic overdosage of the spinal cord, especially with large individual fractions or short treatment times. We conclude that the computed iso-effect tables provide a more reliable clinical guide than conventional time-dose equations.

  8. An experimental spinal cord injury rat model using customized impact device: A cost-effective approach

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaprakash, K.M.; Sridharan, N.

    2013-01-01

    Till date, NYU MASCIS (New York University, Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study) impactor and Ohio State University electromagnetic spinal cord injury device impactor were under use for simulating an experimental spinal cord injury in rodents; functional recovery being assessed through Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scoring method which is an open field behavior based scoring system. Although, the cited impactors are state-of-art devices, affordability to scientists in developing and under developed countries is questionable. Since the acquisition of these impact devices are expensive, we designed a customized impact device based on the requirement, satisfying all the parameters to withstand a standard animal model for contusion type of spinal cord injury at the thoracic level without compromising the lesion reproducibility. Here, a spinal cord contusion is created using a blunt-force impactor in male Wistar rats. Our method gave consistent lesion effects as evaluated by behavior scoring methods. All the animals showed equal degree of performance in tests like narrow beam, inclined plane and horizontal ladder and in BBB scores (open field locomotor test). The aim of presenting our experience is to reinstate the fact that lack of affordability to get sophisticated instrumentation need not be a hurdle in the pursuit of science. PMID:23960429

  9. Effects of diet and/or exercise in enhancing spinal cord sensorimotor learning.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Selvan; Ying, Zhe; Zhuang, Yumei; Zhong, Hui; Wu, Aiguo; Bhatia, Harsharan S; Cruz, Rusvelda; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J K; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Given that the spinal cord is capable of learning sensorimotor tasks and that dietary interventions can influence learning involving supraspinal centers, we asked whether the presence of omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and the curry spice curcumin (Cur) by themselves or in combination with voluntary exercise could affect spinal cord learning in adult spinal mice. Using an instrumental learning paradigm to assess spinal learning we observed that mice fed a diet containing DHA/Cur performed better in the spinal learning paradigm than mice fed a diet deficient in DHA/Cur. The enhanced performance was accompanied by increases in the mRNA levels of molecular markers of learning, i.e., BDNF, CREB, CaMKII, and syntaxin 3. Concurrent exposure to exercise was complementary to the dietary treatment effects on spinal learning. The diet containing DHA/Cur resulted in higher levels of DHA and lower levels of omega-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA) in the spinal cord than the diet deficient in DHA/Cur. The level of spinal learning was inversely related to the ratio of AA:DHA. These results emphasize the capacity of select dietary factors and exercise to foster spinal cord learning. Given the non-invasiveness and safety of the modulation of diet and exercise, these interventions should be considered in light of their potential to enhance relearning of sensorimotor tasks during rehabilitative training paradigms after a spinal cord injury. PMID:22911773

  10. Effect of pressure on the release of radioactive glycine and gamma-aminobutyric acid from spinal cord synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, S.C.; Colton, J.S.; Dutka, A.J.

    1987-11-01

    Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure produces neurological changes referred to as the high-pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS). Manifestations of HPNS include tremor, EEG changes, and convulsions. These symptoms suggest an alteration in synaptic transmission, particularly with inhibitory neural pathways. Because spinal cord transmission has been implicated in HPNS, this study investigated inhibitory neurotransmitter function in the cord at high pressure. Guinea pig spinal cord synaptosome preparations were used to study the effect of compression to 67.7 atmospheres. This study suggest that decreased tonic inhibitory regulation at the level of the spinal cord contributes to the hyperexcitability observed in animals with compression to high pressure.

  11. Effect of voice training in the voice rehabilitation of patients with vocal cord polyps after surgery

    PubMed Central

    LIN, LI; SUN, NA; YANG, QIUHUA; ZHANG, YA; SHEN, JI; SHI, LIXIN; FANG, QIN; SUN, GUANGBIN

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of voice training on the vocal rehabilitation of patients with vocal cords polyps following phonomicrosurgery. A total of 60 cases of vocal cord polyps treated by laser phonomicrosurgery were randomly divided into training and control groups with 30 cases in each group. The patients were treated with laser phonomicrosurgery, routine postoperative treatment and nursing. The training group were additionally treated with vocal training, including relaxation training, breathing training, basic pronunciation training, chewing voice training and tone sandhi pronunciation training, and attention was paid to the training steps. Subjective and objective voice evaluations of the two groups were compared three months after the surgery and the differences between groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Voice training may significantly improve the postoperative voice quality of patients with vocal cord polyps and support rehabilitation. PMID:24669244

  12. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27186530

  13. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27186530

  14. Effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation on the properties of calendered cord fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytaç, Ayşe; Deniz, Veli; Şen, Murat; Hegazy, El-Sayed; Güven, Olgun

    2010-03-01

    The effects of gamma and e-beam irradiation on mechanical and structural properties of nylon 66 (Ny 66), nylon 6 (Ny 6) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics used in tyres were investigated. The untreated (greige), treated cords and calendered fabrics were irradiated at different doses. It is found that the effects of high energy irradiation on greige, treated cords and calendered fabrics are similar. No protective effect of compounds used in calendering was observed against radiation-induced oxidative degradation. The deterioration effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical properties is much higher than that of e-beam irradiation for all types of samples. Limiting viscosity numbers of both gamma and e-beam irradiated nylon 6 and nylon 66 cords were found to decrease with increasing dose. It is concluded that PET calendered fabric has higher resistance to ionizing radiation. Ny 6 and Ny 66 calendered fabrics are more sensitive even at low doses. Therefore, the effects of high energy irradiation on tyre cords have to be taken into consideration during tyre design reinforced with particularly Ny fabrics if pre-vulcanization with high energy radiation is to be applied.

  15. [Traumatic spinal cord injury in children; early and late effects].

    PubMed

    Peters, Jeroen P M; Kramer, William L M

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) have physical, emotional, psychological and economic consequences for patients. Although SCIs in children are rare, they have to cope with the consequences for the rest of their lives. In this article, three children who presented at our emergency department are discussed. These children had suffered SCIs from different etiologies. Most SCIs are caused by trauma and more males than females suffer SCIs. The younger children are, the more likely they will sustain cervical SCIs, which can be attributed to several distinct anatomical differences in the juvenile spine. Depending on the level of the spine injured, multiple secondary problems can occur. In this article, we paint a picture of the complex and multidisciplinary treatment and rehabilitation of young SCI patients and emphasise the need for treatment to take place in a specialised (children's) rehabilitation unit. PMID:23838399

  16. Persistence of the nasotrigeminal reflex after pontomedullary transection.

    PubMed

    Panneton, W Michael; Gan, Qi; Sun, D Wei

    2012-03-15

    Most behaviors have numerous components based on reflexes, but the neural circuits driving most reflexes rarely are documented. The nasotrigeminal reflex induced by stimulating the nasal mucosa causes an apnea, a bradycardia, and variable changes in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP). In this study we tested the nasotrigeminal reflex after transecting the brainstem at the pontomedullary junction. The nasal mucosae of anesthetized rats were stimulated with ammonia vapors and their brainstems then were transected. Complete transections alone induced an increase in resting heart rate (HR; p<0.001) and MABP (p<0.001), but no significant change in ventilation. However, the responses to nasal stimulation after transection were similar to those seen prior to transection. HR still dropped significantly (p<0.001), duration of apnea remained the same, as did changes in MABP. Results from rats whose transection were incomplete are discussed. These data implicate that the neuronal circuitry driving the nasotrigeminal reflex, and indirectly the diving response, is intrinsic to the medulla and spinal cord. PMID:22154693

  17. Allodynia-like effects in rat after ischaemic spinal cord injury photochemically induced by laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hao, J X; Xu, X J; Aldskogius, H; Seiger, A; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    1991-05-01

    We report behaviours suggesting the presence of allodynia elicited by non-noxious brushing and mechanical pressure following photochemically induced ischaemic spinal cord injury in the rat. Female rats were intravenously injected with Erythrosin B and the T10 vertebra was irradiated with a laser beam for 1, 5 or 10 min. These procedures initiated an intravascular photochemical reaction, resulting in ischaemic spinal cord injury. After irradiation a clear allodynia was observed in most rats. The animals vocalized intensely to light touch during gentle handling and were clearly agitated to light brushing of the flanks. The vocalization threshold in response to the mechanical pressure measured with von Frey hairs was markedly decreased during this period. In some animals the existence of spontaneous pain was suggested by spontaneous vocalization. The duration of the allodynia varied among animals from several hours to several days. The severity and duration of allodynia seemed not to be related to the duration of irradiation. In sham-operated rats a slight, transient allodynia was also noted around the wound within a few hours after surgery, which was effectively relieved by systemic morphine (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Morphine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) also partially relieved the allodynia in spinally injured rats 4 h after irradiation. However, morphine, even at a higher dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.), failed to alleviate the allodynia in spinally injured rats 24-48 h after the injury. Systemic injection of the GABAB agonist baclofen (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), but not the GABAA agonist muscimol (1 mg/kg, i.p.), effectively relieved allodynia during this period. Pretreatment with guanethidine 24 h and just prior to the irradiation (20 mg/kg, s.c.) did not prevent the occurrence of allodynia in spinal cord injured rats. The present observation is the first to show that ischaemic spinal cord injury could result in cutaneous mechanical allodynia. This phenomenon is resistant to morphine and may not

  18. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on MMP9/2 expression and motor function in rats with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying-Nuo; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Lin-Feng; Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of hyperbaric oxygen intervention on the microenvironment of nerve regeneration after spinal cord injury modeling and to explore the possible mechanism of nerve regeneration and functional recovery in rats with spinal cord injury. In 98 adult female SD rats, 90 successful models were obtained, which were divided into sham group, spinal cord injury group and hyperbaric oxygen group using randomized block method, 30/group. Spinal cord injury rat model was established in accordance with the modified Allen method. Motor function was assessed at the time points of before modeling, one day, three days, one week, two weeks, three weeks and four weeks after modeling respectively by BBB rating, inclined plane test and improved Tarlov score. At 3 days after modeling, apoptosis of neuronal cells in spinal cord injury region in experimental group was detected by TUNEL method; gene and protein expression of MMP9/2 in spinal cord injury and surrounding tissues was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot assay. At 4 weeks after modeling, histopathological morphological changes in spinal cord injury were observed by HE staining; fluorogold retrograde tracing was used to observe the regeneration and distribution of spinal cord nerve fibers and axon regeneration was observed by TEM. The three motor function scores in hyperbaric oxygen group at each time point after two weeks of treatment were significantly increased compared with spinal cord injury group (P < 0.05). At 3 d after modeling, apoptosis index in hyperbaric oxygen group were significantly lower than those in spinal cord injury group (P < 0.05). At 72 h after modeling, compared with spinal cord injury group, MMP9/2 gene and protein expression in hyperbaric oxygen group was significantly lower (P < 0.05). At four weeks after modeling, fluorogold positive nerve fibers were the most sham group, followed by hyperbaric oxygen group and spinal cord injury group in order; the differences among the groups were

  19. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on MMP9/2 expression and motor function in rats with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ying-Nuo; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Lin-Feng; Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of hyperbaric oxygen intervention on the microenvironment of nerve regeneration after spinal cord injury modeling and to explore the possible mechanism of nerve regeneration and functional recovery in rats with spinal cord injury. In 98 adult female SD rats, 90 successful models were obtained, which were divided into sham group, spinal cord injury group and hyperbaric oxygen group using randomized block method, 30/group. Spinal cord injury rat model was established in accordance with the modified Allen method. Motor function was assessed at the time points of before modeling, one day, three days, one week, two weeks, three weeks and four weeks after modeling respectively by BBB rating, inclined plane test and improved Tarlov score. At 3 days after modeling, apoptosis of neuronal cells in spinal cord injury region in experimental group was detected by TUNEL method; gene and protein expression of MMP9/2 in spinal cord injury and surrounding tissues was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot assay. At 4 weeks after modeling, histopathological morphological changes in spinal cord injury were observed by HE staining; fluorogold retrograde tracing was used to observe the regeneration and distribution of spinal cord nerve fibers and axon regeneration was observed by TEM. The three motor function scores in hyperbaric oxygen group at each time point after two weeks of treatment were significantly increased compared with spinal cord injury group (P < 0.05). At 3 d after modeling, apoptosis index in hyperbaric oxygen group were significantly lower than those in spinal cord injury group (P < 0.05). At 72 h after modeling, compared with spinal cord injury group, MMP9/2 gene and protein expression in hyperbaric oxygen group was significantly lower (P < 0.05). At four weeks after modeling, fluorogold positive nerve fibers were the most sham group, followed by hyperbaric oxygen group and spinal cord injury group in order; the differences among the groups were

  20. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging at 11.7 Tesla visualized the effects of neonatal transection of infraorbital nerve upon primary and secondary trigeminal pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Yasuhiro; Inui-Yamamoto, Chizuko; Suzuki, Takashi; Nakadate, Hiromichi; Nagase, Yoshitaka; Seiyama, Akitoshi; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Seki, Junji

    2014-09-01

    Using 11.7T ultra high-field T2-weighted MRI, the present study aimed to investigate pathological changes of primary and secondary trigeminal pathways following neonatal transection of infraorbital nerve in rats. The trigeminal pathways consist of spinal trigeminal tract, trigeminal sensory nuclear complex, medial lemniscus, ventromedial portion of external medullary lamina and ventral posterior nucleus of thalamus. By selecting optimum parameters of MRI such as repetition time, echo time, and slice orientation, this study visualized the trigeminal pathways in rats without any contrast agents. Pathological changes due to the nerve transection were found at 8 weeks of age as a marked reduction of the areas of the trigeminal pathways connecting from the injured nerve. In addition, T2-weighted MR images of the trigeminal nerve trunk and the spinal trigeminal tract suggest a communication of CSF through the trigeminal nerve between the inside and outside of the brain stem. These results support the utility of ultra high-field MRI system for noninvasive assessment of effects of trigeminal nerve injury upon the trigeminal pathways. PMID:25038563

  1. Neuroprotective effect of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes on spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shenghao; Bao, Yinghui; Lin, Yong; Pan, Yaohua; Fan, Yiling; Wan, Jieqing; Jiang, Jiyao

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord affect a large percentage of the world’s population. However, there are currently no effective treatments for these central nervous system (CNS) injuries. In our study, we evaluated the neuroprotective role of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carrying brain derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF), nogo-66 receptor (NgR) and Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) in spinal cord injury (SCI). Our results showed that transfection into rat cortical neurons with BDNF-DNA significantly elevated the expression of BDNF both in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, transfection with NgR-siRNA and RhoA-siRNA resulted in an obvious down-regulation of NgR and RhoA in neuron cells and in injured spinal cords. In addition, the functionalized MWCNTs carrying BDNF-DNA, NgR-siRNA and RhoA-siRNA exhibited remarkable therapeutic effects on injured spinal cord. Taken together, our study demonstrates that functionalized MWCNTs have a potential therapeutic application on repair and regeneration of the CNS. PMID:26884846

  2. Neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia after spinal cord lesion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Marcello Oliveira; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; Ferreira, Ricardo; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord lesion. METHODS: Wistar rats (n = 30) weighing 320-360 g were randomized to two groups (hypothermia and control) of 15 rats per group. A spinal cord lesion was induced by the standardized drop of a 10-g weight from a height of 2.5 cm, using the New York University Impactor, after laminectomy at the T9-10 level. Rats in the hypothermia group underwent epidural hypothermia for 20 minutes immediately after spinal cord injury. Motor function was assessed for six weeks using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan motor scores and the inclined plane test. At the end of the final week, the rats' neurological status was monitored by the motor evoked potential test and the results for the two groups were compared. RESULTS: Analysis of the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores obtained during the six-week period indicated that there were no significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in the inclined plane test scores during the six-week period. Furthermore, at the end of the study, the latency and amplitude values of the motor evoked potential test were not significantly different between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Hypothermia did not produce a neuroprotective effect when applied at the injury level and in the epidural space immediately after induction of a spinal cord contusion in Wistar rats. PMID:25141116

  3. The effects of the mineral phase on C stabilization mechanisms and the microbial community along an eroding slope transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetterl, S.; Opfergelt, S.; Cornelis, J.; Boeckx, P. F.; van oost, K.; Six, J.

    2013-12-01

    An increasing number of studies show the importance of including soil redistribution processes in understanding carbon (C) dynamics in eroding landscapes. The quality and quantity of soil organic carbon in sloping cropland differs with topographic position. These differences are commonly more visible in the subsoil, while the size and composition of topsoil C pools are similar along the hillslope. The type (plant- or microbial-derived) and quality (level of degradation) of C found in a specific soil fraction depends on the interplay between the temporal dynamic of the specific mechanism and it's strength to protect C from decomposition. Here, we present an analysis that aims to clarify the bio/geo-chemical and mineralogical components involved in stabilizing C at various depths and slope positions and how they affect the microbial community and the degradation of C. For this we analyzed soil samples from different soil depths along a slope transect applying (i) a sequential extraction of the reactive soil phase using pyrophosphate, oxalate and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate, (ii) a semi-quantitative and qualitative analysis of the clay mineralogy, (iii) an analysis of the microbial community using amino sugars and (iv) an analysis of the level of degradation of C in different soil fractions focusing on the soil Lignin signature. The results show that the pattern of minerals and their relative importance in stabilizing C varies greatly along the transect. In the investigated soils, pyrophosphate extractable Manganese, and not Iron or Aluminum as often observed, is strongly correlated to C in the bulk soil and in the non-aggregated silt and clay fractions. This suggests a certain role of Manganese for C stabilization where physical protection is absent. In contrast, pyrophosphate extractable Iron and Aluminum components are largely abundant in water-stable soil aggregates but not correlated to C, suggesting importance of these extracts to stabilize aggregates and

  4. Preventive Effect of Intrathecal Paracetamol on Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Murat; Sayar, Ilyas; Peker, Kemal; Gullu, Huriye; Yildiz, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ischemic injury of the spinal cord during the surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms might lead to paraplegia. Although a number of different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact cause of paraplegia has remained unknown, hampering the development of effective pharmacologic or other strategies for prevention of this condition. A number of studies suggested that cyclooxygenases (COX) contribute to neural breakdown; thus, COX inhibitors might reduce injury. Objectives: We aimed to assess the preventive effect of intrathecal (IT) pretreatment with paracetamol on spinal cord injury in a rat model. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed in Ataturk University Animal Research Laboratory Center, Erzurum, Turkey. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to three experimental groups (n = 6) to receive IT physiologic saline (controls), 50 µg of paracetamol, or 100 µg paracetamol one hour before induction of spinal cord ischemia. Six other rats were considered as the sham group. For the assessment of ischemic injury, motor functions of the hind limbs and histopathologic changes of the lumbar spinal cord were evaluated. Additional 20 rats were divided into two equal groups for the second part of the study where the survival rates were recorded in controls and in animals receiving 100 µg of paracetamol during the 28-day observation period. Results: Pretreatment with 100 µg of paracetamol resulted in a significant improvement in motor functions and histopathologic findings (P < 0.05). Despite a higher rate of survival in 100 µg of paracetamol group (70%) at day 28, the difference was not statistically significant in comparison with controls. Conclusions: Our results suggest a protective effect of pretreatment with IT paracetamol on ischemic spinal cord injury during thoracolumbar aortic aneurysm surgery. PMID:25763224

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes adaptive plasticity within the spinal cord and mediates the beneficial effects of controllable stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huie, J. Russell; Garraway, Sandra M.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Beas, Blanca S.; Montgomery, Karienn S.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Grau, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been characterized as a potent modulator of neural plasticity in both the brain and spinal cord. The present experiments use an in vivo model system to demonstrate that training with controllable stimulation increases spinal BDNF expression and engages a BDNF-dependent process that promotes adaptive plasticity. Spinally transected rats administered legshock whenever one hindlimb is extended (controllable stimulation) exhibit a progressive increase in flexion duration. This simple form of response-outcome (instrumental) learning is not observed when shock is given independent of leg position (uncontrollable stimulation). Uncontrollable electrical stimulation also induces a lasting effect that impairs learning for up to 48 hrs. Training with controllable shock can counter the adverse consequences of uncontrollable stimulation, to both prevent and reverse the learning deficit. Here it is shown that the protective and restorative effect of instrumental training depends on BDNF. Cellular assays showed that controllable stimulation increased BDNF mRNA expression and protein within the lumbar spinal cord. These changes were associated with an increase in the BDNF receptor TrkB protein within the dorsal horn. Evidence is then presented that these changes play a functional role in vivo. Application of a BDNF inhibitor (TrkB-IgG) blocked the protective effect of instrumental training. Direct (intrathecal) application of BDNF substituted for instrumental training to block both the induction and expression of the learning deficit. Uncontrollable stimulation also induced an increase in mechanical reactivity (allodynia) and this too was prevented by BDNF. TrkB-IgG blocked the restorative effect of instrumental training and intrathecal BDNF substituted for training to reverse the deficit. Taken together, these findings outline a critical role for BDNF in mediating the beneficial effects of controllable stimulation on spinal plasticity

  6. Shifts in methanogen community structure and function across a coastal marsh transect: effects of exotic Spartina alterniflora invasion

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junji; Ding, Weixin; Liu, Deyan; Kang, Hojeong; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin

    2016-01-01

    Invasion of Spartina alterniflora in coastal areas of China increased methane (CH4) emissions. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we measured CH4 production potential, methanogen community structure and biogeochemical factors along a coastal wetland transect comprised of five habitat regions: open water, bare tidal flat, invasive S. alterniflora marsh and native Suaeda salsa and Phragmites australis marshes. CH4 production potential in S. alterniflora marsh was 10 times higher than that in other regions, and it was significantly correlated with soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and trimethylamine concentrations, but was not correlated with acetate or formate concentrations. Although the diversity of methanogens was lowest in S. alterniflora marsh, invasion increased methanogen abundance by 3.48-fold, compared with native S. salsa and P. australis marshes due to increase of facultative Methanosarcinaceae rather than acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Ordination analyses suggested that trimethylamine was the primary factor regulating shift in methanogen community structure. Addition of trimethylamine increased CH4 production rates by 1255-fold but only by 5.61- and 11.4-fold for acetate and H2/CO2, respectively. S. alterniflora invasion elevated concentration of non-competitive trimethylamine, and shifted methanogen community from acetotrophic to facultative methanogens, which together facilitated increased CH4 production potential. PMID:26728134

  7. Shifts in methanogen community structure and function across a coastal marsh transect: effects of exotic Spartina alterniflora invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junji; Ding, Weixin; Liu, Deyan; Kang, Hojeong; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin

    2016-01-01

    Invasion of Spartina alterniflora in coastal areas of China increased methane (CH4) emissions. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we measured CH4 production potential, methanogen community structure and biogeochemical factors along a coastal wetland transect comprised of five habitat regions: open water, bare tidal flat, invasive S. alterniflora marsh and native Suaeda salsa and Phragmites australis marshes. CH4 production potential in S. alterniflora marsh was 10 times higher than that in other regions, and it was significantly correlated with soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and trimethylamine concentrations, but was not correlated with acetate or formate concentrations. Although the diversity of methanogens was lowest in S. alterniflora marsh, invasion increased methanogen abundance by 3.48-fold, compared with native S. salsa and P. australis marshes due to increase of facultative Methanosarcinaceae rather than acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Ordination analyses suggested that trimethylamine was the primary factor regulating shift in methanogen community structure. Addition of trimethylamine increased CH4 production rates by 1255-fold but only by 5.61- and 11.4-fold for acetate and H2/CO2, respectively. S. alterniflora invasion elevated concentration of non-competitive trimethylamine, and shifted methanogen community from acetotrophic to facultative methanogens, which together facilitated increased CH4 production potential.

  8. Effect of Initial Seeding Density on Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Fibrocartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Seshareddy, Kiran; Weiss, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    Cells derived from Wharton's jelly from human umbilical cords (called umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells herein) are a novel cell source for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. In this study, we examined the effects of different seeding densities on seeding efficiency, cell proliferation, biosynthesis, mechanical integrity, and chondrogenic differentiation. Cells were seeded on non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA) meshes in an orbital shaker at densities of 5, 25, or 50 million cells/mL and then statically cultured for 4 weeks in chondrogenic medium. At week 0, initial seeding density did not affect seeding efficiency. Throughout the 4-week culture period, absolute cell numbers of the 25 and 50 million-cells/mL (higher density) groups were significantly larger than in the 5 million-cells/mL (lower density) group. The presence of collagen types I and II and aggrecan was confirmed using immunohistochemical staining. Glycosaminoglycan and collagen contents per construct in the higher-density groups were significantly greater than in the lower-density group. Constructs in the high-density groups maintained their mechanical integrity, which was confirmed using unconfined compression testing. In conclusion, human umbilical cord cells demonstrated the potential for chondrogenic differentiation in three-dimensional tissue engineering, and higher seeding densities better promoted biosynthesis and mechanical integrity, and thus a seeding density of at least 25 million cells/mL is recommended for fibrocartilage tissue engineering with umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells. PMID:18759671

  9. THE EFFECT OF MONOSIALOGANGLYOSIDE (GM-1) ADMINISTRATION IN SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    BARROS, TARCÍSIO ELOY PESSOA; ARAUJO, FERNANDO FLORES DE; HIGINO, LUCAS DA PAZ; MARCON, RAPHAEL MARTUS; CRISTANTE, ALEXANDRE FOGAÇA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of monosialoganglioside (GM-1) in spinal cord trauma patients seen in our service who have not been treated with methylprednisolone. Methods: Thirty patients with acute spinal cord trauma were randomly divided into two groups. In Group 1, patients received 200 mg GM-1 in the initial assessment and thereafter received 100 mg intravenous per day for 30 days and Group 2 (control) received saline. Patients were evaluated periodically (at 6 weeks, 6 months, one year and two years), using a standardized neurological assessment of the American Spinal Injury Association / International Spinal Cord Society. Results: The comparative statistical analysis of motor indices, sensitive indices for pain and touch according to the standardization of ASIA / ISCOS showed that the assessments at 6 weeks, 6 months and 2 years, GM-Group 1 patients had higher rates than the control group regarding sensitivity to pain and touch, with no statistically significant difference from the motor index. Conclusion: The functional assessment showed improvement in the sensitive indices of patients treated with GM1 after post-traumatic spinal cord injury compared to patients who received placebo. Level of Evidence IV, Prospective Case Studies Series. PMID:27217811

  10. Effects of hemorrhagic hypotension on tyrosine concentrations in rat spinal cord and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Roberts, C. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine is the precursor for catecholamine neurotransmitters. When catecholamine-containing neurons are physiologically active (as sympathoadrenal cells are in hypotension), tyrosine administration increases catecholamine synthesis and release. Since hypotension can alter plasma amino acid composition, the effects of an acute hypotensive insult on tyrosine concentrations in plasma and spinal cord were examined. Rats were cannulated and bled until the systolic blood pressure was 50 mmHg, or were kept normotensive for 1 h. Tyrosine and other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) known to compete with tyrosine for brain uptake were assayed in plasma and spinal cord. The rate at which intra-arterial (H-3)tyrosine disappeared from the plasma was also estimated in hemorrhaged and control rats. In plasma of hemorrhaged animals, both the tyrosine concentration and the tyrosine/LNAA ratio was elevated; moreover, the disappearance of (H-3)tyrosine was slowed. Tyrosine concentrations also increased in spinal cords of hemorrhaged-hypotensive rats when compared to normotensive controls. Changes in plasma amino acid patterns may thus influence spinal cord concentrations of amino acid precursors for neurotransmitters during the stress of hemorrhagic shock.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of sildenafil in experimental spinal cord injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Hasan; Degirmenci, Selim; Ak, Ahmet; Bayir, Aysegul; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Uyar, Mehmet; Akinci, Murat; Acar, Demet; Kocacan, Metin; Akyurek, Fikret

    2015-01-01

    Neuroprotective agents such as methylprednisolone and sildenafil may limit damage after spinal cord injury. We evaluated the effects of methylprednisolone and sildenafil on biochemical and histologic changes after spinal cord injury in a rabbit model. Female New Zealand rabbits (32 rabbits) were allocated to 4 equal groups: laminectomy only (sham control) or laminectomy and spinal trauma with no other treatment (trauma control) or treatment with either methylprednisolone or sildenafil. Gelsolin and caspase-3 levels in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma were determined, and spinal cord histology was evaluated at 24 hours after trauma. There were no differences in mean cerebrospinal fluid or plasma levels of caspase-3 between the groups or within the groups from 0 to 24 hours after injury. From 0 to 24 hours after trauma, mean cerebrospinal fluid gelsolin levels significantly increased in the sildenafil group and decreased in the sham control and the trauma control groups. Mean plasma gelsolin level was significantly higher at 8 and 24 hours after trauma in the sildenafil than other groups. Histologic examination indicated that general structural integrity was better in the methylprednisolone in comparison with the trauma control group. General structural integrity, leptomeninges, white and grey matter hematomas, and necrosis were significantly improved in the sildenafil compared with the trauma control group. Caspase-3 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood were not increased but gelsolin levels were decreased after spinal cord injury in trauma control rabbits. Sildenafil caused an increase in gelsolin levels and may be more effective than methylprednisolone at decreasing secondary damage to the spinal cord. PMID:25725143

  12. Neurologic foundations of spinal cord fusion (GEMINI).

    PubMed

    Canavero, Sergio; Ren, XiaoPing; Kim, C-Yoon; Rosati, Edoardo

    2016-07-01

    Cephalosomatic anastomosis has been carried out in both monkeys and mice with preservation of brain function. Nonetheless the spinal cord was not reconstructed, leaving the animals unable to move voluntarily. Here we review the details of the GEMINI spinal cord fusion protocol, which aims at restoring electrophysiologic conduction across an acutely transected spinal cord. The existence of the cortico-truncoreticulo-propriospinal pathway, a little-known anatomic entity, is described, and its importance concerning spinal cord fusion emphasized. The use of fusogens and electrical stimulation as adjuvants for nerve fusion is addressed. The possibility of achieving cephalosomatic anastomosis in humans has become reality in principle. PMID:27180142

  13. Effect of maternal lifestyle on cord blood IgE factor.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, T; Morimoto, K; Sasaki, S; Taniguchi, K; Motonaga, M; Akahori, W; Akahori, S; Akahori, T; Ohmori, H; Kuroda, E; Okabe, K; Yugari, K; Yamana, M

    1997-06-01

    During recent decades much interest has been focused on the possibility of predicting and preventing atopic diseases during pregnancy. The idea of being able to detect a predisposition early and take suitable environmental measures in order to avoid overt allergy is an attractive position. Elevated cord IgE of around 1.0 IU/ml has been proposed as a predictor in western children. However, there remains no information about the effect of maternal lifestyle during pregnancy on these levels. Total IgE levels were therefore determined using Pharmacia CAP system and PRIST, with sensitivities of 0.01 kU/l and 0.25 kU/l, respectively, from serum samples taken from 1138 Japanese pairs of cord blood and pregnant women responding to a questionnaire regarding 17 health practices, intake of 32 food allergens and 5 environmental factors. Of these, 28 (2.5%) pairs of samples were excluded from further analysis because of high contamination of IgA (> 15.4 mg/ml) in cord blood. Median cord blood IgE was 0.286 kU/l and geometric mean IgE was 66.25 kU/l in maternal sera using CAP system; there was no significant correlation between maternal log (IgE) and cord blood IgE. Similar results were obtained from PRIST, whose correlation with CAP system was significant (r = 0.884, p < 0.001 for maternal and r = 0.765, p < 0.001 for cord blood). Multiple logistic analysis demonstrated that avoidance of simultaneous exposure to hens' eggs and cow's milk (relative risk = 1.3, p < 0.05) as well as soy beans (relative risk = 2.8, p < 0.01) should be advised to mothers with positive allergic histories and/or high total IgE (> 400 IU/ml), especially in women aged more than 35 years who are pregnant with a male child. However, maintenance of healthy lifestyles, especially taking proper exercise and sleeping, and avoidance of inhalant allergens during late pregnancy may be a more important strategy for the reduction of cord blood IgE levels. PMID:9258545

  14. Effects of paired transcutaneous electrical stimulation delivered at single and dual sites over lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Sayenko, Dimitry G; Atkinson, Darryn A; Floyd, Terrance C; Gorodnichev, Ruslan M; Moshonkina, Tatiana R; Harkema, Susan J; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P

    2015-11-16

    It was demonstrated previously that transcutaneous electrical stimulation of multiple sites over the spinal cord is more effective in inducing robust locomotor behavior as compared to the stimulation of single sites alone in both animal and human models. To explore the effects and mechanisms of interactions during multi-site spinal cord stimulation we delivered transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the single or dual locations over the spinal cord corresponding to approximately L2 and S1 segments. Spinally evoked motor potentials in the leg muscles were investigated using single and paired pulses of 1ms duration with conditioning-test intervals (CTIs) of 5 and 50ms. We observed considerable post-stimulation modulatory effects which depended on CTIs, as well as on whether the paired stimuli were delivered at a single or dual locations, the rostro-caudal relation between the conditioning and test stimuli, and on the muscle studied. At CTI-5, the paired stimulation delivered at single locations (L2 or S1) provided strong inhibitory effects, evidenced by the attenuation of the compound responses as compared with responses from either single site. In contrast, during L2-S1 paradigm, the compound responses were potentiated. At CTI-50, the magnitude of inhibition did not differ among paired stimulation paradigms. Our results suggest that electrical stimuli delivered to dual sites over the lumbosacral enlargement in rostral-to-caudal order, may recruit different populations of motor neurons initially through projecting sensory and intraspinal connections and then directly, resulting in potentiation of the compound spinally evoked motor potentials. The interactive and synergistic effects indicate multi-segmental convergence of descending and ascending influences on the neuronal circuitries during electrical spinal cord stimulation. PMID:26453766

  15. The Effects of Aquatic Exercise on Pulmonary Function in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jung, JaeHyun; Chung, EunJung; Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Byoung-Hee; Lee, JiYeun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of aquatic exercise on pulmonary function of patients with spinal cord injury. [Subjects] The subjects were randomly allocated to an aqua group (n=10) and a land group (n=10). [Methods] Both groups trained for 60 minutes, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Pulmonary function was assessed by measuring the forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory flow rate (FER), force expiratory volume at one second (FEV1) and force expiratory volume at one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC). [Results] Following the intervention, the aqua group showed significant changes in FVC, FER, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC. The land group showed only significant differences FER. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest the effects on the aqua group were significantly higher than those on the land group in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:24926136

  16. Prolonged Local Hypothermia Has No Long-Term Adverse Effect on the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Vipin, Ashwati; Kortelainen, Jukka; Al-Nashash, Hasan; Chua, Soo Min; Thow, Xinyuan; Manivannan, Janani; Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to be neuroprotective and is one of the most effective and promising first-line treatments for central nervous system (CNS) trauma. At present, induction of local hypothermia, as opposed to general hypothermia, is more desired because of its ease of application and safety; fewer side effects and an absence of severe complications have been noted. Local hypothermia involves temperature reduction of a small and specific segment of the spinal cord. Our group has previously shown the neuroprotective effect of short-term, acute moderate general hypothermia through improvements in electrophysiological and motor behavioral assessments, as well as histological examination following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We have also shown the benefit of using short-term local hypothermia versus short-term general hypothermia post-acute SCI. The overall neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia can be categorized into three main components: (1) induction modality, general versus local, (2) invasive, semi-invasive or noninvasive, and (3) duration of hypothermia induction. In this study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility, long-term safety, as well as eventual complications and side effects of prolonged, semi-invasive, moderate local hypothermia (30°C±0.5°C for 5 and 8 hours) in rats with uninjured spinal cord while maintaining their core temperature at 37°C±0.5°C. The weekly somatosensory evoked potential and motor behavioral (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) assessments of rats that underwent 5 and 8 hours of semi-invasive local hypothermia, which revealed no statistically significant changes in electrical conductivity and behavioral outcomes. In addition, 4 weeks after local hypothermia induction, histological examination showed no anatomical damages or morphological changes in their spinal cord structure and parenchyma. We concluded that this method of prolonged local hypothermia is feasible, safe, and has the

  17. Spinal cord deformation due to nozzle gas flow effects using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ronnie J.; Jivraj, Jamil; Vuong, Barry; Ramjist, Joel; Sun, Cuiru; Huang, Yize; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2015-03-01

    The use of gas assistance in laser machining hard materials is well established in manufacturing but not in the context of surgery. Laser cutting of osseous tissue in the context of neurosurgery can benefit from gas-assist but requires an understanding of flow and pressure effects to minimize neural tissue damage. In this study we acquire volumetric flow rates through a gas nozzle on the spinal cord, with dura and without dura.

  18. Analysis of thermal damage in vocal cords for the prevention of collateral laser treatment effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul Vélez, Félix; Luis Arce-Diego, José; del Barrio Fernández, Ángela; Borragán Torre, Alfonso

    2007-05-01

    The importance of vocal cords for the interaction with the world around is obviously known. Vocal cords disorders can be divided mainly into three categories: difficulty of movement of one or both vocal folds, lesion formation on them, and difficulty or lack of mucosal wave movement. In this last case, a laser heating treatment can be useful in order to improve tissue vibration. However, thermal damage should be considered to adjust laser parameters and so to prevent irreversible harmful effects to the patient. in this work, an analysis of thermal damage in vocal folds is proposed. Firstly thermo-optical laser-tissue interaction is studied, by means of a RTT (Radiation Transfer Theory) model solved with a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation, and a bio-heat equation, with a finite difference numerical method based solution, taking into account blood perfusion and boundary effects, for the thermal distribution. The spatial-temporal temperature distributions are obtained for two widely used lasers, Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and KTP (532 nm). From these data, an Arrhenius thermal damage analysis allows a prediction of possible laser treatment harmful effects on vocal cords that could cause scar formation or tissue burn. Different source powers and exposition times are considered, in such a way that an approximation of adequate wavelength, power and duration is achieved, in order to implement an efficient and safe laser treatment.

  19. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B

    2007-12-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S(2) level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S(1) level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation. PMID:18057503

  20. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2007-12-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S2 level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S1 level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation.

  1. Effect of prenatal arsenic exposure on DNA methylation and leukocyte subpopulations in cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Molly L; Houseman, E Andres; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mostofa, Golam; Cardenas, Andres; Wright, Robert O; Christiani, David C

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal arsenic exposure is associated with increased risk of disease in adulthood. This has led to considerable interest in arsenic’s ability to disrupt fetal programming. Many studies report that arsenic exposure alters DNA methylation in whole blood but these studies did not adjust for cell mixture. In this study, we examined the relationship between arsenic in maternal drinking water collected ≤ 16 weeks gestational age and DNA methylation in cord blood (n = 44) adjusting for leukocyte-tagged differentially methylated regions. DNA methylation was quantified using the Infinium HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip array. Recursively partitioned mixture modeling examined the relationship between arsenic and methylation at 473,844 CpG sites. Median arsenic concentration in water was 12 µg/L (range < 1- 510 µg/L). Log10 arsenic was associated with altered DNA methylation across the epigenome (P = 0.002); however, adjusting for leukocyte distributions attenuated this association (P = 0.013). We also observed that arsenic had a strong effect on the distribution of leukocytes in cord blood. In adjusted models, every log10 increase in maternal drinking water arsenic exposure was estimated to increase CD8+ T cells by 7.4% (P = 0.0004) and decrease in CD4+ T cells by 9.2% (P = 0.0002). These results show that prenatal exposure to arsenic had an exposure-dependent effect on specific T cell subpopulations in cord blood and altered DNA methylation in cord blood. Future research is needed to determine if these small changes in DNA methylation alter gene expression or are associated with adverse health effects. PMID:24525453

  2. Effects of robot training on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Gu, Rui; Zhou, Yue; Hu, Chunying

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and robot-assisted rehabilitation (RAT) on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury with respect to defecation time and defecation drug dose (enema). [Subjects] Twenty-four patients with spinal cord injury participated in the study. All subjects had an incomplete injury ranging from level T8 to L2. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into BWSTT and RAT groups. Walking training was provided to both groups for 20 minutes, four times a week, for one month. The defecation time and enema dose were measured before and after the experiment. [Results] The RAT group showed significant shortening of defecation time and decrease of enema dose. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that significantly better improvement in bowel function can be achieved with RAT. PMID:26157223

  3. Effects of Therapy in Patients Suffering from Chronic Back Pain Treated with Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mosiewicz, Anna; Rutkowska, Elżbieta; Matacz, Monika; Mosiewicz, Barbara; Kaczmarczyk, Robert; Trojanowski, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Pain in the lumbosacral part of the spine in the course of degenerative disease is the most common cause of physical activity limitation in adults. Treatment includes pharmacotherapy, physiotherapy, psychotherapy, health promotion, and sometimes surgery. Surgical treatment is not always successful, and the various clinical and psychosomatic symptoms that result from surgical treatment failure are known as failed back surgery syndrome. For some patients with this condition, spinal cord stimulation can provide relief. The aim of the work was to define subjective and objective spinal cord stimulation effects by assessing chosen disability and physical activity limitation ratios. Pain intensity, level of disability, and presence of neurological symptoms were assessed. The examination was performed twice: before the stimulator implantation and at least 6 months postimplantation. The study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery and Paediatric Neurosurgery in Lublin. Thirty-six patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were recruited for this study. The Visual Analog Scale, modified Laitinen's pain questionnaire, and Oswestry Disability Index were used in this work. The study showed that spinal cord stimulation was effective in treating spinal and lower limb pain in 64% of patients, similar to results obtained in other departments. Although back pain and neuropathic pain radiating to the lower limbs decreased, moderate physical activity impairment was still observed according to the Oswestry Disability Index scale. The decrease in neuropathic pain radiating to the lower limbs had the most significant influence on reducing physical activity impairment. PMID:26187548

  4. Cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of double versus single cord blood transplantation in adults with acute leukemia in France

    PubMed Central

    Labopin, Myriam; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Gluckman, Eliane; Blaise, Didier; Mannone, Lionel; Milpied, Noel; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Deconinck, Eric; Michallet, Mauricette; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Nguyen, Stephanie; Cahn, Jean Yves; de Revel, Thierry; Garnier, Federico; Faucher, Catherine; Taright, Namik; Kenzey, Chantal; Volt, Fernanda; Bertrand, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Rocha, Vanderson

    2014-01-01

    Double cord blood transplantation extends the use of cord blood to adults for whom a single unit is not available, but the procedure is limited by its cost. To evaluate outcomes and cost-effectiveness of double compared to single cord blood transplantation, we analyzed 134 transplants in adults with acute leukemia in first remission. Transplants were performed in France with reduced intensity or myeloablative conditioning regimens. Costs were estimated from donor search to 1 year after transplantation. A Markov decision analysis model was used to calculate quality-adjusted life-years and cost-effectiveness ratio within 4 years. The overall survival at 2 years after single and double cord blood transplants was 42% versus 62%, respectively (P=0.03), while the leukemia-free-survival was 33% versus 53%, respectively (P=0.03). The relapse rate was 21% after double transplants and 42% after a single transplant (P=0.006). No difference was observed for non-relapse mortality or chronic graft-versus-host-disease. The estimated costs up to 1 year after reduced intensity conditioning for single and double cord blood transplantation were € 165,253 and €191,827, respectively. The corresponding costs after myeloablative conditioning were € 192,566 and € 213,050, respectively. Compared to single transplants, double cord blood transplantation was associated with supplementary costs of € 21,302 and € 32,420 up to 4 years, but with increases in quality-adjusted life-years of 0.616 and 0.484, respectively, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of € 34,581 and €66,983 in the myeloablative and reduced intensity conditioning settings, respectively. Our results showed that for adults with acute leukemia in first complete remission in France, double cord transplantation is more cost-effective than single cord blood transplantation, with better outcomes, including quality-adjusted life-years. PMID:24143000

  5. Effects of Wharton's jelly cells of the human umbilical cord on acute spinal cord injury in rats, and expression of interleukin-1β and nerve growth factor in spinal cord tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-08-01

    To study the effects of Wharton's jelly cells (WJCs) on acute spinal cord injury (SCI), 81 rats were divided into a sham surgery group, a model group, and a WJC transplantation group (n = 27). Motor functions of the model and WJC transplantation groups were partially recovered, and the recovery was better in the latter group. The WJC transplantation group had integral spinal cord tissues. Compared with the model group, the WJC transplantation group expressed significantly less interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and more nerve growth factor (NGF) (P < 0.05). WJC transplantation changed the microenvironment of the SCI site, inhibited IL-1β expression, increased NGF expression, promoted the recovery of neurological function, and relieved secondary SCI. PMID:25801039

  6. Beneficial effects of IL-37 after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Coll-Miró, Marina; Francos-Quijorna, Isaac; Santos-Nogueira, Eva; Torres-Espin, Abel; Bufler, Philip; Dinarello, Charles A; López-Vales, Rubèn

    2016-02-01

    IL-37, a member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immunity. Whether the antiinflammatory properties of IL-37 extend to the central nervous system remains unknown, however. In the present study, we subjected mice transgenic for human IL-37 (hIL-37tg) and wild-type (WT) mice to spinal cord contusion injury and then treated them with recombinant human IL-37 (rIL-37). In the hIL-37tg mice, the expression of IL-37 was barely detectable in the uninjured cords, but was strongly induced at 24 h and 72 h after the spinal cord injury (SCI). Compared with WT mice, hIL-37tg mice exhibited increased myelin and neuronal sparing and protection against locomotor deficits, including 2.5-fold greater speed in a forced treadmill challenge. Reduced levels of cytokines (e.g., an 80% reduction in IL-6) were observed in the injured cords of hIL-37tg mice, along with lower numbers of blood-borne neutrophils, macrophages, and activated microglia. We treated WT mice with a single intraspinal injection of either full-length or processed rIL-37 after the injury and found that the IL-37-treated mice had significantly enhanced locomotor skills in an open field using the Basso Mouse Scale, as well as supported faster speed on a mechanical treadmill. Treatment with both forms of rIL-37 led to similar beneficial effects on locomotor recovery after SCI. This study presents novel data indicating that IL-37 suppresses inflammation in a clinically relevant model of SCI, and suggests that rIL-37 may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of acute SCI. PMID:26787859

  7. Protective effect and mechanism of probucol in the treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W B; Wang, Y H; Sun, G F; Wu, J H

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of probucol on the treatment of spinal cord injury in rat, 80 rats were randomly divided into two groups of 40: a group treated with probucol and a control group. Allen's method was used to establish a rat model of spinal cord injury. After establishment, probucol (500 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) was intraperitoneally injected into the treatment group rats for 1 week, while the same amount of saline was used to treat the control group. On days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after treatment, the function of rats' spinal cord was evaluated according to the Bresnahan locomotor rating scale. Serum protein and mRNA levels of the cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-17] were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Protein levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17, and the downstream markers signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 and STAT-3 were measured using western blot. In addition, the oxidative stress-related parameters, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA), were also measured. It was found that compared to control group, rats from the treatment group had significantly lower levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 (P < 0.05) on days 1 and 7, as well as lower MDA levels and higher SOD activity on days 7, 21, and 28 (P < 0.05). In summary, probucol improved the recovery of locomotion function after spinal cord injury in rats through downregulation of inflammation and upregulation of anti-oxidative activity. PMID:26214485

  8. Effect of x rays and neutrons on repair and regeneration in the rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Kogel, A.J.; Sissingh, H.A.; Zoetelief, J.

    1982-12-01

    Clinical and experimental results of neutron irradiation have shown higher RBE values for the central nervous system (CNS) than for most other normal tissues. This is because of a considerable impairment of the large capacity of the CNS to repair subeffective damage induced by low LET radiation. Decreasing the dose per fraction of X rays increases the CNS tolerance significantly; this has no effect for neutrons. In the cervical spinal cord and the brain, two types of delayed damage can be described, so-called early and late. Different target cells are assumed to be involved, oligodendroglial cells in the early, and vascular endothelium in the late type. In the lumbar cord, the main lesion is nerve root necrosis, with the Schwann cell as the most probable target. These target cells show differences in response to X rays and neutrons, resulting in different RBE values. The highest RBE is obtained for cervical white matter necrosis. In addition to cellular repair of subeffective damage, long-term tissue regeneration is observed in the spinal cord, beginning at different times for the various types of damage. With neutrons, the rate of long-term regeneration is at least similar, or even more pronounced than for X rays.

  9. Effect of x rays and neutrons on repair and regeneration in the rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kogel, A.J.; Sissingh, H.A.; Zoetelief, J.

    1982-12-01

    Clinical and experimental results of neutron irradiation have shown higher RBE values for the central nervous system (CNS) than for most other normal tissues. This is because of a considerable impairment of a large capacity of the CNS to repair subeffective damage induced by low LET radiation. Decreasing the dose per fraction of X rays increases the CNS tolerance significantly; this has no effect for neutrons. In the cervical spinal cord and the brain, two types of delayed damage can be described, so-called early and late. Different target cells are assumed to be involved, oligodendroglial cells in the early, and vascular endothelim in the late type. In the lumbar cord, the main lesion is nerve root necrosis, with the Schwann cell as the most probable target. These target cells show differences in response to X rays and neutrons, resulting in different RBE values. The highest RBE is obtained for cervical white matter necrosis. In addition to cellular repair of subeffective damage, long-term tissue regeneration is observed in the spinal cord, beginning at different times for the various types of damage. With neutrons, the rate of long-term regeneration is at least similar, or even more pronounced than for X rays.

  10. Effect of Robotic-Assisted Gait Training in Patients With Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Ji Yong; Park, Han Kyul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of robotic-assisted gait training (RAGT) compared to conventional overground training. Methods Sixty patients with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial by comparing RAGT to conventional overground training. The RAGT group received RAGT three sessions per week at duration of 40 minutes with regular physiotherapy in 4 weeks. The conventional group underwent regular physiotherapy twice a day, 5 times a week. Main outcomes were lower extremity motor score of American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (LEMS), ambulatory motor index (AMI), Spinal Cord Independence Measure III mobility section (SCIM3-M), and walking index for spinal cord injury version II (WISCI-II) scale. Results At the end of rehabilitation, both groups showed significant improvement in LEMS, AMI, SCIM3-M, and WISCI-II. Based on WISCI-II, statistically significant improvement was observed in the RAGT group. For the remaining variables, no difference was found. Conclusion RAGT combined with conventional physiotherapy could yield more improvement in ambulatory function than conventional therapy alone. RAGT should be considered as one additional tool to provide neuromuscular reeducation in patient with incomplete SCI. PMID:25566469

  11. Time-related changes of motor unit properties in the rat medial gastrocnemius muscle after the spinal cord injury. II. Effects of a spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Celichowski, Jan; Kryściak, Katarzyna; Krutki, Piotr; Majczyński, Henryk; Górska, Teresa; Sławińska, Urszula

    2010-06-01

    The contractile properties of motor units (MUs) were investigated in the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle in rats after the spinal cord hemisection at a low thoracic level. Hemisected animals were divided into 4 groups: 14, 30, 90 and 180 days after injury. Intact rats formed a control group. The mass of the MG muscle did not change significantly after spinal cord hemisection, hind limb locomotor pattern was almost unchanged starting from two weeks after injury, but contractile properties of MUs were however altered. Contraction time (CT) and half-relaxation time (HRT) of MUs were prolonged in all investigated groups of hemisected rats. The twitch-to-tetanus ratio (Tw/Tet) of fast MUs after the spinal cord hemisection increased. For slow MUs Tw/Tet values did not change in the early stage after the injury, but significantly decreased in rats 90 and 180 days after hemisection. As a result of hemisection the fatigue resistance especially of slow and fast resistant MU types was reduced, as well as fatigue index (Fat I) calculated for the whole examined population of MUs decreased progressively with the time. After spinal cord hemisection a reduced number of fast MUs presented the sag at frequencies 30 and 40 Hz, however more of them revealed sag in 20 Hz tetanus in comparison to control group. Due to considerable changes in twitch contraction time and disappearance of sag effect in unfused tetani of some MUs in hemisected animals, the classification of MUs in all groups of rats was based on the 20 Hz tetanus index (20 Hz Tet I) but not on the standard criteria usually applied for MUs classification. MU type differentiations demonstrated some clear changes in MG muscle composition in hemisected animals consisting of an increase in the proportion of slow MUs (likely due to an increased participation of the studied muscle in tonic antigravity activity) together with an increase in the percentage of fast fatigable MUs. PMID:19679495

  12. Non-transecting bulbar urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andrich, Daniela E.; Mundy, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    Excision and end-to-end anastomosis (EPA) has been the preferred urethroplasty technique for short bulbar strictures and is associated with an excellent functional outcome. Driven by concerns over the potential morbidity associated with dividing the urethra, therefore compromising spongiosal blood flow, as well as spongiofibrosis being superficial in the majority of non-traumatic bulbar strictures, the non-transecting technique for bulbar urethroplasty has been developed with the aim of achieving the same success as EPA without the morbidity associated with transection. This manuscript highlights the fundamental principles underlying the ongoing debate—transection or non-transection of the strictured bulbar urethra? The potential advantages of avoiding dividing the corpus spongiosum of the urethra are discussed. The non-transecting anastomotic procedure together with its various modifications are decribed in detail. Our experience with this technique is presented. Non-transecting excision of spongiofibrosis with preservation of well vascularised underlying spongiosum provides an excellent alternative to dividing the urethra during urethroplasty for short non-traumatic proximal bulbar strictures. PMID:26816808

  13. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  16. Effects of high dose intraperitoneal cytosine arabinoside on the radiation tolerance of the rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Menten, J.; Landuyt, W.; van der Kogel, A.J.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.

    1989-07-01

    The effect of intraperitoneal high dose (9 g/kg) cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) on the early delayed radiation response of the rat cervical spinal cord has been studied. When given 2 hrs before irradiation, systemically administered Ara-C significantly reduces the isoeffect doses for the induction of paralysis due to white matter necrosis by a factor of approximately 1.2 for both a single irradiation treatment and for a two fraction irradiation with 24 hr interval. No effect on the latency time to develop paralysis was recorded.

  17. Hyaluronic acid scaffold has a neuroprotective effect in hemisection spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kushchayev, Sergiy V; Giers, Morgan B; Hom Eng, Doris; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Mortazavi, Martin M; Theodore, Nicholas; Panitch, Alyssa; Preul, Mark C

    2016-07-01

    neuroprotective effect on the spinal cord by decreasing the magnitude of secondary injury after a lacerating spinal cord injury. Although regeneration and behavioral improvement were not observed, the reduction in disorganized scar tissue and the retention of neurons near and above the lesion are important for future regenerative efforts. In addition, this gel would be useful as the base substrate in the development of a more complex scaffold. PMID:26943251

  18. Effects of Gestational Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Methylation Status of Leptin Promoter in the Placenta and Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yan, Feng-Shan; Lian, Jian-Min; Dou, She-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used for diagnosis in gestational women. Though it has several advantages, animal and human studies on the safety of MRI for the fetus remain inconclusive. Epigenetic modifications, which are crucial for cellular functioning, are prone to being affected by environmental changes. Therefore, we hypothesized that MRI during gestation may cause epigenetic modification alterations. Here, we investigated DNA methylation patterns of leptin promoter in the placenta and cord blood of women exposed to MRI during gestation. Results showed that average methylation levels of leptin in the placenta and cord blood were not affected by MRI. We also found that the methylation levels in the placenta and cord blood were not affected by different magnetic fields (1.5T and 3.0T MRI). However, if pregnant women were exposed to MRI at 15 to 20 weeks of gestation, the methylation level of leptin in cord blood was visibly lower than that of pregnant women exposed to MRI after 20-weeks of gestation (P = 0.037). mRNA expression level of leptin in cord blood was also altered, though mRNA expression of leptin in the placenta was not significantly affected. Therefore, we concluded that gestational MRI may not have major effects on the methylation level of leptin in cord blood and the placenta except for MRI applied before 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:26789724

  19. SIKVAV-modified highly superporous PHEMA scaffolds with oriented pores for spinal cord injury repair.

    PubMed

    Kubinová, Šárka; Horák, Daniel; Hejčl, Aleš; Plichta, Zdeněk; Kotek, Jiří; Proks, Vladimír; Forostyak, Serhiy; Syková, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The architecture and mechanical properties of a scaffold for spinal cord injury treatment must provide tissue integration as well as effective axonal regeneration. Previous work has demonstrated the cell-adhesive and growth-promoting properties of the SIKVAV (Ser-Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val)-modified highly superporous poly(2-hydroxethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) hydrogels. The aim of the current study was to optimize the porosity and mechanical properties of this type of hydrogel in order to develop a suitable scaffold for the repair of spinal cord tissue. Three types of highly superporous PHEMA hydrogels with oriented pores of ~60 µm diameter, porosities of 57-68% and equivalent stiffness characterized by elasticity moduli in the range 3-45 kPa were implanted into a spinal cord hemisection, and their integration into the host tissue, as well as the extent of axonal ingrowth into the scaffold pores, were histologically evaluated. The best tissue response was found with a SIKVAV-modified PHEMA hydrogel with 68% porosity and a moderate modulus of elasticity (27 kPa in the direction along the pores and 3.6 kPa in the perpendicular direction). When implanted into a spinal cord transection, the hydrogel promoted tissue bridging as well as aligned axonal ingrowth. In conclusion, a prospective oriented scaffold architecture of SIKVAV-modified PHEMA hydrogels has been developed for spinal cord injury repair; however, to develop an effective treatment for spinal cord injury, multiple therapeutic approaches are needed. PMID:23401421

  20. Spinal Cord Lesion: Effects of and Perspectives for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, V.

    2001-01-01

    Following central motor lesions, two forms of adaptation can be observed which lead to improved mobility: (1) the development of spastic muscle tone, and (2) the activation of spinal locomotor centers induced by specific treadmill training. Tension development during spastic gait is different from that during normal gait and appears to be independent of exaggerated monosynaptic stretch reflexes. Exaggerated stretch reflexes are associated with an absence or reduction of functionally essential polysynaptic reflexes. When supraspinal control of spinal reflexes is impaired, the inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes is missing in addition to a reduced facilitation of polysynaptic reflexes. Therefore, overall leg muscle activity becomes reduced and less well modulated in patients with spasticity. Electrophysiologicai and histological studies have shown that a transformation of motor units takes place following central motor lesions with the consequence that regulation of muscle tone is achieved at a lower level of neuronal organization which in turn enables the patient to walk. Based on observations of the locomotor capacity of the spinal cat, recent studies have indicated that spinal locomotor centers can be activated and trained in patients with complete or incomplete paraplegia when the body is partially unloaded. However, the level of electromyographic activity in the gastrocnemius (the main antigravity muscle during gait) is considerably lower in the patients compared to healthy subjects. During the course of a daily locomotor training program, the amplitude of gastrocnemius, electromyographic activity increases significantly during the stance phase, while inappropriate tibialis anterior activation decreases. Patients with incomplete paraplegia benefit from such training programs such that their walking ability on a stationary surface improves. The pathophysiology and functional significance of spastic muscle tone and the effects of treadmill training on the

  1. Effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on spinal cord tissue after experimental contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Sanli, A Metin; Serbes, Gökhan; Calişkan, Murat; Kaptanoğlu, Erkan; Sargon, Mustafa F; Kilinç, Kamer; Beşalti, Omer; Sekerci, Zeki

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the early effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and ultrastructural findings in rats after spinal cord injury (SCI). We also compared the effects of G-CSF and methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS). Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control, SCI alone (50 g/cm weight drop trauma), SCI+MPSS (30 mg/kg), and SCI+G-CSF (50 μg/kg). Administration of G-CSF and MPSS significantly decreased LPO (p < 0.05) and MPO activity (p < 0.05) in the first 24 hours. MPSS was more effective than G-CSF in reducing LPO (p < 0.05) and in minimizing ultrastructure changes. The results of this study indicate that G-CSF exerts a beneficial effect by decreasing MPO activity and LPO and may reduce tissue damage in the first 24 hours after SCI. Our findings do not exclude the possibility that G-CSF has a protective effect on spinal cord ultrastructure after the first 24 hours following SCI. PMID:20801040

  2. Neuroprotective Effect of Erythropoietin in Postoperation Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Nekoui, Alireza; Del Carmen Escalante Tresierra, Violeta; Abdolmohammadi, Sadegh; Shedid, Daniel; Blaise, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: New research shows shown that erythropoietin has neuro-protective effects. In preclinical trial and human clinical trials, it was demonstrated that erythropoietin is effective treatment for spinal cord injury. Early administration of medications after injury increases the hope of attenuating secondary damage and maximizing an improved outcome. Case presentation: A 42-year-old female patient presented with gait instability and progressive weakness in her right leg over a 6-year period. She was diagnosed as myelomalacia and was candidate for cervical discectomy. After surgery, she suffered from right hemiplegia due to spinal cord injury that did not respond well to routine treatment. Darbepoetin alpha (Aranesp) 100 mcg, subcutaneous daily for three days, was added to the patient’s treatment seven days after trauma and resulted in rapid improvement. The patient recovered progressively and was discharged from the hospital ten days after erythropoietin therapy. Conclusions: This case report supports the beneficial role of erythropoietin in function, maintenance, and recovery of neurons. Erythropoietin is a double-edge sword, as long-term erythropoietin therapy has some complications, like thromboembolism and stroke. Recent studies suggested that erythropoietin should be given as single high dose to exert a rapid neuro-protective effect with minimal hematopoietic side effects. We believe that the effects and other adverse consequences of erythropoietin and its non-erythropoietic derivatives should be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26705520

  3. Transcriptome analyses reveal molecular mechanisms underlying functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongmei; Ge, Weihong; Zhang, Aifeng; Xi, Yue; Chen, Zhihua; Luo, Dandan; Cheng, Yin; Fan, Kevin S.; Horvath, Steve; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Cheng, Liming; Yang, Zhaoyang; Sun, Yi E.; Li, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is considered incurable because axonal regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely challenging, due to harsh CNS injury environment and weak intrinsic regeneration capability of CNS neurons. We discovered that neurotrophin-3 (NT3)-loaded chitosan provided an excellent microenvironment to facilitate nerve growth, new neurogenesis, and functional recovery of completely transected spinal cord in rats. To acquire mechanistic insight, we conducted a series of comprehensive transcriptome analyses of spinal cord segments at the lesion site, as well as regions immediately rostral and caudal to the lesion, over a period of 90 days after SCI. Using weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA), we established gene modules/programs corresponding to various pathological events at different times after SCI. These objective measures of gene module expression also revealed that enhanced new neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and reduced inflammatory responses were keys to conferring the effect of NT3-chitosan on regeneration. PMID:26460053

  4. Transcriptome analyses reveal molecular mechanisms underlying functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Ge, Weihong; Zhang, Aifeng; Xi, Yue; Chen, Zhihua; Luo, Dandan; Cheng, Yin; Fan, Kevin S; Horvath, Steve; Sofroniew, Michael V; Cheng, Liming; Yang, Zhaoyang; Sun, Yi E; Li, Xiaoguang

    2015-10-27

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is considered incurable because axonal regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely challenging, due to harsh CNS injury environment and weak intrinsic regeneration capability of CNS neurons. We discovered that neurotrophin-3 (NT3)-loaded chitosan provided an excellent microenvironment to facilitate nerve growth, new neurogenesis, and functional recovery of completely transected spinal cord in rats. To acquire mechanistic insight, we conducted a series of comprehensive transcriptome analyses of spinal cord segments at the lesion site, as well as regions immediately rostral and caudal to the lesion, over a period of 90 days after SCI. Using weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA), we established gene modules/programs corresponding to various pathological events at different times after SCI. These objective measures of gene module expression also revealed that enhanced new neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and reduced inflammatory responses were keys to conferring the effect of NT3-chitosan on regeneration. PMID:26460053

  5. Spinal cord influences on the colonic myoelectrical activity of fed and fasted rats.

    PubMed Central

    Du, C; Ferré, J P; Ruckebusch, Y

    1987-01-01

    1. The myoelectrical activity of the large intestine of fed and fasted rats was recorded with chronically implanted nichrome wire electrodes after destruction of the spinal cord, after spinal cord transection, and after spinal anaesthesia. 2. After spinal cord ablation, the cyclical organization of the colonic electrical spiking activity, as well as the gastrocolic reflex and accompanying postprandial enhancement of the cyclical pattern of activity, persisted on the proximal and distal colon. On the transverse colon, however, the spiking activity was considerably increased. This latter effect obliterated the gastrocolic response due to feeding but not the subsequent postprandial enhancement of the cyclical pattern of activity. 3. After spinal cord transection, the level of spiking activity also increased on both the transverse and distal colon, but no major changes in cyclical activity or in postprandial responses were recorded. 4. Spinal anaesthesia produced by intrathecal lidocaine increased the motility of the transverse colon to a level which masked the gastrocolic reflex. 5. These results suggest a prevertebral ganglia and/or a local control mechanism for the cyclical organization of the spiking activity of the colon. The central control mechanisms involve mostly spinal inhibitory influences on the transverse colon and supraspinal inhibitory influences on the distal colon. PMID:3656127

  6. Proprioceptive neuropathy affects normalization of the H-reflex by exercise after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Keeler, Benjamin E.; Siegfried, Rachel; Houlé, John D.; Lemay, Michel A.

    2009-01-01

    The H-reflex habituates at relatively low frequency (10 Hz) stimulation in the intact spinal cord, but loss of descending inhibition resulting from spinal cord transection reduces this habituation. There is a return towards a normal pattern of low-frequency habituation in the reflex activity with cycling exercise of the affected hind limbs. This implies that repetitive passive stretching of the muscles in spinalized animals and the accompanying stimulation of large (Group I and II) proprioceptive fibers has modulatory effects on spinal cord reflexes after injury. To test this hypothesis, we induced pyridoxine neurotoxicity that preferentially affects large dorsal root ganglia neurons in intact and spinalized rats. Pyridoxine or saline injections were given twice daily (IP) for 6 weeks and half of the spinalized animals were subjected to cycling exercise during that period. After 6 weeks, the tibial nerve was stimulated electrically and recordings of M and H waves were made from interosseous muscles of the hind paw. Results show that pyridoxine treatment completely eliminated the H-reflex in spinal intact animals. In contrast, transection paired with pyridoxine treatment resulted in a reduction of the frequency-dependent habituation of the H-reflex that was not affected by exercise. These results indicate that normal Group I and II afferent input is critical to achieve exercise-based reversal of hyper-reflexia of the H-reflex after spinal cord injury. PMID:19913536

  7. Cord Blood and Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ways to give How your gift saves lives Donate cord blood Cord blood is changing lives Federal cord blood ... Cord blood options Sibling directed donation How to donate cord blood Participating hospitals Cord blood FAQs Learn if you ...

  8. Antinociceptive effect of ambroxol in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain.

    PubMed

    Hama, Aldric T; Plum, Ann Woodhouse; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2010-12-01

    Symptoms of neuropathic spinal cord injury (SCI) pain include evoked cutaneous hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain, which can be present below the level of the injury. Adverse side-effects obtained with currently available analgesics complicate effective pain management in SCI patients. Voltage-gated Na(+) channels expressed in primary afferent nociceptors have been identified to mediate persistent hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, which in part underlies the symptoms of nerve injury-induced pain. Ambroxol has previously demonstrated antinociceptive effects in rat chronic pain models and has also shown to potently block Na(+) channel current in DRG neurons. Ambroxol was tested in rats that underwent a mid-thoracic spinal cord compression injury. Injured rats demonstrated robust hind paw (below-level) heat and mechanical hypersensitivity. Orally administered ambroxol significantly attenuated below-level hypersensitivity at doses that did not affect performance on the rotarod test. Intrathecal injection of ambroxol did not ameliorate below-level hypersensitivity. The current data suggest that ambroxol could be effective for clinical neuropathic SCI pain. Furthermore, the data suggest that peripherally expressed Na(+) channels could lend themselves as targets for the development of pharmacotherapies for SCI pain. PMID:20732348

  9. Antinociceptive effect of ambroxol in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Aldric T.; Plum, Ann Woodhouse; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Symptoms of neuropathic spinal cord injury (SCI) pain include evoked cutaneous hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain, which can be present below the level of the injury. Adverse side-effects obtained with currently available analgesics complicate effective pain management in SCI patients. Voltage-gated Na+ channels expressed in primary afferent nociceptors have been identified to mediate persistent hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, which in part underlies the symptoms of nerve injury-induced pain. Ambroxol has previously demonstrated antinociceptive effects in rat chronic pain models and has also shown to potently block Na+ channel current in DRG neurons. Ambroxol was tested in rats that underwent a mid-thoracic spinal cord compression injury. Injured rats demonstrated robust hind paw (below-level) heat and mechanical hypersensitivity. Orally administered ambroxol significantly attenuated below-level hypersensitivity at doses that did not affect performance on the rotarod test. Intrathecal injection of ambroxol did not ameliorate below-level hypersensitivity. The current data suggest that ambroxol could be effective for clinical neuropathic SCI pain. Furthermore, the data suggests that peripherally expressed Na+ channels could lend themselves as targets for the development of pharmacotherapies for SCI pain. PMID:20732348

  10. Effects of polarization in low-level laser therapy of spinal cord injury in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Obara, Minoru

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a promising approach to treat the spinal cord injury (SCI). Since nerve fibers have optical anisotropy, propagation of light in the spinal tissue might be affected by its polarization direction. However, the effect of polarization on the efficacy of LLLT has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of polarization on the efficacy of near-infrared LLLT for SCI. Rat spinal cord was injured with a weight-drop device. The lesion site was irradiated with an 808-nm diode laser beam that was transmitted through a polarizing filter immediately after injury and daily for five consecutive days. The laser power at the injured spinal cord surface was 25 mW, and the dosage per day was 9.6 J/cm2 (spot diameter, 2 cm; irradiation duration, 1200 s). Functional recovery was assessed daily by an open-field test. The results showed that the functional scores of the SCI rats that were treated with 808-nm laser irradiation were significantly higher than those of the SCI alone group (Group 1) from day 5 after injury, regardless of the polarization direction. Importantly, as compared to the locomotive function of the SCI rats that were treated with the perpendicularly-polarized laser parallel to the spinal column (Group 2), that of the SCI rats that were irradiated with the linearly aligned polarization (Group 3) was significantly improved from day 10 after injury. In addition, the ATP contents in the injured spinal tissue of Group 3, which were measured immediately after laser irradiation, were moderately higher than those of Group 2. These observations are attributable to the deeper penetration of the parallelpolarized light in the anisotropic spinal tissue, suggesting that polarization direction significantly affects the efficacy of LLLT for SCI.

  11. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on long-term human cord blood monocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Orcel, P.; Bielakoff, J.; De Vernejoul, M.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) modulates growth and differentiation in many cell types and is abundant in bone matrix. We recently showed that human cord blood monocytes cultured in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 acquire some features of osteoclast precursors. Since TGF-beta has been shown to influence bone resorption in organ culture, we have studied the effect of TGF-beta (1-1,000 pg/ml) on cord blood monocyte cultures. These cells were cultured on plastic substrate during 3 weeks in the presence of 20% horse serum and 10(-9) M 1,25(OH)2D3. TGF-beta, from a concentration of 10 pg/ml in the culture medium, decreased in a dose dependent manner the formation of multinucleated cells. At a concentration of TGF-beta of 1 ng/ml, the multinucleated cells were reduced to 2.1% +/- 0.3%, compared to 19.3% +/- 1.5% in control cultures. TGF-beta inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the proliferation of cord blood monocytes as assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation at 7 and 14 days of culture. The fusion index was also decreased by 3 weeks of treatment with TGF-beta. Indomethacin did not reverse the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta. The expression of the osteoclastic phenotype was assessed using two different antibodies: 23C6, a monoclonal antibody directed against the vitronectin receptor, which is highly expressed by osteoclasts but not by adult monocytes, and an antibody to HLA-DR, which is not present on osteoclast. TGF-beta decreased the expression of HLA-DR and increased in a dose-dependent manner the proportion of 23C6-labeled cells; these results suggest that TGF-beta could modulate a differentiation effect to the osteoclastic phenotype. However, when cord blood monocytes were cultured on devitalized rat calvariae prelabeled with 45Ca, TGF-beta did not induce any 45Ca release from bone cultured with monocytes.

  12. Attenuating effect of standardized fruit extract of punica granatum L in rat model of tibial and sural nerve transection induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Injury to a nerve is the most common reason of acquired peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, searching for effective substance to recover of nerve after injury is need of present era. The current study investigates the protective potential of Standardized Fruit Extract of Punica granatum L (PFE) [Ellagic acid (41.6%), Punicalagins (10%), Granatin (5.1%)] in Tibial & Sural Nerve Transection (TST) induced neuropathic pain in rats. Methods TST was performed by sectioning tibial and sural nerve portions of the sciatic nerve and leaving the common peroneal nerve intact. Acetone drop, pin-prick, hot plate, paint brush & Walking Track tests were performed to assess cold allodynia; mechanical heat, hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia & tibial functional index respectively. The levels of TNF-α, TBARS, GSH and Nitrite were measured in the sciatic nerve as an index of inflammation & oxidative stress. Results TST led to significant development of cold allodynia; mechanical and heat hyperalgesia; dynamic mechanical allodynia; functional deficit in walking along with rise in the levels of TBARS, TNF-α, GSH and Nitrite. Administrations of PFE (100 & 300 mg/kg oral), significantly attenuate TST induced behavioral & biochemical changes. Pretreatments of BADGE (120 mg/kg IP) a PPAR-γ antagonist and nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (100 mg/kg IP) abolished the protective effect of PFE. Whereas, pretreatment of L-NAME (5 mg/kg IP) a NOS inhibitor significantly potentiated PFE’s protective effect of PFE. Conclusion PFE shown to have attenuating effect in TST induced neuropathic pain which may be attributed to potential PPAR-gamma agonistic activity, nitric oxide inhibitory, anti-inflammatory and anti oxidative actions. PMID:24499201

  13. Local and Remote Growth Factor Effects After Primate Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J.H.; Rosenzweig, E.S.; Blesch, A.; Moseanko, R.; Havton, L.A.; Edgerton, V.R.; Tuszynski, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Primate models of spinal cord injury differ from rodent models in several respects, including the relative size and functional neuroanatomy of spinal projections. Fundamental differences in scale raise the possibility that retrograde injury signals, and treatments applied at the level of the spinal cord that exhibit efficacy in rodents, may fail to influence neurons at the far greater distances of primate systems. Thus, we examined both local and remote neuronal responses to neurotrophic factor-secreting cell grafts placed within sites of right C7 hemisection lesions in the rhesus macaque. Six months after gene delivery of BDNF and NT-3 into C7 lesion sites, we found both local effects of growth factors on axonal growth, and remote effects of growth factors reflected in significant reductions in axotomy-induced atrophy of large pyramidal neurons within the primary motor cortex. Further examination in a rodent model suggested that BDNF, rather than NT-3, mediated remote protection of corticospinal neurons in the brain. Thus, injured neural systems retain the ability to respond to growth signals over the extended distances of the primate CNS, promoting local axonal growth and preventing lesion-induced neuronal degeneration at a distance. Remote cortical effects of spinally-administered growth factors could “prime” the neuron to respond to experimental therapies that promote axonal plasticity or regeneration. PMID:20660255

  14. Raman-based imaging uncovers the effects of alginate hydrogel implants in spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Roberta; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Koch, Maria; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Uckermann, Ortrud; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Gelinsky, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of spinal cord injury by using implants that provide a permissive environment for axonal growth is in the focus of the research for regenerative therapies. Here, Raman-based label-free techniques were applied for the characterization of morphochemical properties of surgically induced spinal cord injury in the rat that received an implant of soft unfunctionalized alginate hydrogel. Raman microspectroscopy followed by chemometrics allowed mapping the different degenerative areas, while multimodal multiphoton microscopy (e.g. the combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), endogenous two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation on the same platform) enabled to address the morphochemistry of the tissue at cellular level. The regions of injury, characterized by demyelination and scarring, were retrieved and the distribution of key tissue components was evaluated by Raman mapping. The alginate hydrogel was detected in the lesion up to six months after implantation and had positive effects on the nervous tissue. For instance, multimodal multiphoton microscopy complemented the results of Raman mapping, providing the micromorphology of lipid-rich tissue structures by CARS and enabling to discern lipid-rich regions that contained myelinated axons from degenerative regions characterized by myelin fragmentation and presence of foam cells. These findings demonstrate that Raman-based imaging methods provide useful information for the evaluation of alginate implant effects and have therefore the potential to contribute to new strategies for monitoring degenerative and regenerative processes induced in SCI, thereby improving the effectiveness of therapies.

  15. Effects of erythropoietin on posttraumatic place learning in fimbria-fornix transected rats after a 30-day postoperative pause.

    PubMed

    Malá, Hana; Rodriguez Castro, Maria; Dall Jørgensen, Katrine; Mogensen, Jesper

    2007-10-01

    Human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects following both vascular and mechanical brain injury. Previously, we showed that behavioral symptoms associated with mechanical lesions of the hippocampus are nearly abolished due to EPO treatment. In these studies, the EPO administration took place simultaneously with the infliction of brain injury and the rehabilitation training started 6-7 days postoperatively. In the present study, we tested whether the therapeutic effect of EPO on the acquisition of an allocentric eight-arm radial maze spatial task also manifests itself if the rehabilitative training is postponed. Postoperatively, the animals were left without any specific stimulation for 30 days. The current results show an improved behavioral performance of the EPO-treated lesioned group relative to the saline-treated lesioned group, and confirm EPO's therapeutic effect even in case of postponed rehabilitation. However, compared to the control group, the EPO-treated lesioned group demonstrated an impaired task acquisition. All subjects eventually recovered functionally. Subsequently, the animals were given behavioral challenges during which the cue constellation in the room was changed. The challenges revealed that, although the EPO-treated lesion group had achieved the same level of task proficiency as the control group, the cognitive mechanisms mediating the task performance in the EPO-treated lesion group (as well as in the saline-treated lesion group) were dissimilar from those mediating the task in the control group. Both the EPO-treated and the saline-treated lesion group demonstrated an increased dependency on the original cue configuration. PMID:17970627

  16. Sustaining intrinsic growth capacity of adult neurons promotes spinal cord regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Skinner, Kate; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2005-11-01

    The peripheral axonal branch of primary sensory neurons readily regenerates after peripheral nerve injury, but the central branch, which courses in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, does not. However, if a peripheral nerve is transected before a spinal cord injury, sensory neurons that course in the dorsal columns will regenerate, presumably because their intrinsic growth capacity is enhanced by the priming peripheral nerve lesion. As the effective priming lesion is made before the spinal cord injury it would clearly have no clinical utility, and unfortunately, a priming lesion made after a spinal cord injury results in an abortive regenerative response. Here, we show that two priming lesions, one made at the time of a spinal cord injury and a second 1 week after a spinal cord injury, in fact, promote dramatic regeneration, within and beyond the lesion. The first lesion, we hypothesize, enhances intrinsic growth capacity, and the second one sustains it, providing a paradigm for promoting CNS regeneration after injury. primary afferents | dorsal columns | neurite outgrowth | sprouting | priming

  17. The effect of NGF depletion on the neurotropic influence exerted by the distal stump following nerve transection.

    PubMed Central

    Doubleday, B; Robinson, P P

    1995-01-01

    Following nerve section, regenerating axons from the proximal stump grow preferentially towards the distal stump. It has been postulated that this may result from the release of a neurotropic factor. To investigate whether the protein nerve growth factor (NGF) plays such a role, we immunised adult rats against NGF and examined the effect on regeneration of sectioned nerves through Y-shaped silastic tubes towards either the distal stump or an empty arm. Regeneration through the tubes was assessed electrophysiologically and the number of myelinated and nonmyelinated fibres at different sites was quantified using electron microscopy. There was electrophysiological evidence of regeneration towards the distal nerve stump in all the animals and there was no significant difference between the immunised and control animals in the size of compound action potential (CAP) ratios. Histologically, the majority of axons were found to have regenerated towards the distal nerve stump in 9/10 of the control animals and 7/9 of the immunised animals and there was no significant difference between the two groups in the numbers of regenerating myelinated or unmyelinated axons. However, in the immunised animals both myelinated and unmyelinated axons were slightly but significantly smaller and the myelin sheaths were thinner than in the control animals. In 2 immunised animals and none of the controls a small CAP was recorded while stimulating distal to the 'empty arm' and the presence of a small number of myelinated and unmyelinated axons was confirmed histologically. We conclude that as depletion of NGF does not block the preferential growth of regenerating axons towards the distal nerve stump it does not play the major neurotropic role in nerve regeneration. The reduction in size and myelin thickness of the regenerated axons after immunisation confirms the neurotrophic effects of NGF. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7559132

  18. The Effects of Difumarate Salt S-15176 after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tunçdemir, Matem; Kelten, Bilal; Akdemir, Osman; Karaoğlan, Alper; Taşdemiroğlu, Erol

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the present study we analyzed neuroprotective and antiapoptotic effect of the difumarate salt S-15176, as an anti-ischemic, an antioxidant and a stabilizer of mitochondrial membrane in secondary damage following spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Methods Three groups were performed with 30 Wistar rats; control (1), trauma (2), and a trauma+S-15176 (10 mg/kg i.p., dimethyl sulfoxide) treatment (3). SCI was performed at the thoracic level using the weight-drop technique. Spinal cord tissues were collected following intracardiac perfusion in 3rd and 7th days of posttrauma. Hematoxylin and eosin staining for histopatology, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay for apoptotic cells and immunohistochemistry for proapoptotic cytochrome-c, Bax and caspase 9 were performed to all groups. Functional recovery test were applied to each group in 3rd and 7th days following SCI. Results In trauma group, edematous regions, diffuse hemorrhage, necrosis, leukocyte infiltration and severe degeneration in motor neurons were observed prominently in gray matter. The number of apoptotic cells was significantly higher (p<0.05) than control group. In the S-15176-treated groups, apoptotic cell number in 3rd and 7th days (p<0.001), also cytochrome-c (p<0.001), Bax (p<0.001) and caspase 9 immunoreactive cells (p<0.001) were significantly decreased in number compared to trauma groups. Hemorrhage and edema in the focal areas were also noticed in gray matter of treatment groups. Results of the locomotor test were significantly increased in treatment group (p<0.05) when compared to trauma groups. Conclusion We suggest that difumarate salt S-15176 prevents mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis and protects spinal cord from secondary injury and helps to preserve motor function following SCI in rats. PMID:26180614

  19. Transition from fetal to neonatal circulation: Modeling the effect of umbilical cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Mehmet B; Kowalski, William J; Hutchon, David J R; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-06-25

    Hemodynamics of the fetal to neonatal transition are orchestrated through complex physiological changes and results in cardiovascular adaptation to the adult biventricular circulation. Clinical practice during this critical period can influence vital organ physiology for normal newborns, premature babies and congenital heart defect patients. Particularly, the timing of the cord clamping procedure, immediate (ICC) vs. delayed cord clamping (DCC), is hypothesized to be an important factor for the transitory fetal hemodynamics. The clinical need for a quantitative understanding of this physiology motivated the development of a lumped parameter model (LPM) of the fetal cardio-respiratory system covering the late-gestation to neonatal period. The LPM was validated with in vivo clinical data and then used to predict the effects of cord clamping procedures on hemodynamics and vital gases. Clinical time-dependent resistance functions to simulate the vascular changes were introduced. For DCC, placental transfusion (31.3 ml) increased neonatal blood volume by 11.7%. This increased blood volume is reflected in an increase in preload pressures by ~20% compared to ICC, which in turn increased the cardiac output (CO) by 20% (COICC=993 ml/min; CODCC=1197 ml/min). Our model accurately predicted dynamic flow patterns in vivo. DCC was shown to maintain oxygenation if the onset of pulmonary respiration was delayed or impaired. On the other hand, a significant 25% decrease in oxygen saturations was observed when applying ICC under the same physiological conditions. We conclude that DCC has a significant impact on newborn hemodynamics, mainly because of the improved blood volume and the sustained placental respiration. PMID:25773588

  20. Protective effect of rosemary on acrylamide motor neurotoxicity in spinal cord of rat offspring: postnatal follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Gholam, Marwa A.; El-Mehi, Abeer E.; El-Barbary, Abd El-Moneum; Fokar, Ahmed Zo El

    2016-01-01

    The direct interactive effects of rosemary and acrylamide on the development of motor neurons in the spinal cord remains unknown. Our goal is to confirm the protective effects of rosemary against motor neuronal degeneration induced by acrylamide in the developing postnatal rat spinal cord using a postnatal rat model. We assigned the offspring of treated female rats into control, rosemary; acrylamide group; and recovery groups. This work depended on clinical, histopathological, morphometrically, immunohistochemical and genetic methods. In the acrylamide group, we observed oxidation, motor neuron degeneration, apoptosis, myelin degeneration, neurofilament reduction, reactive gliosis. Whoever, concomitant rosemary intake and withdrawal of acrylamide modulate these effects. These findings proof that dietary rosemary can directly protect motor neuron against acrylamide toxicity in the mammalian developing spinal cord. PMID:27051566

  1. Protective effect of rosemary on acrylamide motor neurotoxicity in spinal cord of rat offspring: postnatal follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Al-Gholam, Marwa A; Nooh, Hanaa Zakaria; El-Mehi, Abeer E; El-Barbary, Abd El-Moneum; Fokar, Ahmed Zo El

    2016-03-01

    The direct interactive effects of rosemary and acrylamide on the development of motor neurons in the spinal cord remains unknown. Our goal is to confirm the protective effects of rosemary against motor neuronal degeneration induced by acrylamide in the developing postnatal rat spinal cord using a postnatal rat model. We assigned the offspring of treated female rats into control, rosemary; acrylamide group; and recovery groups. This work depended on clinical, histopathological, morphometrically, immunohistochemical and genetic methods. In the acrylamide group, we observed oxidation, motor neuron degeneration, apoptosis, myelin degeneration, neurofilament reduction, reactive gliosis. Whoever, concomitant rosemary intake and withdrawal of acrylamide modulate these effects. These findings proof that dietary rosemary can directly protect motor neuron against acrylamide toxicity in the mammalian developing spinal cord. PMID:27051566

  2. Effect of Combustion Temperature on Soil and Soil Organic Matter Properties: A Study of Soils from the Western Elevation Transect in Central Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, S. N.; Berhe, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fire is a common ecosystem perturbation that affects many soil physical and chemical properties and soil organic matter (SOM). We investigated the effect of combustion temperatures on the physical and chemical properties of five soils from an elevation transect that spans from 210 to 2865 m.a.s.l. along the Western slope of the Sierra Nevada. All soils formed on a granitic parent material under either oak woodland, oak/mixed-conifer forest, mixed-conifer forest or subalpine mixed-conifer forest ecosystem. Soils show significant differences in SOM content and mineralogy owing to the effects of climate on soil development. Soils from 0 to 5 cm depth were combusted in a muffle furnace at six different temperatures within major fire intensity classes (150, 250, 350, 450, 550 and 650ºC). We determined the effects of combustion temperature on aggregation; specific surface area; pH; mineralogy; cation exchange capacity; carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content; 13C and 15N isotopic composition, and distribution within aggregate sizes; and quality of SOM through infrared spectroscopy. Among other things, we found significant reduction total C and N, accumulation of aromatic carbon functional groups, and loss of aggregation with implication to loss of protection of C as the combustion temperature increases. The findings demonstrate that most significant changes in the soils physical and chemical properties occur around 350ºC. Findings from this study are critical for estimating the amount and rate of change in C and N loss, and other essential soil properties that can be expected from topsoils exposed to different intensity fires.

  3. Transect workshop held in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazangi, Muawia

    A workshop on the progress of the Global Geoscience Transects (GGT) project in the Middle East and Africa (see maps) was held January 15-17 in Cairo, Egypt. (Transect plans in the region have been described in Eos, 69, p. 124). It was jointly organized and funded by the Egyptian National Committee of Geodesy and Geophysics and the International Lithosphere Program coordinating Committee CC-7 of GGT. A. Ashour of Cairo University, Egypt, chaired the workshop; the general secretary was S. Riad of Assiut University, Egypt, who was responsible for most of the organization, scheduling and implementation of the workshop.

  4. The effect of increased T2 signal intensity in the spinal cord on the injury severity and early neurological recovery in patients with central cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Hjelm, Nik; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Weinstein, Michael S; Kepler, Christopher K

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this paper was to compare the severity of the initial neurological injury as well as the early changes in the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor score (AMS) between central cord syndrome (CCS) patients with and without an increased T2 signal intensity in their spinal cord. METHODS Patients with CCS were identified and stratified based on the presence of increased T2 signal intensity in their spinal cord. The severity of the initial neurological injury and the progression of the neurological injury over the 1st week were measured according to the patient's AMS. The effect of age, sex, congenital stenosis, surgery within 24 hours, and surgery in the initial hospitalization on the change in AMS was determined using an analysis of variance. RESULTS Patients with increased signal intensity had a more severe initial neurological injury (AMS 57.6 vs 75.3, respectively, p = 0.01). However, the change in AMS over the 1st week was less severe in patients with an increase in T2 signal intensity (-0.85 vs -4.3, p = 0.07). Analysis of variance did not find that age, sex, Injury Severity Score, congenital stenosis, surgery within 24 hours, or surgery during the initial hospitalization affected the change in AMS. CONCLUSIONS The neurological injury is different between patients with and without an increased T2 signal intensity. Patients with an increased T2 signal intensity are likely to have a more severe initial neurological deficit but will have relatively minimal early neurological deterioration. Comparatively, patients without an increase in the T2 signal intensity will likely have a less severe initial injury but can expect to have a slight decline in neurological function in the 1st week. PMID:26745351

  5. The effects of ionizing radiation and hyperthermia on mouse spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Yeh-Chi.

    1989-01-01

    The spinal cord (T{sub 9}-L{sub 5}) of C3Hf/Sed//Kam mice was irradiated with single or fractionated doses. Four arbitrary scales of neurological change were used. Findings for X were: (1) radiation induces progressive damage, from mild to serve. (2) The latency to damage depended on the dose and the level of damage. Following doses around the ED{sub 50}, the onset of paralysis occurred between 6 and 8 months. (3) For the NSD equation, the exponent for N was 0.36-0.33 for mild to severe paralysis. Comparisons of ED{sub 50s} for 2 fractions separated by various intervals showed no time effect until 30-60 days. (4) If the data for higher doses per fraction were excluded, the {alpha}/{beta} ratios were 3.5-5.6 for score 1-3. (5) Histological evidence of demyelination was evident at the time of paralysis. Using a water bath, the spinal cord was heated at 42.0 to 43.0{degree}C for 10-100 min. The results were: (1) Hyperthermia produces an acute reversible damage in the surviving mice. (2) No detectable late effects were seen up to 1.5 years. (3) A value of 0.48 for R in thermal dose equation was found. (4) Heat lesions included neuronal and vascular damage, but this was only at high thermal dose.

  6. The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on macrophage polarization after rat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Geng, Cheng-Kui; Cao, Hong-Hua; Ying, Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Tian; Yu, Hua-Lin

    2015-05-01

    The immunoreactive responses are a two-edged sword after spinal cord injury (SCI). Macrophages are the predominant inflammatory cells responsible for this response. However, the mechanism underlying the effects of HBOT on the immunomodulation following SCI is unclear now. The present study was performed to examine the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) on macrophage polarization after the rat compressive injury of the spinal cord. HBOT was associated with significant increases in IL-4 and IL-13 levels, and reductions in TNF-α and IFN-ɣ levels. This was associated simultaneously with the levels of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 phenotype: arginase-1- or CD206-positive), and decreased levels of classically activated macrophages (M1 phenotype: iNOS- or CD16/32-positive). These changes were associated with functional recovery in the HBOT-transplanted group, which correlated with preserved axons and increased myelin sparing. Our results suggested that HBOT after SCI modified the inflammatory environment by shifting the macrophage phenotype from M1 to M2, which may further promote the axonal extension and functional recovery. PMID:25724144

  7. Methylprednisolone neutralizes the beneficial effects of erythropoietin in experimental spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorio, Alfredo; Madaschi, Laura; Di Stefano, Barbara; Carelli, Stephana; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; De Biasi, Silvia; Coleman, Thomas; Cerami, Anthony; Brines, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Inflammation plays a major pathological role in spinal cord injury (SCI). Although antiinflammatory treatment using the glucocorticoid methyprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) improved outcomes in several multicenter clinical trials, additional clinical experience suggests that MPSS is only modestly beneficial in SCI and poses a risk for serious complications. Recent work has shown that erythropoietin (EPO) moderates CNS tissue injury, in part by reducing inflammation, limiting neuronal apoptosis, and restoring vascular autoregulation. We determined whether EPO and MPSS act synergistically in SCI. Using a rat model of contusive SCI, we compared the effects of EPO [500-5,000 units/kg of body weight (kg-bw)] with MPSS (30 mg/kg-bw) for proinflammatory cytokine production, histological damage, and motor function at 1 month after a compression injury. Although high-dose EPO and MPSS suppressed proinflammatory cytokines within the injured spinal cord, only EPO was associated with reduced microglial infiltration, attenuated scar formation, and sustained neurological improvement. Unexpectedly, coadministration of MPSS antagonized the protective effects of EPO, even though the EPO receptor was up-regulated normally after injury. These data illustrate that the suppression of proinflammatory cytokines alone does not necessarily prevent secondary injury and suggest that glucocorticoids should not be coadministered in clinical trials evaluating the use of EPO for treatment of SCI. PMID:16260722

  8. [Effect of thalassemia panel reactive antibody on proliferation and apoptosis of cord blood CD34(+) cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing-Ge; Lu, Xue-Liang; Xu, Lü-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei

    2012-02-01

    The study was purposed to explore the effect of panel reactive antibody (PRA) serum from patients with β-thalassemia on proliferation and apoptosis of the CD34(+)cells from cord blood and its mechanism. CD34(+) cells of umbilical cord blood were incubated with different sera and complement respectively. After incubation, the samples were centrifuged and the supernatants were collected for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) detection, and the CD34(+) cells were harvested and measured for the apoptosis by flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI. The intracellular DNA synthesis were also quantified by [(3)H]TdR incorporation using liquid scintillation counter. The results showed that concentration of LDH in PRA positive groups was higher as compared with control group, and the DNA synthesis of CD34(+) cells in PRA positive groups were inhibited. There were no differences in the percentage of cell apoptosis and necrosis among different groups. It is concluded that thalassemic serum PRA impairs the cell membrane, inhibits the DNA synthesis, which can be increased by addition of the complement, but PRA had no significant effect on apoptosis of CD34(+) cells. PMID:22391181

  9. Spinal cord tolerance to single-session uniform irradiation in pigs: implications for a dose-volume effect

    PubMed Central

    Medin, Paul M; Foster, Ryan D; van der Kogel, Albert J; Sayre, James W; McBride, William H; Solberg, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study was performed to test the hypothesis that spinal cord radiosensitivity is significantly modified by uniform versus laterally non-uniform dose distributions. Materials and Methods A uniform dose distribution was delivered to a 4.5–7.0cm length of cervical spinal cord in 22 mature Yucatan minipigs for comparison with a companion study in which a laterally non-uniform dose was given[1]. Pigs were allocated into four dose groups with mean maximum spinal cord doses of 17.5±0.1 Gy(n=7), 19.5±0.2 Gy(n=6), 22.0±0.1 Gy(n=5), and 24.1±0.2 Gy(n=4). The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait within one year. Spinal cord sections were stained with a Luxol fast blue/periodic acid Schiff combination. Results Dose-response curves for uniform versus non-uniform spinal cord irradiation were nearly identical with ED50's (95% confidence interval) of 20.2 Gy(19.1–25.8) and 20.0 Gy(18.3–21.7), respectively. No neurologic change was observed for either dose distribution when the maximum spinal cord dose was ≤17.8 Gy while all animals experienced deficits at doses ≥21.8Gy. Conclusion No dose-volume effect was observed in pigs for the dose distributions studied and the endpoint of motor neurologic deficit; however, partial spinal cord irradiation resulted in less debilitating neurologic morbidity and histopathology. PMID:22985780

  10. Cost-effectiveness of surgery plus radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Nosyk, Bohdan; Fisher, Charles G.; Dvorak, Marcel; Patchell, Roy A.; Regine, William F.; Loblaw, Andrew; Bansback, Nick; Guh, Daphne; Sun, Huiying; Anis, Aslam . E-mail: aslam.anis@ubc.ca

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: A recent randomized clinical trial has demonstrated that direct decompressive surgery plus radiotherapy was superior to radiotherapy alone for the treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. The current study compared the cost-effectiveness of the two approaches. Methods and Materials: In the original clinical trial, clinical effectiveness was measured by ambulation and survival time until death. In this study, an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective. Costs related to treatment and posttreatment care were estimated and extended to the lifetime of the cohort. Weibull regression was applied to extrapolate outcomes in the presence of censored clinical effectiveness data. Results: From a societal perspective, the baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was found to be $60 per additional day of ambulation (all costs in 2003 Canadian dollars). Using probabilistic sensitivity analysis, 50% of all generated ICERs were lower than $57, and 95% were lower than $242 per additional day of ambulation. This analysis had a 95% CI of -$72.74 to 309.44, meaning that this intervention ranged from a financial savings of $72.74 to a cost of $309.44 per additional day of ambulation. Using survival as the measure of effectiveness resulted in an ICER of $30,940 per life-year gained. Conclusions: We found strong evidence that treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression with surgery in addition to radiotherapy is cost-effective both in terms of cost per additional day of ambulation, and cost per life-year gained.

  11. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  12. Effect of exercise on neurogenic inflammation in spinal cord of Type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Vikram; Gonzalez, Mayra; Pennington, Kristen; Nargis, Syeda; Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2016-07-01

    Neuropathy is a long-standing and hard to treat complication of diabetes that interferes almost 25-30% of diabetic patients and impacts the quality of life of the patients. Unforeseen side effects, dependency and addiction made the existing medical treatments comparatively ineffective. A number of studies indicate that moderate physical activity provides health-related advantages. However, existing data do not confirm whether regular physical activity would reduce the amount of inflammation in the nervous system of the subjects with Type 1 diabetes. This study reveals the significance of exercise to alleviate inflammation in the spinal cord of the nervous system and preserve sensory nerve function in animals with Type 1 diabetes after 6 weeks of exercise paradigm. Streptozotocin-diabetic animals were placed in motorized running wheels for sixty minutes per day, for five days a week for 6 weeks starting at one week after diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests that the increases in inflammatory mediators play an important role in the development of sensory neuropathy. This study shows that moderate exercise can reduce the release of a number of proinflammatory cytokines in the dorsal horn (DH) of spinal cord, subsequently delaying the development of neuropathy along with an increase in the anti-inflammatory mediator IL10 in the DH. In general, this study indicates that exercise may provide an alternative to the treatment for sensory neuropathy in Type 1 diabetic subjects via reducing the use of medication and providing an easier way to manage neuropathy. PMID:27018295

  13. Effects of cord compression on fetal blood flow distribution and O/sub 2/ delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Itskovitz, J.; LaGamma, E.F.; Rudolph, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used the radionuclide microsphere technique in nine fetal lambs to examine the effect of partial cord compression on distribution of cardiac output and O/sub 2/ delivery to fetal organs and venous flow patterns. With a 50% reduction in umbilical blood flow the fraction of fetal cardiac output distributed to the brain, heart, carcass, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract increased. Pulmonary blood flow fell. O/sub 2/ delivery to the brain and myocardium was maintained but was reduced to peripheral, renal, and gastrointestinal circulations. Hepatic blood flow decreased and O/sub 2/ delivery fell by 75%. The proportion of umbilical venous blood passing through the ductus venosus increased from 43.9 to 71.8%. The preferential distribution of ductus venosus blood flow through the foramen ovale was enhanced and the proportion of O/sub 2/ delivery to upper body organs derived from the ductus venosus increased. Abdominal inferior vena caval blood flow increased, and it was also preferentially distributed through the foramen ovale and constituted the major fraction of the arterial blood supply to the upper body organs. Thus cord compression modified the distribution of cardiac output and the patterns of venous returns in the fetus. This pattern of circulatory response differs from that observed with other causes of reduced O/sub 2/ delivery.

  14. The effect of anticoagulant, storage temperature and dilution on cord blood hematology parameters over time

    PubMed Central

    FREISE, K. J.; SCHMIDT, R. L.; GINGERICH, E. L.; VENG-PEDERSEN, P.; WIDNESS, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The objective of the study was to determine whether selected hematologic parameters measured on umbilical cord blood samples using an automated hematology analyzer (Sysmex XE-2100) were affected by (i) anticoagulant (the specimens were collected in EDTA vs. sodium heparin), (ii) temperature (the specimens were maintained at 4° C vs. room temperature for up to 72 h) and (iii) 1 : 5 dilution vs. undiluted using the manufacturer's diluting solution. Use of heparin, instead of EDTA, had little effect on the hematologic results (n = 8) except for lower platelet and progenitor cell counts. Results were remarkably stable for 72 h at either room temperature or 4° C except for modest red blood cell swelling at 24 h. Specimens of blood diluted at 1 : 5 had an immediate small, but significant change on white cell count (+13.3%), reticulocyte count (−11.2%) and reticulocyte hemoglobin content (−19.6%). Diluted samples did not change further over 4 h at room temperature. With a 1 : 5 dilution, analysis of 40 μl of cord blood stored for 3 days at room temperature may provide useful hematologic information with little phlebotomy loss. PMID:18422712

  15. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  16. Central neuromechanisms underlying control of intragastric pressure through acupuncture at Zusanli (ST36) in rats: the upper cervical cord is the key link between the ascending and descending pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Chun-yan; Chen, Shu; Chen, Heng; Chu, Xiao; Zhang, Chao; Tan, Cheng; Ye, Lan; Li, Jiang-shan

    2016-01-01

    Sensory inputs stimulated by Zusanli (ST36) acupuncture in the abdomen are known to converge in the upper cervical cord. However, it is unclear whether these inputs are subsequently conveyed to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and what kind of afferent fibers are involved. We focused on the upper cervical cord, where afferent inputs converge, and detected c-fos expression in oxytocinergic neurons. We found that Zusanli acupuncture therapy effectively elevated intragastric pressure, but inhibited expression of c-fos in oxytocinergic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus in upper cervical cord injured rats. These Zusanli acupuncture effects remained even after complete dorsal cord transection. However, after complete transection of the spinal cord or dorsolateral funiculus, the effects were significantly attenuated and even disappeared. These findings suggest that the paraventricular nucleus is responsible for pooling and integrating signals from the Zusanli acupuncture and sensory information from the intragastric pressure variation, thereby contributing to the regulation of intragastric pressure. The upper cervical cord serves as the key link between ascending and descending pathways, which conveys afferent inputs to the paraventricular nucleus through the dorsolateral funiculus. PMID:27482227

  17. Central neuromechanisms underlying control of intragastric pressure through acupuncture at Zusanli (ST36) in rats: the upper cervical cord is the key link between the ascending and descending pathways.

    PubMed

    Yong, Chun-Yan; Chen, Shu; Chen, Heng; Chu, Xiao; Zhang, Chao; Tan, Cheng; Ye, Lan; Li, Jiang-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Sensory inputs stimulated by Zusanli (ST36) acupuncture in the abdomen are known to converge in the upper cervical cord. However, it is unclear whether these inputs are subsequently conveyed to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and what kind of afferent fibers are involved. We focused on the upper cervical cord, where afferent inputs converge, and detected c-fos expression in oxytocinergic neurons. We found that Zusanli acupuncture therapy effectively elevated intragastric pressure, but inhibited expression of c-fos in oxytocinergic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus in upper cervical cord injured rats. These Zusanli acupuncture effects remained even after complete dorsal cord transection. However, after complete transection of the spinal cord or dorsolateral funiculus, the effects were significantly attenuated and even disappeared. These findings suggest that the paraventricular nucleus is responsible for pooling and integrating signals from the Zusanli acupuncture and sensory information from the intragastric pressure variation, thereby contributing to the regulation of intragastric pressure. The upper cervical cord serves as the key link between ascending and descending pathways, which conveys afferent inputs to the paraventricular nucleus through the dorsolateral funiculus. PMID:27482227

  18. Serine-threonine protein kinase activation may be an effective target for reducing neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Mu; Yang, Yan-wei; Cheng, Wei-ping; Lu, Jia-kai; Hou, Si-yu; Dong, Xiu-hua; Liu, Shi-yao

    2015-01-01

    The signaling mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced nerve cell apoptosis are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of apoptosis-related signal transduction pathways following ischemic spinal cord injury, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), serine-threonine protein kinase (Akt) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury by inserting a catheter balloon in the left subclavian artery for 25 minutes. Rat models exhibited notable hindlimb dysfunction. Apoptotic cells were abundant in the anterior horn and central canal of the spinal cord. The number of apoptotic neurons was highest 48 hours post injury. The expression of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) increased immediately after reperfusion, peaked at 4 hours (p-Akt) or 2 hours (p-ERK), decreased at 12 hours, and then increased at 24 hours. Phosphorylated JNK expression reduced after reperfusion, increased at 12 hours to near normal levels, and then showed a downward trend at 24 hours. Pearson linear correlation analysis also demonstrated that the number of apoptotic cells negatively correlated with p-Akt expression. These findings suggest that activation of Akt may be a key contributing factor in the delay of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord ischemia, particularly at the stage of reperfusion, and thus may be a target for neuronal protection and reduction of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury. PMID:26807120

  19. Differential Effects of 670 and 830 nm Red near Infrared Irradiation Therapy: A Comparative Study of Optic Nerve Injury, Retinal Degeneration, Traumatic Brain and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Giacci, Marcus K.; Wheeler, Lachlan; Lovett, Sarah; Dishington, Emma; Majda, Bernadette; Bartlett, Carole A.; Thornton, Emma; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Leonard, Anna; Vink, Robert; Harvey, Alan R.; Provis, Jan; Dunlop, Sarah A.; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Red/near-infrared irradiation therapy (R/NIR-IT) delivered by laser or light-emitting diode (LED) has improved functional outcomes in a range of CNS injuries. However, translation of R/NIR-IT to the clinic for treatment of neurotrauma has been hampered by lack of comparative information regarding the degree of penetration of the delivered irradiation to the injury site and the optimal treatment parameters for different CNS injuries. We compared the treatment efficacy of R/NIR-IT at 670 nm and 830 nm, provided by narrow-band LED arrays adjusted to produce equal irradiance, in four in vivo rat models of CNS injury: partial optic nerve transection, light-induced retinal degeneration, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI). The number of photons of 670 nm or 830 nm light reaching the SCI injury site was 6.6% and 11.3% of emitted light respectively. Treatment of rats with 670 nm R/NIR-IT following partial optic nerve transection significantly increased the number of visual responses at 7 days after injury (P≤0.05); 830 nm R/NIR-IT was partially effective. 670 nm R/NIR-IT also significantly reduced reactive species and both 670 nm and 830 nm R/NIR-IT reduced hydroxynonenal immunoreactivity (P≤0.05) in this model. Pre-treatment of light-induced retinal degeneration with 670 nm R/NIR-IT significantly reduced the number of Tunel+ cells and 8-hydroxyguanosine immunoreactivity (P≤0.05); outcomes in 830 nm R/NIR-IT treated animals were not significantly different to controls. Treatment of fluid-percussion TBI with 670 nm or 830 nm R/NIR-IT did not result in improvements in motor or sensory function or lesion size at 7 days (P>0.05). Similarly, treatment of contusive SCI with 670 nm or 830 nm R/NIR-IT did not result in significant improvements in functional recovery or reduced cyst size at 28 days (P>0.05). Outcomes from this comparative study indicate that it will be necessary to optimise delivery devices, wavelength, intensity and duration of R

  20. Neuroprotective effects of atomoxetine against traumatic spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qing-Xian; Yu, Li; Tian, Shao-Qi; Jiang, Cui-Jun; Yang, Wen-Jiu; Wang, Zhi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Spinal cord injury (SCI) often causes serious and irreversible neurological deficit leading to disability or impairment of normal physical activity. Atomoxetine, a selective norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor has gained much attention in the field of the neurodevelopmental disorder, but its effect on SCI has not been evaluated. The present study has been undertaken to investigate the neuroprotective effects of atomoxetine. Materials and Methods: Administration of atomoxetine 20 mg/kg IP was compared with methylprednisolone (MP) 30 mg/kg IP in traumatic spinal cord injured Wistar rats. Tissue samples were evaluated for apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress, along with histopathological examination and neurological evaluation. Results: There was no significant difference in the caspase-3 activity between the control and the sham groups or between the MP and the atomoxetine groups (P=0.811). The administration of atomoxetine significantly reduced tissue tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and nitric oxide (NO) levels compared to the trauma group (P<0.001). Treatment with atomoxetine also decreased the tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (P=0.026) and increased the tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity compared to the trauma group (P=0.001 and P=0.004, respectively). Histopathological examination showed less degenerated neurons in the atomoxetine group compared to trauma group. Conclusion: This is the first experimental evidence showing meaningful neuroprotective effects of atomoxetine over SCI through anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects by reducing lipid peroxidation, which was confirmed by biochemical, histopathological and the functional evaluation. PMID:27114797

  1. Effects of Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Epidural Stimulation for Standing after Chronic Complete Paralysis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rejc, Enrico; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Sensory and motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered functionally complete resulting in permanent paralysis with no recovery of voluntary movement, standing or walking. Previous findings demonstrated that lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation can activate the spinal neural networks in one individual with motor complete, but sensory incomplete SCI, who achieved full body weight-bearing standing with independent knee extension, minimal self-assistance for balance and minimal external assistance for facilitating hip extension. In this study, we showed that two clinically sensory and motor complete participants were able to stand over-ground bearing full body-weight without any external assistance, using their hands to assist balance. The two clinically motor complete, but sensory incomplete participants also used minimal external assistance for hip extension. Standing with the least amount of assistance was achieved with individual-specific stimulation parameters, which promoted overall continuous EMG patterns in the lower limbs’ muscles. Stimulation parameters optimized for one individual resulted in poor standing and additional need of external assistance for hip and knee extension in the other participants. During sitting, little or negligible EMG activity of lower limb muscles was induced by epidural stimulation, showing that the weight-bearing related sensory information was needed to generate sufficient EMG patterns to effectively support full weight-bearing standing. In general, electrode configurations with cathodes selected in the caudal region of the array at relatively higher frequencies (25–60 Hz) resulted in the more effective EMG patterns for standing. These results show that human spinal circuitry can generate motor patterns effective for standing in the absence of functional supraspinal connections; however the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters is critical. PMID:26207623

  2. Neuroprotective Effects of Testosterone on Motoneuron and Muscle Morphology Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Byers, James S.; Huguenard, Anna L.; Kuruppu, Dulanji; Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Sengelaub, Dale R.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with testosterone is neuroprotective/neurotherapeutic after a variety of motoneuron injuries. Here we assessed whether testosterone might have similar beneficial effects after spinal cord injury (SCI). Young adult female rats received either sham or T9 spinal cord contusion injuries and were implanted with blank or testosterone-filled Silastic capsules. Four weeks later, motoneurons innervating the vastus lateralis muscle of the quadriceps were labeled with cholera toxin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase, and dendritic arbors were reconstructed in three dimensions. Soma volume, motoneuron number, lesion volume, and tissue sparing were also assessed, as were muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area, and motor endplate size and density. Contusion injury resulted in large lesions, with no significant differences in lesion volume, percent total volume of lesion, or spared white or gray matter between SCI groups. SCI with or without testosterone treatment also had no effect on the number or soma volume of quadriceps motoneurons. However, SCI resulted in a decrease in dendritic length of quadriceps motoneurons in untreated animals, and this decrease was completely prevented by treatment with testosterone. Similarly, the vastus lateralis muscle weights and fiber cross-sectional areas of untreated SCI animals were smaller than those of sham-surgery controls, and these reductions were both prevented by testosterone treatment. No effects on motor endplate area or density were observed across treatment groups. These findings suggest that regressive changes in motoneuron and muscle morphology seen after SCI can be prevented by testosterone treatment, further supporting a role for testosterone as a neurotherapeutic agent in the injured nervous system. PMID:22314886

  3. Effects of baclofen on motor units paralysed by chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Häger-Ross, Charlotte K.; Klein, Cliff S.

    2010-01-01

    Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptorB agonist, is used to reduce symptoms of spasticity (hyperreflexia, increases in muscle tone, involuntary muscle activity), but the long-term effects of sustained baclofen use on skeletal muscle properties are unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether baclofen use and paralysis due to cervical spinal cord injury change the contractile properties of human thenar motor units more than paralysis alone. Evoked electromyographic activity and force were recorded in response to intraneural stimulation of single motor axons to thenar motor units. Data from three groups of motor units were compared: 23 paralysed units from spinal cord injured subjects who take baclofen and have done so for a median of 7 years, 25 paralysed units from spinal cord injured subjects who do not take baclofen (median: 10 years) and 45 units from uninjured control subjects. Paralysed motor unit properties were independent of injury duration and level. With paralysis and baclofen, the median motor unit tetanic forces were significantly weaker, twitch half-relaxation times longer and half maximal forces reached at lower frequencies than for units from uninjured subjects. The median values for these same parameters after paralysis alone were comparable to control data. Axon conduction velocities differed across groups and were slowest for paralysed units from subjects who were not taking baclofen and fastest for units from the uninjured. Greater motor unit weakness with long-term baclofen use and paralysis will make the whole muscle weaker and more fatigable. Significantly more paralysed motor units need to be excited during patterned electrical stimulation to produce any given force over time. The short-term benefits of baclofen on spasticity (e.g. management of muscle spasms that may otherwise hinder movement or social interactions) therefore have to be considered in relation to its possible long-term effects on muscle rehabilitation

  4. Modulation of the Effect of Prenatal PAH Exposure on PAH-DNA Adducts in Cord Blood by Plasma Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Kelvin, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Susan; Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Schleicher, Rosemary L.; Camann, David; Tang, Deliang; Perera, Frederica P.

    2011-01-01

    The fetus is more susceptible than the adult to the effects of certain carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Nutritional factors, including antioxidants, have been shown to have a protective effect on carcinogen-DNA adducts and cancer risk in adults. We investigated whether the effect of prenatal airborne PAH exposure, measured by personal air monitoring during pregnancy, on the level of PAH-DNA adducts in a baby's cord blood is modified by the concentration of micronutrients in maternal and cord blood. The micronutrients examined were: retinol (vitamin A), α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol (vitamin E), and carotenoids. With the use of multiple linear regression, we found a significant interaction between prenatal PAH exposure and cord blood concentration of α-tocopherol and carotenoids in predicting the concentration of PAH adducts in cord blood. The association between PAH exposure and PAH adducts was much stronger among those with low α-tocopherol (β = 0.15; P = 0.001) and among those with low carotenoids (β = 0.16; P < 0.001) compared with babies with high levels of these micronutrients (among those with high α-tocopherol: β = 0.05; P = 0.165; among those with high carotenoids: β = 0.06; P = 0.111). These results suggest a protective effect of micronutrients on the DNA damage and potential cancer risk associated with prenatal PAH exposure. PMID:19661084

  5. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord injury; Compression of spinal cord; SCI; Cord compression ... them more likely to fall may also have spinal cord injury. ... vary depending on the location of the injury. Spinal cord injury causes weakness and loss of feeling at, and ...

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation effects on spinal cord compression in Hurler.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Giovanna; Maximova, Natalia; Zennaro, Floriana; Gregori, Massimo; Tamaro, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Hurler syndrome type 1 (MPS-1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder due to the deficiency of the enzyme alpha-L-iduronidase which is necessary for the degradation of dermatan and heparan sulfate. It is characterized by deposit of glycosaminoglycans in tissues, progressive multisystem dysfunction, and early death. HSCT for children with MPS-I is effective, resulting in increased life expectancy and improvement of clinical parameters. The spinal MRI performed on a female 10 yr old undergoing HSCT at the age of 18 months and receiving ERT revealed a considerable decrease in soft tissue around the tip of odontoid causing a significant reduction in spinal cord compression. In light of this result, we suppose that combined ERT and HSCT are successful in Hurler I disease. PMID:24483599

  7. Neuromuscular interaction is required for neurotrophins-mediated locomotor recovery following treadmill training in rat spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qinfeng; Cao, Yana; Dong, Chuanming; Wang, Hongxing; Wang, Qinghua; Tong, Weifeng; Li, Xiangzhe

    2016-01-01

    Recent results have shown that exercise training promotes the recovery of injured rat distal spinal cords, but are still unclear about the function of skeletal muscle in this process. Herein, rats with incomplete thoracic (T10) spinal cord injuries (SCI) with a dual spinal lesion model were subjected to four weeks of treadmill training and then were treated with complete spinal transection at T8. We found that treadmill training allowed the retention of hind limb motor function after incomplete SCI, even with a heavy load after complete spinal transection. Moreover, treadmill training alleviated the secondary injury in distal lumbar spinal motor neurons, and enhanced BDNF/TrkB expression in the lumbar spinal cord. To discover the influence of skeletal muscle contractile activity on motor function and gene expression, we adopted botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) to block the neuromuscular activity of the rat gastrocnemius muscle. BTX-A treatment inhibited the effects of treadmill training on motor function and BDNF/TrKB expression. These results indicated that treadmill training through the skeletal muscle-motor nerve-spinal cord retrograde pathway regulated neuralplasticity in the mammalian central nervous system, which induced the expression of related neurotrophins and promoted motor function recovery. PMID:27190721

  8. Neuromuscular interaction is required for neurotrophins-mediated locomotor recovery following treadmill training in rat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinfeng; Cao, Yana; Dong, Chuanming; Wang, Hongxing; Wang, Qinghua; Tong, Weifeng; Li, Xiangzhe; Shan, Chunlei; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Recent results have shown that exercise training promotes the recovery of injured rat distal spinal cords, but are still unclear about the function of skeletal muscle in this process. Herein, rats with incomplete thoracic (T10) spinal cord injuries (SCI) with a dual spinal lesion model were subjected to four weeks of treadmill training and then were treated with complete spinal transection at T8. We found that treadmill training allowed the retention of hind limb motor function after incomplete SCI, even with a heavy load after complete spinal transection. Moreover, treadmill training alleviated the secondary injury in distal lumbar spinal motor neurons, and enhanced BDNF/TrkB expression in the lumbar spinal cord. To discover the influence of skeletal muscle contractile activity on motor function and gene expression, we adopted botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) to block the neuromuscular activity of the rat gastrocnemius muscle. BTX-A treatment inhibited the effects of treadmill training on motor function and BDNF/TrKB expression. These results indicated that treadmill training through the skeletal muscle-motor nerve-spinal cord retrograde pathway regulated neuralplasticity in the mammalian central nervous system, which induced the expression of related neurotrophins and promoted motor function recovery. PMID:27190721

  9. Beneficial effects of thymosin β4 on spinal cord injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Kuang, Fang; Zhang, Haifeng; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2014-10-01

    Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) has many physiological functions that are highly relevant to spinal cord injury (SCI), including neuronal survival, anti-inflammation, wound repair promotion, and angiogenesis. The present study investigated the therapeutic value of Tβ4 in SCI, with a focus on its neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, and vasculoprotective properties. Tβ4 or a saline control was administered by intraperitoneal injection 30 min, 3 days, or 5 days after SCI with mild compression in rat. Locomotor recovery was tested with the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scale and a footprint analysis. All behavioral assessments were markedly improved with Tβ4 treatment. Histological examination at 7 days post injury showed that the numbers of surviving neurons and oligodendrocytes were significantly increased in Tβ4-treated animals compared to saline-treated controls. Levels of myelin basic protein, a marker of mature oligodendrocytes, in Tβ4-treated rats were 57.8% greater than those in saline-treated controls. The expression of ED1, a marker of activated microglia/macrophages, was reduced by 36.9% in the Tβ4-treated group compared to that of the saline-treated group. Tβ4 treatment after SCI was also associated with a significant decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and a significant increase in the mRNA levels of IL-10 compared to the control. Moreover, the size of lesion cavity delineated by astrocyte scar in the injured spinal cord was markedly reduced in Tβ4-treated animals compared to saline-treated controls. Given the known safety of Tβ4 in clinical trials and its beneficial effects on SCI recovery, the results of this study suggested that Tβ4 is a good candidate for SCI treatment in humans. PMID:24937047

  10. The neuroprotective effect of treatment with curcumin in acute spinal cord injury: laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Cho, Dae-Chul; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was investigating the effects of curcumin on the histological changes and functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Following either sham operation or SCI, 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into three groups: sham group, curcumin-treated group, and vehicle-injected group. Locomotor function was assessed according to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale in rats who had received daily intraperitoneal injections of 200 mg/kg curcumin or an equivalent volume of vehicle for 7 days following SCI. The injured spinal cord was then examined histologically, including quantification of cavitation. BBB scores were significantly higher in rats receiving curcumin than receiving vehicle (P < 0.05). The cavity volume was significantly reduced in the curcumin group as compared to the control group (P = 0.039). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly elevated in the curcumin group as compared to the vehicle group but was not significantly different from the sham group (P < 0.05, P > 0.05, respectively) at one and two weeks after SCI. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated in the vehicle group as compared to the sham group (P < 0.05 at 1 and 2 weeks). MDA activity was significantly reduced in the curcumin group at 2 weeks after SCI when compared to the vehicle group (P = 0.004). The numbers of macrophage were significantly decreased in the curcumin group (P = 0.001). This study demonstrated that curcumin enhances early functional recovery after SCI by diminishing cavitation volume, anti-inflammatory reactions, and antioxidant activity. PMID:24477066

  11. The Effect of Cigarette Smoke Exposure on Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yang; Lv, Gang; Wang, Yan-song; Guo, Zhan-peng

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we examined whether cigarette smoke has neuroprotective or toxic effects on spinal cord injury (SCI). Male Sprague–Dawley rats were included in the study and received either cigarette smoke exposure or fresh air exposure. Twenty-four hours after the last cigarette smoke or fresh air exposure, all rats were injured at thoracic level 12 (T12), using an established static compression model. Our data showed that the cigarette smoke group had higher water content; higher permeability of the blood–spinal cord barrier (BSCB); higher malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) protein expression, and mRNA levels; and lower glutathione (GSH) levels than the control group values at 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h after SCI. There was no significant difference in these between the cigarette smoke group and the control group at 0 h after SCI. The results of the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) hindlimb locomotor rating scale showed that rats in the cigarette smoke group had greater dysfunction in hindlimb movement than did rats in control group from 2 to day 6 after SCI. The extent of recovery did not make any difference from day 7 to day 10 after SCI between the cigarette smoke group and the control group. These results suggested that cigarette smoke can reinforce the oxidative stress injury via HIF-1α and AQP4 in the early stage after SCI. It is possible that cigarette smoke exposure does not affect SCI recovery in the long term; however, it can aggravate the edema and deteriorate BSCB disruption via HIF-1α and AQP4 in the early stage after SCI. More studies will be essential to consider this hypothesis and elucidate the mechanisms involved. PMID:23234244

  12. Estimation of fractal dimensions from transect data

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1994-04-01

    Fractals are a useful tool for analyzing the topology of objects such as coral reefs, forest canopies, and landscapes. Transects are often studied in these contexts, and fractal dimensions computed from them. An open question is how representative a single transect is. Transects may also be used to estimate the dimensionality of a surface. Again the question of representativeness of the transect arises. These two issues are related. This note qualifies the conditions under which transect data may be considered to be representative or may be extrapolated, based on both theoretical and empirical results.

  13. Lizard tail spinal cord: a new experimental model of spinal cord injury without limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Dariusz; Marycz, Krzysztof; Lis, Anna; Zawada, Zbigniew; Tabakow, Paweł; Laska, Jadwiga; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a well-known devastating lesion that sadly is very resistant to all treatment attempts. This fact has stimulated the exploration of multiple regenerative strategies that are examined at both the basic and clinical level. For laboratory research, differentin vivomodels are used, but each has many important limitations. The main limitation of these models is the high level of animal suffering related to the inflicted neurologic injury. It has caused a growing tendency to limit the injury, but this, in turn, produces incomplete SCI models and uncertainties in the neuroregeneration interpretation. To overcome such limitations, a new experimental SCI model is proposed. Geckos have been extensively examined as a potential animal model of SCI. Their spinal cord extends into the tail and can be transected without causing the typical neurologic consequences observed in rat models. In this study, we compared the gecko tail SCI model with the rat model of thoracic SCI. Anatomic and histologic analyses showed comparability between the gecko and rat in diameter of spinal canal and spinal cord, as well as applicability of multiple staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, immunostaining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy). We tested the suitability ofin vivostudy with 3 prototype implants for the reconstruction of SCI: a multichannel sponge, a multilaminar tube, and a gel cylinder. These were compared with a spinal cord excision (control). A 20-wk observation revealed no adverse effects of SCI on the animals' well-being. The animals were easily housed and observed. Histologic analysis showed growth of nervous tissue elements on implant surface and implant cellular colonization. The study showed that the gecko SCI model can be used as a primary model for the assessment of SCI treatment methods. It provides a platform for testing multiple solutions with limited animal suffering before performing tests on mammals. Detailed results of

  14. Effects of ganglioside G(M1) and erythropoietin on spinal cord lesions in rats: functional and histological evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functional and histological effects of ganglioside G(M1) and erythropoietin after experimental spinal cord contusion injury. METHODS: Fifty male Wistar rats underwent experimental spinal cord lesioning using an NYU-Impactor device and were randomly divided into the following groups, which received treatment intraperitoneally. The G(M1) group received ganglioside G(M1) (30 mg/kg); the erythropoietin group received erythropoietin (1000 IU/kg); the combined group received both drugs; and the saline group received saline (0.9%) as a control. A fifth group was the laminectomy group, in which the animals were subjected to laminectomy alone, without spinal lesioning or treatment. The animals were evaluated according to the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scale, motor evoked potential recordings and, after euthanasia, histological analysis of spinal cord tissue. RESULTS: The erythropoietin group had higher BBB scores than the G(M1) group. The combined group had the highest BBB scores, and the saline group had the lowest BBB scores. No significant difference in latency was observed between the three groups that underwent spinal cord lesioning and intervention. However, the combined group showed a significantly higher signal amplitude than the other treatment groups or the saline group (p<0.01). Histological tissue analysis showed no significant difference between the groups. Axonal index was significantly enhanced in the combined group than any other intervention (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: G(M1) and erythropoietin exert therapeutic effects on axonal regeneration and electrophysiological and motor functions in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord lesioning and administering these two substances in combination potentiates their effects. PMID:27438570

  15. Cell elimination as a strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Nurit

    2005-01-01

    Following injury, as part of the wound-healing process, cell proliferation occurs mostly to replace damaged cells and to reconstitute the tissue back to normal condition/function. In the spinal cord some of the dividing cells following injury interfere with the repair processes. This interference occurs at the later stages of wound healing (the third week after injury) triggering chronic inflammation and progressive tissue decay that is the characteristic pathology of spinal cord injury. Specific cell elimination within a critical time window after injury can lead to repair in the acutely injured spinal cord. Cell proliferation events can be manipulated/modified by x-irradiation. Clinically, numerous radiation protocols (i.e., radiation therapy) have been developed that specifically eliminate the rapidly dividing cells without causing any noticeable/significant damage to the tissue as a whole. Radiation therapy when applied within the critical time window after injury prevents the onset of chronic inflammation thus leading to repair of structure and function. Various aspects of the development of this cell-elimination strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury by utilizing radiation therapy are being reviewed. Topics reviewed here: identifying the window of opportunity; and the beneficial repair effects of radiation therapy in a transection injury model and in a model relevant to human injury, the contusion injury model. The possible involvement of cellular components of the blood-spinal cord barrier as the trigger of chronic inflammation and/or target of the radiation therapy is discussed. PMID:15853680

  16. Effect of posterior decompression extent on biomechanical parameters of the spinal cord in cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of the cervical myelopathy due to compression of the spinal cord. Patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament usually require the decompression surgery, and there is a need to better understand the optimal surgical extent with which sufficient decompression without excessive posterior shifting can be achieved. However, few quantitative studies have clarified this optimal extent for decompression of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. We used finite element modeling of the cervical spine and spinal cord to investigate the effect of posterior decompression extent for continuous-type cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament on changes in stress, strain, and posterior shifting that occur with three different surgical methods (laminectomy, laminoplasty, and hemilaminectomy). As posterior decompression extended, stress and strain in the spinal cord decreased and posterior shifting of the cord increased. The location of the decompression extent also influenced shifting. Laminectomy and laminoplasty were very similar in terms of decompression results, and both were superior to hemilaminectomy in all parameters tested. Decompression to the extents of C3-C6 and C3-C7 of laminectomy and laminoplasty could be considered sufficient with respect to decompression itself. Our findings provide fundamental information regarding the treatment of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and can be applied to patient-specific surgical planning. PMID:26951839

  17. Neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury by attenuation of inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gökce, Emre Cemal; Kahveci, Ramazan; Gökce, Aysun; Cemil, Berker; Aksoy, Nurkan; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Kısa, Üçler; Erdoğan, Bülent; Güvenç, Yahya; Alagöz, Fatih; Kahveci, Ozan

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of the spinal cord following thoracoabdominal aortic surgery remains the most devastating complication, with a life-changing impact on the patient. Thymoquinone (TQ), the main constituent of the volatile oil from Nigella sativa seeds, is reported to possess strong antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. This study investigated the effects of TQ administration following I/R injury to the spinal cord. METHODS Thirty-two rats were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Group 1 underwent only laparotomy. For Group 2, aortic clip occlusion was introduced to produce I/R injury. Group 3 was given 30 mg/kg of methylprednisolone intraperitoneally immediately after the I/R injury. Group 4 was given 10 mg/kg of TQ intraperitoneally for 7 days before induction of spinal cord I/R injury, and administration was continued until the animal was euthanized. Locomotor function (Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale and inclined plane test) was assessed at 24 hours postischemia. Spinal cord tissue samples were harvested to analyze tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, and caspase-3. In addition, histological and ultrastructural evaluations were performed. RESULTS Thymoquinone treatment improved neurological outcome, which was supported by decreased levels of oxidative products (malondialdehyde and nitric oxide) and proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1), increased activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase), as well as reduction of motor neuron apoptosis. Light microscopy and electron microscopy results also showed preservation of tissue structure in the treatment group. CONCLUSIONS As shown by functional, biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural analysis, TQ exhibits an important protective effect against I/R injury of the

  18. Hypoxic preconditioning increases the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhilin; Fang, Bo; Tan, Zhibin; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury (SCIRI). However, a large number of transplanted BMSCs often undergo apoptosis, which severely affects the treatment outcome. Previous studies have demonstrated that hypoxic preconditioning effectively increases the survival rate of BMSCs following transplantation, and increases their protective effect on injured tissues. However, there have been few reports regarding roles of hypoxic preconditioning in SCIRI. The present study isolated rat BMSCs and separately transplanted hypoxia‑ and non‑hypoxia‑preconditioned BMSCs into the spinal cord tissues of rats with SCIRI. The role of hypoxic preconditioning in the promotion of the protective effect of BMSCs on SCIRI was investigated using neurological function scores, Evans blue staining, hematoxylin and eosin staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. In addition, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the expression levels of hypoxia‑inducible factor 1α (HIF‑1α), and to investigate its possible underlying mechanism of action. The results indicated that hypoxic preconditioning effectively increased the protective effects of BMSCs on neurological function, blood spinal cord barrier and tissue damage following SCIRI, and inhibited apoptosis. Furthermore, hypoxic preconditioned BMSCs upregulated the expression of HIF‑1α in spinal cord tissues. Therefore, hypoxic preconditioning effectively increased the protective effect of BMSCs on SCIRI and may be associated with upregulation of the expression of HIF‑1α. Hypoxic preconditioning may serve as an effective means of increasing the protective effect of BMSCs on SCIRI. PMID:26783161

  19. Spinal cord injury with unilateral versus bilateral primary hemorrhage — Effects of glibenclamide

    PubMed Central

    Simard, J. Marc; Popovich, Phillip G.; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2011-01-01

    In spinal cord injury (SCI), block of Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channels by glibenclamide protects penumbral capillaries from delayed fragmentation, resulting in reduced secondary hemorrhage, smaller lesions and better neurological function. All published experiments demonstrating a beneficial effect of glibenclamide in rat models of SCI have used a cervical hemicord impact calibrated to produce primary hemorrhage located exclusively ipsilateral to the site of impact. Here, we tested the hypothesis that glibenclamide also would be protective in a model with more extensive, bilateral primary hemorrhage. We studied the effect of glibenclamide in 2 rat cervical hemicord contusion models with identical impact force (10 g, 25 mm), one with the impactor positioned laterally to yield unilateral primary hemorrhage (UPH), and the other with the impactor positioned more medially, yielding larger, bilateral primary hemorrhages (BPH) and 6-week lesion volumes that were 45% larger. Functional outcome measures included: modified (unilateral) Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores, angled plane performance, and rearing times. In the UPH model, the effects of glibenclamide were similar to previous observations, including a functional benefit as early as 24 h after injury and 6-week lesion volumes that were 57% smaller than controls. In the BPH model, glibenclamide exerted a significant benefit over controls, but the functional benefit was smaller than in the UPH model and 6-week lesion volumes were 33% smaller than controls. We conclude that glibenclamide is beneficial in different models of cervical SCI, with the magnitude of the benefit depending on the magnitude and extent of primary hemorrhage. PMID:22197047

  20. Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation on Gait in a Patient with Thalamic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Masahiro; Ishi, Kazuhiko; Osumi, Michihiro; Katsuhira, Junji; Chiba, Ryosuke; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Thalamic pain is a central neuropathic pain disorder which occurs after stroke. Its severe chronic pain is often intractable to pharmacotherapies and affects the patients' activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QOL). Recently, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been reported to be effective in relieving the pain of thalamic pain; however, the effect of SCS on gait performance in patients is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the gait performance before and after SCS in a case with thalamic pain. A 73-year-old male with thalamic pain participated in this study. We evaluated the gait of the patient two times: before SCS insertion and after 6 days of SCS. At the second evaluation, we measured the gait in three conditions: stimulation off, comfortable stimulation, and strong stimulation. SCS succeeded in improving the pain from 7 to 2 on an 11-point numerical rating scale. Step frequency and the velocity of gait tended to increase between pre- and poststimulation periods. There were no apparent differences in gait among the three stimulation conditions (off, comfortable, and strong) at the poststimulation period. SCS may be effective on gait in patients with thalamic pain. PMID:27579198

  1. Therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bingchuan; Gu, Ping; Wang, Wenting; Dong, Ci; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Huimiao; Qiu, Fucheng; Han, Rui; Zhang, Zhenqing; Yan, Baoyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) hold substantial promise for the treatment of ischemic neurological disease, but few clinical data are currently available about its therapeutic effects in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). This study is to evaluate the effects of hUC-MSCs transplantation on patients with HIE. Methods A total 22 patients with HIEwere randomly divided into hUC-MSCs transplantation group (n = 12) and control group (n = 10). After isolation, hUC-MSCs were cultured for 3 to 5 passages in vitro and then intravenously administered to HIE patients in the transplantation group, while the control group received routine treatment only. The outcomes of HIE patients were evaluated at designated time points by clinical assessment scales, including NIHSS, Barthel Index, MMSE, HAMA24, HAMD14 and UPDRS. Results: hUC-MSCs were identified by morphological analysis and flow cytometry assays before clinic transplantation. No significant differences of demographic characteristics were observed between the two groups of subjects. Compared to the control group, hUC-MSCs transplantation markedly improved the outcomes of HIE patients leading to better recovery of neurological function, cognition ability, emotional reaction and extrapyramidal function. No significant adverse effects were found in subjects with hUC-MSCs transplantation during a 180-day follow-up period. Conclusion: These data suggest that hUC-MSCs therapy markedly improves the outcomes of patients with HIE, which is potential for the routine treatment of ischemic neurological disease. PMID:27508046

  2. Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation on Gait in a Patient with Thalamic Pain.

    PubMed

    Yozu, Arito; Sumitani, Masahiko; Shin, Masahiro; Ishi, Kazuhiko; Osumi, Michihiro; Katsuhira, Junji; Chiba, Ryosuke; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Thalamic pain is a central neuropathic pain disorder which occurs after stroke. Its severe chronic pain is often intractable to pharmacotherapies and affects the patients' activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QOL). Recently, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been reported to be effective in relieving the pain of thalamic pain; however, the effect of SCS on gait performance in patients is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the gait performance before and after SCS in a case with thalamic pain. A 73-year-old male with thalamic pain participated in this study. We evaluated the gait of the patient two times: before SCS insertion and after 6 days of SCS. At the second evaluation, we measured the gait in three conditions: stimulation off, comfortable stimulation, and strong stimulation. SCS succeeded in improving the pain from 7 to 2 on an 11-point numerical rating scale. Step frequency and the velocity of gait tended to increase between pre- and poststimulation periods. There were no apparent differences in gait among the three stimulation conditions (off, comfortable, and strong) at the poststimulation period. SCS may be effective on gait in patients with thalamic pain. PMID:27579198

  3. Effects of passive pedaling exercise on the intracortical inhibition in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Langthaler, Patrick B; Bathke, Arne C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Christova, Monica; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-06-01

    Cortical reorganization can be induced by exercise below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of passive and active pedaling exercise on leg motor cortical area excitability of subjects with traumatic SCI. Ten subjects with chronic cervical or thoracic SCI were enrolled in the study. We found a significant effect of pedaling on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), which did not interact with the experimental condition (active vs. passive). This corresponded to a significant reduction of SICI in the subjects with SCI, together with no evidence that this pattern differed for passive vs. active pedaling. We found no significant effect of pedaling on intracortical facilitation. Our results showed that also passive cycling may be beneficial in activating motor cortical regions and possibly also facilitating motor recovery after SCI. The present study confirms and extends the findings of previous studies that have observed task-specific cortical activation during passive pedaling. Therefore passive exercise therapies when applied below the level of the lesion in subjects with SCI could promote cortical neuroplastic reorganization. PMID:27108543

  4. Effectiveness of repeated transplantations of hematopoietic stem cells in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bryukhovetskiy, Andrey S; Bryukhovetskiy, Igor S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the short and long-term effects of the complex cell therapy of 202 cases of spinal cord injury (SCI). METHODS: The main arm included 202 cases of SCI and the control arm included 20 SCI cases. For the therapy the hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells (PCs) were mobilized to peripheral blood by 8 subcutaneous injections of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for 4 d and are harvested at day 5. The cells were administered to the main arm intrathecally every 3 mo for a long term (3-5 years) according to the internal research protocol international medical institute of tissue engineering. Magnetic resonance imaging of the site of injury and urodynamic tests were performed every 6 mo. Motor evoked potentials (MEP), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) were evaluated every 3 mo. The patients were evaluated with american spianl injury association (ASIA) index, functional independence measure index, the Medical Research Council Scale, the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISCSCI-92) and specifically developed scales. The function of bladder was evaluated by a specifically developed clinical scale. The long-term clinical outcomes were assessed for the SCI patients who received no less than 20 intrathecal transplantations of HSCs and hematopoietic precursors (HPs). RESULTS: The restoration of neurologic deficit after HSCs and HPs transplantations was proved stable and evident in 57.4% of the cases. In 42.6% cases no neurologic improvement has been observed. In 50% of the cases the motor restoration began after the first transplantation, which is confirmed in average by 9.9 points improvement in neurologic impairment as compared to the baseline (P < 0.05). Repair of the urinary system was observed in 47.7% of the cases. The sensitivity improved from baseline 124.3 points to 138.4 after the first and to 153.5 points after the second transplantations of HSCs and HPs (P < 0.05, between the

  5. Thoracic 9 Spinal Transection-Induced Model of Muscle Spasticity in the Rat: A Systematic Electrophysiological and Histopathological Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Corleto, Jose A.; Bravo-Hernández, Mariana; Kamizato, Kota; Kakinohana, Osamu; Santucci, Camila; Navarro, Michael R.; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Cizkova, Dasa; Lukacova, Nadezda; Taylor, Julian; Marsala, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The development of spinal hyper-reflexia as part of the spasticity syndrome represents one of the major complications associated with chronic spinal traumatic injury (SCI). The primary mechanism leading to progressive appearance of muscle spasticity is multimodal and may include loss of descending inhibitory tone, alteration of segmental interneuron-mediated inhibition and/or increased reflex activity to sensory input. Here, we characterized a chronic thoracic (Th 9) complete transection model of muscle spasticity in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Isoflurane-anesthetized rats received a Th9 laminectomy and the spinal cord was transected using a scalpel blade. After the transection the presence of muscle spasticity quantified as stretch and cutaneous hyper-reflexia was identified and quantified as time-dependent changes in: i) ankle-rotation-evoked peripheral muscle resistance (PMR) and corresponding electromyography (EMG) activity, ii) Hoffmann reflex, and iii) EMG responses in gastrocnemius muscle after paw tactile stimulation for up to 8 months after injury. To validate the clinical relevance of this model, the treatment potency after systemic treatment with the clinically established anti-spastic agents baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist), tizanidine (α2-adrenergic agonist) and NGX424 (AMPA receptor antagonist) was also tested. During the first 3 months post spinal transection, a progressive increase in ankle rotation-evoked muscle resistance, Hoffmann reflex amplitude and increased EMG responses to peripherally applied tactile stimuli were consistently measured. These changes, indicative of the spasticity syndrome, then remained relatively stable for up to 8 months post injury. Systemic treatment with baclofen, tizanidine and NGX424 led to a significant but transient suppression of spinal hyper-reflexia. These data demonstrate that a chronic Th9 spinal transection model in adult SD rat represents a reliable experimental platform to be used in studying the

  6. Thoracic 9 Spinal Transection-Induced Model of Muscle Spasticity in the Rat: A Systematic Electrophysiological and Histopathological Characterization.

    PubMed

    Corleto, Jose A; Bravo-Hernández, Mariana; Kamizato, Kota; Kakinohana, Osamu; Santucci, Camila; Navarro, Michael R; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Cizkova, Dasa; Lukacova, Nadezda; Taylor, Julian; Marsala, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The development of spinal hyper-reflexia as part of the spasticity syndrome represents one of the major complications associated with chronic spinal traumatic injury (SCI). The primary mechanism leading to progressive appearance of muscle spasticity is multimodal and may include loss of descending inhibitory tone, alteration of segmental interneuron-mediated inhibition and/or increased reflex activity to sensory input. Here, we characterized a chronic thoracic (Th 9) complete transection model of muscle spasticity in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Isoflurane-anesthetized rats received a Th9 laminectomy and the spinal cord was transected using a scalpel blade. After the transection the presence of muscle spasticity quantified as stretch and cutaneous hyper-reflexia was identified and quantified as time-dependent changes in: i) ankle-rotation-evoked peripheral muscle resistance (PMR) and corresponding electromyography (EMG) activity, ii) Hoffmann reflex, and iii) EMG responses in gastrocnemius muscle after paw tactile stimulation for up to 8 months after injury. To validate the clinical relevance of this model, the treatment potency after systemic treatment with the clinically established anti-spastic agents baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist), tizanidine (α2-adrenergic agonist) and NGX424 (AMPA receptor antagonist) was also tested. During the first 3 months post spinal transection, a progressive increase in ankle rotation-evoked muscle resistance, Hoffmann reflex amplitude and increased EMG responses to peripherally applied tactile stimuli were consistently measured. These changes, indicative of the spasticity syndrome, then remained relatively stable for up to 8 months post injury. Systemic treatment with baclofen, tizanidine and NGX424 led to a significant but transient suppression of spinal hyper-reflexia. These data demonstrate that a chronic Th9 spinal transection model in adult SD rat represents a reliable experimental platform to be used in studying the

  7. Effect of spinal cord compression on local vascular blood flow and perfusion capacity.

    PubMed

    Alshareef, Mohammed; Krishna, Vibhor; Ferdous, Jahid; Alshareef, Ahmed; Kindy, Mark; Kolachalama, Vijaya B; Shazly, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce prolonged spinal cord compression that may result in a reduction of local tissue perfusion, progressive ischemia, and potentially irreversible tissue necrosis. Due to the combination of risk factors and the varied presentation of symptoms, the appropriate method and time course for clinical intervention following SCI are not always evident. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element fluid-structure interaction model of the cervical spinal cord was developed to examine how traditionally sub-clinical compressive mechanical loads impact spinal arterial blood flow. The spinal cord and surrounding dura mater were modeled as linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible solids, while blood was modeled as a single-phased, incompressible Newtonian fluid. Simulation results indicate that anterior, posterior, and anteroposterior compressions of the cervical spinal cord have significantly different ischemic potentials, with prediction that the posterior component of loading elevates patient risk due to the concomitant reduction of blood flow in the arterial branches. Conversely, anterior loading compromises flow through the anterior spinal artery but minimally impacts branch flow rates. The findings of this study provide novel insight into how sub-clinical spinal cord compression could give rise to certain disease states, and suggest a need to monitor spinal artery perfusion following even mild compressive loading. PMID:25268384

  8. Effect of Spinal Cord Compression on Local Vascular Blood Flow and Perfusion Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Alshareef, Mohammed; Krishna, Vibhor; Ferdous, Jahid; Alshareef, Ahmed; Kindy, Mark; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Shazly, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce prolonged spinal cord compression that may result in a reduction of local tissue perfusion, progressive ischemia, and potentially irreversible tissue necrosis. Due to the combination of risk factors and the varied presentation of symptoms, the appropriate method and time course for clinical intervention following SCI are not always evident. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element fluid-structure interaction model of the cervical spinal cord was developed to examine how traditionally sub-clinical compressive mechanical loads impact spinal arterial blood flow. The spinal cord and surrounding dura mater were modeled as linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible solids, while blood was modeled as a single-phased, incompressible Newtonian fluid. Simulation results indicate that anterior, posterior, and anteroposterior compressions of the cervical spinal cord have significantly different ischemic potentials, with prediction that the posterior component of loading elevates patient risk due to the concomitant reduction of blood flow in the arterial branches. Conversely, anterior loading compromises flow through the anterior spinal artery but minimally impacts branch flow rates. The findings of this study provide novel insight into how sub-clinical spinal cord compression could give rise to certain disease states, and suggest a need to monitor spinal artery perfusion following even mild compressive loading. PMID:25268384

  9. The effect of glycyrrhizic acid on traumatic spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sehitoglu, M H; Guven, M; Yüksel, Y; Akman, T; Bozkurt Aras, A; Farooqi, A A; Cosar, M

    2016-01-01

    Spine injury associated with traumatic spinal cord injury eventuates in oxidative stress, inflammation and neuronal apoptosis. The aim of this study is to find out whether the glycyrrhizic acid treatment protects spinal cord from traumatic injuries in rats. To this end, the rats were divided into three groups: group I; control group (no drug or operation, n=8), group II; traumatic spinal cord injury group (TSCI, n=8) and group III; glycyrrhizic acid group (TSCI-GA, 80 mg/kg, n=8). Total laminectomy was performed at T10 level. A balloon angioplasty catheter was inserted into the T9 level thoracic spinal cord extradurally. The rats were evaluated with the Tarlov Scale. After 24 hours, spinal cord tissues were taken for biochemical and histopathological examinations. TSCI effectuates unwanted results on tissues, antioxidant systems and cell membranes. Antioxidant enzyme level decreased and lipid peroxidation increased. However, TSCI led to inflammation and apoptosis. Glycyrrhizic acid treatment provided a significant decrease in lipid peroxidation in group III in comparison with group II. Moreover, nuclear respiratory factor 1 levels and superoxide dismutase activity of group III were significantly higher than group II (p<0.05). The histopathological and immunohistochemical results revealed that the numbers of apoptotic and necrotic neuron, edema, hemorrhage, inflammatory cells, NF-κB and S100B expressions were significantly lower than group II (p<0.05). Our study showed that the glycyrrhizic acid treatment reduced oxidative stress and inflammation, and promoted the neuronal functions in traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:27188862

  10. Effect of local application of an antibody against brain-derived neurotrophic factor on neuroma formation after transection of the inferior alveolar nerve in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Valverde Guevara, Yessenia M.; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Isao; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the contributions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) at the injury site toward neuroma formation and nerve regeneration after inferior alveolar nerve transection. Histological analysis confirmed neuroma formation at 2 weeks after complete transection of the inferior alveolar nerve. A local administration of an antibody to BDNF inhibited connective tissue proliferation at the injury site and promoted nerve fiber integrity. Fluorogold labeling showed a significantly higher number of labeled cells in the trigeminal ganglion in the anti-BDNF-treated group compared with the vehicle control group. In-situ hybridization histochemistry showed intense signals for tropomyosin receptor kinase B mRNA in the area of the injury site containing fibrous or granular tissue in the anti-BDNF-treated group. In contrast, these signals were close to the detection limit in the area of the perineurium in intact nerve trunks, indicating that the signals were expressed by fibroblasts within the connective tissue. These findings suggest that antagonization of endogenous BDNF induced by nerve injury reduces neuroma formation, without inhibiting damaged axon regeneration. PMID:25055143

  11. Beneficial Effects of Hypoxic Preconditioning on Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Jing; Tian, Yan-Ming; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Yi

    2015-10-31

    As human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) transplanation may be promising in heart failure treatment, it is important to know whether hypoxic preconditioning (HP) promote hUC-MSCs proliferation and differentiation and protect them against chemical hypoxic damages. This study aimed to investigate the effects of HP on proliferation and differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs). The study also aimed to confirm our hypothesis that HP could promote hUC-MSCs proliferation and differentiation to cardiomyocyte-like cells as well as effectively protecting hUC-MSCs and cardiomyocyte-like cells against chemical hypoxic damages. Isolated hUC-MSCs were cultured in hypoxia at 1%, 3% and 5% O₂ for 72 hours. 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) induced differentiation of hUC-MSCs to cardiomyocyte-like cells was determined by streptavidin-perosidase (SP) immunohistochemical staining and the content of troponin (TnI). Flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle in hUC-MSCs and cardiomyocyte-like cells. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) and mitochondrial Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺](m)), were measured in hUC-MSCs and cardiomyocyte-like cells during chemical hypoxia induced by cobalt chloride (100 μmol/L). HP optimally promoted the proliferation of hUC-MSCs at 3% O₂ and enhanced the differentiation of hUC-MSCs to cardiomyocyte-like cells by 5-AZA in a concentration-dependent manner. The cell cycle distribution of cardiomyocyte-like cells, but not hUC-MSCs, was clearly changed by HP. Chemical hypoxic damage, decreased ΔΨ(m) and increased [Ca²⁺](m), were alleviated significantly in HP-treated cells compared with the normaxia-treated cells. The results demonstrate that HP promoted hUC-MSCs proliferation and differentiation to cardiomyocyte-like cells, and protected both cell types against chemical hypoxic damage. PMID:26536910

  12. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat'hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  13. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T.; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  14. Effects of non-toxic cryoprotective agents on the viability of cord blood derived MNCs.

    PubMed

    Bissoyi, Akalabya; Pramanik, K

    2013-01-01

    The present work investigates the effects of a variety of natural cryoprotectants in combination on post-thaw viability and apoptosis of cryopreserved mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from umbilical cord blood. The extracellular cryoprotectants (10 mM) namely trehalose, hydroxyl ethyl starch, polyvinyl pyrrolidine and intracellular CPAs (5 mM) like erythritol, taurine and ectoine were used to prepare different combinations of freezing medium following L9 (3(4)) Taguchi orthogonal array. Catalase, coenzyme Q10 and n-acetyl cystine (100 microg/m) were added as antioxidants. Among various combinations, freezing medium consisting of hydroxyl ethyl starch, ectoin and co-enzyme Q10 with 10% FBS is found to be most effective combination achieving maximum cell viability of 93%, 5.6% early apoptotic, 0.7% late apoptotic and 0.1% necrotic cells. SEM and phase contrast microscopy confirmed the normal cell morphology of the post-thaw cultured cells with retaining their membrane integrity. The survival rate of MNCs is higher than the rate achieved using conventional Me2SO. PMID:24448765

  15. Biological effects of low-level laser irradiation on umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongli; Wang, Hong; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Weichao; Wang, Chao; Chen, Zhuying

    2016-04-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) can enhance stem cell (SC) activity by increasing migration and proliferation. This study investigated the effects of LLLI on proliferation, enzymatic activity, and growth factor production in human umbilical cord mesenchymal SCs (hUC-MSCs) as well as the underlying mechanisms. hUC-MSCs were assigned to a control group (non-irradiation group) and three LLLI treatment groups (635 nm group, 808 nm group, and 635/808 nm group). Laser power density and energy density of 20 mW/cm2 and 12 J/cm2, respectively, were used for each experiment. The proliferation rate was higher in the 635 nm as compared to the other groups. LLLI at 808 nm did not induce cell proliferation. ROS levels in cells exposed to 635, 808, and 635/808 nm radiation were increased by 52.81%, 26.89%, and 21.15%, respectively, relative to the control group. CAT, tGPx, and SOD activity was increased. LLLI at 808 nm increased the levels of IL-1, IL-6, and NFκB but not VEGF. LLLI improved hUC-MSCs function and increased antioxidant activity. Dual-wavelength LLLI had more potent effects on hUC-MSCs than single-wavelength treatment. LLLI has potential applications in the preconditioning of hUC-MSCs in vitro prior to transplantation, which could improve the regenerative capacity of cells.

  16. Effects of conventional and alternating cushion weight-shifting in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gary A.; Bogie, Kath M.

    2015-01-01

    A repeated-measures study of 13 adult full-time wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI) was carried out to determine whether alternating-pressure air cushion (APAC) use compared with independent pressure relief (IPR) provides reliable, effective pressure relief for individuals with SCI. Bilateral mean ischial interface pressure (IP), transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), and unilateral laser Doppler blood flow were evaluated. Blood flow component contributions were determined using short-time Fourier transform (STFT)-based spectral analysis. IPR assessment was carried out at recruitment. Study participants then used an APAC for 2 wk every 3 mo for 18 mo. IPR weight-shifting decreased mean ischial IP (p < 0.05) and increased mean TcPO2 (p < 0.05). All variables rapidly returned to preintervention levels following weight-shifting except for the cardiac component of blood flow. APAC-induced weight-shifting decreased mean ischial IP (p < 0.05). Mean TcPO2 increased and was higher than for IPR. STFT analysis indicated that quiet sitting following APAC-induced weight-shifting produced a higher neurogenic component of blood flow than following IPR (p = 0.02). Thus, IPR positively affects multiple aspects of tissue health but produces transient improvements and must be repeated regularly. APAC activation dynamically and continuously alters IP distribution with more sustained positive tissue health effects. PMID:25629607

  17. Effects of conventional and alternating cushion weight-shifting in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gary A; Bogie, Kath M

    2014-01-01

    A repeated-measures study of 13 adult full-time wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI) was carried out to determine whether alternating-pressure air cushion (APAC) use compared with independent pressure relief (IPR) provides reliable, effective pressure relief for individuals with SCI. Bilateral mean ischial interface pressure (IP), transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), and unilateral laser Doppler blood flow were evaluated. Blood flow component contributions were determined using short-time Fourier transform (STFT)-based spectral analysis. IPR assessment was carried out at recruitment. Study participants then used an APAC for 2 wk every 3 mo for 18 mo. IPR weight-shifting decreased mean ischial IP (p < 0.05) and increased mean TcPO2 (p < 0.05). All variables rapidly returned to preintervention levels following weight-shifting except for the cardiac component of blood flow. APAC-induced weight-shifting decreased mean ischial IP (p < 0.05). Mean TcPO2 increased and was higher than for IPR. STFT analysis indicated that quiet sitting following APAC-induced weight-shifting produced a higher neurogenic component of blood flow than following IPR (p = 0.02). Thus, IPR positively affects multiple aspects of tissue health but produces transient improvements and must be repeated regularly. APAC activation dynamically and continuously alters IP distribution with more sustained positive tissue health effects. PMID:25629607

  18. Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Human Trophoblast Cell Functions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yajing; Wu, Yanming; Chang, Xinwen; Li, Yan; Wang, Kai; Duan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Trophoblast cell dysfunction is involved in many disorders during pregnancy such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. Few treatments exist, however, that target improving trophoblast cell function. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are capable of self-renewing, can undergo multilineage differentiation, and have homing abilities; in addition, they have immunomodulatory effects and paracrine properties and thus are a prospective source for cell therapy. To identify whether hUCMSCs can regulate trophoblast cell functions, we treated trophoblast cells with hUCMSC supernatant or cocultured them with hUCMSCs. Both treatments remarkably enhanced the migration and invasion abilities of trophoblast cells and upregulated their proliferation ability. At a certain concentration, hUCMSCs also modulated hCG, PIGF, and sEndoglin levels in the trophoblast culture medium. Thus, hUCMSCs have a positive effect on trophoblast cellular functions, which may provide a new avenue for treatment of placenta-related diseases during pregnancy. PMID:26949402

  19. The Effects of Testosterone on Oxidative Stress Markers in Mice with Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Choobineh, Hamid; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Pasalar, Parvin; Jahanzad, Issa; Ghorbani, Rostam; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes infertility in male patients through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction, semen and hormone abnormalities. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in poor semen quality and subsequent infertility in males with SCI. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of SCI on the level of testosterone hormone. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we evaluated the effects of exogenous testosterone on the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as well as the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation (PCO), as markers of OS, in 10 groups of SCI mice. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was determined using the 2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline- 6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation assay. Results Exogenous testosterone administration in mice with SCI significantly reduced SOD and GPx enzyme activities and MDA level. There was no significant decrease in PCO content. In addition, TAC remarkably increased in the sham and SCI groups not treated with testosterone but remained unchanged in all other experimental groups. Exogenous testosterone also reduced serum testosterone levels in all groups except the positive control group. Conclusion Our cumulative data indicated that SCI could cause sterility by disturbing the plasmatic testosterone balance. The normal level of endogenous testosterone was not completely restored by exogenous testosterone administration. PMID:27123205

  20. Computed Tomography Perfusion Assessment of Radiation Therapy Effects on Spinal Cord Hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Bisdas, Sotirios; Sharma, Anand K.; McDonald, Daniel; Strojan, Primoz; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: We used computed tomography (CT) perfusion to evaluate the acute and late effect of radiation therapy (RT) on spinal cord (SC) hemodynamics in patients without symptoms of myelopathy. We hypothesized that SC perfusion could be acutely altered during RT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed neck CT perfusion studies of 36 head-and-neck cancer patients (N1), 16 of whom had previously undergone RT. In a separate group of 6 patients (N2), CT perfusion studies were obtained before RT, after 40 Gy, and after treatment completion. Results: In the N1 group, SC blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and capillary permeability (CP) maps were not significantly different between RT-treated and RT-naive patients. In the N2 group, BF and CP were significantly increased during treatment compared with the baseline and post-RT studies. Conclusions: Radiation therapy of the head and neck may cause transient perturbations of SC perfusion that seem to reverse after treatment. There are no definite chronic effects of RT on SC perfusion observeable at the typical doses administered during treatment of head and neck malignancies.

  1. Partly shared spinal cord networks for locomotion and scratching.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Ari; Hao, Zhao-Zhe

    2011-12-01

    Animals produce a variety of behaviors using a limited number of muscles and motor neurons. Rhythmic behaviors are often generated in basic form by networks of neurons within the central nervous system, or central pattern generators (CPGs). It is known from several invertebrates that different rhythmic behaviors involving the same muscles and motor neurons can be generated by a single CPG, multiple separate CPGs, or partly overlapping CPGs. Much less is known about how vertebrates generate multiple, rhythmic behaviors involving the same muscles. The spinal cord of limbed vertebrates contains CPGs for locomotion and multiple forms of scratching. We investigated the extent of sharing of CPGs for hind limb locomotion and for scratching. We used the spinal cord of adult red-eared turtles. Animals were immobilized to remove movement-related sensory feedback and were spinally transected to remove input from the brain. We took two approaches. First, we monitored individual spinal cord interneurons (i.e., neurons that are in between sensory neurons and motor neurons) during generation of each kind of rhythmic output of motor neurons (i.e., each motor pattern). Many spinal cord interneurons were rhythmically activated during the motor patterns for forward swimming and all three forms of scratching. Some of these scratch/swim interneurons had physiological and morphological properties consistent with their playing a role in the generation of motor patterns for all of these rhythmic behaviors. Other spinal cord interneurons, however, were rhythmically activated during scratching motor patterns but inhibited during swimming motor patterns. Thus, locomotion and scratching may be generated by partly shared spinal cord CPGs. Second, we delivered swim-evoking and scratch-evoking stimuli simultaneously and monitored the resulting motor patterns. Simultaneous stimulation could cause interactions of scratch inputs with subthreshold swim inputs to produce normal swimming, acceleration

  2. Task-specificity vs. ceiling effect: step-training in shallow water after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kuerzi, J; Brown, E H; Shum-Siu, A; Siu, A; Burke, D; Morehouse, J; Smith, R R; Magnuson, D S K

    2010-07-01

    While activity-based rehabilitation is one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury, the necessary components for optimal locomotor retraining have not yet been determined. Currently, a number of different activity-based approaches are being investigated including body weight-supported treadmill training (with and without manual assistance), robotically-assisted treadmill training, bicycling and swimming, among others. We recently showed, in the adult rat, that intensive rehabilitation based on swimming brought about significant improvements in hindlimb performance during swimming but did not alter the normal course of recovery of over-ground walking (Smith et al., 2006a,b, 2009). However, swimming lacks the phasic limb-loading and plantar cutaneous feedback thought to be important for weight-supported step training. So, we are investigating an innovative approach based on walking in shallow water where buoyancy provides some body weight support and balance while still allowing for limb-loading and appropriate cutaneous afferent feedback during retraining. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine if spinal cord injured animals show improved overground locomotion following intensive body weight-supported locomotor training in shallow water. The results show that training in shallow water successfully improved stepping in shallow water, but was not able to bring about significant improvements in overground locomotion despite the fact that the shallow water provides sufficient body weight support to allow acutely injured rats to generate frequent plantar stepping. These observations support previous suggestions that incompletely injured animals retrain themselves while moving about in their cages and that daily training regimes are not able to improve upon this already substantial functional improvement due to a ceiling effect, rather than task-specificity, per se. These results also support the concept that moderately-severe thoracic

  3. CD14{sup +} monocytes promote the immunosuppressive effect of human umbilical cord matrix stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ding; TEDA Life and Technology Research Center, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, TEDA, Tianjin ; Chen, Ke; TEDA Life and Technology Research Center, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, TEDA, Tianjin ; Du, Wei Ting; Han, Zhi-Bo; TEDA Life and Technology Research Center, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, TEDA, Tianjin ; Ren, He; Chi, Ying; TEDA Life and Technology Research Center, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, TEDA, Tianjin ; and others

    2010-09-10

    Here, the effect of CD14{sup +} monocytes on human umbilical cord matrix stem cell (hUC-MSC)-mediated immunosuppression was studied in vitro. hUC-MSCs exerted a potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation and interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) secretion capacities of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells in response to anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation. Transwell co-culture system revealed that the suppressive effect was primarily mediated by soluble factors. Addition of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (indomethacin or NS-398) almost completely abrogated the immunosuppression activity of hUC-MSCs, identifying prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) as an important soluble mediator. CD14{sup +} monocytes were found to be able to enhance significantly the immunosuppressive effect of hUC-MSCs in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine IL-1{beta}, either exogenously added or produced by CD14{sup +} monocytes in culture, could trigger expression of high levels of PGE{sub 2} by hUC-MSCs, whereas inclusion of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) in the culture down-regulated not only PGE{sub 2} expression, but also reversed the promotional effect of CD14{sup +} monocytes and partially restored CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell proliferation and IFN-{gamma} secretion. Our data demonstrate an important role of monocytes in the hUC-MSC-induced immunomodulation, which may have important implications in future efforts to explore the clinical potentials of hUC-MSCs.

  4. Geoscientists will meet to organize transects project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Global Geosciences Transects (GGT) project is a new activity of the International Lithosphere Program (ILP). The objective of GGT is to compile a series of 100 km-wide crustal transects across major structures in all continents.The transects will be similar to those being produced by the North American Continent- Ocean Transects Program under the coordination of Robert C. Speed (Northwestern University, Evanston, 111.), except that they will include continental interiors and paleostructures (e.g., Precambrian sutures, rifts) as well as continental margins and active tectonic zones

  5. Effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons or photons on the canine cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.

    1981-10-01

    The cervical spinal cords of 36 young adult male beagles were irradiated with fast neutrons with a mean energy of 15 MeV in four fractions/week/5 weeks to total doses of 1167, 1750, 2625, or 3938 rad. Nineteen beagles received 3500, 5250, or 7875 rad of photons in like manner. Sensory evoked responses recorded before and periodically after irradiations remained stable on 22 test and 6 control dogs. The cerebrospinal fluid contained excess protein and erythrocytes often before and always after the onset of neurological symptons. All dogs in the 3938-rad neutron, 6/9 dogs in the 2625-rad neutron, and 4/6 dogs in the 7875-rad photon groups developed cervical muscular spasms, incoordination, and progressive paralysis and were euthanatized. The relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons as measured by the onset of neurological signs is approximately 3 (7875 photons/ 2625 neutrons) and is less than 4.5 (7875 photons/1750 neutrons). Gross pathological findings included hemorrhages, softening, and poliomyelomalacia, especially of the dorsal horns. Two dogs developed neoplasms in the irradiated field 1065 and 1470 days following neutron irradiation.

  6. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise responses in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, C R; Taylor, B J; Campbell, I G; Romer, L M

    2014-10-01

    We asked whether specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves respiratory structure and function and peak exercise responses in highly trained athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Ten Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) were paired by functional classification then randomly assigned to an IMT or placebo group. Diaphragm thickness (B-mode ultrasonography), respiratory function [spirometry and maximum static inspiratory (PI ,max ) and expiratory (PE ,max ) pressures], chronic activity-related dyspnea (Baseline and Transition Dyspnea Indices), and physiological responses to incremental arm-crank exercise were assessed before and after 6 weeks of pressure threshold IMT or sham bronchodilator treatment. Compared to placebo, the IMT group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness (P = 0.001) and PI ,max (P = 0.016). There was a significant increase in tidal volume at peak exercise in IMT vs placebo (P = 0.048) and a strong trend toward an increase in peak work rate (P = 0.081, partial eta-squared = 0.33) and peak oxygen uptake (P = 0.077, partial eta-squared = 0.34). No other indices changed post-intervention. In conclusion, IMT resulted in significant diaphragmatic hypertrophy and increased inspiratory muscle strength in highly trained athletes with cervical SCI. The strong trend, with large observed effect, toward an increase in peak aerobic performance suggests IMT may provide a useful adjunct to training in this population. PMID:23530708

  7. Teratogenic effects of pyridoxine on the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia of embryonic chickens.

    PubMed

    Sharp, A A; Fedorovich, Y

    2015-03-19

    Our understanding of the role of somatosensory feedback in regulating motility during chicken embryogenesis and fetal development in general has been hampered by the lack of an approach to selectively alter specific sensory modalities. In adult mammals, pyridoxine overdose has been shown to cause a peripheral sensory neuropathy characterized by a loss of both muscle and cutaneous afferents, but predominated by a loss of proprioception. We have begun to explore the sensitivity of the nervous system in chicken embryos to the application of pyridoxine on embryonic days 7 and 8, after sensory neurons in the lumbosacral region become post-mitotic. Upon examination of the spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion and peripheral nerves, we find that pyridoxine causes a loss of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 3-positive neurons, a decrease in the diameter of the muscle innervating nerve tibialis, and a reduction in the number of large diameter axons in this nerve. However, we found no change in the number of Substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive neurons, the number of motor neurons or the diameter or axonal composition of the femoral cutaneous nerve. Therefore, pyridoxine causes a peripheral sensory neuropathy in embryonic chickens largely consistent with its effects in adult mammals. However, the lesion may be more restricted to proprioception in the chicken embryo. Therefore, pyridoxine lesion induced during embryogenesis in the chicken embryo can be used to assess how the loss of sensation, largely proprioception, alters spontaneous embryonic motility and subsequent motor development. PMID:25592428

  8. Effect of Spinal Cord Injury on the Respiratory System: Basic Research and Current Clinical Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, M. Beth; Nantwi, Kwaku; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leads to an impairment of the respiratory system. The more rostral the level of injury, the more likely the injury will affect ventilation. In fact, respiratory insufficiency is the number one cause of mortality and morbidity after SCI. This review highlights the progress that has been made in basic and clinical research, while noting the gaps in our knowledge. Basic research has focused on a hemisection injury model to examine methods aimed at improving respiratory function after SCI, but contusion injury models have also been used. Increasing synaptic plasticity, strengthening spared axonal pathways, and the disinhibition of phrenic motor neurons all result in the activation of a latent respiratory motor pathway that restores function to a previously paralyzed hemidiaphragm in animal models. Human clinical studies have revealed that respiratory function is negatively impacted by SCI. Respiratory muscle training regimens may improve inspiratory function after SCI, but more thorough and carefully designed studies are needed to adequately address this issue. Phrenic nerve and diaphragm pacing are options available to wean patients from standard mechanical ventilation. The techniques aimed at improving respiratory function in humans with SCI have both pros and cons, but having more options available to the clinician allows for more individualized treatment, resulting in better patient care. Despite significant progress in both basic and clinical research, there is still a significant gap in our understanding of the effect of SCI on the respiratory system. PMID:17853653

  9. Mild hypothermia combined with a scaffold of NgR-silenced neural stem cells/Schwann cells to treat spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Liang, Jinhua; Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Shuhong; Sun, Wenwen

    2014-01-01

    Because the inhibition of Nogo proteins can promote neurite growth and nerve cell differentiation, a cell-scaffold complex seeded with Nogo receptor (NgR)-silenced neural stem cells and Schwann cells may be able to improve the microenvironment for spinal cord injury repair. Previous studies have found that mild hypothermia helps to attenuate secondary damage in the spinal cord and exerts a neuroprotective effect. Here, we constructed a cell-scaffold complex consisting of a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold seeded with NgR-silenced neural stem cells and Schwann cells, and determined the effects of mild hypothermia combined with the cell-scaffold complexes on the spinal cord hemi-transection injury in the T9 segment in rats. Compared with the PLGA group and the NgR-silencing cells + PLGA group, hindlimb motor function and nerve electrophysiological function were clearly improved, pathological changes in the injured spinal cord were attenuated, and the number of surviving cells and nerve fibers were increased in the group treated with the NgR-silenced cell scaffold + mild hypothermia at 34°C for 6 hours. Furthermore, fewer pathological changes to the injured spinal cord and more surviving cells and nerve fibers were found after mild hypothermia therapy than in injuries not treated with mild hypothermia. These experimental results indicate that mild hypothermia combined with NgR gene-silenced cells in a PLGA scaffold may be an effective therapy for treating spinal cord injury. PMID:25657741

  10. Therapy induces widespread reorganization of motor cortex after complete spinal transection that supports motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, Patrick D; Manohar, Anitha; Shumsky, Jed S; Moxon, Karen A

    2016-05-01

    Reorganization of the somatosensory system and its relationship to functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been well studied. However, little is known about the impact of SCI on organization of the motor system. Recent studies suggest that step-training paradigms in combination with spinal stimulation, either electrically or through pharmacology, are more effective than step training alone at inducing recovery and that reorganization of descending corticospinal circuits is necessary. However, simpler, passive exercise combined with pharmacotherapy has also shown functional improvement after SCI and reorganization of, at least, the sensory cortex. In this study we assessed the effect of passive exercise and serotonergic (5-HT) pharmacological therapies on behavioral recovery and organization of the motor cortex. We compared the effects of passive hindlimb bike exercise to bike exercise combined with daily injections of 5-HT agonists in a rat model of complete mid-thoracic transection. 5-HT pharmacotherapy combined with bike exercise allowed the animals to achieve unassisted weight support in the open field. This combination of therapies also produced extensive expansion of the axial trunk motor cortex into the deafferented hindlimb motor cortex and, surprisingly, reorganization within the caudal and even the rostral forelimb motor cortex areas. The extent of the axial trunk expansion was correlated to improvement in behavioral recovery of hindlimbs during open field locomotion, including weight support. From a translational perspective, these data suggest a rationale for developing and optimizing cost-effective, non-invasive, pharmacological and passive exercise regimes to promote plasticity that supports restoration of movement after spinal cord injury. PMID:26826448

  11. The radiation response of the cervical spinal cord of the pig: Effects of changing the irradiated volume

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Aardweg, G.J.M.J.; Hopewell, J.W.; Whitehouse, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the field size effect for the cervical spinal cord of the pig after single doses of {gamma}-rays. In this study, clinically relevant volumes of the spinal cord were irradiated. The effects of the local irradiation of different lengths of the spinal cord (2.5 cm, 5.0 cm, and 10.0 cm) have been evaluated in mature pigs (37-43 weeks). Single doses of 25-31 Gy were given using a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-source, at a dose rate of 0.21-0.30 Gy/min. The incidence of radiation-induced paralysis was used as the endpoint. The data were analyzed using probit analysis and a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP)-model. Twenty-five animals out of a total of 53 developed paralysis, with histological evidence of parenchymal and vascular changes in their white matter. The slope of the dose-response curves decreased with the decrease in field size; however, there was no significant difference at the radiation dose associated with a 50% incidence of paralysis (ED{sub 50}) irrespective of the method of analysis. The ED{sub 50} values {+-} standard errors ({+-} SE) were 27.02 {+-} 0.36 Gy, 27.68 {+-} 0.57 Gy, and 28.28 {+-} 0.78 Gy for field lengths of 10, 5, and 2.5 cm, respectively. Analysis of the data with a normal tissue complication probability (NCTP) model gave similar results. The latent period of paralysis was 7.5-16.5 weeks with no significant differences between dose and field size. No significant field size-related differences in response were detectable in the cervical spinal cord of mature pigs after single dose irradiations, specifically at a clinically relevant level of effect (< ED{sub 10}). 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. The effects of retinoic acid on immunoglobulin synthesis by human cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Israel, H; Odziemiec, C; Ballow, M

    1991-06-01

    Derivatives of vitamin A have attracted considerable attention as agents which have immune potentiating properties and possibly tumor-suppressive effects. Recent investigations have shown that retinoic acid (RA) can augment immunoglobulin production of B-cell hybridomas from patients with immune deficiency. In this study we examined the ability of RA to modify the mitogen-induced polyclonal immunoglobulin synthesis of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC). RA in concentrations ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-7) M augmented IgM synthesis of CBMC in response to formalinized Cowans I strain Staphylococcus aureus (SAC) up to 45.6-fold which was greater at suboptimal responses to SAC. There were no changes in IgG or IgA synthesis and minimal effects on SAC-induced proliferative responses. RA did not produce similar changes in IgM synthesis of SAC-stimulated adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and RA had no effect on the immunoglobulin synthesis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-stimulated CBMC or adult PBMC. Time course studies showed that peak enhancement occurred when RA was added between 4 and 24 hr after culture initiation and required prior activation by SAC for augmentation of IgM synthesis. Cell separation experiments showed that prior incubation (18 hr) of an enriched T-cell fraction with RA enhanced the IgM synthesis of a T-cell-depleted B-cell fraction. These experiments and the findings that RA-induced augmentation of IgM production in response to SAC, but not to EBV suggest that the immunoregulatory effects of RA may be mediated by either T cells or T-cell products. Further studies will be necessary to understand the mechanism by which RA augments IgM synthesis of CBMC. PMID:2029794

  13. Effects of serotonergic medications on locomotor performance in humans with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leech, Kristan A; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Hornby, T George

    2014-08-01

    Incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) often results in significant motor impairments that lead to decreased functional mobility. Loss of descending serotonergic (5HT) input to spinal circuits is thought to contribute to motor impairments, with enhanced motor function demonstrated through augmentation of 5HT signaling. However, the presence of spastic motor behaviors in SCI is attributed, in part, to changes in spinal 5HT receptors that augment their activity in the absence of 5HT, although data demonstrating motor effects of 5HT agents that deactivate these receptors are conflicting. The effects of enhancement or depression of 5HT signaling on locomotor function have not been thoroughly evaluated in human iSCI. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate acute effects of 5HT medications on locomotion in 10 subjects with chronic (>1 year) iSCI. Peak overground and treadmill locomotor performance, including measures of gait kinematics, electromyographic (EMG) activity, and oxygen consumption, were assessed before and after single-dose administration of either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a 5HT antagonist using a double-blinded, randomized, cross-over design. Results indicate that neither medication led to improvements in locomotion, with a significant decrease in peak overground gait speed observed after 5HT antagonists (from 0.8±0.1 to 0.7±0.1 m/s; p=0.01). Additionally, 5-HT medications had differential effects on EMG activity, with 5HT antagonists decreasing extensor activity and SSRIs increasing flexor activity. Our data therefore suggest that acute manipulation of 5HT signaling, despite changes in muscle activity, does not improve locomotor performance after iSCI. PMID:24742292

  14. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies. PMID:26450984

  15. Effects of Rolipram on Adult Rat Oligodendrocytes and Functional Recovery after Contusive Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Eric; Whitaker, Christopher M.; Burke, Darlene A.; Hetman, Michal; Onifer, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic human spinal cord injury causes devastating and long-term hardships. These are due to the irreparable primary mechanical injury and secondary injury cascade. In particular, oligodendrocyte cell death, white matter axon damage, spared axon demyelination, and the ensuing dysfunction in action potential conduction lead to the initial deficits and impair functional recovery. For these reasons, and that oligodendrocyte and axon survival may be related, various neuroprotective strategies after SCI are being investigated. We previously demonstrated that oligodendrocytes in the adult rat epicenter ventrolateral funiculus express 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent phosphodiesterase 4 subtypes and that their death was attenuated up to 3 days after contusive cervical spinal cord injury when rolipram, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, was administered. Here, we report that 1) there are more oligodendrocyte somata in the adult rat epicenter ventrolateral funiculus, 2) descending and ascending axonal conductivity in the ventrolateral funiculus improves, and that 3) there are fewer hindlimb footfall errors during grid-walking at 5 weeks after contusive cervical spinal cord injury when rolipram is delivered for 2 weeks. This is the first demonstration of improved descending and ascending long-tract axonal conductivity across a spinal cord injury with this pharmacological approach. Since descending long-tract axonal conductivity did not return to normal, further evaluations of the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic window of rolipram as well as optimal combinations are necessary before consideration for neuroprotection in humans with spinal cord injury. PMID:19635528

  16. Effects of air stacking on pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong-Hwa; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of air stacking on pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with cervical spinal cord injury. [Subjects] Twenty-six patients were included in the study and were randomized into experimental (n = 14) and control (n = 12) groups. [Methods] Both groups performed therapeutic exercises: the control group performed incentive spirometry, while the experimental group performed 20 repetitions of air stacking exercise twice a day. The training for both groups continued for 5 days a week for 6 weeks. [Results] Forced vital capacity and peak cough flow increased significantly in the experimental group compared to the controls. All within-group variables in the experimental group differed significantly at 6 weeks compared to baseline, while in the control group only Forced vital capacity differed significantly at 6 weeks compared to baseline. [Conclusion] Air stacking exercise significantly improved pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:26180355

  17. Clinicopathologic effects of a 21-aminosteroid compound (U74389G) and high-dose methylprednisolone on spinal cord function after simulated spinal cord trauma.

    PubMed

    Coates, J R; Sorjonen, D C; Simpson, S T; Cox, N R; Wright, J C; Hudson, J A; Finn-Bodner, S T; Brown, S A

    1995-01-01

    A model simulating acute-compressive spinal cord trauma at the second lumbar spinal cord segment (100 g, 300 seconds) was used to evaluate the efficacy of a vehicle control, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS), and a 21-aminosteroid compound (U74389G). Dogs were allocated into one of five treatment groups (A to E) using ultrasonographic determination of spinal cord diameters to ensure even distribution of spinal cord diameters among the treatment groups. Initial dosages of the vehicle control (A), methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg of body weight) (B), or U74389G (30 mg/kg, 3 mg/kg, or 10 mg/kg of body weight) (C, D, or E, respectively) were administered intravenously 30 minutes after trauma. Dosages were reduced by one-half for 2 and 6 hour treatments. Then every 4 hours for 42 hours, dosages were reduced one-third and one-sixth from the original dose of methylprednisolone and U74389G, respectively. Neurological examinations were performed daily for 21 days. Histopathological examination of the traumatized spinal cord showed malacic and degenerative lesions. Although significant differences in some portions of the neurological and histopathologic examinations were observed, clinical efficacy for MPSS and U74389G could not be established in this model. PMID:7778252

  18. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  19. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  20. Effect of cannabinoids on CGRP release in the isolated rat lumbar spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Milne, Michael; Ashton, John C

    2016-02-12

    Cannabinoids produce analgesia through a variety of mechanisms. It has been proposed that one mechanism is by modulating the release of CGRP in the spinal cord pain pathways. Previous studies have reported that cannabinoids, particularly CB2 receptor agonists, can modulate CGRP release in the isolated rat spinal cord. In our experiments, the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin evoked CGRP release and this was supressed by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine and by the opioid receptor agonist DAMGO. However, none of the cannabinoid receptor agonists that we tested were able to modulate evoked CGRP release; including WIN 55,212-2, methanandamide, and GW405833. These results question the role of spinal cord cannabinoid receptors in the regulation of CGRP signaling. PMID:26762784

  1. Repair of spinal cord injury by implantation of bFGF-incorporated HEMA-MOETACL hydrogel in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; He, Jianyu; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Xian; Xie, En; Liu, Cuicui; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yi; Huang, Linhong; Hao, Dingjun

    2015-03-01

    There is no effective strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). An appropriate combination of hydrogel materials and neurotrophic factor therapy is currently thought to be a promising approach. In this study, we performed experiments to evaluate the synergic effect of implanting hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride (HEMA-MOETACL) hydrogel incorporated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) into the site of surgically induced SCI. Prior to implantation, the combined hydrogel was surrounded by an acellular vascular matrix. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection at the T-9 level, followed by implantation of bFGF/HEMA-MOETACL 5 days after transection surgery. Our results showed that the bFGF/HEMA-MOETACL transplant provided a scaffold for the ingrowth of regenerating tissue eight weeks after implantation. Furthermore, this newly designed implant promoted both nerve tissue regeneration and functional recovery following SCI. These results indicate that HEMA-MOETACL hydrogel is a promising scaffold for intrathecal, localized and sustained delivery of bFGF to the injured spinal cord and provide evidence for the possibility that this approach may have clinical applications in the treatment of SCI.

  2. [Effect of narcotic analgesics on excitatory transmission in the spinal cord].

    PubMed

    Chichenkov, O N; Molodavkin, G M

    1978-02-01

    As demonstrated on nonanesthetized curare-immobilized spinal cats morphine, promedol and fentanyl failed to alter the amplitude of induced potentials in the ventro-lateral columns of the lumbar spinal cord, evoked by a single or repetitive stimulation of the cutaneous or pelvic nerves. In some experiments the same drugs inhibited the nerurons of the posterior horns of the spinal cord activated by the nociceptive stimulation of the peripheral receptors in intraarterial administration of bradykinin. It is suggested that a spinal component was involved in the action of hypnotic analgetics. PMID:24487

  3. Effect of antiseptic agents on skin flora of the perineum of men with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, D S; Montgomerie, J Z; Graham, I E; Schick, D G; Jimenez, E M

    1984-09-01

    Male patients with spinal cord injury are frequently colonized with P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae on the perineum. Regular bathing with bar soap has not influenced this colonization. We have attempted to remove these bacteria using antiseptic agents. The number of P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and total aerobic bacteria on the perineum and the penile shaft was determined before and after cleaning with bar soap, chlorhexidine, povidone-iodine and pHresh. Povidone-iodine and chlorhexidine had no advantage over bar soap or pHresh in the removal of P. aeruginosa or K. pneumoniae from the perineum of patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:6436188

  4. Selected suitable seed cell, scaffold and growth factor could maximize the repair effect using tissue engineering method in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wen-Chen; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Qiu, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury usually leads to permanent disability, which could cause a huge financial problem to the patient. Up to now there is no effective method to treat this disease. The key of the treatment is to enable the damage zone axonal regeneration and luckily it could go through the damage zone; last a connection can be established with the target neurons. This study attempts to combine stem cell, material science and genetic modification technology together, by preparing two genes modified adipose-derived stem cells and inducing them into neuron direction; then by compositing them on the silk fibroin/chitosan scaffold and implanting them into the spinal cord injury model, seed cells can have features of neuron cells. At the same time, it could stably express the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3, both of which could produce synergistic effects, which have a positive effect on the recovery of spinal cord. The spinal cord scaffold bridges the broken end of the spinal cord and isolates with the surrounding environment, which could avoid a scar effect on the nerve regeneration and provide three-dimensional space for the seed cell growth, and at last we hope to provide a new treatment for spinal cord injury with the tissue engineering technique.

  5. Selected suitable seed cell, scaffold and growth factor could maximize the repair effect using tissue engineering method in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wen-Chen; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Qiu, Yu-Sheng

    2016-08-20

    Spinal cord injury usually leads to permanent disability, which could cause a huge financial problem to the patient. Up to now there is no effective method to treat this disease. The key of the treatment is to enable the damage zone axonal regeneration and luckily it could go through the damage zone; last a connection can be established with the target neurons. This study attempts to combine stem cell, material science and genetic modification technology together, by preparing two genes modified adipose-derived stem cells and inducing them into neuron direction; then by compositing them on the silk fibroin/chitosan scaffold and implanting them into the spinal cord injury model, seed cells can have features of neuron cells. At the same time, it could stably express the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3, both of which could produce synergistic effects, which have a positive effect on the recovery of spinal cord. The spinal cord scaffold bridges the broken end of the spinal cord and isolates with the surrounding environment, which could avoid a scar effect on the nerve regeneration and provide three-dimensional space for the seed cell growth, and at last we hope to provide a new treatment for spinal cord injury with the tissue engineering technique. PMID:27622154

  6. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanganeria, Purva; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Khanna, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml-1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained.

  7. Effect of a Cooling Vest on Core Temperature in Athletes With and Without Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Trbovich, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is well accepted that persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) have impaired ability to regulate core temperature due to impaired vasomotor and sudomotor activity below their level of injury. Impaired heat dissipation puts SCI athletes at great risk of exercise-induced hyperthermia (EIH) (>37.8°C). There is minimal evidence for efficacy of any specific cooling method in SCI athletes in a thermoneutral sport-specific setting. Objective: To evaluate the extent of EIH in persons with and without SCI and subsequently examine the effect of a cooling vest to attenuate rise in core body temperature (Tc). Methods: SCI (n = 17) and able-bodied (AB; n = 19) athletes participated in a 60-minute intermittent sprinting exercise in a thermoneutral (21.1°C-23.9°C) environment. Participants were separated according to their level of injury: tetraplegia defined as above T1 (TP; n = 6), high paraplegia defined as T5 through T1 (HP; n = 5), low paraplegia defined as T6 and below (LP; n = 6), and AB (n = 19). Tc was recorded at 15-minute intervals using an ingestible thermometer pill. This protocol was completed with a cooling vest (V) and without a cooling vest (NV). Results: All SCI and most AB athletes experienced EIH. After 60 minutes, Tc of TP athletes was significantly increased compared to HP (P = .03) and AB athletes (P = .007). There was no significant effect of the vest on Tc over time for any group. Conclusions: TP athletes have the highest risk of exercise-induced hyperthermia. The cooling vest does not significantly attenuate rise in Tc in SCI or AB athletes. PMID:24574824

  8. The Effect of an Obesogenic Maternal Environment on Expression of Fetal Umbilical Cord Blood miRNA

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Samuel; Elovitz, Michal A.; Durnwald, Celeste P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to maternal obesity in utero predisposes offspring to obesity and metabolic disease. This study investigated whether maternal obesity is associated with alterations in expression of fetal microRNA (miRNA). Study Design: A cohort study of women with body mass index (BMI) ≥35 kg/m2 (n = 16) versus those with normal BMI 20 to 24.9 (n = 20) was performed. All participants had normal glucose tolerance (1-hour glucose challenge test <130) and normally grown neonates (2700-3500 g). Umbilical cord samples were collected immediately after delivery. Expression of miRNA was assessed using Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 3.0 Arrays. Differential miRNA expression was determined using Student t tests with Benjamini-Hocherg correction. Results: For 1733 human mature miRNAs, the expression levels were not statistically different in umbilical cord blood samples from pregnancies of obese women compared to controls. Conclusion: Expression of fetal miRNA is not altered in umbilical cord blood in response to in utero exposure to obesity. Alternate mechanisms underlying the fetal effects of maternal obesity should be explored. PMID:25544675

  9. Effects of 50 MeV/sub d. -->. Be/ neutron irradiation on Rhesus monkey cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, J.H.; Hussey, D.H.; Raulston, G.L.; Chester, D.V.M.; Gleiser, C.A.; Gray, K.N.; Huchton, J.I.; Almond, P.R.

    1980-03-01

    The cervical spinal cords of ten Rhesus monkeys were irradiated with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons according to one of two dosage schedules: (1) 1300 rad/ sub n..gamma../ in nine fractions over 29 days, and (2) 1550 rad/sub n..gamma../ in nine fractions over 29 days. These doses are equivalent to 4000 rad/sub eq/ and 4800 rad/sub eq/, respectively, with /sup 60/Co using an RBE of 3.1 for late effects (conventional 200 rad per day fractionation). Whereas none of five monkeys that received a spinal cord dose of 1300 rad/sub n..gamma../ developed signs of neurologic dysfunction, all five animals that were irradiated to a dose of 1550 rad/sub n..gamma../ developed significant radiation myelitis. The histopathologic changes correlated well with the clinical observations. All of the animals that received 1550 rad/sub n..gamma../ exhibited severe malacia and moderate to severe demyelination of the white matter of the cervical spinal cord. The histopathologic changes in the monkeys irradiated with 1300 rad/sub n..gamma../ were minimal by comparison.

  10. The dose response relation for rat spinal cord paralysis analyzed in terms of the effective size of the functional subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamus-Górka, Magdalena; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Brahme, Anders; Lind, Bengt K.

    2008-11-01

    Radiobiological models for estimating normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) are increasingly used in order to quantify or optimize the clinical outcome of radiation therapy. A good NTCP model should fulfill at least the following two requirements: (a) it should predict the sigmoid shape of the corresponding dose-response curve and (b) it should accurately describe the probability of a specified response for arbitrary non-uniform dose delivery for a given endpoint as accurately as possible, i.e. predict the volume dependence. In recent studies of the volume effect of a rat spinal cord after irradiation with narrow and broad proton beams the authors claim that none of the existing NTCP models is able to describe their results. Published experimental data have been used here to try to quantify the change in the effective dose (D50) causing 50% response for different field sizes. The present study was initiated to describe the induction of white matter necrosis in a rat spinal cord after irradiation with narrow proton beams in terms of the mean dose to the effective volume of the functional subunit (FSU). The physically delivered dose distribution was convolved with a function describing the effective size or, more accurately, the sensitivity distribution of the FSU to obtain the effective mean dose deposited in it. This procedure allows the determination of the mean D50 value of the FSUs of a certain size which is of interest for example if the cell nucleus of the oligodendrocyte is the sensitive target. Using the least-squares method to compare the effective doses for different sizes of the functional subunits with the experimental data the best fit was obtained with a length of about 9 mm. For the non-uniform dose distributions an effective FSU length of 8 mm gave the optimal fit with the probit dose-response model. The method could also be used to interpret the so-called bath and shower experiments where the heterogeneous dose delivery was used in the

  11. Neuroprotection and reduction of glial reaction by cannabidiol treatment after sciatic nerve transection in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Perez, Matheus; Benitez, Suzana U; Cartarozzi, Luciana P; Del Bel, Elaine; Guimarães, Francisco S; Oliveira, Alexandre L R

    2013-11-01

    In neonatal rats, the transection of a peripheral nerve leads to an intense retrograde degeneration of both motor and sensory neurons. Most of the axotomy-induced neuronal loss is a result of apoptotic processes. The clinical use of neurotrophic factors is difficult due to side effects and elevated costs, but other molecules might be effective and more easily obtained. Among them, some are derived from Cannabis sativa. Cannabidiol (CBD) is the major non-psychotropic component found on the surface of such plant leaves. The present study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective potential of CBD. Thus, 2-day-old Wistar rats were divided into the following experimental groups: sciatic nerve axotomy + CBD treatment (CBD group), axotomy + vehicle treatment (phosphate buffer group) and a control group (no-treatment group). The results were analysed by Nissl staining, immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling at 5 days post-lesion. Neuronal counting revealed both motor and sensory neuron rescue following treatment with CBD (15 and 30 mg/kg). Immunohistochemical analysis (obtained by synaptophysin staining) revealed 30% greater synaptic preservation within the spinal cord in the CBD-treated group. CBD administration decreased the astroglial and microglial reaction by 30 and 27%, respectively, as seen by glial fibrillary acidic protein and ionised calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 immunolabeling quantification. In line with such results, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling reaction revealed a reduction of apoptotic cells, mostly located in the spinal cord intermediate zone, where interneurons promote sensory-motor integration. The present results show that CBD possesses neuroprotective characteristics that may, in turn, be promising for future clinical use. PMID:23981015

  12. A Brain-Machine-Muscle Interface for Restoring Hindlimb Locomotion after Complete Spinal Transection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Monzurul; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zicong; Li, Yan; He, Jufang

    2014-01-01

    A brain-machine interface (BMI) is a neuroprosthetic device that can restore motor function of individuals with paralysis. Although the feasibility of BMI control of upper-limb neuroprostheses has been demonstrated, a BMI for the restoration of lower-limb motor functions has not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to determine if gait-related information can be captured from neural activity recorded from the primary motor cortex of rats, and if this neural information can be used to stimulate paralysed hindlimb muscles after complete spinal cord transection. Neural activity was recorded from the hindlimb area of the primary motor cortex of six female Sprague Dawley rats during treadmill locomotion before and after mid-thoracic transection. Before spinal transection there was a strong association between neural activity and the step cycle. This association decreased after spinal transection. However, the locomotive state (standing vs. walking) could still be successfully decoded from neural recordings made after spinal transection. A novel BMI device was developed that processed this neural information in real-time and used it to control electrical stimulation of paralysed hindlimb muscles. This system was able to elicit hindlimb muscle contractions that mimicked forelimb stepping. We propose this lower-limb BMI as a future neuroprosthesis for human paraplegics. PMID:25084446

  13. Comparative effects of glibenclamide and riluzole in a rat model of severe cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Simard, J Marc; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanov, Alexander; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Both glibenclamide and riluzole reduce necrosis and improve outcome in rat models of spinal cord injury (SCI). In SCI, gene suppression experiments show that newly upregulated sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1)-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channels in microvascular endothelial cells are responsible for "persistent sodium currents" that cause capillary fragmentation and "progressive hemorrhagic necrosis". Glibenclamide is a potent blocker of Sur1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channels (IC(50), 6-48 nM). Riluzole is a pleotropic drug that blocks "persistent sodium currents" in neurons, but in SCI, its molecular mechanism of action is uncertain. We hypothesized that riluzole might block the putative pore-forming subunits of Sur1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channels, Trpm4. In patch clamp experiments, riluzole blocked Sur1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channels in endothelial cells and heterologously expressed Trpm4 (IC(50), 31 μM). Using a rat model of cervical SCI associated with high mortality, we compared the effects of glibenclamide and riluzole administered beginning at 3h and continuing for 7 days after impact. During the acute phase, both drugs reduced capillary fragmentation and progressive hemorrhagic necrosis, and both prevented death. At 6 weeks, modified (unilateral) Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan locomotor scores were similar, but measures of complex function (grip strength, rearing, accelerating rotarod) and tissue sparing were significantly better with glibenclamide than with riluzole. We conclude that both drugs act similarly, glibenclamide on the regulatory subunit, and riluzole on the putative pore-forming subunit of the Sur1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channel. Differences in specificity, dose-limiting potency, or in spectrum of action may account for the apparent superiority of glibenclamide over riluzole in this model of severe SCI. PMID:22177998

  14. Putative mechanisms behind effects of spinal cord stimulation on vascular diseases: a review of experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingyuan; Linderoth, Bengt; Foreman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a widely used clinical technique to treat ischemic pain in peripheral, cardiac and cerebral vascular diseases. The use of this treatment advanced rapidly during the late 80's and 90's, particularly in Europe. Although the clinical benefits of SCS are clear and the success rate remains high, the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. SCS at lumbar spinal segments (L2-L3) produces vasodilation in the lower limbs and feet which is mediated by antidromic activation of sensory fibers and decreased sympathetic outflow. SCS at thoracic spinal segments (T1-T2) induces several benefits including pain relief, reduction in both frequency and severity of angina attacks, and reduced short-acting nitrate intake. The benefits to the heart are not likely due to an increase, or redistribution of local blood flow, rather, they are associated with SCS-induced myocardial protection and normalization of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. At somewhat lower cervical levels (C3-C6), SCS induces increased blood flow in the upper extremities. SCS at the upper cervical spinal segments (C1-C2) increased cerebral blood flow, which is associated with a decrease in sympathetic activity, an increase in vasomotor center activity and a release of neurohumoral factors. This review will summarize the basic science studies that have contributed to our understanding about mechanisms through which SCS produces beneficial effects when used in the treatment of vascular diseases. Furthermore, this review will particularly focus on the antidromic mechanisms of SCS-induced vasodilation in the lower limbs and feet. PMID:18083639

  15. Effects of exercise training on urinary tract function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hubscher, Charles H; Montgomery, Lynnette R; Fell, Jason D; Armstrong, James E; Poudyal, Pradeepa; Herrity, April N; Harkema, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes dramatic changes in the quality of life, including coping with bladder dysfunction which requires repeated daily and nightly catheterizations. Our laboratory has recently demonstrated in a rat SCI model that repetitive sensory information generated through task-specific stepping and/or loading can improve nonlocomotor functions, including bladder function (Ward PJ, Herrity AN, Smith RR, Willhite A, Harrison BJ, Petruska JC, Harkema SJ, Hubscher CH. J Neurotrauma 31: 819-833, 2014). To target potential underlying mechanisms, the current study included a forelimb-only exercise group to ascertain whether improvements may be attributed to general activity effects that impact target organ-neural interactions or to plasticity of the lumbosacral circuitry that receives convergent somatovisceral inputs. Male Wistar rats received a T9 contusion injury and were randomly assigned to three groups 2 wk postinjury: quadrupedal locomotion, forelimb exercise, or a nontrained group. Throughout the study (including preinjury), all animals were placed in metabolic cages once a week for 24 h to monitor water intake and urine output. Following the 10-wk period of daily 1-h treadmill training, awake cystometry data were collected and bladder and kidney tissue harvested for analysis. Metabolic cage frequency-volume measurements of voiding and cystometry reveal an impact of exercise training on multiple SCI-induced impairments related to various aspects of urinary tract function. Improvements in both the quadrupedal and forelimb-trained groups implicate underlying mechanisms beyond repetitive sensory information from the hindlimbs driving spinal network excitability of the lumbosacral urogenital neural circuitry. Furthermore, the impact of exercise training on the upper urinary tract (kidney) underscores the health benefit of activity-based training on the entire urinary system within the SCI population. PMID:26984956

  16. Effects of Reducing Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling-3 (SOCS3) Expression on Dendritic Outgrowth and Demyelination after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keun Woo; Lin, Ching-Yi; Li, Kevin; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-01-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) is associated with limitations of nerve growth capacity after injury to the central nervous system. Although genetic manipulations of SOCS3 can enhance axonal regeneration after optic injury, the role of SOCS3 in dendritic outgrowth after spinal cord injury (SCI) is still unclear. The present study investigated the endogenous expression of SOCS3 and its role in regulating neurite outgrowth in vitro. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) induces SOCS3 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cells. In parallel to SOCS3 expression, IL-6 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in NS-1 cells. Lentiviral delivery of short hairpin RNA (shSOCS3) (Lenti-shSOCS3) to decrease SOCS3 expression into NS-1 cells enhanced IL-6-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 (P-STAT3 Tyr705) and promoted neurite outgrowth. In addition, we determined if reduction of SOCS3 expression by microinjection of Lenti-shSOCS3 into spinal cord enhances dendrite outgrowth in spinal cord neurons after SCI. Knocking down of SOCS3 in spinal cord neurons with Lenti-shSOCS3 increased complete SCI-induced P-STAT3 Tyr705. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that complete SCI induced a significant reduction of microtubule association protein 2-positive (MAP-2+) dendrites in the gray and white matter at 1 and 4 weeks after injury. The SCI-induced reduction of MAP-2+ dendrites was inhibited by infection with Lenti-shSOCS3 in areas both rostral and caudal to the lesion at 1 and 4 weeks after complete SCI. Furthermore, shSOCS3 treatment enhanced up-regulation of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) expression, which co-localized with MAP-2+ dendrites in white matter and with MAP-2+ cell bodies in gray matter, indicating Lenti-shSOCS3 may induce dendritic regeneration after SCI. Moreover, we demonstrated that Lenti-shSOCS3 decreased SCI-induced demyelination in white matter of spinal cord both rostral and

  17. The Superficial Precoagulation, Sealing, and Transection Method: A “Bloodless” and “Ecofriendly” Laparoscopic Liver Transection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ikoma, Naruhiko; Takei, Hidehiro; Oshima, Go; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Minimizing blood loss is an important aspect of laparoscopic liver resection. Liver transection is the most challenging part of liver resection, but no standard method is available for this step at present. Herein, we have introduced the superficial precoagulation, sealing, and transection (SPST) method, a potentially “bloodless” and “ecofriendly” laparoscopic liver transection technique involving reusable devices: the VIO soft-coagulation system; VIO BiClamp (bipolar electrosurgical coagulation); Olympus SonoSurg (ultrasonic surgical system); and CUSA (ultrasonic aspirator). Furthermore, we have reported the short-term outcomes of laparoscopic liver transection with the SPST method. Methods: The study included 14 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic partial liver resection with the SPST method at a single institution between August 2008 and June 2010. Results: The median operative time was 201 minutes (range, 97 to 332 min) and the median blood loss was 5 mL (range, 5 to 250 mL). There was no requirement for blood transfusion, no intraoperative complications, and no cases of conversion to open laparotomy. There were no liver transection-related complications such as postoperative bile leakage, bleeding, or infection. All surgical margins were negative, with a mean margin of 4.6 mm, and no local recurrence was observed at an average follow-up of 37.6 months. Conclusions: The SPST method is a simple, efficient, and cost-effective surgical technique for laparoscopic liver resection. It is associated with low intraoperative blood loss and good short-term outcomes. We recommend that the SPST method should be used as a standard technique for laparoscopic liver transection (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/SLE/A103). PMID:24752166

  18. Neuroprotective effects of electroacupuncture on early- and late-stage spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-fei; Zhang, Shu-quan; Liu, Jia-bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-san; Gu, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the neurite growth inhibitor Nogo-A can cause secondary neural damage by activating RhoA. In the present study, we hypothesized that electroacupuncture promotes neurological functional recovery after spinal cord injury by inhibiting RhoA expression. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using a modification of Allen's method. The rats were given electroacupuncture treatment at Dazhui (Du14), Mingmen (Du4), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Huantiao (GB30), Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints with a sparse-dense wave at a frequency of 4 Hz for 30 minutes, once a day, for a total of 7 days. Seven days after injury, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale and inclined plane test scores were significantly increased, the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord tissue was significantly reduced, and RhoA and Nogo-A mRNA and protein expression levels were decreased in rats given electroacupuncture compared with rats not given electroacupuncture. Four weeks after injury, pathological tissue damage in the spinal cord at the site of injury was alleviated, the numbers of glial fibrillary acidic protein- and neurofilament 200-positive fibers were increased, the latencies of somatosensory-evoked and motor-evoked potentials were shortened, and their amplitudes were increased in rats given electroacupuncture. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture treatment reduces neuronal apoptosis and decreases RhoA and Nogo-A mRNA and protein expression at the site of spinal cord injury, thereby promoting tissue repair and neurological functional recovery. PMID:26692861

  19. Neuroprotective effects of electroacupuncture on early- and late-stage spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Fei; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Liu, Jia-Bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San; Gu, Rui

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the neurite growth inhibitor Nogo-A can cause secondary neural damage by activating RhoA. In the present study, we hypothesized that electroacupuncture promotes neurological functional recovery after spinal cord injury by inhibiting RhoA expression. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using a modification of Allen's method. The rats were given electroacupuncture treatment at Dazhui (Du14), Mingmen (Du4), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Huantiao (GB30), Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints with a sparse-dense wave at a frequency of 4 Hz for 30 minutes, once a day, for a total of 7 days. Seven days after injury, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale and inclined plane test scores were significantly increased, the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord tissue was significantly reduced, and RhoA and Nogo-A mRNA and protein expression levels were decreased in rats given electroacupuncture compared with rats not given electroacupuncture. Four weeks after injury, pathological tissue damage in the spinal cord at the site of injury was alleviated, the numbers of glial fibrillary acidic protein- and neurofilament 200-positive fibers were increased, the latencies of somatosensory-evoked and motor-evoked potentials were shortened, and their amplitudes were increased in rats given electroacupuncture. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture treatment reduces neuronal apoptosis and decreases RhoA and Nogo-A mRNA and protein expression at the site of spinal cord injury, thereby promoting tissue repair and neurological functional recovery. PMID:26692861

  20. The effect of mesh reinforcement of a stapled transection line on the rate of pancreatic occlusion failure after distal pancreatectomy: review of a single institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Fabian Mc; Cavataio, Antonino; Strasberg, Steven M; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Simon, Peter O; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Doyle, MB Majella; Mathews, Brent D; Porembka, Matthew R; Linehan, David C; Hawkins, William G

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic occlusion failure (POF) after distal pancreatectomy remains a common source of morbidity. Here, we review our experience with distal pancreatectomy and attempt to identify factors which influence POF rates. Patients and Methods One hundred sixty-nine distal pancreatectomies were performed between 2002 and 2007. Review of the computerized medical records and physician office records was performed for all patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors which might influence the incidence of POF. The data set was analysed for factors which might influence the pancreatic occlusion rate. Analysis included patient and disease characteristics including: age, gender, body mass index (BMI), diagnosis, consistency of the pancreas and history of pancreatitis, as well as intra-operative variables including: surgeon, absorbable mesh reinforcement and operative approach. Results POF was the most common peri-operative complication. POF was identified in 32 out of 169 patients (19%). Transection technique (hand sewn, stapled, stapled with mesh) and procedure complexity were factors associated with differences in POF rates by both univariate and multivariate analyses. POF was identified in 7 out of 70 patients (10%) when an absorbable mesh was utilized, and 25 of 99 patients (25%) when mesh was not utilized (P < 0.02). Discussion These data suggest that a randomized controlled trial will be required to determine if mesh reinforcement reduces the rate and severity of POF after distal pancreatectomy. PMID:19590620

  1. White matter atlas of the human spinal cord with estimation of partial volume effect.

    PubMed

    Lévy, S; Benhamou, M; Naaman, C; Rainville, P; Callot, V; Cohen-Adad, J

    2015-10-01

    Template-based analysis has proven to be an efficient, objective and reproducible way of extracting relevant information from multi-parametric MRI data. Using common atlases, it is possible to quantify MRI metrics within specific regions without the need for manual segmentation. This method is therefore free from user-bias and amenable to group studies. While template-based analysis is common procedure for the brain, there is currently no atlas of the white matter (WM) spinal pathways. The goals of this study were: (i) to create an atlas of the white matter tracts compatible with the MNI-Poly-AMU template and (ii) to propose methods to quantify metrics within the atlas that account for partial volume effect. The WM atlas was generated by: (i) digitalizing an existing WM atlas from a well-known source (Gray's Anatomy), (ii) registering this atlas to the MNI-Poly-AMU template at the corresponding slice (C4 vertebral level), (iii) propagating the atlas throughout all slices of the template (C1 to T6) using regularized diffeomorphic transformations and (iv) computing partial volume values for each voxel and each tract. Several approaches were implemented and validated to quantify metrics within the atlas, including weighted-average and Gaussian mixture models. Proof-of-concept application was done in five subjects for quantifying magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in each tract of the atlas. The resulting WM atlas showed consistent topological organization and smooth transitions along the rostro-caudal axis. The median MTR across tracts was 26.2. Significant differences were detected across tracts, vertebral levels and subjects, but not across laterality (right-left). Among the different tested approaches to extract metrics, the maximum a posteriori showed highest performance with respect to noise, inter-tract variability, tract size and partial volume effect. This new WM atlas of the human spinal cord overcomes the biases associated with manual delineation and partial

  2. Beneficial effect of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells on an endotoxin-induced rat model of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    FU, LIHUA; LIU, YONGJUN; ZHANG, DAN; XIE, JIANG; GUAN, HONGBO; SHANG, TAO

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which exhibit the property of immune-modulation, have been shown to treat various diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. There is a functional similarity between the pulmonary circulation and the placenta, but it remains to be elucidated whether MSCs can be applied to treat endotoxin-induced hypertension during pregnancy; therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of a human umbilical cord-derived MSC infusion on endotoxin-induced hypertension during pregnancy. Rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=7 per group): Control, endotoxin-treated and endotoxin + MSCs. The model of preeclampsia (PE) was established via the intravenous injection of endotoxin. In the endotoxin + MSCs group, MSCs at 2×106 cells/rat were injected via the vena caudalis. The blood pressure, urine protein and number of white blood cells were measured. In addition, the protein expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were examined by ELISA. The blood pressure, levels of urine protein and number of white blood cells in the endotoxin-treated group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05); however, this increase was significantly attenuated in the endotoxin + MSCs group (P<0.05). In addition, the application of MSCs significantly reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β and increased the levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 in the endotoxin-treated rats. In conclusion, umbilical cord-derived MSCs have a protective effect in an endotoxin-induced model of PE, and this effect is likely elicited through the suppression of inflammatory factors. Umbilical cord-derived MSC-based therapy may provide a potential therapeutic method for endotoxin-induced hypertension during pregnancy. PMID:26640561

  3. Learning from the spinal cord: How the study of spinal cord plasticity informs our view of learning

    PubMed Central

    Grau, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews research examining whether and how training can induce a lasting change in spinal cord function. A framework for the study of learning, and some essential issues in experimental design, are discussed. A core element involves delayed assessment under common conditions. Research has shown that brain systems can induce a lasting (memory-like) alteration in spinal function. Neurons within the lower (lumbosacral) spinal cord can also adapt when isolated from the brain by means of a thoracic transection. Using traditional learning paradigms, evidence suggests that spinal neurons support habituation and sensitization as well as Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. At a neurobiological level, spinal systems support phenomena (e.g., long-term potentiation), and involve mechanisms (e.g., NMDA mediated plasticity, protein synthesis) implicated in brain-dependent learning and memory. Spinal learning also induces modulatory effects that alter the capacity for learning. Uncontrollable/unpredictable stimulation disables the capacity for instrumental learning and this effect has been linked to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Predictable/controllable stimulation enables learning and counters the adverse effects of uncontrollable simulation through a process that depends upon brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Finally, uncontrollable, but not controllable, nociceptive stimulation impairs recovery after a contusion injury. A process-oriented approach (neurofunctionalism) is outlined that encourages a broader view of learning phenomena. PMID:23973905

  4. Effects of theta burst stimulation on referred phantom sensations in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra C; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-03-01

    To further explore the mechanisms underlying cortical reorganization in patients with phantom sensations after deafferentation, a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation study was carried out in two patients with referred phantom sensations (RPS) after incomplete spinal cord injury at the thoracic level. We delivered continuous (inhibitory), intermittent (excitatory), and placebo theta burst stimulation to the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), primary somatosensory cortex (S1), and secondary somatosensory cortex (S2). Perception of RPS was significantly and transiently disrupted by inhibitory theta burst stimulation applied over S1 and, to a lesser extent, S2. This study supports the hypothesis that RPS depend on remapping in the somatosensory cortex and provides further electrophysiological evidence in vivo that cortical reorganizational processes are critically modulated by GABAergic mechanisms. Enhancement of GABAergic activity may block cortical reorganization, leading to RPS in spinal cord injury patients. PMID:26626415

  5. Effects of hypoxia on proliferation of human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Longying; Shu, Xiaomei; Lang, Changhui; Yu, Xiaohua

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine the influence of hypoxia on proliferation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs). The mononuclear cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation from human umbilical cord blood and then, respectively, cultured under hypoxia (5 % O2) or normoxia (20 % O2). Their cell morphology, cell surface markers, β-galactosidase staining, cell growth curve, DNA cycle, and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were evaluated. We found that hypoxia, in part via HIF-1α, improved the proliferation efficiency, and prevented senescence of hUCB-MSCs without altering their morphology and surface markers. These results demonstrated that hypoxia provides a favorable culture condition to promote hUCB-MSCs proliferation in vitro, which is a better way to obtain sufficient numbers of hUCB-MSCs for research and certainly clinical application. PMID:25742732

  6. MANAGEMENT OF CORD AND PLACENTAL BLOOD AND ITS EFFECT UPON THE NEWBORN, Part I

    PubMed Central

    McCausland, A. M.; Holmes, Frances; Schumann, William R.

    1949-01-01

    A comparative study was made of erythrocyte counts and weights of the newborn at term. Three groups were used: Cases in which the cord was clamped at once, those in which the cord was allowed to pulsate five minutes, and those in which the cord and placental blood was stripped into the baby. Standards and procedure were set up so that there would be a minimum of error. Evidence was elicited showing that babies in the “pulsating” and the “stripped” groups received a significant amount of blood which was beneficial. The amount varied, but when the stripping method was used, the term baby received about 100 cc. of blood. Babies receiving this blood had higher erythrocyte counts, higher hemoglobin values, higher initial weights, less weight loss, and less rapid loss of weight. It is believed the additional blood supplied is of benefit especially to prematures and to those infants who are in any degree of shock following long labors, difficult deliveries, abruptio placenta, placenta previa, or compression of the cord. The added blood benefits the baby by combating the initial shock, by aiding in filling the capillary bed of the expanding lungs, by increasing iron reserve, by lessening demand upon blood-forming organs (especially in prematures), by protecting the breakdown of body proteins and by aiding the transition from one source of oxygen to another. Five minutes, as a rule, is not long enough to wait for pulsation if the baby is to receive its quota of available blood. Stripping of cord and placental blood into the infant is not a harmful procedure when done gently and is particularly useful in cases where the condition of the mother or child is such that it is inadvisable to wait for the uterus to force the blood physiologically into the child. The additional blood does not cause icterus. The pulsating of the umbilical cord plays only a minor role in the process by which the baby receives blood after the second stage of labor. The pressure of the uterine

  7. Effects of zileuton and montelukast in mouse experimental spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, T; Rossi, A; Mazzon, E; Di Paola, R; Muià, C; Caminiti, R; Bramanti, P; Sautebin, L; Cuzzocrea, S

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis from arachidonic acid (AA). Here, we examined the role of the 5-LO-product, cysteinyl-LT (Cys-LT), with a 5-LO inhibitor (zileuton) and a Cys-LT, receptor antagonist (montelukast), in the inflammatory response and tissue injury associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Experimental approach: SCI was induced in mice by the application of vascular clips to the dura via a two-level T6 to T7 laminectomy for 1 min. Cord inflammation was assessed histologically and by measuring inflammatory mediators (ELISA) and apoptosis by annexin V, TUNEL, Fas ligand staining and Bax and Bcl-2 expression (immunohistochemistry and western blots). Motor function in hindlimbs was assessed by a locomotor rating scale, for 10 days after cord injury. Key results: SCI in mice resulted in tissue damage, oedema, neutrophil infiltration, apoptosis, tumour necrosis-α (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in injured tissue. Treatment of the mice with zileuton or montelukast reduced the spinal cord inflammation and tissue injury, neutrophil infiltration, TNF-α, COX-2 and pERK1/2 expression, PGE2 and LTB4 production, and apoptosis. In separate experiments, zileuton or montelukast significantly improved the recovery of limb function over 10 days. Conclusions and implications: Zileuton and montelukast produced a substantial reduction of inflammatory events associated with experimental SCI. Our data underline the important role of 5-LO and Cys-LT in neurotrauma. PMID:18059327

  8. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles proceeds through activation of Sox2-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to mammals, amphibians, such as adult urodeles (for example, newts) and anuran larvae (for example, Xenopus) can regenerate their spinal cord after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. Results Here, we report that tail amputation results in a global increase of Sox2 levels and proliferation of Sox2+ cells. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 diminished proliferation of spinal cord resident cells affecting tail regeneration after amputation, suggesting that spinal cord regeneration is crucial for the whole process. After spinal cord transection, Sox2+ cells are found in the ablation gap forming aggregates. Furthermore, Sox2 levels correlated with regenerative capabilities during metamorphosis, observing a decrease in Sox2 levels at non-regenerative stages. Conclusions Sox2+ cells contribute to the regeneration of spinal cord after tail amputation and transection. Sox2 levels decreases during metamorphosis concomitantly with the lost of regenerative capabilities. Our results lead to a working hypothesis in which spinal cord damage activates proliferation and/or migration of Sox2+ cells, thus allowing regeneration of the spinal cord after tail amputation or reconstitution of the ependymal epithelium after spinal cord transection. PMID:22537391

  9. Effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis of the rat fetal spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Miho; Nakahara, Keiko; Goto, Shintaro; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya . E-mail: a0d201u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Date, Yukari; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2006-11-24

    Expressions of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) mRNA and its protein were confirmed in rat fetal spinal cord tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, over 3 nM ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induced significant proliferation of primary cultured cells from the fetal spinal cord. The proliferating cells were then double-stained using antibodies against the neuronal precursor marker, nestin, and the cell proliferation marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and the nestin-positive cells were also found to be co-stained with antibody against GHS-R. Furthermore, binding studies using [{sup 125}I]des-acyl ghrelin indicated the presence of a specific binding site for des-acyl ghrelin, and confirmed that the binding was displaced with unlabeled des-acyl ghrelin or ghrelin. These results indicate that ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induce proliferation of neuronal precursor cells that is both dependent and independent of GHS-R, suggesting that both ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are involved in neurogenesis of the fetal spinal cord.

  10. Late effects of radiation on the lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs: Re-treatment tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, K.A. ); Withers, H.R.; Chiang, Chi-Shiun )

    1993-07-15

    Using a guinea pig model of lumbar myelopathy, various factors affecting the tolerance of spinal cord to irradiation were assessed: (a) extent of initial injury; (b) time interval between priming and test doses; and (c) animal age at the time of initial radiation treatment. A 3 cm section of lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs was irradiated with fractionated doses of 4.5 Gy gamma rays given as 9 fractions per week. Guinea pigs were primed with 9 x 4.5 Gy in 7 days which is 60% of the ED[sub 50] for a continuous course of treatment. After 28 or 40 weeks, animal were retreated with 6-14 fractions of 4.5 Gy. Animals were observed for 2 years following the priming dose and both the incidence and latency of myelopathy recorded. Young adult guinea pigs (8 wk old) showed both a decreased radiation tolerance and latency compared to old individuals (40 wk old). At 28 or 40 wk after 9 x 4.5 Gy, only about 8% of the initial injury was remembered in young adult guinea pigs. The amount of residual injury was dependent on the initial damage as a proportion of the tolerance dose. The spinal cord shows a greater capacity for long-term recovery than generally appreciated and re-treatment doses clinically prescribed may be lower than necessary. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The effect of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on the recovery of bladder and hindlimb function after spinal cord contusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells are widely used for transplantation into the injured spinal cord in vivo model and for safety, many human clinical trials are continuing to promote improvements of motor and sensory functions after spinal cord injury. Yet the exact mechanism for these improvements remains undefined. Neurogenic bladder following spinal cord injury is the main problem decreasing the quality of life for patients with spinal cord injury, but there are no clear data using stem cell transplantation for the improvement of neurogenic bladder for in vivo studies and the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to delineate the effect of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) transplantation on the restoration of neurogenic bladder and impaired hindlimb function after spinal cord contusion of rats and the relationship between neurotrophic factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and bladder and hindlimb functions. Results Modified moderate contusion injury were performed on the thoracic spinal cord of Sprague-Dawley rats using MASCIS impactor and hMSCs, human fibroblasts or phosphate-buffered saline were transplanted into injured spinal cord 9 days after injury for hMSC and two control groups respectively. Ladder test showed more rapid restoration of hindlimb function in hMSC group than in control group, but Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score and coupling score were not different significantly among hMSC and two control groups. Neurogenic bladder was not improved in either group. ED1 positive macrophages were significantly reduced in hMSC group than in two control groups, but ELISA and RT-PCR studies revealed BDNF and NT-3 levels in spinal cord and bladder were not different among hMSC and two control groups regardless the experimental duration. Conclusion hMSC transplantation was effective in reducing inflammatory reaction after spinal cord contusion of rats but not sufficient to recover locomotor and bladder

  12. Effects of repeated dosing with mechanistically distinct antinociceptive ligands in a rat model of neuropathic spinal cord injury pain

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Aldric T; Pearson, James P; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    A lack of efficacy of some analgesic drugs has been previously described in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury (SCI) pain. It has been suggested that repeated dosing in these animals over time may eventually lead to efficacy. However, it is also possible that efficacy may diminish over time with repeated dosing. This study evaluated the efficacy of various drugs upon repeated dosing over time in a rat model of SCI pain. Four weeks following an acute spinal cord compression at the mid-thoracic level, rats developed decreased hind paw withdrawal threshold, suggestive of below level neuropathic hypersensitivity. Either cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonist CP 55,940, the anticonvulsant carbamazepine or gabapentin, the antidepressant amitriptyline or vehicle was administered over a period of 7 days. Neither carbamazepine nor amitriptyline demonstrated efficacy either after a single or repeated dosing. Beginning with a 50% efficacious dose of gabapentin, the effect of gabapentin in SCI rats neither increased nor decreased over the treatment period. The antinociceptive effect of CP 55,940 was maintained for the entire treatment period, which was mediated by CB1 but not CB2 receptors. The current data suggest that sustained antinociception can be obtained with some drugs in rats with neuropathic SCI pain. Furthermore, the current data do not substantiate the notion that repeated treatment with initially ineffective drugs will eventually lead to efficacy; treatments that are not acutely effective are unlikely to demonstrate clinical efficacy. PMID:25505583

  13. Global geoscience transects in the Arab region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazangi, Mauwia

    The Global Geoscience Transects (GGT) project is one of the most recent initiatives of the International Lithosphere Program (ILP). The GGT project is represented by ILP Coordinating Committee 7 (CC7), which is coordinated by J . Monger (Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver). M. Barazangi (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.) is responsible for the coordination of the Middle East and North Africa region, which includes most of the Arab countries.The main objective of the GGT project is to strengthen and broaden international cooperation mainly through active participation of Earth scientists in constructing geological and geophysical transects, especially cross sections. The transects will be at least to Moho depth and will contain as much detail as transects of geological structures mapped on Earth's surface. The transects are being selected by the participating geoscientists to traverse all continents and, as much as possible, to form a continuous grid across political boundaries. Members of CC7 act as regional coordinators to help the local Earth scientists to initiate and implement GGT objectives. The implementation phase has to a large extent been standardized to follow clear guidelines that were developed by CC7 members. These guidelines are based on a modified and expanded version of the recent highly successful Continent-Ocean Transect project of the Geological Society of America.

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually ...

  15. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  16. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  17. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  18. Spermatic Cord Leiomyosarcoma Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Pamela; Muruato-Araiza, Jesus Sebastian; Marcos-Morales, Selim; Cepeda-Nieto, Ana Cecilia; Berdeal-Fernandez, Eliseo; Zepeda-Contreras, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    Case description of a male patient of 64 years who presents a left groin-scrotum painless tumor, growing, from several months of evolution. Physical examination demonstrated the existence of a mass effect of the left distal spermatic cord, and was later confirmed by ultrasound and CT. Laboratory parameters were normal. The performed surgery consisted in a radical orchiectomy with high ligation of the left cord. In conclusion, preoperative diagnosis of spermatic cord leiomyosarcoma is difficult we need the combination of present illness, physical examination, exams and the gold standard histopathological and immunohistochemical studies allowed a definitive diagnosis. PMID:27169019

  19. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (<7 days after orotracheal intubation) tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  20. Effects of Electroacupuncture at Governor Vessel Acupoints on Neurotrophin-3 in Rats with Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Song, Liang-yu; Song, Hong-tao; Yuan, Xiao-chen; Mao, Ying-qiu; Jing, Quan-kai

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to explore new, noninvasive treatment options for spinal cord injuries (SCI), this study investigated the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) for SCI rat models. SCI was induced by a modified Allen's weight-drop method. We investigated the response of EA at Dazhui (GV 14) and Mingmen (GV 4) acupoints to understand the effects and mechanisms of EA in neuroprotection and neuronal function recovery after SCI. BBB testing was used to detect motor function of rats' hind limbs among groups, and EA was shown to promote the recovery of SCI rats' motor function. Nissl staining showed a restored neural morphology and an increase in the quantity of neurons after EA. Also, the antiapoptosis role was exposed by TUNEL staining. Western blotting analysis was used to determine the protein expression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in spinal cord tissue. Compared to the sham group, the expression levels of NT-3 were significantly decreased and EA was shown to upregulate the expression of NT-3. The present study suggests that the role of EA in neuroprotection and dorsal neuronal function recovery after SCI in rats, especially EA stimulation at GV 14 and GV 4, can greatly promote neuronal function recovery, which may result from upregulating the expression of NT-3. PMID:27597902

  1. Effects of Electroacupuncture at Governor Vessel Acupoints on Neurotrophin-3 in Rats with Experimental Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yu-Ping; Yao, Hai-Jiang; Lv, Wei; Song, Liang-Yu; Song, Hong-Tao; Yuan, Xiao-Chen; Mao, Ying-Qiu; Jing, Quan-Kai; Shi, Su-Hua; Li, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to explore new, noninvasive treatment options for spinal cord injuries (SCI), this study investigated the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) for SCI rat models. SCI was induced by a modified Allen's weight-drop method. We investigated the response of EA at Dazhui (GV 14) and Mingmen (GV 4) acupoints to understand the effects and mechanisms of EA in neuroprotection and neuronal function recovery after SCI. BBB testing was used to detect motor function of rats' hind limbs among groups, and EA was shown to promote the recovery of SCI rats' motor function. Nissl staining showed a restored neural morphology and an increase in the quantity of neurons after EA. Also, the antiapoptosis role was exposed by TUNEL staining. Western blotting analysis was used to determine the protein expression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in spinal cord tissue. Compared to the sham group, the expression levels of NT-3 were significantly decreased and EA was shown to upregulate the expression of NT-3. The present study suggests that the role of EA in neuroprotection and dorsal neuronal function recovery after SCI in rats, especially EA stimulation at GV 14 and GV 4, can greatly promote neuronal function recovery, which may result from upregulating the expression of NT-3. PMID:27597902

  2. A PARYLENE-BASED MICROELECTRODE ARRAY IMPLANT FOR SPINAL CORD STIMULATION IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Nandra, Mandheerej. S.; Lavrov, Igor A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-01-01

    The design and fabrication of an epidural spinal cord implant using a parylene-based microelectrode array is presented. Rats with hindlimb paralysis from a complete spinal cord transection were implanted with the device and studied for up to eight weeks, where we have demonstrated recovery of hindlimb stepping functionality through pulsed stimulation. The microelectrode array allows for a high degree of freedom and specificity in selecting the site of stimulation compared to wire-based implants, and triggers varied biological responses that can lead to an increased understanding of the spinal cord and locomotion recovery for victims of spinal cord injury. PMID:21841938

  3. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on NACHT domain-leucine-rich-repeat- and pyrin domain-containing protein 3 inflammasome expression in rats following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Li, Chunsheng; Gao, Chunjin; Li, Zhuo; Yang, Jing; Liu, Xuehua; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-01

    The clinical application of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in spinal cord injury (SCI) has been reported, however the mechanism underlying its therapeutic effects remains to be elucidated. In the present study, SCI was modeled in male Sprague‑Dawley rats. A total of 120 rats were randomly divided into four groups: Sham‑operated group (SH); sham‑operated and hyperbaric oxygen group (SH+HBO); spinal cord injury group (SCI) and spinal cord injury and hyperbaric oxygen treatment group (SCI+HBO). The rats in each group were randomly divided into five smaller groups (12 h, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after surgery). The mRNA and protein expression levels of NACHT domain‑, leucine‑rich‑repeat‑ and pyrin domain‑containing protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome, including NALP3, adaptor molecule apoptosis‑associated speck‑like protein (ASC) and caspase‑1 were determined at several time points following injury. The results of the present study demonstrated that HBOT compromised the mRNA and protein expression levels of NALP3, ASC and caspase‑1 in the SCI model rats and HBOT mitigated SCI‑induced interleukin 1β release in the injured spinal cord tissue. It was concluded that HBOT is an effective approach, which can prevent against spinal cord injury, likely by inactivating NALP3 inflammasome. PMID:25672366

  4. The effect of virtual visual feedback on supernumerary phantom limb pain in a patient with high cervical cord injury: a single-case design study.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Osamu; Iki, Hidemasa; Sawa, Shunji; Osumi, Michihiro; Morioka, Shu

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the effect of virtual visual feedback (VVF) on supernumerary phantom limb pain (SPLP) in a patient with high cervical cord injury. The subject was a 22-year-old man diagnosed with complete spinal cord injury (level C2) approximately 5 years ago. We applied the ABA'B' single-case design and set phases B and B' as intervention phases for comparison. SPLP significantly improved in comparison of phase A with phase B and phase A with phase B'. We suggest that VVF reduces SPLP and the effect lasts after VVF. PMID:25676730

  5. Ameliorative Effects of p75NTR-ED-Fc on Axonal Regeneration and Functional Recovery in Spinal Cord-Injured Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Zhu, Feng; Huang, Peng; Yu, Ying; Long, Zai-Yun; Wu, Ya-Min

    2015-12-01

    As a co-receptor of Nogo-66 receptor (NgR) and a critical receptor for paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PirB), p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) mediates the inhibitory effects of myelin-associated inhibitors on axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. Therefore, the p75NTR antagonist, such as recombinant p75NTR protein or its homogenates may block the inhibitory effects of myelin and promote the axonal regeneration and functional recovery. The purposes of this study are to subclone and express the extracellular domain gene of human p75NTR with IgG-Fc (hp75NTR-ED-Fc) in prokaryotic expression system and investigate the effects of the recombinant protein on axonal regeneration and functional recovery in spinal cord-injured rats. The hp75NTR-ED-Fc coding sequence was amplified from pcDNA-hp75NTR-ED-Fc by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subcloned into vector pET32a (+), then the effects of the purified recombinant protein on neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons cultured with myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) were determined, and the effects of the fusion protein on axonal regeneration, functional recovery, and its possible mechanisms in spinal cord-injured rats were further investigated. The results indicated that the purified infusion protein could promote neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons, promote axonal regeneration and functional recovery, and decrease RhoA activation in spinal cord-injured rats. Taken together, the findings revealed that p75NTR still may be a potential and novel target for therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury and that the hp75NTR-ED-Fc fusion protein treatment enhances functional recovery by limiting tissue loss and stimulating axonal growth in spinal cord-injured rats, which may result from decreasing the activation of RhoA. PMID:25394381

  6. The effect of amniotic membrane extract on umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cell expansion: is there any need to save the amniotic membrane besides the umbilical cord blood?

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Zahra; Babaei, Ali; Vasaghi, Attiyeh; Habibagahi, Mojtaba; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Umbilical cord blood is a good source of the mesenchymal stem cells that can be banked, expanded and used in regenerative medicine. The objective of this study was to test whether amniotic membrane extract, as a rich source of growth factors such as basic-fibroblast growth factor, can promote the proliferation potential of the umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells. Materials and Methods: The study design was interventional. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from voluntary healthy infants from hospitals in Shiraz, Iran, cultured in the presence of basic-fibroblast growth factor and amniotic membrane extracts (from pooled - samples), and compared with control cultures. Proliferation assay was performed and duplication number and time were calculated. The expression of stem cell’s specific markers and the differentiation capacity toward osteogenic and adipogenic lineages were evaluated. Results: Amniotic membrane extract led to a significant increase in the proliferation rate and duplication number and a decrease in the duplication time without any change in the cell morphology. Both amniotic membrane extract and basic-fibroblast growth factor altered the expressing of CD44 and CD105 in cell population. Treating basic-fibroblast growth factor but not the amniotic membrane extract favored the differentiation potential of the stem cells toward osteogenic lineage. Conclusion: The amniotic membrane extract administration accelerated cell proliferation and modified the CD marker characteristics which may be due to the induction of differentiation toward a specific lineage. Amniotic membrane extract may enhance the proliferation rate and duplication number of the stem cell through changing the duplication time. PMID:27096069

  7. Regulatory effects of intermittent noxious stimulation on spinal cord injury-sensitive microRNAs and their presumptive targets following spinal cord contusion

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Eric R.; Woller, Sarah A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Grau, James W.; Miranda, Rajesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrollable nociceptive stimulation adversely affects recovery in spinally contused rats. Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in altered microRNA (miRNA) expression both at, and distal to the lesion site. We hypothesized that uncontrollable nociception further influences SCI-sensitive miRNAs and associated gene targets, potentially explaining the progression of maladaptive plasticity. Our data validated previously described sensitivity of miRNAs to SCI alone. Moreover, following SCI, intermittent noxious stimulation decreased expression of miR124 in dorsal spinal cord 24 h after stimulation and increased expression of miR129-2 in dorsal, and miR1 in ventral spinal cord at 7 days. We also found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression was significantly down-regulated 1 day after SCI alone, and significantly more so, after SCI followed by tailshock. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) mRNA expression was significantly increased at both 1 and 7 days post-SCI, and significantly more so, 7 days post-SCI with shock. MiR1 expression was positively and significantly correlated with IGF-1, but not BDNF mRNA expression. Further, stepwise linear regression analysis indicated that a significant proportion of the changes in BDNF and IGF-1 mRNA expression were explained by variance in two groups of miRNAs, implying co-regulation. Collectively, these data show that uncontrollable nociception which activates sensorimotor circuits distal to the injury site, influences SCI-miRNAs and target mRNAs within the lesion site. SCI-sensitive miRNAs may well mediate adverse consequences of uncontrolled sensorimotor activation on functional recovery. However, their sensitivity to distal sensory input also implicates these miRNAs as candidate targets for the management of SCI and neuropathic pain. PMID:25278846

  8. Comparative Study on the Effects of Ceftriaxone and Monocytes on Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tajkey, Javad; Biglari, Alireza; Habibi Asl, Bohlol; Ramazani, Ali; Mazloomzadeh, Saeideh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison between the efficacy of ceftriaxone and monocytes on improvement of neuron protection and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rat. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into three groups of ten. Spinal cord injury was performed on rats under general anesthesia using the weight dropping method. Ceftriaxone was injected intraperitoneally 200 mg/kg/day for seven days after SCI. Monocytes were injected 2 × 105 cells 4 days after SCI. Hind limb motor function was assessed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scale. Corticospinal tract (CST) axons were traced by injection of biotin dextran amine (BDA) into the sensorimotor cortex. Results: There were statistically significant differences in BBB scores in ceftriaxone in comparison to both monocytes receiving and control groups. On the other hand there were statistically significant differences in axon counting in both ceftriaxone and monocytes receiving groups in comparison to control group. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that ceftriaxone improves functional recovery more effective than monocytes in rats after SCI. These results are from an experimental model and validation is required for further investigation. PMID:26236656

  9. Biochemical Monitoring of Spinal Cord Injury by FT-IR Spectroscopy—Effects of Therapeutic Alginate Implant in Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Uckermann, Ortrud; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Doberenz, Falko; Gelinsky, Michael; Leipnitz, Elke; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Sablinskas, Valdas; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces complex biochemical changes, which result in inhibition of nervous tissue regeneration abilities. In this study, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was applied to assess the outcomes of implants made of a novel type of non-functionalized soft calcium alginate hydrogel in a rat model of spinal cord hemisection (n = 28). Using FT-IR spectroscopic imaging, we evaluated the stability of the implants and the effects on morphology and biochemistry of the injured tissue one and six months after injury. A semi-quantitative evaluation of the distribution of lipids and collagen showed that alginate significantly reduced injury-induced demyelination of the contralateral white matter and fibrotic scarring in the chronic state after SCI. The spectral information enabled to detect and localize the alginate hydrogel at the lesion site and proved its long-term persistence in vivo. These findings demonstrate a positive impact of alginate hydrogel on recovery after SCI and prove FT-IR spectroscopic imaging as alternative method to evaluate and optimize future SCI repair strategies. PMID:26559822

  10. Changes in autophagy in rats after spinal cord injury and the effect of hyperbaric oxygen on autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongming; Liu, Dong; Su, Peng; Lin, Fanguo; Tang, Qifeng

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on the autophagic changes after induction of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. A total of 75 rats were randomly divided into the sham-operated group, the spinal cord injury group, and the SCI+HBO group. We found that at 7 d and 14 d after surgery, the BBB scores were higher in the SCI+HBO group in comparison to the SCI group. The expression of Beclin-1 and LC3II was upregulated in the SCI and SCI+HBO groups after SCI. Fluorescently stained Beclin-1 and LC3II proteins were barely detectable in the sham group. In contrast, Beclin-l and LC3II expression was observed in neurons and glial cells from the SCI and SCI+HBO groups. Beclin-1 and LC3II expression appeared at 6h after SCI. At each time point, Beclin-1 and LC3II expression was significantly higher in the SCI+HBO group compared to the SCI group. These results suggest that autophagy is activated in rats after SCI and sustained over a period of time. HBO treatment enhances autophagy expression in rats after SCI and accelerates cell repair rate, which may represent one of the mechanisms of action of HBO in the treatment of SCI. PMID:26949182

  11. Effect of exercise on the expression of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Yong, Min-Sik; Na, Sang-Su

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] We examined the impact of exercise on the expression pattern of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] To produce monosodium iodoacetate-induced arthritis, rats were administered 3 mg/50 µL monosodium iodoacetate through the interarticular space of the right knee. The animals were randomly divided into four groups: rats sacrificed 3 weeks after 0.9% saline solution injection (shame group, n = 10), rats sacrificed 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (control group, n = 10), rats with 4 weeks rest from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (no exercise group, n = 10), and rats with 4 weeks treadmill training from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (exercise group, n = 10). Serial coronal sections of the lumbar spine were cut and processed for immunohistochemistry. [Results] The expression of nerve growth factor was significantly increased in the EG compared with the SG, CG, and NEG. [Conclusion] Increased nerve growth factor expression in the spinal cord due to exercise-induced stimulation can be effective in treating chronic pain. Such treatment will contribute not only to improving the joint function of patients with chronic pain but also their quality of life. PMID:26357438

  12. Effect of DSPE-PEG on compound action potential, injury potential and ion concentration following compression in ex vivo spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aihua; Huo, Xiaolin; Zhang, Guanghao; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Changzhe; Rong, Wei; Xu, Jing; Song, Tao

    2016-05-01

    It has been shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG) can reseal membrane disruption on the spinal cord, but only high concentrations of PEG have been shown to have this effect. Therefore, the effect of PEG is somewhat limited, and it is necessary to investigate a new approach to repair spinal cord injury. This study assesses the ability of 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(poly (ethylene glycol)) 2000] (DSPE-PEG) to recover physiological function and attenuate the injury-induced influx of extracellular ions in ex vivo spinal cord injury. Isolated spinal cords were subjected to compression injury and treated with PEG or DSPE-PEG immediately after injury. The compound action potential (CAP) was recorded before and after injury to assess the functional recovery. Furthermore, injury potential, the difference in gap potentials before and after compression, and the concentration of intracellular ions were used to evaluate the effect of DSPE-PEG on reducing ion influx. Data showed that the injury potential and ion concentration of the untreated, PEG and DSPE-PEG group, without significant difference among them, are remarkably higher than those of the intact group. Moreover, the CAP recovery of the DSPE-PEG and PEG treated spinal cords was significantly greater than that of the untreated spinal cords. The level of CAP recovery in the DSPE-PEG and PEG treated groups was the same, but the concentration of DSPE-PEG used was much lower than the concentration of PEG. These results suggest that instant application of DSPE-PEG could effectively repair functional disturbance in SCI at a much lower concentration than PEG. PMID:27021025

  13. The effect of small radiation doses on the rat spinal cord: the concept of partial tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, K.K.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Van Der Schueren, E.

    1983-10-01

    To evaluate the tolerance of the rat spinal cord to small radiation doses per fraction, an increasing number of fractions is required for induction of paralysis. The assessment of doses of 1-2 Gy, as used in the clinic, would require that over 100 fractions be given. The validity of replacing part of a fractionated irradiation of the spinal cord by a single large dose has been tested. Fractionated irradiation doses with 18 MeV X rays were followed by a ''top-up'' dose of 15 Gy as a single treatment. This is the fraction size of a treatment with two irradiation doses leading to paralysis in 50% of the animals (ED 50). Fractionated treatments were carried out with 2, 5, 10 and 20 fractions followed by the top-up dose of 15 Gy. the isoeffect curve, as a function of the number of fractions, has the same slope as experiments performed without top-up dose. The results show that the quality and quantity of cellular repair is not modified when part of a multifractionated exposure is replaced by a larger top-dose. An important consequence of this finding is, that in treatments with unequal fraction sizes, the partial tolerances can simply be added. Since a top-up dose can replace a sizable number of irradiation treatments, its application will allow investigations of the extent of sublethal damage repair for fraction sizes as low as 1 Gy.

  14. Abnormal dephosphorylation effect on NMDA receptor regulation in ALS spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wagey, R; Krieger, C; Shaw, C A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a significant reduction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor binding in spinal cord sections from patients who died with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) compared to that in control patients. The reduction in NMDA receptor binding in ALS could be increased toward control values by treatment with phorbol ester, suggesting a role for receptor protein phosphorylation in this disorder. In the present study we have evaluated the time course of recovery of [3H]MK-801 binding following phorbol ester treatment to assess protein phosphatase activity in spinal cord sections from ALS and control subjects. Phorbol ester-stimulated changes in [3H]MK-801 binding returned to untreated values significantly faster in ALS tissue compared to control and could not be blocked by the coapplication of the protein phosphatase inhibitors sodium vanadate or sodium beta-D-glycerol phosphate. Okadaic acid coapplication blocked recovery in both ALS and control tissue at a concentration range at which phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) would likely be inhibited. The results suggest that abnormal levels or activity of protein phosphatases, including calcineurin, may be involved in the abnormal levels of NMDA receptors in ALS and may play some role in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:9440123

  15. Biocompatibility of reduced graphene oxide nanoscaffolds following acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Palejwala, Ali H.; Fridley, Jared S.; Mata, Javier A.; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Luerssen, Thomas G.; Perlaky, Laszlo; Kent, Thomas A.; Tour, James M.; Jea, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graphene has unique electrical, physical, and chemical properties that may have great potential as a bioscaffold for neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury. These nanoscaffolds have previously been shown to be biocompatible in vitro; in the present study, we wished to evaluate its biocompatibility in an in vivo spinal cord injury model. Methods: Graphene nanoscaffolds were prepared by the mild chemical reduction of graphene oxide. Twenty Wistar rats (19 male and 1 female) underwent hemispinal cord transection at approximately the T2 level. To bridge the lesion, graphene nanoscaffolds with a hydrogel were implanted immediately after spinal cord transection. Control animals were treated with hydrogel matrix alone. Histologic evaluation was performed 3 months after the spinal cord transection to assess in vivo biocompatibility of graphene and to measure the ingrowth of tissue elements adjacent to the graphene nanoscaffold. Results: The graphene nanoscaffolds adhered well to the spinal cord tissue. There was no area of pseudocyst around the scaffolds suggestive of cytotoxicity. Instead, histological evaluation showed an ingrowth of connective tissue elements, blood vessels, neurofilaments, and Schwann cells around the graphene nanoscaffolds. Conclusions: Graphene is a nanomaterial that is biocompatible with neurons and may have significant biomedical application. It may provide a scaffold for the ingrowth of regenerating axons after spinal cord injury. PMID:27625885

  16. Effect of breast milk of healthy and allergic mothers on in vitro stimulation of cord blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zizka, Jan; Hrdý, Jirí; Lodinová-Zádníková, Raja; Kocourková, Ingrid; Novotná, Olga; Sterzl, Ivan; Prokesová, Ludmila

    2007-09-01

    Maternal milk has beneficial effects on the development and function of the newborn's immune system. Whether the milk of allergic mother has the same effects as the milk of healthy mothers is not yet quite clear. To contribute to the characterization of its immunomodulatory action, we tested the effect of milk of healthy and allergic mothers on the proliferation and immunoglobulin formation in cultures of cord blood mononuclear leucocytes (CBML) of newborns of healthy and allergic mothers. CBML proliferation was tested by (3)H-thymidine incorporation, IgM, IgG and IgA production by reverse ELISPOT. CBML response was examined in unstimulated cultures and after stimulation with polyclonal activators in the presence or absence of colostrum or milk. The cells of children of allergic mothers have a significantly higher proliferative activity than those of children of healthy mothers. Maternal colostrum/milk in high doses markedly suppresses cell proliferation after stimulation with polyclonal activators, whereas lower milk doses in the cultures have no such effect and exert a rather stimulatory action. Immunoglobulin production by cord blood lymphocytes is also different in the two groups of children. Low basal immunoglobulin formation is increased after stimulation with a strong polyclonal activator of B cells--Bacillus firmus, CBML of children of allergic mothers produce more IgA than those of children of healthy mothers. The stimulated production of all immunoglobulin classes in cells of children of healthy mothers is still enhanced by colostrum/milk. Children of allergic mothers show a markedly increased production of only IgM and IgA. The effect of healthy and allergic colostrum and milk on cell proliferation and immunoglobulin production is similar. The lymphocytes of children of allergic mothers differ from the lymphocytes of children of healthy mothers in their proliferative activity and the ability to form immunoglobulin already at birth. PMID:17651385

  17. Low doses of urethane effectively inhibit spinal seizures evoked by sudden cooling of toad isolated spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-crespo, J.C.; Dalo, N.L. )

    1992-01-01

    The effect of low doses of urethane on three phases of spinal seizures evoked by sudden cooling (SSSC) of toad isolated spinal cord was studied. In control toads, SSSC began with a latency of 91[plus minus]3 sec exhibiting brief tremors, followed by clonic muscle contractions and finally reaching a tonic contraction. The latency of onset of seizures was significantly enhanced. The tonic phase was markedly abolished in toads pretreated intralymphaticaly with 0.15 g/kg of urethane. Tremors were the only phase observed in 55% of toads that received doses of 0.2 g/kg, and a total blockage of seizures was seen after doses of 0.25 g/kg of urethane in 50% of the preparations. A possible depressant effect of urethane on transmission mediated by excitatory amino acids is suggested.

  18. Iatrogenic oesophageal transection during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed Nasir; Al-Saif, Osama Habib

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been hailed as an easy and safe procedure when compared with other bariatric operations. However, it may be associated with well-recognised early complications such as leaks and bleeding, as well as late ones such as stenosis and weight regain. Iatrogenic complete oesophageal transection has never been reported before as a complication. We report a case of complete oesophageal transection during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy that was not recognised intraoperatively. The repair of this iatrogenic injury was staged, with the final stage carried out some 3 months after the initial procedure. This case report highlights the possible occurrence of complete oesophageal transection during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and suggests steps to avoid and correct such complications. PMID:24591379

  19. The effects of retinol on in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis by cord blood and adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Napoli, J L; Ballow, M

    1993-04-01

    In this study we examined the effects of retinol (ROH), a metabolic precursor of retinoic acid (RA), on Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC)-induced immunoglobulin synthesis of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) and adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). ROH augmented SAC-induced IgM synthesis of CBMC by 5.9 +/- 1.5-fold (n = 7, mean +/- s.d.), and IgG synthesis of adult PBMC by 16.3 +/- 5.1-fold (n = 3) at optimal concentrations of 10(-6) M and 10(-11) M, respectively. No augmenting effects could be demonstrated for the other immunoglobulin isotypes. Time-course studies showed that the synthesis of IgM by CBMC was accelerated with detectable immunoglobulin in supernatant fluids starting on day 3. ROH augmented immunoglobulin synthesis of CBMC stimulated by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a T cell-independent polyclonal activator, and of EBV-transformed B cell clones (2.5 +/- 0.2 and 4.1 +/- 1.5-fold increase, respectively), which suggests that ROH can act directly on B cells to enhance immunoglobulin synthesis. In contrast, when ROH was preincubated with cord blood T cells, washed and added to the B cell-enriched fraction with SAC, no increase (0.9-1.8-fold) in IgM synthesis was obtained. Thus, the principal mechanism(s) by which ROH augments immunoglobulin synthesis is by acting on B cells. This is in contrast to the immunoglobulin-enhancing effects of RA which is mediated by T cells, or T cell products, e.g. cytokine. Our studies suggest that RA and ROH may have different pathways of immunoglobulin-enhancing effects, perhaps mediated by different retinoid binding proteins resulting in gene activation and immunoglobulin synthesis. PMID:8385583

  20. A Preclinical Physiological Assay to Test Modulation of Knee Joint Pain in the Spinal Cord: Effects of Oxycodone and Naproxen

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Jason A.; Stanley, Phil; Gore, Katrina; Turner, Jamie; Dias, Rebecca; Rees, Huw

    2014-01-01

    Sensory processing in the spinal cord during disease states can reveal mechanisms for novel treatments, yet very little is known about pain processing at this level in the most commonly used animal models of articular pain. Here we report a test of the prediction that two clinically effective compounds, naproxen (an NSAID) and oxycodone (an opiate), are efficacious in reducing the response of spinal dorsal horn neurons to noxious knee joint rotation in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) sensitized rat. The overall objective for these experiments was to develop a high quality in vivo electrophysiology assay to confidently test novel compounds for efficacy against pain. Given the recent calls for improved preclinical experimental quality we also developed and implemented an Assay Capability Tool to determine the quality of our assay and ensure the quality of our results. Spinal dorsal horn neurons receiving input from the hind limb knee joint were recorded in anesthetized rats 14 days after they were sensitized with 1 mg of MIA. Intravenous administered oxycodone and naproxen were each tested separately for their effects on phasic, tonic, ongoing and afterdischarge action potential counts in response to innocuous and noxious knee joint rotation. Oxycodone reduced tonic spike counts more than the other measures, doing so by up to 85%. Tonic counts were therefore designated the primary endpoint when testing naproxen which reduced counts by up to 81%. Both reductions occurred at doses consistent with clinically effective doses for osteoarthritis. These results demonstrate that clinically effective doses of standard treatments for osteoarthritis reduce pain processing measured at the level of the spinal cord for two different mechanisms. The Assay Capability Tool helped to guide experimental design leading to a high quality and robust preclinical assay to use in discovering novel treatments for pain. PMID:25157947

  1. Effect of older age on treatment decisions and outcomes among patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Rivers, Carly S.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Tsai, Eve C.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Attabib, Najmedden; Kwon, Brian K.; Christie, Sean D.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Hurlbert, R. John; Townson, Andrea; Parent, Stefan; Drew, Brian; Chen, Jason; Dvorak, Marcel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Older people are at increased risk of traumatic spinal cord injury from falls. We evaluated the impact of older age (≥ 70 yr) on treatment decisions and outcomes. Methods: We identified patients with traumatic spinal cord injury for whom consent and detailed data were available from among patients recruited (2004–2013) at any of the 31 acute care and rehabilitation hospitals participating in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry. Patients were assessed by age group (< 70 v. ≥ 70 yr). The primary outcome was the rate of acute surgical treatment. We used bivariate and multivariate regression models to assess patient and injury-related factors associated with receiving surgical treatment and with the timing of surgery after arrival to a participating centre. Results: Of the 1440 patients included in our study cohort, 167 (11.6%) were 70 years or older at the time of injury. Older patients were more likely than younger patients to be injured by falling (83.1% v. 37.4%; p < 0.001), to have a cervical injury (78.0% v. 61.6%; p = 0.001), to have less severe injuries on admission (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade C or D: 70.5% v. 46.9%; p < 0.001), to have a longer stay in an acute care hospital (median 35 v. 28 d; p < 0.005) and to have a higher in-hospital mortality (4.2% v. 0.6%; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis did not show that age of 70 years or more at injury was associated with a decreased likelihood of surgical treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22–1.07). An unplanned sensitivity analysis with different age thresholds showed that a threshold of 65 years was associated with a decreased chance of surgical treatment (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.19–0.80). Older patients who underwent surgical treatment had a significantly longer wait time from admission to surgery than younger patients (37 v. 19 h; p < 0.001). Interpretation: We found chronological age to be a factor influencing

  2. Neuroprotective effects and impact on caspase-12 expression of tauroursodeoxycholic acid after acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Miao, Lei; Hei, Long; Lin, Leilei; Ding, Huiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) on nerve function after acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats, observe its effect on neuronal apoptosis and caspase-12 expression levels, and investigate the underlying mechanism. Methods: We used a modified Allen’s weight-drop trauma method to establish a rat acute SCI model. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: group A (sham surgery group), group B (DMSO control group) and group C (TUDCA treatment group), with 36 rats in each group. At one minute and at 24 hours after successfully establishing the model, rats in group C received an intraperitoneal injection of TUDCA (200 mg/kg), while rats in group B received an equal amount of DMSO at the same time points. At 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury, a modified Tarlov scoring method and Rivlin’s oblique plate test were used to evaluate rat spinal cord nerve function recovery. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury. Specimens were obtained from the center of the injury sites; the pathological changes in spinal cord tissue were observed after hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL method, and the expression of caspase-12 was measured at the protein level using immunohistochemistry and Western blots. Results: Group C differed significantly from group B in Tarlov scores and the oblique table test as early as 24 hours after the injury (P < 0.05). The TUNEL assay test results showed that neurons underwent apoptosis after SCI, which peaked at 24 hours. The ratios of apoptotic cells in group C were significantly lower than those in group B at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury (P < 0.01). The immunohistochemistry and Western blot results showed that the caspase-12 expression levels of group C were lower than those of group B at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury (P < 0.05). Conclusion: TUDCA can inhibit the expression of caspase

  3. Effects of spinal cord injury on body composition and metabolic profile – Part I

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Dolbow, David R.; Dolbow, James D.; Khalil, Refka K.; Castillo, Camilo; Gater, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Several body composition and metabolic-associated disorders such as glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and lipid abnormalities occur prematurely after spinal cord injury (SCI) and at a higher prevalence compared to able-bodied populations. Within a few weeks to months of the injury, there is a significant decrease in total lean mass, particularly lower extremity muscle mass and an accompanying increase in fat mass. The infiltration of fat in intramuscular and visceral sites is associated with abnormal metabolic profiles. The current review will summarize the major changes in body composition and metabolic profiles that can lead to comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases after SCI. It is crucial for healthcare specialists to be aware of the magnitude of these changes. Such awareness may lead to earlier recognition and treatment of metabolic abnormalities that may reduce the co-morbidities seen over the lifetime of persons living with SCI. PMID:25001559

  4. Spasticity in spinal cord injured patients: 2. Initial measures and long-term effects of surface electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C J; Kett, N A; Bolam, J M

    1988-10-01

    Electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles has been shown to affect their spasticity, especially in patients with hemiplegia. But little has been reported on the long-term effects of such stimulation on individuals with spinal cord injury. This paper documents initial quadriceps spasticity in 31 spinal cord injured subjects, and the effect of four to eight weeks of reconditioning using electrical stimulation. Spasticity was quantified through the use of a normalized relaxation index (R2n) obtained from a pendulum drop test. The reconditioning protocol consisted of twice daily 20-minute exercise sessions at least four hours apart, six days per week. Spasticity and stimulated quadriceps torque were measured during one to three evaluations performed at least one day apart at the beginning of the program, and at four and eight weeks. There was no significant difference in average initial measures of spasticity between left and right legs and no effect of time since injury on average R2n values. Significant differences were seen for right leg average baseline R2n values when grouped by lesion level or completeness. Quadriplegic individuals were more spastic than paraplegic individuals, and subjects with incomplete lesions were more spastic than those with complete lesions. These findings are interrelated since most of the quadriplegic subjects (14 of 16) had incomplete lesions. Most participants had increased spasticity after four weeks of reconditioning but not after eight weeks. However, only eight subjects completed eight weeks of reconditioning. Subjects who had the greatest increases in spasticity also had the greatest gains in stimulated torque, both after four and eight weeks.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3263102

  5. The Effectiveness of FES-Evoked EMG Potentials to Assess Muscle Force and Fatigue in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Estigoni, Eduardo H.; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Wahab, Ahmad Khairi Abdul; Davis, Glen M.

    2014-01-01

    The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG) potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p < 0.05) between the decline in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI) population. PMID:25025551

  6. The effectiveness of FES-evoked EMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Estigoni, Eduardo H; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Wahab, Ahmad Khairi Abdul; Davis, Glen M

    2014-01-01

    The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG) potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p < 0.05) between the decline in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI) population. PMID:25025551

  7. Effect of human umbilical cord blood derived lineage negative stem cells transplanted in amyloid-β induced cognitive impaired mice.

    PubMed

    Banik, Avijit; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Kalra, Jasvinder; Anand, Akshay

    2015-09-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is pathologically characterized by extracellular deposition of insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and intracellular tangles made up of phosphorylated tau in brain. Several therapeutic approaches are being carried out in animal AD models for testing their safety and efficacy in altering disease pathology and behavioral deficits. Very few studies have examined the effect of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) derived stem cells in degenerative disease models despite growing number of cord blood banks worldwide. Here we have examined the therapeutic efficacy of hUCB derived lineage negative (Lin -ve) stem cells in alleviating behavioral and neuropathological deficits in a mouse model of cognitive impairment induced by bilateral intrahippocampal injection of Aβ-42. Lin -ve cells were transplanted at two doses (50,000 and 100,000) at the site of injury and examined at 10 and 60 days post transplantation for rescue of memory deficits. These cells were found to ameliorate cognitive impairment in 50,000-60 days and 100,000-10 days groups whereas, 50,000-10 days and 100,000-60 days groups could not exert any significant improvement. Further, mice showing spatial memory improvement were mediated by up-regulation of BDNF, CREB and also by concomitant down regulation of Fas-L in their brain. The transplanted cells were found in the host tissue and survived up to 60 days without expressing markers of neuronal differentiation or reducing Aβ burden in mouse brain. We suggest that these undifferentiated cells could exert neuroprotective effects either through inhibiting apoptosis and/or trophic effects in the brain. PMID:25989508

  8. Asiaticoside attenuates the effects of spinal cord injury through antioxidant and anti‑inflammatory effects, and inhibition of the p38‑MAPK mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang; Fu, Changfeng; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Hongxia; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Asiaticoside has potent pharmacological activity and broader pharmacological effects, including anti‑oxidant, antidepressant and hepatic protection effects, and the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. However, the mechanism underlying the effects of asiaticoside on neurological pain in spinal cord injury (SCI) remain to be fully elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated the specific mechanism underlying the beneficial action of asiaticoside in a SCI rat model. In the present study, Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores was determined to analyze the therapeutic effects of asiaticoside on the neurological function of the SCI rat model. The water content of the spinal cord was also determined to measure its effects on the SCI rats. Oxidative stress, levels of nitric oxide and inflammation were detected using commercial kits. Western blot analysis was used to measure the protein expression levels of p38‑mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the SCI rat. Asiaticoside effectively augmented the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores of the SCI rats. Significant reductions in the water content of the spinal cord, the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and the activities of the nuclear factor‑κB p65 unit, tumor necrosis factor‑α, interleukin(IL)‑1β and IL‑6 were observed in the experimental animals. Furthermore, on examination of the oxidative stress‑associated parameters, increased production of malondialdehyde and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase were detected in the SCI rat model. Asiaticoside also significantly suppressed the expression of p38‑MAPK, which indicated that the therapeutic effects of asiaticoside may be associated with the p38‑MAPK pathway. These data confirmed that asiaticoside attenuates SCI through antioxidant and anti‑inflammatory effects, and through inhibition of the p38‑MAPK mechanism. PMID:26458544

  9. Carbon Ion Irradiation of the Rat Spinal Cord: Dependence of the Relative Biological Effectiveness on Linear Energy Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Saager, Maria; Glowa, Christin; Peschke, Peter; Brons, Stephan; Scholz, Michael; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Jürgen; Karger, Christian P.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions in the rat spinal cord as a function of linear energy transfer (LET). Methods and Materials: As an extension of a previous study, the cervical spinal cord of rats was irradiated with single doses of carbon ions at 6 positions of a 6-cm spread-out Bragg peak (16-99 keV/μm). The TD{sub 50} values (dose at 50% complication probability) were determined according to dose-response curves for the development of paresis grade 2 within an observation time of 300 days. The RBEs were calculated using TD{sub 50} for photons of our previous study. Results: Minimum latency time was found to be dose-dependent, but not significantly LET-dependent. The TD{sub 50} values for the onset of paresis grade 2 within 300 days were 19.5 ± 0.4 Gy (16 keV/μm), 18.4 ± 0.4 Gy (21 keV/μm), 17.7 ± 0.3 Gy (36 keV/μm), 16.1 ± 1.2 Gy (45 keV/μm), 14.6 ± 0.5 Gy (66 keV/μm), and 14.8 ± 0.5 Gy (99 keV/μm). The corresponding RBEs increased from 1.26 ± 0.05 (16 keV/μm) up to 1.68 ± 0.08 at 66 keV/μm. Unexpectedly, the RBE at 99 keV/μm was comparable to that at 66 keV/μm. Conclusions: The data suggest a linear relation between RBE and LET at high doses for late effects in the spinal cord. Together with additional data from ongoing fractionated irradiation experiments, these data will provide an extended database to systematically benchmark RBE models for further improvements of carbon ion treatment planning.

  10. Antiallodynic effect of tianeptine via modulation of the 5-HT7 receptor of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai; Heo, Bong Ha; Kim, Woong Mo; Kim, Yong Chul; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2015-06-26

    Although tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant has been reported to have antinociceptive effects, the mode of action is different from that of tricyclic antidepressants despite structural similarities. We examined the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal tianeptine in neuropathic pain rats and determined the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT7) receptor of the GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord. Neuropathic pain was induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL). After observation of the effect from intrathecal tianeptine, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (SB-269970) was administered intrathecally 10 min before delivery of tianeptine, to determine the contribution of spinal 5-HT7 receptor on the activity of tianeptine. GAD expression and GABA concentrations were assessed. Intrathecal tianeptine dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia in SNL rats. Pre-treatment with intrathecal SB-269970 reversed the antiallodynic effect of tianeptine. Both GAD65 expression and the GABA concentration in the spinal cord were decreased in neuropathic rats but were increased by tianeptine. Additionally, 5-HT7 receptor and GAD65 were co-localized in the spinal cord. Intrathecal tianeptine reduces neuropathic pain. 5-HT7 receptor of the GABAergic interneurons together with GAD65 plays a role in the activity of tianeptine at the spinal cord level. PMID:25982324

  11. The Effect of Frequency and Type of Internet Use on Perceived Social Support and Sense of Well-Being in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the effect of frequency and type of Internet use on perceived social support and sense of well-being in persons with spinal cord injury. The results show that Internet use is not significantly related to perceived social support. Bivariate analysis indicates that there is a significant negative association between total…

  12. Effective energy output per cord of air-dried wood in five native, american hardwoods from a typical Tennessee woodpile

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.L. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    Calories per gram, moisture content, and density were determined for five species of equally seasoned hardwood. These data were used to calculate the effective British Thermal Unit (BTU) per cord in Quercus alba (white oak), Quercus velutina (black oak), Liriodendron tulipifera (yellow poplar), Carya ovata (shagbark hickory), and Cornus florida (flowering dogwood). These species were compared at typical moisture contents on an available-heat-per-volume basis to determine the best woodfuel value for the homeowner as well as for industry. While calories per gram were similar across species, the differing moisture contents and densities produced significant differences in the amount of available heat per volume of wood. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Biofunctionalized PEDOT-coated microfibers for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Alves-Sampaio, Alexandra; García-Rama, Concepción; Collazos-Castro, Jorge E

    2016-05-01

    Poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-coated carbon microfibers (PEDOT-MFs) hold promise for developing advanced neuroprostheses and neural repair devices. We investigated the chronic cellular responses to PEDOT-MFs implanted into the uninjured and the transected rat spinal cord, and compared the effects of polymer surface biofunctionalization with covalently attached polylysine (PLL) or a multimolecular complex of PLL, heparin, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and fibronectin. An alginate gel was used to facilitate microfiber implantation and reduce connective tissue scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI). PLL/heparin/bFGF/fibronectin-functionalized PEDOT-MFs showed excellent integration within the uninjured and injured spinal cord, frequently establishing contact with neuronal somas, axons, dendrites and glial cells, accompanied by very little or absent scarring response. On the contrary, non-functionalized and PLL-functionalized microfibers provoked inflammation and fibrosis with loss of neural elements in the surrounding tissue. Within the lesion, the PEDOT-MFs by themselves facilitated longitudinal alignment of migratory cells and growing axons, and their modification with PLL/heparin/bFGF/fibronectin promoted tissue healing, enhancing blood vessel formation and axonal regeneration without increasing inflammation. These results support the incorporation of biofunctionalized electroconducting microfibers in neuro-electronic interfaces and lesion-bridging systems for the treatment of SCI. PMID:26963900

  14. Effects of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells isolated from Wharton's jelly of caprine umbilical cord on cutaneous wound healing; histopathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Azari, Omid; Babaei, Homayoon; Derakhshanfar, Amin; Nematollahi-Mahani, Seyed Noureddin; Poursahebi, Raheleh; Moshrefi, Mojgan

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transplanted Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJMSCs) of caprine umbilical cord on cutaneous wound healing process in goat. After collection of caprine pregnant uterus of mixed breed goats from abattoir, the Wharton's jelly (WJ) of umbilical cord was harvested. The tissues were minced in ventilated flasks and explant culture method was used for separating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The isolated cells were immunostained for Actin protein, histochemically assayed for the presence of alkaline phosphatase activity, and analyzed for detection of matrix receptors (CD44) and hematopoetic lineage markers (CD34), using flow cytometery. After The isolated cells, 3×10(6) MSCs were stained with BrdU and prepared for transplantation to each wound. Four 3-cm linear full thickness skin incisions were made on both sides of thoracic vertebrate of four Raeini goats (two wounds on each side). The left wounds were implanted with MSCs in 0.6 ml of Phosphate buffer saline (PBS), and the right wounds considered as control group that received 0.6 ml of PBS. The samples were taken from the wounds 7 and 12 days after the wounding, and healing process was compared histologically between the two groups. Anti-BrdU staining showed that the transplanted cells were still alive in the wound bed during the study. The histopathological study revealed that re-epithelialization was complete at days 7 in treated wounds with WJMSCs, whereas in control wound the wounds still showed incomplete epithelialization 12 days after wounding. Also, microscopic evaluation showed less inflammation, thinner granulation tissue formation with minimum scar in the treated wounds in comparison with control wounds. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the beneficial effect of caprine WJMSCs in cutaneous wound healing in goat. PMID:21340694

  15. Assessment of the Neuroprotective Effects of Lavandula angustifolia Extract on the Contusive Model of Spinal Cord Injury in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaka, Gholamreza; Yaghoobi, Kayvan; Davoodi, Shaghayegh; Hosseini, Seyed R.; Sadraie, Seyed H.; Mansouri, Korosh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Spinal cord injury (SCI) involves a primary trauma and secondary cellular processes that can lead to severe damage to the nervous system, resulting in long-term spinal deficits. At the cellular level, SCI causes astrogliosis, of which glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a major index. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Lavandula angustifolia (Lav) on the repair of spinal cord injuries in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Forty-five female rats were randomly divided into six groups of seven rats each: the intact, sham, control (SCI), Lav 100, Lav 200, and Lav 400 groups. Every week after SCI onset, all animals were evaluated for behavior outcomes by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) score. H&E staining was performed to examine the lesions post-injury. GFAP expression was assessed for astrogliosis. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) testing was performed to detect the recovery of neural conduction. Results: BBB scores were significantly increased and delayed responses on sensory tests were significantly decreased in the Lav 200 and Lav 400 groups compared to the control group. The greatest decrease of GFAP was evident in the Lav 200 and Lav 400 groups. EMG results showed significant improvement in the hindlimbs in the Lav 200 and Lav 400 groups compared to the control group. Cavity areas significantly decreased and the number of ventral motor neurons significantly increased in the Lav 200 and Lav 400 groups. Conclusion: Lav at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg can promote structural and functional recovery after SCI. The neuroprotective effects of L. angustifolia can lead to improvement in the contusive model of SCI in Wistar rats. PMID:26903793

  16. The Adjustment Process for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: The Effect of Perceived Premorbid Sense of Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Daniel C.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between perceived changes in sense of coherence from pre- to postinjury and adjustment for a group of individuals with spinal cord injury. It was hypothesized that after a spinal cord injury, an individual's belief that he or she had significantly reduced his or her sense of coherence would be associated…

  17. Rodent Models and Behavioral Outcomes of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Sydney A.; Schmidt, Christine E.; Schallert, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Rodent spinal cord injury (SCI) models have been developed to examine functional and physiological deficits after spinal cord injury with the hope that these models will elucidate information about human SCI. Models are needed to examine possible treatments and to understand histopathology after SCI; however, they should be considered carefully and chosen based on the goals of the study being performed. Contusion, compression, transection, and other models exist and have the potential to reveal important information about SCI that may be related to human SCI and the outcomes of treatment and timing of intervention. PMID:25309824

  18. Appendiceal transection associated with seat belt restraint

    PubMed Central

    Go, Seung Je; Ye, Jin Bong; Kim, Joong Suck

    2016-01-01

    The seat belt is designed for safety in a motor vehicle and should be worn to prevent severe injuries. But, the seat belt itself can be an injury factor in combination with deceleration forces applied to fixation points of mobile viscera. Here, we present a 23-year-man with traumatic transection of the appendix, highly mobile viscera, following seat belt injury. PMID:27478816

  19. Appendiceal transection associated with seat belt restraint.

    PubMed

    Go, Seung Je; Sul, Young Hoon; Ye, Jin Bong; Kim, Joong Suck

    2016-08-01

    The seat belt is designed for safety in a motor vehicle and should be worn to prevent severe injuries. But, the seat belt itself can be an injury factor in combination with deceleration forces applied to fixation points of mobile viscera. Here, we present a 23-year-man with traumatic transection of the appendix, highly mobile viscera, following seat belt injury. PMID:27478816

  20. The effect of fractionated doses of radiation on mouse spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Y.C. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY ); Taylor, J.M.G.; McBridge, W.H.; Withers, H.R. )

    1993-09-20

    The purpose was to determine: (a) the dose-response relationship and latent time to paralysis following fractionated doses of radiation in mice, (b) the values of parameters for isoeffect curves, and (c) whether these parameters depend on the size of dose per fraction and the severity of injury. The spinal cords (T[sub 9]-L[sub 5]) of 608 C[sub 3]Hf/Sed/Kam mice were irradiated with fractionated doses of x-radiation. Three levels of neurological damage were used to grade the spinal cord response. Animals which did not develop paralysis were observed for at least 18 months after irradiation. The fractionated schedules consisted of either 2, 3, 4, 6, 10, or 20 fractions in addition to single doses. For the fractionated regimes the daily fraction size ranged from 2 Gy to 24 Gy, and for single doses the range was 12 Gy to 52 Gy. Both the latent time to paralysis and the incidence of paralysis were considered as endpoints. For analysis of the sparing associated with fractionation, the dose points were divided into two groups: a [open quotes]low damage[close quotes] group consisting of doses of near or less than the ED[sub 50] at 450 days and a [open quotes]high damage[close quotes] group consisting of doses much larger than the ED[sub 50] at 450 days in which there was 100% incidence of paralysis. The latent time depended on the radiation dose; for each fixed fraction number the latent period became progressively shorter with higher total doses. Differences in histology in fractionation sensitivity are observed between the two groups. The low damage data in each fractionation treatment are the important data in the analysis of long-term incidence of paralysis. On the other hand, the high damage data were emphasized for the analysis of latency. Three statistical methods (mixture model, Cox model, and Fe-plot) were used to fit the linear-quadratic dose response model and the [open quotes]Nominal Standard Dose[close quotes] (NSD) model. 29 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babic, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal channel showed a good correlation with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted onto the transplanted cells. The results suggest that focused targeting and fast delivery of stem cells can be achieved using the proposed non-invasive magnetic system. With future implementation the proposed targeting and delivery strategy bears advantages for the treatment of disease requiring fast stem cell transplantation.Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal

  2. Presynaptic and postsynaptic effects of local cathodal DC polarization within the spinal cord in anaesthetized animal preparations

    PubMed Central

    Bolzoni, F; Jankowska, E

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare presynaptic and postsynaptic actions of direct current polarization in the spinal cord, focusing on DC effects on primary afferents and motoneurons. To reduce the directly affected spinal cord region, a weak polarizing direct current (0.1–0.3 μA) was applied locally in deeply anaesthetized cats and rats; within the hindlimb motor nuclei in the caudal lumbar segments, or in the dorsal horn within the terminal projection area of low threshold skin afferents. Changes in the excitability of primary afferents activated by intraspinal stimuli (20–50 μA) were estimated using increases or decreases in compound action potentials recorded from the dorsal roots or peripheral nerves as their measure. Changes in the postsynaptic actions of the afferents were assessed from intracellularly recorded monosynaptic EPSPs in hindlimb motoneurons and monosynaptic extracellular field potentials (evoked by group Ia afferents in motor nuclei, or by low threshold cutaneous afferents in the dorsal horn). The excitability of motoneurons activated by intraspinal stimuli was assessed using intracellular records or motoneuronal discharges recorded from a ventral root or a muscle nerve. Cathodal polarization was found to affect motoneurons and afferents providing input to them to a different extent. The excitability of both was markedly increased during DC application, although post-polarization facilitation was found to involve presynaptic afferents and some of their postsynaptic actions, but only negligibly motoneurons themselves. Taken together, these results indicate that long-lasting post-polarization facilitation of spinal activity induced by locally applied cathodal current primarily reflects the facilitation of synaptic transmission. PMID:25416625

  3. Effects of estrogen on functional and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury: An experimental study with rats

    PubMed Central

    Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; da Rocha, Ivan Dias; Marcon, Raphael Martus

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional and histological effects of estrogen as a neuroprotective agent after a standard experimentally induced spinal cord lesion. METHODS: In this experimental study, 20 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one group with rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI) at T10 and receiving estrogen therapy with 17-beta estradiol (4mg/kg) immediately following the injury and after the placement of skin sutures and a control group with rats only subjected to SCI. A moderate standard experimentally induced SCI was produced using a computerized device that dropped a weight on the rat's spine from a height of 12.5 mm. Functional recovery was verified with the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale on the 2nd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd days after injury and by quantifying the motor-evoked potential on the 42nd day after injury. Histopathological evaluation of the SCI area was performed after euthanasia on the 42nd day. RESULTS: The experimental group showed a significantly greater functional improvement from the 28th to the 42nd day of observation compared to the control group. The experimental group showed statistically significant improvements in the motor-evoked potential compared with the control group. The results of pathological histomorphometry evaluations showed a better neurological recovery in the experimental group, with respect to the proportion and diameter of the quantified nerve fibers. CONCLUSIONS: Estrogen administration provided benefits in neurological and functional motor recovery in rats with SCI beginning at the 28th day after injury. PMID:26598084

  4. Short communication: The effect of 4 antiseptic compounds on umbilical cord healing and infection rates in the first 24 hours in dairy calves from a commercial herd.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A L; Timms, L L; Stalder, K J; Tyler, H D

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of 4 antiseptic compounds on the healing rate and incidence of infection of umbilical cords in newborn calves (n=60). Late gestation Jersey cows were monitored at a commercial farm (Sioux Jersey, Salix, IA) and newborn purebred (n=30) and crossbred (n=30) calves were obtained within 30min after birth. Calves were alternately assigned by birth order to 4 treatment groups: 7% tincture of iodine, 0.1% chlorine created using a novel chlorine disinfectant technology, chlorohexidine gluconate 4.0% wt/vol, and 10% trisodium citrate. Prior to dipping (within 30min of birth), diameter of the umbilical cords (as an indicator of cord drying and healing) were determined using digital calipers. In addition, as an indicator of umbilical infections, surface temperature of the umbilical stump (along with a reference point at the midpoint of the sternum) was determined using a dual-laser infrared thermometer. These measurements were all repeated at 24±1 h of age. All data were analyzed using mixed model methods. All models included fixed effects of breed (Jersey or Jersey cross), sex (bull or heifer), and treatment. Fixed effect interactions were not included in the statistical model due to the relatively small sample size. No treatment differences were noted for healing rate of umbilical cords. Initially, mean umbilical cord diameter was 22.84±3.89mm and cords healed to a mean diameter of 7.64±4.12mm at 24 h of age. No umbilical infections were noted for calves on any treatment during the course of this study. Mean surface temperature of the umbilical stump was 33.1±2.2°C at birth (1.5±1.6°C higher than the sternal reference temperature), and at 24±1 h of age the mean temperature of the umbilical stump was 33.0±4.3°C (0.5±1.8°C lower than the sternal reference temperature). These data suggest that these antiseptic compounds are equally effective for preventing infections and permitting healing of the umbilical cord

  5. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates nerve regeneration following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mai; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, which is frequently caused by orofacial surgery or trauma, induces sensory loss in orofacial regions innervated by the IAN. However, no effective treatment for orofacial sensory loss currently exists. We determined whether sensory loss in facial skin above the mental foramen following IAN transection was recovered by exposure of the transected IAN to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). Inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX) was performed in 7-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. On day 7 after IANX, the effect of daily LIPUS (from day 0) on the transected IAN, in terms of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, was examined. Moreover, the number of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the facial skin above the mental foramen of rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS was counted using the retrograde neurotracing technique. Daily exposure of the transected IAN to LIPUS significantly promoted recovery of the head-withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, and the number of TG neurons innervating the facial skin above mental foramen was significantly increased in rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS compared with sham or LIPUS-unexposed rats. Daily treatment of stumps of the transected IAN with LIPUS facilitated morphological and functional regeneration, suggesting that LIPUS is an effective and novel therapy for IAN injury. PMID:27058986

  6. Effects of Hypoxia and Chitosan on Equine Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, J.; Wagoner Johnson, A.

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan opens new perspectives in regenerative medicine as it enhances the properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) through formation of spheroids. Hypoxia has also been proposed to enhance stemness and survival of MSCs after in vivo implantation. These characteristics are relevant to the development of an off-the-shelf source of allogenic cells for regenerative therapy of tendinopathies. Umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UCM-MSCs) offer an abundant source of immature and immunoprivileged stem cells. In this study, equine UCM-MSCs (eqUCM-MSCs) conditioned for 3 and 7 days on chitosan films at 5% oxygen were compared to eqUCM-MSCs under standard conditions. Equine UCM-MSCs formed spheroids on chitosan but yielded 72% less DNA than standard eqUCM-MSCs. Expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Nanog was 4 to 10 times greater in conditioned cells at day 7. Fluorescence-labeled cells cultured for 7 days under standard conditions or on chitosan films under hypoxia were compared in a bilateral patellar tendon defect model in rats. Fluorescence was present in all treated tendons, but the modulus of elasticity under tension was greater in tendons treated with conditioned cells. Chitosan and hypoxia affected cell yield but improved the stemness of eqUCM-MSCs and their contribution to the healing of tissues. Given the abundance of allogenic cells, these properties are highly relevant to clinical applications and outweigh the negative impact on cell proliferation. PMID:27379167

  7. Comparison of the Effects of Different Cryoprotectants on Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gecai; Yue, Aihuan; Ruan, Zhongbao; Yin, Yigang; Wang, Ruzhu; Ren, Yin; Zhu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Cryoprotectants (CPA) for stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) have been widely developed based on empirical evidence, but there is no consensus on a standard protocol of preservation of the UCB cells. Methods. In this study, UCB from 115 donors was collected. Each unit of UCB was divided into four equal parts and frozen in different kinds of cryoprotectant as follows: group A, 10% ethylene glycol and 2.0% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (v/v); group B, 10% DMSO and 2.0% dextran-40; group C, 2.5% DMSO (v/v) + 30 mmol/L trehalose; and group D, without CPA. Results. CD34+, cell viability, colony forming units (CFUs), and cell apoptosis of pre- and postcryopreservation using three cryoprotectants were analyzed. After thawing, significant differences in CD34+ count, CFUs, cell apoptosis, and cell viability were observed among the four groups (P < 0.05).  Conclusion. The low concentration of DMSO with the addition of trehalose might improve the cryopreservation outcome. PMID:26770201

  8. Protective effects of gallic acid against spinal cord injury-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Hong; Wang, Zao; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of gallic acid in oxidative stress induced during spinal cord injury (SCI). In order to measure oxidative stress, the levels of lipid peroxide, protein carbonyl, reactive oxygen species and nitrates/nitrites were determined. In addition, the antioxidant status during SCI injury and the protective role of gallic acid were investigated by determining glutathione levels as well as the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. Adenosine triphophatase (ATPase) enzyme activities were determined to evaluate the role of gallic acid in SCI-induced deregulation of the activity of enzymes involved in ion homeostasis. The levels of inflammatory markers such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB and cycloxygenase (COX)-2 were determined by western blot analysis. Treatment with gallic acid was observed to significantly mitigate SCI-induced oxidative stress and the inflammatory response by reducing the oxidative stress, decreasing the expression of NF-κB and COX-2 as well as increasing the antioxidant status of cells. In addition, gallic acid modulated the activity of ATPase enzymes. Thus the present study indicated that gallic acid may have a role as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent against SCI. PMID:25955644

  9. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herrity, April N.; Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Stirling, David P.; Rau, Kristofer K.

    2015-01-01

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  10. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Rau, Kristofer K; Hubscher, Charles H

    2015-06-15

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  11. Effects of Exercise Training and Inspiratory Muscle Training in Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sheel, A. William; Reid, Wendy Darlene; Townson, Andrea F; Ayas, Najib T; Konnyu, Kristin J

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To provide a systematic review of the studies assessing exercise training and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in individuals for the improved respiratory function of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: Thirteen studies (5 exercise training, 8 IMT) were identified. Articles were scored for their methodological quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scores and Downs and Black tools for randomized and nonrandomized studies, respectively. Conclusions were based on the most rigorously executed studies using Sackett's levels of evidence. Results: Study comparison was compromised by diverse research designs; small sample sizes; and heterogeneity of studied populations, protocols, and outcome measures. Based on current literature, there is level 2 evidence supporting exercise training as an intervention to improve respiratory strength and endurance and level 4 evidence to support exercise training as an intervention that might improve resting and exercising respiratory function in people with SCI. There is level 4 evidence to support IMT as an intervention that might decrease dyspnea and improve respiratory function in people with SCI. Conclusions: There are insufficient data to strongly support the use of exercise training or IMT for improved respiratory function in people with SCI. There is some evidence of efficacy of both regimens; however, the evidence is not of the best possible quality. PMID:19086707

  12. Swimming behaviour and calcium incorporation into inner ear otoliths of fish after vestibular nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, E; Anken, R H; Rahmann, H

    2004-01-01

    Previous investigations on neonate swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) revealed that otolithic calcium incorporation (visualized using the calcium tracer alizarin complexone) and thus otolith growth had ceased after nerve transection, supporting a hypothesis according to which the gravity-dependent otolith growth is regulated neuronally. Subsequent investigations on larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) yielded contrasting results, repeatedly depending on the particular batch of cichlids investigated. Like most neonate swordtails, Type I cichlids revealed a stop of calcium incorporation after unilateral vestibular nerve transection. Their behaviour after transection was normal, and the otolithic calcium incorporation in controls of the same batch was symmetric. In Type II cichlids, however, vestibular nerve transection had no effect on otolithic calcium incorporation. They behaved kinetotically after transection (this kind of kinetosis was qualitatively similar to the swimming behaviour exhibited by larval cichlids during microgravity in the course of parabolic aircraft flights). The otolithic calcium incorporation in control animals was asymmetric. These results show that the effects of vestibular nerve transection as well as the efficacy of the mechanism, which regulates otolith growth/otolithic calcium incorporation, are--depending on the particular batch of animals--genetically predispositioned. In conclusion, the regulation of otolithic calcium incorporation is guided neuronally, in part via the vestibular nerve and, in part, via a further pathway, which remains to be addressed in the course of future investigations. PMID:15803634

  13. Swimming behaviour and calcium incorporation into inner ear otoliths of fish after vestibular nerve transection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmann, E.; Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Previous investigations on neonate swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) revealed that otolithic calcium incorporation (visualized using the calcium tracer alizarin complexone) and thus otolith growth had ceased after nerve transection, supporting a hypothesis according to which the gravity-dependent otolith growth is regulated neuronally. Subsequent investigations on larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) yielded contrasting results, repeatedly depending on the particular batch of cichlids investigated. Like most neonate swordtails, Type I cichlids revealed a stop of calcium incorporation after unilateral vestibular nerve transection. Their behaviour after transection was normal, and the otolithic calcium incorporation in controls of the same batch was symmetric. In Type II cichlids, however, vestibular nerve transection had no effect on otolithic calcium incorporation. They behaved kinetotically after transection (this kind of kinetosis was qualitatively similar to the swimming behaviour exhibited by larval cichlids during microgravity in the course of parabolic aircraft flights). The otolithic calcium incorporation in control animals was asymmetric. These results show that the effects of vestibular nerve transection as well as the efficacy of the mechanism, which regulates otolith growth/otolithic calcium incorporation, are - depending on the particular batch of animals - genetically predispositioned. In conclusion, the regulation of otolithic calcium incorporation is guided neuronally, in part via the vestibular nerve and, in part, via a further pathway, which remains to be addressed in the course of future investigations.

  14. Swimming Behavior and Calcium Incorporation into inner Ear Otoliths of Fish after vestibular Nerve Transection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmann, E.; Anken, R.; Rahmann, H.

    Previous investigations on neonate swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) revealed that otolithic calcium incorporation (visualized using the calcium-tracer alizarin- complexone) and thus otolith growth had ceased after nerve transection, supporting a hypothesis according to which the gravity-dependent otolith growth is regulated neuronally. Subsequent investigations on larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) yielded contrasting results, repeatedly depending on the particular batch of cichlids investigated: Like neonate swordtails, type I cichlids revealed a stop of calcium incorporation after unilateral vestibular nerve transection. Their behaviour after transection was normal and the otolithic calcium incorporation in controls of the same batch was symmetrical. In type II cichlids, however, vestibular nerve transection had no effect on otolithic calcium incorporation. They behaved kinetotically after transection (this kind of kinetosis was qualitatively similar to the swimming behaviour exhibited by larval cichlids during microgravity in the course of parabolic aircraft flights). The otolithic calcium incorporation in control animals was asymmetrical. These results stongly suggest that the effects of vestibular nerve transection as well as the efficacy of the mechanism, which regulates otolith growth/otolithic calcium incorporation, are - depending on the particular batch of animals - genetically predispositioned. Thus, it is assumed that the mechanisms regulating otolith growth and equlibibrium differ in the two types of cichlid fish. This work was financially supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) e.V. (FKZ: 50 WB 9997).

  15. Effects of short- and long-term rat hind limb immobilization on spinal cord insulin-like growth factor-I and its receptor.

    PubMed

    Suliman, I A; Lindgren, J U; Elhassan, A M; Diab, K M; Adem, A

    2001-08-31

    In this study we investigated changes in the spinal cord insulin-like growth factor-I peptide (IGF-I) and its receptors (IGF-IR) after hind limb immobilization for 5 days, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Moreover, effects on IGF-I and nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) in two types of skeletal muscle were also investigated. IGF-I levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) whereas IGF-IR and nAChRs were measured by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Spinal cord IGF-I levels decreased significantly after 5 days, 2 and 4 weeks of immobilization, whereas IGF-IR increased significantly after 4 and 8 weeks compared to controls. In skeletal muscles, nAChRs increased significantly after 5 days and 2 weeks in the soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior (TIB) muscles, respectively, and continued up to 8 weeks in both muscles. IGF-I concentration decrease significantly after 4 and 8 weeks in the SOL and TIB muscles, respectively. Despite the normal levels of IGF-I in both muscles at the early time points (5 days and 2 weeks), low levels of IGF-I were observed concurrently in the spinal cord ipsilateral to the immobilized limb. Our findings suggest that the early decrease in the IGF-I level and the late upregulation in the IGF-IR in the spinal cord might represent a nervous system response to disuse. PMID:11520489

  16. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  17. Double umbilical cord blood transplant is effective therapy for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Philip A; Perera, Travis; Marin, David; Oran, Betul; Popat, Uday; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Shah, Nina; Parmar, Simrit; Rezvani, Katayoun; Olson, Amanda; Kebriaei, Partow; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Ciurea, Stefan; Champlin, Richard E; Bajel, Ashish; Szer, Jeffrey; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Ritchie, David; Hosing, Chitra M

    2016-07-01

    A sub-group of patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) who relapse after autologous stem cell transplant can achieve long-term disease-free-survival after allogeneic stem cell transplant (alloSCT). There is limited information regarding the tolerability and efficacy of double umbilical cord blood transplant (dUCBT) for relapsed/refractory HL. We analyzed 27 consecutive, heavily pre-treated patients receiving dUCBT for relapsed/refractory HL at two centers from 2003-2014. The majority of patients relapsed <6 months after autologous stem cell transplant. A total of 15 patients received myeloablative (most commonly melphalan, fludarabine, thiotepa and anti-thymocyte globulin [ATG]) and 12 non-myeloablative conditioning regimens (fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, 200cGy total body irradiation +/- ATG). All patients engrafted; median time to neutrophil and platelet engraftment was 17 and 37 days, respectively. Overall response rate was 68%; 58% achieved complete remission. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 12.2 months; median overall survival was 27 months. Cumulative incidences of relapse and of non-relapse mortality at 5 years were 30% and 37.9%, respectively; 5-year PFS was 31.3% (95%CI 10.1-52.5). There was a trend toward inferior PFS in patients with lymph node size ≥2 cm at the time of alloSCT (p = 0.07) and toward inferior survival in patients with chemorefractory disease pre-alloSCT (p = 0.12). dUCBT is feasible in patients with heavily pre-treated HL and can achieve long-term disease-free survival in approximately 30% of patients. PMID:26472485

  18. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    West, Christopher R.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.; Campbell, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P < 0.05), vital capacity was increased (114 ± 9%, P < 0.05), whereas total lung capacity was relatively well preserved (99 ± 5%). During exercise, binding introduced a passive increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure, due primarily to an increase in gastric pressure. Active pressures during inspiration were similar across conditions. A sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes was evident in the unbound condition, and these volumes were shifted downward with binding. Expiratory flow limitation did not occur in any subject and there was substantial reserve to increase flow and volume in both conditions. V̇o2 was elevated with binding during the final stages of exercise (8–12%, P < 0.05), whereas blood lactate concentration was reduced (16–19%, P < 0.05). V̇o2/heart rate slopes were less steep with binding (62 ± 35 vs. 47 ± 24 ml/beat, P < 0.05). Ventilation, symptoms, and work rates were similar across conditions. The results suggest that abdominal binding shifts tidal breathing to lower lung volumes without influencing flow limitation, symptoms, or exercise tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function. PMID:24855136

  19. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher R; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Campbell, Ian G; Romer, Lee M

    2014-07-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P < 0.05), vital capacity was increased (114 ± 9%, P < 0.05), whereas total lung capacity was relatively well preserved (99 ± 5%). During exercise, binding introduced a passive increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure, due primarily to an increase in gastric pressure. Active pressures during inspiration were similar across conditions. A sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes was evident in the unbound condition, and these volumes were shifted downward with binding. Expiratory flow limitation did not occur in any subject and there was substantial reserve to increase flow and volume in both conditions. V̇o2 was elevated with binding during the final stages of exercise (8-12%, P < 0.05), whereas blood lactate concentration was reduced (16-19%, P < 0.05). V̇o2/heart rate slopes were less steep with binding (62 ± 35 vs. 47 ± 24 ml/beat, P < 0.05). Ventilation, symptoms, and work rates were similar across conditions. The results suggest that abdominal binding shifts tidal breathing to lower lung volumes without influencing flow limitation, symptoms, or exercise tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function. PMID:24855136

  20. The effects of maternal anxiety during pregnancy on IGF2/H19 methylation in cord blood.

    PubMed

    Mansell, T; Novakovic, B; Meyer, B; Rzehak, P; Vuillermin, P; Ponsonby, A-L; Collier, F; Burgner, D; Saffery, R; Ryan, J

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that maternal mental health in pregnancy can influence fetal development. The imprinted genes, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and H19, are involved in fetal growth and each is regulated by DNA methylation. This study aimed to determine the association between maternal mental well-being during pregnancy and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of IGF2 (DMR0) and the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR) in newborn offspring. Maternal depression, anxiety and perceived stress were assessed at 28 weeks of pregnancy in the Barwon Infant Study (n=576). DNA methylation was measured in purified cord blood mononuclear cells using the Sequenom MassArray Platform. Maternal anxiety was associated with a decrease in average ICR methylation (Δ=-2.23%; 95% CI=-3.68 to -0.77%), and across all six of the individual CpG units in anxious compared with non-anxious groups. Birth weight and sex modified the association between prenatal anxiety and infant methylation. When stratified into lower (⩽3530 g) and higher (>3530 g) birth weight groups using the median birth weight, there was a stronger association between anxiety and ICR methylation in the lower birth weight group (Δ=-3.89%; 95% CI=-6.06 to -1.72%), with no association in the higher birth weight group. When stratified by infant sex, there was a stronger association in female infants (Δ=-3.70%; 95% CI=-5.90 to -1.51%) and no association in males. All the linear regression models were adjusted for maternal age, smoking and folate intake. These findings show that maternal anxiety in pregnancy is associated with decreased IGF2/H19 ICR DNA methylation in progeny at birth, particularly in female, low birth weight neonates. ICR methylation may help link poor maternal mental health and adverse birth outcomes, but further investigation is needed. PMID:27023171

  1. Transection of Radioactive Seeds in Breast Specimens.

    PubMed

    Gilcrease, Michael Z; Dogan, Basak E; Black, Dalliah M; Contreras, Alejandro; Dryden, Mark J; Jimenez, Sandra M

    2016-10-01

    Radioactive seed localization is a new procedure for localizing breast lesions that has several advantages over the standard wire-localization procedure. It is reported to be safe for both patients and medical personnel. Although it is theoretically possible to transect the titanium-encapsulated seed while processing the breast specimen in the pathology laboratory, the likelihood of such an event is thought to be exceedingly low. In fact, there are no previous reports of such an event in the literature to date. We recently encountered 2 cases in which a radioactive seed was inadvertently transected while slicing a breast specimen at the grossing bench. In this report, we describe each case and offer recommendations for minimizing radioactive exposure to personnel and for preventing radioactive contamination of laboratory equipment. PMID:27627744

  2. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    were incorporated in the PEG-PCL-PEG gel and injected into a lesion transecting the main dorsomedial and minor ventral medial corticospinal tract (CST). The degree of collateralization of the transected CST was quantified as an indicator of the regenerative potential of these treatments. At one month post-injury, we observed the robust rostral collateralization of the CST tract in response to the bFGF plasmid-loaded gel. In conclusion, we hope that this platform technology can be applied to the sustained local delivery of other proteins for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  3. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral ...

  4. Spinal cord stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a mild electric current to block nerve impulses ... stretched into the space on top of your spinal cord. These wires will be connected to a small ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  6. Effects of riluzole on P2X7R expression in the spinal cord in rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Zhuang, Ying; Yan, Ming; Chen, Hui; Ge, An-Qi; Sun, Li; Miao, Bei

    2016-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is becoming an intractable health threat, with its profound effect on quality of life, thus posing a major challenge to clinical therapy. Despite the reported efficacy of riluzole in some pain models, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study aimed to assess the effects of riluzole in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Subsequent to model establishment, paw withdrawal latencies (PWLs) and the paw withdrawal mecha threshold (PWT) rapidly decreased, coupled with inhibited microglial activation and upregulated P2X7R expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH). Following intraperitoneal administration of riluzole (4mg/kg) once daily for 5 consecutive days as from day 3 after surgery, the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the hind limbs were significantly attenuated. In addition, riluzole downregulated P2X7R expression and inhibited microglial activation in SCDH. Our results indicated that riluzole is effective in alleviating neuropathic pain and inhibiting microglial activation, presumably via the downregulated P2X7R expression in SCDH. PMID:26952972

  7. Bombing Target Identification from Limited Transect Data

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Barry L.; Hathaway, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; McKenna, Sean A.

    2006-08-07

    A series of sensor data combined with geostatistical techniques were used to determine likely target areas for a historic military aerial bombing range. Primary data consisted of magnetic anomaly information from limited magnetometer transects across the site. Secondary data included airborne LIDAR, orthophotography, and other general site characterization information. Identification of likely target areas relied primarily upon kriging estimates of magnetic anomaly densities across the site. Secondary information, such as impact crater locations, was used to refine the boundary delineations.

  8. Late Effects after Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation in Very Young Children after Busulfan-Based, Myeloablative Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Allewelt, Heather; El-Khorazaty, Jill; Mendizabal, Adam; Taskindoust, Mahsa; Martin, Paul L; Prasad, Vinod; Page, Kristin; Sanders, Jean; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2016-09-01

    Infants and young children who undergo allogeneic cord blood transplantation (CBT) are at increased risk for late effects because of exposure of developing organs to chemotherapy and radiation therapy typically used in transplant conditioning regimens. Busulfan (Bu)-based myeloablative regimens were developed to eliminate radiation exposure in these young children with the hope that late effects would be minimized. We now describe the late effects in 102 consecutive patients surviving a minimum of 5 years (median follow-up, 12.9 years) post-CBT. Patients were conditioned with high-dose chemotherapy using Bu-containing regimens. No patient received total body irradiation. The median age at transplant was 1 year (range, .1 to 2). Diagnoses included inherited metabolic diseases (59.8%), leukemia (17.6%), congenital immune deficiency (20.2%), bone marrow failure/myelodysplastic syndrome (3.9%), and hemoglobinopathy (2%). Among patients surviving 5 years, the overall survival rate at 10 years post-CBT was 93% (95% CI, 84.9 to 96.8). Virtually all patients (98%) experienced at least 1 significant late effect. Most (83.3%) experienced 2 or more late effects, and more than half of the patients (64.7%) experienced 3 or more late effects. The most commonly observed late effects included dental problems (92.2%), short stature (55.9%), cognitive deficits (53.6%), pulmonary dysfunction (18.6%), and abnormal pubertal development (27.9%). This is the first report of late effects of Bu-based conditioning in a cohort of very young patients at the time of transplant. These results will inform clinical care guidelines for long-term follow-up and add to the growing information regarding outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27264632

  9. Effects of Pain and Pain Management on Motor Recovery of Spinal Cord-Injured Patients: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Jacquelyn J; Haefeli, Jenny; Jutzeler, Catherine R; Röhrich, Frank; Weidner, Norbert; Saur, Marion; Maier, Doris D; Kalke, Yorck B; Schuld, Christian; Curt, Armin; Kramer, John K

    2016-09-01

    Background Approximately 60% of patients suffering from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) develop pain within days to weeks after injury, which ultimately persists into chronic stages. To date, the consequences of pain after SCI have been largely examined in terms of interfering with quality of life. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the effects of pain and pain management on neurological recovery after SCI. Methods We analyzed clinical data in a prospective multicenter observational cohort study in patients with SCI. Using mixed effects regression techniques, total motor and sensory scores were modelled at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. Results A total of 225 individuals were included in the study (mean age: 45.8 ± 18 years, 80% male). At 1 month postinjury, 28% of individuals with SCI reported at- or below-level neuropathic pain. While pain classification showed no effect on neurological outcomes, individuals administered anticonvulsant medications at 1 month postinjury showed significant reductions in pain intensity (2 points over 1 year; P < .05) and greater recovery in total motor scores (7.3 points over 1 year; P < .05). This drug effect on motor recovery remained significant after adjustment for injury level and injury severity, pain classification, and pain intensity. Conclusion While initial pain classification and intensity did not reveal an effect on motor recovery following acute SCI, anticonvulsants conferred a significant beneficial effect on motor outcomes. Early intervention with anticonvulsants may have effects beyond pain management and warrant further studies to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness in human SCI. PMID:26747127

  10. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  11. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  12. The effects of maternal anxiety during pregnancy on IGF2/H19 methylation in cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, T; Novakovic, B; Meyer, B; Rzehak, P; Vuillermin, P; Ponsonby, A-L; Collier, F; Burgner, D; Saffery, R; Ryan, J; Vuillermin, Peter; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Carlin, John B; Allen, Katie J; Tang, Mimi L; Saffery, Richard; Ranganathan, Sarath; Burgner, David; Dwyer, Terry; Jachno, Kim; Sly, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that maternal mental health in pregnancy can influence fetal development. The imprinted genes, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and H19, are involved in fetal growth and each is regulated by DNA methylation. This study aimed to determine the association between maternal mental well-being during pregnancy and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of IGF2 (DMR0) and the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR) in newborn offspring. Maternal depression, anxiety and perceived stress were assessed at 28 weeks of pregnancy in the Barwon Infant Study (n=576). DNA methylation was measured in purified cord blood mononuclear cells using the Sequenom MassArray Platform. Maternal anxiety was associated with a decrease in average ICR methylation (Δ=−2.23% 95% CI=−3.68 to −0.77%), and across all six of the individual CpG units in anxious compared with non-anxious groups. Birth weight and sex modified the association between prenatal anxiety and infant methylation. When stratified into lower (⩽3530 g) and higher (>3530 g) birth weight groups using the median birth weight, there was a stronger association between anxiety and ICR methylation in the lower birth weight group (Δ=−3.89% 95% CI=−6.06 to −1.72%), with no association in the higher birth weight group. When stratified by infant sex, there was a stronger association in female infants (Δ=−3.70% 95% CI=−5.90 to −1.51%) and no association in males. All the linear regression models were adjusted for maternal age, smoking and folate intake. These findings show that maternal anxiety in pregnancy is associated with decreased IGF2/H19 ICR DNA methylation in progeny at birth, particularly in female, low birth weight neonates. ICR methylation may help link poor maternal mental health and adverse birth outcomes, but further investigation is needed. PMID:27023171

  13. Effect of maternal and neonatal factors on cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, Sheetal G.; Sadanandan, Nidhish P.; Mehaboob, A. K.; Gopaliah, Lakshminarayana R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is most common preventable cause of mental retardation in children. Cord blood Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (CBTSH) level is an accepted screening tool for CH. Objectives: To study CBTSH profile in neonates born at tertiary care referral center and to analyze the influence of maternal and neonatal factors on their levels. Design: Cross retrospective sectional study. Methods: Study population included 979 neonates (males = 506 to females = 473). The CBTSH levels were estimated using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on Cobas analyzer. Kit based cut-offs of TSH level were used for analysis. All neonates with abnormal CBSTH levels, were started on levothyroxine supplementation 10 μg/Kg/day and TSH levels were reassessed as per departmental protocol. Results: The mean CBTSH was 7.82 μIU/mL (Range 0.112 to 81.4, SD = 5.48). The mean CBTSH level was significantly higher in first order neonates, neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, delivered at term or preterm, neonates with APGAR score <5 and those needing advanced resuscitation after birth. The CBTSH level >16.10 and <1.0 μIU/mL was found in 4.39 % and 1.02 % neonates respectively. The prevalence rate of CBTSH level >16.1 μIU/mL was significantly higher in neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, term and preterm neonates, APAGR score of <5, presence of fetal distress, need for resuscitation beyond initial steps and in those with birth weight of <1.5 Kg. Three neonates were confirmed to have CH after retesting of TSH level. Conclusions: The CBTSH estimation is an easy, non-invasive method for screening for CH. The cutoff level of CB TSH (μIU/mL) >16.10 and <1.0 led to a recall of 5.41% of neonates which is practicable given the scenario in our Country. The mode of delivery and perinatal stress factors have a significant impact on CBTSH levels and any rise to be seen in the light of these factors. The prevalence

  14. An effective oral vitamin D replacement therapy in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, William A.; Emmons, Racine R.; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; Kirshblum, Steven C.; Spungen, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). A 3-month course of oral vitamin D3 to ‘normalize’ serum vitamin D levels was investigated. Design Prospective drug-intervention study. Setting VA Medical Center; private rehabilitation facility. Methods Seven individuals with chronic SCI and vitamin D deficiency completed 3 months of oral vitamin D3 (i.e. cholecalciferol) supplementation. At screening, baseline, and months 1 and 3, blood was collected for serum calcium, 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and N-telopeptide (NTx); 24-hour urine for calcium, creatinine, and NTx was performed. Oral vitamin D3 (2000 IU daily) and elemental calcium (1.3 g daily) were prescribed for 90 days. The results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation (SD). Analysis of variance with a Fisher's post-hoc analysis was performed to test for differences between study visits. Subjects were classified as deficient (<20 ng/ml), relatively deficient (20–30 ng/ml), or not deficient (>30 ng/ml) in 25(OH)D. Results Serum 25(OH)D levels were greater at months 1 and 3 than at baseline (26 ± 6 and 48 ± 17 vs. 14 ± 2 ng/ml; P = 0.005). Six of seven subjects were no longer deficient [25(OH)D >30 ng/ml] by month 3. Serum iPTH levels were significantly decreased at month 1 and month 3; serum NTx levels were significantly lower at month 3 than at baseline. Serum and urinary calcium levels remained within the normal range. Conclusion A daily prescription of 2000 IU of oral vitamin D3 for 3 months safely raised serum 25(OH)D levels into the normal range in persons with chronic SCI on calcium supplementation. PMID:22118252

  15. Effect of Progesterone Therapy on TNF-α and iNOS Gene Expression in Spinal Cord Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Farahabadi, Akram; Akbari, Mohammad; Amini Pishva, Akram; Zendedel, Adib; Arabkheradmand, Ali; Beyer, Cordian; Dashti, Nasrin; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) as a destructive crash result in neurons degeneration. The SCI lead to the onset of biochemical and molecular cascades such as inflammation that in turn has a key role in neurodegeneration development. The previous studies demonstrated the role of TNF-α and iNOS genes in intensifying the process after SCI. As a consequence, these genes overexpression intensify the inflammation and neuron degeneration process. In the present study, 32 male Wistar rats were chased and divided into four groups of eight. The SCI were induced in three groups and another group used as a sham. The progesterone hormone used as a therapeutic agent in rats with SCI. The results showed that injection of 10 μg/kg/12h progesterone hormone reduced the TNF-α and iNOS gene expression significantly and confirmed the role of progesterone in the reduction of inflammation. Also, the numbers of intact neurons in progesterone group were higher than other groups that demonstrated the protective effects of progesterone on neuron death. The BBB test was performed and demonstrated that progesterone is an effective factor to the improvement of locomotor response. These results of the study confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of progesterone hormone and suggested that it can be used as a therapeutic factor for SCI. PMID:27306339

  16. The effect of Am-80, a synthetic retinoid, on spinal cord injury-induced motor dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Mitsuko; Ohta, Yuki; Tokura, Yukie; Hamaguchi, Akemi; Shudo, Koichi; Okano, Hideyuki; Igarashi, Rie

    2009-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of 4[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8,-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)carbamoyl] benzoic acid (Am-80), a synthetic retinoid, on spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Treatment with Am-80 (orally and subcutaneously) significantly promoted recovery from SCI-induced motor dysfunction. On day 28 after injury, the lesion cavity was markedly reduced, while the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP; myelin), betaIIItubulin (neuron), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; astrocyte) was increased, in comparison with SCI controls. Interestingly, expression of neurotrophin receptor, tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) was over 3-fold higher after Am-80 treatment than in SCI controls. A lot of TrkB-positive cells as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-positive ones were observed around the injured site. Am-80 (10 microM) combined with BDNF (100 ng/ml) promoted extensive neurite outgrowth and TrkB gene expression by cultured SH-SY5Y cells, as did all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Thymidine incorporation was dramatically suppressed, but there was little effect on cell viability. These findings suggest that Am-80 has the potential to be used for treating neurodegenerative disorders, including SCI. Its efficacy may be partly ascribed to promotion of cell viability and differentiation of neural stem cells through increased TrkB expression. PMID:19182380

  17. EFFECTS OF ROBOTIC-LOCOMOTOR TRAINING ON STRETCH REFLEX FUNCTION AND MUSCULAR PROPERTIES IN INDIVIDUALS WITH SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Mirbagheri, Mehdi M.; Kindig, Matthew W.; Niu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the therapeutic effect of robotic-assisted step training (RAST) on neuromuscular abnormalities associated with spasticity by characterization of their recovery patterns in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Twenty-three motor-incomplete SCI subjects received one-hour RAST sessions three times per week for four weeks, while an SCI control group received no training. Neuromuscular properties were assessed using ankle perturbations prior to and during the training, and a system-identification technique quantified stretch reflex and intrinsic stiffness magnitude and modulation with joint position. Growth-mixture modeling classified subjects based on similar intrinsic and reflex recovery patterns. Results All recovery classes in the RAST group presented significant (p<0.05) reductions in intrinsic and reflex stiffness magnitude and modulation with position; the control group presented no changes over time. Subjects with larger baseline abnormalities exhibited larger reductions, and over longer training periods. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that RAST can effectively reduce neuromuscular abnormalities, with greater improvements for subjects with higher baseline abnormalities. Significance Our findings suggest, in addition to its primary goal of improving locomotor patterns, RAST can also reduce neuromuscular abnormalities associated with spasticity. These findings also demonstrate that these techniques can be used to characterize neuromuscular recovery patterns in response to various types of interventions. PMID:25449559

  18. A Noninvasive Neuroprosthesis Augments Hand Grasp Force in Individuals with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: The Functional and Therapeutic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Costa, Davide; Chiaramonte, Sara; Binda, Luca; Beghi, Ettore; Redaelli, Tiziana; Occhi, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate myoelectrically controlled functional electrical stimulation (MeCFES) for enhancing the tenodesis grip in people with tetraplegia. The second aim was to estimate the potential number of candidates for the MeCFES device. The application of MeCFES provides the user with direct control of the grasp force as opposed to triggered FES systems. Methods. Screening 253 medical records of C5 to C7 spinal cord injury resulted in 27 participants who trained activities of daily living for 12 × 2 hours, using the MeCFES. Hand function was evaluated by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Primary outcome was the ARAT change score with/without the device, before/after the intervention period. Secondary outcome was the number of positive or clinically relevant change scores with respect to the cohort. Results. The MeCFES improved hand test score in 63% of the subjects at first application. Training resulted in a significant therapeutic effect, which resulted in an overall increase of hand function in 89% of the participants and 30% experienced a clinically relevant change (6 points or more). Conclusions. Clinical relevance was found both as an assistive aid and as a therapeutic tool in rehabilitation. The therapeutic effect deserves further investigation in clinical studies. PMID:24489513

  19. Transmed Transect VIII: from Laurussia to Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, R. A.; Mart, Y.; Okay, A.; Robertson, A.; Stovba, S.; Khriachtchevskaia, O.

    2003-04-01

    TransMed transect VIII crosses the easternmost Mediterranean Sea. Some 2600 km long, it runs from Laurussia in the north (Ukrainian Shield) to Gondwana in the south (Arabian Shield). The Late Palaeozoic aged intracratonic Dniepr-Donets rift basin lies near the northern end of the transect and the modern intracratonic Red Sea rift lies at the southern end. Intervening tectonic units, north to south, include the Scythian Platform and Crimean Orogen in Ukraine; the Black Sea; the Pontides, Kirsehir Massif, and Taurides in Turkey; Cyprus with the Troodos complex; the Levant Basin and distal parts of the Nile Delta in the eastern Mediterranean; and the Sinai in Egypt. Deep structure, including crustal thickness and affinity, is poorly known along much of the transect. Although all available crustal scale seismic data have been considered, much of the deeper parts of the transect are inferred from the exposed geology and how this can be modelled in terms of regional paleotectonics and are, accordingly, speculative. Palaeozoic and younger sediments of the Scythian Platform overlie basement that is surmised to be younger than the adjoining Archean Ukrainian Shield. The whole of the crust of the Crimean Orogen, underlying thrust nappes emplaced during the early Mesozoic, is speculated to comprise an accretionary complex of mainly Triassic age that is correlated with the Sakarya Zone of northern Turkey. The Black Sea is a back-arc rift basin that opened in Late Cretacous-Tertiary times but the margins of the Black Sea intersected by the transect are not conjugate. The Pontide margin of the Black Sea, in northern Turkey, is formed by the Istanbul Zone, with Proterozoic-aged basement correlative with Moesian crust found in southern Romania and Bulgaria. The Kirsehir Massif is made up of Cretaceous metamorphic and granitic rocks, and represents the deeper parts of a magmatic arc. The Taurides form a south-vergent thrust-stack involving Palaeozoic to Eocene sediments. The

  20. Evaluation of radio-tracking and strip transect methods for determining foraging ranges of Black-Legged Kittiwakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostrand, W.D.; Drew, G.S.; Suryan, R.M.; McDonald, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    We compared strip transect and radio-tracking methods of determining foraging range of Black-legged Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). The mean distance birds were observed from their colony determined by radio-tracking was significantly greater than the mean value calculated from strip transects. We determined that this difference was due to two sources of bias: (1) as distance from the colony increased, the area of available habitat also increased resulting in decreasing bird densities (bird spreading). Consequently, the probability of detecting birds during transect surveys also would decrease as distance from the colony increased, and (2) the maximum distance birds were observed from the colony during radio-tracking exceeded the extent of the strip transect survey. We compared the observed number of birds seen on the strip transect survey to the predictions of a model of the decreasing probability of detection due to bird spreading. Strip transect data were significantly different from modeled data; however, the field data were consistently equal to or below the model predictions, indicating a general conformity to the concept of declining detection at increasing distance. We conclude that radio-tracking data gave a more representative indication of foraging distances than did strip transect sampling. Previous studies of seabirds that have used strip transect sampling without accounting for bird spreading or the effects of study-area limitations probably underestimated foraging range.

  1. Effects of Tramadol on Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons in the Rat Spinal Cord: An In Vivo Patch-Clamp Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Funai, Yusuke; Funao, Tomoharu; Mori, Takashi; Nishikawa, Kiyonobu

    2015-01-01

    Tramadol is thought to modulate synaptic transmissions in the spinal dorsal horn mainly by activating µ-opioid receptors and by inhibiting the reuptake of monoamines in the CNS. However, the precise mode of modulation remains unclear. We used an in vivo patch clamp technique in urethane-anesthetized rats to determine the antinociceptive mechanism of tramadol. In vivo whole-cell recordings of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) were made from substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons (lamina II) at holding potentials of 0 mV and -70 mV, respectively. The effects of intravenous administration (0.5, 5, 15 mg/kg) of tramadol were evaluated. The effects of superfusion of tramadol on the surface of the spinal cord and of a tramadol metabolite (M1) were further analyzed. Intravenous administration of tramadol at doses >5 mg/kg decreased the sEPSCs and increased the sIPSCs in SG neurons. These effects were not observed following naloxone pretreatment. Tramadol superfusion at a clinically relevant concentration (10 µM) had no effect, but when administered at a very high concentration (100 µM), tramadol decreased sEPSCs, produced outward currents, and enhanced sIPSCs. The effects of M1 (1, 5 mg/kg intravenously) on sEPSCs and sIPSCs were similar to those of tramadol at a corresponding dose (5, 15 mg/kg). The present study demonstrated that systemically administered tramadol indirectly inhibited glutamatergic transmission, and enhanced GABAergic and glycinergic transmissions in SG neurons. These effects were mediated primarily by the activation of μ-opioid receptors. M1 may play a key role in the antinociceptive mechanisms of tramadol. PMID:25933213

  2. Exercise induces cortical plasticity after neonatal spinal cord injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tina; Shumsky, Jed S; Murray, Marion; Moxon, Karen A

    2009-06-10

    Exercise-induced cortical plasticity is associated with improved functional outcome after brain or nerve injury. Exercise also improves functional outcomes after spinal cord injury, but its effects on cortical plasticity are not known. The goal of this investigation was to study the effect of moderate exercise (treadmill locomotion, 3 min/d, 5 d/week) on the somatotopic organization of forelimb and hindlimb somatosensory cortex (SI) after neonatal thoracic transection. We used adult rats spinalized as neonates because some of these animals develop weight-supported stepping, and, therefore, the relationship between cortical plasticity and stepping could also be examined. Acute, single-neuron mapping was used to determine the percentage of cortical cells responding to cutaneous forelimb stimulation in normal, spinalized, and exercised spinalized rats. Multiple single-neuron recording from arrays of chronically implanted microwires examined the magnitude of response of these cells in normal and exercised spinalized rats. Our results show that exercise not only increased the percentage of responding cells in the hindlimb SI but also increased the magnitude of the response of these cells. This increase in response magnitude was correlated with behavioral outcome measures. In the forelimb SI, neonatal transection reduced the percentage of responding cells to forelimb stimulation, but exercise reversed this loss. This restoration in the percentage of responding cells after exercise was accompanied by an increase in their response magnitude. Therefore, the increase in responsiveness of hindlimb SI to forelimb stimulation after neonatal transection and exercise may be due, in part, to the effect of exercise on the forelimb SI. PMID:19515923

  3. The Effect of Baicalin as A PPAR Activator on Erythroid Differentiation of CD133+Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Parvaneh; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Movassaghpour Akbari, Ali Akbar; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin; Dehdilani, Nima; Ejtehadifar, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a group of nu- clear receptor proteins whose functions as transcription factors regulate gene expres- sions. PPARs play essential roles in the regulation of cellular differentiation, development, and metabolism (carbohydrate, lipid, protein), and tumorigenesis of higher organisms. This study attempts to determine the effect of baicalin, a PPARγ activator, on erythroid differentiation of cluster of differentiation 133+(CD133+) cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, in order to investigate the effects of the PPARγ agonists baicalin and troglitazone on erythropoiesis, we isolated CD133+ cells from human umbilical cord blood using the MACS method. Isolated cells were cultured in erythroid-inducing medium with or without various amounts of the two PPARγ activa- tors (baicalin and troglitazone). Erythroid differentiation of CD133+cord blood HSCs were assessed using microscopic morphology analysis, flow cytometric analysis of erythroid surface markers transferrin receptor (TfR) and glycophorin A (GPA) and bycolony forming assay. Results Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis revealed the erythroid differentiation of CD133+cord blood HSCs under applied erythroid inducing conditions. Our flow cytometric data showed that the TfR and GPA positive cell population diminished significantly in the presence of either troglitazone or baicalin. The suppression of erythroid differentiation in response to PPARγ agonists was dose-dependent. Erythroid colony-forming ability of HSC decreased significantly after treatment with both PPARγ agonists but troglitazone had a markedly greater effect. Conclusion Our results have demonstrated that PPARγ agonists modulate erythroid dif- ferentiation of CD133+HSCs, and therefore play an important role in regulation of normal erythropoiesis under physiologic conditions. Thus, considering the availability and applica

  4. Advance in spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury: Blood-spinal cord barrier and remote ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qijing; Huang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ji; Zhu, Hongfei

    2016-06-01

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is the physiological and metabolic substance diffusion barrier between blood circulation and spinal cord tissues. This barrier plays a vital role in maintaining the microenvironment stability of the spinal cord. When the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the structure and function of the BSCB is disrupted, further destroying the spinal cord homeostasis and ultimately leading to neurological deficit. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is an approach in which interspersed cycles of preconditioning ischemia is followed by reperfusion to tissues/organs to protect the distant target tissues/organs against subsequent lethal ischemic injuries. RIPC is an innovation of the treatment strategies that protect the organ from I/R injury. In this study, we review the morphological structure and function of the BSCB, the injury mechanism of BSCB resulting from spinal cord I/R, and the effect of RIPC on it. PMID:27060223

  5. BMPR1a and BMPR1b Signaling Exert Opposing Effects on Gliosis after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Vibhu; Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Tysseling, Vicki; Hebert, Amy; Birch, Derin; Mcguire, Tammy L.; Stupp, Samuel I.; Kessler, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Astrogliosis following spinal cord injury (SCI) involves an early hypertrophic response that is beneficial and a subsequent formation of a dense scar. We investigated the role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in gliosis after SCI and find that BMPR1a and BMPR1b signaling exerts opposing effects on hypertrophy. Conditional ablation of BMPR1a from glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells leads to defective astrocytic hypertrophy, increased infiltration by inflammatory cells, and reduced axon density. BMPR1b-null mice conversely develop “hyperactive” reactive astrocytes and consequently have smaller lesion volumes. The effects of ablation of either receptor are reversed in the double knock-out animals. These findings indicate that BMPR1a and BMPR1b exert directly opposing effects on the initial reactive astrocytic hypertrophy. Also, BMPR1b knock-out mice have an attenuated glial scar in the chronic stages following injury, suggesting that it has a greater role in glial scar progression. To elucidate the differing roles of the two receptors in astrocytes, we examined the effects of ablation of either receptor in serum-derived astrocytes in vitro. We find that the two receptors exert opposing effects on the posttranscriptional regulation of astrocytic microRNA-21. Further, overexpression of microRNA-21 in wild-type serum-derived astrocytes causes a dramatic reduction in cell size accompanied by reduction in GFAP levels. Hence, regulation of microRNA-21 by BMP signaling provides a novel mechanism for regulation of astrocytic size. Targeting specific BMPR subunits for therapeutic purposes may thus provide an approach for manipulating gliosis and enhancing functional outcomes after SCI. PMID:20130193

  6. Mixed-Reality Exercise Effects on Participation of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries and Developmental Disabilities: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Baumgardner, Chad A.; McLachlan, Leslie; Bodine, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effectiveness of a mixed-reality (MR) exercise environment on engagement and enjoyment levels of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Methods: Six people participated in this cross-sectional, observational pilot study involving one MR exercise trial. The augmented reality environment was based on a first-person perspective video of a scenic biking/walking trail in Colorado. Males and females (mean age, 43.3 ± 13.7 years) were recruited from a research database for their participation in previous clinical studies. Of the 6 participants, 2 had SCI, 2 had IDD, and 2 were without disability. The primary outcome measurement of this pilot study was the self-reported engagement and enjoyment level of each participant after the exercise trial. Results: All participants reported increased levels of engagement, enjoyment, and immersion involving the MR exercise environment as well as positive feedback recommending this type of exercise approach to peers with similar disabilities. All the participants reported higher than normal levels of enjoyment and 66.7% reported higher than normal levels of being on a real trail. Conclusion: Participants’ feedback suggested that the MR environment could be entertaining, motivating, and engaging for users with disabilities, resulting in a foundation for further development of this technology for use in individuals with cognitive and physical disabilities. PMID:25477747

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of Transplanted Mesenchymal Stromal Cells-derived Human Umbilical Cord Blood Neural Progenitor Cells in EAE.

    PubMed

    Rafieemehr, Hassan; Kheyrandish, Maryam; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-12-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of transplanted human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells (UCB-MSC) derived neural progenitor cell (MDNPC) in EAE, an experimental model of MS. To initiate neuronal differentiation of UCB-MSCs, the pre-induction medium was removed and replaced with induction media containing retinoic acid, b FGF, h EGF, NGF, IBMX and ascorbic acid for one week. The expression of neural genes was examined in comparison to control group by real-time PCR assay. Then, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) was induced using myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, 35-55 peptides) in 24 C57BL/6 mice. After induction, the mice were divided in four groups (n=6) as follows: healthy, PBS, UCB-MSCs and MDNPC, respectively. At the end of the study, disease status in all the groups was analyzed using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining of brain sections. We found that UCB-MSCs exhibit neuronal differentiation potential in vitro and transplanted MDNPC lowered clinical score and reduced CNS leukocyte infiltration compared to untreated mice. Our results showed that MDNPC from UCB may be a proper candidate for regenerative therapy in MS and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26725557

  8. Effect of adjusting pulse durations of functional electrical stimulation cycling on energy expenditure and fatigue after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Poarch, Hunter J; Dolbow, David D; Castillo, Teodoro; Gater, David R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of three different pulse durations (200, 350, and 500 microseconds [P200, P350, and P500, respectively]) on oxygen uptake (VO2), cycling performance, and energy expenditure (EE) percentage of fatigue of the knee extensor muscle group immediately and 48 to 72 h after cycling in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). A convenience sample of 10 individuals with motor complete SCI participated in a repeated-measures design using a functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycle ergometer over a 3 wk period. There was no difference among the three FES protocols on relative VO2 or cycling EE. Delta EE between exercise and rest was 42% greater in both P500 and P350 compared with P200 (p = 0.07), whereas recovery VO2 was 23% greater in P350 compared with P200 (p = 0.03). There was no difference in the outcomes of the three pulse durations on muscle fatigue. Knee extensor torque significantly decreased immediately after (p < 0.001) and 48 to 72 h after (p < 0.001) FES leg cycling. Lengthening pulse duration did not affect submaximal or relative VO2 or EE, total EE, and time to fatigue. Greater recovery VO2 and delta EE were noted in P350 and P500 compared with P200. An acute bout of FES leg cycling resulted in torque reduction that did not fully recover 48 to 72 h after cycling. PMID:25803753

  9. Intrathecal baclofen as adjuvant therapy to enhance the effect of spinal cord stimulation in neuropathic pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lind, Göran; Meyerson, Björn A; Winter, Jaleh; Linderoth, Bengt

    2004-08-01

    Only about 60-70% of well selected patients with neuropathic pain syndromes of peripheral origin enjoy sufficient pain relief with spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Since recent animal experiments have demonstrated that the GABA-B receptor is pivotal in the effect of SCS on certain neuropathic symptoms, the use of baclofen as an adjunct to stimulation emerged as an option in patients not responding satisfactorily to SCS. Forty-eight patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin responding poorly to SCS were enrolled in a study with intrathecal baclofen; in a few cases adenosine was also tried. Twenty patients reported significant pain reduction at bolus trials and were offered implantation of a drug pump. Seven patients subsequently had pumps implanted together with SCS and four had pumps alone. Three patients had only peroral baclofen therapy as an adjunct to SCS. The 14 patients continuing with baclofen therapy as an adjunct to SCS, or alone, were followed for an average of 35 months after pump implant. The group with SCS+pump n=5; 2 explanted) reported an average decrease of pain ratings from VAS 82 to 33. The group with i.t. baclofen only had a pain decrease from VAS 63 to 33, while the three patients with peroral baclofen+SCS had less benefit from drug therapy. Adjunctive drug therapy for patients with unsatisfactory pain relief by SCS may offer a possibility to enhance pain alleviation. PMID:15207519

  10. Randomised trial of the effects of four weeks of daily stretch on extensibility of hamstring muscles in people with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Lisa A; Byak, Adrian J; Ostrovskaya, Marsha; Glinsky, Joanne; Katte, Lyndall; Herbert, Robert D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this assessor-blind randomised controlled trial was to determine the effect of four weeks of 30 minute stretches each weekday on extensibility of the hamstring muscles in people with recent spinal cord injuries. A consecutive sample of 16 spinal cord-injured patients with no or minimal voluntary motor power in the lower limbs and insufficient hamstring muscle extensibility to enable optimal long sitting were recruited. Subjects' legs were randomly allocated to experimental and control conditions. The hamstring muscles of the experimental leg of each subject were stretched with a 30 Nm torque at the hip for 30 minutes each weekday for four weeks. The hamstring muscles of the contralateral leg were not stretched during this period. Extensibility of the hamstring muscles (hip flexion range of motion with knee extended, measured with a 48 Nm torque at the hip) of both legs was measured by a blinded assessor at the commencement of the study and one day after the completion of the four-week stretch period. Changes in hamstring muscle extensibility from initial to final measurements were calculated. The effect of stretching was expressed as the mean difference in these changes between stretched and non-stretched legs. The mean effect of stretching was 1 degree (95% CI -2 to 5 degrees). Four weeks of 30 minute stretches each weekday does not affect the extensibility of the hamstring muscle in people with spinal cord injuries. PMID:12952517

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Antagonism in Spinal Cord Cultures and in a Mouse Model of Motor Neuron Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    De Paola, Massimiliano; Mariani, Alessandro; Bigini, Paolo; Peviani, Marco; Ferrara, Giovanni; Molteni, Monica; Gemma, Sabrina; Veglianese, Pietro; Castellaneta, Valeria; Boldrin, Valentina; Rossetti, Carlo; Chiabrando, Chiara; Forloni, Gianluigi; Mennini, Tiziana; Fanelli, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Sustained inflammatory reactions are common pathological events associated with neuron loss in neurodegenerative diseases. Reported evidence suggests that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key player of neuroinflammation in several neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms by which TLR4 mediates neurotoxic signals remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of TLR4 in in vitro and in vivo settings of motor neuron degeneration. Using primary cultures from mouse spinal cords, we characterized both the proinflammatory and neurotoxic effects of TLR4 activation with lipopolysaccharide (activation of microglial cells, release of proinflammatory cytokines and motor neuron death) and the protective effects of a cyanobacteria-derived TLR4 antagonist (VB3323). With the use of TLR4-deficient cells, a critical role of the microglial component with functionally active TLR4 emerged in this setting. The in vivo experiments were carried out in a mouse model of spontaneous motor neuron degeneration, the wobbler mouse, where we preliminarily confirmed a protective effect of TLR4 antagonism. Compared with vehicle- and riluzole-treated mice, those chronically treated with VB3323 showed a decrease in microglial activation and morphological alterations of spinal cord neurons and a better performance in the paw abnormality and grip-strength tests. Taken together, our data add new understanding of the role of TLR4 in mediating neurotoxicity in the spinal cord and suggest that TLR4 antagonists could be considered in future studies as candidate protective agents for motor neurons in degenerative diseases. PMID:22562723

  12. G-1 exerts neuroprotective effects through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 following spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiang; Meng, Jia; Wang, Xin-Shang; Kang, Wen-Bo; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) always occurs accidently and leads to motor dysfunction because of biochemical and pathological events. Estrogen has been shown to be neuroprotective against SCI through estrogen receptors (ERs), but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of a newly found membrane ER, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPR30 or GPER1), and discussed the feasibility of a GPR30 agonist as an estrogen replacement. Forty adult female C57BL/6J mice (10-12 weeks old) were divided randomly into vehicle, G-1, E2, G-1 + G-15 and E2 + G-15 groups. All mice were subjected to SCI using a crushing injury approach. The specific GPR30 agonist, G-1, mimicked the effects of E2 treatment by preventing SCI-induced apoptotic cell death and enhancing motor functional recovery after injury. GPR30 activation regulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathways, increased GPR30 and anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but decreased the pro-apoptosis factor Bax and cleaved caspase-3. However, the neuroprotective effects of G-1 and E2 were blocked by the specific GPR30 antagonist, G-15. Thus, GPR30 rather than classic ERs is required to induce estrogenic neuroprotective effects. Given that estrogen replacement therapy may cause unexpected side effects, especially on the reproductive system, GPR30 agonists may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating SCI. PMID:27407175

  13. G-1 exerts neuroprotective effects through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 following spinal cord injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qiang; Meng, Jia; Wang, Xin-shang; Kang, Wen-bo; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) always occurs accidently and leads to motor dysfunction because of biochemical and pathological events. Estrogen has been shown to be neuroprotective against SCI through estrogen receptors (ERs), but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of a newly found membrane ER, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPR30 or GPER1), and discussed the feasibility of a GPR30 agonist as an estrogen replacement. Forty adult female C57BL/6J mice (10–12 weeks old) were divided randomly into vehicle, G-1, E2, G-1 + G-15 and E2 + G-15 groups. All mice were subjected to SCI using a crushing injury approach. The specific GPR30 agonist, G-1, mimicked the effects of E2 treatment by preventing SCI-induced apoptotic cell death and enhancing motor functional recovery after injury. GPR30 activation regulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathways, increased GPR30 and anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but decreased the pro-apoptosis factor Bax and cleaved caspase-3. However, the neuroprotective effects of G-1 and E2 were blocked by the specific GPR30 antagonist, G-15. Thus, GPR30 rather than classic ERs is required to induce estrogenic neuroprotective effects. Given that estrogen replacement therapy may cause unexpected side effects, especially on the reproductive system, GPR30 agonists may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating SCI. PMID:27407175

  14. The effects of electrical stimulation on body composition and metabolic profile after spinal cord injury – Part II

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Dolbow, David R.; Dolbow, James D.; Khalil, Refka K.; Gater, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Diet and exercise are cornerstones in the management of obesity and associated metabolic complications, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and disturbances in the lipid profile. However, the role of exercise in managing body composition adaptations and metabolic disorders after spinal cord injury (SCI) is not well established. The current review summarizes evidence about the efficacy of using neuromuscular electrical stimulation or functional electrical stimulation in exercising the paralytic lower extremities to improve body composition and metabolic profile after SCI. There are a number of trials that investigated the effects on muscle cross-sectional area, fat-free mass, and glucose/lipid metabolism. The duration of the intervention in these trials varied from 6 weeks to 24 months. Training frequency ranged from 2 to 5 days/week. Most studies documented significant increases in muscle size but no noticeable changes in adipose tissue. While increases in skeletal muscle size after twice weekly training were greater than those trials that used 3 or 5 days/week, other factors such as differences in the training mode, i.e. resistance versus cycling exercise and pattern of muscle activation may be responsible for this observation. Loading to evoke muscle hypertrophy is a key component in neuromuscular training after SCI. The overall effects on lean mass were modest and did not exceed 10% and the effects of training on trunk or pelvic muscles remain unestablished. Most studies reported improvement in glucose metabolism with the enhancement of insulin sensitivity being the major factor following training. The effect on lipid profile is unclear and warrants further investigation. PMID:25001669

  15. Effects of microtubule-associated protein tau expression on neural stem cell migration after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhi-ping; Wang, Guo-xiang; Xia, Peng; Hou, Ting-ting; Zhou, Hong-li; Wang, Tie-jun; Yang, Xiao-yu

    2016-01-01

    Our preliminary proteomics analysis suggested that expression of microtubule-associated protein tau is elevated in the spinal cord after injury. Therefore, the first aim of the present study was to examine tau expression in the injured spinal cord. The second aim was to determine whether tau can regulate neural stem cell migration, a critical factor in the successful treatment of spinal cord injury. We established rat models of spinal cord injury and injected them with mouse hippocampal neural stem cells through the tail vein. We used immunohistochemistry to show that the expression of tau protein and the number of migrated neural stem cells were markedly increased in the injured spinal cord. Furthermore, using a Transwell assay, we showed that neural stem cell migration was not affected by an elevated tau concentration in the outer chamber, but it was decreased by changes in intracellular tau phosphorylation state. These results demonstrate that neural stem cells have targeted migration capability at the site of injury, and that although tau is not a chemokine for targeted migration of neural stem cells, intracellular tau phosphorylation/dephosphorylation can inhibit cell migration. PMID:27073389

  16. The effects of particulate ambient air pollution on the murine umbilical cord and its vessels: a quantitative morphological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Veras, Mariana Matera; Guimarães-Silva, Rosane Maria; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Mayhew, Terry M

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that particulate matter (PM) compromise birth weight and placental morphology. We hypothesized that exposing mice to ambient PM would affect umbilical cord (UC) morphology. To test this, mice were kept in paired open-top exposure chambers at the same location and ambient conditions but, in one chamber, the air was filtered (F) and, in the other, it was not (NF). UCs were analysed stereologically and by immunohistochemistry to localize isoprostane and endothelin receptors. The cords of mice from NF chambers were smaller in volume due to loss of mucoid connective tissue and decrease in volume of collagen. These structural changes and in umbilical vessels were associated with greater volumes of regions immunostained for isoprostane, ET(A)R and ET(B)R. Findings indicate that the adverse effects of PM on birth weight may be mediated in part by alterations in UC structure or imbalances in the endogenous regulators of vascular tone and oxidative stress. PMID:22975478

  17. Nanoparticles Exacerbate Both Ubiquitin and Heat Shock Protein Expressions in Spinal Cord Injury: Neuroprotective Effects of the Proteasome Inhibitor Carfilzomib and the Antioxidant Compound H-290/51.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari S; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, Jose V; Sjöquist, Per-Ove; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2015-10-01

    Increased levels of ubiquitin and heat shock protein (HSP) 72 kD are often seen in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, their roles in cell injury or survival are not well known. Thus, we have investigated the possible relationship between ubiquitin and HSP expressions in relation to cell injury in healthy animals, or following nanoparticle (NP) intoxication in SCI animals. A focal SCI was inflicted on the T10-11 segments over the right dorsal horn; animals were allowed to survive from 5 to 8 h after trauma. Separate groups of rats were exposed to SiO2, Ag, or Cu NPs for 7 days and subjected to SCI on the eighth day. A marked increase in ubiquitin or HSP immunoreactive cells occurred in the T9 to T12 segments 5 h after the injury, which further extended to the T4 and L5 after 8 h of survival. At this time, a marked increase in blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability to Evans blue and radioiodine, accompanied by an intense edema formation, was observed. Changes were further exacerbated in NP-treated traumatized rats. The most marked expressions of ubiquitin and HSP in SCI were seen in rats treated with SiO2, followed by Ag, and Cu NPs. Treatment with H-290/51 (50 mg/kg p.o., 30 to 60 min after injury) or carfilzomib (1 mg/kg, i.v., 30 to 60 min after trauma) significantly reduced the ubiquitin or HSP expressions, as well as the BSCB breakdown, the edema formation, and the cell injury in the cord both 5 and 8 h after the injury, in normal animals. However, a double dose of H-290/51 (100 mg/kg) or carfilzomib (2 mg/kg) is needed to reduce cord pathology or ubiquitin and HSP expressions in traumatized animals treated with NPs. H-290/51 showed superior beneficial effects in reducing cord pathology in SCI than carfilzomib. These observations are the first to demonstrate that (i) NP-treated traumatized animals induce a widespread BSCB leakage, edema formation, and cord pathology as well as an overexpression of ubiquitin and HSP, (ii) high doses of antioxidant

  18. Effects of magnetic nanoparticle-incorporated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells exposed to pulsed electromagnetic fields on injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunjin; Choi, Yun-Kyong; Lee, Dong Heon; Park, Hee Jung; Seo, Young-Kwon; Jung, Hyun; Kim, Soo-Chan; Kim, Sung-Min; Park, Jung-Keug

    2013-01-01

    Transplanting mesenchymal stem cells into injured lesions is currently under study as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord injury. In this study, the effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on injured rat spinal cord were investigated in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-incorporated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). A histological analysis revealed significant differences in MNP-incorporated cell distribution near the injured site under the PEMF in comparison with that in the control group. We confirmed that MNP-incorporated cells were widely distributed in the lesions under PEMF. The results suggest that MNP-incorporated hBM-MSCs were guided by the PEMF near the injured site, and that PEMF exposure for 8 H per day over 4 weeks promoted behavioral recovery in spinal cord injured rats. The results show that rats with MNP-incorporated hBM-MSCs under a PEMF were more effective on the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan behavioral test and suggest that the PEMF enhanced the action of transplanted cells for recovery of the injured lesion. PMID:24033637

  19. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Induces Tumoricidal Effects on Lymphoma Cells Through Hydrogen Peroxide Mediation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao Daniel; Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2016-09-01

    Several groups have reported that human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) possess unique tumoricidal properties against many cancers. However, the exact mechanisms as to how hWJSCs inhibit tumor growth are not known. Recent evidence suggests that exposure of cancer cells to high hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels from H2 O2 -releasing drugs causes their death. We therefore explored whether the tumoricidal effect of hWJSCs on lymphoma cells was mediated via H2 O2 . We first exposed lymphoma cells to six different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) concentrates of hWJSC-conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) (3, 5, 10, 30, 50, 100 kDa) for 48 h. Since, the 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate showed the greatest cell inhibition we then investigated whether the tumoricidal effect of the specific 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate on two different lymphoma cell lines (Ramos and Toledo) was mediated via accumulation of H2 O2 . We used a battery of assays (MTT, propidium iodide, mitochondria membrane potential, apoptosis, cell cycle, oxidative stress enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation) to test this mechanism. The hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate significantly decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cell death and apoptosis in both lymphoma cell lines. There were significant increases in superoxide dismutase with concomitant decreases in glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and thioredoxin peroxidase activities. H2 O2 levels, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation were also significantly increased in both lymphoma cell lines. The results suggested that the hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate regulates cellular H2 O2 leading to a tumoricidal effect and may thus be a promising anti-lymphoma agent. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2045-2055, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27392313

  20. Evaluation of Pain and Its Effect on Quality of Life and Functioning in Men with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hassanijirdehi, Marzieh; Khak, Mohammad; Afshari-Mirak, Sohrab; Holakouie-Naieni, Kourosh; Saadat, Soheil; Taheri, Taher

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most important consequences of spinal cord injury (SCI). It may affect several aspects of life, especially the quality of life (QoL). Hence, this study was conducted to establish an understanding of pain and its correlates and effects on patients with SCI in our community. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 58 male veterans suffering from SCI were admitted to our center for a regular follow-up. Demographic and SCI-related descriptive information were gathered using a self-reported questionnaire. To evaluate the patients' pain quality and the effect of pain on daily life, a questionnaire in 3 parts of lumbar, cervical and shoulder pain was administered. EuroQoL questionnaire and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 12 were also used to assess the patients' QoL. Results The mean age of the participants was 45.91 ± 6.69 with mean injury time of 25.54 ± 5.91. forty-four patients (75.9%) reported pain, including lumbar pain (63%), cervical pain (39%) and shoulder pain (51%). The presence of pain was associated with lower QoL. Patients with lumbar pain reported a significant amount of pain affecting their daily life and this effect was higher in patients with lower GHQ score or anxiety/depressive disorder. Conclusions Musculoskeletal pain, is a common complaint in veterans with SCI and is inversely associated with functioning and general health status. Lumbar and shoulder pain affects patient's daily living more than cervical pain. PMID:25852835

  1. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion. PMID:26834329

  2. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bao-an; Zi, Jin-hua; Wu, Li-sheng; Zhang, Cun-hua; Chen, Yun-zhen

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers. PMID:26692864

  3. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pei, Bao-An; Zi, Jin-Hua; Wu, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Cun-Hua; Chen, Yun-Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers. PMID:26692864

  4. Learning about time within the spinal cord: evidence that spinal neurons can abstract and store an index of regularity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuan H.; Turtle, Joel D.; Huang, Yung-Jen; Strain, Misty M.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Grau, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that intermittent noxious stimulation has divergent effects on spinal cord plasticity depending upon whether it occurs in a regular (fixed time, FT) or irregular (variable time, VT) manner: In spinally transected animals, VT stimulation to the tail or hind leg impaired spinal learning whereas an extended exposure to FT stimulation had a restorative/protective effect. These observations imply that lower level systems are sensitive to temporal relations. Using spinally transected rats, it is shown that the restorative effect of FT stimulation emerges after 540 shocks; fewer shocks generate a learning impairment. The transformative effect of FT stimulation is related to the number of shocks administered, not the duration of exposure. Administration of 360 FT shocks induces a learning deficit that lasts 24 h. If a second bout of FT stimulation is given a day after the first, it restores the capacity to learn. This savings effect implies that the initial training episode had a lasting (memory-like) effect. Two bouts of shock have a transformative effect when applied at different locations or at difference frequencies, implying spinal systems abstract and store an index of regularity (rather than a specific interval). Implications of the results for step training and rehabilitation after injury are discussed. PMID:26539090

  5. Effectiveness of radiation therapy without surgery in metastatic spinal cord compression: Final results from a prospective trial

    SciTech Connect

    Maranzano, E.; Latini, P.

    1995-07-15

    In assessing effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), we performed a prospective trial in which patients with this complication were generally treated with RT plus steroids, and surgery was reserved for selected cases. Of the 209 evaluable cases, 110 were females and 99 males, and median age was 62 years. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 13 to 88) and treatment consisted of 30 Gy RT (using two different schedules) together with steroids (standard or high doses, depending on motor deficit severity). Back pain total response rate was 82% (complete or partial response or stable pain, 54, 17, or 11%, respectively). About three-fourths of the patients (76%) achieved full recovery or preservation of walking ability and 44% with sphincter dysfunction improved. Early diagnosis was the most important response predictor so that a large majority of patients able to walk and with good bladder function maintained these capacities. Duration of response was also influenced by histology. Median survival time was 6 months, with a 28% probability of survival for 1 year. Survival time was longer for patients able to walk before and/or after RT, those with favourable histologies, and females. There was agreement between patient survival and duration of response, systemic relapse of disease being generally the cause of death. Early diagnosis of MSCC was a powerful predictor of outcome. Primary tumor histology had weight only when patients were nonwalking, paraplegic, or had bladder dysfunction. The effectiveness of RT plus steroids in MSCC emerged in our trial. The most important factors positively conditioning our results were: the high rate of early diagnoses (52%) and the number of tumors with favorable histologies (124 out of 209, 63%) recruited, and the choice of best treatment based on appropriate patient selection for surgery and RT or RT alone. 30 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training on Fitness and Walking Related Outcomes in Ambulatory Individuals with Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    DiPiro, Nicole D.; Embry, Aaron E.; Fritz, Stacy L.; Middleton, Addie; Krause, James S.; Gregory, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single group, pretest-posttest study. Objectives To determine the effects of a non-task-specific, voluntary, progressive aerobic exercise training (AET) intervention on fitness and walking-related outcomes in ambulatory adults with chronic motor-incomplete SCI. Setting Rehabilitation research center. Methods Ten ambulatory individuals (50% female; 57.94 ± 9.33 years old; 11.11 ± 9.66 years post injury) completed voluntary, progressive moderate-to-vigorous intensity AET on a recumbent stepper three days per week for six weeks. The primary outcome measures were aerobic capacity (VO2peak) and self-selected overground walking speed (OGWS). Secondary outcome measures included: walking economy, six-minute walk test (6MWT), daily step counts, Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI-II), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Results Nine participants completed all testing and training. Significant improvements in aerobic capacity (P=0.011), OGWS (P=0.023), the percentage of VO2peak utilized while walking at self-selected speed (P=0.03), and daily step counts (P=0.025) resulted following training. Conclusions The results indicate that total-body, voluntary, progressive AET is safe, feasible, and effective for improving aerobic capacity, walking speed, and select walking-related outcomes in an exclusively ambulatory SCI sample. This study suggests the potential for non-task-specific aerobic exercise to improve walking following incomplete SCI and builds a foundation for further investigation aimed at the development of exercise based rehabilitation strategies to target functionally limiting impairments in ambulatory individuals with chronic SCI. PMID:26666508

  7. Effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration on intracerebral hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghua; Shang, Xiao; Hao, Maolin; Zheng, Maoyong; Li, Yanxia; Liang, Zhigang; Cui, Yuanxiao; Liu, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effects of human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs) transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration on neural functional recovery and p53 gene expression in rats with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Collagenase type-IV was injected to the caudate nucleus of the rats to make ICH models. One hundred and twenty Sprague-Dawley rats with successful modeling were randomly divided into 4 groups, including the ICH group, hematoma aspiration group, HUC-MSCs transplantation group and HUC-MSCs transplantation combined with hematoma aspiration group (combination group). Neural functional status of the rats was assessed by modified neurological severity score (mNSS). Expression of p53 in the cerebral tissues surrounding ICH was detected by immunohistochemical assays. The scores of mNSS and the expression of p53 gene in the hematoma aspiration group, the HUC-MSCs transplantation group and the combination group were significantly lower than those in the ICH group at each indicated time point (p < 0.05). Intriguingly, mNSS scores and p53 expression in the combination group were significantly lower than those in the hematoma aspiration group on day 7, 14 and 30 (p < 0.05), and significantly lower than those in the HUC-MSCs transplantation group on day 14 and 30 (p < 0.05). HUC-MSCs transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration is more effective than either therapy alone in rats with ICH and could distinctly reduce the damage of nerve cells. PMID:26807166

  8. The Effects of Body Mass Composition and Cushion Type on Seat-Interface Pressure in Spinal Cord Injured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee; Beom, Jaewon; Yuk, Jee Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of body mass composition and cushion type on seat-interface pressure in spinal cord injured (SCI) patients and healthy subjects. Methods Twenty SCI patients and control subjects were included and their body mass composition measured. Seat-interface pressure was measured with participants in an upright sitting posture on a wheelchair with three kinds of seat cushion and without a seat cushion. We also measured the pressure with each participant in three kinds of sitting postures on each air-filled cushion. We used repeated measure ANOVA, the Mann-Whitney test, and Spearman correlation coefficient for statistical analysis. Results The total skeletal muscle mass and body water in the lower extremities were significantly higher in the control group, whilst body fat was significantly higher in the SCI group. However, the seat-interface pressure and body mass composition were not significantly correlated in both groups. Each of the three types of seat cushion resulted in significant reduction in the seat-interface pressure. The SCI group had significantly higher seatinterface pressure than the control group regardless of cushion type or sitting posture. The three kinds of sitting posture did not result in a significant reduction of seat-interface pressure. Conclusion We confirmed that the body mass composition does not have a direct effect on seat-interface pressure. However, a reduction of skeletal muscle mass and body water can influence the occurrence of pressure ulcers. Furthermore, in order to minimize seat-interface pressure, it is necessary to apply a method fitted to each individual rather than a uniform method. PMID:26798612

  9. Chronic Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Impairs Ejaculatory Reflexes in Male Rats: Partial Recovery by Systemic Infusions of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist 7OHDPAT.

    PubMed

    Kozyrev, Natalie; Staudt, Michael D; Brown, Arthur; Coolen, Lique M

    2016-05-15

    Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes major disruption of ejaculatory function in men. Ejaculation is a reflex and the spinal generator for ejaculatory reflexes in the rat has been located in the lumbosacral spinal cord. The effects of SCI on the rat spinal ejaculation generator and ejaculatory reflexes remain understudied. The first goal of the current study was to establish the effects of chronic SCI on the function of the spinal ejaculation generator. Male rats received a contusion injury of the spinal cord at spinal level T6-T7. Ejaculatory reflexes elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) were evaluated in injured and control rats at 4-6 weeks following SCI. SCI males demonstrated significant reductions in bursting of the bulbocavernosus muscle (BCM), an indicator for expulsion phase of ejaculation, and in seminal vesicle pressure (SVP) increases, an indicator for the emission phase of ejaculation, following DPN stimulation. Thus, contusion SCI resulted in long-term impairment of ejaculatory reflexes. The D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (7OHDPAT) facilitates ejaculation in spinal cord intact rats, thus the second goal of the current study was to test whether subcutaneous infusions of 7OHDPAT can facilitate ejaculatory reflexes in rats with chronic SCI. Male rats received a contusion injury at T6-T7 and effects of systemic administration of 7OHDPAT (1 mg/kg) were tested 4-5 weeks following injury. Results showed that 7OHDPAT administration facilitated ejaculatory reflexes in SCI males with or without DPN stimulation, provided that supraspinal inputs to the lumbar cord were severed by transection just prior to evaluating the reflex. Thus, 7OHDPAT administration in SCI males was able to overcome the detrimental effects of SCI on ejaculatory reflexes. PMID:26437577

  10. Positively Charged Oligo[Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Fumarate] Scaffold Implantation Results in a Permissive Lesion Environment after Spinal Cord Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Jeffrey S.; Esmaeili Rad, Melika; Grahn, Peter J.; Chen, Bingkun K.; Knight, Andrew M.; Schmeichel, Ann M.; Isaq, Nasro A.; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Positively charged oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF+) scaffolds loaded with Schwann cells bridge spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions and support axonal regeneration in rat. The regeneration achieved is not sufficient for inducing functional recovery. Attempts to increase regeneration would benefit from understanding the effects of the scaffold and transplanted cells on lesion environment. We conducted morphometric and stereological analysis of lesions in rats implanted with OPF+ scaffolds with or without loaded Schwann cells 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 weeks after thoracic spinal cord transection. No differences were found in collagen scarring, cyst formation, astrocyte reactivity, myelin debris, or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) accumulation. However, when scaffold-implanted animals were compared with animals with transection injuries only, these barriers to regeneration were significantly reduced, accompanied by increased activated macrophages/microglia. This distinctive and regeneration permissive tissue reaction to scaffold implantation was independent of Schwann cell transplantation. Although the tissue reaction was beneficial in the short term, we observed a chronic fibrotic host response, resulting in scaffolds surrounded by collagen at 8 weeks. This study demonstrates that an appropriate biomaterial scaffold improves the environment for regeneration. Future targeting of the host fibrotic response may allow increased axonal regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25891264

  11. Staging Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  12. Effect of Spinal Cord Injury on Quality of Life of Affected Soldiers in India: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhawna

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A prospective cross-sectional study with convenience sampling approach was done to assess quality of life (QoL) in 100 soldiers and veterans affected by spinal cord injury (SCI). Purpose SCI affects almost every aspect of the life of an affected individual. This study was done to measure the impact of SCI on QoL of affected soldiers and veterans using the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. Overview of Literature The devastating effect of SCI on QoL is well known. However, this study is unique in that it includes soldiers and veterans, who constitute a large, but excluded, cohort in most demographic studies. Methods A cross-sectional study was done at two SCI rehabilitation centres of the Indian armed forces. Data was collected by face-to-face interviews from 100 patients, which included both sociodemographic data as well as all the questions included in WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results Age and marital status did not have any influence on QoL. Level of injury (paraplegic or quadriplegic), level of education and presence of other medical co-morbidities had the most significant influence on QoL. Presence of other medical co-morbidities had a negative influence on QoL. Conclusions Identification of factors having a positive and negative influence on QoL help in formulating measures and policies that positively influence the QoL following SCI in soldiers. Future longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes and assessment of additional variables in addition to WHOQOL-BREF, like presence/absence of secondary complications, are required to bring about policy changes to provide SCI patients with additional support and increased access to equipment or lifestyle interventions. PMID:27114767

  13. Effect of chronic activity-based therapy on bone mineral density and bone turnover in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Harness, Eric T.; Witzke, Kara A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporosis is a severe complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Many exercise modalities are used to slow bone loss, yet their efficacy is equivocal. This study examined the effect of activity-based therapy (ABT) targeting the lower extremities on bone health in individuals with SCI. Methods Thirteen men and women with SCI (age and injury duration = 29.7 ± 7.8 and 1.9 ± 2.7 years) underwent 6 months of ABT. At baseline and after 3 and 6 months of training, blood samples were obtained to assess bone formation (serum procollagen type 1 N propeptide (PINP) and bone resorption (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), and participants underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans to obtain total body and regional estimates of bone mineral density (BMD). Results Results demonstrated significant increases (p < 0.05) in spine BMD (+4.8 %; 1.27 ± 0.22–1.33 ± 0.24 g/cm2) and decreases (p < 0.01) in total hip BMD (−6.1 %; 0.98 ± 0.18–0.91 ± 0.16 g/cm2) from 0 to 6 months of training. BMD at the bilateral distal femur (−7.5 to −11.0 %) and proximal tibia (− 8.0 to −11.2 %) declined but was not different (p > 0.05) versus baseline. Neither PINP nor CTX was altered (p> 0.05) with training. Conclusions Chronic activity-based therapy did not reverse bone loss typically observed soon after injury, yet reductions in BMD were less than the expected magnitude of decline in lower extremity BMD in persons with recent SCI. PMID:24097172

  14. The Effects of Secretion Factors from Umbilical Cord Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kui-Xing; Xu, Liang-Liang; Rui, Yun-Feng; Huang, Shuo; Lin, Si-En; Xiong, Jiang-Hui; Li, Ying-Hui; Lee, Wayne Yuk-Wai; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Factors synthesized by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contain various growth factors, cytokines, exosomes and microRNAs, which may affect the differentiation abilities of MSCs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of secretion factors of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) on osteogenesis of human bone marrow derived MSCs (hBMSCs). The results showed that 20 μg/ml hUCMSCs secretion factors could initiate osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs without osteogenic induction medium (OIM), and the amount of calcium deposit (stained by Alizarin Red) was significantly increased after the hUCMSCs secretion factors treatment. Real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the expression of osteogenesis-related genes including ALP, BMP2, OCN, Osterix, Col1α and Runx2 were significantly up-regulated following hUCMSCs secretion factors treatment. In addition, we found that 10 μg hUCMSCs secretion factors together with 2×105 hBMSCs in the HA/TCP scaffolds promoted ectopic bone formation in nude mice. Local application of 10 μg hUCMSCs secretion factors with 50 μl 2% hyaluronic acid hydrogel and 1×105 rat bone marrow derived MSCs (rBMSCs) also significantly enhanced the bone repair of rat calvarial bone critical defect model at both 4 weeks and 8 weeks. Moreover, the group that received the hUCMSCs secretion factors treatment had more cartilage and bone regeneration in the defect areas than those in the control group. Taken together, these findings suggested that hUCMSCs secretion factors can initiate osteogenesis of bone marrow MSCs and promote bone repair. Our study indicates that hUCMSCs secretion factors may be potential sources for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:25799169

  15. Effects of electromyostimulation on muscle and bone in men with acute traumatic spinal cord injury: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Arija-Blázquez, Alfredo; Ceruelo-Abajo, Silvia; Díaz-Merino, María S.; Godino-Durán, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Dhier, Luís; Martin, José L. R.; Florensa-Vila, José

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of 14 weeks of electromyostimulation (EMS) training (47 minutes/day, 5 days/week) on both muscle and bone loss prevention in persons with recent, complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Prospective, experimental, controlled, single-blind randomized trial with external blind evaluation by third parties. Methods Eight men with recent SCI (8 weeks from injury; ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) “A”) were randomized into the intervention or the control groups. Cross-sectional area of the quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging. Bone mineral density changes were assessed with a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Several bone biomarkers (i.e. total testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, insulin-growth factor I, osteocalcin, serum type I collagen C-telopeptide), lipid, and lipoprotein profiles were quantified. A standard oral glucose tolerance test was performed before and after the 14-week training. All analyses were conducted at the beginning and after the intervention. Results The intervention group showed a significant increase in QF muscle size when compared with the control group. Bone losses were similar in both groups. Basal levels of bone biomarkers did not change over time. Changes in lipid and lipoprotein were similar in both groups. Glucose and insulin peaks moved forward after the training in the intervention group. Conclusions This study indicates that skeletal muscle of patients with complete SCI retains the ability to grow in response to a longitudinal EMS training, while bone does not respond to similar external stimulus. Increases in muscle mass might have induced improvements in whole body insulin-induced glucose uptake. PMID:24090427

  16. The protective effects of 15-deoxy-delta-(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Bradley J; Girolami, Elizabeth I; Ghasemlou, Nader; Jeong, Suh Young; David, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Secondary tissue damage that occurs within days after spinal cord injury contributes significantly to permanent paralysis, sensory loss, and other functional disabilities. The acute inflammatory response is thought to contribute largely to this secondary damage. We show here that 15-deoxy-delta-12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), a metabolite of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) that has anti-inflammatory actions, given daily for the first 2 weeks after spinal cord contusion injury in mice, results in significant improvement of sensory and locomotor function. 15d-PGJ2-treated mice also show diminished signs of microglia/macrophage activation, increased neuronal survival, greater serotonergic innervation, and reduced demyelination in the injured spinal cord. These changes are accompanied by a reduction in chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Our results also indicate that 15d-PGJ2 is likely to reduce inflammation in the injured spinal cord by attenuating multiple signaling pathways: reducing activation of NF-kappa B; enhancing expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling1 and reducing the activation of Janus activated Kinase 2. PMID:18205174

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF SEROTONERGIC AND ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD: EFFECTS OF NEONATAL CHEMICAL LESIONS AND HYPERTHYROIDISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ontogeny of serotonergic receptors and alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in thoracolumbar spinal cord of rats given neurotoxins which destroy serotonergic (5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) or noradrenergic (6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)) nerve terminals was examined. Intraci...

  18. Beneficial effect of the oxygen free radical scavenger amifostine (WR-2721) on spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chronidou, Fany; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Georgiou, Christos D; Koletsis, Efstratios N; Karanikolas, Menelaos; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Background Paraplegia is the most devastating complication of thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aortic surgery. During these operations, an ischemia-reperfusion process is inevitable and the produced radical oxygen species cause severe oxidative stress for the spinal cord. In this study we examined the influence of Amifostine, a triphosphate free oxygen scavenger, on oxidative stress of spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion in rabbits. Methods Eighteen male, New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized and spinal cord ischemia was induced by temporary occlusion of the descending thoracic aorta by a coronary artery balloon catheter, advanced through the femoral artery. The animals were randomly divided in 3 groups. Group I functioned as control. In group II the descending aorta was occluded for 30 minutes and then reperfused for 75 min. In group III, 500 mg Amifostine was infused into the distal aorta during the second half-time of ischemia period. At the end of reperfusion all animals were sacrificed and spinal cord specimens were examined for superoxide radicals by an ultra sensitive fluorescent assay. Results Superoxide radical levels ranged, in group I between 1.52 and 1.76 (1.64 ± 0.10), in group II between 1.96 and 2.50 (2.10 ± 0.23), and in group III (amifostine) between 1.21 and 1.60 (1.40 ± 0.19) (p = 0.00), showing a decrease of 43% in the Group of Amifostine. A lipid peroxidation marker measurement ranged, in group I between 0.278 and 0.305 (0.296 ± 0.013), in group II between 0.427 and 0.497 (0.463 ± 0.025), and in group III (amifostine) between 0.343 and 0.357 (0.350 ± 0.007) (p < 0.00), showing a decrease of 38% after Amifostine administration. Conclusion By direct and indirect methods of measuring the oxidative stress of spinal cord after ischemia/reperfusion, it is suggested that intra-aortic Amifostine infusion during spinal cord ischemia phase, significantly attenuated the spinal cord oxidative injury in rabbits. PMID:19758462

  19. Developmental and Functional Effects of Steroid Hormones on the Neuroendocrine Axis and Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Zubeldia-Brenner, L; Roselli, C E; Recabarren, S E; Gonzalez Deniselle, M C; Lara, H E

    2016-07-01

    This review highlights the principal effects of steroid hormones at central and peripheral levels in the neuroendocrine axis. The data discussed highlight the principal role of oestrogens and testosterone in hormonal programming in relation to sexual orientation, reproductive and metabolic programming, and the neuroendocrine mechanism involved in the development of polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype. Moreover, consistent with the wide range of processes in which steroid hormones take part, we discuss the protective effects of progesterone on neurodegenerative disease and the signalling mechanism involved in the genesis of oestrogen-induced pituitary prolactinomas. PMID:27262161

  20. In Vivo Neuroprotective Effect of Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate Solution in an Ischemia/Reperfusion Spinal Cord Injury Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin Kwang; Kang, Min-Woong; Rhee, Youn Ju; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Han, Sung Joon; Cho, Hyun Jin; Na, Myung Hoon; Yu, Jae-Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Background Paraplegia is a devastating complication following operations on the thoracoabdominal aorta. We investigated whether histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution could reduce the extent of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) spinal cord injuries in a rat model using a direct delivery method. Methods Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into four groups. The sham group (n=6) underwent a sham operation, the IR group (n=6) underwent only an aortic occlusion, the saline infusion group (saline group, n=6) underwent an aortic occlusion and direct infusion of cold saline into the occluded aortic segment, and the HTK infusion group (HTK group, n=6) underwent an aortic occlusion and direct infusion of cold HTK solution into the occluded aortic segment. An IR spinal cord injury was induced by transabdominal clamping of the aorta distally to the left renal artery and proximally to the aortic bifurcation for 60 minutes. A neurological evaluation of locomotor function was performed using the modified Tarlov score after 48 hours of reperfusion. The spinal cord was harvested for histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The spinal cord IR model using direct drug delivery in rats was highly reproducible. The Tarlov score was 4.0 in the sham group, 1.17±0.75 in the IR group, 1.33±1.03 in the saline group, and 2.67±0.81 in the HTK group (p=0.04). The histopathological analysis of the HTK group showed reduced neuronal cell death. Conclusion Direct infusion of cold HTK solution into the occluded aortic segment may reduce the extent of spinal cord injuries in an IR model in rats. PMID:27525231

  1. The effect of spinal cord-injury level on the outcome of neurogenic bladder treatment using OnabotulinumtoxinA

    PubMed Central

    Al Taweel, Waleed; Alzyoud, Khalil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to report the effectiveness and safety OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) intradetrusor injections in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity. And to assess the result based on SCI level. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the chart of 103 patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI at the rehab center who received OnabotulinumtoxinA in our Neurourology Department for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms between January 2007 and December 2013. All patients had a clinical examination, urinalysis, and an urodynamic study at baseline and 3 months after treatment as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS; range scale: 0–10) and a bladder diary checked for 3 days. 300 IU of OnabotulinumtoxinA, detrusor muscle injections were performed in 30 sites under cystoscopic guidance. Outcome measures included frequency of urge urinary incontinence collected by bladder diaries; changes in urodynamic parameters such as maximum cystometric bladder capacity, reflex volume, maximum detrusor pressure; side-effects; antimuscarinic drug consumption and quality of life (QOL) measured with VAS. Results: The study includes 32 female and 71 male with a mean patient age of 29 years (range: 18–56 year). The effect of Botox injection on bladder function was observed within 1–2 week after treatment. The urodynamic parameters were improved significantly after treatment compared with baseline values. There were significant reductions in the frequencies of incontinence episodes after treatment as seen in the voiding diary. A significant improvement in patient satisfaction was found after treatment which was expressed on the VAS assessment, with an improvement of the mean of 3 points. Patients with thoracic and lumbar injury have better result compare to cervical injury patients. The earliest recurrence of clinical symptoms was at 10 weeks. Overall, the mean duration of symptomatic improvement was 8

  2. Long-lasting effects of chemical hypoxia on spinal cord function in tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Robertson, R Meldrum; Björnfors, E Rebecka; Sillar, Keith T

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the effects of chemical hypoxia on the central pattern generator controlling swimming in stage 42 Xenopus laevis larvae. We recorded motoneuron activity from ventral roots of immobilized tadpoles and evoked swim episodes by brief electrical stimulation of the tail skin. In the presence of the metabolic inhibitor, sodium azide (5 mM, NaN3), swim episode duration and cycle frequency decreased until swim motor patterns could not be evoked. On recovery, cycle frequency returned to preazide levels; however, episode duration remained short for at least an hour. In addition, recovery induced spontaneous, short bouts of swimming similar to the slow rhythm that is evoked by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid. We conclude that abiotic features of the environment can have long-term modulatory effects on circuit function in the CNS. PMID:20697300

  3. Explosive cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Device, jetcord, is metal-clad linear explosive of sufficient flexibility to allow forming into intricate shapes. Total effect is termed ''cutting'' with jetcord consistently ''cutting'' a target of greater thickness than can be penetrated. Applications include sheet metal working, pipe cutting and fire-fighting.

  4. Nanomedicine for Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds. PMID:23945984

  5. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  6. Effects of umbilical cord tissue mesenchymal stem cells (UCX®) on rat sciatic nerve regeneration after neurotmesis injuries

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, A; Pereira, T; Armada-da-Silva, PAS; Amado, S; Veloso, AP; Amorim, I; Ribeiro, J; Santos, JD; Bárcia, RN; Cruz, P; Cruz, H; Luís, AL; Santos, JM; Geuna, S; Maurício, AC

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerves have the intrinsic capacity of self-regeneration after traumatic injury but the extent of the regeneration is often very poor. Increasing evidence demonstrates that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may play an important role in tissue regeneration through the secretion of soluble trophic factors that enhance and assist in repair by paracrine activation of surrounding cells. In the present study, the therapeutic value of a population of umbilical cord tissue-derived MSCs, obtained by a proprietary method (UCX®), was evaluated on end-to-end rat sciatic nerve repair. Furthermore, in order to promote both, end-to-end nerve fiber contacts and MSC cell-cell interaction, as well as reduce the flush away effect of the cells after administration, a commercially available haemostatic sealant, Floseal®, was used as vehicle. Both, functional and morphologic recoveries were evaluated along the healing period using extensor postural thrust (EPT), withdrawal reflex latency (WRL), ankle kinematics analysis, and either histological analysis or stereology, in the hyper-acute, acute and chronic phases of healing. The histological analysis of the hyper-acute and acute phase studies revealed that in the group treated with UCX® alone the Wallerian degeneration was improved for the subsequent process of regeneration, the fiber organization was higher, and the extent of fibrosis was lower. The chronic phase experimental groups revealed that treatment with UCX® induced an increased number of regenerated fibers and thickening of the myelin sheet. Kinematics analysis showed that the ankle joint angle determined for untreated animals was significantly different from any of the treated groups at the instant of initial contact (IC). At opposite toe off (OT) and heel rise (HR), differences were found between untreated animals and the groups treated with either uCx® alone or UCX® administered with Floseal®. Overall, the UCX® application presented positive effects in

  7. Effects of receptor-selective neurokinin agonists and a neurokinin antagonist on the electrical activity of spinal cord neurones in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Wienrich, M.; Reuss, K.; Harting, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. Rat spinal cord neurones grown in tissue culture were used to examine the electrophysiological effects of the neurokin in (NK)-selective agonists (pGlu6, Pro9) substance P(6-11) (septide; NK1, 10(-6)M) and (pGlu5, MePhe8, MeGly9)SP(1-7) (DiMe-C7; NK3, 10(-6)M). In addition, the effect of the neurokinin antagonist (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP (10(-5)M) on the neurokinin-evoked responses was investigated. 2. Neurokinin-evoked responses consisted of an increase in neuronal activity with or without long-lasting (mean: 50s) depolarizations of the membrane potential of up to 25mV. The latter also occurred in the presence of tetrodotoxin (10(-7)M) (direct response). 3. In a number of spinal cord neurones (n = 17) only septide induced a membrane depolarization while DiMe-C7 elicited no response. On the other hand, in 2 neurones a response was exclusively evoked by DiMe-C7. 4. The neurokinin antagonist (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP had no effect of its own but blocked the septide- and DiMe-C7-induced depolarizations. It had no effect on the glutamate (10(-5)M)-evoked depolarization. 5. It is concluded that by the use of neurokinin receptor-selective agonists, subpopulations of spinal cord neurones in primary dissociated cell culture can be differentiated which express the NK1 or the NK3 receptor. Cells expressing only the NK1 receptor outnumber those expressing only the NK3 receptor subtype. Both receptors can be blocked by the neurokinin antagonist (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP. PMID:2480170

  8. Effect of spinal cord injury on the heart and cardiovascular fitness.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W T; Kiratli, B J; Sarkarati, M; Weraarchakul, G; Myers, J; Franklin, B A; Parkash, I; Froelicher, V

    1998-11-01

    increasing number of SCI patients becoming aged. Currently 71,000 (40%) of the total 179,000 patients with SCI living in the United States are older than 40 years, and 45,000 have injuries sustained more than 20 years earlier. In addition, new injuries in the older population are increasing (currently 11% of all injuries), and some of these new patients with SCI already have pre-existing cardiac disease. Studies have demonstrated that improved lifestyle, physical activity, lipid management, and dietary restrictions can affect major risk factors for coronary artery disease. Therefore an aggressive cardiac prevention program is appropriate for patients with SCI as part of their rehabilitation. At a given submaximal workload, arm exercise is performed at a greater physiologic cost than is leg exercise. At maximal effort, however, physiologic responses are generally greater in leg exercise than arm exercise. Arm exercise is less efficient and less effective than lower body exercise in developing and maintaining both central and peripheral aspects of cardiovascular fitness. The situation is further compounded in SCI because of poor venous return as a result of lower-limb blood pooling, as a result of lack of sympathetic tone, and a diminished or absent venous "muscle pump" in the legs. This latter mechanism perhaps contributes the greatest diminution in the potential for aerobic performance in the SCI population. Obtaining a cardiopulmonary training effect in individuals with SCI is quite possible. Current studies indicate decreases in submaximal HR, respiratory quotient, minute ventilation, and oxygen uptake, with increases in maximal power output, oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and lactic acid. Individuals with SCI have been shown to benefit from lower limb functional electrical stimulation (FES)-induced exercise. Studies have consistently reported increases in lower limb strength and cycle endurance performance with these protocols, as well as improvements in metabolic and

  9. Differential effects of myelin basic protein-activated Th1 and Th2 cells on the local immune microenvironment of injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Guo; Shi, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yue-Juan; Xie, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, An-You; Jiang, Zheng-Song; Feng, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Chen; Xi, Jin; Lü, He-Zuo

    2016-03-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) activated T cells (MBP-T) play an important role in the damage and repair process of the central nervous system (CNS). However, whether these cells play a beneficial or detrimental role is still a matter of debate. Although some studies showed that MBP-T cells are mainly helper T (Th) cells, their subtypes are still not very clear. One possible explanation for MBP-T immunization leading to conflicting results may be the different subtypes of T cells are responsible for distinct effects. In this study, the Th1 and Th2 type MBP-T cells (MBP-Th1 and -Th2) were polarized in vitro, and their effects on the local immune microenvironment and tissue repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) after adoptive immunization were investigated. In MBP-Th1 cell transferred rats, the high levels of pro-inflammatory cells (Th1 cells and M1 macrophages) and cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, -β, IL-1β) were detected in the injured spinal cord; however, the anti-inflammatory cells (Th2 cells, regulatory T cells, and M2 macrophages) and cytokines (IL-4, -10, and -13) were found in MBP-Th2 cell transferred animals. MBP-Th2 cell transfer resulted in decreased lesion volume, increased myelination of axons, and preservation of neurons. This was accompanied by significant locomotor improvement. These results indicate that MBP-Th2 adoptive transfer has beneficial effects on the injured spinal cord, in which the increased number of Th2 cells may alter the local microenvironment from one primarily populated by Th1 and M1 cells to another dominated by Th2, Treg, and M2 cells and is conducive for SCI repair. PMID:26772636

  10. Effect of the synthetic polyamine N,N'-bis-(3-aminopropyl) cyclohexane-1,4-diamine (DCD) on rat spinal cord nociceptive transmission.

    PubMed

    Bilbeny, Norberto; Paeile, Carlos; Contreras, Selfa; Font, María; García, Hernán

    2004-10-01

    In rats submitted to a C-fiber reflex response paradigm, intravenous (i.v.) administration of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg of the synthetic polyamine N,N'-bis-(3-aminopropyl) cyclohexane-1,4-diamine (DCD) dose-dependently reduced both the integrated C reflex responses and wind-up activity. Inhibitory effects of the polyamine on spinal cord nociceptive transmission are likely to be consequence of blockade by extracellular DCD of NMDA receptor channels localized in dorsal horn neurons, although modulatory actions at supraspinal level and at other ion channels could also be possible. PMID:15353239

  11. Effect of restricted mobility on RNA content and nucleotide composition and on protein content in motoneurons of spinal cord anterior horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunova, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation into the effect of hypokinesia on the ribonucleic acid (RNA) content, the nucleotide composition, and dynamics of protein content in the motoneuron of the rat spinal cord anterior horns is described. Methodology and findings are presented. The study results showed that the nucleotide composition of the total cellular RNA at all the studied periods of hypokinesia remained unchanged and is characteristic for the cytoplasmic, high polymer ribosomal RNA. This means that with a change in the functional state of the neuron the newly formed RNA of the nerve cell has the same composition of bases as the original RNA that belongs to the ribosomal type.

  12. Trunk robot rehabilitation training with active stepping reorganizes and enriches trunk motor cortex representations in spinal transected rats.

    PubMed

    Oza, Chintan S; Giszter, Simon F

    2015-05-01

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we examine effects of robot rehabilitation that promotes recovery of hindlimb weight support functions on trunk motor cortex representations. Adult rats spinal transected as neonates (NTX rats) at the T9/10 level significantly improve function with our robot rehabilitation paradigm, whereas treadmill-only trained do not. We used intracortical microstimulation to map motor cortex in two NTX groups: (1) treadmill trained (control group); and (2) robot-assisted treadmill trained (improved function group). We found significant robot rehabilitation-driven changes in motor cortex: (1) caudal trunk motor areas expanded; (2) trunk coactivation at cortex sites increased; (3) richness of trunk cortex motor representations, as examined by cumulative entropy and mutual information for different trunk representations, increased; (4) trunk motor representations in the cortex moved toward more normal topography; and (5) trunk and forelimb motor representations that SCI-driven plasticity and compensations had caused to overlap were segregated. We conclude that effective robot rehabilitation training induces significant reorganization of trunk motor cortex and partially reverses some plastic changes that may be adaptive in non-stepping paraplegia after SCI. PMID:25948267

  13. Trunk Robot Rehabilitation Training with Active Stepping Reorganizes and Enriches Trunk Motor Cortex Representations in Spinal Transected Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Chintan S.

    2015-01-01

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we examine effects of robot rehabilitation that promotes recovery of hindlimb weight support functions on trunk motor cortex representations. Adult rats spinal transected as neonates (NTX rats) at the T9/10 level significantly improve function with our robot rehabilitation paradigm, whereas treadmill-only trained do not. We used intracortical microstimulation to map motor cortex in two NTX groups: (1) treadmill trained (control group); and (2) robot-assisted treadmill trained (improved function group). We found significant robot rehabilitation-driven changes in motor cortex: (1) caudal trunk motor areas expanded; (2) trunk coactivation at cortex sites increased; (3) richness of trunk cortex motor representations, as examined by cumulative entropy and mutual information for different trunk representations, increased; (4) trunk motor representations in the cortex moved toward more normal topography; and (5) trunk and forelimb motor representations that SCI-driven plasticity and compensations had caused to overlap were segregated. We conclude that effective robot rehabilitation training induces significant reorganization of trunk motor cortex and partially reverses some plastic changes that may be adaptive in non-stepping paraplegia after SCI. PMID:25948267

  14. Intubated, ventilating patients with complete tracheal transection: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Bowley, Douglas M. G.; Plani, Frank; Murillo, Dennis; Smith, Martin; Degiannis, Elias

    2003-01-01

    Tracheal transection is a rare injury after blunt trauma. The presence of complete tracheal transection in the intubated, ventilating patient is even more rare and constitutes a major diagnostic challenge. The liberal use of computed tomography (CT) scans as an adjunct to endoscopy is paramount. PMID:12855026

  15. CONDITIONING LESIONS BEFORE OR AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY RECRUIT BROAD GENETIC MECHANISMS THAT SUSTAIN AXONAL REGENERATION: SUPERIORITY TO CAMP-MEDIATED EFFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Blesch, Armin; Lu, Paul; Tsukada, Shingo; Alto, Laura Taylor; Roet, Kasper; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Dan; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that peripheral nerve conditioning lesions significantly enhance central axonal regeneration via modulation of cAMP-mediated mechanisms. To gain insight into the nature and temporal dependence of neural mechanisms underlying conditioning lesion effects on central axonal regeneration, we compared the efficacy of peripheral sciatic nerve crush lesions to cAMP elevations (in lumbar dorsal root ganglia) on central sensory axonal regeneration when administered either before or after cervical spinal cord lesions. We found significantly greater effects of conditioning lesions compared to cAMP elevations on central axonal regeneration when combined with cellular grafts at the lesion site and viral neurotrophin delivery; further, these effects persisted whether conditioning lesions were applied prior to or shortly after spinal cord injury. Indeed, conditioning lesions recruited extensively greater sets of genetic mechanisms of possible relevance to axonal regeneration compared to cAMP administration, and sustained these changes for significantly greater time periods through the post-lesion period. We conclude that cAMP-mediated mechanisms account for only a portion of the potency of conditioning lesions on central axonal regeneration, and that recruitment of broader genetic mechanisms can extend the effect and duration of cellular events that support axonal growth. PMID:22227059

  16. DOM along the Continuum from River to Reservoir: a Comparison of Freshwater and Saline Transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, E. C.; Stephens, B.

    2009-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays key roles in aquatic ecosystems: as an organic carbon (energy) link between terrestrial and aquatic systems, a food source for biota, a reactant in photochemical reactions, and a sunscreen/competitor for light for aquatic organisms. The composition as well as the concentration of aquatic DOM is believed to determine DOM's efficacy in these roles. The transport and alteration of DOM in river/estuarine systems are significant processes in determining the concentration and composition of DOM in the receiving lake or ocean system (especially in productive and economically important coastal regions). Therefore this study provides a preliminary comparison of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, DOM optical properties, and chemical composition of high molecular weight DOM (HMW DOM) on two river-to-receiving-basin transects, one freshwater (St. Louis River/Lake Superior, Minnesota, USA) and the other with a salinity gradient (Elizabeth River/lower Chesapeake Bay/coastal Atlantic, Virginia, USA). Both transects share optical property ranges and general downstream trends toward lower DOC concentrations, less aromaticity, and lower molecular weight DOM, however, there is a stronger downstream decrease in DOC concentration in the saline transect. In HMW DOM, there is more retention of carboxylic signals downstream in the freshwater transect, relative to a downstream shift toward more proteinaceous material in the saline transect. These observed DOM differences most likely result from variations in biological activity, photochemistry, and ionic strength in the two transects. Ionic strength effects include in situ processes (e.g. flocculation) and interactions affecting DOM isolation and analysis.

  17. Neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation for spinal cord injury treatment; A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yousefifard, M; Rahimi-Movaghar, V; Nasirinezhad, F; Baikpour, M; Safari, S; Saadat, S; Moghadas Jafari, A; Asady, H; Razavi Tousi, S M T; Hosseini, M

    2016-05-13

    Despite the vast improvements of cell therapy in spinal cord injury treatment, no optimum protocol has been developed for application of neural stem/progenitor cells. In this regard, the present meta-analysis showed that the efficacy of the neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) transplantation depends mainly on injury model, intervention phase, transplanted cell count, immunosuppressive use, and probably stem cell source. Improved functional recovery post NSPC transplantation was found to be higher in transection and contusion models. Moreover, NSPC transplantation in acute phase of spinal injury was found to have better functional recovery. Higher doses (>3×10(6)cell/kg) were also shown to be optimum for transplantation, but immunosuppressive agent administration negatively affected the motor function recovery. Scaffold use in NSPC transplantation could also effectively raise functional recovery. PMID:26917272

  18. Effect of 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP-211, on micturition following spinal cord injury in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Javanbakht, Javad; Barati, Fardin; Fakhraei, Nahid; Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Central and peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors play a critical role in regulation of micturition reflex. The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of a 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP-211 (N-(4-cyanophenylmethyl)-4-(2-diphenyl)-1-piperazinehexanamide) on micturition reflex in acute spinal cord-injured (SCI) rats during infusion of vehicle into the bladder. Methods: SCI was induced by compressing T10 segment using an aneurysm clip, extradurally in male rats. Following two weeks, LP-211 doses (0.003-0.3 mg/kg) were administered cumulatively (intraperitoneally, i.p.) with 20 min interval. The 5-HT7 antagonist, SB-269970 ((R)-3-[2-[2-(4-Methylpiperidin-1-yl) ethyl] pyrrolidine-1-sulfonyl] phenol hydrochloride), was administered after achievement of LP-211 dose-response. A cystometric study was performed 2 weeks after spinal crushing in all the animals. Cystometric variables consisting of micturition volume (voided volume), residual volume (volume remaining in the bladder after voiding), and bladder capacity (micturition volume plus residual volume). Voiding efficiency was calculated as the percent of micturition volume to bladder capacity. Findings: Intact and sham-operated rats showed few significant changes in micturition reflex. SCI rats responded to LP-211 (0.003-0.3, mg/kg, i.v.) with dose-dependent increases in bladder capacity, and residual volume. In this treatment group, LP-211 induced significant dose-dependent increases in micturition volume, resulting in significant increases in voiding efficiency (P<0.001) compared to intact and sham-operated rats, SB-269970 (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) completely reversed the LP-211-induced changes on micturition volume and voiding efficiency was decreased significantly. Conclusion: The 5-HT7 receptors activation by LP-211 facilitated the micturition reflex. Furthermore, 5-HT7 receptors do seem to play an important role in physiological regulation of micturition, and as a result, may represent a

  19. Effects of underwater treadmill training on leg strength, balance, and walking performance in adults with incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Sandra L.; Caputo, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Dana K.; Morgan, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To document the effects of underwater treadmill training (UTT) on leg strength, balance, and walking performance in adults with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Design Pre-test and post-test design. Setting Exercise physiology laboratory. Participants Adult volunteers with iSCI (n = 11). Intervention Participants completed 8 weeks (3 × /week) of UTT. Each training session consisted of three walks performed at a personalized speed, with adequate rest between walks. Body weight support remained constant for each participant and ranged from 29 to 47% of land body weight. Increases in walking speed and duration were staggered and imposed in a gradual and systematic fashion. Outcome measures Lower-extremity strength (LS), balance (BL), preferred and rapid walking speeds (PWS and RWS), 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), and daily step activity (DSA). Results Significant (P < 0.05) increases were observed in LS (13.1 ± 3.1 to 20.6 ± 5.1 N·kg−1), BL (23 ± 11 to 32 ± 13), PWS (0.41 ± 0.27 to 0.55 ± 0.28 m·s−1), RWS (0.44 ± 0.31 to 0.71 ± 0.40 m·s−1), 6MWD (97 ± 80 to 177 ± 122 m), and DSA (593 ± 782 to 1310 ± 1258 steps) following UTT. Conclusion Physical function and walking ability were improved in adults with iSCI following a structured program of UTT featuring individualized levels of body weight support and carefully staged increases in speed and duration. From a clinical perspective, these findings highlight the potential of UTT in persons with physical disabilities and diseases that would benefit from weight-supported exercise. PMID:24969269

  20. Potential of adult mammalian lumbosacral spinal cord to execute and acquire improved locomotion in the absence of supraspinal input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Prober, R. J.; de Guzman, C. P.; de Leon, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neural circuitry of the lumbar spinal cord can generate alternating extension and flexion of the hindlimbs. The hindlimbs of adult cats with complete transection of the spinal cord at a low thoracic level (T12-T13) can perform full weight-supporting locomotion on a treadmill belt moving at a range of speeds. Some limitations in the locomotor capacity can be associated with a deficit in the recruitment level of the fast extensors during the stance phase and the flexors during the swing phase of a step cycle. The level of locomotor performance, however, can be enhanced by daily training on a treadmill while emphasizing full weight-support stepping and by providing appropriately timed sensory stimulation, loading, and/or pharmacologic stimulation of the hindlimb neuromuscular apparatus. Furthermore, there appears to be an interactive effect of these interventions. For example, the maximum treadmill speed that a spinal adult cat can attain and maintain is significantly improved with daily full weight-supporting treadmill training, but progressive recruitment of fast extensors becomes apparent only when the hindlimbs are loaded by gently pulling down on the tail during the stepping. Stimulation of the sural nerve at the initiation of the flexion phase of the step cycle can likewise markedly improve the locomotor capability. Administration of clonidine, in particular in combination with an elevated load, resulted in the most distinct and consistent alternating bursts of electromyographic activity during spinal stepping. These data indicate that the spinal cord has the ability to execute alternating activation of the extensor and flexor musculature of the hindlimbs (stepping) and that this ability can be improved by several interventions such as training, sensory stimulation, and use of some pharmacologic agents. Thus, it appears that the spinal cord, without supraspinal input, is highly plastic and has the potential to "learn," that is, to acquire and improve its

  1. Correction of bias in belt transect studies of immotile objects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.R.; Pospahala, R.S.

    1970-01-01

    Unless a correction is made, population estimates derived from a sample of belt transects will be biased if a fraction of, the individuals on the sample transects are not counted. An approach, useful for correcting this bias when sampling immotile populations using transects of a fixed width, is presented. The method assumes that a searcher's ability to find objects near the center of the transect is nearly perfect. The method utilizes a mathematical equation, estimated from the data, to represent the searcher's inability to find all objects at increasing distances from the center of the transect. An example of the analysis of data, formation of the equation, and application is presented using waterfowl nesting data collected in Colorado.

  2. Effectiveness of minocycline and FK506 alone and in combination on enhanced behavioral and biochemical recovery from spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Zakaria, Abdulrahim; Almutairi, Khalid M

    2016-06-01

    Injury to the spinal cord results in immediate physical damage (primary injury) followed by a prolonged posttraumatic inflammatory disorder (secondary injury). The present study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of minocycline and FK506 (Tacrolimus) individually and in combination on recovery from experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). Young adult male rats were subjected to experimental SCI by weight compression method. Minocycline (50mg/kg) and FK506 (1mg/kg) were administered orally in combination and individually to the SCI group daily for three weeks. During these three weeks, the recovery was measured using behavioral motor parameters (including BBB, Tarlov and other scorings) every other day for 29days after SCI. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and the segment of the spinal cord centered at the injury site was removed for the histopathological studies as well as for biochemical analysis of monoamines such as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxy-indolacetic acid (5-HIAA) and some oxidative stress indices, such as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), total glutathione (GSH) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). All behavioral results indicated that both drugs induced significant recovery from SCI with respect to time. The biochemical and histopathological results supported the behavioral findings, revealing significant recovery in the regeneration of the injured spinal tissues, the monoamine levels, and the oxidative stress indices. Overall, the effects of the tested drugs for SCI recovery were as follows: FK506+minocycline>minocycline>FK506 in all studied parameters. Thus, minocycline and FK506 may prove to be a potential therapy cocktail to treat acute SCI. However, further studies are warranted. PMID:27106204

  3. The effect of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel on bone marrow stromal cell transplant survival and spinal cord repair

    PubMed Central

    Ritfeld, Gaby J; Rauck, Britta; Novosat, Tabitha L; Park, Daewon; Patel, Pavan; Roos, Raymund AC; Wang, Yadong; Oudega, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy for nervous tissue repair is limited by low transplant survival. We investigated the effects of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(serinol hexamethylene urethane) (ESHU) on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplant survival and repair using a rat model of spinal cord contusion. Transplantation of BMSCs in ESHU at three days post-contusion resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in BMSC survival at one week post-injury and a 66% increase in spared nervous tissue volume at four weeks post-injury. These improvements were accompanied by enhanced hindlimb motor and sensorimotor recovery. In vitro, we found that ESHU protected BMSCs from hydrogen peroxide-mediated death, resulting in a four-fold increase in BMSC survival with two-fold fewer BMSCs expressing the apoptosis marker, caspase 3 and the DNA oxidation marker, 8-Oxo-deoxyguanosine. We argue that ESHU protected BMSCs transplanted is a spinal cord contusion from death thereby augmenting their effects on neuroprotection leading to improved behavioral restoration. The data show that the repair effects of intraneural BMSC transplants depend on the degree of their survival and may have a widespread impact on cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:24331711

  4. Short-Term Effect of Percutaneous Bipolar Continuous Radiofrequency on Sacral Nerves in Patients Treated for Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity After Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Ahn, Sang Ho; Cho, Yun Woo; Kwak, Sang Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the short-term effects of bipolar radiofrequency applied to sacral nerves to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods Ten patients with spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were recruited. These subjects were randomized to two groups: intervention (n=5) and control (n=5), members of which received conventional treatment. Voiding diary, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) and the urinary incontinence quality of life scale (IQOL) data were obtained and an urodynamic study (UDS) was performed before and after intervention. In the intervention group, percutaneous bipolar continuous radiofrequency (CRF) was performed on both the S2 and S3 nerves in each patient. Results In a comparison of daily frequency and number of urinary incontinence and ICIQ and IQOL scores at baseline and at 1 and 3 months after intervention, all variables achieved a significant effect for time (p<0.05). Regarding UDS parameters, pre/post intervention differences between baseline and 3-month post-intervention for volume at maximal detrusor pressure during filling and reflex detrusor volume at first contraction were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). However, pre/post intervention differences in maximum cystometric capacity and maximum detrusor pressure during filling were not significant between the two groups (p>0.05). Conclusion Percutaneous bipolar CRF applied to sacral nerves might be an effective therapy for neurogenic overactive bladder that reduces urinary incontinence and improves quality of life. PMID:26605169

  5. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  6. Effect of urethral infusion of atracurium besylate on manual bladder expression in dogs and cats with spinal cord injuries: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, F; De Rensis, F; Saleri, R; Spattini, G

    2015-05-23

    The aim of this randomised trial was to assess the effect of urethral infusion of atracurium besylate in dogs and cats with signs of urinary retention secondary to lesions affecting spinal cord segments T3-L3. Eighteen dogs and six cats with urinary retention were examined and scored before treatment on the degree of difficulty of inducing bladder emptying by manual bladder compression. Animals were subsequently treated in a blinded fashion by the same operator with urethral infusion of 2-4 ml of either a solution of 0.5 mg/ml of atracurium (treatment group) or placebo (control group) and, after five minutes, a second attempt was made to induce bladder emptying by manual compression and a post-treatment score assigned. Pretreatment scores did not differ between the treatment and control groups (5.6±0.8 v 6.2±0.7, respectively; P=0.22); however, post-treatment scores were significantly lower in the treatment group compared with the control group (2.9±0.4 v 5.9±0.3; P<0.05). Urethral infusion of atracurium facilitates manual bladder expression in dogs and cats with urinary retention secondary to spinal cord injuries. No side effects were recognised. PMID:25920417

  7. Probable preventive effects of placenta from oxidative stress; Evaluation of total antioxidant status, total oxidant status and oxidative stress index in fetal cord blood during the delivery.

    PubMed

    Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Ebru; Tolun, Fatma İnanç; Bakacak, Murat; Bal, Nilay Gül; Sakallı, Hilal; Güneş, Mehmet

    2016-06-30

    Depression in pregnancy may have negative effects on birth outcomes. It may also effect the intrauterine environment of the fetus. The umbilical cord is the conduit between the fetus and placenta, and functions in the transport between fetus and mother. Investigating biochemical parameters in fetal cord blood (FCB) during delivery may be helpful to understanding to what the fetus is exposed to, at least in the last trimester. In this study, we aimed to investigate total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) in the FCB of depressed mothers and healthy controls during delivery. Our study included 33 depressed mothers and 37 healthy controls. TAS, TOS, and OSI were measured according to Erel's method. We found that TAS, TOS, and OSI levels were similar in patients and healthy controls; however, the birth weights of depressed patients were significantly lower than those of healthy controls. Our results suggest that the placental barrier may prevent from oxidative stress. Future studies should include blood samples collected simultaneously from mothers during delivery. PMID:27124206

  8. Effect of a tachykinin antagonist on a nociceptive reflex in the isolated spinal cord-tail preparation of the newborn rat.

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, M; Yanagisawa, M

    1988-01-01

    1. The pharmacological profile of Spantide, [D-Arg1, D-Trp7,9, Leu11] substance P, as a substance P (SP) antagonist was examined in isolated spinal cords of newborn rats. Potential changes were recorded extracellularly from a lumbar ventral root (L1-L5). Application of SP to the perfusion bath with a brief pressure pulse of 0.05-0.8 s duration produced a dose-dependent depolarization of the ventral root. Spantide in concentrations of 2-16 microM depressed the depolarizing responses of the ventral root to SP in a concentration-dependent manner. The log dose-response curve of SP was shifted to the right in the presence of 16 microM-Spantide by log 5. The responses to neurokinin A (NKA) and bombesin were similarly depressed by 16 microM-Spantide whereas the responses to noradrenaline, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), neurotensin and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone were not affected by 16 microM-Spantide. 2. In an isolated spinal cord-tail preparation of the newborn rat, brief pulse injection of capsaicin into the perfusion solution of the tail induced a depolarizing response in a lumbar ventral root (L3-L5). This response probably represents a nociceptive C fibre reflex. 3. The capsaicin-induced nociceptive reflex was markedly depressed by 16 microM-Spantide and the reflex recovered its original amplitude and shape 30-60 min after removal of Spantide. 4. The capsaicin-induced nociceptive reflex was depressed by morphine (2 microM) and dynorphin (1-13) (0.2 microM), and these effects were reversed by 1 microM-naloxone. 5. In an isolated spinal cord preparation of the newborn rat, stimulation of a dorsal root with single or double shocks induced depolarizing responses of slow time course in both ipsilateral and contralateral ventral roots of the same segment. These slow depolarizing responses were also depressed by 16 microM-Spantide. In contrast the monosynaptic reflex was not affected by 16 microM-Spantide. 6. The present results suggest that SP and NKA are involved as

  9. A randomized trial of functional electrical stimulation for walking in incomplete spinal cord injury: Effects on walking competency

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Naaz; Masani, Kei; Catharine Craven, B.; Giangregorio, Lora M.; Hitzig, Sander L.; Richards, Kieva; Popovic, Milos R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multi-channel surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) for walking has been used to improve voluntary walking and balance in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective To investigate short- and long-term benefits of 16 weeks of thrice-weekly FES-assisted walking program, while ambulating on a body weight support treadmill and harness system, versus a non-FES exercise program, on improvements in gait and balance in individuals with chronic incomplete traumatic SCI, in a randomized controlled trial design. Methods Individuals with traumatic and chronic (≥18 months) motor incomplete SCI (level C2 to T12, American Spinal Cord Injury Association Impairment Scale C or D) were recruited from an outpatient SCI rehabilitation hospital, and randomized to FES-assisted walking therapy (intervention group) or aerobic and resistance training program (control group). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, and after 4, 6, and 12 months. Gait, balance, spasticity, and functional measures were collected. Results Spinal cord independence measure (SCIM) mobility sub-score improved over time in the intervention group compared with the control group (baseline/12 months: 17.27/21.33 vs. 19.09/17.36, respectively). On all other outcome measures the intervention and control groups had similar improvements. Irrespective of group allocation walking speed, endurance, and balance during ambulation all improved upon completion of therapy, and majority of participants retained these gains at long-term follow-ups. Conclusions Task-oriented training improves walking ability in individuals with incomplete SCI, even in the chronic stage. Further randomized controlled trials, involving a large number of participants are needed, to verify if FES-assisted treadmill training is superior to aerobic and strength training. PMID:25229735

  10. Use of the transect method in satellite survey missions with application to the infrared astronomical satellite /IRAS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, W. I.; Lundy, S. A.; Ling, H. Y.; Stroberg, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The coverage of the celestial sphere or the surface of the earth with a narrow-field instrument onboard a satellite can be described by a set of swaths on the sphere. A transect is a curve on this sphere constructed to sample the coverage. At each point on the transect the number of times that the field-of-view of the instrument has passed over the point is recorded. This information is conveniently displayed as an integer-valued histogram over the length of the transect. The effectiveness of the transect method for a particular observing plan and the best placement of the transects depends upon the structure of the set of observations. Survey missions are usually characterized by a somewhat parallel alignment of the instrument swaths. Using autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions among the histograms the structure of a survey has been analyzed into two components, and each is illustrated by a simple mathematical model. The complex, all-sky survey to be performed by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) is synthesized in some detail utilizing the objectives and constraints of that mission. It is seen that this survey possesses the components predicted by the simple models and this information is useful in characterizing the properties of the IRAS survey and the placement of the transects as a function of celestial latitude and certain structural properties of the coverage.

  11. Quality of Red Blood Cells Isolated from Umbilical Cord Blood Stored at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhurova, Mariia; Akabutu, John; Acker, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product. PMID:24089645

  12. Longitudinal Evaluation of Residual Cortical and Subcortical Motor Evoked Potentials in Spinal Cord Injured Rats.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Castro, Elena; Navarro, Xavier; García-Alías, Guillermo

    2016-05-15

    We have applied transcranial electrical stimulation to rats with spinal cord injury and selectively tested the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) conveyed by descending motor pathways with cortical and subcortical origin. MEPs were elicited by electrical stimulation to the brain and recorded on the tibialis anterior muscles. Stimulation parameters were characterized and changes in MEP responses tested in uninjured rats, in rats with mild or moderate contusion, and in animals with complete transection of the spinal cord. All injuries were located at the T8 vertebral level. Two peaks, termed N1 and N2, were obtained when changing from single pulse stimulation to trains of 9 pulses at 9 Hz. Selective injuries to the brain or spinal cord funiculi evidenced the subcortical origin of N1 and the cortical origin of N2. Animals with mild contusion showed small behavioral deficits and abolished N1 but maintained small amplitude N2 MEPs. Substantial motor deficits developed in rats with moderate contusion, and these rats had completely eliminated N1 and N2 MEPs. Animals with complete cord transection had abolished N1 and N2 and showed severe impairment of locomotion. The results indicate the reliability of MEP testing to longitudinally evaluate over time the degree of impairment of cortical and subcortical spinal pathways after spinal cord injuries of different severity. PMID:26560177

  13. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess is caused by an infection inside the spine. An abscess of the spinal cord itself is ... by a staphylococcus infection that spreads through the spine. It may be caused by tuberculosis in some ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dramatically Improves Function After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats May 2004 press release on an experimental treatment ... NINDS). Signaling Molecule Improves Nerve Cell Regeneration in Rats August 2002 news summary on a signaling molecule ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  16. Cord-Blood Banking

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord blood mainly because of the promise that stem cell research holds for the future. Most of us would have little use for stem cells now, but research into using them to treat diseases is ongoing — ...

  17. Experimental Strategies to Bridge Large Tissue Gaps in the Injured Spinal Cord after Acute and Chronic Lesion.

    PubMed

    Brazda, Nicole; Estrada, Veronica; Voss, Christian; Seide, Klaus; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Müller, Hans Werner

    2016-01-01

    After a spinal cord injury (SCI) a scar forms in the lesion core which hinders axonal regeneration. Bridging the site of injury after an insult to the spinal cord, tumor resections, or tissue defects resulting from traumatic accidents can aid in facilitating general tissue repair as well as regenerative growth of nerve fibers into and beyond the affected area. Two experimental treatment strategies are presented: (1) implantation of a novel microconnector device into an acutely and completely transected thoracic rat spinal cord to readapt severed spinal cord tissue stumps, and (2) polyethylene glycol filling of the SCI site in chronically lesioned rats after scar resection. The chronic spinal cord lesion in this model is a complete spinal cord transection which was inflicted 5 weeks before treatment. Both methods have recently achieved very promising outcomes and promoted axonal regrowth, beneficial cellular invasion and functional improvements in rodent models of spinal cord injury. The mechanical microconnector system (mMS) is a multi-channel system composed of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with an outlet tubing system to apply negative pressure to the mMS lumen thus pulling the spinal cord stumps into the honeycomb-structured holes. After its implantation into the 1 mm tissue gap the tissue is sucked into the device. Furthermore, the inner walls of the mMS are microstructured for better tissue adhesion. In the case of the chronic spinal cord injury approach, spinal cord tissue - including the scar-filled lesion area - is resected over an area of 4 mm in length. After the microsurgical scar resection the resulting cavity is filled with polyethylene glycol (PEG 600) which was found to provide an excellent substratum for cellular invasion, revascularization, axonal regeneration and even compact remyelination in vivo. PMID:27077921

  18. Early expression of glycine and GABA(A) receptors in developing spinal cord neurons. Effects on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Tapia, J C; Mentis, G Z; Navarrete, R; Nualart, F; Figueroa, E; Sánchez, A; Aguayo, L G

    2001-01-01

    Using fluorometric and immunocytochemical techniques, we found that high glycine concentrations or blockade of glycine receptors increases neurite outgrowth in developing mouse spinal cord neurons. Glycine- and GABA(A)-activated currents were demonstrated during applications of glycine and GABA (50-100 microM) in 5 days in vitro (DIV) neurons. Long application (> or =10 min) of 100 microM glycine desensitized the membrane response by more than 95%. Application of glutamate in the absence of external Mg(2+), at several membrane potentials, did not produce any detectable membrane response in these cells. Immunocytochemical studies with NR1 and GluR1 antibodies showed a delayed appearance of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors respectively. Spontaneous synaptic activity was readily observed in 5 DIV neurons. The use of various receptor antagonists (strychnine, bicuculline, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate [APV], 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione [CNQX]) revealed that this activity was predominantly glycinergic, and to a smaller extent, GABAergic. In the presence of bicuculline, APV and CNQX, we detected abundant spontaneous depolarizing potentials which often reached the action potential threshold. Further evidence for functional synaptic activity was provided by the detection of co-localization of gephyrin and synaptophysin at 5 DIV using confocal microscopy. Fluorometric studies with Fluo-3, a Ca(2+) indicator, in 5 DIV cultures showed the presence of spontaneous fluctuations associated with tetrodotoxin-sensitive synaptic events. The number of neurons displaying these fluctuations was significantly increased (>100%) when the cells were bathed in a strychnine-containing solution. On the other hand, these synaptically mediated Ca(2+) events were blocked by the co-application of strychnine and bicuculline. This suggests that glycine and GABA(A) receptors provide a fundamental regulation of both

  19. Investigating frontal variability from repeated glider transects in the Ligurian Current (North West Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piterbarg, L.; Taillandier, V.; Griffa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Mesoscale variability of the Ligurian Current (North Western Mediterranean Sea) is studied using glider data from a repeated cross-frontal transect. The Ligurian Current is characterized by a complex time variability, with propagation velocities that can be compared to those of the glider. As a consequence, time variability can appear as folded into space variability in the glider data through the mechanism of Doppler smearing. In this paper, we provide a general framework to illustrate the effects of spatial and temporal variability and introduce a simple methodology to at least partially unfold the uncertainty. We capitalize on the fact that the glider repeatedly covers the transect, and we build time series of isopycnal depth at fixed points using nonlinear interpolation in time and spatial smoothing. Estimates of the isopycnal space patterns are obtained at various times, and a function fitting is used when appropriate allowing to describe the frontal time variability through a few descriptive parameters. Results show a mesoscale signal with scales consistent with what is known in the literature, and characterized by a cross-shore oscillation of the front between approximately 15 and 50 km offshore. The frontal oscillation is quite smooth during the first four transects with propagation speed significantly lower than the glider (≈ 8 km/day), so that the deconvolution method is robust. Local wind also appears to play a role. During the last two transects, instead, the system undergoes dramatic changes with time scales of the order of a day, so that the deconvolution is more problematic.

  20. Effect of Overground Training Augmented By Mental Practice On Gait Velocity in Chronic, Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kelli G.; Gramer, Robert; Butler, Laine; Cramer, Steven C.; Hade, Erinn; Page, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare efficacy of a regimen combining mental practice (MP) with overground training with the efficacy of a regimen comprised of overground training only on gait velocity and lower extremity motor outcomes in individuals with chronic (> 12 months post injury), incomplete, spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Randomized controlled, single blinded, study Setting Outpatient rehabilitation laboratories located in the Midwestern and Western United States Participants 18 subjects with chronic, incomplete SCI Interventions Subjects were randomly assigned to receive: (a) Overground Training only (OT), occurring 3 days/week for 8 weeks; or (b) OT augmented by MP (MP + OT), during which randomly assigned subjects listened to a mental practice audio recording directly following OT sessions. Main Outcome Measures Subjects were administered a test of gait velocity as well as the Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA), Spinal Cord Injury Independence Measure (SCIM), and Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) on 2 occasions before intervention, 1 week after intervention, and 12 weeks after intervention. Results A significant increase in gait velocity was exhibited across subjects at both 1 week post-therapy (p=0.0046) and at 12 weeks post-therapy (p=0.0056). However, no differences were seen in intervention response at either 1 or 12 weeks post intervention among subjects in the MP + OT versus the OT groups. Conclusion Overground training was associated with significant gains in gait velocity, and that these gains were not augmented by further addition of mental practice. PMID:24342552

  1. Stable isotope differences among the Lake Michigan 2015 CSMI transects

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Lake Michigan 2015 Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI), eight transects situated near tributaries that present a gradient of phosphorus loads were sampled from nearshore to offshore during May, July, and September. Our objective was to evaluate associa...

  2. Umbilical cord avulsion in waterbirth.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    Umbilical cord avulsion (or "cord snapping") is often cited as a risk associated with waterbirth. This article discusses a case study in which a cord avulsed during a waterbirth and uses it as a basis to explore the incidence, etiology, and associated risk factors of umbilical cord avulsion. The diagnosis, clinical presentation, and management of cord avulsion in waterbirth is presented along with a thorough review of the literature and relevant professional standards. This article offers recommendations for clinical practice to minimize the risk of a cord avulsion and highlights the need for additional research and provider education to ensure optimal care of women and newborns. PMID:24588881

  3. Ultrasound, color - normal umbilical cord (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a normal color Doppler ultrasound of the umbilical cord performed at 30 weeks gestation. The cord ... the cord, two arteries and one vein. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta, located in ...

  4. COAST: Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, W.; Johnson, H. P.; Kent, G.; Keranen, K. M.; Tobin, H. J.; Trehu, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia margin is the site of active subduction, where the Juan de Fuca plate subducts under the North American plate at a rate of ~35 mm/yr. This system is of great scientific and societal interest, as it is capable of very large (Mw~9) earthquakes, creates volcanic hazards in the Cascades, and hosts periodic episodic tremor and slip (ETS) episodes. Despite evidence that the system has generated large megathrust earthquakes, limited seismicity creates large uncertainties in the position, structure, and physical state of the plate boundary. The COAST (Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects) project conducted an open-access, open-participation 2D seismic survey of the Cascadia subduction margin off Grays Harbor, WA, that will provide benchmark seismic images to address key scientific issues regarding the location, physical state, fluid budget, and associated methane systems of the subducting plate boundary and overlying crust. We collected seismic reflection, multibeam bathymetric, sidescan sonar, gravity, and magnetic data on the Cascadia subduction margin from the R/V Langseth in July 2012 in a high-priority GeoPRISMS corridor off Grays Harbor, Washington. The cruise was open-participation, with an organized shipboard education and training program, and the data are open-access, with immediate, full release to the community of all geophysical data. Project goals include (1) determining the location of the offshore plate boundary, (2) constraining sediment subduction and plate boundary roughness, (3) estimating pore fluid pathways, (4) determining controls on methane distribution, and (5) imaging compressional and extensional structures that may pose geohazards on the Cascadia margin. Initial observations include the following: (1) The Pleistocene accretionary wedge is well imaged and shows landward-vergent thrust faulting throughout our survey area. An outboard series of ramp-and-thrust structures gives way to a region characterized by folds that separate

  5. Sparing of Descending Axons Rescues Interneuron Plasticity in the Lumbar Cord to Allow Adaptive Learning After Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christopher N.; Faw, Timothy D.; White, Susan; Buford, John A.; Grau, James W.; Basso, D. Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX). This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI). To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm (ILP). In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days) or late (42 days) after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7 days, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between spared

  6. The structural and functional effects of fine particulate matter from cooking oil fumes on rat umbilical cord blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Hou, Lijuan; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Cijiang; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Yachun; Cao, Jiyu

    2016-08-01

    A growing body of epidemiological evidence has supported the association between maternal exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, the specific biological mechanisms implicated in the causes of adverse pregnancy outcomes are not well defined. In this study, a pregnant rat model of exposure to different doses of cooking oil fumes (COFs)-derived PM2.5 by tail intravenous injection in different pregnant stages was established. The results indicated that exposure to COFs-derived PM2.5 was associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, changed the structure of umbilical cord blood vessels, decreased the diameter and lumen area, and increased wall thickness. What's more, a significant increase of maximum contraction tension was observed in the early pregnancy high-dose exposure group and pregnant low-dose exposure group compared to the control group. Based on the maximum contraction tension, acetylcholine (ACh) did not induce vasodilation but caused a dose-dependent constriction, and there were significant differences in the two groups compared to the control group. Exposure to COFs-derived PM2.5 impaired the vasomotor function of umbilical veins by affecting the expression of NO and ET-1. This is the first study that evaluated the association of risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and pregnant rats exposed to COFs-derived PM2.5 and primarily explored the potential mechanisms of umbilical cord blood vessels injury on a rat model. More detailed vitro and vivo studies are needed to further explore the mechanism in the future. PMID:27178289

  7. Immunomodulatory effects of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells on differentiation, maturation and endocytosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Mohsen; Masoud, Ahmad; Shakiba, Yadollah; Hadjati, Jamshid; Mohyeddin Bonab, Mandana; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Latifpour, Mostafa; Nikbin, Behrooz

    2013-03-01

    The Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord is believed to be a source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which can be therapeutically applied in degenerative diseases.In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effect of umbilical cord derived-mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) and bone marrow-derived-mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on differentiation, maturation, and endocytosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in a transwell culture system under laboratory conditions. Monocytes were differentiated into immature dendritic cells (iDCs) in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 6 days and then differentiated into mature dendritic cells (mDCs) in the presence of TNF-α for 2 days. In every stage of differentiation, immature and mature dendritic cells were separately co-cultured with UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs. The findings showed that UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs inhibited strongly differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells at higher dilution ratios (1:1). The BM-MSCs and UC-MSCs showed more inhibitory effect on CD1a, CD83, CD86 expression, and dendritic cell endocytic activity, respectively. On the other hand, these cells severely up-regulated CD14 marker expression. We concluded that UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs could inhibit differentiation, maturation and endocytosis in monocyte-derived DCs through the secreted factors and free of any cell-cell contacts under laboratory conditions. As DCs are believed to be the main antigen presenting cells for naïve T cells in triggering immune responses, it would be logical that their inhibitory effect on differentiation, maturation and function can decrease or modulate immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:23454777

  8. Direct Effect of Remifentanil and Glycine Contained in Ultiva® on Nociceptive Transmission in the Spinal Cord: In Vivo and Slice Patch Clamp Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sumie, Makoto; Shiokawa, Hiroaki; Yamaura, Ken; Karashima, Yuji; Hoka, Sumio; Yoshimura, Megumu

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultiva® is commonly administered intravenously for analgesia during general anaesthesia and its main constituent remifentanil is an ultra-short-acting μ-opioid receptor agonist. Ultiva® is not approved for epidural or intrathecal use in clinical practice. Previous studies have reported that Ultiva® provokes opioid-induced hyperalgesia by interacting with spinal dorsal horn neurons. Ultiva® contains glycine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter but also an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-activator. The presence of glycine in the formulation of Ultiva® potentially complicates its effects. We examined how Ultiva® directly affects nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Methods We made patch-clamp recordings from substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in the adult rat spinal dorsal horn in vivo and in spinal cord slices. We perfused Ultiva® onto the SG neurons and analysed its effects on the membrane potentials and synaptic responses activated by noxious mechanical stimuli. Results Bath application of Ultiva® hyperpolarized membrane potentials under current-clamp conditions and produced an outward current under voltage-clamp conditions. A barrage of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by the stimuli was suppressed by Ultiva®. Miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) were depressed in frequency but not amplitude. Ultiva®-induced outward currents and suppression of mEPSCs were not inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, but were inhibited by the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. The Ultiva®-induced currents demonstrated a specific equilibrium potential similar to glycine. Conclusions We found that intrathecal administration of Ultiva® to SG neurons hyperpolarized membrane potentials and depressed presynaptic glutamate release predominantly through the activation of glycine receptors. No Ultiva®-induced excitatory effects were observed in SG neurons. Our results suggest different analgesic mechanisms of Ultiva® between intrathecal

  9. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Drew L; Bergen, Jamie M; Johnson, Russell N; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M; Horner, Philip J; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-03-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics. PMID:26888285

  10. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Drew L.; Bergen, Jamie M.; Johnson, Russell N.; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M.; Horner, Philip J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2016-01-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics. PMID:26888285

  11. OPTIMAL TIMING FOR CLAMPING THE UMBILICAL CORD AFTER BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Tonse N. K.; Singal, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis This paper provides a brief overview of pros and cons of clamping the cord too early (within seconds) after birth. It also highlights evolving data that suggests that delaying cord clamping for 30–60 seconds after birth is beneficial to the baby and the mother, with no measurable negative effects. PMID:23164185

  12. Pediatric spinal cord injury: a review by organ system.

    PubMed

    Powell, Aaron; Davidson, Loren

    2015-02-01

    In this article, an overview is provided of pediatric spinal cord injury, organized by effects of this injury on various organ systems. Specific management differences between children and adults with spinal cord injury are highlighted. A detailed management approach is offered for particularly complex topics, such as spasticity and upper extremity reconstruction. PMID:25479784

  13. Simultaneous Brain–Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6–C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain–spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations. PMID:26125597

  14. Umbilical cord care in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... the stump clean with gauze and water only. Sponge bathe the rest of your baby, as well. ... Neonatal care - umbilical cord Images Umbilical cord healing Sponge bath References Carlo WA, Ambalavanan N. The umbilicus. ...

  15. Increased Cx32 expression in spinal cord TrkB oligodendrocytes following peripheral axon injury.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, Aminata P; Isaacson, Lori G

    2016-08-01

    Following injury to motor axons in the periphery, retrograde influences from the injury site lead to glial cell plasticity in the vicinity of the injured neurons. Following the transection of peripherally located preganglionic axons of the cervical sympathetic trunk (CST), a population of oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage cells expressing full length TrkB, the cognate receptor for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is significantly increased in number in the spinal cord. Such robust plasticity in OL lineage cells in the spinal cord following peripheral axon transection led to the hypothesis that the gap junction communication protein connexin 32 (Cx32), which is specific to OL lineage cells, was influenced by the injury. Following CST transection, Cx32 expression in the spinal cord intermediolateral cell column (IML), the location of the parent cell bodies, was significantly increased. The increased Cx32 expression was localized specifically to TrkB OLs in the IML, rather than other cell types in the OL cell lineage, with the population of Cx32/TrkB cells increased by 59%. Cx32 expression in association with OPCs was significantly decreased at one week following the injury. The results of this study provide evidence that peripheral axon injury can differentially affect the gap junction protein expression in OL lineage cells in the adult rat spinal cord. We conclude that the retrograde influences originating from the peripheral injury site elicit dramatic changes in the CNS expression of Cx32, which in turn may mediate the plasticity of OL lineage cells observed in the spinal cord following peripheral axon injury. PMID:27246301

  16. Examination of the Combined Effects of Chondroitinase ABC, Growth Factors and Locomotor Training following Compressive Spinal Cord Injury on Neuroanatomical Plasticity and Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Alluin, Olivier; Fehlings, Michael G.; Rossignol, Serge; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2014-01-01

    While several cellular and pharmacological treatments have been evaluated following spinal cord injury (SCI) in animal models, it is increasingly recognized that approaches to address the glial scar, including the use of chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), can facilitate neuroanatomical plasticity. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that combinatorial strategies are key to unlocking the plasticity that is enabled by ChABC. Given this, we evaluated the anatomical and functional consequences of ChABC in a combinatorial approach that also included growth factor (EGF, FGF2 and PDGF-AA) treatments and daily treadmill training on the recovery of hindlimb locomotion in rats with mid thoracic clip compression SCI. Using quantitative neuroanatomical and kinematic assessments, we demonstrate that the combined therapy significantly enhanced the neuroanatomical plasticity of major descending spinal tracts such as corticospinal and serotonergic-spinal pathways. Additionally, the pharmacological treatment attenuated chronic astrogliosis and inflammation at and adjacent to the lesion with the modest synergistic effects of treadmill training. We also observed a trend for earlier recovery of locomotion accompanied by an improvement of the overall angular excursions in rats treated with ChABC and growth factors in the first 4 weeks after SCI. At the end of the 7-week recovery period, rats from all groups exhibited an impressive spontaneous recovery of the kinematic parameters during locomotion on treadmill. However, although the combinatorial treatment led to clear chronic neuroanatomical plasticity, these structural changes did not translate to an additional long-term improvement of locomotor parameters studied including hindlimb-forelimb coupling. These findings demonstrate the