Science.gov

Sample records for core burnup calculations

  1. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  2. Detailed Burnup Calculations for Testing Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczynski, F.

    2005-05-01

    A general method (MCQ) has been developed by introducing a microscopic burnup scheme that uses the Monte Carlo calculated fluxes and microscopic reaction rates of a complex system and a depletion code for burnup calculations as a basis for solving nuclide material balance equations for each spatial region in which the system is divided. Continuous energy-dependent cross-section libraries and full 3D geometry of the system can be input for the calculations. The resulting predictions for the system at successive burnup time steps are thus based on a calculation route where both geometry and cross sections are accurately represented, without geometry simplifications and with continuous energy data, providing an independent approach for benchmarking other methods and nuclear data of actinides, fission products, and other burnable absorbers. The main advantage of this method over the classical deterministic methods currently used is that the MCQ System is a direct 3D method without the limitations and errors introduced on the homogenization of geometry and condensation of energy of deterministic methods. The Monte Carlo and burnup codes adopted until now are the widely used MCNP and ORIGEN codes, but other codes can be used also. For using this method, there is need of a well-known set of nuclear data for isotopes involved in burnup chains, including burnable poisons, fission products, and actinides. For fixing the data to be included in this set, a study of the present status of nuclear data is performed, as part of the development of the MCQ method. This study begins with a review of the available cross-section data of isotopes involved in burnup chains for power and research nuclear reactors. The main data needs for burnup calculations are neutron cross sections, decay constants, branching ratios, fission energy, and yields. The present work includes results of selected experimental benchmarks and conclusions about the sensitivity of different sets of cross-section data for burnup calculations, using some of the main available evaluated nuclear data files (ENDF-B-VI-Rel.8, JEFF-3.0, JENDL-3.3), on an isotope-by-isotope basis as much as possible. The selected experimental burnup benchmarks are reference cases for LWR and HWR reactors, with analysis of isotopic composition as a function of burnup. For LWR (H2O-moderated uranium oxide lattices) four benchmarks are included: ATM-104 NEA Burnup credit criticality benchmark; Yankee-Rowe Core V; H.B.Robinson Unit 2 and Turkey Point Unit 3. For HWR (D2O-moderated uranium oxide cluster lattices), three benchmarks were selected: NPD-19-rod Fuel Clusters; Pickering-28-rod Fuel Clusters; and Bruce-37-rod Fuel Clusters. The isotopes with experimental concentration data included in these benchmarks are: Se-79, Sr90, Tc99, Ru106, Sn126, Sb125,1129, Cs133-137, Nd143, 145, Sm149-150, 152, Eul53-155, U234-235, 238, Np237, Pu238-242, Am241-243, and Cm242-248. Results and analysis of differences between calculated and measured absolute and/or relative concentrations of these isotopes for the seven benchmarks are included in this work.

  3. Accident source terms for pressurized water reactors with high-burnup cores calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Leonard, Mark Thomas; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs2MoO4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU analyses. Additionally, current analyses suggest that the NUREG-1465 release fractions are conservative by about a factor of 2 in terms of release fractions and that release durations for in-vessel and late in-vessel release periods are in fact longer than the NUREG-1465 durations. It is currently planned that a subsequent report will further characterize these results using more refined statistical methods, permitting a more precise reformulation of the NUREG-1465 alternative source term for both LBU and HBU fuels, with the most important finding being that the NUREG-1465 formula appears to embody significant conservatism compared to current best-estimate analyses.

  4. High-burnup core design using minor actinide-containing metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Obara, T.

    2013-07-01

    A neutronic design study of metal fuel fast reactor (FR) cores is conducted on the basis of an innovative fuel design concept to achieve an extremely high burnup and realize an efficient fuel cycle system. Since it is expected that the burnup reactivity swing will become extremely large in an unprecedented high burnup core, minor actinides (MAs) from light water reactors (LWRs) are added to fresh fuel to improve the core internal conversion. Core neutronic analysis revealed that high burnups of about 200 MWd/kg for a small-scale core and about 300 MWd/kg for a large-scale core can be attained while suppressing the burnup reactivity swing to almost the same level as that of conventional cores with normal burnup. An actinide burnup analysis has shown that the MA consumption ratio is improved to about 60% and that the accumulated MAs originating from LWRs can be efficiently consumed by the high-burnup metal fuel FR. (authors)

  5. PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR CORE WITH PLUTONIUM BURNUP

    DOEpatents

    Puechl, K.H.

    1963-09-24

    A pressurized water reactor is described having a core containing Pu/sup 240/ in which the effective microscopic neutronabsorption cross section of Pu/sup 240/ in unconverted condition decreases as the time of operation of the reactor increases, in order to compensate for loss of reactivity resulting from fission product buildup during reactor operation. This means serves to improve the efficiency of the reactor operation by reducing power losses resulting from control rods and burnable poisons. (AEC)

  6. MONTE-CARLO BURNUP CALCULATION UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION AND PROPAGATION DETERMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Sternat, M.; Nichols, T.

    2011-06-09

    Reactor burnup or depletion codes are used thoroughly in the fields of nuclear forensics and nuclear safeguards. Two common codes include MONTEBURNS and MCNPX/CINDER. These are Monte-Carlo depletion routines utilizing MCNP for neutron transport calculations and either ORIGEN or CINDER for burnup calculations. Uncertainties exist in the MCNP steps, but this information is not passed to the depletion calculations or saved. To quantify this transport uncertainty and determine how it propagates between burnup steps, a statistical analysis of multiple repeated depletion runs is performed. The reactor model chosen is the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) in a single assembly, infinite lattice configuration. This model was burned for a 150 day cycle broken down into three steps. The output isotopics as well as effective multiplication factor (k-effective) were tabulated and histograms were created at each burnup step using the Scott Method to determine the bin width. The distributions for each code are a statistical benchmark and comparisons made. It was expected that the gram quantities and k-effective histograms would produce normally distributed results since they were produced from a Monte-Carlo routine, but some of the results appear to not. Statistical analyses are performed using the {chi}{sup 2} test against a normal distribution for the k-effective results and several isotopes including {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 240}Pu.

  7. MONTE-CARLO BURNUP CALCULATION UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION AND PROPAGATION DETERMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.; Sternat, M.; Charlton, W.

    2011-05-08

    MONTEBURNS is a Monte-Carlo depletion routine utilizing MCNP and ORIGEN 2.2. Uncertainties exist in the MCNP transport calculation, but this information is not passed to the depletion calculation in ORIGEN or saved. To quantify this transport uncertainty and determine how it propagates between burnup steps, a statistical analysis of a multiple repeated depletion runs is performed. The reactor model chosen is the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) in a single assembly, infinite lattice configuration. This model was burned for a 25.5 day cycle broken down into three steps. The output isotopics as well as effective multiplication factor (k-effective) were tabulated and histograms were created at each burnup step using the Scott Method to determine the bin width. It was expected that the gram quantities and k-effective histograms would produce normally distributed results since they were produced from a Monte-Carlo routine, but some of results do not. The standard deviation at each burnup step was consistent between fission product isotopes as expected, while the uranium isotopes created some unique results. The variation in the quantity of uranium was small enough that, from the reaction rate MCNP tally, round off error occurred producing a set of repeated results with slight variation. Statistical analyses were performed using the {chi}{sup 2} test against a normal distribution for several isotopes and the k-effective results. While the isotopes failed to reject the null hypothesis of being normally distributed, the {chi}{sup 2} statistic grew through the steps in the k-effective test. The null hypothesis was rejected in the later steps. These results suggest, for a high accuracy solution, MCNP cell material quantities less than 100 grams and greater kcode parameters are needed to minimize uncertainty propagation and minimize round off effects.

  8. Burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core using MCNPX.

    SciTech Connect

    Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a reactor design with a burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core that was evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). The current trend in advanced reactor design is the concept of a small modular reactor (SMR). However, very few of the SMR designs attempt to substantially increase the lifetime of a reactor core, especially without zone loading, fuel reshuffling, or other artificial mechanisms in the core that %E2%80%9Cflatten%E2%80%9D the power profile, including non-uniform cooling, non-uniform moderation, or strategic poison placement. Historically, the limitations of computing capabilities have prevented acceptable margins in the temporal component of the spatial excess reactivity in a reactor design, due primarily to the error in burnup calculations. This research was performed as an initial scoping analysis into the concept of a long-life fast reactor. It can be shown that a long-life fast reactor concept can be modeled using MCNPX to predict burnup and neutronics behavior. The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs. For the purpose of this study, a single core design was investigated: a relatively small reactor core, yielding a medium amount of power (~200 to 400 MWth). The results of this scoping analysis were successful in providing a preliminary reactor design involving metal U-235/U-238 fuel with HT-9 fuel cladding and sodium coolant at a 20% volume fraction.

  9. Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

  10. Comparison of PWR - Burnup calculations with SCALE 5.0/TRITON other burnup codes and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Oberle, P.; Broeders, C. H. M.; Dagan, R.

    2006-07-01

    The increasing tendency towards fuel lifetime extension in thermal nuclear reactors motivated validation work for available evaluation tools for nuclear fuel burnup calculations. In this study two deterministic codes with different transport solvers and one Monte Carlo method are investigated. The code system KAPROS/KARBUS uses the classical deterministic First Collision Probability method utilizing a cylinderized Wigner-Seitz cell. In the SCALES.0/TRITON/NEWT code the Extended Step Characteristic method is applied. In a first step the two deterministic codes are compared with experimental results from the KWO-Isotope Correlation Experiment up to 30 MWD/kg HM burnup, published in 1981. Two pin cell calculations are analyzed by comparison of calculated and experimental results for important heavy isotope vectors. The results are very satisfactory. Subsequently, further validation at higher burnup (< 80 MWD/kg HM) is provided by comparison of the two deterministic codes and the Monte Carlo based burnup code MONTEBURNS for PWR UO{sub 2} fuel assembly calculations. Possible reasons for differences in the results are analyzed and discussed. Especially the influence of cross section data and processing is presented. (authors)

  11. Fuel burnup calculation of Ghana MNSR using ORIGEN2 and REBUS3 codes.

    PubMed

    Abrefah, R G; Nyarko, B J B; Fletcher, J J; Akaho, E H K

    2013-10-01

    Ghana Research Reactor-1 core is to be converted from HEU fuel to LEU fuel in the near future and managing the spent nuclear fuel is very important. A fuel depletion analysis of the GHARR-1 core was performed using ORIGEN2 and REBUS3 codes to estimate the isotopic inventory at end-of-cycle in order to help in the design of an appropriate spent fuel cask. The results obtained for both codes were consistent for U-235 burnup weight percent and Pu-239 build up as a result of burnup. PMID:23796663

  12. Burnup calculations for the HOMER-15 and SAFE-300 reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Benjamin W.; Poston, David I.

    2002-01-01

    The Heatpipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term low-cost space fission power system. As the U-235 fuel of the HPS is burned, higher actinides and fission products will be produced. This will cause changes in system reactivity, radioactivity, and decay power. One potential concern is that gaseous fission products may exert excessive pressure on the fuel pin cladding. To evaluate these issues, simulations were run in MONTEBURNS. MONTEBURNS is an automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. This paper describes the results of these simulations, as well as how those results compare with the current experimental database of irradiated materials. .

  13. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  14. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Afifah, Maryam Su’ud, Zaki; Miura, Ryosuke; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-30

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don’t need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  15. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd.

  16. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Brady, M.C.

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155.

  17. Burnup calculation by the method of first-flight collision probabilities using average chords prior to the first collision

    SciTech Connect

    Karpushkin, T. Yu.

    2012-12-15

    A technique to calculate the burnup of materials of cells and fuel assemblies using the matrices of first-flight neutron collision probabilities rebuilt at a given burnup step is presented. A method to rebuild and correct first collision probability matrices using average chords prior to the first neutron collision, which are calculated with the help of geometric modules of constructed stochastic neutron trajectories, is described. Results of calculation of the infinite multiplication factor for elementary cells with a modified material composition compared to the reference one as well as calculation of material burnup in the cells and fuel assemblies of a VVER-1000 are presented.

  18. Large Core Code Evaluation Working Group Benchmark Problem Four: neutronics and burnup analysis of a large heterogeneous fast reactor. Part 1. Analysis of benchmark results. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.L.; Protsik, R.; Lewellen, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Core Code Evaluation Working Group Benchmark Problem Four was specified to provide a stringent test of the current methods which are used in the nuclear design and analyses process. The benchmark specifications provided a base for performing detailed burnup calculations over the first two irradiation cycles for a large heterogeneous fast reactor. Particular emphasis was placed on the techniques for modeling the three-dimensional benchmark geometry, and sensitivity studies were carried out to determine the performance parameter sensitivities to changes in the neutronics and burnup specifications. The results of the Benchmark Four calculations indicated that a linked RZ-XY (Hex) two-dimensional representation of the benchmark model geometry can be used to predict mass balance data, power distributions, regionwise fuel exposure data and burnup reactivities with good accuracy when compared with the results of direct three-dimensional computations. Most of the small differences in the results of the benchmark analyses by the different participants were attributed to ambiguities in carrying out the regionwise flux renormalization calculations throughout the burnup step.

  19. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and new predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named “tebow,” was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.

  20. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and newmore » predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named “tebow,” was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.« less

  1. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and new predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named tebow, was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.

  2. Burnup calculations and chemical analysis of irradiated fuel samples studied in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, P.; Guenther-Leopold, I.; Berger, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The isotopic compositions of 5 UO{sub 2} samples irradiated in a Swiss PWR power plant, which were investigated in the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II programme, were calculated using the CASMO-4 and BOXER assembly codes. The burnups of the samples range from 50 to 90 MWd/kg. The results for a large number of actinide and fission product nuclides were compared to those of chemical analyses performed using a combination of chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry. A good agreement of calculated and measured concentrations is found for many of the nuclides investigated with both codes. The concentrations of the Pu isotopes are mostly predicted within {+-}10%, the two codes giving quite different results, except for {sup 242}Pu. Relatively significant deviations are found for some isotopes of Cs and Sm, and large discrepancies are observed for Eu and Gd. The overall quality of the predictions by the two codes is comparable, and the deviations from the experimental data do not generally increase with burnup. (authors)

  3. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  4. Evaluation of fission product worth margins in PWR spent nuclear fuel burnup credit calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.; Finck, P.J.; Jammes, C.; Stenberg, C.G.

    1999-02-17

    Current criticality safety calculations for the transportation of irradiated LWR fuel make the very conservative assumption that the fuel is fresh. This results in a very substantial overprediction of the actual k{sub eff} of the transportation casks; in certain cases, this decreases the amount of spent fuel which can be loaded in a cask, and increases the cost of transporting the spent fuel to the repository. Accounting for the change of reactivity due to fuel depletion is usually referred to as ''burnup credit.'' The US DOE is currently funding a program aimed at establishing an actinide only burnup credit methodology (in this case, the calculated reactivity takes into account the buildup or depletion of a limited number of actinides). This work is undergoing NRC review. While this methodology is being validated on a significant experimental basis, it implicitly relies on additional margins: in particular, the absorption of neutrons by certain actinides and by all fission products is not taken into account. This provides an important additional margin and helps guarantee that the methodology is conservative provided these neglected absorption are known with reasonable accuracy. This report establishes the accuracy of fission product absorption rate calculations: (1) the analysis of European fission product worth experiments demonstrates that fission product cross-sections available in the US provide very good predictions of fission product worth; (2) this is confirmed by a direct comparison of European and US cross section evaluations; (3) accuracy of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) fission product content predictions is established in a recent ORNL report where several SNF isotopic assays are analyzed; and (4) these data are then combined to establish in a conservative manner the fraction of the predicted total fission product absorption which can be guaranteed based on available experimental data.

  5. Substantiation of parameters of the geometric model of the research reactor core for the calculation using the Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Radaev, A. I. Schurovskaya, M. V.

    2015-12-15

    The choice of the spatial nodalization for the calculation of the power density and burnup distribution in a research reactor core with fuel assemblies of the IRT-3M and VVR-KN type using the program based on the Monte Carlo code is described. The influence of the spatial nodalization on the results of calculating basic neutronic characteristics and calculation time is investigated.

  6. Accuracy considerations for Chebyshev rational approximation method (CRAM) in Burnup calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pusa, M.

    2013-07-01

    The burnup equations can in principle be solved by computing the exponential of the burnup matrix. However, due to the difficult numerical characteristics of burnup matrices, the problem is extremely stiff and the matrix exponential solution has previously been considered infeasible for an entire burnup system containing over a thousand nuclides. It was recently discovered by the author that the eigenvalues of burnup matrices are generally located near the negative real axis, which prompted introducing the Chebyshev rational approximation method (CRAM) for solving the burnup equations. CRAM can be characterized as the best rational approximation on the negative real axis and it has been shown to be capable of simultaneously solving an entire burnup system both accurately and efficiently. In this paper, the accuracy of CRAM is further studied in the context of burnup equations. The approximation error is analyzed based on the eigenvalue decomposition of the burnup matrix. It is deduced that the relative accuracy of CRAM may be compromised if a nuclide concentration diminishes significantly during the considered time step. Numerical results are presented for two test cases, the first one representing a small burnup system with 36 nuclides and the second one a full a decay system with 1531 nuclides. (authors)

  7. Environment-based pin-power reconstruction method for homogeneous core calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Leroyer, H.; Brosselard, C.; Girardi, E.

    2012-07-01

    Core calculation schemes are usually based on a classical two-step approach associated with assembly and core calculations. During the first step, infinite lattice assemblies calculations relying on a fundamental mode approach are used to generate cross-sections libraries for PWRs core calculations. This fundamental mode hypothesis may be questioned when dealing with loading patterns involving several types of assemblies (UOX, MOX), burnable poisons, control rods and burn-up gradients. This paper proposes a calculation method able to take into account the heterogeneous environment of the assemblies when using homogeneous core calculations and an appropriate pin-power reconstruction. This methodology is applied to MOX assemblies, computed within an environment of UOX assemblies. The new environment-based pin-power reconstruction is then used on various clusters of 3x3 assemblies showing burn-up gradients and UOX/MOX interfaces, and compared to reference calculations performed with APOLLO-2. The results show that UOX/MOX interfaces are much better calculated with the environment-based calculation scheme when compared to the usual pin-power reconstruction method. The power peak is always better located and calculated with the environment-based pin-power reconstruction method on every cluster configuration studied. This study shows that taking into account the environment in transport calculations can significantly improve the pin-power reconstruction so far as it is consistent with the core loading pattern. (authors)

  8. An extended version of the SERPENT-2 code to investigate fuel burn-up and core material evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufiero, M.; Cammi, A.; Fiorina, C.; Leppänen, J.; Luzzi, L.; Ricotti, M. E.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the Monte Carlo burn-up code SERPENT-2 has been extended and employed to study the material isotopic evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This promising GEN-IV nuclear reactor concept features peculiar characteristics such as the on-line fuel reprocessing, which prevents the use of commonly available burn-up codes. Besides, the presence of circulating nuclear fuel and radioactive streams from the core to the reprocessing plant requires a precise knowledge of the fuel isotopic composition during the plant operation. The developed extension of SERPENT-2 directly takes into account the effects of on-line fuel reprocessing on burn-up calculations and features a reactivity control algorithm. It is here assessed against a dedicated version of the deterministic ERANOS-based EQL3D procedure (PSI-Switzerland) and adopted to analyze the MSFR fuel salt isotopic evolution. Particular attention is devoted to study the effects of reprocessing time constants and efficiencies on the conversion ratio and the molar concentration of elements relevant for solubility issues (e.g., trivalent actinides and lanthanides). Quantities of interest for fuel handling and safety issues are investigated, including decay heat and activities of hazardous isotopes (neutron and high energy gamma emitters) in the core and in the reprocessing stream. The radiotoxicity generation is also analyzed for the MSFR nominal conditions. The production of helium and the depletion in tungsten content due to nuclear reactions are calculated for the nickel-based alloy selected as reactor structural material of the MSFR. These preliminary evaluations can be helpful in studying the radiation damage of both the primary salt container and the axial reflectors.

  9. Propagation of Nuclear Data Uncertainties for ELECTRA Burn-up Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöstrand, H.; Alhassan, E.; Duan, J.; Gustavsson, C.; Koning, A. J.; Pomp, S.; Rochman, D.; Österlund, M.

    2014-04-01

    The European Lead-Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) has been proposed as a training reactor for fast systems within the Swedish nuclear program. It is a low-power fast reactor cooled by pure liquid lead. In this work, we propagate the uncertainties in 239Pu transport data to uncertainties in the fuel inventory of ELECTRA during the reactor lifetime using the Total Monte Carlo approach (TMC). Within the TENDL project, nuclear models input parameters were randomized within their uncertainties and 740 239Pu nuclear data libraries were generated. These libraries are used as inputs to reactor codes, in our case SERPENT, to perform uncertainty analysis of nuclear reactor inventory during burn-up. The uncertainty in the inventory determines uncertainties in: the long-term radio-toxicity, the decay heat, the evolution of reactivity parameters, gas pressure and volatile fission product content. In this work, a methodology called fast TMC is utilized, which reduces the overall calculation time. The uncertainty of some minor actinides were observed to be rather large and therefore their impact on multiple recycling should be investigated further. It was also found that, criticality benchmarks can be used to reduce inventory uncertainties due to nuclear data. Further studies are needed to include fission yield uncertainties, more isotopes, and a larger set of benchmarks.

  10. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  11. Development of Monteburns: A Code That Links MCNP and ORIGEN2 in an Automated Fashion for Burnup Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Holly R. Trellue

    1998-12-01

    Monteburns is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code 0RIGEN2. Monteburns produces many criticality and burnup computational parameters based on material feed/removal specifications, power(s), and time intervals. This code processes input from the user indicating the system geometry, initial material compositions, feed/removal, and other code-specific parameters. Results from MCNP, 0RIGEN2, and other calculations are then output successively as the code runs. The principle function of monteburns is to first transfer one-group cross sections and fluxes from MCNP to 0RIGEN2, and then transfer the resulting material compositions (after irradiation and/or decay) from 0RIGEN2 back to MCNP in a repeated, cyclic fashion. The main requirement of the code is that the user have a working MCNP input file and other input parameters; all interaction with 0RIGEN2 and other calculations are performed by monteburns. This report presents the results obtained from the benchmarking of monteburns to measured and previously obtained data from traditional Light Water Reactor systems. The majority of the differences seen between the two were less than five percent. These were primarily a result of variances in cross sections between MCNP, cross section libraries used by other codes, and observed values. With this understanding, this code can now be used with confidence for burnup calculations in three-dimensional systems. It was designed for use in the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste project at Los Alamos National Laboratory but is also being applied to the analysis of isotopic production/destruction of transuranic actinides in a reactor system. The code has now been shown to sufficiently support these calculations.

  12. Burnup calculations for KIPT accelerator driven subcritical facility using Monte Carlo computer codes-MCB and MCNPX.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.; Talamo, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-06-09

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility, using the KIPT electron accelerator. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron physics experiments and material structure analyses are planned using this facility. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}375 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products reduce continuously the reactivity during the operation, which reduces the neutron flux level and consequently the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, fuel assemblies should be added after long operating periods to compensate for the lost reactivity. This process requires accurate prediction of the fuel burnup, the decay behavior of the fission produces, and the introduced reactivity from adding fresh fuel assemblies. The recent developments of the Monte Carlo computer codes, the high speed capability of the computer processors, and the parallel computation techniques made it possible to perform three-dimensional detailed burnup simulations. A full detailed three-dimensional geometrical model is used for the burnup simulations with continuous energy nuclear data libraries for the transport calculations and 63-multigroup or one group cross sections libraries for the depletion calculations. Monte Carlo Computer code MCNPX and MCB are utilized for this study. MCNPX transports the electrons and the produced neutrons and photons but the current version of MCNPX doesn't support depletion/burnup calculation of the subcritical system with the generated neutron source from the target. MCB can perform neutron transport and burnup calculation for subcritical system using external neutron source, however it cannot perform electron transport calculations. To solve this problem, a hybrid procedure is developed by coupling these two computer codes. The user tally subroutine of MCNPX is developed and utilized to record the information of the each generated neutron from the photonuclear reactions resulted from the electron beam interactions. MCB reads the recorded information of each generated neutron thorough the user source subroutine. In this way, the neutron source generated by electron reactions could be utilized in MCB calculations, without the need for MCB to transport the electrons. Using the source subroutines, MCB could get the external neutron source, which is prepared by MCNPX, and perform depletion calculation for the driven subcritical facility.

  13. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady; Khrennikov, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  14. Application of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry combined with in-core measurements for correction of neutron source used for RPV fluence calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Borodkin, P.G.; Borodkin, G.I.; Khrennikov, N.N.

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with calculated and semi-analytical evaluations of VVER-1000 reactor core neutron source distributions and their influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leakage. Neutron activation measurements analyzed in the paper were carried out in an ex-vessel air cavity at different nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 during different fuel cycles. The time-integrated neutron source distributions used for DORT calculations were prepared via two different approaches based on (a) calculated fuel burnup (standard routine procedure) and (b) in-core measurements by means of self-powered detectors (SPDs) and thermocouples (TCs) (new approach). Considering that fuel burnup distributions in operating VVER may be evaluated now by the use of analytical methods (calculations) only, it is necessary to develop new approaches for the testing and correction of calculated evaluations of a neutron source. The results presented in this paper allow one to consider the reverse task of the alternative estimation of fuel burnup distributions. The proposed approach is based on the adjustment (fitting) of time-integrated neutron source distributions, and thus fuel burnup patterns, in some part of the reactor core, taking into account neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations, and in-core SPD and TC measurement data. (authors)

  15. ORPHEE research reactor: 3D core depletion calculation using Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, F.; Brun, E.

    2014-06-01

    ORPHEE is a research reactor located at CEA Saclay. It aims at producing neutron beams for experiments. This is a pool-type reactor (heavy water), and the core is cooled by light water. Its thermal power is 14 MW. ORPHEE core is 90 cm height and has a cross section of 27x27 cm2. It is loaded with eight fuel assemblies characterized by a various number of fuel plates. The fuel plate is composed of aluminium and High Enriched Uranium (HEU). It is a once through core with a fuel cycle length of approximately 100 Equivalent Full Power Days (EFPD) and with a maximum burnup of 40%. Various analyses under progress at CEA concern the determination of the core neutronic parameters during irradiation. Taking into consideration the geometrical complexity of the core and the quasi absence of thermal feedback for nominal operation, the 3D core depletion calculations are performed using the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® [1,2,3]. A preliminary validation of the depletion calculation was performed on a 2D core configuration by comparison with the deterministic transport code APOLLO2 [4]. The analysis showed the reliability of TRIPOLI-4® to calculate a complex core configuration using a large number of depleting regions with a high level of confidence.

  16. New {sup 237}Np burning strategy in a supercritical CO{sub 2} cooled fast reactor core attaining zero burnup reactivity loss

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H. N.; Kato, Y.

    2006-07-01

    A new {sup 237}Np burning strategy in a supercritical CO{sub 2} cooled fast reactor core is proposed, which consumes {sup 237}Np as fuel and utilizes it as a burnable poison to attain zero burnup reactivity loss. Addition of {sup 237}Np at content of 6.5 weight percent in fuel engenders essentially zero burnup reactivity loss of the rate of 0.02% {Delta}k/k over ten years and consumption of the equivalent quantity produced from about 14 light-water reactors of equivalent electrical output. The zero burnup reactivity loss results in reduction of the control rod number to half that of a usual sodium-cooled mixed oxide fuel core with no added {sup 237}Np and no need for rod operation with fuel burning. Void reactivity is smaller by 25% than that of the usual core, although {sup 237}Np is added and the active core length is elongated to 1.2 m. The power density is reduced to about 1/5 of that of a usual core and the hot spot temperature of cladding is below its maximum permissible temperature of 700 deg. C. (authors)

  17. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; Umbel, Marissa

    2015-09-18

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fissionmore » yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice.« less

  18. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; Umbel, Marissa

    2015-09-18

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fission yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice.

  19. Moderator poison design and burn-up calculations at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Ferguson, P. D.; Iverson, E. B.; Gallmeier, F. X.; Popova, I.

    2008-06-01

    The spallation neutron source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was commissioned in April 2006. At the nominal operating power (1.4 MW), it will have thermal neutron fluxes approximately an order of magnitude greater than any existing pulsed spallation source. It thus brings a serious challenge to the lifetime of the moderator poison sheets. The SNS moderators are integrated with the inner reflector plug (IRP) at a cost of ˜$2 million a piece. A replacement of the inner reflector plug presents a significant drawback to the facility due to the activation and the operation cost. Although there are a lot of factors limiting the lifetime of the inner reflector plug, like radiation damage to the structural material and helium production of beryllium, the bottle-neck is the lifetime of the moderator poison sheets. Increasing the thickness of the poison sheet extends the lifetime but would sacrifice the neutronic performance of the moderators. A compromise is accepted at the current SNS target system which uses thick Gd poison sheets at a projected lifetime of 6 MW-years of operation. The calculations in this paper reveal that Cd may be a better poison material from the perspective of lifetime and neutronic performance. In replacing Gd, the inner reflector plug could reach a lifetime of 8 MW-years with ˜5% higher peak neutron fluxes at almost no loss of energy resolution.

  20. KARATE - a code for VVER-440 core calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Gado, J.; Hegedus, Cs.J.; Hegyi, Gy.; Kereszturi, A.; Makai, M.; Maraczi, Cs.; Telbisz, M.

    1994-12-31

    A modular calculation system has been elaborated at the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute for VVER-440 cores. The purpose of KARATE is the calculation of neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic processes in the core at normal, startup, and slow transient conditions. KARATE is under validation and verification (V&V) against mathematical, experimental, and operational data.

  1. Core Physics and Kinetics Calculations for the Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.; Albright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient, compact nuclear reactors would provide high specific impulse spacecraft propulsion. This analysis and numerical simulation effort has focused on the technical feasibility issues related to the nuclear design characteristics of a novel reactor design. The Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor (FPCR) is a shockwave-driven gaseous-core nuclear reactor, which uses Magneto Hydrodynamic effects to generate electric power to be used for propulsion. The nuclear design of the system depends on two major calculations: core physics calculations and kinetics calculations. Presently, core physics calculations have concentrated on the use of the MCNP4C code. However, initial results from other codes such as COMBINE/VENTURE and SCALE4a. are also shown. Several significant modifications were made to the ISR-developed QCALC1 kinetics analysis code. These modifications include testing the state of the core materials, an improvement to the calculation of the material properties of the core, the addition of an adiabatic core temperature model and improvement of the first order reactivity correction model. The accuracy of these modifications has been verified, and the accuracy of the point-core kinetics model used by the QCALC1 code has also been validated. Previously calculated kinetics results for the FPCR were described in the ISR report, "QCALC1: A code for FPCR Kinetics Model Feasibility Analysis" dated June 1, 2002.

  2. NEPHTIS: Core depletion validation relying on 2D transport core calculations with the APOLLO2 code

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, F.; Raepsaet, X.; Groizard, M.; Poinot, C.

    2006-07-01

    The CEA, in collaboration with EDF and AREVA-NP, is developing a core modelling tool called NEPHTIS, for Neutronic Process for HTGR Innovating Systems and dedicated at present day to the prismatic block-type HTGR (High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors). Due to the lack of usable HTGR experimental results, the confidence in this neutronic computational tool relies essentially on comparisons to reference or best-estimate calculations. In the present analysis, the Aleppo deterministic transport code has been selected as reference for validating core depletion simulations carried out within NEPHTIS. These reference calculations were performed on fully detailed 2D core configurations using the Method of Characteristics. The latter has been validated versus Monte Carlo method for different static core configurations [1], [2] and [3]. All the presented results come from an annular HTGR core loaded with uranium-based fuel (15% enrichment). During the core depletion validation, reactivity, reaction rates distributions and nuclei concentrations have been compared. In addition, the impact of various physical and geometrical parameters such as the core loading (one-through or batch-wise reloading) and the amount of burnable poison has been investigated during the validation phases. The results confirm that NEPHTIS is able to predict the core reactivity with uncertainties of {+-}350 pcm. At the end of the core irradiation, the U-235 consumption is calculated within {+-} 0, 7 % while the plutonium mass discharged from the core is calculated within {+-}1 %. As far as the core power distributions are concerned, small discrepancies ( and < 2.3 %) can be observed on the fuel block-averaged power distribution in the core. (authors)

  3. Modifying scoping codes to accurately calculate TMI-cores with lifetimes greater than 500 effective full-power days

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, D.; Levine, S.L. ); Luoma, J.; Mahgerefteh, M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Three Mile Island unit 1 core reloads have been designed using fast but accurate scoping codes, PSUI-LEOPARD and ADMARC. PSUI-LEOPARD has been normalized to EPRI-CPM2 results and used to calculate the two-group constants, whereas ADMARC is a modern two-dimensional, two-group diffusion theory nodal code. Problems in accuracy were encountered for cycles 8 and higher as the core lifetime was increased beyond 500 effective full-power days. This is because the heavier loaded cores in both {sup 235}U and {sup 10}B have harder neutron spectra, which produces a change in the transport effect in the baffle reflector region, and the burnable poison (BP) simulations were not accurate enough for the cores containing the increased amount of {sup 10}B required in the BP rods. In the authors study, a technique has been developed to take into account the change in the transport effect in the baffle region by modifying the fast neutron diffusion coefficient as a function of cycle length and core exposure or burnup. A more accurate BP simulation method is also developed, using integral transport theory and CPM2 data, to calculate the BP contribution to the equivalent fuel assembly (supercell) two-group constants. The net result is that the accuracy of the scoping codes is as good as that produced by CASMO/SIMULATE or CPM2/SIMULATE when comparing with measured data.

  4. FRAPCON-3: A computer code for the calculation of steady-state, thermal-mechanical behavior of oxide fuel rods for high burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Berna, G.A.; Beyer, G.A.; Davis, K.L.; Lanning, D.D.

    1997-12-01

    FRAPCON-3 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady-state response of light water reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, and deformation of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (1) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (2) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (3) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (4) fission gas release, (5) fuel rod internal gas pressure, (6) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (7) cladding oxidation, and (8) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat-transfer correlations. The codes` integral predictions of mechanical behavior have not been assessed against a data base, e.g., cladding strain or failure data. Therefore, it is recommended that the code not be used for analyses of cladding stress or strain. FRAPCON-3 is programmed for use on both mainframe computers and UNIX-based workstations such as DEC 5000 or SUN Sparcstation 10. It is also programmed for personal computers with FORTRAN compiler software and at least 8 to 10 megabytes of random access memory (RAM). The FRAPCON-3 code is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by the FRAPTRAN computer code (formerly named FRAP-T6).

  5. Bias estimates used in lieu of validation of fission products and minor actinides in MCNP Keff calculations for PWR burnup credit casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Don E.; Marshall, William J.; Wagner, John C.; Bowen, Douglas G.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation recently issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3. This ISG provides guidance for burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and storage of PWR pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in casks. Revision 3 includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MA). Based on previous work documented in NUREG/CR-7109, recommendation 4 of ISG-8, Rev. 3, includes a recommendation to use 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth to conservatively cover the bias due to the specified FP&MAs. This bias is supplementary to the bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF and does not address extension to actinides and fission products beyond those identified herein. The work described in this report involves comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII based nuclear data and supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when either SCALE or MCNP codes are used for criticality calculations, provided the other conditions of the recommendation 4 are met. The method used in this report may also be applied to demonstrate the applicability of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias to other codes using ENDF/B V, VI or VII based nuclear data. The method involves use of the applicant s computational method to generate FP&MA worths for a reference SNF cask model using specified spent fuel compositions. The applicant s FP&MA worths are then compared to reference values provided in this report. The applicants FP&MA worths should not exceed the reference results by more than 1.5% of the reference FP&MA worths.

  6. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  7. Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this topical report is to present to the NRC for review and acceptance a methodology for using burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems for PWR spent fuel transportation packages, while maintaining the criticality safety margins and related requirements of 10 CFR Part 71 and 72. The proposed methodology consists of five major steps as summarized below: (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations in SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). and (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper fuel assembly selection prior to loading. (This step is required but the details are outside the scope of this topical report.) When reviewed and accepted by the NRC, this topical report will serve as a criterion document for criticality control analysts and will provide steps for the use of actinide-only burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems. The NRC-accepted burnup credit methodology will be used by commercial SNF storage and transportation package designers. Design-specific burnup credit criticality analyses will be defined, developed, and documented in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for each specific storage or transportation package that uses burnup credit. These SARs will then be submitted to the NRC for review and approval. This topical report is expected to be referenced in a number of storage and transportation cask applications to be submitted by commercial cask and canister designers to the NRC. Therefore, NRC acceptance of this topical report will result in increased efficiency of the review process for these SNF storage and transportation cask applications. The DOE will also reference NRC-accepted topical reports in its license application for a geologic repository. DOE is requesting NRC acceptance for two general aspects of the actinide-only burnup credit methodology. First, data is sufficient to validate the burnup credit criticality analysis methodology presented in this topical report. This includes the chemical assay data used to validate the spent fuel isotopic concentration calculations and critical experiments used to validate the burnup credit criticality calculations. Second, the conservative methodology in utilizing this data for burnup credit is acceptable. A detailed breakdown of what the DOE is specifically seeking NRC acceptance of is presented in Section 1.6.

  8. Calculation of core loss and copper loss in amorphous/nanocrystalline core-based high-frequency transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Wang, Youhua; Zhu, Jianguo; Guo, Youguang; Lei, Gang; Liu, Chengcheng

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous and nanocrystalline alloys are now widely used for the cores of high-frequency transformers, and Litz-wire is commonly used as the windings, while it is difficult to calculate the resistance accurately. In order to design a high-frequency transformer, it is important to accurately calculate the core loss and copper loss. To calculate the core loss accurately, the additional core loss by the effect of end stripe should be considered. It is difficult to simulate the whole stripes in the core due to the limit of computation, so a scale down model with 5 stripes of amorphous alloy is simulated by the 2D finite element method (FEM). An analytical model is presented to calculate the copper loss in the Litz-wire, and the results are compared with the calculations by FEM.

  9. Topical report on actinide-only burnup credit for PWR spent nuclear fuel packages. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1997-04-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection prior to loading. A measurement of the average assembly burnup is required and that measurement must be within 10% of the utility burnup record for the assembly to be accepted. The measurement device must be accurate to within 10%. Each step is described in detail for use with any computer code system and is then demonstrated with the SCALE 4.2 computer code package using 27BURNUPLIB cross sections.

  10. Nuclear safety analyses and core design calculations to convert the Texas A & M University Nuclear Science Center reactor to low enrichment uranium fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, T.A.

    1995-03-02

    This project involved performing the nuclear design and safety analyses needed to modify the license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to allow operation of the Texas A& M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) with a core containing low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. The specific type of LEU fuel to be considered was the TRIGA 20-20 fuel produced by General Atomic. Computer codes for the neutronic analyses were provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the assistance of William Woodruff of ANL in helping the NSCR staff to learn the proper use of the codes is gratefully acknowledged. The codes applied in the LEU analyses were WIMSd4/m, DIF3D, NCTRIGA and PARET. These codes allowed full three dimensional, temperature and burnup dependent calculations modelling the NSCR core to be performed for the first time. In addition, temperature coefficients of reactivity and pulsing calculations were carried out in-house, whereas in the past this modelling had been performed at General Atomic. In order to benchmark the newly acquired codes, modelling of the current NSCR core with highly enriched uranium fuel was also carried out. Calculated results were compared to both earlier licensing calculations and experimental data and the new methods were found to achieve excellent agreement with both. Therefore, even if an LEU core is never loaded at the NSCR, this project has resulted in a significant improvement in the nuclear safety analysis capabilities established and maintained at the NSCR.

  11. Advances in core loss calculations for magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triner, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A new analytical technique which predicts the basic magnetic properties under various operating conditions encountered in state-of-the-art dc-ac/dc converters is discussed. Using a new flux-controlled core excitation circuit, magnetic core characteristics were developed for constant values of ramp flux (square wave voltage excitation) and frequency. From this empirical data, a mathematical loss characteristics equation is developed to analytically predict the specific core loss of several magnetic materials under various waveform excitation conditions. In addition, these characteristics show the circuit designer for the first time the direct functional relatonships between induction level and specific core loss as a function of the two key dc-dc converter operating parameters of input voltage and duty cycle.

  12. Advances in core loss calculations for magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triner, J. E.

    1982-07-01

    A new analytical technique which predicts the basic magnetic properties under various operating conditions encountered in state-of-the-art dc-ac/dc converters is discussed. Using a new flux-controlled core excitation circuit, magnetic core characteristics were developed for constant values of ramp flux (square wave voltage excitation) and frequency. From this empirical data, a mathematical loss characteristics equation is developed to analytically predict the specific core loss of several magnetic materials under various waveform excitation conditions. In addition, these characteristics show the circuit designer for the first time the direct functional relatonships between induction level and specific core loss as a function of the two key dc-dc converter operating parameters of input voltage and duty cycle.

  13. Development of a core follow calculational system for research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, E.Z.; Ball, G.; Joubert, W.R.

    1994-12-31

    Over the last few years a comprehensive PWR and MTR core analysis code system based on modern reactor physics methods has been under development by the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa. This system, known as OSCAR-3, will incorporate a customized graphical user interface and data management system to ensure user-friendliness and good quality control. The system has now reached the stage of development where it can be used for practical MTR core analyses. This paper describes the current capabilities of the components of the OSCAR-3 package, their integration within the package, and outlines future developments.

  14. Preliminary Study of Burnup Characteristics for a Simplified Small Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Irwanto, Dwi; Kato, Yukikata; Obara, Toru; Yamanaka, Ichiro

    2010-06-22

    Simplification of the pebble bed reactor by removing the unloading device from the system was peformed. For this reactor design, a suitable fuel-loading scheme is the Peu a Peu (little by little) fueling scheme. In the Peu a Peu modus, there is no unloading device; as such, the fuels are never discharged and remain at the bottom of the core during reactor operation. This means that the burnup cycle and reactivity is controlled by the addition of fuel. The objectives of the the present study were to find a means of carrying out the exact calculations needed to analyze the Peu a Peu fuel-loading scheme and to optimize the fuel composition, and fuel-loading scheme to achieve better burnup characteristics. The Monte Carlo method is used to perform calculations with high accuracy. Before the calculation of the whole core, the analysis for the infinite geometry was performed. The power generated per mass consumed for each combination of the uranium enrichment and packing fraction was analyzed from the parametric survey. By using the optimal value obtained, a whole-core calculation for the small 20 MWth reactor was performed and the criticality and burnup of this design was analyzed.

  15. Preliminary Study of Burnup Characteristics for a Simplified Small Pebble Bed Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwanto, Dwi; Kato, Yukikata; Yamanaka, Ichiro; Obara, Toru

    2010-06-01

    Simplification of the pebble bed reactor by removing the unloading device from the system was peformed. For this reactor design, a suitable fuel-loading scheme is the Peu à Peu (little by little) fueling scheme. In the Peu à Peu modus, there is no unloading device; as such, the fuels are never discharged and remain at the bottom of the core during reactor operation. This means that the burnup cycle and reactivity is controlled by the addition of fuel. The objectives of the the present study were to find a means of carrying out the exact calculations needed to analyze the Peu à Peu fuel-loading scheme and to optimize the fuel composition, and fuel-loading scheme to achieve better burnup characteristics. The Monte Carlo method is used to perform calculations with high accuracy. Before the calculation of the whole core, the analysis for the infinite geometry was performed. The power generated per mass consumed for each combination of the uranium enrichment and packing fraction was analyzed from the parametric survey. By using the optimal value obtained, a whole-core calculation for the small 20 MWth reactor was performed and the criticality and burnup of this design was analyzed.

  16. Effects of Burnup and Temperature Distributions to CANDLE Burnup of Block-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yasunori Ohoka; Ismile; Hiroshi Sekimoto

    2004-07-01

    The CANDLE burnup strategy is a new reactor burnup concept, where the distributions of fuel nuclide densities, neutron flux, and power density move with the same constant speed along the core axis from bottom to top or from top to bottom of the core and without any change in their shapes. It can be applied easily to the block-type high temperature gas cooled reactor using an appropriate burnable poison mixed with uranium oxide fuel. In the present study, the burnup distribution and the temperature distribution in the core are investigated and their effects on the CANDLE burnup core characteristics are studied. In this study, the natural gadolinium is used as the burnable poison. With the fuel enrichment of 15%, the natural gadolinium concentration of 3.0% and the fuel pin pitch of 6.6 cm, the CANDLE burnup is realized with the burning region moving speed of 29 cm/year and the axial half width of power density distribution of 1.5 m for uniform group constant case at 900 K. When the effect of nuclide change by burnup is considered, the burning region speed becomes 25 cm/year and the axial half-width of power density distribution becomes 1.25 m. When the temperature distributions effect is considered, the effects on the core characteristics are smaller than the burnup distribution effect. The maximum fuel temperature of the parallel flow case is higher than the counter flow case. (authors)

  17. /sup 18/O as a core plus two valence neutrons: A three-body Faddeev calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Ueta, K.; Miyake, H.; Mizukami, A.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleus /sup 18/O is studied assuming a three-body model: two neutrons outside an inert core of /sup 16/O: and solving the Faddeev equations. The calculated spectrum is in good agreement with experiment.

  18. Investigation of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation effects in polonium atomic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    A detailed investigation of the atomic structure and radiative parameters involving the lowest states within the 6p4, 6p36d, 6p37s, 6p37p and 6p37d configurations of neutral polonium is reported in the present paper. Using different physical models based on the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock approach, the influence of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation on the atomic parameters is discussed in detail. This work allowed us to fix the spectroscopic designation of some experimental level energy values and to provide for the first time a set of reliable oscillator strengths corresponding to 31 Po I spectral lines in the wavelength region from 175 to 987 nm.

  19. Impact investigation of reactor fuel operating parameters on reactivity for use in burnup credit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloma, Tanya Noel

    When representing the behavior of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF), credit is sought for the reduced reactivity associated with the net depletion of fissile isotopes and the creation of neutron-absorbing isotopes, a process that begins when a commercial nuclear reactor is first operated at power. Burnup credit accounts for the reduced reactivity potential of a fuel assembly and varies with the fuel burnup, cooling time, and the initial enrichment of fissile material in the fuel. With regard to long-term SNF disposal and transportation, tremendous benefits, such as increased capacity, flexibility of design and system operations, and reduced overall costs, provide an incentive to seek burnup credit for criticality safety evaluations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Interim Staff Guidance 8, Revision 2 in 2002, endorsing burnup credit of actinide composition changes only; credit due to actinides encompasses approximately 30% of exiting pressurized water reactor SNF inventory and could potentially be increased to 90% if fission product credit were accepted. However, one significant issue for utilizing full burnup credit, compensating for actinide and fission product composition changes, is establishing a set of depletion parameters that produce an adequately conservative representation of the fuel's isotopic inventory. Depletion parameters can have a significant effect on the isotopic inventory of the fuel, and thus the residual reactivity. This research seeks to quantify the reactivity impact on a system from dominant depletion parameters (i.e., fuel temperature, moderator density, burnable poison rod, burnable poison rod history, and soluble boron concentration). Bounding depletion parameters were developed by statistical evaluation of a database containing reactor operating histories. The database was generated from summary reports of commercial reactor criticality data. Through depletion calculations, utilizing the SCALE 6 code package, several light water reactor assembly designs and in-core locations are analyzed in establishing a combination of depletion parameters that conservatively represent the fuel's isotopic inventory as an initiative to take credit for fuel burnup in criticality safety evaluations for transportation and storage of SNF.

  20. Isotopic validation for PWR actinide-only burnup credit using Yankee Rowe data

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Safety analyses of criticality control systems for transportation packages include an assumption that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) loaded into the package is fresh or unirradiated. In other words, the spent fuel is assumed to have its original, as-manufactured U-235 isotopic content. The ``fresh fuel`` assumption is very conservative since the potential reactivity of the nuclear fuel is substantially reduced after being irradiated in the reactor core. The concept of taking credit for this reduction in nuclear fuel reactivity due to burnup of the fuel, instead of using the fresh fuel assumption in the criticality safety analysis, is referred to as ``Burnup Credit.`` Burnup credit uses the actual physical composition of the fuel and accounts for the net reduction of fissile material and the buildup of neutron absorbers in the fuel as it is irradiated. Neutron absorbers include actinides and other isotopes generated as a result of the fission process. Using only the change in actinide isotopes in the burnup credit criticality analysis is referred to as ``Actinide-Only Burnup Credit.`` The use of burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems enables more spent fuel to be placed in a package. Increased package capacity results in a reduced number of storage, shipping and disposal containers for a given number of SNF assemblies. Fewer shipments result in a lower risk of accidents associated with the handling and transportation of spent fuel, thus reducing both radiological and nonradiological risk to the public. This paper describes the modeling and the results of comparison between measured and calculated isotopic inventories for a selected number of samples taken from a Yankee Rowe spent fuel assembly.

  1. Nuclide analysis in high burnup fuel samples irradiated in Vandellós 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicky, H. U.; Low, J.; Granfors, M.; Alejano, C.; Conde, J. M.; Casado, C.; Sabater, J.; Lloret, M.; Quecedo, M.; Gago, J. A.

    2010-07-01

    In the framework of a high burnup fuel demonstration programme, rods with an enrichment of 4.5% 235U were operated to a rod average burnup of about 70 MWd/kgU in the Spanish Vandellós 2 pressurised water reactor. The rods were sent to hot cells and used for different research projects. This paper describes the isotopic composition measurements performed on samples of those rods, and the analysis of the measurement results based on comparison against calculated values. The fraction and composition of fission gases released to the rod free volume was determined for two of the rods. About 8% of Kr and Xe produced by fission were released. From the isotopic composition of the gases, it could be concluded that the gases were not preferentially released from the peripheral part of the fuel column. Local burnup and isotopic content of gamma emitting nuclides were determined by quantitatively evaluating axial gamma scans of the full rods. Nine samples were cut at different axial levels from three of the rods and analysed in two campaigns. More than 50 isotopes of 16 different elements were assessed, most of them by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry after separation with High Performance Liquid Chromatography. In general, these over 400 data points gave a consistent picture of the isotopic content of irradiated fuel as a function of burnup. Only in a few cases, the analysis provided unexpected results that seem to be wrong, in most cases due to unidentified reasons. Sample burnup analysis was performed by comparing experimental isotopic abundances of uranium and plutonium composition as well as neodymium isotopic concentrations with corresponding CASMO based data. The results were in agreement with values derived independently from gamma scanning and from core design data and plant operating records. Measured isotope abundances were finally assessed using the industry standard SAS2H sequence of the SCALE code system. This exercise showed good agreement between measured and calculated values for most of the analysed isotopes, similar to those reported previously for lower burnup ranges. Thus, it could be concluded, that SAS2H results for high burnup samples are not subject to higher uncertainty and/or different biases than for lower burnup samples, and that the different isotopic experimental measurement methods provide accurate results with acceptable precision.

  2. 3D numerical calculations and synthetic observations of magnetized massive dense core collapse and fragmentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commerçon, B.; Hennebelle, P.; Levrier, F.; Launhardt, R.; Henning, Th.

    2012-03-01

    I will present radiation-magneto-hydrodynamics calculations of low-mass and massive dense core collapse, focusing on the first collapse and the first hydrostatic core (first Larson core) formation. The influence of magnetic field and initial mass on the fragmentation properties will be investigated. In the first part reporting low mass dense core collapse calculations, synthetic observations of spectral energy distributions will be derived, as well as classical observational quantities such as bolometric temperature and luminosity. I will show how the dust continuum can help to target first hydrostatic cores and to state about the nature of VeLLOs. Last, I will present synthetic ALMA observation predictions of first hydrostatic cores which may give an answer, if not definitive, to the fragmentation issue at the early Class 0 stage. In the second part, I will report the results of radiation-magneto-hydrodynamics calculations in the context of high mass star formation, using for the first time a self-consistent model for photon emission (i.e. via thermal emission and in radiative shocks) and with the high resolution necessary to resolve properly magnetic braking effects and radiative shocks on scales <100 AU (Commercon, Hennebelle & Henning ApJL 2011). In this study, we investigate the combined effects of magnetic field, turbulence, and radiative transfer on the early phases of the collapse and the fragmentation of massive dense cores (M=100 M_⊙). We identify a new mechanism that inhibits initial fragmentation of massive dense cores, where magnetic field and radiative transfer interplay. We show that this interplay becomes stronger as the magnetic field strength increases. We speculate that highly magnetized massive dense cores are good candidates for isolated massive star formation, while moderately magnetized massive dense cores are more appropriate to form OB associations or small star clusters. Finally we will also present synthetic observations of these collapsing massive dense cores.

  3. Molecular Evolution of A First Core in 3 Dimensional Hydrodynamic Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, K.; Aikawa, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Tomida, K.; Saigo, K.; Tomisaka, K.; Hersant, F.; Wakelam, V.

    2011-05-01

    It is well established that stars are formed by gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores. Collapsing cores initially undergo isothermal collapse. The isothermal condition breaks down at the density of ˜ 10-13 g cm-3, and the temperature starts rising. Increasing gas pressure decelerates the contraction, and the cores come to hydrostatic equilibrium with a radius of a few AU and a mass of ˜ 0.01 M⊙, which is called the first cores (e.g. Larson 1969). Observation of the first cores is important but challenging, since their lifetime is short (˜ 1000 yr). The mechanical property of the first cores have been studied by multi-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations considering interstellar magnetic fields and radiative transfer (e.g. Tomisaka 2002; Machida et al.2008; Tomida et al. 2010). In contrast, their chemical property is yet to be understood. It is important to reveal their chemical property in terms of which lines we should use to observe the first cores. In addition, the first cores evolve to protoplanetary disks (Saigo et al. 2008; Machida et al. 2010), hence the compositions of the first cores restrict the initial compositions of disks. We investigate molecular evolution of star forming cores that are initially rotating molecular cloud cores and collapse to form the first cores. The results of three dimensional hydrodynamic calculations (Matsumoto & Hanawa 2003) are adopted as physical models of the core. We trace trajectories of test particles in the hydrodynamic calculations, and molecular evolution is solved using low temperature chemical network (Garrod & Herbst 2006) at T < 100 K and high temperature network (Harada et al. 2010) at T > 100 K along the trajectories. We also consider three body reactions and collisional dissociations (Willacy et al. 1998). Trace particles fall into the first core almost spherically, and rotate in the first core where the spiral arms transports angular momentum. In our model with barotropic approximation, we find that in outer regions (R > 5 AU), the composition is similar to the low temperature chemistry. In intermediate regions (R ˜3 AU), hot-core like species, such as HCOOCH_3 and CH_3OCH_3 are generated. In central regions (R < 1 AU), complex molecules, such as HC_7N, HC_9N and NH_2CN, are formed in the gas phase.

  4. Inherent safety of minimum-burnup breed and burn reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Qvist, S.; Reenspan, E.

    2012-07-01

    Reactors that aim to sustain the breed and burn (B and B) mode of operation at minimum discharge burnup require excellent neutron economy, Minimum-burnup B and B cores are generally large and feature low neutron leakage probability and a hard neutron spectrum. While highly promising fuel cycles can be achieved with such designs, the very same features are pushing the limits of the core's ability to passively respond safely to unprotected accidents. Low leakage minimum-burnup sodium-cooled B and B cores have a large positive coolant void-worth and coolant temperature reactivity coefficient. In this study, the applicability of major approaches for fast reactor void-worth reduction is evaluated specifically for B and B cores. The design, shuffling scheme and performance of a new metallic-fueled, sodium-cooled minimum burnup B and B core, used as basis for the void-worth reduction analysis, is presented. The analysis shows that reactivity control systems based on passive {sup 6}Li injection during temperature excursions are the only option able to provide negative void-worth without significantly increasing the minimum burnup required for sustaining the B and B mode of operation. A new type of lithium expansion module (LEM) system was developed specifically for B and B cores and its effect on core performance is presented. (authors)

  5. Ab initio multi-irrep symplectic no-core configuration interaction calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, A. E.; Caprio, M. A.; Dytrych, T.

    2015-10-01

    The Sp (3 , R) symplectic symmetry has a close physical connection to both the microscopic shell model and the collective deformation and rotational degrees of freedom. In addition, recent SU(3)-coupled no-core shell model [SU(3)-NCSM] calculations indicate that rotational nuclei have an approximate symplectic symmetry. Ab Initio multi-irrep symplectic no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations combine the traditional symplectic model with the SU(3)-NCSM to extend the range of NCCI calculations beyond the p-shell nuclei. Moreover, carrying out calculations in a symplectic basis provides a natural framework in which to study the emerging rotational behavior observed in NCCI calculations. We present key elements of this framework and initial calculations. Supported by the US DOE under grants DE-FG02-95ER-40934 and DE-SC0005248 and by the US National Science Foundation under Grant No. OCI-0904874.

  6. Performance of relativistic effective core potentials in DFT calculations on actinide compounds.

    PubMed

    Odoh, Samuel O; Schreckenbach, Georg

    2010-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations using relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs) have emerged as a robust and fast method of calculating the structural parameters and energy changes of the thermochemical reactions of actinide complexes. A comparative investigation of the performance of the Stuttgart small-core and large-core RECPs in DFT calculations has been carried out. The vibrational frequencies and reaction enthalpy changes of several uranium(VI) compounds computed using these RECPs were compared to those obtained using DFT and a four-component one-electron scalar relativistic approximation of the full Dirac equation with large all-electron basis sets (AE). The relativistic AE method is a full solution of the Dirac equation with all spin components separated out. This method gives the "correct" answer (with respect to scalar relativity) which should be closest to experimental values when an adequate density functional is used and in the absence of significant spin-orbit effects. The small-core RECP always show better agreement with the four-component scalar- relativistic AE method than the large-core RECP. We conclude that the 5s, 5p, and 5d orbitals are of great importance in determining the chemistry of actinide complexes. Instances in which large-core RECPs give better agreement with experimental data are attributed to either experimental uncertainties or error cancellations. PMID:20039716

  7. Time delays between core power production and external detector response from Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1996-08-01

    One primary concern for design of safety systems for reactors is the time response of external detectors to changes in the core. This paper describes a way to estimate the time delay between the core power production and the external detector response using Monte Carlo calculations and suggests a technique to measure the time delay. The Monte Carlo code KENO-NR was used to determine the time delay between the core power production and the external detector response for a conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. The Monte Carlo estimated time delay was determined to be about 10 ms for this conceptual design of the ANS reactor.

  8. RMC - A Monte Carlo Code for Reactor Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Li, Zeguang; She, Ding; Liang, Jin'gang; Xu, Qi; Qiu, Yishu; Yu, Jiankai; Sun, Jialong; Fan, Xiao; Yu, Ganglin

    2014-06-01

    A new Monte Carlo transport code RMC has been being developed by Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing as a tool for reactor core analysis on high-performance computing platforms. To meet the requirements of reactor analysis, RMC now has such functions as criticality calculation, fixed-source calculation, burnup calculation and kinetics simulations. Some techniques for geometry treatment, new burnup algorithm, source convergence acceleration, massive tally and parallel calculation, and temperature dependent cross sections processing are researched and implemented in RMC to improve the effciency. Validation results of criticality calculation, burnup calculation, source convergence acceleration, tallies performance and parallel performance shown in this paper prove the capabilities of RMC in dealing with reactor analysis problems with good performances.

  9. Interaction of loading pattern and nuclear data uncertainties in reactor core calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.; Gallner, L.; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B.; Pautz, A.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W.

    2012-07-01

    Along with best-estimate calculations for design and safety analysis, understanding uncertainties is important to determine appropriate design margins. In this framework, nuclear data uncertainties and their propagation to full core calculations are a critical issue. To deal with this task, different error propagation techniques, deterministic and stochastic are currently developed to evaluate the uncertainties in the output quantities. Among these is the sampling based uncertainty and sensitivity software XSUSA which is able to quantify the influence of nuclear data covariance on reactor core calculations. In the present work, this software is used to investigate systematically the uncertainties in the power distributions of two PWR core loadings specified in the OECD UAM-Benchmark suite. With help of a statistical sensitivity analysis, the main contributors to the uncertainty are determined. Using this information a method is studied with which loading patterns of reactor cores can be optimized with regard to minimizing power distribution uncertainties. It is shown that this technique is able to halve the calculation uncertainties of a MOX/UOX core configuration. (authors)

  10. An improved energy-collapsing method for core-reflector modelization in SFR core calculations using the PARIS platform

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, J. F.; Archier, P.; Calloo, A.; Jacquet, P.; Tommasi, J.; Le Tellier, R.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project, sodium cooled fast reactor studies are conducted at CEA in compliance with GEN IV reactors criteria, particularly for safety requirements. An improved safety requires better calculation tools to obtain accurate reactivity effects (especially sodium void effect) and power map distributions. The current calculation route lies on the JEFF3.1.1 library and the classical two-step approach performed with the ECCO module of the ERANOS code system at the assembly level and the Sn SNATCH solver - implemented within the PARIS platform - at the core level. 33-group cross sections used by SNATCH are collapsed from 1968-group self-shielded cross-section with a specific flux-current weighting. Recent studies have shown that this collapsing is non-conservative when dealing with core-reflector interface and can lead to reactivity discrepancies larger than 500 pcm in the case of a steel reflector. Such a discrepancy is due to the flux anisotropy at the interface, which is not taken into account when cross sections are obtained from separate fuel and reflector assembly calculations. A new approach is proposed in this paper. It consists in separating the self-shielding and the flux calculations. The first one is still performed with ECCO on separate patterns. The second one is done with SNATCH on a 1D traverse, representative of the core-reflector interface. An improved collapsing method using angular flux moments is then carried out to collapse the cross sections onto the 33-group structure. In the case of a simplified ZONA2B 2D homogeneous benchmark, results in terms of k{sub eff} and power map are strongly improved for a small increase of the computing time. (authors)

  11. Sensitivity of ex-core neutron detectors to vibrations of PWR fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; Renier, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The response of an ex-core neutron detector to fuel assembly vibrations in an 1150-MWe Westinghouse pressurized-water reactor (PWR) was determined by performing space-dependent reactor-kinetics calculations. The effect on the detector response of reducing the soluble-boron concentration in the coolant and fuel burnup over the first fuel cycle was also determined. The results of the calculations indicate that the ex-core neutron detectors are sensitive to fuel-assembly vibrations occurring over large spatial regions of the core, and that the detector response increases with fuel burnup and decreasing soluble-boron concentration.

  12. Local Burn-Up Effects in the NBSR Fuel Element

    SciTech Connect

    Brown N. R.; Hanson A.; Diamond, D.

    2013-01-31

    This study addresses the over-prediction of local power when the burn-up distribution in each half-element of the NBSR is assumed to be uniform. A single-element model was utilized to quantify the impact of axial and plate-wise burn-up on the power distribution within the NBSR fuel elements for both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. To validate this approach, key parameters in the single-element model were compared to parameters from an equilibrium core model, including neutron energy spectrum, power distribution, and integral U-235 vector. The power distribution changes significantly when incorporating local burn-up effects and has lower power peaking relative to the uniform burn-up case. In the uniform burn-up case, the axial relative power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 59% in the HEU single-element and 46% in the LEU single-element with uniform burn-up. In the uniform burn-up case, the plate-wise power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 23% in the HEU single-element and 18% in the LEU single-element. The degree of over-prediction increases as a function of burn-up cycle, with the greatest over-prediction at the end of Cycle 8. The thermal flux peak is always in the mid-plane gap; this causes the local cumulative burn-up near the mid-plane gap to be significantly higher than the fuel element average. Uniform burn-up distribution throughout a half-element also causes a bias in fuel element reactivity worth, due primarily to the neutronic importance of the fissile inventory in the mid-plane gap region.

  13. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  14. Development code for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input on the MCNPX for neutronic calculation in PWR core

    SciTech Connect

    Hartini, Entin Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan

    2014-09-30

    This research was carried out on the development of code for uncertainty analysis is based on a statistical approach for assessing the uncertainty input parameters. In the butn-up calculation of fuel, uncertainty analysis performed for input parameters fuel density, coolant density and fuel temperature. This calculation is performed during irradiation using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport. The Uncertainty method based on the probabilities density function. Development code is made in python script to do coupling with MCNPX for criticality and burn-up calculations. Simulation is done by modeling the geometry of PWR terrace, with MCNPX on the power 54 MW with fuel type UO2 pellets. The calculation is done by using the data library continuous energy cross-sections ENDF / B-VI. MCNPX requires nuclear data in ACE format. Development of interfaces for obtaining nuclear data in the form of ACE format of ENDF through special process NJOY calculation to temperature changes in a certain range.

  15. Development code for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input on the MCNPX for neutronic calculation in PWR core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan

    2014-09-01

    This research was carried out on the development of code for uncertainty analysis is based on a statistical approach for assessing the uncertainty input parameters. In the butn-up calculation of fuel, uncertainty analysis performed for input parameters fuel density, coolant density and fuel temperature. This calculation is performed during irradiation using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport. The Uncertainty method based on the probabilities density function. Development code is made in python script to do coupling with MCNPX for criticality and burn-up calculations. Simulation is done by modeling the geometry of PWR terrace, with MCNPX on the power 54 MW with fuel type UO2 pellets. The calculation is done by using the data library continuous energy cross-sections ENDF / B-VI. MCNPX requires nuclear data in ACE format. Development of interfaces for obtaining nuclear data in the form of ACE format of ENDF through special process NJOY calculation to temperature changes in a certain range.

  16. Coke burnup in a dry coke quenching device and methods of decreasing it

    SciTech Connect

    Filonenko, Yu.Ya.; Naumkin, V.A.; Eremenko, G.N.; Sobolev, S.Ya.; Rusakov, Yu.V.

    1984-01-01

    Decreasing coke burnup in a coke dry quenching device is one method of improving the technicoeconomic indices of its functioning. Unfortunately, at present there is no standard method of calculating coke burnup. This prevents a thorough analysis to be made of the efficiency of the functioning of either individual dry coke quenching device (DCQD) chambers or the devices in general. Coke burnup in a DCQD can be calculated from the equation for the thermal balance of the system. The calculation method is described.

  17. New Soft-Core Potential Function for Molecular Dynamics Based Alchemical Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Gapsys, Vytautas; Seeliger, Daniel; de Groot, Bert L

    2012-07-10

    The fields of rational drug design and protein engineering benefit from accurate free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations. A thermodynamic integration scheme is often used to calculate changes in the free energy of a system by integrating the change of the system's Hamiltonian with respect to a coupling parameter. These methods exploit nonphysical pathways over thermodynamic cycles involving particle introduction and annihilation. Such alchemical transitions require the modification of the classical nonbonded potential energy terms by applying soft-core potential functions to avoid singularity points. In this work, we propose a novel formulation for a soft-core potential to be applied in nonequilibrium free energy calculations that alleviates singularities, numerical instabilities, and additional minima in the potential energy for all combinations of nonbonded interactions at all intermediate alchemical states. The method was validated by application to (a) the free energy calculations of a closed thermodynamic cycle, (b) the mutation influence on protein thermostability, (c) calculations of small ligand solvation free energies, and (d) the estimation of binding free energies of trypsin inhibitors. The results show that the novel soft-core function provides a robust and accurate general purpose solution to alchemical free energy calculations. PMID:26588970

  18. Neutronic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core

    SciTech Connect

    Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E.; Grigoriadis, D.

    2008-07-15

    For a five-year transitional period the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) was operating with a mixed core, containing both Low Enrichment (LEU) and High Enrichment (HEU) Uranium MTR- type fuel assemblies. The neutronic study of the GRR-1 conversion to LEU has been performed using a code system comprising the core-analysis code CITATION-LDI2 and the cell-calculation modules XSDRNPM and NITAWL-II of the SCALE code. A conceptual LEU core configuration was defined and analyzed with respect to the three dimensional multi-group neutron fluxes, the power distribution, the control-rod worth and the compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. Perturbation calculations and reactivity feedback computations were also carried out to provide input to a subsequent thermal-hydraulic study. (author)

  19. VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmark: Results of ORNL Calculations Using HELIOS-1.4 - Revised Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, RJ

    2001-06-01

    The Task Force on Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition (TFRPD) was formed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) to study reactor physics, fuel performance, and fuel cycle issues related to the disposition of weapons-grade (WG) plutonium as mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel. To advance the goals of the TFRPD, 10 countries and 12 institutions participated in a major TFRPD activity: a blind benchmark study to compare code calculations to experimental data for the VENUS-2 MOX core at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the HELIOS-1.4 code system was used to perform the comprehensive study of pin-cell and MOX core calculations for the VENUS-2 MOX core benchmark study.

  20. Electronic Structure Calculations and Adaptation Scheme in Multi-core Computing Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Seshagiri, Lakshminarasimhan; Sosonkina, Masha; Zhang, Zhao

    2009-05-20

    Multi-core processing environments have become the norm in the generic computing environment and are being considered for adding an extra dimension to the execution of any application. The T2 Niagara processor is a very unique environment where it consists of eight cores having a capability of running eight threads simultaneously in each of the cores. Applications like General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure (GAMESS), used for ab-initio molecular quantum chemistry calculations, can be good indicators of the performance of such machines and would be a guideline for both hardware designers and application programmers. In this paper we try to benchmark the GAMESS performance on a T2 Niagara processor for a couple of molecules. We also show the suitability of using a middleware based adaptation algorithm on GAMESS on such a multi-core environment.

  1. Isotopic Bias and Uncertainty for Burnup Credit Applications

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Scaglione

    2002-08-19

    The application of burnup credit requires calculating the isotopic inventory of the irradiated fuel. The depletion calculation simulates the burnup of the fuel under reactor operating conditions. The result of the depletion analysis is the predicted isotopic composition, which is ultimately input to a criticality analysis to determine the system multiplication factor (k{sub eff}). This paper demonstrates an approach for calculating the isotopic bias and uncertainty in k{sub eff} for commercial spent nuclear fuel burnup credit. This paper covers 74 different radiochemical assayed spent fuel samples from 22 different fuel assemblies that were irradiated in eight different pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The samples evaluated span an enrichment range of 2.556 wt% U-235 through 4.67 wt% U-235, and burnups from 6.92 GWd/MTU through 55.7 GWd/MTU.

  2. High-resolution Valence and Core Excitation Spectra via First-Principles Calculations and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Eric; Fossard, F.; Gilmore, K.; Hug, G.; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F.

    We calculate the optical and C K-edge near edge spectra of crystalline and molecular C60 measured with high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The calculations are carried out using at least three different methods: Bethe-Salpeter calculations using the NIST Bethe-Salpeter Equation solver (NBSE) in the valence and OCEAN (Obtaining Core Excitation with Ab initio methods and NBSE) suite [Gilmore et al., Comp. Phys. Comm., (2015)]; excited-core-hole calculations using XCH [D. Prendergast and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 215502 (2006)]; and constrained occupancy using StoBe (Stockholm-Berlin core-excitation code) [StoBe-deMon version 3.0, K. Hermann et al. (2009)]. They include self-energy effects, lifetime-damping, and Debye-Waller effects. A comparison of spectral features to those observed illustrates the sensitivity of certain features to computation details (e.g., self-energy corrections and core-hole screening). This may point to limitations of various approximations, e.g. in conventional BSE paradigm and/or the incomplete treatment of vibrational effects. Supported in part by DOE BES Grant DE-FG03-97ER45623 (JJR, JJK, FV).

  3. Use of Relativistic Effective Core Potentials in the Calculation of Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Kim, Yong-Ki

    1999-01-01

    Based on the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, the advantage of using relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) in the calculation of total ionization cross sections of heavy atoms or molecules containing heavy atoms is discussed. Numerical examples for Ar, Kr, Xe, and WF6 are presented.

  4. Validation Work to Support the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Calculational Burnup Methodology Using Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Spent Fuel Assay Data

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz

    1999-08-01

    Six uranium isotopes and fourteen fission product isotopes were calculated on a mass basis at end-of-life (EOL) conditions for three fuel rods from different Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) measurements. The three fuel rods evaluated here were taken from an LWBR seed module, a standard blanket module, and a reflector (Type IV) module. The calculated results were derived using a depletion methodology previously employed to evaluate many of the radionuclide inventories for spent nuclear fuels at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The primary goal of the calculational task was to further support the validation of this particular calculational methodology and its application to diverse reactor types and fuels. Result comparisons between the calculated and measured mass concentrations in the three rods indicate good agreement for the three major uranium isotopes (U-233, U-234, U-235) with differences of less than 20%. For the seed and standard blanket rod, the U-233 and U-234 differences were within 5% of the measured values (these two isotopes alone represent greater than 97% of the EOL total uranium mass). For the major krypton and xenon fission product isotopes, differences of less than 20% and less than 30% were observed, respectively. In general, good agreement was obtained for nearly all the measured isotopes. For these isotopes exhibiting significant differences, possible explanations are discussed in terms of measurement uncertainty, complex transmutations, etc.

  5. Validation of finite difference core diffusion calculation methods with FEM and NEM for VVER-1000 MWe reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannathan, V.; Singh, T.; Pal, U.; Karthikeyan, R.; Sundaram, G.

    2006-07-01

    India is developing several in-house fuel management codes for the design evaluation of WER-1000 M We reactors, being built at Kudankulam, Tamil Nadu in collaboration with Russian Federation. A lattice burnup code EXCEL provides the few group lattice parameters of various fuel assembly types constituting the core. The core diffusion analyses have been performed by two methods. In the first method the entire fuel assembly is treated as a single homogenized cell. Each fuel assembly cell is divided into 6n{sup 2} triangles, where 'n' is the number of uniform divisions on a side of the hexagon. Regular triangular meshes are used in the active core as well as in surrounding reflector regions. This method is incorporated in the code TRIHEXFA. In the second method a pin by pin description of the core is accomplished by considering the few group lattice parameters generated by EXCEL code for various fuel and non-fuel cells in each fuel assembly. Regular hexagonal cells of one pin pitch are considered in the core and reflector regions. This method is incorporated in HEXPIN code. Both these codes use centre mesh finite difference method (FDM) for regular triangular or hexagonal meshes. It is well known that the large size of the WER fuel assembly, the zigzag structure of the core-baffle zone, the distribution of water tubes of different diameter in this baffle zone and the surrounding steel and water layers of different thickness, all lead to a very complex description of the core-reflector interface. We are analyzing the WER core in fresh state by two other approaches to obtain independent benchmark reference solutions. They are finite element method (FEM) and nodal expansion method (NEM). The few group cross sections of EXCEL are used in the FEM and NEM analyses. The paper would present the comparison of the results of core followup simulations of FD codes with those of FEM and NEM analyses. (authors)

  6. Calculation of ex-core physical quantities using the 3D importance functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakas, Christos; De Laubiere, Xavier

    2014-06-01

    Diverse physical quantities are calculated in engineering studies with penalizing hypotheses to assure the required operation margins for each reactor. Today, these physical quantities are obtained by direct calculations from deterministic or Monte Carlo codes. The related states are critical or sub-critical. The current physical quantities are for example: the SRD counting rates (source range detector) in the sub-critical state, the IRD (intermediary range detector) and PRD (power range detector) counting rates (neutron particles only), the deposited energy in the reflector (neutron + photon particles), the fluence or the DPA (displacement per atom) in the reactor vessel (neutron particles only). The reliability of the proposed methodology is tested in the EPR reactor. The main advantage of the new methodology is the simplicity to obtain the physical quantities by an easy matrix calculation importance linked to nuclear power sources for all the cycles of the reactor. This method also allows to by-pass the direct calculations of the physical quantity of irradiated cores by Monte Carlo Codes, these calculations being impossible today (too many isotopic concentrations / MCNP5 limit). This paper presents the first feasibility study for the physical quantities calculation outside of the core by the importance method instead of the direct calculations used currently by AREVA.

  7. An improved resonance self-shielding method for heterogeneous fast reactor assembly and core calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Yang, W. S.

    2013-07-01

    An improved resonance self-shielding method has been developed to accurately estimate the effective multigroup cross sections for heterogeneous fast reactor assembly and core calculations. In the method, the heterogeneity effect is considered by the use of isotopic escape cross sections while the resonance interference effect is accounted for through the narrow resonance approximation or slowing-down calculations for specific compositions. The isotopic escape cross sections are calculated by solving fixed-source transport equations with the method of characteristics for the whole problem domain. This method requires no pre-calculated resonance integral tables or parameters that are typically necessary in the subgroup method. Preliminary results for multi pin-cell fast reactor problems show that the escape cross sections estimated from the explicit-geometry fixed source calculations produce more accurate eigenvalue and self-shielded effective cross sections than those from conventional one-dimensional geometry models. (authors)

  8. TORT/MCNP coupling method for the calculation of neutron flux around a core of BWR.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    For the analysis of BWR neutronics performance, accurate data are required for neutron flux distribution over the In-Reactor Pressure Vessel equipments taking into account the detailed geometrical arrangement. The TORT code can calculate neutron flux around a core of BWR in a three-dimensional geometry model, but has difficulties in fine geometrical modelling and lacks huge computer resource. On the other hand, the MCNP code enables the calculation of the neutron flux with a detailed geometry model, but requires very long sampling time to give enough number of particles. Therefore, a TORT/MCNP coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this method, the TORT code calculates angular flux distribution on the core surface and the MCNP code calculates neutron spectrum at the points of interest using the flux distribution. The coupling method will be used as the DOT-DOMINO-MORSE code system. This TORT/MCNP coupling method was applied to calculate the neutron flux at points where induced radioactivity data were measured for 54Mn and 60Co and the radioactivity calculations based on the neutron flux obtained from the above method were compared with the measured data. PMID:16604689

  9. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity of Liquid Iron at Core Pressures and Temperatures: First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koker, N.; Steinle-Neumann, G.; Vlček, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ability of liquid iron to transport heat and electric charge by conduction at extreme pressure and temperature is of paramount importance to the thermal history of the core. Thermal conductivity determines the amount of heat conducted along the core adiabat, i.e. heat not available for generation of the magnetic field, and also strongly controls the time required for the inner core to reach its current size. Electrical conductivity sets the rate of magnetic field dissipation, and consequently the amount of energy required to sustain the geodynamo. Also, because these properties tightly control the heat budget within the core, they dictate the extent to which radiogenic heat need to be invoked to obtain thermal history models that are in agreement with geophysical and paleomagnetic observations. Current estimates for electrical conductivity of iron at conditions characteristic of Earth's core are rather uncertain, constraining the value only to within a factor of three. Thermal conductivity values are subsequently obtained by applying the Wiedemann-Franz relation, the validity of which has not been rigorously shown at extreme pressures. In addition, electronic transport properties are expected to depend strongly on pressure (P) and temperature (T), as well as on the concentration (X) of light elements in the liquid metal. However, with no data available on these variations, geophysical studies in which these values are applied invariably assume them to be constant. In an effort to improve our understanding of the P-T-X behavior of electronic transport properties in the core, and also to test the various assumptions made in their determination, we have performed first-principles calculations of the electrical and thermal conductivity of liquid iron over a large range of pressure and temperature conditions, including those characteristic of Earth's core. Compositions respectively doped with silicon, oxygen and sulphur are also considered. These calculations involve using first-principles molecular dynamics to generate a series of uncorrelated liquid structures at constant temperature and density, for which the electronic transport properties are then computed using the Kubo-Greenwood equation. Our aim is to construct a parameterized model for the thermal and electrical conductivity of liquid iron as a function of pressure, temperature and light element composition, which can be applied in geodynamo simulations and thermal history models for planetary cores. Preliminary results indicate a strong pressure and temperature dependence, with the Wiedemann-Franz relation only approximately satisfied. Implications of these results for models of the thermal history of the core will be considered and discussed.

  10. VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmark: Results of ORNL Calculations Using HELIOS-1.4

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, RJ

    2001-02-02

    The Task Force on Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition, now an Expert Group, was set up through the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency to facilitate technical assessments of burning weapons-grade plutonium mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in U.S. pressurized-water reactors and Russian VVER nuclear reactors. More than ten countries participated to advance the work of the Task Force in a major initiative, which was a blind benchmark study to compare code benchmark calculations against experimental data for the VENUS-2 MOX core at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the HELIOS-1.4 code was used to perform a comprehensive study of pin-cell and core calculations for the VENUS-2 benchmark.

  11. Liquid iron-sulfur alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei; Imada, Saori; Nakajima, Yoichi; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2014-10-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate liquid iron-sulfur alloys (Fe, Fe56S8, Fe52S12, and Fe48S16) under high-pressure and high-temperature (150-300 GPa and 4000-6000 K) conditions corresponding to the Earth's outer core. Considering only the density profile, the best match with the preliminary reference Earth model is by liquid Fe-14 wt % S (Fe50S14), assuming sulfur is the only light element. However, its bulk sound velocity is too high, in particular in the deep outer core, suggesting that another light component such as oxygen is required. An experimental check using inelastic X-ray scattering shows good agreement with the calculations. In addition, a present study demonstrates that the Birch's law does not hold for liquid iron-sulfur alloy, consistent with a previous report on pure liquid iron.

  12. Development of the MCNPX depletion capability: A Monte Carlo linked depletion method that automates the coupling between MCNPX and CINDER90 for high fidelity burnup calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensin, Michael Lorne

    Monte Carlo-linked depletion methods have gained recent interest due to the ability to more accurately model complex 3-dimesional geometries and better track the evolution of temporal nuclide inventory by simulating the actual physical process utilizing continuous energy coefficients. The integration of CINDER90 into the MCNPX Monte Carlo radiation transport code provides a high-fidelity completely self-contained Monte-Carlo-linked depletion capability in a well established, widely accepted Monte Carlo radiation transport code that is compatible with most nuclear criticality (KCODE) particle tracking features in MCNPX. MCNPX depletion tracks all necessary reaction rates and follows as many isotopes as cross section data permits in order to achieve a highly accurate temporal nuclide inventory solution. This work chronicles relevant nuclear history, surveys current methodologies of depletion theory, details the methodology in applied MCNPX and provides benchmark results for three independent OECD/NEA benchmarks. Relevant nuclear history, from the Oklo reactor two billion years ago to the current major United States nuclear fuel cycle development programs, is addressed in order to supply the motivation for the development of this technology. A survey of current reaction rate and temporal nuclide inventory techniques is then provided to offer justification for the depletion strategy applied within MCNPX. The MCNPX depletion strategy is then dissected and each code feature is detailed chronicling the methodology development from the original linking of MONTEBURNS and MCNP to the most recent public release of the integrated capability (MCNPX 2.6.F). Calculation results of the OECD/NEA Phase IB benchmark, H. B. Robinson benchmark and OECD/NEA Phase IVB are then provided. The acceptable results of these calculations offer sufficient confidence in the predictive capability of the MCNPX depletion method. This capability sets up a significant foundation, in a well established and supported radiation transport code, for further development of a Monte Carlo-linked depletion methodology which is essential to the future development of advanced reactor technologies that exceed the limitations of current deterministic based methods.

  13. Efficient implementation of core-excitation Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, K.; Vinson, John; Shirley, E. L.; Prendergast, D.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Kas, J. J.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an efficient implementation of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) method for obtaining core-level spectra including X-ray absorption (XAS), X-ray emission (XES), and both resonant and non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra (N/RIXS). Calculations are based on density functional theory (DFT) electronic structures generated either by ABINIT or QuantumESPRESSO, both plane-wave basis, pseudopotential codes. This electronic structure is improved through the inclusion of a GW self energy. The projector augmented wave technique is used to evaluate transition matrix elements between core-level and band states. Final two-particle scattering states are obtained with the NIST core-level BSE solver (NBSE). We have previously reported this implementation, which we refer to as OCEAN (Obtaining Core Excitations from Ab initio electronic structure and NBSE) (Vinson et al., 2011). Here, we present additional efficiencies that enable us to evaluate spectra for systems ten times larger than previously possible; containing up to a few thousand electrons. These improvements include the implementation of optimal basis functions that reduce the cost of the initial DFT calculations, more complete parallelization of the screening calculation and of the action of the BSE Hamiltonian, and various memory reductions. Scaling is demonstrated on supercells of SrTiO3 and example spectra for the organic light emitting molecule Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3) are presented. The ability to perform large-scale spectral calculations is particularly advantageous for investigating dilute or non-periodic systems such as doped materials, amorphous systems, or complex nano-structures.

  14. Parametric calculation of pulse transformer with open magnetic cores based on magnetostatic-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin-xiong; Liu, Jin-liang

    2013-01-01

    An analytical method for calculating the magnetostatic field of a pulse transformer with open magnetic cores is put forward in this paper, and formulas for calculating inductances of a small aspect-ratio transformer are derived. In comparison to results calculated by finite element magnetostatic-field simulations, the calculated values of inductance of primary winding L1 and the inductance of secondary winding L2 have a relative error of about 5%, while the error of the coupling coefficient (k) is less than 2%. Meanwhile, the effect of current nonuniformity in the primary winding on magnetizing inductance is studied. According to the calculated results, this effect reduces the magnetizing inductance and the coupling coefficient of the transformer, and can lead to an overvoltage phenomenon on the secondary winding. A small aspect-ratio pulse transformer with open magnetic cores is developed, which has a small size of 250mm×150mm in length and diameter, respectively. Inductances of the transformer are measured. The measured results conform to the law obtained in this work. Tests of the pulsed transformer are carried out. Experimental results show that the transformer can export a high-voltage pulse with an amplitude of 310 kV and full width at half maximum of 1μs.

  15. Methodology of full-core Monte Carlo calculations with leakage parameter evaluations for benchmark critical experiment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboev, A. G.; Ilyashenko, A. S.; Vetrova, O. A.

    1997-02-01

    The method of bucking evaluation, realized in the MOnte Carlo code MCS, is described. This method was applied for calculational analysis of well known light water experiments TRX-1 and TRX-2. The analysis of this comparison shows, that there is no coincidence between Monte Carlo calculations, obtained by different ways: the MCS calculations with given experimental bucklings; the MCS calculations with given bucklings evaluated on base of full core MCS direct simulations; the full core MCNP and MCS direct simulations; the MCNP and MCS calculations, where the results of cell calculations are corrected by the coefficients taking into the account the leakage from the core. Also the buckling values evaluated by full core MCS calculations have differed from experimental ones, especially in the case of TRX-1, when this difference has corresponded to 0.5 percent increase of Keff value.

  16. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2011-09-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Previously, the design of the LEU fuel had been determined in order to provide the users of the NBSR with the same cycle length as exists for the current HEU fueled reactor. The fuel composition at different points within an equilibrium fuel cycle had also been determined. In the present study, neutronics parameters have been calculated for these times in the fuel cycle for both the existing HEU and the proposed LEU equilibrium cores. The results showed differences between the HEU and LEU cores that would not lead to any significant changes in the safety analysis for the converted core. In general the changes were reasonable except that the figure-of-merit for neutrons that can be used by experimentalists shows there will be a 10% reduction in performance. The calculations included kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions.

  17. Liquid iron-hydrogen alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei

    2015-09-01

    We examined the density, bulk sound (compressional) velocity, and Grüneisen parameter of liquid pure Fe, Fe100H28 (0.50 wt % H), Fe88H40 (0.81 wt % H), and Fe76H52 (1.22 wt % H) at Earth's outer core pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions (~100 to 350 GPa, 4000 to 7000 K) based on first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. The results demonstrate that the thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of liquid iron alloy decreases with increasing pressure, temperature, and hydrogen concentration, indicating a relatively small temperature gradient in the outer core when hydrogen is present. Along such temperature profile, both the density and compressional velocity of liquid iron containing ~1 wt % hydrogen match seismological observations. It suggests that hydrogen could be a primary light element in the core, although the shear velocity of the inner core is not reconciled with solid Fe-H alloy and thus requires another impurity element.

  18. Statistical error propagation in ab initio no-core full configuration calculations of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro Prez, R.; Amaro, J. E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    We propagate the statistical uncertainty of experimental N N scattering data into the binding energy of 3H and 4He. We also study the sensitivity of the magnetic moment and proton radius of the 3H to changes in the N N interaction. The calculations are made with the no-core full configuration method in a sufficiently large harmonic oscillator basis. For those light nuclei we obtain ? Estat(3H) =0.015 MeV and ? Estat(4He) =0.055 MeV .

  19. Energy-Deposition and Damage Calculations in Core-Vessel Inserts at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.

    2002-06-25

    Heat-deposition and damage calculations are described for core-vessel inserts in the target area of the Spallation Neutron Source. Two separate designs for these inserts (or neutron beam tubes) were studied; a single-unit insert and a multi-unit insert. The single unit contains a neutron guide; the multi unit does not. Both units are constructed of stainless steel. For the single unit, separate studies were carried out with the guide composed of stainless steel, glass, and aluminum. Results are also reported for an aluminum window on the front of the insert, a layer of nickel on the guide, a cadmium shield surrounding the guide, and a stainless steel plug in the beam-tube opening. The locations of both inserts were the most forward positions to be occupied by each design respectively thus ensuring that the calculations are conservative.

  20. Designing Critical Experiments in Support of Full Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Don; Roberts, Jeremy A

    2008-01-01

    Burnup credit is the process of accounting for the negative reactivity due to fuel burnup and generation of parasitic absorbers over fuel assembly lifetime. For years, the fresh fuel assumption was used as a simple bound in criticality work for used fuel storage and transportation. More recently, major actinides have been included [1]. However, even this yields a highly conservative estimate in criticality calculations. Because of the numerous economical benefits including all available negative reactivity (i.e., full burnup credit) could provide [2], it is advantageous to work toward full burnup credit. Unfortunately, comparatively little work has been done to include non-major actinides and other fission products (FP) in burnup credit analyses due in part to insufficient experimental data for validation of codes and nuclear data. The Burnup Credit Criticality Experiment (BUCCX) at Sandia National Laboratory was a set of experiments with {sup 103}Rh that have relevance for burnup credit [3]. This work uses TSUNAMI-3D to investigate and adjust a BUCCX model to match isotope-specific, energy-dependent k{sub eff} sensitivity profiles to those of a representative high-capacity cask model (GBC-32) [4] for each FP of interest. The isotopes considered are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 143}Nd, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 155}Gd, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 95}Mo, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 101}Ru, and {sup 151}Eu. The goal is to understand the biases and bias uncertainties inherent in nuclear data, and ultimately, to apply these in support of full burnup credit.

  1. Burnup estimation of fuel sourcing radioactive material based on monitored Cs and Pu isotopic activity ratios in Fukushima N. P. S. accident

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ando, Y.

    2012-07-01

    After the severe core damage of Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Station, radioactive material leaked from the reactor buildings. As part of monitoring of radioactivity in the site, measurements of radioactivity in soils at three fixed points have been performed for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs with gamma-ray spectrometry and for Pu, Pu, and {sup 240}Pu with {alpha}-ray spectrometry. Correlations of radioactivity ratios of {sup 134}Cs to {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 238}Pu to the sum of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu with fuel burnup were studied by using theoretical burnup calculations and measurements on isotopic inventories, and compared with the Cs and Pu radioactivity rations in the soils. The comparison indicated that the burnup of the fuel sourcing the radioactivity was from 18 to 38 GWd/t, which corresponded to that of the fuel in the highest power and, therefore, the highest decay heat in operating high-burnup fueled BWR cores. (authors)

  2. A multi-platform linking code for fuel burnup and radiotoxicity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, R.; Pereira, C.; Veloso, M. A. F.; Cardoso, F.; Costa, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A linking code between ORIGEN2.1 and MCNP has been developed at the Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear/UFMG to calculate coupled neutronic/isotopic results for nuclear systems and to produce a large number of criticality, burnup and radiotoxicity results. In its previous version, it evaluated the isotopic composition evolution in a Heat Pipe Power System model as well as the radiotoxicity and radioactivity during lifetime cycles. In the new version, the code presents features such as multi-platform execution and automatic results analysis. Improvements made in the code allow it to perform simulations in a simpler and faster way without compromising accuracy. Initially, the code generates a new input for MCNP based on the decisions of the user. After that, MCNP is run and data, such as recoverable energy per prompt fission neutron, reaction rates and keff, are automatically extracted from the output and used to calculate neutron flux and cross sections. These data are then used to construct new ORIGEN inputs, one for each cell in the core. Each new input is run on ORIGEN and generates outputs that represent the complete isotopic composition of the core on that time step. The results show good agreement between GB (Coupled Neutronic/Isotopic code) and Monteburns (Automated, Multi-Step Monte Carlo Burnup Code System), developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  3. Hybrid parallel code acceleration methods in full-core reactor physics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courau, T.; Plagne, L.; Ponicot, A.; Sjoden, G.

    2012-07-01

    When dealing with nuclear reactor calculation schemes, the need for three dimensional (3D) transport-based reference solutions is essential for both validation and optimization purposes. Considering a benchmark problem, this work investigates the potential of discrete ordinates (Sn) transport methods applied to 3D pressurized water reactor (PWR) full-core calculations. First, the benchmark problem is described. It involves a pin-by-pin description of a 3D PWR first core, and uses a 8-group cross-section library prepared with the DRAGON cell code. Then, a convergence analysis is performed using the PENTRAN parallel Sn Cartesian code. It discusses the spatial refinement and the associated angular quadrature required to properly describe the problem physics. It also shows that initializing the Sn solution with the EDF SPN solver COCAGNE reduces the number of iterations required to converge by nearly a factor of 6. Using a best estimate model, PENTRAN results are then compared to multigroup Monte Carlo results obtained with the MCNP5 code. Good consistency is observed between the two methods (Sn and Monte Carlo), with discrepancies that are less than 25 pcm for the k{sub eff}, and less than 2.1% and 1.6% for the flux at the pin-cell level and for the pin-power distribution, respectively. (authors)

  4. Establishment of consistent benchmark framework for performing high-fidelity whole core transport/diffusion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bergiers, C.; Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a benchmark framework established as a basis for investigation of the validity of multi-group approximation with respect to the continuous energy approach, of the level of spatial homogenization with respect to heterogeneous solution, and of the level of angular approximation to the linear Boltzmann transport equation in respect to the Monte Carlo reference solution. Several steady-state solutions of this benchmark have been generated using three different computer codes focusing on the two-dimensional (2-D) geometry model. MCNP5 has been used to generate the reference solution using the continuous energy library. HELIOS is then used for both to solve the problem using a 45 group cross-section library and to generate new sets of few-group cross-sections for the core simulator NEM. The results from the diffusion option of the NEM code on pin-by-pin and Fuel Assembly (FA) basis are presented and discussed in the paper. The benchmark is being designed for evaluation of number of energy groups (number of energy groups and energy cut off points) and spatial (homogenized assembly level vs. homogenized pin cell level) representation needed for high-fidelity reactor core calculation schemes developed at the Pennsylvania State Univ. such as NEM SP3, hybrid NEM-BEM and some recent developments of embedded three-dimensional pin-by-pin diffusion / SP3 finite element calculation schemes. (authors)

  5. Calculated coupling efficiency between an elliptical-core optical fiber and an optical waveguide over temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Weisshaar, Andreas; Li, Jian; Beheim, Glenn

    1995-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of coupling the output of a single-mode optical fiber into a single-mode rib waveguide in a temperature varying environment, a theoretical calculation of the coupling efficiency between the two was investigated. Due to the complex geometry of the rib guide, there is no analytical solution to the wave equation for the guided modes, thus, approximation and/or numerical techniques must be utilized to determine the field patterns of the guide. In this study, three solution methods were used for both the fiber and guide fields; the effective-index method (EIM), Marcatili's approximation, and a Fourier method. These methods were utilized independently to calculate the electric field profile of each component at two temperatures, 20 C and 300 C, representing a nominal and high temperature. Using the electric field profile calculated from each method, the theoretical coupling efficiency between an elliptical-core optical fiber and a rib waveguide was calculated using the overlap integral and the results were compared. It was determined that a high coupling efficiency can be achieved when the two components are aligned. The coupling efficiency was more sensitive to alignment offsets in the y direction than the x, due to the elliptical modal field profile of both components. Changes in the coupling efficiency over temperature were found to be minimal.

  6. Full Core 3-D Simulation of a Partial MOX LWR Core

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bays; W. Skerjanc; M. Pope

    2009-05-01

    A comparative analysis and comparison of results obtained between 2-D lattice calculations and 3-D full core nodal calculations, in the frame of MOX fuel design, was conducted. This study revealed a set of advantages and disadvantages, with respect to each method, which can be used to guide the level of accuracy desired for future fuel and fuel cycle calculations. For the purpose of isotopic generation for fuel cycle analyses, the approach of using a 2-D lattice code (i.e., fuel assembly in infinite lattice) gave reasonable predictions of uranium and plutonium isotope concentrations at the predicted 3-D core simulation batch average discharge burnup. However, it was found that the 2-D lattice calculation can under-predict the power of pins located along a shared edge between MOX and UO2 by as much as 20%. In this analysis, this error did not occur in the peak pin. However, this was a coincidence and does not rule out the possibility that the peak pin could occur in a lattice position with high calculation uncertainty in future un-optimized studies. Another important consideration in realistic fuel design is the prediction of the peak axial burnup and neutron fluence. The use of 3-D core simulation gave peak burnup conditions, at the pellet level, to be approximately 1.4 times greater than what can be predicted using back-of-the-envelope assumptions of average specific power and irradiation time.

  7. High accuracy modeling for advanced nuclear reactor core designs using Monte Carlo based coupled calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espel, Federico Puente

    The main objective of this PhD research is to develop a high accuracy modeling tool using a Monte Carlo based coupled system. The presented research comprises the development of models to include the thermal-hydraulic feedback to the Monte Carlo method and speed-up mechanisms to accelerate the Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Presently, deterministic codes based on the diffusion approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation, coupled with channel-based (or sub-channel based) thermal-hydraulic codes, carry out the three-dimensional (3-D) reactor core calculations of the Light Water Reactors (LWRs). These deterministic codes utilize nuclear homogenized data (normally over large spatial zones, consisting of fuel assembly or parts of fuel assembly, and in the best case, over small spatial zones, consisting of pin cell), which is functionalized in terms of thermal-hydraulic feedback parameters (in the form of off-line pre-generated cross-section libraries). High accuracy modeling is required for advanced nuclear reactor core designs that present increased geometry complexity and material heterogeneity. Such high-fidelity methods take advantage of the recent progress in computation technology and coupled neutron transport solutions with thermal-hydraulic feedback models on pin or even on sub-pin level (in terms of spatial scale). The continuous energy Monte Carlo method is well suited for solving such core environments with the detailed representation of the complicated 3-D problem. The major advantages of the Monte Carlo method over the deterministic methods are the continuous energy treatment and the exact 3-D geometry modeling. However, the Monte Carlo method involves vast computational time. The interest in Monte Carlo methods has increased thanks to the improvements of the capabilities of high performance computers. Coupled Monte-Carlo calculations can serve as reference solutions for verifying high-fidelity coupled deterministic neutron transport methods with detailed and accurate thermal-hydraulic models. The development of such reference high-fidelity coupled multi-physics scheme is described in this dissertation on the basis of MCNP5, NEM, NJOY and COBRA-TF (CTF) computer codes. This work presents results from studies performed and implemented at the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) on both accelerating Monte Carlo criticality calculations by using hybrid nodal diffusion Monte Carlo schemes and thermal-hydraulic feedback modeling in Monte Carlo core calculations. The hybrid MCNP5/CTF/NEM/NJOY coupled code system is proposed and developed in this dissertation work. The hybrid coupled code system contains a special interface developed to update the required MCNP5 input changes to account for dimension and density changes provided by the thermal-hydraulics feedback module. The interface has also been developed to extract the flux and reaction rates calculated by MCNP5 to later transform the data into the power feedback needed by CTF (axial and radial peaking factors). The interface is contained in a master program that controls the flow of the calculations. Both feedback modules (thermal-hydraulic and power subroutines) use a common internal interface to further accelerate the data exchange. One of the most important steps to correctly include the thermal hydraulic feedback into MCNP5 calculations begins with temperature dependent cross section libraries. If the cross sections used for the calculations are not at the correct temperature, the temperature feedback cannot be included into MCNP5 (referred to the effect of temperature on cross sections: Doppler boarding of resolve and unresolved resonances, thermal scattering and elastic scattering). The only method of considering the temperature effects on cross sections is through the generation (or as introduced in this dissertation through a novel interpolation mechanism) of continuous energy temperature-dependent cross section libraries. An automated methodology for generation of continuous energy temperature-dependent cross section libraries has been developed as part of the hybrid Monte Carlo-based coupled core studies at PSU. This tool is used together with the automated cross-section temperature interpolation capability for intermediate points. The automated methodology, combined with the interpolation capability, has considerably reduced the cross section generation time. A new methodology for generation and interpolation of temperature-dependent thermal scattering cross section libraries for MCNP5 is introduced as well. Using the interpolation methodology specially designed for thermal scattering cross sections, a thermal scattering grid at the desired temperature was generated. This gives the possibility of performing MCNP5 criticality calculations at the correct moderator temperature and improving the accuracy of the calculations. A cross section update methodology has been included, which efficiently reduces the time of the cross section libraries update. Several acceleration strategies are introduced and implemented in the hybrid coupled code system. The computation process is greatly accelerated by calculating the 3-D distributions of fission source and thermal-hydraulics parameters with the coupled NEM/CTF code and then using coupled MCNP5/CTF code to fine tune the results to obtain an increased accuracy. The PSU NEM code employs cross-sections generated by MCNP5 for pin-cell based nodal compositions. Finally, the hybrid coupled system is automated and enhanced in order to provide the user with an efficient and easy to use high accuracy modeling tool.

  8. Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model Calculations Using Realistic Two- and Three-Body Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Forssen, C; Caurier, E

    2004-11-30

    There has been significant progress in the ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. One such method is the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM). Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions this method can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications. We highlight our study of the parity inversion in {sup 11}Be, for which calculations were performed in basis spaces up to 9{Dirac_h}{Omega} (dimensions reaching 7 x 10{sup 8}). We also present our latest results for the p-shell nuclei using the Tucson-Melbourne TM three-nucleon interaction with several proposed parameter sets.

  9. Properties of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms calculated using an accurate effective core potential

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Robin; Christ, Kevin V.; Greene, Chris H.

    2004-04-01

    The first three electronically excited states in the alkaline-earth-metal atoms magnesium, calcium, and strontium comprise the (nsnp){sup 3}P{sub J}{sup o}(J=0,1,2) fine-structure manifold. All three states are metastable and are of interest for optical atomic clocks as well as for cold-collision physics. An efficient technique--based on a physically motivated potential that models the presence of the ionic core--is employed to solve the Schroedinger equation for the two-electron valence shell. In this way, radiative lifetimes, laser-induced clock shifts, and long-range interaction parameters are calculated for metastable Mg, Ca, and Sr.

  10. Applicability of 3D Monte Carlo simulations for local values calculations in a PWR core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Franck; Cochet, Bertrand; Jinaphanh, Alexis; Jacquet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    As technical support of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN has been developing the MORET Monte Carlo code for many years in the framework of criticality safety assessment and is now working to extend its application to reactor physics. For that purpose, beside the validation for criticality safety (more than 2000 benchmarks from the ICSBEP Handbook have been modeled and analyzed), a complementary validation phase for reactor physics has been started, with benchmarks from IRPHEP Handbook and others. In particular, to evaluate the applicability of MORET and other Monte Carlo codes for local flux or power density calculations in large power reactors, it has been decided to contribute to the "Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark" (hosted by OECD/NEA). The aim of this benchmark is to monitor, in forthcoming decades, the performance progress of detailed Monte Carlo full core calculations. More precisely, it measures their advancement towards achieving high statistical accuracy in reasonable computation time for local power at fuel pellet level. A full PWR reactor core is modeled to compute local power densities for more than 6 million fuel regions. This paper presents results obtained at IRSN for this benchmark with MORET and comparisons with MCNP. The number of fuel elements is so large that source convergence as well as statistical convergence issues could cause large errors in local tallies, especially in peripheral zones. Various sampling or tracking methods have been implemented in MORET, and their operational effects on such a complex case have been studied. Beyond convergence issues, to compute local values in so many fuel regions could cause prohibitive slowing down of neutron tracking. To avoid this, energy grid unification and tallies preparation before tracking have been implemented, tested and proved to be successful. In this particular case, IRSN obtained promising results with MORET compared to MCNP, in terms of local power densities, standard deviations and computing times.

  11. Testing the improved method for calculating the radiation heat generation at the periphery of the BOR-60 reactor core

    SciTech Connect

    Varivtsev, A. V. Zhemkov, I. Yu.

    2014-12-15

    The application of the improved method for calculating the radiation heat generation in the elements of an experimental device located at the periphery of the BOR-60 reactor core results in a significant reduction in the discrepancies between the calculated and the experimental data. This allows us to conclude that the improved method has an advantage over the one used earlier.

  12. Core follow calculation with the nTRACER numerical reactor and verification using power reactor measurement data

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Y. S.; Joo, H. G.; Yoon, J. I.

    2013-07-01

    The nTRACER direct whole core transport code employing the planar MOC solution based 3-D calculation method, the subgroup method for resonance treatment, the Krylov matrix exponential method for depletion, and a subchannel thermal/hydraulic calculation solver was developed for practical high-fidelity simulation of power reactors. Its accuracy and performance is verified by comparing with the measurement data obtained for three pressurized water reactor cores. It is demonstrated that accurate and detailed multi-physic simulation of power reactors is practically realizable without any prior calculations or adjustments. (authors)

  13. Strategies for Application of Isotopic Uncertainties in Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2002-12-23

    Uncertainties in the predicted isotopic concentrations in spent nuclear fuel represent one of the largest sources of overall uncertainty in criticality calculations that use burnup credit. The methods used to propagate the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations to the uncertainty in the predicted neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of the system can have a significant effect on the uncertainty in the safety margin in criticality calculations and ultimately affect the potential capacity of spent fuel transport and storage casks employing burnup credit. Methods that can provide a more accurate and realistic estimate of the uncertainty may enable increased spent fuel cask capacity and fewer casks needing to be transported, thereby reducing regulatory burden on licensee while maintaining safety for transporting spent fuel. This report surveys several different best-estimate strategies for considering the effects of nuclide uncertainties in burnup-credit analyses. The potential benefits of these strategies are illustrated for a prototypical burnup-credit cask design. The subcritical margin estimated using best-estimate methods is discussed in comparison to the margin estimated using conventional bounding methods of uncertainty propagation. To quantify the comparison, each of the strategies for estimating uncertainty has been performed using a common database of spent fuel isotopic assay measurements for pressurized-light-water reactor fuels and predicted nuclide concentrations obtained using the current version of the SCALE code system. The experimental database applied in this study has been significantly expanded to include new high-enrichment and high-burnup spent fuel assay data recently published for a wide range of important burnup-credit actinides and fission products. Expanded rare earth fission-product measurements performed at the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia that contain the only known publicly-available measurement for {sup 103}Rh have also been included.

  14. Criticality validation for burnup credit using recycle Pu criticals

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes, E.; Lancaster, D.

    1997-04-01

    A set of 23 additional critical experiments were analyzed to provide additional input to the criticality validation portion of spent fuel cask analysis. The results of this analyses were combined with the previously analyzed criticals to determine the upper safety limit on k{sub eff}. The combined set of criticals can be used used for criticality validation for burnup credit, and are better suited for the range of isotopics in spent nuclear fuels. A trend observed in the analysis was that the calculated k{sub eff} deviates from the criticals in the positive direction, implying that increased burnup results in increased safety margin. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Analysis on burnup step effect for evaluating reactor criticality and fuel breeding ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Saputra, Geby; Purnama, Aditya Rizki; Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi

    2014-09-30

    Criticality condition of the reactors is one of the important factors for evaluating reactor operation and nuclear fuel breeding ratio is another factor to show nuclear fuel sustainability. This study analyzes the effect of burnup steps and cycle operation step for evaluating the criticality condition of the reactor as well as the performance of nuclear fuel breeding or breeding ratio (BR). Burnup step is performed based on a day step analysis which is varied from 10 days up to 800 days and for cycle operation from 1 cycle up to 8 cycles reactor operations. In addition, calculation efficiency based on the variation of computer processors to run the analysis in term of time (time efficiency in the calculation) have been also investigated. Optimization method for reactor design analysis which is used a large fast breeder reactor type as a reference case was performed by adopting an established reactor design code of JOINT-FR. The results show a criticality condition becomes higher for smaller burnup step (day) and for breeding ratio becomes less for smaller burnup step (day). Some nuclides contribute to make better criticality when smaller burnup step due to individul nuclide half-live. Calculation time for different burnup step shows a correlation with the time consuming requirement for more details step calculation, although the consuming time is not directly equivalent with the how many time the burnup time step is divided.

  16. Dispersion properties of liquid crystal core photonic crystal fibers calculated by a multipole method modified for anisotropic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Naoki

    2015-03-01

    Temperature dependence of the dispersion properties of liquid crystal core photonic crystal fibers with large air fraction in clads between 300 and 2000 nm for different core diameters have been calculated by a multipole method, which is modified to treat anisotropic inclusions rigorously. In calculations, air holes are assumed to be arranged in a regular hexagonal array in fused silica and a central hole is filled with liquid crystal to create a core. Below the clearing point temperature, the liquid crystal molecules are assumed to be oriented parallel to the cylindrical axis of the holes, where the liquid crystal is highly anisotropic. The large changes of the dispersion properties are found at the clearing point temperature, where the liquid crystal becomes isotropic.

  17. All-electron Bethe-Salpeter calculations for shallow-core x-ray absorption near-edge structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olovsson, W.; Tanaka, I.; Mizoguchi, T.; Puschnig, P.; Ambrosch-Draxl, C.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra are calculated by fully solving the electron/core-hole Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) in an all-electron framework. We study transitions from shallow core states, including the Mg L2,3 edge in MgO, the Li K edge in the Li halides LiF, LiCl, LiBr, and LiI, as well as Li2O . We illustrate the advantage of the many-body approach over a core-hole supercell calculation. Both schemes lead to strongly bound excitons, but the nonlocal treatment of the electron-hole interaction in the BSE turns out to be crucial for an agreement with experiment.

  18. Gross Gamma Dose Rate Measurements for TRIGA Spent Nuclear Fuel Burnup Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, Philip Lon; Sterbentz, James William

    2001-04-01

    Gross gamma-ray dose rates from six spent TRIGA fuel elements were measured and compared to calculated values as a means to validate the reported element burnups. A newly installed and functional gamma-ray detection subsystem of the In-Cell Examination System was used to perform the measurements and is described in some detail. The analytical methodology used to calculate the corresponding dose rates is presented along with the calculated values. Comparison of the measured and calculated dose rates for the TRIGA fuel elements indicates good agreement (less than a factor of 2 difference). The intent of the subsystem is to measure the gross gamma dose rate and correlate the measurement to a calculated dose rate based on the element s known burnup and other pertinent spent fuel information. Although validation of the TRIGA elements’ burnup is of primary concern in this paper, the measurement and calculational techniques can be used to either validate an element’s reported burnup or provide a burnup estimate for an element with an unknown burnup.

  19. Pre-Melting in Iron and Iron Alloys at Earth's Core Conditions: Results from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocadlo, L.; Martorell, B.; Brodholt, J. P.; Wood, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    Seismically determined S-wave velocities in the Earth's inner core are observed to be much lower (10-30%) than those generally inferred from mineral physics. This is a remarkably large discrepancy - mineralogical models for the mantle and the outer core match the observed velocities to around 1%. In no other large volume of the Earth does such a difference exist. There have been a number of arguments put forward over the years to account for the difference, but none have been universally accepted and our inability to explain the seismic velocities of the inner core remains an uncomfortable truth. Here, we present results from ab initio molecular dynamics calculations performed at 360 GPa and core temperatures on hcp and fcc iron, and on fcc-Fe alloyed with nickel and hcp-Fe alloyed with silicon. The calculated shear modulus, and therefore seismic velocities, of pure hcp-Fe reduces dramatically just prior to melting, providing an elegant explanation for the observed velocities. Calculations on fcc-Fe show no such strong reduction in VS, with a transformation to an hcp-type structure prior to melting; addition of 6.5 atm% and 13 atm% Ni to fcc-Fe raises the temperature of this transition. When silicon is added to hcp-Fe, the pre-melting behaviour is found to be very similar to that of pure hcp-Fe with a strong nonlinear shear weakening just before melting and a corresponding reduction in VS. Because temperatures range from T/Tm = 1 at the inner-outer core boundary to T/Tm ≈ 0.99 at the centre, this strong nonlinear effect on VS should occur in the inner core, providing a compelling explanation for the low VS observed.

  20. Review of Technical Studies in the United States in Support of Burnup Credit Regulatory Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C; Parks, Cecil V; Mueller, Don; Gauld, Ian C

    2010-01-01

    Taking credit for the reduction in reactivity associated with fuel depletion can enable more cost-effective, higher-density storage, transport, disposal, and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) while maintaining sufficient subcritical margin to establish an adequate safety basis. Consequently, there continues to be considerable interest in the United States (U.S.), as well as internationally, in the increased use of burnup credit in SNF operations, particularly related to storage, transport, and disposal of commercial SNF. This interest has motivated numerous technical studies related to the application of burnup credit, both domestically and internationally, as well as the design of SNF storage, transport and disposal systems that rely on burnup credit for maintaining subcriticality. Responding to industry requests and needs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a burnup credit research program in 1999, with support from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to develop regulatory guidance and the supporting technical bases for allowing and expanding the use of burnup credit in pressurized-water reactor SNF storage and transport applications. Although this NRC research program has not been continuous since its inception, considerable progress has been achieved in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues, availability of relevant information and data, and subsequently updated regulatory guidance for expanded use of burnup credit. This paper reviews technical studies performed by ORNL for the U.S. NRC burnup credit research program. Examples of topics include reactivity effects associated with reactor operating characteristics, fuel assembly characteristics, burnable absorbers, control rods, spatial burnup distributions, cooling time, and assembly misloading; methods and data for validation of isotopic composition predictions; methods and data for validation of criticality calculations; and operational issues and data related to assembly burnup confirmation. The objective of this paper is to summarize the work and significant accomplishments, with references to the technical reports and publications for complete details, and provide a useful resource to others in the burnup credit community.

  1. Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium based fuel core using experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, V. T.; Fujii, T.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T.; Takaki, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Watanabe, H.; Unesaki, H.

    2012-07-01

    Considering the importance of thorium data and concerning about the accuracy of Th-232 cross section library, a series of experiments of thorium critical core carried out at KUCA facility of Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst. have been analyzed. The core was composed of pure thorium plates and 93% enriched uranium plates, solid polyethylene moderator with hydro to U-235 ratio of 140 and Th-232 to U-235 ratio of 15.2. Calculations of the effective multiplication factor, control rod worth, reactivity worth of Th plates have been conducted by MVP code using JENDL-4.0 library [1]. At the experiment site, after achieving the critical state with 51 fuel rods inserted inside the reactor, the measurements of the reactivity worth of control rod and thorium sample are carried out. By comparing with the experimental data, the calculation overestimates the effective multiplication factor about 0.90%. Reactivity worth of the control rods evaluation using MVP is acceptable with the maximum discrepancy about the statistical error of the measured data. The calculated results agree to the measurement ones within the difference range of 3.1% for the reactivity worth of one Th plate. From this investigation, further experiments and research on Th-232 cross section library need to be conducted to provide more reliable data for thorium based fuel core design and safety calculation. (authors)

  2. Instant release fraction and matrix release of high burn-up UO2 spent nuclear fuel: Effect of high burn-up structure and leaching solution composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Purroy, D.; Clarens, F.; González-Robles, E.; Glatz, J. P.; Wegen, D. H.; de Pablo, J.; Casas, I.; Giménez, J.; Martínez-Esparza, A.

    2012-08-01

    Two weak points in Performance Assessment (PA) exercises regarding the alteration of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are the contribution of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) and the effect of High Burn-Up Structure (HBS). This manuscript focuses on the effect of HBS in matrix (long term) and instant release of a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) SNF irradiated in a commercial reactor with a mean Burn-Up (BU) of 60 GWd/tU. In order to study the HBS contribution, two samples from different radial positions have been prepared. One from the centre of the SNF, labelled CORE, and one from the periphery, enriched with HBS and labelled OUT. Static leaching experiments have been carried out with two synthetic leaching solutions: bicarbonate (BIC) and Bentonitic Granitic Groundwater (BGW), and in all cases under oxidising conditions. IRF values have been calculated from the determined Fraction of Inventory in Aqueous Phase (FIAP). In all studied cases, some radionuclides (RN): Rb, Sr and Cs, have shown higher release rates than uranium, especially at the beginning of the experiment, and have been considered as IRF. Redox sensitive RN like Mo and Tc have been found to dissolve slightly faster than uranium and further studies might be needed to confirm if they can also be considered part of the IRF. Most of the remaining studied RN, mainly actinides and lanthanides, have been found to dissolve congruently with the uranium matrix. Finally, Zr, Ru and Rh presented lower release rates than the matrix. Higher matrix release has been determined for CORE than for OUT samples showing that the formation of HBS might have a protective effect against the oxidative corrosion of the SNF. On the contrary, no significant differences have been observed between the two studied leaching solutions (BIC and BGW). Two different IRF contributions have been determined. One corresponding to the fraction of inventory segregated in the external open grain boundaries, directly available to water and very significant during the first days of the experiment; and a second one corresponding to a less accessible, most probably located at the internal grain boundaries, one order of magnitude lower than the first one at equal given dissolution times but of much longer period of incidence. Unlike matrix release results, higher Cs IRF release was found for OUT than for CORE sample. This effect can be attributed to thermal migration of Cs to the periphery of the fuel during irradiation. In the case of Rb no clear differences were observed between CORE and OUT showing equilibrium between the opposing thermal migration and matrix effects. Finally, Sr CORE/OUT release ratio showed similar behaviour to matrix release, thus proving no significant thermal migration during irradiation.

  3. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  4. A method for modeling finite-core vortices in wake-flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical method for computing nonplanar vortex wakes represented by finite-core vortices is presented. The approach solves for the velocity on an Eulerian grid, using standard finite-difference techniques; the vortex wake is tracked by Lagrangian methods. In this method, the distribution of continuous vorticity in the wake is replaced by a group of discrete vortices. An axially symmetric distribution of vorticity about the center of each discrete vortex is used to represent the finite-core model. Two distributions of vorticity, or core models, are investigated: a finite distribution of vorticity represented by a third-order polynomial, and a continuous distribution of vorticity throughout the wake. The method provides for a vortex-core model that is insensitive to the mesh spacing. Results for a simplified case are presented. Computed results for the roll-up of a vortex wake generated by wings with different spanwise load distributions are presented; contour plots of the flow-field velocities are included; and comparisons are made of the computed flow-field velocities with experimentally measured velocities.

  5. Accident source terms for light-water nuclear power plants using high-burnup or MOX fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Salay, Michael; Gauntt, Randall O.; Lee, Richard Y.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Representative accident source terms patterned after the NUREG-1465 Source Term have been developed for high burnup fuel in BWRs and PWRs and for MOX fuel in a PWR with an ice-condenser containment. These source terms have been derived using nonparametric order statistics to develop distributions for the timing of radionuclide release during four accident phases and for release fractions of nine chemical classes of radionuclides as calculated with the MELCOR 1.8.5 accident analysis computer code. The accident phases are those defined in the NUREG-1465 Source Term - gap release, in-vessel release, ex-vessel release, and late in-vessel release. Important differences among the accident source terms derived here and the NUREG-1465 Source Term are not attributable to either fuel burnup or use of MOX fuel. Rather, differences among the source terms are due predominantly to improved understanding of the physics of core meltdown accidents. Heat losses from the degrading reactor core prolong the process of in-vessel release of radionuclides. Improved understanding of the chemistries of tellurium and cesium under reactor accidents changes the predicted behavior characteristics of these radioactive elements relative to what was assumed in the derivation of the NUREG-1465 Source Term. An additional radionuclide chemical class has been defined to account for release of cesium as cesium molybdate which enhances molybdenum release relative to other metallic fission products.

  6. Transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations to relate interfacial intermixing and the magnetism of core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, C.-C.; Hsiao, C.-H.; Ouyang, Chuenhou; Skoropata, E.; Lierop, J. van

    2015-05-07

    Significant efforts towards understanding bi-magnetic core-shell nanoparticles are underway currently as they provide a pathway towards properties unavailable with single-phased systems. Recently, we have demonstrated that the magnetism of γ-Fe2O3/CoO core-shell nanoparticles, in particular, at high temperatures, originates essentially from an interfacial doped iron-oxide layer that is formed by the migration of Co{sup 2+} from the CoO shell into the surface layers of the γ-Fe2O3 core [Skoropata et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 024410 (2014)]. To examine directly the nature of the intermixed layer, we have used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and first-principles calculations to examine the impact of the core-shell intermixing at the atomic level. By analyzing the HRTEM images and energy dispersive spectra, the level and nature of intermixing was confirmed, mainly as doping of Co into the octahedral site vacancies of γ-Fe2O3. The average Co doping depths for different processing temperatures (150 °C and 235 °C) were 0.56 nm and 0.78 nm (determined to within 5% through simulation), respectively, establishing that the amount of core-shell intermixing can be altered purposefully with an appropriate change in synthesis conditions. Through first-principles calculations, we find that the intermixing phase of γ-Fe2O3 with Co doping is ferromagnetic, with even higher magnetization as compared to that of pure γ-Fe2O3. In addition, we show that Co doping into different octahedral sites can cause different magnetizations. This was reflected in a change in overall nanoparticle magnetization, where we observed a 25% reduction in magnetization for the 235 °C versus the 150 °C sample, despite a thicker intermixed layer.

  7. Simulating the Dynamics of Earth's Core: Using NCCS Supercomputers Speeds Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    If one wanted to study Earth's core directly, one would have to drill through about 1,800 miles of solid rock to reach liquid core-keeping the tunnel from collapsing under pressures that are more than 1 million atmospheres and then sink an instrument package to the bottom that could operate at 8,000 F with 10,000 tons of force crushing every square inch of its surface. Even then, several of these tunnels would probably be needed to obtain enough data. Faced with difficult or impossible tasks such as these, scientists use other available sources of information - such as seismology, mineralogy, geomagnetism, geodesy, and, above all, physical principles - to derive a model of the core and, study it by running computer simulations. One NASA researcher is doing just that on NCCS computers. Physicist and applied mathematician Weijia Kuang, of the Space Geodesy Branch, and his collaborators at Goddard have what he calls the,"second - ever" working, usable, self-consistent, fully dynamic, three-dimensional geodynamic model (see "The Geodynamic Theory"). Kuang runs his model simulations on the supercomputers at the NCCS. He and Jeremy Bloxham, of Harvard University, developed the original version, written in Fortran 77, in 1996.

  8. Equation of state of hexagonal closed packed iron under Earth's core conditions from quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, E.; Brodholt, J. P.; Alfè, D.

    2009-01-01

    We applied quantum Monte Carlo techniques to compute the equation of state of hexagonal closed packed iron in the range of pressure relevant to Earth’s core. We used an accurate iron pseudopotential with a frozen Ne core. Trial wave functions have been obtained from density-functional theory (DFT) plane-wave calculations and expanded in systematically improvable B splines. Tests with various exchange-correlation functionals showed that the B3LYP functional is the one that provided the best trial wave functions. Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations were carried out using simulation cells with up to 96 atoms (1536 electrons), with some attempts to use up to 150 atoms, and corrected for finite-size errors using the scheme of Chiesa [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 076404 (2006)] and Kwee [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 126404 (2008)]. The calculated equation of state agrees closely with the experiments of Mao [J. Geophys. Res. 95, 21737 (1990)] and those of Dewaele [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 215504 (2006)]. It also agrees with the DFT data of Söderlind [Phys. Rev. B 53, 14063 (1996)] and Alfè [Phys. Rev. B 61, 132 (2000)], and therefore, reinforces those previous calculations.

  9. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  10. Some Nuclear Calculations of U-235-D2O Gaseous-Core Cavity Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.; Hyland, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    The results of a multigroup, diffusion theory study of spherical gaseous-core cavity reactors are presented in this report. The reactor cavity of gaseous U235 is enclosed by a region of hydrogen gas and is separated from an external D2O moderator-reflector by a zirconium structural shell. Some cylindrical reactors are also investigated. A parametric study of spherical reactors indicates that, for the range of variables studied, critical mass increases as: (1) Fuel region is compressed within the reactor cavity, (2) moderator thickness is decreased, (3) structural shell thickness is increased, and (4) moderator temperature is increased. A buckling analogy is used to estimate the critical mass of fully reflected cylindrical reactors from spherical results without fuel compression. For a reactor cavity of a 120-centimeter radius uniformly filled with fuel, no structural shell, a moderator temperature of 70 F, and a moderator thickness of 100 centimeters, the critical mass of a spherical reactor is 3.1 kilograms while that of a cylinder with a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.0 (L/D = 1) is approximately 3.8 kilograms and, with L/D = 2, 5.9 kilograms. For the range of variables considered for U235-D2O gaseous-core cavity reactors, the systems are characterized by 95 to 99 percent thermal absorptions, with the flux reaching a maximum in the moderator about 10 to 15 centimeters from the reactor cavity.

  11. Nonradiative and dissociative decay channels of core-excited H2S studied by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naves de Brito, Arnaldo; Ågren, Hans

    1992-06-01

    Ab initio studies of the 2p(3a1)-6a1 and 2p(3a1)-3b2 photoexcitation resonances of H2S have been carried out in order to support interpretations of recent photoelectron and autoionization spectra using synchrotron-radiation excitation. The full H2S*-->S+H2 and H2S*-->S+H+H potential-energy surfaces as well as the resonant energies for autoionization (Auger) decay of core-excited states in the fragment HS species have been obtained by multiconfiguration self-consistent-field calculations. The results support an interpretation of the spectral fundings in terms of fast dissociation of the H2S* 2p-16a11 and 2p-13b12 states to core-excited states in HS* followed by resonance Auger decay to HS+ valence single-hole states.

  12. AB initio free energy calculations of the solubility of silica in metallic hydrogen and application to giant planet cores

    SciTech Connect

    González-Cataldo, F.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, B.

    2014-05-20

    By combining density functional molecular dynamics simulations with a thermodynamic integration technique, we determine the free energy of metallic hydrogen and silica, SiO{sub 2}, at megabar pressures and thousands of degrees Kelvin. Our ab initio solubility calculations show that silica dissolves into fluid hydrogen above 5000 K for pressures from 10 and 40 Mbars, which has implications for the evolution of rocky cores in giant gas planets like Jupiter, Saturn, and a substantial fraction of known extrasolar planets. Our findings underline the necessity of considering the erosion and redistribution of core materials in giant planet evolution models, but they also demonstrate that hot metallic hydrogen is a good solvent at megabar pressures, which has implications for high-pressure experiments.

  13. Recommendations for Addressing Axial Burnup in the PWR Burnup Credit Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-10-23

    This report presents studies performed to support the development of a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial-burnup distribution in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The effect of the axial-burnup distribution on reactivity and proposed approaches for addressing the axial-burnup distribution are briefly reviewed. A publicly available database of profiles is examined in detail to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. A statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial-burnup-profile database was performed, and the most reactive (bounding) profiles were identified as statistical outliers. The impact of these bounding profiles on k{sub eff} is quantified for a high-density burnup credit cask. Analyses are also presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of loading assemblies with axial-burnup profiles that are not bounded by the database. The report concludes with a discussion on the issues for consideration and recommendations for addressing axial burnup in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transportation.

  14. Use of relativistic effective core potentials in the calculation of total electron-impact ionization cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Kim, Yong-Ki

    2000-03-01

    The binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) model of Kim and Rudd for total ionization cross-sections by electron impact is re-examined when the target is an atom with principal quantum number n⩾3, or a molecule consisting of one or more atoms with n⩾3. It is shown that the use of relativistic effective core potential (RECP) for heavy atoms removes the need for the empirical scaling used previously. BEB cross-sections of Ar, Kr, Xe, Cl, Br, I, and WF 6 calculated using RECP are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data, especially in the low-energy region.

  15. Numerical calculation of the radiation exposure from galactic cosmic rays at aviation altitudes with the PANDOCA core model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Meier, Matthias M.; Reitz, Günther

    2014-03-01

    The increased radiation exposure at aviation altitudes is of public interest as well as of legal relevance in many countries. The dose rates that are elevated compared to sea level are mainly caused by galactic cosmic ray particles interacting with the atmosphere and producing a complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The intensity and composition of this radiation field mainly depend on altitude, geomagnetic shielding, and primary particle intensity. In this work, we present a model based on Monte Carlo simulations, which retrospectively estimates secondary particle fluence as well as ambient dose equivalent rates and effective dose rates at any point in the atmosphere. This model will be used as the physical core in the Professional Aviation Dose Calculator (PANDOCA) software developed by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) for the calculation of route doses in aviation. The calculations are based on galactic cosmic ray spectra taking into account primary nuclei from hydrogen to iron by direct transport calculations of hydrogen and helium nuclei and approximating heavier nuclei by the number of protons equaling the corresponding atomic number. A comparison to experimental data recorded on several flights with a tissue equivalent proportional counter shows a very good agreement between model calculations and measurements.

  16. Short period ScP phase amplitude calculations for core-mantle boundary with intermediate scale topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhichao; Ni, Sidao; Wu, Wenbo; Sun, Daoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography plays a key role in constraining geodynamic modeling and core-mantle coupling. It's effective to resolve the intermediate lateral scale topography (hundreds of km) with short period core reflected seismic phases (ScP) due to their small Fresnel-zones at short epicentral distances (<3336 km (30°)). We developed a method based on the ray theory and representation theorem to calculate short period ScP synthetics for intermediate lateral scale CMB topography. The CMB topography we introduced here is axisymmetric and specified with two parameters: H (height) and L (diameter, or lateral length scale). Our numerical computation shows that a bump (H > 0) and dip (H < 0) model would cause defocusing/weakening and focusing/amplifying effects on ScP amplitude. Moreover, the effect of frequency and combination of L and H are quantified with the amplification coefficients. Then we applied this method to estimate a possible CMB topography beneath northeastern Japan, and a CMB model with L = 140 km, H = 1.2 km overall matches the observed pattern of 2D PcP/ScP amplitude ratios. However, it is difficult to totally rule out other factors that may also affect PcP/ScP pattern because of limitation of ray-based algorithms we used here. A hybrid method combining ray theory and numerical method is promising for studying complicated 3D structure and CMB topography in the future.

  17. Ab initio no core calculations of light nuclei and preludes to Hamiltonian quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.; Maris, P.; Shirokov, A.M.; Honkanen, H.; li, J.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; Teramond, G.F.de; /Costa Rica U.

    2009-08-03

    Recent advances in ab initio quantum many-body methods and growth in computer power now enable highly precise calculations of nuclear structure. The precision has attained a level sufficient to make clear statements on the nature of 3-body forces in nuclear physics. Total binding energies, spin-dependent structure effects, and electroweak properties of light nuclei play major roles in pinpointing properties of the underlying strong interaction. Eventually,we anticipate a theory bridge with immense predictive power from QCD through nuclear forces to nuclear structure and nuclear reactions. Light front Hamiltonian quantum field theory offers an attractive pathway and we outline key elements.

  18. Ab initio no core calculations of light nuclei and preludes to Hamiltonian quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J. P.; Maris, P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, J.; Shirokov, A. M.; Brodsky, S. J.; Harindranath, A.

    2009-12-17

    Recent advances in ab initio quantum many-body methods and growth in computer power now enable highly precise calculations of nuclear structure. The precision has attained a level sufficient to make clear statements on the nature of 3-body forces in nuclear physics. Total binding energies, spin-dependent structure effects, and electroweak properties of light nuclei play major roles in pinpointing properties of the underlying strong interaction. Eventually, we anticipate a theory bridge with immense predictive power from QCD through nuclear forces to nuclear structure and nuclear reactions. Light front Hamiltonian quantum field theory offers an attractive pathway and we outline key elements.

  19. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN predictions. After confirming that the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF worked and provided consistent results with FRAPTRAN predictions for a single fuel rod configuration, the same type of analysis was carried out for a bigger system which is the 4x4 PWR bundle consisting of 15 fuel pins and one control guide tube. Steady- state calculations at Hot Full Power (HFP) conditions for control guide tube out (unrodded) were performed using the 4x4 PWR array with CTF/TORT-TD coupled code system. Fuel centerline, surface and average temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD with and without the new fuel thermal conductivity model were compared against CTF/TORT-TD/FRAPTRAN predictions to demonstrate the improvement in fuel centerline predictions when new model was used. In addition to that constant and CTF dynamic gap conductance model were used with the new thermal conductivity model to show the performance of the CTF dynamic gap conductance model and its impact on fuel centerline and surface temperatures. Finally, a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) scenario using the same 4x4 PWR array was run both at Hot Zero Power (HZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP) condition, starting at a position where half of the control rod is inserted. This scenario was run using CTF/TORT-TD coupled code system with and without the new fuel thermal conductivity model. The purpose of this transient analysis was to show the impact of thermal conductivity degradation (TCD) on feedback effects, specifically Doppler Reactivity Coefficient (DRC) and, eventually, total core reactivity.

  20. Analysis and comparison of CVS-ADC approaches up to third order for the calculation of core-excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Jan Holzer, Andre; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-06-07

    The extended second order algebraic-diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)-x) scheme for the polarization operator in combination with core-valence separation (CVS) approximation is well known to be a powerful quantum chemical method for the calculation of core-excited states and the description of X-ray absorption spectra. For the first time, the implementation and results of the third order approach CVS-ADC(3) are reported. Therefore, the CVS approximation has been applied to the ADC(3) working equations and the resulting terms have been implemented efficiently in the adcman program. By treating the α and β spins separately from each other, the unrestricted variant CVS-UADC(3) for the treatment of open-shell systems has been implemented as well. The performance and accuracy of the CVS-ADC(3) method are demonstrated with respect to a set of small and middle-sized organic molecules. Therefore, the results obtained at the CVS-ADC(3) level are compared with CVS-ADC(2)-x values as well as experimental data by calculating complete basis set limits. The influence of basis sets is further investigated by employing a large set of different basis sets. Besides the accuracy of core-excitation energies and oscillator strengths, the importance of cartesian basis functions and the treatment of orbital relaxation effects are analyzed in this work as well as computational timings. It turns out that at the CVS-ADC(3) level, the results are not further improved compared to CVS-ADC(2)-x and experimental data, because the fortuitous error compensation inherent in the CVS-ADC(2)-x approach is broken. While CVS-ADC(3) overestimates the core excitation energies on average by 0.61% ± 0.31%, CVS-ADC(2)-x provides an averaged underestimation of −0.22% ± 0.12%. Eventually, the best agreement with experiments can be achieved using the CVS-ADC(2)-x method in combination with a diffuse cartesian basis set at least at the triple-ζ level.

  1. Analysis and comparison of CVS-ADC approaches up to third order for the calculation of core-excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Jan; Holzer, Andre; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The extended second order algebraic-diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)-x) scheme for the polarization operator in combination with core-valence separation (CVS) approximation is well known to be a powerful quantum chemical method for the calculation of core-excited states and the description of X-ray absorption spectra. For the first time, the implementation and results of the third order approach CVS-ADC(3) are reported. Therefore, the CVS approximation has been applied to the ADC(3) working equations and the resulting terms have been implemented efficiently in the adcman program. By treating the α and β spins separately from each other, the unrestricted variant CVS-UADC(3) for the treatment of open-shell systems has been implemented as well. The performance and accuracy of the CVS-ADC(3) method are demonstrated with respect to a set of small and middle-sized organic molecules. Therefore, the results obtained at the CVS-ADC(3) level are compared with CVS-ADC(2)-x values as well as experimental data by calculating complete basis set limits. The influence of basis sets is further investigated by employing a large set of different basis sets. Besides the accuracy of core-excitation energies and oscillator strengths, the importance of cartesian basis functions and the treatment of orbital relaxation effects are analyzed in this work as well as computational timings. It turns out that at the CVS-ADC(3) level, the results are not further improved compared to CVS-ADC(2)-x and experimental data, because the fortuitous error compensation inherent in the CVS-ADC(2)-x approach is broken. While CVS-ADC(3) overestimates the core excitation energies on average by 0.61% ± 0.31%, CVS-ADC(2)-x provides an averaged underestimation of -0.22% ± 0.12%. Eventually, the best agreement with experiments can be achieved using the CVS-ADC(2)-x method in combination with a diffuse cartesian basis set at least at the triple-ζ level.

  2. Evaluation of accuracy of calculations of VVER-1000 core states with incomplete covering of fuel by the absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, G. L.

    2012-07-01

    An additional verification of bundled software (BS) SAPFIR-95 and amp;RC [1] and code KORSAR/GP [2] was performed. Both software products were developed in A.P. Alexandrov NITI and certified by ROSTEKHNADZOR of RF for numeric simulation of stationary, transitional and emergency conditions of VVER reactors. A benchmark model for neutronics calculations was created within the limits of this work. The cold subcritical state of VVER - 1000 reactor stationary fuelling was simulated on the basis of FA with an increased height of the fuel column (TVS-2M) considering detailed presentation of radial and front neutron reflectors. A case of passing of pure condensate slug through the core in initially deep subcritical state during start of the first RCP set after refueling was considered as an examined condition of reactor operation. A relatively small size of the slug, its spatial position near the reflectors (lower and lateral), as well as failure of the inserted control rods of the control and protection system (CPS CR) to reach the lower limit of the fuel column stipulate for methodical complexity of a correct calculation of the neutron multiplication constant (K{sub eff}) using engineering codes. Code RC was used as a test program in the process of reactor calculated 3-D modeling. Code MCNP5 [3] was used as the precision program, which solves the equation of neutrons transfer by Monte-Carlo method and which was developed in the US (Los-Alamos). As a result of comparative calculations dependency of K{sub eff} on two parameters was evaluated - boron acid concentration (Cb) and CPS CR position. Reactivity effect was evaluated, which is implemented as a result of failure of all CPS control rods to reach the lower fuel limit calculated using the engineering codes mentioned above. (authors)

  3. Radionuclide inventories : ORIGEN2.2 isotopic depletion calculation for high burnup low-enriched uranium and weapons-grade mixed-oxide pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Ross, Kyle W.; Smith, James Dean; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory computer code, ORIGEN2.2 (CCC-371, 2002), was used to obtain the elemental composition of irradiated low-enriched uranium (LEU)/mixed-oxide (MOX) pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies. Described in this report are the input parameters for the ORIGEN2.2 calculations. The rationale for performing the ORIGEN2.2 calculation was to generate inventories to be used to populate MELCOR radionuclide classes. Therefore the ORIGEN2.2 output was subsequently manipulated. The procedures performed in this data reduction process are also described herein. A listing of the ORIGEN2.2 input deck for two-cycle MOX is provided in the appendix. The final output from this data reduction process was three tables containing the radionuclide inventories for LEU/MOX in elemental form. Masses, thermal powers, and activities were reported for each category.

  4. Extended Burnup Demonstration Reactor Fuels Program. Annual progress report, April 1983-March 1984. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, C.A.

    1985-06-20

    The US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation have participated since 1979 in a cooperative Extended Burnup Demonstration Program. Under the program, standard ENC-fabricated reload fuel in the Big Rock Point and Oyster Creek reactor cores has been irradiated to discharge burnups at or beyond 35,000 MWD/MTU, one to two cycles beyond its originally projected exposure life. The program provides for examination of the fuel at poolside before and after each extended burnup cycle as well as for limited destructive hot cell examination. The 1984 progress report covers work performed under the EBD program between April 1983 and March 1984. Major milestones reached during the period include completion of a hot cell examination on four high burnup rods from Big Rock Point and of a poolside on the Oyster Creek EBD fuel at discharge. The hot cell examination of four rods at burnups to 37.2 GWD/MTU confirmed poolside measurements on the same fuel, showing the urania and gadolinia-bearing fuel rods to be in excellent condition. No major cladding degradation, pellet restructuring, or pellet-clad interaction was found in any of the samples examined. The Oyster Creek fuel, examined at an assembly average exposure of 34.5 GWD/MTU, showed good performance with regard to both diametral creepdown and clad oxide accumulation.

  5. Investigation of Burnup Credit Modeling Issues Associated with BWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2000-10-12

    Although significant effort has been dedicated to the study of burnup-credit issues over the past decade, U.S. studies to-date have primarily focused on spent pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) fuel. The current licensing approach taken by the U.S. Department of Energy for burnup credit in transportation seeks approval for PWR fuel only. Burnup credit for boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel has not yet been formally sought. Burnup credit for PWR fuel was pursued first because: (1) nearly two-thirds (by mass) of the total discharged commercial spent fuel in the United States is PWR fuel, (2) it can substantially increase the fuel assembly capacity with respect to current designs for PWR storage and transportation casks, and (3) fuel depletion in PWRs is generally less complicated than fuel depletion in BWRs. However, due to international needs, the increased enrichment of modern BWR fuels, and criticality safety issues related to permanent disposal within the United States, more attention has recently focused on spent BWR fuel. Specifically, credit for fuel burnup in the criticality safety analysis for long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel enables improved design efficiency, which, due to the large mass of fissile material that will be stored in the repository, can have substantial financial benefits. For criticality safety purposes, current PWR storage and transportation canister designs employ flux traps between assemblies. Credit for fuel burnup will eliminate the need for these flux traps, and thus, significantly increase the PWR assembly capacity (for a fixed canister volume). Increases in assembly capacity of approximately one-third are expected. In contrast, current BWR canister designs do not require flux traps for criticality safety, and thus, are already at their maximum capacity in terms of physical storage. Therefore, benefits associated with burnup credit for BWR storage and transportation casks may be limited to increasing the enrichment capacity and/or decreasing the neutron absorber concentration. However, regulations associated with permanent disposal require consideration of scenarios and/or package conditions that are not relevant or credible for storage or transportation, and as a result, necessitate credit for burnup in BWR fuel to maintain capacity objectives. Burnup credit relies on depletion calculations to provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents and subsequent criticality calculations to assess the value of k{sub eff} for a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of postulated conditions. Therefore, validation is necessary to quantify biases and uncertainties between analytic predictions and measured isotopics. However, the design and operational aspects of BWRs result in a more heterogeneous and time-varying reactor configuration than those of PWRs. Thus, BWR spent fuel analyses and validation efforts are significantly more complicated than those of their PWR counterparts. BWR spent fuel assemblies are manufactured with variable enrichments, both radially and axially, are exposed to time- and spatially-varying void distributions, contain integral burnable absorber rods, and are subject to partial control-blade insertion during operation. The latter is especially true in older fuel assemblies. Away-from-reactor depletion tools used for characterization of spent fuel have typically been developed and validated for more homogeneous PWR fuel assemblies without integral burnable absorber rods, and thus must be reassessed for BWR configurations to determine a conservative methodology for estimating the isotopic content of spent BWR fuel. This report examines the use of SAS2H8 for calculating spent BWR fuel isotopics for burnup-credit criticality safety analyses and assesses the adequacy of SAS2H for this task. The effects of SAS2H modeling assumptions on calculated spent BWR fuel isotopics and the effects of depletion assumptions on calculated k{sub inf} values are investigated. Detailed two-dimensional (2-D) HELIOS9 assembly calculations are compared to one-dimensional (1-D) cylindrical approximations performed using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE.10 SAS2H uses a 1-D transport solution (XSDRNPM) to generate three-group fuel-averaged fluxes, which are used in the point depletion ORIGEN-S code. Studies focused on the effect of geometric modeling with approximate 1-D models and the effect of variations in relevant depletion parameters are presented.

  6. Burnup Credit Approach Used in the Yucca Mountain License Application

    SciTech Connect

    Scaglione, John M; Wagner, John C

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy has submitted a license application (LA) for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The license application is currently under review by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper will describe the methodology and approach used in the LA to address the issue of criticality and the role of burnup credit during the postclosure period. The most significant and effective measures for prevention of criticality in the repository include multiple redundant barriers that act to isolate fissionable material from water (which can act as a moderator, corrosive agent, and transporter of fissile material); inherent geometry of waste package internals and waste forms; presence of fixed neutron absorbers in waste package internals; and fuel burnup for commercial spent nuclear fuel. A probabilistic approach has been used to screen criticality from the total system performance assessment. Within the probabilistic approach, criticality is considered an event, and the total probability of a criticality event occurring within 10,000 years of disposal is calculated and compared against the regulatory criterion. The total probability of criticality includes contributions associated with both internal (within waste packages) and external (external to waste packages) criticality for each of the initiating events that could lead to waste package breach. The occurrence of and conditions necessary for criticality in the repository have been thoroughly evaluated using a comprehensive range of parameter distributions. A simplified design-basis modeling approach has been used to evaluate the probability of criticality by using numerous significant and conservative assumptions. Burnup credit is used only for evaluations of in-package configurations and uses a combination of conservative and bounding modeling approximations to ensure conservatism. This paper will review the NRC regulatory criteria relevant to postclosure criticality, explain the role of criticality within the overall repository performance assessment, describe the strategy for preventing criticality via design features and waste form properties, and discuss the numerous considerations relevant to criticality and burnup credit for spent nuclear fuel disposed of in a geologic repository, with emphasis on the burnup credit approach and analyses.

  7. ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT

    SciTech Connect

    A.H. Wells

    2004-11-17

    The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent {sup 235}U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU).

  8. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports.

  9. Model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The restructuring process of the high burnup structure (HBS) formation in UO2 fuel results in sub-micron size grains that accelerate the fission gas swelling, which will raise some concern over the safety of extended the nuclear fuel operation life in the reactor. A mechanistic and engineering model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel based on the experimental observations of the HBS in the literature is presented. The model takes into account dislocations evolution under irradiation and the grain subdivision occur successively at increasing local burnup. It is assumed that the original driving force for subdivision of grain in the HBS of UO2 fuel is the production and accumulation of dislocation loops during irradiation. The dislocation loops can also be annealed through thermal diffusion when the temperature is high enough. The capability of this model is validated by the comparison with the experimental data of temperature threshold of subdivision, dislocation density and sub-grain size as a function of local burnup. It is shown that the calculated results of the dislocation density and subdivided grain size as a function of local burnup are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis to Burnup Estimates on ADS using the ACAB Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cabellos, O.; Sanz, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Embid, M.; Alvarez, F.; Reyes, S.

    2005-05-24

    Within the scope of the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) concept for nuclear waste management applications, the burnup uncertainty estimates due to uncertainty in the activation cross sections (XSs) are important regarding both the safety and the efficiency of the waste burning process. We have applied both sensitivity analysis and Monte Carlo methodology to actinides burnup calculations in a lead-bismuth cooled subcritical ADS. The sensitivity analysis is used to identify the reaction XSs and the dominant chains that contribute most significantly to the uncertainty. The Monte Carlo methodology gives the burnup uncertainty estimates due to the synergetic/global effect of the complete set of XS uncertainties. These uncertainty estimates are valuable to assess the need of any experimental or systematic re-evaluation of some uncertainty XSs for ADS.

  11. Antineutrinos for Reactor Safeguards: Effect of Fuel Loading and Burnup on the Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Anna; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2014-02-01

    Various types of nuclear reactor related information, including relative power level and fuel evolution parameters, can be inferred remotely using antineutrino detectors. We show that it is possible to verify assembly-level burnup using information derived from an antineutrino detector if the nominal reactor fuel loading is known. Alternatively, if the core power is measured using an independent method, for example, a thermal hydraulic element, and the nominal core behavior is known, the antineutrino detector has a capability to determine previously unknown MOX loading in the core.

  12. Economic incentives and recommended development for commercial use of high burnup fuels in the once-through LWR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.; Merckx, K.R.; Holm, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    This study calculates the reduced uranium requirements and the economic incentives for increasing the burnup of current design LWR fuels from the current range of 25 to 35 MWD/Kg to a range of 45 to 55 MWD/Kg. The changes in fuel management strategies which may be required to accommodate these high burnup fuels and longer fuel cycles are discussed. The material behavior problems which may present obstacles to achieving high burnup or to license fuel are identified and discussed. These problems are presented in terms of integral fuel response and the informational needs for commercial and licensing acceptance. Research and development programs are outlined which are aimed at achieving a licensing position and commercial acceptance of high burnup fuels.

  13. A Modal Expansion Equilibrium Cycle Perturbation Method for Optimizing High Burnup Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touran, Nicholas W.

    This dissertation develops a simulation tool capable of optimizing advanced nuclear reactors considering the multiobjective nature of their design. An Enhanced Equilibrium Cycle (EEC) method based on the classic equilibrium method is developed to evaluate the response of the equilibrium cycle to changes in the core design. Advances are made in the consideration of burnup-dependent cross sections and dynamic fuel performance (fission gas release, fuel growth, and bond squeeze-out) to allow accuracy in high-burnup reactors such as the Traveling Wave Reactor. EEC is accelerated for design changes near a reference state through a new modal expansion perturbation method that expands arbitrary flux perturbations on a basis of λ-eigenmodes. A code is developed to solve the 3-D, multigroup diffusion equation with an Arnoldi-based solver that determines hundreds of the reference flux harmonics and later uses these harmonics to determine expansion coefficients required to approximate the perturbed flux. The harmonics are only required for the reference state, and many substantial and localized perturbations from this state are shown to be well-approximated with efficient expressions after the reference calculation is performed. The modal expansion method is coupled to EEC to produce the later-in-time response of each design perturbation. Because the code determines the perturbed flux explicitly, a wide variety of core performance metrics may be monitored by working within a recently-developed data management system called the ARMI. Through ARMI, the response of each design perturbation may be evaluated not only for the flux and reactivity, but also for reactivity coefficients, thermal hydraulics parameters, economics, and transient performance. Considering the parameters available, an automated optimization framework is designed and implemented. A non-parametric surrogate model using the Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE) algorithm is trained with many design perturbations and then transformed through the Physical Programming (PP) paradigm to build an aggregate objective function without iteratively determining weights. Finally, the design is optimized with standard gradient-based methods. Through the power of ACE and the transparency of PP, the optimization system allows users to locate designs that best suit their multiobjective preferences with ease.

  14. Three Dimensional Analysis of 3-Loop PWR RCCA Ejection Accident for High Burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Marciulescu, Cristian; Sung, Yixing; Beard, Charles L.

    2006-07-01

    The Rod Control Cluster Assembly (RCCA) ejection accident is a Condition IV design basis reactivity insertion event for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The event is historically analyzed using a one-dimensional (1D) neutron kinetic code to meet the current licensing criteria for fuel rod burnup to 62,000 MWD/MTU. The Westinghouse USNRC-approved three-dimensional (3D) analysis methodology is based on the neutron kinetics version of the ANC code (SPNOVA) coupled with Westinghouse's version of the EPRI core thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. The 3D methodology provides a more realistic yet conservative analysis approach to meet anticipated reduction in the licensing fuel enthalpy rise limit for high burnup fuel. A rod ejection analysis using the 3D methodology was recently performed for a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR at an up-rated core power of 3151 MWt with reload cores that allow large flexibility in assembly shuffling and a fuel hot rod burnup to 75,000 MWD/MTU. The analysis considered high enrichment fuel assemblies at the control rod locations as well as bounding rodded depletions in the end of life, zero power and full power conditions. The analysis results demonstrated that the peak fuel enthalpy rise is less than 100 cal/g for the transient initiated at the hot zero power condition. The maximum fuel enthalpy is less than 200 cal/g for the transient initiated from the full power condition. (authors)

  15. Revised Burnup Code System SWAT: Description and Validation Using Postirradiation Examination Data

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki; Kiyosumi, Takehide

    2002-05-15

    The burnup code system Step-Wise Burnup Analysis Code System (SWAT) is revised for use in a burnup credit analysis. An important feature of the revised SWAT is that its functions are achieved by calling validated neutronics codes without any changes to the original codes. This feature is realized with a system function of the operating system, which allows the revised SWAT to be independent of the development status of each code.A package of the revised SWAT contains the latest libraries based on JENDL-3.2 and the second version of the JNDC FP library. These libraries allow us to analyze burnup problems, such as an analysis of postirradiation examination (PIE), using the latest evaluated data of not only cross sections but also fission yield and decay constants.Another function of the revised SWAT is a library generator for the ORIGEN2 code, which is one of the most reliable burnup codes. ORIGEN2 users can obtain almost the same results with the revised SWAT using the library prepared by this function.The validation of the revised SWAT is conducted by calculation of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency burnup credit criticality safety benchmark Phase I-B and analyses of PIE data for spent fuel from Takahama Unit 3. The analysis of PIE data shows that the revised SWAT can predict the isotopic composition of main uranium and plutonium with a deviation of 5% from experimental results taken from UO{sub 2} fuels of 17 x 17 fuel assemblies. Many results of fission products including samarium are within a deviation of 10%. This means that the revised SWAT has high reliability to predict the isotopic composition for pressurized water reactor spent fuel.

  16. Parametric Study of the Effect of Burnable Poison Rods for PWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-09-28

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) issued by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (U.S. NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommended restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. In the absence of readily available information on burnable poison rod (BPR) design specifications and usage in U.S. pressurized-water-reactors (PWRs), and the subsequent reactivity effect of BPR exposure on discharged spent nuclear fuel (SNF), NRC staff has indicated a need for additional information in these areas. In response, this report presents a parametric study of the effect of BPR exposure on the reactivity of SNF for various BPR designs, fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions, and documents BPR design specifications. Trends in the reactivity effects of BPRs are established with infinite pin-cell and assembly array calculations with the SCALE and HELIOS code packages, respectively. Subsequently, the reactivity effects of BPRs for typical initial enrichment and burnup combinations are quantified based on three-dimensional (3-D) KENO V.a Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic rail-type cask designed for burnup credit. The calculations demonstrate that the positive reactivity effect due to BPR exposure increases nearly linearly with burnup and is dependent on the number, poison loading, and design of the BPRs and the initial fuel enrichment. Expected typical reactivity increases, based on one-cycle BPR exposure, were found to be less than 1% {Delta}k. Based on the presented analysis, guidance is offered on an appropriate approach for calculating bounding SNF isotopic data for assemblies exposed to BPRs. Although the analyses do not address the issue of validation of depletion methods for assembly designs with BPRs, they do demonstrate that the effect of BPRs is generally well behaved and that independent codes and cross-section libraries predict similar results. The report concludes with a discussion of the issues for consideration and recommendations for inclusion of SNF assemblies exposed to BPRs in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transport.

  17. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kazeminejad, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  18. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  19. Development and experimental validation of a calculation scheme for nuclear heating evaluation in the core of the OSIRIS material testing reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Malouch, F.

    2011-07-01

    The control of the temperature in material samples irradiated in a material testing reactor requires the knowledge of the nuclear heating caused by the energy deposition by neutrons and photons interacting in the irradiation device structures. Thus, a neutron-photonic three-dimensional calculation scheme has been developed to evaluate the nuclear heating in experimental devices irradiated in the core of the OSIRIS MTR reactor (CEA/Saclay Center). The aim is to obtain a predictive tool for the nuclear heating estimation in irradiation devices. This calculation scheme is mainly based on the TRIPOLI-4 three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code, developed by CEA (Saclay Center). An experimental validation has been carried out on the basis of nuclear heating measurements performed in the OSIRIS core. After an overview of the experimental devices irradiated in the OSIRIS reactor, we present the calculation scheme and the first results of the experimental validation. (authors)

  20. Calculated Coupling Efficiency Between an Elliptical-Core Optical Fiber and a Silicon Oxynitride Rib Waveguide [Corrected Copy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Beheim, Glenn

    1995-01-01

    The effective-index method and Marcatili's technique were utilized independently to calculate the electric field profile of a rib channel waveguide. Using the electric field profile calculated from each method, the theoretical coupling efficiency between a single-mode optical fiber and a rib waveguide was calculated using the overlap integral. Perfect alignment was assumed and the coupling efficiency calculated. The coupling efficiency calculation was then repeated for a range of transverse offsets.

  1. DANDE: a linked code system for core neutronics/depletion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LaBauve, R.J.; England, T.R.; George, D.C.; MacFarlane, R.E.; Wilson, W.B.

    1985-06-01

    This report describes DANDE - a modular neutronics, depletion code system for reactor analysis. It consists of nuclear data processing, core physics, and fuel depletion modules, and allows one to use diffusion and transport methods interchangeably in core neutronics calculations. This latter capability is especially important in the design of small modular cores. Additional unique features include the capability of updating the nuclear data file during a calculation; a detailed treatment of depletion, burnable poisons as well as fuel; and the ability to make geometric changes such as control rod repositioning and fuel relocation in the course of a calculation. The detailed treatment of reactor fuel burnup, fission-product creation and decay, as well as inventories of higher-order actinides is a necessity when predicting the behavior of reactor fuel under increased burn conditions. The operation of the code system is made clear in this report by following a sample problem.

  2. Solution of the stationary state of the PWR MOX/UO-2 core transient benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, A.; Langenbuch, S.; Zwermann, W.

    2006-07-01

    The multi-group Discrete Ordinates transport code DORT is applied to solve the stationary state of the OECD/NEA PWR MOX/UO-2 Core Transient Benchmark. Pin cell homogenised cross sections in 16 energy groups and P{sub 1} scattering order have been obtained by fuel assembly burn-up calculations using HELIOS. In this paper, we report on the details of our calculations for this benchmark problem and show our results to be in good agreement with an MCNP Monte Carlo solution with nuclear point data and a multi-group DeCART Method of Characteristics solution. (authors)

  3. Assessment of Reactivity Margins and Loading Curves for PWR Burnup Credit Cask Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-12-17

    This report presents studies to assess reactivity margins and loading curves for pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety evaluations. The studies are based on a generic high-density 32-assembly cask and systematically vary individual calculational (depletion and criticality) assumptions to demonstrate the impact on the predicted effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, and burnup-credit loading curves. The purpose of this report is to provide a greater understanding of the importance of input parameter variations and quantify the impact of calculational assumptions on the outcome of a burnup-credit evaluation. This study should provide guidance to regulators and industry on the technical areas where improved information will most enhance the estimation of accurate subcritical margins. Based on these studies, areas where future work may provide the most benefit are identified. The report also includes an evaluation of the degree of burnup credit needed for high-density casks to transport the current spent nuclear fuel inventory. By comparing PWR discharge data to actinide-only based loading curves and determining the number of assemblies that meet the loading criteria, this evaluation finds that additional negative reactivity (through either increased credit for fuel burnup or cask design/utilization modifications) is necessary to accommodate the majority of current spent fuel assemblies in high-capacity casks. Assemblies that are not acceptable for loading in the prototypic high-capacity cask may be stored or transported by other means (e.g., lower capacity casks that utilize flux traps and/or increased fixed poison concentrations or high-capacity casks with design/utilization modifications).

  4. Benefits of the delta K of depletion benchmarks for burnup credit validation

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.; Machiels, A.

    2012-07-01

    Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) burnup credit validation is demonstrated using the benchmarks for quantifying fuel reactivity decrements, published as 'Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty,' EPRI Report 1022909 (August 2011). This demonstration uses the depletion module TRITON available in the SCALE 6.1 code system followed by criticality calculations using KENO-Va. The difference between the predicted depletion reactivity and the benchmark's depletion reactivity is a bias for the criticality calculations. The uncertainty in the benchmarks is the depletion reactivity uncertainty. This depletion bias and uncertainty is used with the bias and uncertainty from fresh UO{sub 2} critical experiments to determine the criticality safety limits on the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}. The analysis shows that SCALE 6.1 with the ENDF/B-VII 238-group cross section library supports the use of a depletion bias of only 0.0015 in delta k if cooling is ignored and 0.0025 if cooling is credited. The uncertainty in the depletion bias is 0.0064. Reliance on the ENDF/B V cross section library produces much larger disagreement with the benchmarks. The analysis covers numerous combinations of depletion and criticality options. In all cases, the historical uncertainty of 5% of the delta k of depletion ('Kopp memo') was shown to be conservative for fuel with more than 30 GWD/MTU burnup. Since this historically assumed burnup uncertainty is not a function of burnup, the Kopp memo's recommended bias and uncertainty may be exceeded at low burnups, but its absolute magnitude is small. (authors)

  5. Monte Carlo Calculation of Core Reactivity and Fluxes for the Development of the BNCT Neutron Source at the Kyiv Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritzay, Olena; Kalchenko, Oleksandr; Klimova, Nataliya; Razbudey, Volodymyr; Sanzhur, Andriy; Binney, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    The presented results show our consecutive steps in developing a neutron source with parameters required by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at the Kyiv Research Reactor (KRR). The main goal of this work was to analyze the influence of installation of different types of uranium converters close to the reactor core on neutron beam characteristics and on level of reactor safety. The general Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP, version 4B, has been used for these calculations.

  6. Heavy strain conditions in colloidal core-shell quantum dots and their consequences on the vibrational properties from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Peng; Bester, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    We perform large-scale ab initio density functional theory calculations to study the lattice strain and the vibrational properties of colloidal semiconductor core-shell nanoclusters with up to one thousand atoms (radii up to 15.6 Å). For all the group IV, III-V, and II-VI semiconductors studied, we find that the atom positions of the shell atoms seem unaffected by the core material. In particular, for group-IV core-shell clusters the shell material remains unstrained, while the core adapts to the large lattice mismatch (compressive or tensile strain). For InAs-InP and CdSe-CdS, both the cores and the shells are compressively strained corresponding to pressures up to 20 GPa. We show that this compression, which contributes a large blueshift of the vibrational frequencies, is counterbalanced, to some degree, by the undercoordination effect of the near-surface shell, which contributes a redshift to the vibrational modes. These findings lead to a different interpretation of the frequency shifts of recent Raman experiments, while they confirm the speculated interface nature of the low-frequency shoulder of the high-frequency Raman peak.

  7. ABRAC: A microcomputer-based Fortran code for multi-cyle burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Pressurized-water reactors have reactor physics and fuel management characteristics which are very amenable to simplified analysis. Given models which account for the dominant features of core and fuel performance, it is possible to rapidly perform relatively accurate scoping studies of many years of reactor operation in just a few hours on a modern (386-class) microcomputer. Models are described for burnup-dependent cross-section generation, for burnup of fuel under irradiation, and for computation of radial power distributions in hexagonal geometry assuming hexagonal fuel assemblies. Comparisons with more elaborate methods are given in order to validate the models, and to quantify the accuracy of the results. 16 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. A Tight Lattice, Epithermal Core Design for the Integral PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Saccheri, J.G.B.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J.

    2004-07-01

    An 8-year core design for an epithermal, water-cooled reactor has been developed based upon assessments of nuclear reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics and economics. An integral vessel configuration is adopted and self-supporting wire-wrap fuel is employed for the tight lattice of the epithermal core. A streaming path is incorporated in each assembly to ensure a negative void coefficient. A whole-core MCNP simulation of the tight core shows a negative void coefficient for any burnup with positive K{sub EFF}. The VIPRE{sup TM} code has been used to calculate the critical heat flux (CHF) by means of an appropriate wire-wrap CHF correlation, specifically introduced in the source code. Economically, the high fuel enrichment (14% w/o {sup 235}U) and the very long core life (8 ys) lead to high lifetime-levelized unit fuel cycle cost (in mills/kWhre). However, both operation and maintenance and capital-related expenditures strongly benefited from the higher electric output per unit volume, which yielded quite small lifetime-levelized unit capital and operation and maintenance costs for the overall plant. Financing costs are included and an estimate is provided for the total lifetime-levelized unit cost of the epithermal core, which is about 20% lower than that of a more open lattice thermal spectrum core fitting into the same core envelope and with 4-year lifetime. (authors)

  9. S∧4 Reactor: Operating Lifetime and Estimates of Temperature and Burnup Reactivity Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The S∧4 reactor has a sectored, Mo-14%Re solid core for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion. The reactor is loaded with UN fuel, cooled with a He-Xe gas mixture at ~1200 K and operates at steady thermal power of 550 kW. Following a launch abort accident, the axial and radial BeO reflectors easily disassemble upon impact so that the bare reactor is subcriticial when submerged in wet sand or seawater and the core voids are filled with seawater. Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) additives have been shown to increase the UN fuel enrichment and significantly reduce the total mass of the reactor. This paper investigates the effects of SSA additions on the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients and the operational lifetime of the S∧4 reactor. SSAs slightly decrease the temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, but significantly increase the operating lifetime by decreasing the burnup reactivity coefficient. With no SSAs, fuel enrichment is only 58.5 wt% and the estimated operating lifetime is the shortest (7.6 years) with the highest temperature and burnup reactivity feedback coefficients (-0.2709 ¢/K and -1.3470 $/atom%). With europium-151 and gadolinium-155 additions, the enrichment (91.5 and 94 wt%) and operating lifetime (9.9 and 9.8 years) of the S∧4 reactor are the highest while the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients (-0.2382 and -0.2447 ¢/K -0.9073 and 0.8502 $/atom%) are the lowest.

  10. Determination of deuterium-tritium critical burn-up parameter by four temperature theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazirzadeh, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Khanbabei, B.

    2015-12-01

    Conditions for thermonuclear burn-up of an equimolar mixture of deuterium-tritium in non-equilibrium plasma have been investigated by four temperature theory. The photon distribution shape significantly affects the nature of thermonuclear burn. In three temperature model, the photon distribution is Planckian but in four temperature theory the photon distribution has a pure Planck form below a certain cut-off energy and then for photon energy above this cut-off energy makes a transition to Bose-Einstein distribution with a finite chemical potential. The objective was to develop four temperature theory in a plasma to calculate the critical burn up parameter which depends upon initial density, the plasma components initial temperatures, and hot spot size. All the obtained results from four temperature theory model are compared with 3 temperature model. It is shown that the values of critical burn-up parameter calculated by four temperature theory are smaller than those of three temperature model.

  11. Microstructural modeling of thermal conductivity of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, Melissa; Tonks, Michael; Novascone, Stephen; Hayes, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels as a function of burn-up and temperature is fundamental to the efficient and safe operation of nuclear reactors. However, modeling the thermal conductivity of fuel is greatly complicated by the radially inhomogeneous nature of irradiated fuel in both composition and microstructure. In this work, radially and temperature-dependent models for effective thermal conductivity were developed utilizing optical micrographs of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel. The micrographs were employed to create finite element meshes with the OOF2 software. The meshes were then used to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the microstructures using the BISON [1] fuel performance code. The new thermal conductivity models were used to calculate thermal profiles at end of life for the fuel pellets. These results were compared to thermal conductivity models from the literature, and comparison between the new finite element-based thermal conductivity model and the Duriez-Lucuta model was favorable.

  12. Microstructural Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Stephen Novascone; Steven Hayes

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels as a function of burn-up and temperature is fundamental to the efficient and safe operation of nuclear reactors. However, modeling the thermal conductivity of fuel is greatly complicated by the radially inhomogeneous nature of irradiated fuel in both composition and microstructure. In this work, radially and temperature-dependent models for effective thermal conductivity were developed utilizing optical micrographs of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel. The micrographs were employed to create finite element meshes with the OOF2 software. The meshes were then used to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the microstructures using the BISON fuel performance code. The new thermal conductivity models were used to calculate thermal profiles at end of life for the fuel pellets. These results were compared to thermal conductivity models from the literature, and comparison between the new finite element-based thermal conductivity model and the Duriez–Lucuta model was favorable.

  13. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Pecchia, M.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  14. First-principles calculation of charge transfer at surfaces: The case of core-excited Ar*(2p3/2-14s) on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Portal, Daniel; Menzel, Dietrich; Echenique, Pedro M.

    2007-12-01

    We present an ab initio scheme for the calculation of the resonant charge transfer of electrons at surfaces. The electron initially resides in a bound resonance, i.e., appearing below the vacuum level, associated with a core-excited adsorbate. Our treatment is based on first-principles density-functional calculations of this initial situation using finite slabs. These results are combined with bulk calculations of the substrate material to obtain the Hamiltonian of the semi-infinite system in which the electron evolves. Therefore, we include a realistic description of the electronic structure of both subsystems, substrate and adsorbate, and the interaction between them. The surface Green’s function is then computed using the transfer matrix method and projected onto a wave packet localized in the adsorbate. The width and energy of the resonance can be obtained from an analysis of the projected Green’s function, and the charge transfer time can be estimated. The calculated width is independent of the wave packet used for the projection, at least as far as there are not several overlapping resonances at neighboring energies. Alternatively, one can directly calculate the time evolution of the population of the initial wave packet. Both alternatives are presented and compared. Our first-principles calculations are based on periodic arrangements of adsorbates on the surface. With an appropriate average of the k∥ resolved results, one can extrapolate to the limit of an isolated adsorbate. We discuss several possibilities to do this. As an application, we focus on the case of the 4s bound resonance of a core-excited Ar*(2p3/2-14s) adsorbate on Ru(0001), for which there are extensive experimental studies. The calculated values and trends are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Efficiency and accuracy of the perturbation response coefficient generation method for whole core comet calculations in BWR and CANDU configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    The coarse mesh transport method (COMET) is a highly accurate and efficient computational tool which predicts whole-core neutronics behaviors for heterogeneous reactor cores via a pre-computed eigenvalue-dependent response coefficient (function) library. Recently, a high order perturbation method was developed to significantly improve the efficiency of the library generation method. In that work, the method's accuracy and efficiency was tested in a small PWR benchmark problem. This paper extends the application of the perturbation method to include problems typical of the other water reactor cores such as BWR and CANDU bundles. It is found that the response coefficients predicted by the perturbation method for typical BWR bundles agree very well with those directly computed by the Monte Carlo method. The average and maximum relative errors in the surface-to-surface response coefficients are 0.02%-0.05% and 0.06%-0.25%, respectively. For CANDU bundles, the corresponding quantities are 0.01%-0.05% and 0.04% -0.15%. It is concluded that the perturbation method is highly accurate and efficient with a wide range of applicability. (authors)

  16. Review of Technical Issues Related to Predicting Isotopic Compositions and Source Terms for High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I. C.; Parks, C. V.

    2000-12-11

    This report has been prepared to review the technical issues important to the prediction of isotopic compositions and source terms for high-burnup, light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel as utilized in the licensing of spent fuel transport and storage systems. The current trend towards higher initial 235U enrichments, more complex assembly designs, and more efficient fuel management schemes has resulted in higher spent fuel burnups than seen in the past. This trend has led to a situation where high-burnup assemblies from operating LWRs now extend beyond the area where available experimental data can be used to validate the computational methods employed to calculate spent fuel inventories and source terms. This report provides a brief review of currently available validation data, including isotopic assays, decay heat measurements, and shielded dose-rate measurements. Potential new sources of experimental data available in the near term are identified. A review of the background issues important to isotopic predictions and some of the perceived technical challenges that high-burnup fuel presents to the current computational methods are discussed. Based on the review, the phenomena that need to be investigated further and the technical issues that require resolution are presented. The methods and data development that may be required to address the possible shortcomings of physics and depletion methods in the high-burnup and high-enrichment regime are also discussed. Finally, a sensitivity analysis methodology is presented. This methodology is currently being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a computational tool to better understand the changing relative significance of the underlying nuclear data in the different enrichment and burnup regimes and to identify the processes that are dominant in the high-burnup regime. The potential application of the sensitivity analysis methodology to help establish a range of applicability for experimental data in code validation is also discussed and demonstrated.

  17. Development of HELIOS/CAPP code system for the analysis of block type VHTR cores

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. C.; Han, T. Y.; Jo, C. K.; Noh, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the HELIOS/CAPP code system developed for the analysis of block type VHTR cores is presented and verified against several VHTR core configurations. Verification results shows that HELIOS code predicts less negative MTC and RTC than McCARD code does and thus HELIOS code overestimates the multiplication factors at the states with high moderator and reflector temperature especially when the B{sub 4}C BP is loaded. In the depletion calculation for the VHTR single cell fuel element, the error of HELIOS code increases as burnup does. It is ascribed to the fact that HELIOS code treats some fission product nuclides with large resonances as non-resonant nuclides. In the 2-D core depletion calculation, a relatively large reactivity error is observed in the case with BP loading while the reactivity error in the case without BP loading is less than 300 pcm. (authors)

  18. Using NDA Techniques to Improve Safeguards Metrics on Burnup Quantification and Plutonium Content in LWR SNF

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, Steven F; Charlton, William S; Solodov, Alexander A; Ehinger, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Globally, there exists a long history in reprocessing in evaluation of the shipper/receiver difference (SRD) on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) received and processed. Typically, the declared shipper s values for uranium and plutonium in SNF (based on calculations involving the initial manufacturer s data and reactor operating history) are used as the input quantities to the head-end process of the facility. Problems have been encountered when comparing these values with measured results of the input accountability tank contents. A typical comparison yields a systematic bias indicated as a loss of 5 7 percent of the plutonium (Pu) and approximately 1 percent for the uranium (U). Studies suggest that such deviation can be attributed to the non-linear nature of the axial burnup values of the SNF. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Texas A&M University are co-investigating the development of a new method, via Nondestructive Assay (NDA) techniques, to improve the accuracy in burnup and Pu content quantification. Two major components have been identified to achieve this objective. The first component calculates a measurement-based burnup profile along the axis of a fuel rod. Gamma-ray data is collected at numerous locations along the axis of the fuel rod using a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector designed for a wide range of gamma-ray energies. Using two fission products, 137Cs and 134Cs, the burnup is calculated at each measurement location and a profile created along the axis of the rod based on the individual measurement locations. The second component measures the U/Pu ratio using an HPGe detector configured for relatively low-energy gamma-rays including x-rays. Fluorescence x-rays from U and Pu are measured and compared to the U/Pu ratio determined from a destructive analysis of the sample. This will be used to establish a relationship between the measured and actual values. This relationship will be combined with the burnup analysis results to establish a relationship between fission product activity and Pu content. It is anticipated that this new method will allow receiving facilities to make a limited number of NDA, gamma-ray, measurements to confirm the shipper declared values for burnup and Pu content thereby improving the SRD.

  19. Analysis of burnup and isotopic compositions of BWR 9 x 9 UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Ando, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    2012-07-01

    In order to extend isotopic composition data focusing on fission product nuclides, measurements are progressing using facilities of JAEA for five samples taken from high burnup BWR 9 x 9 UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies. Neutronics analysis with an infinite assembly model was applied to the preliminary measurement data using a continuous-energy Monte Carlo burnup calculation code MVP-BURN with nuclear libraries based on JENDL-3.3 and JENDL-4.0. The burnups of the samples were determined to be 28.0, 39.3, 56.6, 68.1, and 64.0 GWd/t by the Nd-148 method. They were compared with those calculated using node-average irradiation histories of power and in-channel void fractions which were taken from the plant data. The comparison results showed that the deviations of the calculated burnups from the measurements were -4 to 3%. It was confirmed that adopting the nuclear data library based on JENDL-4.0 reduced the deviations of the calculated isotopic compositions from the measurements for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 144}Nd, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 146}Nd, {sup 148}Nd, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 154}Gd, and {sup 157}Gd. On the other hand, the effect of the revision in the nuclear. data library on the neutronics analysis was not significant for major U and Pu isotopes. (authors)

  20. Benefits of actinide-only burnup credit for shutdown PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.; Fuentes, E.; Kang, C.; Rivard, D.

    1998-02-01

    Owners of PWRs that are shutdown prior to resolution of interim storage or permanent disposal issues have to make difficult decisions on what to do with their spent fuel. Maine Yankee is currently evaluating multiple options for spent fuel storage. Their spent fuel pool has 1,434 assemblies. In order to evaluate the value to a utility of actinide-only burnup credit, analysis of the number of canisters required with and without burnup credit was made. In order to perform the analysis, loading curves were developed for the Holtec Hi-Star 100/MPC-32. The MPC-32 is hoped to be representative of future burnup credit designs from many vendors. The loading curves were generated using the actinide-only burnup credit currently under NRC review. The canister was analyzed for full loading (32 assemblies) and with partial loadings of 30 and 28 assemblies. If no burnup credit is used the maximum capacity was assumed to be 24 assemblies. this reduced capacity is due to the space required for flux traps which are needed to sufficiently reduce the canister reactivity for the fresh fuel assumption. Without burnup credit the 1,343 assemblies would require 60 canisters. If all the fuel could be loaded into the 32 assembly canisters only 45 canisters would be required. Although the actinide-only burnup credit approach is very conservative, the total number of canisters required is only 47 which is only two short of the minimum possible number of canisters. The utility is expected to buy the canister and the storage overpack. A reasonable cost estimate for the canister plus overpack is $500,000. Actinide-only burnup credit would save 13 canisters and overpacks which is a savings of about $6.5 million. This savings is somewhat reduced since burnup credit requires a verification measurement of burnup. The measurement costs for these assemblies can be estimated as about $1 million. The net savings would be $5.5 million.

  1. The features of neutronic calculations for fast reactors with hybrid cores on the basis of BFS-62-3A critical assembly experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mitenkova, E. F.; Novikov, N. V.; Blokhin, A. I.

    2012-07-01

    The different (U-Pu) fuel compositions are considered for next generation of sodium fast breeder reactors. The considerable discrepancies in axial and radial neutron spectra for hybrid reactor systems compared to the cores with UO{sub 2} fuel cause increasing uncertainty of generating the group nuclear constants in those reactor systems. The calculation results of BFS-62-3A critical assembly which is considered as full-scale model of BN-600 hybrid core with steel reflector specify quite different spectra in local areas. For those systems the MCNP 5 calculations demonstrate significant sensitivity of effective multiplication factor K{sub eff} and spectral indices to nuclear data libraries. For {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu the results of calculated radial fission rate distributions against the reconstructed ones are analyzed. Comparative analysis of spectral indices, neutron spectra and radial fission rate distributions are performed using the different versions of ENDF/B, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, JEFF-3.1.1 libraries and BROND-3 for Fe, Cr isotopes. For analyzing the fission rate sensitivity to the plutonium presence in the fuel {sup 239}Pu is substituted for {sup 235}U (enrichment 90%) in the FA areas containing the plutonium. For {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu radial fission rate distributions the explanation of pick values discrepancies is based on the group fission constants analyses and possible underestimation of some features at the experimental data recovery method (Westcott factors, temperature dependence). (authors)

  2. Towards a spectroscopically accurate set of potentials for heavy hydride laser cooling candidates: Effective core potential calculations of BaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Keith; McLaughlin, Brendan M.; Lane, Ian C.

    2016-04-01

    BaH (and its isotopomers) is an attractive molecular candidate for laser cooling to ultracold temperatures and a potential precursor for the production of ultracold gases of hydrogen and deuterium. The theoretical challenge is to simulate the laser cooling cycle as reliably as possible and this paper addresses the generation of a highly accurate ab initio 2Σ+ potential for such studies. The performance of various basis sets within the multi-reference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approximation with the Davidson correction is tested and taken to the Complete Basis Set (CBS) limit. It is shown that the calculated molecular constants using a 46 electron effective core-potential and even-tempered augmented polarized core-valence basis sets (aug-pCVnZ-PP, n = 4 and 5) but only including three active electrons in the MRCI calculation are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. The predicted dissociation energy De for the X2Σ+ state (extrapolated to the CBS limit) is 16 895.12 cm-1 (2.094 eV), which agrees within 0.1% of a revised experimental value of <16 910.6 cm-1, while the calculated re is within 0.03 pm of the experimental result.

  3. Towards a spectroscopically accurate set of potentials for heavy hydride laser cooling candidates: Effective core potential calculations of BaH.

    PubMed

    Moore, Keith; McLaughlin, Brendan M; Lane, Ian C

    2016-04-14

    BaH (and its isotopomers) is an attractive molecular candidate for laser cooling to ultracold temperatures and a potential precursor for the production of ultracold gases of hydrogen and deuterium. The theoretical challenge is to simulate the laser cooling cycle as reliably as possible and this paper addresses the generation of a highly accurate ab initio (2)Σ(+) potential for such studies. The performance of various basis sets within the multi-reference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approximation with the Davidson correction is tested and taken to the Complete Basis Set (CBS) limit. It is shown that the calculated molecular constants using a 46 electron effective core-potential and even-tempered augmented polarized core-valence basis sets (aug-pCVnZ-PP, n = 4 and 5) but only including three active electrons in the MRCI calculation are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. The predicted dissociation energy De for the X(2)Σ(+) state (extrapolated to the CBS limit) is 16 895.12 cm(-1) (2.094 eV), which agrees within 0.1% of a revised experimental value of <16 910.6 cm(-1), while the calculated re is within 0.03 pm of the experimental result. PMID:27083728

  4. First-principles core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy calculation on arsenic defects in silicon crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Hiroki; Miyazawa, Miki; Matsushima, Naoki; Yamauchi, Jun

    2014-02-21

    We investigate the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) binding energies of As 3d in Si for various defects in neutral and charged states by first-principles calculation. It is found that the complexes of a substitutional As and a vacancy in charged and neutral states explain the experimentally observed unknown peak very well.

  5. Uncertainties in the effects of burnup and their impact on criticality safety licensing criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.W.; Fisher, L.E.

    1990-07-13

    Current criteria for criticality safety for spent fuel shipping and storage casks are conservative because no credit is permitted for the effects of burnup of the fuel inside the cask. Cask designs that will transport and store large numbers of fuel assemblies (20 or more) must devote a substantial part of their payload to criticality control measures if they are to meet this criteria. The Department of Energy is developing the data necessary to support safety analyses that incorporate the effects of burnup for the next generation of spent fuel shipping casks. The efforts described here are devoted to the development of acceptance criteria that will be the basis for accepting safety analyses. Preliminary estimates of the uncertainties of the effects of burnup have been developed to provide a basis for the consideration of critically safety criteria. The criticality safety margins in a spent fuel shipping or storage cask are dominated by the portions of a fuel assembly that are in low power regions of a reactor core, and the reactor operating conditions are very different from spent fuel storage or transport cask conditions. Consequently, the experience that has been gathered during years of reactor operation does not apply directly to the prediction of criticality safety margins for spent fuel shipping or storage casks. The preliminary estimates of the uncertainties presented in this paper must be refined by both analytical and empirical studies that address both the magnitude of the uncertainties and their interdependence. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Core-valence Gaussian basis sets of double and triple zeta quality for Li to Ar. Applications in calculations of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, P. J. P.; Gomes, M. S.; Pires, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    In this Letter we extend the XZP basis sets (X = D and T) developed by Jorge et al. for Li-Ar atoms with the tight functions and optimize these functions using the criterion of maximizing the core correlation energy (CCE) developed by Woon and Dunning. The basis sets generated with this method were designated as CXZP. Our results showed CCE of the CXZP sets compared to the XZP sets were between 153 and 240 millihartrees (for Na-Ar). Applications in calculations of NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants at the B3LYP and SOPPA levels were performed.

  7. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR using a U7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2014-06-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The LEU fuel may be a monolithic foil (LEUm) of U10Mo (10% molybdenum by weight in an alloy with uranium) or a dispersion of U7Mo in aluminum (LEUd). A previous report provided neutronic calculations for the LEUm fuel and this report presents the neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel. The neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel are compared to those previously obtained for the present HEU fuel and the proposed LEUm fuel. The results show no significant differences between the LEUm and the LEUd other than the LEUd fuel requires slightly less uranium than the LEUm fuel due to less molybdenum being present. The calculations include kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions under normal operation and with misloaded fuel elements.

  8. Calculation and comparison of xenon and samarium reactivities of the HEU, LEU core in the low power research reactor.

    PubMed

    Dawahra, S; Khattab, K; Saba, G

    2015-07-01

    Comparative studies for the conversion of the fuel from HEU to LEU in the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) have been performed using the MCNP4C and GETERA codes. The precise calculations of (135)Xe and (149)Sm concentrations and reactivities were carried out and compared during the MNSR operation time and after shutdown for the existing HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched) and the potential LEU fuels (U3Si2-Al, U3Si-Al, U9Mo-Al, 19.75% enriched and UO2, 12.6% enriched) in this paper using the MCNP4C and GETERA codes. It was found that the (135)Xe and (149)Sm reactivities did not reach their equilibrium reactivities during the daily operating time of the reactor. The (149)Sm reactivities could be neglected compared to (135)Xe reactivities during the reactor operating time and after shutdown. The calculations for the UAl4-Al produced the highest (135)Xe reactivity in all the studied fuel group during the reactor operation (0.39 mk) and after the reactor shutdown (0.735 mk), It followed by U3Si-Al (0.34 mk, 0.653 mk), U3Si2-Al (0.33 mk, 0.634 mk), U9Mo-Al (0.3 mk, 0.568 mk) and UO2 (0.24 mk, 0.448 mk) fuels, respectively. Finally, the results showed that the UO2 was the best candidate for fuel conversion to LEU in the MNSR since it gave the lowest (135)Xe reactivity during the reactor operation and after shutdown. PMID:25816783

  9. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-08-02

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses.

  10. PWR cores with silicon carbide cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dobisesky, J. P.; Carpenter, D.; Pilat, E.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of using silicon carbide rather than Zircaloy cladding, to reach higher power levels and higher discharge burnups in PWRs has been evaluated. A preliminary fuel design using fuel rods with the same dimensions as in the Westinghouse Robust Fuel Assembly but with fuel pellets having 10 vol% central void has been adopted to mitigate the higher fuel temperatures that occur due to the lower thermal conductivity of the silicon carbide and to the persistence of the open clad-pellet gap over most of the fuel life. With this modified fuel design, it is possible to achieve 18 month cycles that meet present-day operating constraints on peaking factor, boron concentration, reactivity coefficients and shutdown margin, while allowing batch average discharge burnups up to 80 MWD/kgU and peak rod burnups up to 100 MWD/kgU. Power uprates of 10% and possibly 20% also appear feasible. For non-uprated cores, the silicon carbide-clad fuel has a clear advantage that increases with increasing discharge burnup. Even for comparable discharge burnups, there is a savings in enriched uranium. Control rod configuration modifications may be required to meet the shutdown margin criterion for the 20% up-rate. Silicon carbide's ability to sustain higher burnups than Zircaloy also allows the design of a licensable two year cycle with only 96 fresh assemblies, avoiding the enriched uranium penalty incurred with use of larger batch sizes due to their excessive leakage. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of burnup credit for fuel storage analysis -- Experience in Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, J.M.; Recio, M.

    1995-04-01

    Several Spanish light water reactor commercial nuclear power plants are close to maximum spent-fuel pool storage capacity. The utilities are working on the implementation of state-of-the-art methods to increase the storage capacity, including both changes in the pool design (recracking) and the implementation of new analysis approaches with reduced conservation (burnup credit). Burnup credit criticality safety analyses have been approved for two pressurized water reactor plants (four units) and one boiling water reactor (BWR); an other BWR storage analysis is being developed at this moment. The elimination of the ``fresh fuel assumption`` increases the complexity of the criticality analysis to be performed, sometimes putting into question the capability of the analytic tools to properly describe this new situation and increasing the scope of the scenarios to be analyzed. From a regulatory perspective, the reactivity reduction associated with burnup of the fuel can be given credit only if the exposure of each fuel bundle can be known with enough accuracy. Subcriticality of spent-fuel storage depends mainly on the initial fuel enrichment, storage geometry, fuel exposure history, and cooling time. The last two aspects introduced new uncertainties in the criticality analysis that should be quantified in an adequate way. In addition, each and every fuel bundle has its own specific exposure history, so that strong assumptions and simplified calculational schemes have to be developed to undertake the analysis. The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Spanish regulatory authority on the matter of nuclear safety and radiation protection, plays an active role in the development of analysis methods to support burnup credit, making proposals that may be beneficial in terms of risk and cost while keeping the widest safety margins possible.

  12. Portable gamma-ray holdup and attributes measurements of high- and variable-burnup plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, T.R.; Russo, P.A.; Miller, M.C.; Menlove, H.O. ); Takahashi, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Aoki, I. )

    1991-01-01

    High burnup-plutonium holdup has been assayed quantitatively by low resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The assay was calibrated with four plutonium standards representing a range of fuel burnup and {sup 241}Am content. Selection of a calibration standard based on its qualitative spectral similarity to gamma-ray spectra of the process material is partially responsible for the success of these holdup measurements. The spectral analysis method is based on the determination of net counts in a single spectral region of interest (ROI). However, the low-resolution gamma-ray assay signal for the high-burnup plutonium includes unknown amounts of contamination from {sup 241}Am. For most needs, the range of calibration standards required for this selection procedure is not available. A new low-resolution gamma-ray spectral analysis procedure for assay of {sup 239}Pu has been developed. The procedure uses the calculated isotope activity ratios and the measured net counts in three spectral ROIs to evaluate and remove the {sup 241}Am contamination from the {sup 239}Pu assay signal on a spectrum-by-spectrum basis. The calibration for the new procedure requires only a single plutonium standard. The procedure also provides a measure of the burnup and age attributes of holdup deposits. The new procedure has been demonstrated using portable gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment for a wide range of plutonium standards and has also been applied to the assay of {sup 239}Pu holdup in a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Investigations of Alternative Steam Generator Location and Flatter Core Geometry for Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Johan; Tucek, Kamil; Wider, Hartmut

    2006-07-01

    This paper concerns two independent safety investigations on critical and sub-critical heavy liquid metal cooled fast reactors using simple flow paths. The first investigation applies to locating the steam generators in the risers instead of the down-comers of a simple flow path designed sub-critical reactor of 600 MW{sub th} power. This was compared to a similar design, but with the steam generators located in the downcomers. The transients investigated were Total-Loss-of-Power and unprotected Loss-Of-Flow. It is shown that this reactor peaks at 1041 K after 29 hours during a Total-Loss-Of-Power accident. The difference between locating the steam generators in the risers and the downcomers is insignificant for this accident type. During an unprotected Loss-Of-Flow accident at full power, the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 1010 K, which is 337 K above nominal outlet temperature. The second investigation concerns a 1426 MW{sub th} critical reactor where the influence of the core height versus the core outlet temperature is studied during an unprotected Loss-Of-Flow and Total-Loss-Of-Power accident. A pancake type core geometry of 1.0 m height and 5.8 m diameter, is compared to a compact core of 2 m height and 4.5 m diameter. Moderators, like BeO and hydrides, and their influence on safety coefficients and burnup swings are also presented. Both cores incinerate transuranics from spent LWR fuel with minor actinide fraction of 5%. We show that LFRs can be designed both to breed and burn transuranics from LWRs. It is shown that the hydrides lead to the most favorable reactivity feedbacks, but the poorest reactivity swing. The computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CD was used for all thermal hydraulic calculations, and the MCNP and MCB for neutronics, and burn-up calculations. (authors)

  14. Monte Carlo burnup code acceleration with the correlated sampling method. Preliminary test on an UOX cell with TRIPOLI-4{sup R}

    SciTech Connect

    Dieudonne, C.; Dumonteil, E.; Malvagi, F.; Diop, C. M.

    2013-07-01

    For several years, Monte Carlo burnup/depletion codes have appeared, which couple a Monte Carlo code to simulate the neutron transport to a deterministic method that computes the medium depletion due to the neutron flux. Solving Boltzmann and Bateman equations in such a way allows to track fine 3 dimensional effects and to get rid of multi-group hypotheses done by deterministic solvers. The counterpart is the prohibitive calculation time due to the time-expensive Monte Carlo solver called at each time step. Therefore, great improvements in term of calculation time could be expected if one could get rid of Monte Carlo transport sequences. For example, it may seem interesting to run an initial Monte Carlo simulation only once, for the first time/burnup step, and then to use the concentration perturbation capability of the Monte Carlo code to replace the other time/burnup steps (the different burnup steps are seen like perturbations of the concentrations of the initial burnup step). This paper presents some advantages and limitations of this technique and preliminary results in terms of speed up and figure of merit. Finally, we will detail different possible calculation scheme based on that method. (authors)

  15. KUGEL: a thermal, hydraulic, fuel performance, and gaseous fission product release code for pebble bed reactor core analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Fehrenbach, M.E.

    1981-05-01

    The KUGEL computer code is designed to perform thermal/hydraulic analysis and coated-fuel particle performance calculations for axisymmetric pebble bed reactor (PBR) cores. This computer code was developed as part of a Department of Energy (DOE)-funded study designed to verify the published core performance data on PBRs. The KUGEL code is designed to interface directly with the 2DB code, a two-dimensional neutron diffusion code, to obtain distributions of thermal power, fission rate, fuel burnup, and fast neutron fluence, which are needed for thermal/hydraulic and fuel performance calculations. The code is variably dimensioned so that problem size can be easily varied. An interpolation routine allows variable mesh size to be used between the 2DB output and the two-dimensional thermal/hydraulic calculations.

  16. Approach for validating actinide and fission product compositions for burnup credit criticality safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Gauld, Ian C.; Ilas, Germina; Wagner, John C.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a depletion code validation approach for criticality safety analysis using burnup credit for actinide and fission product nuclides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) compositions. The technical basis for determining the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations is comparison of calculations to available measurements obtained from destructive radiochemical assay of SNF samples. Probability distributions developed for the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations were applied to the SNF compositions of a criticality safety analysis model by the use of a Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling method to determine bias and bias uncertainty in effective neutron multiplication factor. Application of the Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling approach is demonstrated for representative criticality safety analysis models of pressurized water reactor spent fuel pool storage racks and transportation packages using burnup-dependent nuclide concentrations calculated with SCALE 6.1 and the ENDF/B-VII nuclear data. Furthermore, the validation approach and results support a recent revision of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Interim Staff Guidance 8.

  17. Approach for validating actinide and fission product compositions for burnup credit criticality safety analyses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Gauld, Ian C.; Ilas, Germina; Wagner, John C.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a depletion code validation approach for criticality safety analysis using burnup credit for actinide and fission product nuclides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) compositions. The technical basis for determining the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations is comparison of calculations to available measurements obtained from destructive radiochemical assay of SNF samples. Probability distributions developed for the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations were applied to the SNF compositions of a criticality safety analysis model by the use of a Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling method to determine bias and bias uncertainty in effective neutron multiplication factor. Application ofmore » the Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling approach is demonstrated for representative criticality safety analysis models of pressurized water reactor spent fuel pool storage racks and transportation packages using burnup-dependent nuclide concentrations calculated with SCALE 6.1 and the ENDF/B-VII nuclear data. Furthermore, the validation approach and results support a recent revision of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Interim Staff Guidance 8.« less

  18. Approach for Validating Actinide and Fission Product Compositions for Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Gauld, Ian C; Ilas, Germina; Wagner, John C

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a depletion code validation approach for criticality safety analysis using burnup credit for actinide and fission product nuclides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) compositions. The technical basis for determining the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations is comparison of calculations to available measurements obtained from destructive radiochemical assay of SNF samples. Probability distributions developed for the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations were applied to the SNF compositions of a criticality safety analysis model by the use of a Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling method to determine bias and bias uncertainty in effective neutron multiplication factor. Application of the Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling approach is demonstrated for representative criticality safety analysis models of pressurized water reactor spent fuel pool storage racks and transportation packages using burnup-dependent nuclide concentrations calculated with SCALE 6.1 and the ENDF/B-VII nuclear data. The validation approach and results support a recent revision of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Interim Staff Guidance 8.

  19. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  20. First-principle calculation of core level binding energies of Li{sub x}PO{sub y}N{sub z} solid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Guille, Émilie; Vallverdu, Germain Baraille, Isabelle

    2014-12-28

    We present first-principle calculations of core-level binding energies for the study of insulating, bulk phase, compounds, based on the Slater-Janak transition state model. Those calculations were performed in order to find a reliable model of the amorphous Li{sub x}PO{sub y}N{sub z} solid electrolyte which is able to reproduce its electronic properties gathered from X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) experiments. As a starting point, Li{sub 2}PO{sub 2}N models were investigated. These models, proposed by Du et al. on the basis of thermodynamics and vibrational properties, were the first structural models of Li{sub x}PO{sub y}N{sub z}. Thanks to chemical and structural modifications applied to Li{sub 2}PO{sub 2}N structures, which allow to demonstrate the relevance of our computational approach, we raise an issue concerning the possibility of encountering a non-bridging kind of nitrogen atoms (=N{sup −}) in Li{sub x}PO{sub y}N{sub z} compounds.

  1. Numerical Tests for the Problem of U-Pu Fuel Burnup in Fuel Rod and Polycell Models Using the MCNP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, V. G.; Lopatkin, A. V.

    An important aspect in the verification of the engineering techniques used in the safety analysis of MOX-fuelled reactors, is the preparation of test calculations to determine nuclide composition variations under irradiation and analysis of burnup problem errors resulting from various factors, such as, for instance, the effect of nuclear data uncertainties on nuclide concentration calculations. So far, no universally recognized tests have been devised. A calculation technique has been developed for solving the problem using the up-to-date calculation tools and the latest versions of nuclear libraries. Initially, in 1997, a code was drawn up in an effort under ISTC Project No. 116 to calculate the burnup in one VVER-1000 fuel rod, using the MCNP Code. Later on, the authors developed a computation technique which allows calculating fuel burnup in models of a fuel rod, or a fuel assembly, or the whole reactor. It became possible to apply it to fuel burnup in all types of nuclear reactors and subcritical blankets.

  2. Design and analysis of a nuclear reactor core for innovative small light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Alexey I.

    In order to address the energy needs of developing countries and remote communities, Oregon State University has proposed the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design. In order to achieve five years of operation without refueling, use of 8% enriched fuel is necessary. This dissertation is focused on core design issues related with increased fuel enrichment (8.0%) and specific MASLWR operational conditions (such as lower operational pressure and temperature, and increased leakage due to small core). Neutron physics calculations are performed with the commercial nuclear industry tools CASMO-4 and SIMULATE-3, developed by Studsvik Scandpower Inc. The first set of results are generated from infinite lattice level calculations with CASMO-4, and focus on evaluation of the principal differences between standard PWR fuel and MASLWR fuel. Chapter 4-1 covers aspects of fuel isotopic composition changes with burnup, evaluation of kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients. Chapter 4-2 discusses gadolinium self-shielding and shadowing effects, and subsequent impacts on power generation peaking and Reactor Control System shadowing. The second aspect of the research is dedicated to core design issues, such as reflector design (chapter 4-3), burnable absorber distribution and programmed fuel burnup and fuel use strategy (chapter 4-4). This section also includes discussion of the parameters important for safety and evaluation of Reactor Control System options for the proposed core design. An evaluation of the sensitivity of the proposed design to uncertainty in calculated parameters is presented in chapter 4-5. The results presented in this dissertation cover a new area of reactor design and operational parameters, and may be applicable to other small and large pressurized water reactor designs.

  3. A highly heterogeneous 3D PWR core benchmark: deterministic and Monte Carlo method comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaboulay, J.-C.; Damian, F.; Douce, S.; Lopez, F.; Guenaut, C.; Aggery, A.; Poinot-Salanon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Physical analyses of the LWR potential performances with regards to the fuel utilization require an important part of the work dedicated to the validation of the deterministic models used for theses analyses. Advances in both codes and computer technology give the opportunity to perform the validation of these models on complex 3D core configurations closed to the physical situations encountered (both steady-state and transient configurations). In this paper, we used the Monte Carlo Transport code TRIPOLI-4®; to describe a whole 3D large-scale and highly-heterogeneous LWR core. The aim of this study is to validate the deterministic CRONOS2 code to Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®; in a relevant PWR core configuration. As a consequence, a 3D pin by pin model with a consistent number of volumes (4.3 millions) and media (around 23,000) is established to precisely characterize the core at equilibrium cycle, namely using a refined burn-up and moderator density maps. The configuration selected for this analysis is a very heterogeneous PWR high conversion core with fissile (MOX fuel) and fertile zones (depleted uranium). Furthermore, a tight pitch lattice is selcted (to increase conversion of 238U in 239Pu) that leads to harder neutron spectrum compared to standard PWR assembly. In these conditions two main subjects will be discussed: the Monte Carlo variance calculation and the assessment of the diffusion operator with two energy groups for the core calculation.

  4. Simulation of Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) Burnup in Russian VVER Reactors with the HELIOS Code Package

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.; Kravchenko, J.; Lazarenko, A.; Pavlovitchev, A.; Sidorenko, V.; Chetverikov, A.

    2000-03-01

    The HELIOS reactor-physics computer program system was used to simulate the burnup of UO{sub 2} fuel in three VVER reactors. The manner in which HELIOS was used in these simulations is described. Predictions of concentrations for actinides up to {sup 244}Cm and for isotopes of neodymium were compared with laboratory-measured values. Reasonable agreement between calculated and measured values was seen for experimental samples from a fuel rod in the interior of an assembly.

  5. Isotopic biases for actinide-only burnup credit

    SciTech Connect

    Rahimi, M.; Lancaster, D.; Hoeffer, B.; Nichols, M.

    1997-04-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to present the new methodology for establishing bias and uncertainty associated with isotopic prediction in spent fuel assemblies for burnup credit analysis. The analysis applies to the design of criticality control systems for spent fuel casks. A total of 54 spent fuel samples were modeled and analyzed using the Shielding Analyses Sequence (SAS2H). Multiple regression analysis and a trending test were performed to develop isotopic correction factors for 10 actinide burnup credit isotopes. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  6. WIMS/PANTHER analysis of UO{sub 2}/MOX cores using embedded super-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, M.; Bryce, P.; Hall, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a method of analysing PWR UO{sub 2}MOX cores with WIMS/PANTHER. Embedded super-cells, run within the reactor code, are used to correct the standard methodology of using 2-group smeared data from single assembly lattice calculations. In many other codes the weakness of this standard approach has been improved for MOX by imposing a more realistic environment in the lattice code, or by improving the sophistication of the reactor code. In this approach an intermediate set of calculations is introduced, leaving both lattice and reactor calculations broadly unchanged. The essence of the approach is that the whole core is broken down into a set of 'embedded' super-cells, each extending over just four quarter assemblies, with zero leakage imposed at the assembly mid-lines. Each supercell is solved twice, first with a detailed multi-group pin-by-pin solution, and then with the standard single assembly approach. Correction factors are defined by comparing the two solutions, and these can be applied in whole core calculations. The restriction that all such calculations are modelled with zero leakage means that they are independent of each other and of the core-wide flux shape. This allows parallel pre-calculation for the entire cycle once the loading pattern has been determined, in much the same way that single assembly lattice calculations can be pre-calculated once the range of fuel types is known. Comparisons against a whole core pin-by-pin reference demonstrates that the embedding process does not introduce a significant error, even after burnup and refuelling. Comparisons against a WIMS reference demonstrate that a pin-by-pin multi-group diffusion solution is capable of capturing the main interface effects. This therefore defines a practical approach for achieving results close to lattice code accuracy, but broadly at the cost of a standard reactor calculation. (authors)

  7. Core Design Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  8. A validated methodology for evaluating burnup credit in spent fuel casks

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.C. ); Sanders, T.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel offers both economic and risk incentives. This paper presents a general overview of the technical work being performed in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to resolve issues related to the implementation of burnup credit. An analysis methodology is presented along with information representing the validation of the method against available experimental data. The experimental data that are applicable to burnup credit include chemical assay data for the validation of the isotopic prediction models, fresh fuel critical experiments for the validation of criticality calculations for various cask geometries, and reactor restart critical data to validate criticality calculations with spent fuel. The methodology has been specifically developed to be simple and generally applicable, therefore giving rise to uncertainties or sensitivities which are identified and quantified in terms of a percent bias in k{sub eff}. Implementation issues affecting licensing requirements and operational procedures are discussed briefly. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Study on Ultra-Long Life,Small U-Zr Metallic Fuelled Core With Burnable Poison

    SciTech Connect

    Kenji Tsuji; Hiromitsu Inagaki; Akira Nishikawa; Hisato Matsumiya; Yoshiaki Sakashita; Yasuyuki Moriki; Mitsuaki Yamaoka; Norihiko Handa

    2002-07-01

    A conceptual design for a 50 MWe sodium cooled, U-Pu-Zr metallic fuelled, fast reactor core, which aims at a core lifetime of 30 years, has been performed [1]. As for the compensation for a large burn-up reactivity through 30 years, an axially movable reflector, which is located around the core, carries the major part of it and a burnable poison does the rest. This concept has achieved not only a long core lifetime but also a high discharged burn-up. On this study, a conceptual design for a small fast reactor loading U-Zr metallic fuelled core instead of U-Pu-Zr fuelled core has been conducted, based on the original core arrangement of 4S reactor [2]. Within the range of this study including safety requirements, adopting the burnable poison would be effective to construct a core concept that achieves both a long lifetime and a high discharged burn-up. (authors)

  10. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

  11. Evolution of porosity in the high-burnup fuel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Antonino; Horvath, Matthias I.; Restani, Renato

    2007-03-01

    The evolution of the high-burnup structure (HBS) porosity is investigated. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) measurements of UO 2 fuel with ≈105 GWd/tHM rod average burnup show the formation of an ultra-high burnup structure with a local burnup of 300 GWd/tHM in the proximity of the fuel-cladding interface. Such structure is characterized by gas pores of sizes up to 15 μm. A large population of pores with 3-5 μm pores is also observed in more inner regions of the HBS. An analysis of the pore size distributions indicates predominance of 3.5 μm and 7.5 μm pores. A simple model accounting for vacancy diffusion kinetics and coalescence is used to interpret the observations: the 3.5 μm pores are obtained by growth of 1 μm pores with an initial overpressurization of 50-70 MPa. The extra-large pores with diameters ≈7-8 μm result by coalescence of the intermediate size pores, assuming that: (1) such pores are only slightly overpressurized and that (2) the coalescence process occurs at constant porosity, as observed experimentally.

  12. Spent fuel dissolution rates as a function of burnup and water chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.J.

    1998-06-01

    To help provide a source term for performance-assessment calculations, dissolution studies on light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel have been conducted over the past few years at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. This report describes that work for fiscal years 1996 through mid-1998 and includes summaries of some results from previous years for completeness. The following conclusions were based on the results of various flowthrough dissolution rate tests and on tests designed to measure the inventories of {sup 129}I located within the fuel/cladding gap region of different spent fuels: (1) Spent fuels with burnups in the range 30 to 50 MWd/kgM all dissolved at about the same rate over the conditions tested. To help determine whether the lack of burnup dependence extends to higher and lower values, tests are in progress or planned for spent fuels with burnups of 13 and {approximately} 65 MWd/kgM. (2) Oxidation of spent fuel up to the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} stage does not have a large effect on intrinsic dissolution rates. However, this degree of oxidation could increase the dissolution rates of relatively intact fuel by opening the grain boundaries, thereby increasing the effective surface area that is available for contact by water. From a disposal viewpoint, this is a potentially more important consideration than the effect on intrinsic rates. (3) The gap inventories of {sup 129}I were found to be smaller than the fission gas release (FGR) for the same fuel rod with the exception of the rod with the highest FGR. Several additional fuels would have to be tested to determine whether a generalized relationship exists between FGR and {sup 129}I gap inventory for US LWR fuels.

  13. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.; Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  14. Investigation of Irradiation Behavior of SiC-Coated Fuel Particle at Extended Burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Tobita, Tsutomu

    2003-06-15

    In current high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), Tri-isotropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles are employed as fuel. In safety design of the HTGR fuels, it is important to retain fission products within particles so that their release to primary coolant does not exceed an acceptable level. From this point of view, the basic design criteria for the fuel are to minimize the failure fraction of as-fabricated fuel coating layers and to prevent significant additional fuel failures during operation. The maximum burnup of the first-loading fuel of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is limited to 3.6%FIMA (% fission per initial metallic atom) to certify its integrity during the operation. In order to investigate fuel behavior under extended burnup condition, irradiation tests were performed. The irradiation was carried out as HRB-22 and 91F-1A capsule irradiation tests. The fuel for the irradiation tests was called extended burnup fuel, whose target burnup and fast neutron fluence were higher than those of the first-loading fuel of the HTTR. In order to keep fuel integrity up to over 5%FIMA, the thickness of buffer and SiC layers of fuel particle were increased. The fuel compacts were irradiated in the HRB-22 and the 91F-1A capsules at the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, respectively. The comparison of measured and calculated release rate-to-birth rate ratios showed that there were additional failures in both irradiation tests. A pressure vessel failure model analysis showed that no tensile stresses acted on the SiC layers even at the end of irradiation and no pressure vessel failure occurred in the intact particles even in a particle with thin buffer layer with failed OPyC layer. The presumed failure mechanisms are additional through-coatings failure of as-fabricated SiC-failed particles or an excessive increase of internal pressure by the accelerated irradiation. Further study is needed to clarify the failure mechanism.

  15. Contribution of fuel vibrations to ex-core neutron noise during the first and second fuel cycles of the Sequoyah-1 pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; March-Leuba, J.; Smith, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    Noise measurements were performed during the first and second fuel cycles of the Sequoyah-1 pressurized water reactor (PWR) to observe long-term changes in the ex-core neutron signatures. Increases in the ex-core neutron noise amplitude were observed throughout the 0.1- to 50.0-Hz range. In-core noise measurements indicate that fuel assembly vibrations contribute significantly to the ex-core neutron noise at nearly all frequencies in this range, probably due to mechanical or acoustic coupling with other vibrating internal structures. Space-dependent kinetics calculations show that ex-core neutron noise induced by fixed-amplitude fuel assembly vibrations will increase over a fuel cycle because of soluble boron and fuel concentration changes associated with burnup. These reactivity effects can also lead to 180/sup 0/ phase shifts between cross-core detectors. We concluded that it may be difficult to separate the changes in neutron noise due to attenuation (shielding) effects of structural vibrations from changes due to reactivity effects of fuel assembly motion on the basis of neutron noise amplitude or phase information. Amplitudes of core support barrel vibrations inferred from ex-core neutron noise measurements using calculated scale factors are likely to have a high degree of uncertainty, since these scale factors usually do not account for neutron noise generated by fuel assembly vibrations. Modifications in fuel management or design may also lead to altered neutron noise signature behavior over a fuel cycle.

  16. Features of the application of the Monte Carlo method to calculations for large RBMK reactors and to model correction on the basis of data from in-core detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. E.; Schukin, N. V.; Bychkov, S. A.; Druzhinin, V. E.; Lysov, D. A.; Shmonin, Yu. V.; Gurevich, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    Statistical errors in sampling neutron fields in physically large systems like an RBMK are analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Recommendations concerning the choice of parameters for calculations are given. A new procedure for Monte Carlo RBMK calculations with model corrections on the basis of data from in-core detectors is proposed. Dedicated software based on the CUDA software and hardware platform is developed for computational research. Results of testing the procedure and software in question via calculations for real RBMK reactors are discussed.

  17. Features of the application of the Monte Carlo method to calculations for large RBMK reactors and to model correction on the basis of data from in-core detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, I. E. Schukin, N. V.; Bychkov, S. A.; Druzhinin, V. E.; Lysov, D. A.; Shmonin, Yu. V.; Gurevich, M. I.

    2014-12-15

    Statistical errors in sampling neutron fields in physically large systems like an RBMK are analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Recommendations concerning the choice of parameters for calculations are given. A new procedure for Monte Carlo RBMK calculations with model corrections on the basis of data from in-core detectors is proposed. Dedicated software based on the CUDA software and hardware platform is developed for computational research. Results of testing the procedure and software in question via calculations for real RBMK reactors are discussed.

  18. Core loading pattern optimization of thorium fueled heavy water breeder reactor using genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Soewono, C. N.; Takaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    In this work genetic algorithm was proposed to solve fuel loading pattern optimization problem in thorium fueled heavy water reactor. The objective function of optimization was to maximize the conversion ratio and minimize power peaking factor. Those objectives were simultaneously optimized using non-dominated Pareto-based population ranking optimal method. Members of non-dominated population were assigned selection probabilities based on their rankings in a manner similar to Baker's single criterion ranking selection procedure. A selected non-dominated member was bred through simple mutation or one-point crossover process to produce a new member. The genetic algorithm program was developed in FORTRAN 90 while neutronic calculation and analysis was done by COREBN code, a module of core burn-up calculation for SRAC. (authors)

  19. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Widiawati, Nina Su’ud, Zaki

    2015-09-30

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from −0.6695443 % at BOC to −0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  20. Analytical core loss calculations for magnetic materials used in high frequency high power converter applications. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triner, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The basic magnetic properties under various operating conditions encountered in the state-of-the-art DC-AC/DC converters are examined. Using a novel core excitation circuit, the basic B-H and loss characteristics of various core materials may be observed as a function of circuit configuration, frequency of operation, input voltage, and pulse-width modulation conditions. From this empirical data, a mathematical loss characteristics equation is developed to analytically predict the specific core loss of several magnetic materials under various waveform excitation conditions.

  1. Reactivity loss validation of high burn-up PWR fuels with pile-oscillation experiments in MINERVE

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, P.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Eschbach, R.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A.

    2012-07-01

    The ALIX experimental program relies on the experimental validation of the spent fuel inventory, by chemical analysis of samples irradiated in a PWR between 5 and 7 cycles, and also on the experimental validation of the spent fuel reactivity loss with bum-up, obtained by pile-oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor. These latter experiments provide an overall validation of both the fuel inventory and of the nuclear data responsible for the reactivity loss. This program offers also unique experimental data for fuels with a burn-up reaching 85 GWd/t, as spent fuels in French PWRs never exceeds 70 GWd/t up to now. The analysis of these experiments is done in two steps with the APOLLO2/SHEM-MOC/CEA2005v4 package. In the first one, the fuel inventory of each sample is obtained by assembly calculations. The calculation route consists in the self-shielding of cross sections on the 281 energy group SHEM mesh, followed by the flux calculation by the Method Of Characteristics in a 2D-exact heterogeneous geometry of the assembly, and finally a depletion calculation by an iterative resolution of the Bateman equations. In the second step, the fuel inventory is used in the analysis of pile-oscillation experiments in which the reactivity of the ALIX spent fuel samples is compared to the reactivity of fresh fuel samples. The comparison between Experiment and Calculation shows satisfactory results with the JEFF3.1.1 library which predicts the reactivity loss within 2% for burn-up of {approx}75 GWd/t and within 4% for burn-up of {approx}85 GWd/t. (authors)

  2. The Fork+ burnup measurement system: Design and first measurement campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.E.; Bronowski, D.R.; McMurtry, W.; Ewing, R.; Jordan, R.; Rivard, D.

    1998-12-31

    Previous work with the original Fork detector showed that burnup as determined by reactor records could be accurately allocated to spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The original Fork detector, designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, used an ion chamber to measure gross gamma count and a fission chamber to measure neutrons from an activation source, {sup 244}Cm. In its review of the draft Topical Report on Burnup Credit, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission indicated it felt uncomfortable with a measurement system that depended on reactor records for calibration. The Fork+ system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute with the aim of providing this independent measurement capability. The initial Fork+ prototype was used in a measurement campaign at the Maine Yankee reactor. The campaign confirmed the applicability of the sensor approach in the Fork+ system and the efficiency of the hand-portable Fork+ prototype in making fuel assembly measurements. It also indicated potential design modifications that will be necessary before the Fork+ can be used effectively on high-burnup spent fuel.

  3. VORCOR: A computer program for calculating characteristics of wings with edge vortex separation by using a vortex-filament and-core model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Mehrotra, S. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code base on an improved vortex filament/vortex core method for predicting aerodynamic characteristics of slender wings with edge vortex separations is developed. The code is applicable to camber wings, straked wings or wings with leading edge vortex flaps at subsonic speeds. The prediction of lifting pressure distribution and the computer time are improved by using a pair of concentrated vortex cores above the wing surface. The main features of this computer program are: (1) arbitrary camber shape may be defined and an option for exactly defining leading edge flap geometry is also provided; (2) the side edge vortex system is incorporated.

  4. Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion Reactors for Fuel Cycle Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-09-01

    This report presents FY13 activities for the analysis of D2O cooled tight-pitch High-Conversion PWRs (HCPWRs) with U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores aiming at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. The analyses are carried out from several aspects which could not be covered in FY12 activities. SCALE 6.1 code system is utilized, and a series of simple 3D fuel pin-cell models are developed in order to perform Monte Carlo based criticality and burnup calculations. The performance of U-Pu fueled cores with axial and internal blankets is analyzed in terms of their impact on the relative fissile Pu mass balance, initial Pu enrichment, and void coefficient. In FY12, Pu conversion performances of D2O-cooled HCPWRs fueled with MOX were evaluated with small sized axial/internal DU blankets (approximately 4cm of axial length) in order to ensure the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. In this fiscal year report, the axial sizes of DU blankets are extended up to 30 cm in order to evaluate the amount of DU necessary to reach break-even and/or breeding conditions. Several attempts are made in order to attain the milestone of the HCPWR designs (i.e., break-even condition and negative void reactivity) by modeling of HCPWRs under different conditions such as boiling of D2O coolant, MOX with different 235U enrichment, and different target burnups. A similar set of analyses are performed for Th-U fueled cores. Several promising characteristics of 233U over other fissile like 239Pu and 235U, most notably its higher fission neutrons per absorption in thermal and epithermal ranges combined with lower ___ in the fast range than 239Pu allows Th-U cores to be taller than MOX ones. Such an advantage results in 4% higher relative fissile mass balance than that of U-Pu fueled cores while retaining the negative void reactivity until the target burnup of 51 GWd/t. Several other distinctions between U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores are identified by evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of keff, mass balance, and void coefficient. The effect of advanced iron alloy cladding (i.e., FeCrAl) on the performance of Pu conversion in MOX fueled cores is studied instead of using standard stainless-steel cladding. Variations in clad thickness and coolant-to-fuel volume ratio are also exercised. The use of FeCrAl instead of SS as a cladding alloy reduces the required Pu enrichment and improves the Pu conversion rate primarily due to the absence of nickel in the cladding alloy that results in the reduction of the neutron absorption. Also the difference in void coefficients between SS and FeCrAl alloys is nearly 500 pcm over the entire burnup range. The report also shows sensitivity and uncertainty analyses in order to characterize D2O cooled HCPWRs from different aspects. The uncertainties of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected reactor cores are evaluated at different burnup points in order to find similarities and trends respect to D2O-HCPWR.

  5. A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

    2011-05-01

    A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  6. Assessment of Fission Product Cross-Section Data for Burnup Credit Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Dunn, Michael E; Mueller, Don

    2007-12-01

    Past efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and others have provided sufficient technical information to enable the NRC to issue regulatory guidance for implementation of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup credit; however, consideration of only the reactivity change due to the major actinides is recommended in the guidance. Moreover, DOE, NRC, and EPRI have noted the need for additional scientific and technical data to justify expanding PWR burnup credit to include fission product (FP) nuclides and enable burnup credit implementation for boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The criticality safety assessment needed for burnup credit applications will utilize computational analyses of packages containing SNF with FP nuclides. Over the years, significant efforts have been devoted to the nuclear data evaluation of major isotopes pertinent to reactor applications (i.e., uranium, plutonium, etc.); however, efforts to evaluate FP cross-section data in the resonance region have been less thorough relative to actinide data. In particular, resonance region cross-section measurements with corresponding R-matrix resonance analyses have not been performed for FP nuclides. Therefore, the objective of this work is to assess the status and performance of existing FP cross-section and cross-section uncertainty data in the resonance region for use in burnup credit analyses. Recommendations for new cross-section measurements and/or evaluations are made based on the data assessment. The assessment focuses on seven primary FP isotopes (103Rh, 133Cs, 143Nd, 149Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, and 155Gd) that impact reactivity analyses of transportation packages and two FP isotopes (153Eu and 155Eu) that impact prediction of 155Gd concentrations. Much of the assessment work was completed in 2005, and the assessment focused on the latest FP cross-section evaluations available in the international nuclear data community as of March 2005. The accuracy of the cross-section data was investigated by comparing existing cross-section evaluations against available measured cross-section data. When possible, benchmark calculations were also used to assess the performance of the latest FP cross-section data. Since March 2005, the U.S. and European data projects have released newer versions of their respective data files. Although there have been updates to the international data files and to some degree FP data, much of the updates have included nuclear cross-section modeling improvements at energies above the resonance region. The one exception is improved ENDF/B-VII cross-section uncertainty data or covariance data for gadolinium isotopes. In particular, ENDF/B-VII includes improved 155Gd resonance parameter covariance data, but they are based on previously measured resonance data. Although the new covariance data are available for 155Gd, the conclusions of the FP cross-section data assessment of this report still hold in lieu of the newer international cross-section data files. Based on the FP data assessment, there is judged to be a need for new total and capture cross-section measurements and corresponding cross-section evaluations, in a prioritized manner, for the nine FPs to provide the improved information and technical rigor needed for criticality safety analyses.

  7. Calculating core-level excitations and X-ray absorption spectra of medium-sized closed-shell molecules with the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme for the polarization propagator.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jan; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Core-level excitations are generated by absorption of high-energy radiation such as X-rays. To describe these energetically high-lying excited states theoretically, we have implemented a variant of the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme of second-order ADC(2) by applying the core-valence separation (CVS) approximation to the ADC(2) working equations. Besides excitation energies, the CVS-ADC(2) method also provides access to properties of core-excited states, thereby allowing for the calculation of X-ray absorption spectra. To demonstrate the potential of our implementation of CVS-ADC(2), we have chosen medium-sized molecules as examples that have either biological importance or find application in organic electronics. The calculated results of CVS-ADC(2) are compared with standard TD-DFT/B3LYP values and experimental data. In particular, the extended variant, CVS-ADC(2)-x, provides the most accurate results, and the agreement between the calculated values and experiment is remarkable. PMID:25130619

  8. Extended burnup fuel - a beneficial environmental step for the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Tulenko, J.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The beneficial environmental effects generated by extending the burnup of light water reactors (LWR) fuel covers the entire fuel cycle from cradle (mining) to grave (fuel disposal). The purpose of this paper is to outline the beneficial efforts of extending burnup and show how a proposed financial incentive waste charge would encourage the development and utilization of extended burnup. Environmental consciousness demands that economic incentives be implemented to encourage utilities to extend burnup of their LWR fuel. This paper builds on earlier work and focuses and extends their results. The cornerstone of the positive environmental effects of extended burnup results from the increased plutonium energy generation as burnup is increased and residence time is increased.

  9. Preliminary safety analysis of Pb-Bi cooled 800 MWt modified CANDLE burn-up scheme based fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2014-09-30

    Pb-Bi Cooled fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme with 10 regions and 10 years cycle length has been investigated from neutronic aspects. In this study the safety aspect of such reactors have been investigated and discussed. Several condition of unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP) have been simulated and the results show that the reactors excellent safety performance. At 80 seconds after unprotected loss of flow condition, the core flow rate drop to about 25% of its initial flow and slowly move toward its natural circulation level. The maximum fuel temperature can be managed below 1000°C and the maximum cladding temperature can be managed below 700°C. The dominant reactivity feedback is radial core expansion and Doppler effect, followed by coolant density effect and fuel axial expansion effect.

  10. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  11. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr₃ 1-in. x 1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr₃ 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1”x1” LaBr₃ simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel burnup calibrationmore » curve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.« less

  12. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr₃ 1-in. x 1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr₃ 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1”x1” LaBr₃ simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel burnup calibration curve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.

  13. Radionuclide Data and Calculations and Loss-On-Ignition, X-Ray Fluorescence, and ICP-AES Data from Cores in Catchments of the Animas River, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Stanley E.; Rice, Cyndi A.; Marot, Marci E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Interior Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Initiative is focused on the evaluation of the effect of past mining practices on the water quality and the riparian and aquatic habitats of impacted stream reaches downstream from historical mining districts located primarily on Federal lands. This problem is manifest in the eleven western states (west of longitude 102 degrees) where the majority of hardrock mines that had past production are located on Federal lands. In areas of temperate climate and moderate to heavy precipitation, the effects of rapid chemical and physical weathering of sulfides exposed on mine-waste dumps and acidic drainage from mines have resulted in elevated metal concentrations in the stream water and stream-bed sediment. The result of these mineral weathering processes has an unquantified impact on the quality of the water and the aquatic and riparian habitats that may limit their recreational resource value. One of the confounding factors in these studies is the determination of the component of metals derived from hydrothermally altered but unmined portions of these drainage basins. Several watersheds have been studied to evaluate the effects of acid mine drainage and acid rock drainage on the near-surface environment. The Animas River watershed in southwestern Colorado contains a large number of past-producing metal mines that have affected the watershed. Beginning in October 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a collaborative study of these effects under the USGS-AML Initiative. In this report, we present the radionuclide and geochemical analytical results of sediment coring during 1997-1999 from two cores from oxbow lakes 0.5 mi. upstream from the 32nd Street Bridge near Durango, Colo., and from three cores from beaver ponds within the Mineral Creek drainage basin near Silverton, Colo.

  14. Interplay of Correlation and Relativistic Effects in Correlated Calculations on Transition-Metal Complexes: The (Cu2O2)(2+) Core Revisited.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Dimitrios G; Neese, Frank

    2011-05-10

    Owing to the availability of large-scale computing facilities and the development of efficient new algorithms, wave function-based ab initio calculations are becoming more common in bioinorganic chemistry. In principle they offer a systematic route toward high accuracy. However, these calculations are by no means trivial. In this contribution we address some pertinent points through a systematic theoretical study for the equilibrium between the peroxo- and bis-(μ-oxo) isomers of the [{Cu(C2H8N2)}2O2](2+) complex. While this system is often regarded as a prototypical multireference case, we treat it with the single reference local-pair natural orbital coupled cluster method and reiterate that the multireference character in this system is very limited. A set of intermediate structures, for the interconversion between the two isomers, is calculated through a relaxed surface scan thus allowing the calculation of an energetic profile that cleanly connects the bis-(μ-oxo) and side-on peroxo minima on the ground-state potential energy surface. Only at the highest level of theory involving complete basis set extrapolation, triple excitation contributions as well as relativistic and solvent effects, the bis-(μ-oxo) isomer is found to be slightly more stable than the peroxo structure. This is in agreement with the experimental findings. The effects of basis set, triples excitation, relativity, and solvent contribution have all been analyzed in detail. Finally, the ab initio results are compared with density functional calculations using various functionals. It is demonstrated that the largest part of the discrepancies of the results reported in the literature are due to an inconsistent handling of relativistic effects, which are large in both ab initio and density functional theory calculations. PMID:26610142

  15. Structure of high-burnup-fuel Zircaloy cladding. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.

    1983-06-01

    Zircaloy cladding from high-burnup (> 20 MWd/kg U) fuel rods in light-water reactors is characterized by a high density of irradiation-induced defects (RID), compositional changes (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen uptake) associated with in-service corrosion, and geometrical changes produced by creepdown, bowing, and irradiation-induced growth. During a reactor power transient, the cladding is subject to localized stress imposed by thermal expansion of the cracked fuel pellets and to mechanical constraints imposed by pellet-cladding friction. As part of a program to provide a better understanding of brittle-type failure of Zircaloy fuel cladding by pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) phenomenon, the stress-rupture properties and microstructural characteristics of high-burnup spent fuel cladding have been under investigation. This paper reports the results of the microstructural examinations by optical microscopy, scanning (SEM), 100-keV transmission (TEM), and 1 MeV high-voltage (HVEM) electron microscopies of the fractured spent fuel cladding with a specific empahsis on a correlation of the structural characteristics with the fracture behavior.

  16. Attainable Burnup in a LIFE Engine Loaded with Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Fratoni, M; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F

    2009-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) system uses a laser-based fusion source for electricity production. The (D,T) reaction, beside a pure fusion system, allows the option to drive a sub-critical fission blanket in order to increase the total energy gain. In a typical fusion-fission LIFE engine the fission blanket is a spherical shell around the fusion source, preceded by a beryllium shell for neutron multiplications by means of (n,2n) reactions. The fuel is in the form of TRISO particles dispersed in carbon pebbles, cooled by flibe. The optimal design features 80 cm thick blanket, 16 cm multiplier, and 20% TRISO packing factor. A blanket loaded with depleted uranium and depleted in a single batch with continuous mixing can achieve burnup as high as {approx}85% FIMA while generating 2,000 MW of total thermal power and producing enough tritium to be used for fusion. A multi-segment blanket with a central promotion shuffling scheme enhances burnup to {approx}90% FIMA, whereas a blanket that is operated with continuous refueling achieves only 82% FIMA under the same constraints of thermal power and tritium self-sufficiency. Both, multi-segment and continuous refueling eliminate the need for a fissile breeding phase.

  17. Microstructural Characterization of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Melissa C. Teague; Brian P. Gorman; Steven L. Hayes; Douglas L. Porter; Jeffrey King

    2013-10-01

    High burn-up mixed oxide fuel with local burn-ups of 3.4–23.7% FIMA (fissions per initial metal atom) were destructively examined as part of a research project to understand the performance of oxide fuel at extreme burn-ups. Optical metallography of fuel cross-sections measured the fuel-to-cladding gap, clad thickness, and central void evolution in the samples. The fuel-to-cladding gap closed significantly in samples with burn-ups below 7–9% FIMA. Samples with burn-ups in excess of 7–9% FIMA had a reopening of the fuel-to-cladding gap and evidence of joint oxide-gain (JOG) formation. Signs of axial fuel migration to the top of the fuel column were observed in the fuel pin with a peak burn-up of 23.7% FIMA. Additionally, high burn-up structure (HBS) was observed in the two highest burn-up samples (23.7% and 21.3% FIMA). The HBS layers were found to be 3–5 times thicker than the layers found in typical LWR fuel. The results of the study indicate that formation of JOG and or HBS prevents any significant fuel-cladding mechanical interaction from occurring, thereby extending the potential life of the fuel elements.

  18. Comparison of XSUSA and "Two-Step" Approaches for Full Core Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Yankov, Artem; Klein, M.; Jessee, Matthew Anderson; Zwermann, W.; Velkov, Kiril; Pautz, Andreas; Collins, Benjamin; Downar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    While there are multiple sources of error that are introduced into the standard computational regime for simulating reactor cores, rigorous uncertainty analysis methods are available primarily for quantifying the effects of cross section uncertainties. Two methods for propagating cross section uncertainties through core simulators are the XSUSA statistical approach and the 'Two-Step' method. The XSUSA approach, which is based on the SUSA code package, is fundamentally a stochastic sampling method. Alternatively, the Two-Step method utilizes generalized perturbation theory in the first step and stochastic sampling in the second step. The consistency of these two methods in quantifying uncertainties in the multiplication factor and in the core power distribution will be examined in the framework of phase I-3 of the UAM Benchmark. Using the TMI core as a base model for analysis, the XSUSA and Two-Step methods are applied with certain limitations and the results are compared to those produced by other stochastic sampling-based codes. Based on the uncertainty analysis results, conclusions are made for which method is currently a more viable option for computing uncertainties in burnup and transient calculations.

  19. A Two-Step Approach to Uncertainty Quantification of Core Simulators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yankov, Artem; Collins, Benjamin; Klein, Markus; Jessee, Matthew A.; Zwermann, Winfried; Velkov, Kiril; Pautz, Andreas; Downar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For the multiple sources of error introduced into the standard computational regime for simulating reactor cores, rigorous uncertainty analysis methods are available primarily to quantify the effects of cross section uncertainties. Two methods for propagating cross section uncertainties through core simulators are the XSUSA statistical approach and the “two-step” method. The XSUSA approach, which is based on the SUSA code package, is fundamentally a stochastic sampling method. Alternatively, the two-step method utilizes generalized perturbation theory in the first step and stochastic sampling in the second step. The consistency of these two methods in quantifying uncertainties in the multiplication factor andmore » in the core power distribution was examined in the framework of phase I-3 of the OECD Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling benchmark. With the Three Mile Island Unit 1 core as a base model for analysis, the XSUSA and two-step methods were applied with certain limitations, and the results were compared to those produced by other stochastic sampling-based codes. Based on the uncertainty analysis results, conclusions were drawn as to the method that is currently more viable for computing uncertainties in burnup and transient calculations.« less

  20. Shutdown-induced tensile stress in monolithic miniplates as a possible cause of plate pillowing at very high burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Pavel G; Ozaltun, Hakan; Robinson, Adam Brady; Rabin, Barry H

    2014-04-01

    Post-irradiation examination of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-12 miniplates showed that in-reactor pillowing occurred in at least 4 plates, rendering performance of these plates unacceptable. To address in-reactor failures, efforts are underway to define the mechanisms responsible for in-reactor pillowing, and to suggest improvements to the fuel plate design and operational conditions. To achieve these objectives, the mechanical response of monolithic fuel to fission and thermally-induced stresses was modeled using a commercial finite element analysis code. Calculations of stresses and deformations in monolithic miniplates during irradiation and after the shutdown revealed that the tensile stress generated in the fuel increased from 2 MPa to 100 MPa at shutdown. The increase in tensile stress at shutdown possibly explains in-reactor pillowing of several RERTR-12 miniplates irradiated to the peak local burnup of up to 1.11x1022 fissions/cm3 . This paper presents the modeling approach and calculation results, and compares results with post-irradiation examinations and mechanical testing of irradiated fuel. The implications for the safe use of the monolithic fuel in research reactors are discussed, including the influence of fuel burnup and power on the magnitude of the shutdown-induced tensile stress.

  1. The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, B.D.

    1998-07-01

    Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies associated with spent fuel oxidation (Section 5).

  2. Calculation of the Phenix end-of-life test 'Control Rod Withdrawal' with the ERANOS code

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, V.

    2012-07-01

    The Inst. of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) acts as technical support to French public authorities. As such, IRSN is in charge of safety assessment of operating and under construction reactors, as well as future projects. In this framework, one current objective of IRSN is to evaluate the ability and accuracy of numerical tools to foresee consequences of accidents. Neutronic studies step in the safety assessment from different points of view among which the core design and its protection system. They are necessary to evaluate the core behavior in case of accident in order to assess the integrity of the first barrier and the absence of a prompt criticality risk. To reach this objective one main physical quantity has to be evaluated accurately: the neutronic power distribution in core during whole reactor lifetime. Phenix end of life tests, carried out in 2009, aim at increasing the experience feedback on sodium cooled fast reactors. These experiments have been done in the framework of the development of the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. Ten tests have been carried out: 6 on neutronic and fuel aspects, 2 on thermal hydraulics and 2 for the emergency shutdown. Two of them have been chosen for an international exercise on thermal hydraulics and neutronics in the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. Concerning neutronics, the Control Rod Withdrawal test is relevant for safety because it allows evaluating the capability of calculation tools to compute the radial power distribution on fast reactors core configurations in which the flux field is very deformed. IRSN participated to this benchmark with the ERANOS code developed by CEA for fast reactors studies. This paper presents the results obtained in the framework of the benchmark activity. A relatively good agreement was found with available measures considering the approximations done in the modeling. The work underlines the importance of burn-up calculations in order to have a fine core concentrations mesh for the calculation of the power distribution. (authors)

  3. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  4. Core Optimization of a Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-06-01

    Achieving a high fuel burnup in the Deep-Burn (DB) pebble bed reactor design, while remaining within the limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback, is challenging. The high content of Pu and Minor Actinides in the Deep-Burn fuel significantly impacts the thermal neutron energy spectrum as compared to a ’standard’ UO2 fueled core. This can result in power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed core in locally thermalized regions near the graphite reflectors. Furthermore, the interplay of the Pu resonances of the neutron absorption cross sections at low-lying energies can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator at certain operating conditions. The DB concept focuses on the destruction of spent fuel transuranics in TRISO coated particle fueled gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60-70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), using a single-pass, multi in-core fuel (re)cycling scheme. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the present low enriched uranium core designs, i.e. the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). A Pu and Minor Actinide fueled PBMR-400 design serves as the starting point for a core optimization study. The fuel temperature, power peak, temperature reactivity coefficients, and burnup capabilities of the modified designs are analyzed with the PEBBED code. A code-to-code coupling with the PASTA code allows for the analysis of the TRISO fuel performance for both normal and Loss Of Forced Cooling conditions. An improved core design is sought, maximizing the fuel discharge burnup, while retaining negative temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range and avoiding high fuel temperatures (fuel failure probabilities).

  5. MCNPX Monte Carlo burnup simulations of the isotope correlation experiments in the NPP obrigheim.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Broeders, C.

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the simulation work of the Isotope Correlation Experiment (ICE) using the MCNPX Monte Carlo computer code package. The Monte Carlo simulation results are compared with the ICE-Experimental measurements for burnup up to 30 GWD/t. The comparison shows the good capabilities of the MCNPX computer code package for predicting the depletion of the uranium fuel and the buildup of the plutonium isotopes in a PWR thermal reactor. The Monte Carlo simulation results show also good agreements with the experimental data for calculating several long-lived and stable fission products. However, for the americium and curium actinides, it is difficult to judge the predication capabilities for these actinides due to the large uncertainties in the ICE-Experimental data. In the MCNPX numerical simulations, a pin cell model is utilized to simulate the fuel lattice of the nuclear power reactor. Temperature dependent libraries based on JEFF3.1 nuclear data files are utilized for the calculations. In addition, temperature dependent libraries based ENDF/B-VII nuclear data files are utilized and the obtained results are very close to the JEFF3.1 results, except for {approx}10% differences in the prediction of the minor actinide isotopes buildup.

  6. Temperature and burnup correlated fuel-cladding chemical interaction in U-10ZR metallic fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, William J.

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors and provide a number of advantages over other fuel types considering their fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Resistance to cladding "breach" and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the nuclear power plant primary coolant system is a key performance parameter for a nuclear fuel system. In metallic fuel, FCCI weakens the cladding, especially at high power-high temperature operation, contributing to fuel pin breach. Empirical relationships for FCCI have been developed from a large body of data collected from in-pile (EBR-II) and out-of-pile experiments [1]. However, these relationships are unreliable in predicting FCCI outside the range of EBR-II experimental data. This dissertation examines new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of prototypic length metallic fuel irradiations performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The fuel in these assemblies operated a temperature and burnup conditions similar to that in EBR-II but with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. Comparing FCCI formation data from FFTF and EBR-II provides new insight into FCCI formation kinetics. A model is developed combining both production and diffusion of lanthanides to the fuel-cladding interface and subsequent reaction with the cladding. The model allows these phenomena to be influenced by fuel burnup (lanthanide concentrations) and operating temperature. Parameters in the model are adjusted to reproduce measured FCCI layer thicknesses from EBR-II and FFTF. The model predicts that, under appropriate conditions, rate of FCCI formation can be controlled by either fission product transport or by the reaction rate of the interaction species at the fuel-cladding interface. This dissertation will help forward the design of metallic fuel systems for advanced sodium cooled fast reactors by allowing the prediction of FCCI layer formation in full length reactor designs. This should improve lifetime prediction of fuel performance capability for new advanced sodium cooled fast reactors with extended core designs.

  7. Measurement and calculation of the fast-neutron and photon spectra from the core boundary to the biological shielding in the WWER-1000 reactor model.

    PubMed

    Osmera, B; Cvachovec, F; Kyncl, J; Smutný, V

    2005-01-01

    The fast-neutron and photon space-energy distributions have been measured in an axially (1.25 m active height) and azimuthally (60 degree symmetry sector) shortened model of the WWER-1000 reactor assembled in the LR-0 experimental reactor. The space-energy distributions have been calculated with the stochastic code MCNP and the deterministic three-dimensional code TORT. Selected results are presented and discussed in the paper. This work has been done in the frame of the EU 5th FW project REDOS REDOS, Reactor Dosimetry: Accurate determination and benchmarking of radiation field parameters, relevant for reactor pressure vessel monitoring. EURATOM Programme, Call 2000/C 294/04). All geometry and material composition data of the model as well as the available experimental data were carefully checked and revised. PMID:16381689

  8. Assessment of the use of extended burnup fuel in light water power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Bailey, W.J.; Beyer, C.E.; Bold, F.C.; Tawil, J.J.

    1988-02-01

    This study has been conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the environmental and economic impacts associated with the use of extended burnup nuclear fuel in light water power reactors. It has been proposed that current batch average burnup levels of 33 GWd/t uranium be increased to above 50 GWd/t. The environmental effects of extending fuel burnup during normal operations and during accident events and the economic effects of cost changes on the fuel cycle are discussed in this report. The physical effects of extended burnup on the fuel and the fuel assembly are also presented as a basis for the environmental and economic assessments. Environmentally, this burnup increase would have no significant impact over that of normal burnup. Economically, the increased burnup would have favorable effects, consisting primarily of a reduction: (1) total fuel requirements; (2) reactor downtime for fuel replacement; (3) the number of fuel shipments to and from reactor sites; and (4) repository storage requirements. 61 refs., 4 figs., 27 tabs.

  9. Determination of actinide and fission-product isotopes in very-high-burnup spent nuclear fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, V. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Clark, M. A.; Graczyk, D. G.; Tsai, Y.; Streets, W. E.; Vander Pol, M. H.; Billone, M. C.

    2008-07-01

    A work plan was desired that would produce data for a wide array of actinide and fission-product isotopes with reasonably good accuracy and relatively low cost. An analysis scheme involving a fairly small number of separations, dilutions, and measurement methods was used to generate information on 74 isotopes in two spent-fuel samples of >70 GWd/MTU burnup. Some of the measured isotopes are of high interest for burnup-credit evaluations and had not been reported previously for high-burnup fuels.

  10. Development of Technical Basis for Burnup Credit Regulatory Guidance in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Cecil V; Wagner, John C; Mueller, Don; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-01-01

    In the United States (U.S.) there has been and continues to be considerable interest in the increased use of burnup credit as part of the safety basis for SNF systems and this interest has motivated numerous technical studies related to the application of burnup credit for maintaining subcriticality. Responding to industry requests and needs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated a burnup credit research program, with support from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to develop regulatory guidance and the supporting technical basis for allowing and expanding the use of burnup credit in pressurized-water reactor SNF storage and transport applications. The objective of this paper is to summarize the work and significant accomplishments, with references to the technical reports and publications for complete details.

  11. Extension of the TRANSURANUS burnup model to heavy water reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassmann, K.; Walker, C. T.; van de Laar, J.

    1998-06-01

    The extension of the light water reactor burnup equations of the TRANSURANUS code to heavy water reactor conditions is described. Existing models for the fission of 235U and the buildup of plutonium in a heavy water reactor are evaluated. In order to overcome the limitations of the frequently used RADAR model at high burnup, a new model is presented. After verification against data for the radial distributions of Xe, Cs, Nd and Pu from electron probe microanalysis, the model is used to analyse the formation of the high burnup structure in a heavy water reactor. The new model allows the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod designs at high burnup in the OECD Halden Heavy Water Reactor.

  12. An Approach for Validating Actinide and Fission Product Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses--Criticality (keff) Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Scaglione, John M; Mueller, Don; Wagner, John C

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant remaining challenges associated with expanded implementation of burnup credit in the United States is the validation of depletion and criticality calculations used in the safety evaluation - in particular, the availability and use of applicable measured data to support validation, especially for fission products. Applicants and regulatory reviewers have been constrained by both a scarcity of data and a lack of clear technical basis or approach for use of the data. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff have noted that the rationale for restricting their Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) to actinide-only is based largely on the lack of clear, definitive experiments that can be used to estimate the bias and uncertainty for computational analyses associated with using burnup credit. To address the issue of validation, the NRC initiated a project with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to (1) develop and establish a technically sound validation approach (both depletion and criticality) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) criticality safety evaluations based on best-available data and methods and (2) apply the approach for representative SNF storage and transport configurations/conditions to demonstrate its usage and applicability, as well as to provide reference bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the criticality (k{sub eff}) validation approach, and resulting observations and recommendations. Validation of the isotopic composition (depletion) calculations is addressed in a companion paper at this conference. For criticality validation, the approach is to utilize (1) available laboratory critical experiment (LCE) data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC) program to support validation of the principal actinides and (2) calculated sensitivities, nuclear data uncertainties, and the limited available fission product LCE data to predict and verify individual biases for relevant minor actinides and fission products. This paper (1) provides a detailed description of the approach and its technical bases, (2) describes the application of the approach for representative pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor safety analysis models to demonstrate its usage and applicability, (3) provides reference bias results based on the prerelease SCALE 6.1 code package and ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross-section data, and (4) provides recommendations for application of the results and methods to other code and data packages.

  13. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  14. Cladding stress during extended storage of high burnup spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Patrick A. C.; Einziger, Robert E.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to assess the potential for low temperature creep and delayed hydride cracking failures in high burnup spent fuel cladding during extended dry storage, the U.S. NRC analytical fuel performance tools were used to predict cladding stress during a 300 year dry storage period for UO2 fuel burned up to 65 GWd/MTU. Fuel swelling correlations were developed and used along with decay gas production and release fractions to produce circumferential average cladding stress predictions with the FRAPCON-3.5 fuel performance code. The resulting stresses did not result in cladding creep failures. The maximum creep strains accumulated were on the order of 0.54-1.04%, but creep failures are not expected below at least 2% strain. The potential for delayed hydride cracking was assessed by calculating the critical flaw size required to trigger this failure mechanism. The critical flaw size far exceeded any realistic flaw expected in spent fuel at end of reactor life.

  15. Results of a Neutronic Simulation of HTR-Proteus Core 4.2 using PEBBED and other INL Reactor Physics Tools: FY-09 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar

    2009-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory’s deterministic neutronics analysis codes and methods were applied to the computation of the core multiplication factor of the HTR-Proteus pebble bed reactor critical facility. A combination of unit cell calculations (COMBINE-PEBDAN), 1-D discrete ordinates transport (SCAMP), and nodal diffusion calculations (PEBBED) were employed to yield keff and flux profiles. Preliminary results indicate that these tools, as currently configured and used, do not yield satisfactory estimates of keff. If control rods are not modeled, these methods can deliver much better agreement with experimental core eigenvalues which suggests that development efforts should focus on modeling control rod and other absorber regions. Under some assumptions and in 1D subcore analyses, diffusion theory agrees well with transport. This suggests that developments in specific areas can produce a viable core simulation approach. Some corrections have been identified and can be further developed, specifically: treatment of the upper void region, treatment of inter-pebble streaming, and explicit (multiscale) transport modeling of TRISO fuel particles as a first step in cross section generation. Until corrections are made that yield better agreement with experiment, conclusions from core design and burnup analyses should be regarded as qualitative and not benchmark quality.

  16. Role of Minor Actinides for Long-Life Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Artisyuk, V.; Shmelev, A.; Nikitin, K.; Peryoga, Y

    2002-07-01

    The paper addresses the study on advanced fuel cycles for LWR oriented to high burnup values that exceed 100 GWd/tHM, thus giving the chance to establish the long-life reactor cores without fuel reloading on site. The key element of this approach is a broad involvement of Minor Actinides whose admixture to 20% enriched uranium fuel provides safe release of initial reactivity excess and improved proliferation resistance properties. (authors)

  17. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Enercon Services, Inc.

    2011-03-14

    Enercon Services, Inc. (ENERCON) was requested under Task Order No.2 to identify scientific and technical data needed to benchmark and justify Full Burnup Credit, which adds 16 fission products and 4 minor actinides1 to Actinide-Only burnup credit. The historical perspective for Full Burnup Credit is discussed, and interviews of organizations participating in burnup credit activities are summarized as a basis for identifying additional data needs and making recommendation. Input from burnup credit participants representing two segments of the commercial nuclear industry is provided. First, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been very active in the development of Full Burnup Credit, representing the interests of nuclear utilities in achieving capacity gains for storage and transport casks. EPRI and its utility customers are interested in a swift resolution of the validation issues that are delaying the implementation of Full Burnup Credit [EPRI 2010b]. Second, used nuclear fuel storage and transportation Cask Vendors favor improving burnup credit beyond Actinide-Only burnup credit, although their discussion of specific burnup credit achievements and data needs was limited citing business sensitive and technical proprietary concerns. While Cask Vendor proprietary items are not specifically identified in this report, the needs of all nuclear industry participants are reflected in the conclusions and recommendations of this report. In addition, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were interviewed for their input into additional data needs to achieve Full Burnup Credit. ORNL was very open to discussions of Full Burnup Credit, with several telecoms and a visit by ENERCON to ORNL. For many years, ORNL has provided extensive support to the NRC regarding burnup credit in all of its forms. Discussions with ORNL focused on potential resolutions to the validation issues for the use of fission products. SNL was helpful in ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost compared to the acquisition of equivalent experimental data. ENERCON concludes that even with the costs of code data library updating, the use of S/U analysis methodologies could be accomplished on a shorter schedule and a lower cost than the gathering of sufficient experimental data. ENERCON estimates of the costs of an updated S/U computer code and data suite are $5M to $10M with a schedule of two to three years. Recent ORNL analyses using the S/U analysis method show that the bias and uncertainty values for fission product cross sections are smaller than previously expected. This result is confirmed by a similar EPRI approach using different data and computer codes. ENERCON also found that some issues regarding the implementation of burnup credit appear to have been successfully resolved especially the axial burnup profile issue and the depletion parameter issue. These issues were resolved through data gathering activities at the Yucca Mountain Project and ORNL.

  18. Adaptive core simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Khalik, Hany Samy

    The work presented in this thesis is a continuation of a master's thesis research project conducted by the author to gain insight into the applicability of inverse methods to developing adaptive simulation capabilities for core physics problems. Use of adaptive simulation is intended to improve the fidelity and robustness of important core attributes predictions such as core power distribution, thermal margins and core reactivity. Adaptive simulation utilizes a selected set of past and current reactor measurements of reactor observables, i.e. in-core instrumentations readings, to adapt the simulation in a meaningful way. A meaningful adaption will result in high fidelity and robust adapted core simulators models. To perform adaption, we propose an inverse theory approach in which the multitudes of input data to core simulators, i.e. reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic data, are to be adjusted to improve agreement with measured observables while keeping core simulators models unadapted. At a first glance, devising such adaption for typical core simulators models would render the approach impractical. This follows, since core simulators are based on very demanding computational models, i.e. based on complex physics models with millions of input data and output observables. This would spawn not only several prohibitive challenges but also numerous disparaging concerns. The challenges include the computational burdens of the sensitivity-type calculations required to construct Jacobian operators for the core simulators models. Also, the computational burdens of the uncertainty-type calculations required to estimate the uncertainty information of core simulators input data presents a demanding challenge. The concerns however are mainly related to the reliability of the adjusted input data. We demonstrate that the power of our proposed approach is mainly driven by taking advantage of this unfavorable situation. Our contribution begins with the realization that to obtain numerical solutions to demanding computational models, matrix methods are often employed to produce approximately equivalent discretized computational models that may be manipulated further by computers. The discretized models are described by matrix operators that are often rank-deficient, i.e. ill-posed. We introduce a novel set of matrix algorithms, denoted by Efficient Subspace Methods (ESM), intended to approximate the action of very large, dense, and numerically rank-deficient matrix operators. We demonstrate that significant reductions in both computational and storage burdens can be attained for a typical BWR core simulator adaption problem without compromising the quality of the adaption. We demonstrate robust and high fidelity adaption utilizing a virtual core, e.g. core simulator predicted observables with the virtual core either based upon a modified version of the core simulator whose input data are to be adjusted or an entirely different core simulator. Further, one specific application of ESM is demonstrated, that is being the determination of the uncertainties of important core attributes such as core reactivity and core power distribution due to the available ENDF/B cross-sections uncertainties. The use of ESM is however not limited to adaptive core simulation techniques only, but a wide range of engineering applications may easily benefit from the introduced algorithms, e.g. machine learning and information retrieval techniques highly depends on finding low rank approximations to large scale matrices. In the appendix, we present a stand-alone paper that presents a generalized framework for ESM, including the mathematical theory behind the algorithms and several demonstrative applications that are central to many engineering arenas---(a) sensitivity analysis, (b) parameter estimation, and (c) uncertainty analysis. We choose to do so to allow other engineers, applied mathematicians, and scientists from other scientific disciplines to take direct advantage of ESM without having to sail across the sea of reactor core calculations.

  19. Validation of the new code package APOLLO2.8 for accurate PWR neutronics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Santamarina, A.; Bernard, D.; Blaise, P.; Leconte, P.; Palau, J. M.; Roque, B.; Vaglio, C.; Vidal, J. F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper summarizes the Qualification work performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the new APOLLO2.S/SHEM-MOC package based on JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data file for the prediction of PWR neutronics parameters. This experimental validation is based on PWR mock-up critical experiments performed in the EOLE/MINERVE zero-power reactors and on P.I. Es on spent fuel assemblies from the French PWRs. The Calculation-Experiment comparison for the main design parameters is presented: reactivity of UOX and MOX lattices, depletion calculation and fuel inventory, reactivity loss with burnup, pin-by-pin power maps, Doppler coefficient, Moderator Temperature Coefficient, Void coefficient, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} poisoning worth, Efficiency of Ag-In-Cd and B4C control rods, Reflector Saving for both standard 2-cm baffle and GEN3 advanced thick SS reflector. From this qualification process, calculation biases and associated uncertainties are derived. This code package APOLLO2.8 is already implemented in the ARCADIA new AREVA calculation chain for core physics and is currently under implementation in the future neutronics package of the French utility Electricite de France. (authors)

  20. A search for minimum volume of Breed and Burn cores

    SciTech Connect

    Di Sanzo, C.; Greenspan, E.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to quantify the minimum volume a Breed and Burn (B and B) core can be designed to have and the corresponding burnup required for sustaining the breed-and-burn mode of operation based on neutronics; radiation damage constraints are ignored. The minimum radius for an idealized spherical B and B reactor is 136 cm or 110 cm for, respectively, 40% or 28% coolant volume fraction. The peak required burnup is about 25%. The minimum volume of a more realistic cylindrical B and B core is estimated to be only {approx}15% larger than that of the idealized spherical core but is only 43% of the volume of the medium-size B and B core previously designed to fit within the S-Prism reactor vessel. Thus it appears that SMR s can, in principle, be designed to have a B and B core. It was also found that the minimum volume B and B core does not necessarily coincide with the maximum permissible leakage from a core that can sustain the B and B mode of operation. (authors)

  1. Calculating Path-Dependent Travel Time Prediction Variance and Covariance for the SALSA3D Global Tomographic P-Velocity Model with a Distributed Parallel Multi-Core Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipp, J. R.; Encarnacao, A.; Ballard, S.; Young, C. J.; Phillips, W. S.; Begnaud, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recently our combined SNL-LANL research team has succeeded in developing a global, seamless 3D tomographic P-velocity model (SALSA3D) that provides superior first P travel time predictions at both regional and teleseismic distances. However, given the variable data quality and uneven data sampling associated with this type of model, it is essential that there be a means to calculate high-quality estimates of the path-dependent variance and covariance associated with the predicted travel times of ray paths through the model. In this paper, we show a methodology for accomplishing this by exploiting the full model covariance matrix. Our model has on the order of 1/2 million nodes, so the challenge in calculating the covariance matrix is formidable: 0.9 TB storage for 1/2 of a symmetric matrix, necessitating an Out-Of-Core (OOC) blocked matrix solution technique. With our approach the tomography matrix (G which includes Tikhonov regularization terms) is multiplied by its transpose (GTG) and written in a blocked sub-matrix fashion. We employ a distributed parallel solution paradigm that solves for (GTG)-1 by assigning blocks to individual processing nodes for matrix decomposition update and scaling operations. We first find the Cholesky decomposition of GTG which is subsequently inverted. Next, we employ OOC matrix multiply methods to calculate the model covariance matrix from (GTG)-1 and an assumed data covariance matrix. Given the model covariance matrix we solve for the travel-time covariance associated with arbitrary ray-paths by integrating the model covariance along both ray paths. Setting the paths equal gives variance for that path. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Identifying and bounding uncertainties in nuclear reactor thermal power calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Hauser, E.; Estrada, H.

    2012-07-01

    Determination of the thermal power generated in the reactor core of a nuclear power plant is a critical element in the safe and economic operation of the plant. Direct measurement of the reactor core thermal power is made using neutron flux instrumentation; however, this instrumentation requires frequent calibration due to changes in the measured flux caused by fuel burn-up, flux pattern changes, and instrumentation drift. To calibrate the nuclear instruments, steam plant calorimetry, a process of performing a heat balance around the nuclear steam supply system, is used. There are four basic elements involved in the calculation of thermal power based on steam plant calorimetry: The mass flow of the feedwater from the power conversion system, the specific enthalpy of that feedwater, the specific enthalpy of the steam delivered to the power conversion system, and other cycle gains and losses. Of these elements, the accuracy of the feedwater mass flow and the feedwater enthalpy, as determined from its temperature and pressure, are typically the largest contributors to the calorimetric calculation uncertainty. Historically, plants have been required to include a margin of 2% in the calculation of the reactor thermal power for the licensed maximum plant output to account for instrumentation uncertainty. The margin is intended to ensure a cushion between operating power and the power for which safety analyses are performed. Use of approved chordal ultrasonic transit-time technology to make the feedwater flow and temperature measurements (in place of traditional differential-pressure- based instruments and resistance temperature detectors [RTDs]) allows for nuclear plant thermal power calculations accurate to 0.3%-0.4% of plant rated power. This improvement in measurement accuracy has allowed many plant operators in the U.S. and around the world to increase plant power output through Measurement Uncertainty Recapture (MUR) up-rates of up to 1.7% of rated power, while also decreasing the probability of significant over-power events. This paper will examine the basic elements involved in calculation of thermal power using ultrasonic transit-time technology and will discuss the criteria for bounding uncertainties associated with each element in order to achieve reactor thermal power calculations to within 0.3% to 0.4%. (authors)

  3. Impacts of a high-burnup spent fuel on a geological disposal system design

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, D.K.; Lee, Y.; Lee, J.Y.; Choi, H.J.; Choi, J.W.

    2007-07-01

    The influence of a burnup increase of a spent nuclear fuel on a deep geological disposal system was evaluated in this study. First, the impact of a burnup increase on each aspect related to thermal and nuclear safety concerns was quantified. And then, the tunnel length, excavation volume, and the raw materials for a cast insert, copper, bentonite, and backfill needed to constitute a disposal system were comprehensively analyzed based on the spent fuel inventory to generate 1 Terawatt-year (TWa), to establish the overall effects and consequences on a geological disposal. As a result, impact of a burnup increase on the criticality safety and radiation shielding was shown to be negligible. The disposal area, however, is considerably affected because of a higher thermal load. And, it is reasonable to use a canister such as the Korean Reference Disposal Canister (KDC-1) containing 4 spent fuels up to 50 GWD/MtU, and to use a canister containing 3 spent fuels beyond 50 GWD/MtU. Although a considerable increased, 33 % in the tunnel length and 30 % in the excavation volume, was observed as the burnup increases from 50 to 60 GWD/MtU, because a decrease in the canister needs can offset an increase in the excavation volume, it can be concluded that a burnup increase of a spent fuel is not a critical concern for a geological disposal of a spent fuel. (authors)

  4. Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Carmack

    2012-05-01

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in the EBR-II and study of the differences between the two fuel systems is critical for design of large advanced sodium cooled fast reactor systems. Comparing FCCI layer formation data between FFTF and EBR-II indicates that the same diffusion model can be used to represent the two systems when considering time, temperature, burnup history, and axial temperature and power profiles. This dissertation shows that FCCI formation peaks further below the top of the fuel column in FFTF experiments than has been observed in EBR-II experiments. The work provided in this dissertation will help forward the design of advanced metallic fuel systems for advanced sodium cooled fast reactors by allowing the prediction of FCCI layer formation in full length reactor designs. This will allow the accurate lifetime prediction of fuel performance capability for new advanced sodium cooled fast reactors with extended core designs.

  5. Development and preliminary verification of the 3D core neutronic code: COCO

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; Mo, K.; Li, W.; Bai, N.; Li, J.

    2012-07-01

    As the recent blooming economic growth and following environmental concerns (China)) is proactively pushing forward nuclear power development and encouraging the tapping of clean energy. Under this situation, CGNPC, as one of the largest energy enterprises in China, is planning to develop its own nuclear related technology in order to support more and more nuclear plants either under construction or being operation. This paper introduces the recent progress in software development for CGNPC. The focus is placed on the physical models and preliminary verification results during the recent development of the 3D Core Neutronic Code: COCO. In the COCO code, the non-linear Green's function method is employed to calculate the neutron flux. In order to use the discontinuity factor, the Neumann (second kind) boundary condition is utilized in the Green's function nodal method. Additionally, the COCO code also includes the necessary physical models, e.g. single-channel thermal-hydraulic module, burnup module, pin power reconstruction module and cross-section interpolation module. The preliminary verification result shows that the COCO code is sufficient for reactor core design and analysis for pressurized water reactor (PWR). (authors)

  6. Determination of curie content and {sup 134/137}cesium ratios by gamma spectroscopy of high burnup plutonium-aluminum fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, D.L.; Tanner, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) gamma spectroscopy techniques were used to measure {sup 134/137}Cs ratios on nine PuAl Mark 42 fuel assemblies. The purpose of the ratio measurement was to confirm theoretical burnup calculations. {sup 134/137}Cs ratios were determined from the measured activity based on corrected net peak area counts for the 605 keV peak from {sup 134}Cs and the 662 keV peak from {sup 137}Cs/{sup 137m}Ba. Assembly No. 2 {sup 134/137}Cs ratio measured on 4-15-92 was 0.19. The measured {sup 134/137}Cs ratio was decay corrected to be 2.11 on 8-1-84 based on the half lives of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. The measured {sup 134/137}Cs ratio range was 1.90--2.14 for all nine assemblies. These measured values compare to a theoretical ratio of 1.7 on 8-1-84 determined by burnup calculations. Total cesium curie content was also requested and determined using the NDA direct measurements. Gamma spectral data were measured on the nine sectioned Mark 42 fuel assemblies. Measured cesium curie content, decay corrected to 8-1-84, ranged from 18170--24480 curies of {sup 134}Cs and 8620--11646 curies of {sup 137}Cs. Theoretical cesium curie content of 8-1-84 was 15200 curies {sup 134}Cs and 8973 curies {sup 137}Cs. Direct assay cesium ratio is 12% to 26% higher than the predicted ratio of 1.7. The measured {sup 134}Cs data indicate between 20%--61% more activity than that predicted by the burnup code, whereas the measured {sup 137}Cs activity is between 4% less to 30% more than the predicted activity. This information may be used to address issues concerning criticality safety, storage, and shipping of this type of material.

  7. Steady-state irradiation testing of U-Pu-Zr fuel to >18% burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, R.G.; Wisner, R.S. ); Billone, M.C.; Hofman, G.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Tests of austenitic stainless steel clad U-xP-10Zr fuel (x=o, 8, 19 wt. %) to peak burnups as high as 18.4 at. % have been completed in the EBR-II. Fuel swelling and fractional fission gas release are slowly increasing functions of burnup beyond 2 at. % burnup. Increasing plutonium content in the fuel reduces swelling and decreases the amount of fission gas which diffuses from fuel to plenum. LIFE-METAL code modelling of cladding strains is consistent with creep by fission gas loading and irradiation-induced swelling mechanisms. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction involves the ingress of rare-earth fission products. Constituent redistribution in the fuel had not limited steady-state performance. Cladding breach behavior at closure welds, in the gas plenum, and in the fuel column region have been benign events. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Development and implementation of monitoring for the reactor core of unit No. 5 of the Novovoronezh nuclear plant by local parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytkov, A. N.; Tereshchenko, A. B.; Kravchenko, Yu. N.; Boldyrev, N. V.; Pozychaniuk, I. V.; Lisitsyn, D. I.; Golubev, E. I.

    2014-04-01

    In the course of upgrading the unit no. 5 reactor core of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant, operational limits by local parameters, which limit the admissible linear power density and the relative power of fuel elements, were established. Due to applying modern computer technologies in systems of the in-core monitoring, the calculation of power density for all fuel elements in the real-time mode is implemented. To monitor the power density of fuel elements, the algorithm for determining the limiting linear power density is developed depending on the reactor core height and on the average nuclear fuel burnup. The admissible relative power of fuel elements is determined. In the course of the performed work, the excessive conservative limitations on nonuniformity of the reactor power density are excluded. The monitoring of power density by local parameters instead of indirect K q (fuel-assembly relative power) and K v (relative power of the fuel assembly section) made it possible to increase the fuel efficiency and to improve the economic parameters of fuel cycles of the unit no. 5 reactor core of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant.

  9. Post Irradiation Examination for Advanced Materials at Burnups Exceeding the Current Limit

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Strumpell

    2004-12-31

    Permitting fuel to be irradiated to higher burnups limits can reduce the amount of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) requiring storage and/or disposal and enable plants to operate with longer more economical cycle lengths and/or at higher power levels. Therefore, Framatome ANP (FANP) and the B&W Owner's Group (BWOG) have introduced a new fuel rod design with an advanced M5 cladding material and have irradiated several test fuel rods through four cycles. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) joined FANP and the BWOG in supporting this project during its final phase of collecting and evaluating high burnup data through post irradiation examination (PIE).

  10. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Development of a Stabilized Light Water Reactor Fuel Matrix for Extended Burnup

    SciTech Connect

    BD Hanson; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; SG Prussin

    2000-09-08

    The main objective of this project is to develop an advanced fuel matrix capable of achieving extended burnup while improving safety margins and reliability for present operations. In the course of this project, the authors improve understanding of the mechanism for high burnup structure (HBS) formation and attempt to design a fuel to minimize its formation. The use of soluble dopants in the UO{sub 2} matrix to stabilize the matrix and minimize fuel-side corrosion of the cladding is the main focus.

  11. Pre-conceptual design study of ASTRID core

    SciTech Connect

    Varaine, F.; Marsault, P.; Chenaud, M. S.; Bernardin, B.; Conti, A.; Sciora, P.; Venard, C.; Fontaine, B.; Devictor, N.; Martin, L.; Scholer, A. C.; Verrier, D.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project at CEA, core design studies are performed at CEA with the AREVA and EDF support. At the stage of the project, pre-conceptual design studies are conducted in accordance with GEN IV reactors criteria, in particularly for safety improvements. An improved safety for a sodium cooled reactor requires revisiting many aspects of the design and is a rather lengthy process in current design approach. Two types of cores are under evaluation, one classical derived from the SFR V2B and one more challenging called CFV (low void effect core) with a large gain on the sodium void effect. The SFR V2b core have the following specifications: a very low burn-up reactivity swing (due to a small cycle reactivity loss) and a reduced sodium void effect with regard to past designs such as the EFR (around 2$ minus). Its performances are an average burn-up of 100 GWd/t, and an internal conversion ratio equal to one given a very good behavior of this core during a control rod withdrawal transient). The CFV with its specific design offers a negative sodium void worth while maintaining core performances. In accordance of ASTRID needs for demonstration those cores are 1500 MWth power (600 MWe). This paper will focus on the CFV pre-conceptual design of the core and S/A, and the performances in terms of safety will be evaluated on different transient scenario like ULOF, in order to assess its intrinsic behavior compared to a more classical design like V2B core. The gap in term of margin to a severe accident due to a loss of flow initiator underlines the potential capability of this type of core to enhance prevention of severe accident in accordance to safety demonstration. (authors)

  12. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  13. 78 FR 67348 - Invitation for Public Comment on Draft Test Plan for the High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing notice of request for public comment on its draft test plan for the High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project (CDP). The test plan will guide the Department's activities, research, and development throughout the execution of the High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project. The draft test plan places its......

  14. Estimation of average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors by using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, A.

    2012-07-01

    Average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors is estimated, using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method for measured radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs in contaminated soils within the range of 100 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. As a result, the measured {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio from the contaminated soil is 0.996{+-}0.07 as of March 11, 2011. Based on the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method, the estimated burnup of damaged fuels is approximately 17.2{+-}1.5 [GWd/tHM]. It is noted that the numerical results of various calculation codes (SRAC2006/PIJ, SCALE6.0/TRITON, and MVP-BURN) are almost the same evaluation values of {sup 134}Cs/ {sup 137}Cs ratio with same evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF-B/VII.0). The void fraction effect in depletion calculation has a major impact on {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio compared with the differences between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF-B/VII.0. (authors)

  15. Core design studies for a 1000 MW{sub th} advanced burner reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the core design and performance characteristics of 1000 MW{sub th} Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts with a wide range of TRU conversion ratio. Using ternary metal alloy and mixed oxide fuels, reference core designs of a medium TRU conversion ratio of {approx}0.7 were developed by trade-off between burnup reactivity loss and TRU conversion ratio. Based on these reference core concepts, TRU burner cores with low and high TRU conversion ratios were developed by changing the intra-assembly design parameters and core configurations. Reactor performance characteristics were evaluated in detail, including equilibrium cycle core performances, reactivity feedback coefficients, and shutdown margins. The results showed that by employing different assembly designs, a wide range of TRU conversion ratios from {approx}0.2 to break-even can be achieved within the same core without introducing significant performance and safety penalties.

  16. Evaluation of Cross-Section Sensitivities in Computing Burnup Credit Fission Product Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2005-08-12

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Interim Staff Guidance 8 (ISG-8) for burnup credit covers actinides only, a position based primarily on the lack of definitive critical experiments and adequate radiochemical assay data that can be used to quantify the uncertainty associated with fission product credit. The accuracy of fission product neutron cross sections is paramount to the accuracy of criticality analyses that credit fission products in two respects: (1) the microscopic cross sections determine the reactivity worth of the fission products in spent fuel and (2) the cross sections determine the reaction rates during irradiation and thus influence the accuracy of predicted final concentrations of the fission products in the spent fuel. This report evaluates and quantifies the importance of the fission product cross sections in predicting concentrations of fission products proposed for use in burnup credit. The study includes an assessment of the major fission products in burnup credit and their production precursors. Finally, the cross-section importances, or sensitivities, are combined with the importance of each major fission product to the system eigenvalue (k{sub eff}) to determine the net importance of cross sections to k{sub eff}. The importances established the following fission products, listed in descending order of priority, that are most likely to benefit burnup credit when their cross-section uncertainties are reduced: {sup 151}Sm, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 143}Nd.

  17. Multiscale modeling of thermal conductivity of high burnup structures in UO2 fuels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bai, Xian -Ming; Tonks, Michael R.; Zhang, Yongfeng; Hales, Jason D.

    2015-12-22

    The high burnup structure forming at the rim region in UO2 based nuclear fuel pellets has interesting physical properties such as improved thermal conductivity, even though it contains a high density of grain boundaries and micron-size gas bubbles. To understand this counterintuitive phenomenon, mesoscale heat conduction simulations with inputs from atomistic simulations and experiments were conducted to study the thermal conductivities of a small-grain high burnup microstructure and two large-grain unrestructured microstructures. We concluded that the phonon scattering effects caused by small point defects such as dispersed Xe atoms in the grain interior must be included in order to correctlymore » predict the thermal transport properties of these microstructures. In extreme cases, even a small concentration of dispersed Xe atoms such as 10-5 can result in a lower thermal conductivity in the large-grain unrestructured microstructures than in the small-grain high burnup structure. The high-density grain boundaries in a high burnup structure act as defect sinks and can reduce the concentration of point defects in its grain interior and improve its thermal conductivity in comparison with its large-grain counterparts. Furthermore, an analytical model was developed to describe the thermal conductivity at different concentrations of dispersed Xe, bubble porosities, and grain sizes. Upon calibration, the model is robust and agrees well with independent heat conduction modeling over a wide range of microstructural parameters.« less

  18. Multiscale modeling of thermal conductivity of high burnup structures in UO2 fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Tonks, Michael R.; Zhang, Yongfeng; Hales, Jason D.

    2016-03-01

    The high burnup structure forming at the rim region in UO2 based nuclear fuel pellets has interesting physical properties such as improved thermal conductivity, even though it contains a high density of grain boundaries and micron-size gas bubbles. To understand this counterintuitive phenomenon, mesoscale heat conduction simulations with inputs from atomistic simulations and experiments were conducted to study the thermal conductivities of a small-grain high burnup microstructure and two large-grain unrestructured microstructures. We concluded that the phonon scattering effects caused by small point defects such as dispersed Xe atoms in the grain interior must be included in order to correctly predict the thermal transport properties of these microstructures. In extreme cases, even a small concentration of dispersed Xe atoms such as 10-5 can result in a lower thermal conductivity in the large-grain unrestructured microstructures than in the small-grain high burnup structure. The high-density grain boundaries in a high burnup structure act as defect sinks and can reduce the concentration of point defects in its grain interior and improve its thermal conductivity in comparison with its large-grain counterparts. An analytical model was developed to describe the thermal conductivity at different concentrations of dispersed Xe, bubble porosities, and grain sizes. Upon calibration, the model is robust and agrees well with independent heat conduction modeling over a wide range of microstructural parameters.

  19. Correlation of waterside corrosion and cladding microstructure in high-burnup fuel and gadolinia rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Waterside corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding has been examined in high-burnup fuel rods from several BWRs and PWRs, as well as in 3 wt % gadolinia burnable poison rods obtained from a BWR. The corrosion behavior of the high-burnup rods was then correlated with results from a microstructural characterization of the cladding by optical, scanning-electron, and transmission-electron microscopy (OM, SEM, and TEM). OM and SEM examination of the BWR fuel cladding showed both uniform and nodular oxide layers 2 to 45 {mu}m in thickness after burnups of 11 to 30 MWd/kgU. For one of the BWRs, which was operated at 307{degree}C rather than the normal 288{degree}C, a relatively thick (50 to 70 {mu}m) uniform oxide, rather than nodular oxides, was observed after a burnup of 27 to 30 MWd/kgU. TEM characterization revealed a number of microstructural features that occurred in association with the intermetallic precipitates in the cladding metal, apparently as a result of irradiation-induced or -enhanced processes. The BWR rods that exhibited white nodular oxides contained large precipitates (300 to 700 nm in size) that were partially amorphized during service, indicating that a distribution of the large intermetallic precipitates is conductive to nodular oxidation. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Multiscale modeling of thermal conductivity of high burnup structures in UO2 fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xian -Ming; Tonks, Michael R.; Zhang, Yongfeng; Hales, Jason D.

    2015-12-22

    The high burnup structure forming at the rim region in UO2 based nuclear fuel pellets has interesting physical properties such as improved thermal conductivity, even though it contains a high density of grain boundaries and micron-size gas bubbles. To understand this counterintuitive phenomenon, mesoscale heat conduction simulations with inputs from atomistic simulations and experiments were conducted to study the thermal conductivities of a small-grain high burnup microstructure and two large-grain unrestructured microstructures. We concluded that the phonon scattering effects caused by small point defects such as dispersed Xe atoms in the grain interior must be included in order to correctly predict the thermal transport properties of these microstructures. In extreme cases, even a small concentration of dispersed Xe atoms such as 10-5 can result in a lower thermal conductivity in the large-grain unrestructured microstructures than in the small-grain high burnup structure. The high-density grain boundaries in a high burnup structure act as defect sinks and can reduce the concentration of point defects in its grain interior and improve its thermal conductivity in comparison with its large-grain counterparts. Furthermore, an analytical model was developed to describe the thermal conductivity at different concentrations of dispersed Xe, bubble porosities, and grain sizes. Upon calibration, the model is robust and agrees well with independent heat conduction modeling over a wide range of microstructural parameters.

  1. Irradiation performance of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with ferritic/martensitic cladding irradiated to high burnups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Katsuyama, Kozo; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Carmack, Jon

    2011-05-01

    The ACO-3 irradiation test, which attained extremely high burnups of about 232 GWd/t and resisted a high neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) of about 39 × 10 26 n/m 2 as one of the lead tests of the Core Demonstration Experiment in the Fast Flux Test Facility, demonstrated that the fuel pin cladding made of ferritic/martensitic HT-9 alloy had superior void swelling resistance. The measured diameter profiles of the irradiated ACO-3 fuel pins showed axially extensive incremental strain in the MOX fuel column region and localized incremental strain near the interfaces between the MOX fuel and upper blanket columns. These incremental strains were as low as 1.5% despite the extremely high level of the fast neutron fluence. Evaluation of the pin diametral strain indicated that the incremental strain in the MOX fuel column region was substantially due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep caused by internal fission gas pressure, while the localized strain near the MOX fuel/upper blanket interface was likely the result of the pellet/cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) caused by cesium/fuel reactions. The evaluation also suggested that the PCMI was effectively mitigated by a large gap size between the cladding and blanket column.

  2. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-27

    EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

  4. Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel Burnup Characteristics in Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2006-07-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) test capsules prepared with weapons-derived plutonium have been irradiated to a burnup of 50 GWd/t. The MOX fuel was fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by a master-mix process and has been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Previous withdrawals of the same fuel have occurred at 9, 21, 30, 40, and 50 GWd/t. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) manages this test series for the Department of Energy’s Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). A UNIX BASH (Bourne Again SHell) script CMO has been written and validated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2 (CMO). The new Monte Carlo burnup analysis methodology in this paper consists of MCNP coupling through CMO with ORIGEN-2(MCWO). MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN-2. The fuel burnup analyses presented in this study were performed using MCWO. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations for the ATR small I-irradiation test position. The purpose of this report is to validate both the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxide (WG-MOX) test assembly model and the new fuel burnup analysis methodology by comparing the computed results against the neutron monitor measurements and the irradiated WG-MOX post irradiation examination (PIE) data.

  5. The use of WIMS-ANL lumped fission product cross sections for burned core analysis with the MCNP Monte Carlo code.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-10-14

    Most Monte Carlo neutronics analyses are performed for fresh cores. To model snapshots of the cores at different stages during burnup using MCNP, a method is presented that uses lumped fission product (LFP) cross sections generated by the WIMS-ANL code and processed for use in MCNP. Results of analyses for four very different reactor cores using MTR-type and Russian-designed fuel assemblies, with LEU and HEU fuels, are provided to demonstrate the use of this method.

  6. Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-03-01

    The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.

  7. Advanced MOX Core Design Study of Sodium Cooled Reactors in Current Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Niwa, H.

    2002-07-01

    The Sodium cooled MOX core design studies are performed with the target burnup of 150 GWd/t and measures against the recriticality issues in core disruptive accidents (CDAs). Four types of core are comparatively studied in viewpoints of core performance and reliability. Result shows that all the types of core satisfy the target and that the homogeneous core with axial blanket partial elimination subassembly is the most superior concept in case the effectiveness of measures against recriticality issues by the axial blanket partial elimination is assured. (authors)

  8. MCNP modelling of the PBMR equilibrium core

    SciTech Connect

    Albornoz, F.; Korochinsky, S.

    2006-07-01

    A complete MCNP model of the PBMR equilibrium core is presented, which accounts for the same fuel regions defined in the PBMR core management code, as well as for complete fuel and reflector temperature distributions. This comprehensive 3D model is the means to calculate and characterize the neutron and photon boundary sources of the equilibrium core, and is also used to support some specific core neutronic studies needing detailed geometry modelling. Due to the geometrical modelling approach followed, an unrealistic partial cutting of fuel kernels and pebbles is introduced in the model. The variations introduced by this partial cutting both on the packing fraction and on the uranium load of the modelled core and its corresponding effect on core reactivity and flux levels, have been investigated and quantified. A complete set of high-temperature cross-section data was applied to the calculation of the PBMR equilibrium core, and its effect on the calculated core reactivity is also reported. (authors)

  9. Dynamic core length in saturated core fault current limiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulshin, Y.; Wolfus, Y.; Friedman, A.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2013-09-01

    A saturated core fault current limiter (SCFCL) is a non-linear core-reactor where the core is saturated by an external superconducting DC bias source to achieve a low core permeability at nominal AC currents. Fault current levels in the AC coils de-saturate the core and transform it to a higher permeability state, hence limiting the fault current. In this work we describe the transition between saturated and de-saturated states in three SCFCL configurations. The ‘effective core length’, Leff, of the SCFCL, defined as the length of the de-saturated AC core limb, is introduced for exploring this transition as a function of the current, I, in the AC coil. Practically, Leff allows one to see the SCFCL as an inductor with a variable core length, allowing calculations of the impedance of the SCFCL over the whole range of operating currents. The Leff(I) curve is further used to calculate the dynamics of the demagnetization factor in a SCFCL. We show that the strong change in the magnetic induction of a SCFCL at high current is the result of both increasing the effective core length and decreasing the demagnetization factor. The method and results presented here serve as an important tool for comparing between various SCFCL concepts not only by comparing their impedance values at the extreme fault and nominal current conditions but also by providing an insight into the full de-saturation process.

  10. Automated Design and Optimization of Pebble-bed Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2010-07-01

    We present a conceptual design approach for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors using recirculating pebble-bed cores. The design approach employs PEBBED, a reactor physics code specifically designed to solve for and analyze the asymptotic burnup state of pebble-bed reactors, in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain a core that maximizes a fitness value that is a function of user-specified parameters. The uniqueness of the asymptotic core state and the small number of independent parameters that define it suggest that core geometry and fuel cycle can be efficiently optimized toward a specified objective. PEBBED exploits a novel representation of the distribution of pebbles that enables efficient coupling of the burnup and neutron diffusion solvers. With this method, even complex pebble recirculation schemes can be expressed in terms of a few parameters that are amenable to modern optimization techniques. With PEBBED, the user chooses the type and range of core physics parameters that represent the design space. A set of traits, each with acceptable and preferred values expressed by a simple fitness function, is used to evaluate the candidate reactor cores. The stochastic search algorithm automatically drives the generation of core parameters toward the optimal core as defined by the user. The optimized design can then be modeled and analyzed in greater detail using higher resolution and more computationally demanding tools to confirm the desired characteristics. For this study, the design of pebble-bed high temperature reactor concepts subjected to demanding physical constraints demonstrated the efficacy of the PEBBED algorithm.

  11. Core transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good news for all petroleum geoscientists, mining and environmental scientists, university researchers, and the like: Shell Oil Company has deeded its Midland core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at the University of Texas at Austin. The Midland repository includes more than 1 million linear meters of slab, whole core, and prepared cuttings. Data comprising one of the largest U.S. core collections—the geologic samples from wells drilled in Texas and 39 other states—are now public data and will be incorporated into the existing BEG database. Both Shell and the University of Texas at Austin are affiliated with the American Geological Institute, which assisted in arranging the transfer as part of its goal to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System at regional centers across the United States.

  12. Core design and safety studies for a small modular fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W. S.; Cahalan, J. E.; Dunn, F. E.

    2006-07-01

    The paper describes the core design and performance characteristics and the safety analysis results for a 50 MWe small modular fast reactor design that was developed jointly by ANL, CEA, and JNC as an international collaborative effort. The main goal in the core design was to achieve a 30-year lifetime with no refueling. In order to minimize the burnup reactivity swing, metal fuel with a high heavy metal volume fraction was selected. To enhance the proliferation resistance and actinide transmutation, all the transuranic (TRU) elements recovered from light water reactor spent fuel were used in a ternary alloy form of U-TRU-10Zr. A 125 MWt core design was developed, for which the burnup reactivity swing was only 1.6$ over the 30-year core lifetime. The average discharge burnup was 87 MWd/kg, and the maximum sodium void worth was 4.65$. The evaluated reactivity coefficients provided sufficient negative feedbacks. Shutdown margins of control systems were confirmed. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis results showed that peak 2{sigma} cladding inner-wall and fuel centerline temperatures were less than design limits with sufficient margins. Detailed transient analyses for the total loss of power to reactor and intermediate coolant pumps showed that no fuel damage or cladding failure would occur, even when multiple safety systems were assumed to malfunction. (authors)

  13. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  14. RIA Limits Based On Commercial PWR Core Response To RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Charles L.; Mitchell, David B.; Slagle, William H.

    2006-07-01

    Reactivity insertion accident (RIA) limits have been under intense review by regulators since 1993 with respect to what should be the proper limit as a function of burnup. Some national regulators have imposed new lower limits while in the United States the limits are still under review. The data being evaluated with respect to RIA limits come from specialized test reactors. However, the use of test reactor data needs to be balanced against the response of a commercial PWR core in setting reasonable limits to insure the health and safety of the public without unnecessary restrictions on core design and operation. The energy deposition limits for a RIA were set in the 1970's based on testing in CDC (SPERT), TREAT, PBF and NSRR test reactors. The US limits given in radially averaged enthalpy are 170 cal/gm for fuel cladding failure and 280 cal/gm for coolability. Testing conducted in the 1990's in the CABRI, NSRR and IGR test reactors have demonstrated that the cladding failure threshold is reduced with burnup, with the primary impact due to hydrogen pickup for in-reactor corrosion. Based on a review of this data very low enthalpy limits have been proposed. In reviewing proposed limits from RIL-0401(1) it was observed that much of the data used to anchor the low allowable energy deposition levels was from recent NSRR tests which do not represent commercial PWR reactor conditions. The particular characteristics of the NSRR test compared to commercial PWR reactor characteristics are: - Short pulse width: 4.5 ms vs > 8 ms; - Low temperature conditions: < 100 deg. F vs 532 deg. F. - Low pressure environment: atmospheric vs {approx} 2200 psi. A review of the historical RIA database indicates that some of the key NSRR data used to support the RIL was atypical compared to the overall RIA database. Based on this detailed review of the RIA database and the response of commercial PWR core, the following view points are proposed. - The Failure limit should reflect local fuel enthalpy and the condition of the fuel, i.e. burnup and expected oxide levels as a function of enthalpy. Limits based on cladding oxide needs to take into account that in many core designs the highest oxide will generally be on high burnup rods on the core periphery which have low reactivity, and lower peaking factors. Otherwise excessively low limits based generally on oxide could restrict use of fuel from the spent fuel pool. (authors)

  15. McCARD for Neutronics Design and Analysis of Research Reactor Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Park, Ho Jin; Kwon, Soonwoo; Seo, Geon Ho; Hyo Kim, Chang

    2014-06-01

    McCARD is a Monte Carlo (MC) neutron-photon transport simulation code developed exclusively for the neutronics design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores. McCARD is equipped with the hierarchical modeling and scripting functions, the CAD-based geometry processing module, the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameter and source multiplication factor estimation modules as well as the burnup analysis capability for the neutronics design and analysis of both research and power reactor cores. This paper highlights applicability of McCARD for the research reactor core neutronics analysis, as demonstrated for Kyoto University Critical Assembly, HANARO, and YALINA.

  16. Mechanistic model for the fragmentation of the high-burnup structure during LOCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulacsy, Katalin

    2015-11-01

    A model was developed to account for the fragmentation of the high-burnup structure in fuel pellets during a loss-of-coolant accident. The basic assumptions of the model are that the pores have reached the dislocation punching overpressure during base irradiation and that the increasing overpressure due to rising temperature causes fuel fracturing. The distribution of the pore sizes is taken into account, not only the mean value. The model predicts the existence of a minimum pore size in normal operation, the decrease of threshold burnup for fuel fragmentation when the last-cycle power rating of the rod is high and a reduced fragmentation when a strong PCMI restraint is present during the transient. It can reproduce experimental results in terms of temperature range for fragmentation.

  17. Draft evaluation of the frequency for gas sampling for the high burnup confirmatory data project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, Christine T.; Alsaed, Halim A.; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-03-26

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-15SN0802041, “Draft Evaluation of the Frequency for Gas Sampling for the High Burn-up Storage Demonstration Project” under Work Package FT-15SN080204, “ST Field Demonstration Support – SNL”. This report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the High Burnup (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project. The evaluation of: 1) the types and magnitudes of gases that could be present in the project cask and, 2) the degradation mechanisms that could change gas compositions culminates in an adaptive gas sampling frequency strategy. This adaptive strategy is compared against the sampling frequency that has been developed based on operational considerations. Gas sampling will provide information on the presence of residual water (and byproducts associated with its reactions and decomposition) and breach of cladding, which could inform the decision of when to open the project cask.

  18. Thermal properties of U-Mo alloys irradiated to moderate burnup and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Pool, Karl N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Smith, Frances N.

    2015-09-01

    A variety of physical and thermal property measurements as a function of temperature and fission density were performed on irradiated U-Mo alloy monolithic fuel samples with a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061. The U-Mo alloy density, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are strongly influenced by increasing burnup, mainly as the result of irradiation induced recrystallization and fission gas bubble formation and coalescence. U-Mo chemistry, specifically Mo content, and specific heat capacity was not as sensitive to increasing burnup. Measurements indicated that thermal conductivity of the U-Mo alloy decreased approximately 30% for a fission density of 3.30 × 1021 fissions cm-3 and approximately 45% for a fission density of 4.52 × 1021 fissions cm-3 from unirradiated values at 200 °C. An empirical thermal conductivity degradation model developed previously and summarized here agrees well with the experimental measurements.

  19. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. THE EFFECT OF BURNUP AND SEPARATION EFFICIENCY ON URANIUM UTILIZATION AND RADIOTOXICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Bays; Steven Piet

    2001-11-01

    This paper addresses two fundamental issues of fuel cycle sustainability. The two primary issues of interest are efficient use of the natural uranium resource (cradle), and management of nuclear waste radiotoxicity (grave). Both uranium utilization and radiotoxicity are directly influenced by the burnup achieved during irradiation (transmutation related) and where applicable the separation efficiency (partitioning related). Burnup influences the in-growth of transuranics by breeding them into the fuel cycle. Transuranic breeding is virtually essential to resource sustainability because it increases utilization of naturally abundant fertile U-238. However, the direct consequence of this build-up is the in-growth of transuranic isotopes which generally increase the source of future geologically committed radiotoxicity. For scenarios involving recycle, separation efficiency influences the degree to which this transuranic source term is removed from active service in the fuel stream and made a disposal legacy of human activity.

  1. Passive nondestructive burnup monitoring of MNSR irradiated fuel by measuring photoneutrons produced within fission products.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Kh

    2009-10-01

    A passive nondestructive method for monitoring of Syrian miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) fuel burnup is introduced. The inner irradiation site design inside the Be reflector was exploited to measure the generated photoneutrons induced by fission products hard gamma radiation in the subcritical state. The photoneutron flux was measured using gold foils as a function of cooling time and operation power. For cooling time ranges between 10 and 25d, experiments show that (140)Ba is the extremely dominating inducer of photoneutrons and the measured flux is proportional to the accumulated (140)Ba. This result forms a new method base for MNSR fuel burnup monitoring. It might be used also as a safeguards technique to check the operator declared information. PMID:19620012

  2. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-10-31

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty,cycles (high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) andto investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment.

  3. A Genesis breakup and burnup analysis in off-nominal Earth return and atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Ahmed; Ling, Lisa; McRonald, Angus

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis project conducted a detailed breakup/burnup analysis before the Earth return to determine if any spacecraft component could survive and reach the ground intact in case of an off-nominal entry. In addition, an independent JPL team was chartered with the responsibility of analyzing several definitive breakup scenarios to verify the official project analysis. This paper presents the analysis and results of this independent team.

  4. Validation of the REBUS-3/RCT methodologies for EBR-II core-follow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    One of the many tasks to be completed at EBR-2/FCF (Fuel Cycle Facility) regarding fuel cycle closure for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is to develop and install the systems to be used for fissile material accountancy and control. The IFR fuel cycle and pyrometallurgical process scheme determine the degree of actinide of actinide buildup in the reload fuel assemblies. Inventories of curium, americium and neptunium in the fuel will affect the radiation and thermal environmental conditions at the fuel fabrication stations, the chemistry of reprocessing, and the neutronic performance of the core. Thus, it is important that validated calculational tools be put in place for accurately determining isotopic mass and neutronic inputs to FCF for both operational and material control and accountancy purposes. The primary goal of this work is to validate the REBUS-2/RCT codes as tools which can adequately compute the burnup and isotopic distribution in binary- and ternary-fueled Mark-3, Mark-4, and Mark-5 subassemblies. 6 refs.

  5. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Germina; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  6. Review and Prioritization of Technical Issues Related to Burnup Credit for LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C. V.

    2000-03-13

    This report has been prepared to review relevant background information and provide technical discussion that will help initiate a PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process for use of burnup credit in light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel storage and transport cask applications. The PIRT process will be used by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to help prioritize and guide a coordinated program of research and as a means to obtain input/feedback from industry and other interested parties. The review and discussion in this report are based on knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries. Current regulatory practice and perceived industry needs are also reviewed as a background for prioritizing technical needs that will facilitate safe practice in the use of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation is given. Finally, phenomena that need to be better understood for effective licensing, together with technical issues that require resolution, are presented and discussed in the form of a prioritization ranking and initial draft program plan.

  7. Nuclide Composition Benchmark Data Set for Verifying Burnup Codes on Spent Light Water Reactor Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Inagawa, Jun; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Kurosawa, Setsumi; Kohno, Nobuaki; Onuki, Mamoru; Mochizuki, Hiroki

    2002-02-15

    To establish a nuclide composition benchmark data set for the verification of burnup codes, destructive analyses of light water reactor spent-fuel samples, which were cut out from several heights of spent-fuel rods, were carried out at the analytical laboratory at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The 16 samples from three kinds of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods and the 18 samples from two boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rods were examined. Their initial {sup 235}U enrichments and burnups were from 2.6 to 4.1% and from 4 to 50 GWd/t, respectively. One PWR fuel rod and one BWR fuel rod contained gadolinia as a burnable poison. The measurements for more than 40 nuclides of uranium, transuranium, and fission product elements were performed by destructive analysis using mass spectrometry, and alpha-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry. Burnup for each sample was determined by the {sup 148}Nd method. The analytical methods and the results as well as the related irradiation condition data are compiled as a complete benchmark data set.

  8. Cladding metallurgy and fracture behavior during reactivity-initiated accidents at high burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-12-01

    High-burnup fuel failure during a reactivity-initiated accident has been the subject of safety-related concern. Because of wide variations in metallurgical and simulation test conditions, it has been difficult to understand the complex failure behavior from major tests in NSRR and CABRI reactors. In this paper, a failure model based on fracture toughness and microstructural characteristics is proposed in which fracture toughness of high-burnup cladding is assumed to be sensitive to temperature and exhibit ductile-brittle transition phenomena similar to those of irradiated bcc alloys. Significant effects of temperature and shape of the pulse are predicted when a simulated test is conducted near the material`s transition temperature. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness is, in turn, sensitive to cladding microstructure such as density, distribution, and orientation of hydrides, oxygen distribution in the metallic phase, and irradiation-induced damage. Because all these factors are strongly influenced by corrosion, the key parameters that influence susceptibility to failure are oxide layer thickness and hydriding behavior. Therefore, fuel failure is predicted to be strongly dependent on cladding axial location as well as on burnup. 10 figs, 21 refs.

  9. Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of Alternative Fuel Materials in Thermal Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Oggianu, Stella Maris; No, Hee Cheon; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2003-09-15

    A strategy is proposed for the assessment of nuclear fuel material economic potential use in future light water reactors (LWRs). In this methodology, both the required enrichment and the fuel performance limits are considered. In order to select the best fuel candidate, the optimal burnup that produces the lowest annual fuel cost within the burnup potential for a given fuel material and smear density ratio is determined.Several nuclear materials are presented as examples of the application of the methodology proposed in this paper. The alternative fuels considered include uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium carbide (UC), uranium nitride (UN), metallic uranium (U-Zr alloy), combined thorium and uranium oxides (ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}), and combined thorium and uranium metals (U/Th). For these examples, a typical LWR lattice geometry in a zirconium-based cladding was assumed. The uncertainties in the results presented are large due to the scarcity of experimental data regarding the behavior of the considered materials at high burnups. Also, chemical compatibility issues are to be considered separately.The same methodology can be applied in the future to evaluate the economic potential of other nuclear fuel materials including different cladding designs, dispersions of ceramics into ceramics, dispersions of ceramics into metals, and also for geometries other than the traditional circular fuel pin.

  10. Irradiation performance of PFBR MOX fuel after 112 GWd/t burn-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkiteswaran, C. N.; Jayaraj, V. V.; Ojha, B. K.; Anandaraj, V.; Padalakshmi, M.; Vinodkumar, S.; Karthik, V.; Vijaykumar, Ran; Vijayaraghavan, A.; Divakar, R.; Johny, T.; Joseph, Jojo; Thirunavakkarasu, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Rao, B. P. C.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-06-01

    The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which is in advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, India, will use mixed oxide (MOX) fuel with a target burnup of 100 GWd/t. The fuel pellet is of annular design to enable operation at a peak linear power of 450 W/cm with the requirement of minimum duration of pre-conditioning. The performance of the MOX fuel and the D9 clad and wrapper material was assessed through Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) after test irradiation of 37 fuel pin subassembly in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) to a burn-up of 112 GWd/t. Fission product distribution, swelling and fuel-clad gap evolution, central hole diameter variation, restructuring, fission gas release and clad wastage due to fuel-clad chemical interaction were evaluated through non-destructive and destructive examinations. The examinations have indicated that the MOX fuel can safely attain the desired target burn-up in PFBR.

  11. Fuel Breeding and Core Behavior Analyses on In Core Fuel Management of Water Cooled Thorium Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Waris, Abdul; Subhki, Muhamad Nurul; Ismail,

    2010-12-23

    Thorium fuel cycle with recycled U-233 has been widely recognized having some contributions to improve the water-cooled breeder reactor program which has been shown by a feasible area of breeding and negative void reactivity which confirms that fissile of 233U contributes to better fuel breeding and effective for obtaining negative void reactivity coefficient as the main fissile material. The present study has the objective to estimate the effect of whole core configuration as well as burnup effects to the reactor core profile by adopting two dimensional model of fuel core management. About more than 40 months of cycle period has been employed for one cycle fuel irradiation of three batches fuel system for large water cooled thorium reactors. All position of fuel arrangement contributes to the total core conversion ratio which gives conversion ratio less than unity of at the BOC and it contributes to higher than unity (1.01) at the EOC after some irradiation process. Inner part and central part give the important part of breeding contribution with increasing burnup process, while criticality is reduced with increasing the irradiation time. Feasibility of breeding capability of water-cooled thorium reactors for whole core fuel arrangement has confirmed from the obtained conversion ratio which shows higher than unity. Whole core analysis on evaluating reactivity change which is caused by the change of voided condition has been employed for conservative assumption that 100% coolant and moderator are voided. It obtained always a negative void reactivity coefficient during reactor operation which shows relatively more negative void coefficient at BOC (fresh fuel composition), and it becomes less negative void coefficient with increasing the operation time. Negative value of void reactivity coefficient shows the reactor has good safety properties in relation to the reactivity profile which is the main parameter in term of criticality safety analysis. Therefore, this evaluation has confirmed that breeding condition and negative coefficient can be obtained simultaneously for water-cooled thorium reactor obtains based on the whole core fuel arrangement.

  12. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  13. Calculation of radiation induced swelling of uranium mononitride using the digital computer program CYGRO 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, H. W.; Fiero, I. B.

    1971-01-01

    Fuel volume swelling and clad diametral creep strains were calculated for five fuel pins, clad with either T-111 (Ta-8W-2.4Hf) or PWC-11 (Nb-1Zr-0.1C). The fuel pins were irradiated to burnups between 2.7 and 4.6%. Clad temperatures were between 1750 and 2400 F (1228 and 1589 K). The maximum percentage difference between calculated and experimentally measured values of volumetric fuel swelling is 60%.

  14. Development and validation of burnup dependent computational schemes for the analysis of assemblies with advanced lattice codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Karthikeyan

    The main aim of this research is the development and validation of computational schemes for advanced lattice codes. The advanced lattice code which forms the primary part of this research is "DRAGON Version4". The code has unique features like self shielding calculation with capabilities to represent distributed and mutual resonance shielding effects, leakage models with space-dependent isotropic or anisotropic streaming effect, availability of the method of characteristics (MOC), burnup calculation with reaction-detailed energy production etc. Qualified reactor physics codes are essential for the study of all existing and envisaged designs of nuclear reactors. Any new design would require a thorough analysis of all the safety parameters and burnup dependent behaviour. Any reactor physics calculation requires the estimation of neutron fluxes in various regions of the problem domain. The calculation goes through several levels before the desired solution is obtained. Each level of the lattice calculation has its own significance and any compromise at any step will lead to poor final result. The various levels include choice of nuclear data library and energy group boundaries into which the multigroup library is cast; self shielding of nuclear data depending on the heterogeneous geometry and composition; tracking of geometry, keeping error in volume and surface to an acceptable minimum; generation of regionwise and groupwise collision probabilities or MOC-related information and their subsequent normalization thereof, solution of transport equation using the previously generated groupwise information and obtaining the fluxes and reaction rates in various regions of the lattice; depletion of fuel and of other materials based on normalization with constant power or constant flux. Of the above mentioned levels, the present research will mainly focus on two aspects, namely self shielding and depletion. The behaviour of the system is determined by composition of resonant and predominantly scattering isotopes. When the concentration of resonant isotopes is small, its presence does not affect the flux shape which is smooth. But when the concentration becomes high, there will be dips in the flux where resonances of the isotopes occur. This will affect the reaction rate, which is a product of cross section and flux. The reaction rate will thus be lower than that when one does not consider the flux dip. This is the phenomenon of self shielding. Self shielding treatment is thus a very important aspect of reactor lattice analysis code. This needs to be correctly modelled to obtain a physically sound and acceptable solution. In this research we will be looking into behaviour of the advanced self shielding models that have been incorporated in the code DRAGON Version4. The self shielding models are primarily classified into two broad groups, which are based on "equivalence in dilution" and "subgroup approach". These self shielding models will be tested against a variety of lattices which include Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU-6), CANDU-New Generation (CANDU-NG), Light Water Reactor (LWR), and High Conversion Light Water Reactor (HCLWR). The fuel composition will vary from natural uranium oxide to enriched uranium oxide and plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX). We will also consider the presence of strong neutron absorbers like gadolinium and dysprosium in the lattice. The coolant/moderator chosen for the analysis will be light water/heavy water or a combination. The lattice geometry will vary from square, hexagonal and annular. Thus a broad spectrum of lattices will be analysed to assess the behaviour of advanced self shielding models. The results obtained using DRAGON will be validated against that obtained using Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The reference solutions for all situations will be provided by MCNP5. The depletion behaviour of any lattice will depend on the power or flux normalization that is considered. In general the flux in various regions is estimated with reference to a single neutron absorbed and is normalized subsequently to the power produced by the lattice. Power normalization is predominantly performed by equating the product of energy per fission and fission reaction rate to constant power. But in this research work, we will be normalizing the power using decay energy and energies from most neutron induced reactions. These energy values are obtained from the basic evaluated nuclear datafiles and are built into the custom cross section library. We will also be estimating the individual contribution due to each neutron induced reaction and also the contribution to each reaction type by each element. We will be analysing CANDU-6, PWR thorium pincell and gadolinium pincell benchmarks for validating depletion model. The burnup dependent behaviour of the PWR thorium pincell will be validated against the reference results obtained using code MONTEBURNS which links codes MCNP and ORIGEN, an isotopic depletion code.

  15. An object-oriented implementation of the invariant imbedding method in reactor physics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsbacka, Matthew John

    The method of imbedded invariants was applied to reactor physics problems using an object-oriented computational approach. To my knowledge this is the first application of object-oriented methods to such problems. In so doing, a three-dimensional implementation of invariant imbedding was realized for the first time in a practical reactor physics problem. Invariant imbedding presents an alternative approach to solving the traditional reactor physics problems of calculating the neutron multiplication factor, ksb{eff}, and the neutron distribution in a nuclear system. In essence, invariant imbedding reformulates a traditional boundary value problem into the form of an initial value problem where related subspaces of a problem are linked together under a common imbedding parameter. Using this mathematical approach, the neutronic characteristics of elements comprising a neutron multiplying system are coupled together to recursively calculate ksb{eff} for any system arrangement. System mesh elements are characterized using a Monte Carlo code, so that each element can contain any unique interior geometry and/or material composition. Cells do not have to have the same shapes as long as their bounding faces match. Thus, three-dimension criticality calculations are possible for any system change ranging from fuel burnup to severe core-disruption accident consequence analyses. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by analysing a set of critical experiments done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A three-dimensional model was demonstrated to converge to a benchmark solution as the mesh element size was reduced. A correction factor was implemented to speed up convergence for large meshes.

  16. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  17. Low Burnup Inert Matrix Fuels Performance: TRANSURANUS Analysis of the Halden IFA-652 First Irradiation Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, R.; Vettraino, F.; Tverberg, T.

    2006-07-01

    The inert matrix fuels are a promising option to reduce-eliminate worldwide plutonium stockpiles by burning it in LWRs. These fuels, where plutonium is hosted in a U-free inert matrix phase, may reach high burning efficiency while preventing new plutonium build-up under irradiation. A specific investigation on CSZ and thoria inert matrices has been developed by ENEA since several years. In-pile testing on the ENEA-conceived innovative fuels is ongoing in the OECD Halden HBWR since June 2000 (IFA-652 experiment). The registered burnup at the end of 2005 is about 38 MWd.kgU{sub eq}{sup -1} vs. 45 MWd.kgU{sub eq}{sup -1} (40 MWd.kgUOX{sub eq}{sup -1}) target. Fuel pins are equipped with fuel temperature thermocouples, internal pressure transducers and fuel stack elongation sensors, with the task of studying thermal conductivity and its degradation with burnup, densification-swelling behaviour and the FGR. In this paper, the response at low burnup (< 7 MWd.kgU{sub eq}{sup -1}) of CSZ-based fuels loaded in IFA-652, is analysed by means of the TRANSURANUS code. To this purpose, a comprehensive modelling of the above mentioned un-irradiated fuels, mainly relying on the thermophysical characterisation performed at the JRC/ITU-Karlsruhe, has been implemented in a custom TRANSURANUS version (TU-IMF). A comparison of the code predictions vs. the experimental data, aimed at evaluating the early-stage under irradiation phenomena, particularly densification and relocation, has been performed. (authors)

  18. Criticality Analysis of Assembly Misload in a PWR Burnup Credit Cask

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J. C.

    2008-01-31

    The Interim Staff Guidance on bumup credit (ISG-8) for spent fuel in storage and transportation casks, issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends a bumup measurement for each assembly to confirm the reactor record and compliance with the assembly bumup value used for loading acceptance. This recommendation is intended to prevent unauthorized loading (misloading) of assemblies due to inaccuracies in reactor burnup records and/or improper assembly identification, thereby ensuring that the appropriate subcritical margin is maintained. This report presents a computational criticality safety analysis of the consequences of misloading fuel assemblies in a highcapacity cask that relies on burnup credit for criticality safety. The purpose of this report is to provide a quantitative understanding of the effects of fuel misloading events on safety margins. A wide variety of fuel-misloading configurations are investigated and results are provided for informational purposes. This report does not address the likelihood of occurrence for any of the misload configurations considered. For representative, qualified bumup-enrichment combinations, with and without fission products included, misloading two assemblies that are underburned by 75% results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045, while misloading four assemblies that are underburned by 50% also results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045. For the cask and conditions considered, a reduction in bumup of 20% in all assemblies results in an increase in kff of less than 0.035. Misloading a single fresh assembly with 3, 4, or 5 wt% 235U enrichment results in an increase in keffof--0.02, 0.04, or 0.06, respectively. The report concludes with a summary of these and other important findings, as well as a discussion of relevant issues that should be considered when assessing the appropriate role of burnup measurements.

  19. Chaotic Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    Uses chaos theory to investigate the nonlinear phenomenon of population growth fluctuation. Illustrates the use of computers and computer programs to make calculations in a nonlinear difference equation system. (MDH)

  20. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  1. Corrosion and hydrogen pick-up behaviors of cladding and structural components in BWR high burnup 9x9 lead use assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Toshiyasu; Nakae, Nobuo; Ogata, Keizo; Baba, Toshikazu; Kamimura, Katsuichiro; Matsumoto, Toshio; Kakiuchi, Kazuo

    2007-07-01

    The high burnup BWR 9x9 lead use fuel assemblies, which have been designed for maximum assembly burnup of 55 GWd/t in Japan, have been examined after irradiations to confirm the reliability of the current safety evaluation methodology, and to accumulate data to judge the adequacy to apply it to the future higher burnup fuel. After 3 and 5 cycle irradiations, post irradiation examinations were performed for both 9x9 Type-A and Type-B fuel assemblies. Both Type LUAs utilize Zry-2 claddings, while there are deviation in the contents of impurity and alloying elements between Type-A and Type-B, especially in Fe and Si concentration. Measured oxide thicknesses of fuel rods showed no significant difference between after 3 and 5 cycle irradiation except for some rods at corner position in Type B LUA. The axial profile of hydrogen concentration and oxide thickness for the corner rods in Type B LUA after 5 cycle irradiation had peaks at the second lowest span from the bottom. The maximum oxide thickness is about 50 {mu}m on the surface facing the bundle outside at the second lowest span and dense hydrides layer (Hydride rim) is observed in peripheral region of cladding showing unexpected high hydrogen concentration. The results of calculated thermal-hydraulic conditions show that the thermal neutron flux at the corner position was higher than the other position. On the other hand, the void fraction and the mass flux were relatively lower at the corner position. The oxide thickness on spacer band and spacer cell of Zry-2 increases from 3 to 5 cycle irradiations. Spacer band of Zry-4 showed significantly thick oxide after 5 cycle irradiations but Hydrogen concentration was relatively small in contrast its obviously thick oxide in comparison with Zry-2 spacer bands. The large increase in hydrogen concentration was measured in Zry-2 spacers after 5 cycle irradiations and the evaluated hydrogen pick-up rate also increased remarkably. (authors)

  2. Influence of fuel vibration on PWR neutron noise associated with core barrel motion

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; March-Leuba, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ex-core neutron detector noise has been utilized to monitor core support barrel (CSB) vibrations. In order to observe long-term changes, noise signals at Sequoyah-1 were monitored continuously during the whole first fuel cycle and part of the second cycle. Results suggest that neutron noise measurements performed infrequently may not provide adequate surveillance of the CSB because it may be difficult to separate noise amplitude changes due solely to CSB motion from changes caused by fuel motion and burnup. (DLC)

  3. Metal fueled long life fast reactor cores with inherent safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Tsugio; Ninokata, Hisashi; Endo, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    A large fast reactor core concept is proposed that has inherent safety characteristics against both the Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) event and the Unprotected Transient of Over-Power (UTOP) event, where commonly used zirconium alloy metal fuel (U-Pu- Zr) is adopted to achieve a long life cycle length up to 5 years. The burn-up reactivity of the core which is equivalent to the maximum insertion reactivity in the UTOP due to the control rod run-out event at the rated power, is reduced to less than 1 $ by introducing minor actinides to the fuel, while the sodium void reactivity is suppressed to be negative by applying a step core concept, where the inner core height is lower than the outer core height, and by deleting the upper axial blanket. (authors)

  4. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methodsmore » for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20% FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.« less

  5. An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

    2014-10-01

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  6. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20% FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  7. Overview of core designs and requirements/criteria for core restraint systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W.H.

    1984-09-01

    The requirements and lifetime criteria for the design of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Core Restraint System are presented. A discussion of the three types of core restraint systems used in LMFBR core design is given. Details of the core restraint system selected for FFTF are presented and the reasons for this selection given. Structural analysis procedures being used to manage the FFTF assembly irradiations are discussed. Efforts that are ongoing to validate the calculational methods and lifetime criteria are presented.

  8. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  9. R and D of Oxide Dispersion Strengthening Steels for High Burn-up Fuel Claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, A.; Cho, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Kasada, R.; Ukai, S.; Fujiwara, M.

    2004-07-01

    Research and development of fuel clad materials for high burn-up operation of light water reactor and super critical water reactor (SCPWR) will be shown with focusing on the effort to overcome the requirements of material performance as the fuel clad. Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels are well known as a high temperature structural material. Recent irradiation experiments indicated that the steels were quite highly resistant to neutron irradiation embrittlement, showing hardening without accompanying loss of ductility. High Cr ODS steels whose chromium concentration was in the range from 15 to 19 wt% showed high resistance to corrosion in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW). As for the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ODS steels, the critical hydrogen concentration required to hydrogen embrittlement is ranging 10{approx}12 wppm that is approximately one order of magnitude higher value than that of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel. In the ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel, indicating that the ODS steels are also resistant to helium He bubble-induced embrittlement. Finally, it is demonstrated that the ODS steels are very promising for the fuel clad material for high burn-up operation of water-cooling reactors. (authors)

  10. Laser Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Cesium in Nuclear Burn-up and Sediment Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Pibida, L.; Mcmahon, C. A.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2004-04-15

    Isotopic ratio measurements of Cs-135 to Cs-137 Were performed using both resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to determine the chronological age of nuclear fuel burn-up samples. Initial measurements on a lake sediment sample are being performed at NIST for determination of cesium content in the sample. Atomization behavior of the graphite furnace source, the overall efficiency and selectivity were measured for different sample preparations. Single-resonance excitation 6s S-2(1/2) (F = 4) --> 6p P-2(3/2) (F' = 5) with an extended cavity diode laser followed by photoionization with the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser yielded optical selectivity for Cs-135 and Cs-137 of more than two orders of magnitude against stable Cs-133 and overall selectivity of 10(8). An overall efficiency of 5 x 10(-7) was measured for standard Cs-133 solutions and for the nuclear fuel burn-up samples.

  11. EBSD and TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, Melissa C.; Gorman, Brian P.; Miller, Brandon D.; King, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and studying the irradiation behavior of high burn-up oxide fuel is critical to licensing of future fast breeder reactors. Advancements in experimental techniques and equipment are allowing for new insights into previously irradiated samples. In this work dual column focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscope (SEM) was utilized to prepared transmission electron microscope samples from mixed oxide fuel with a burn-up of 6.7% FIMA. Utilizing the FIB/SEM for preparation resulted in samples with a dose rate of <0.5 mRem/h compared to approximately 1.1 R/h for a traditionally prepared TEM sample. The TEM analysis showed that the sample taken from the cooler rim region of the fuel pellet had approximately 2.5x higher dislocation density than that of the sample taken from the mid-radius due to the lower irradiation temperature of the rim. The dual column FIB/SEM was additionally used to prepared and serially slice approximately 25 um cubes. High quality electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) were collected from the face at each step, showing, for the first time, the ability to obtain EBSD data from high activity irradiated fuel.

  12. HOW STARLESS ARE STARLESS CORES?

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, Scott; Friesen, Rachel; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Enoch, Melissa; Sadavoy, Sarah

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we present the results of Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy continuum and spectral line observations of the dense core Per-Bolo 45. Although this core has previously been classified as starless, we find evidence for an outflow and conclude that Per-Bolo 45 is actually an embedded, low-luminosity protostar. We discuss the impact of newly discovered, low-luminosity, embedded objects in the Perseus molecular cloud on starless core and protostar lifetimes. We estimate that the starless core lifetime has been overestimated by 4%-18% and the Class 0/I protostellar lifetime has been underestimated by 5%-20%. Given the relatively large systematic uncertainties involved in these calculations, variations on the order of 10% do not significantly change either core lifetimes or the expected protostellar luminosity function. Finally, we suggest that high-resolution (sub)millimeter surveys of known cores lacking near-infrared and mid-infrared emission are necessary to make an accurate census of starless cores.

  13. Plasma core reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall. Results of calculations for outward-directed radiant energy fluxes corresponding to radiating temperatures of 2000 to 5000 K indicate total operating pressures from 80 to 650 atm, centerline temperatures from 6900 to 30,000 K, and total radiated powers from 25 to 2500 MW, respectively. Applications are described for this type of reactor such as (1) high-thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) highly efficient systems for generation of electricity, and (3) hydrogen or synthetic fuel production systems using the intense radiant energy fluxes.

  14. 77 FR 26050 - Burnup Credit in the Criticality Safety Analyses of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... nuclear fuel (SNF) in transportation packages and storage casks. The draft SFST-ISG proposes to revise the... SNF systems, (d) add a recommendation for an optional misload analysis coupled with additional administrative SNF system loading procedures, in lieu of a direct burnup measurement, and (e) make...

  15. Metallic inert matrix fuel concept for minor actinides incineration to achieve ultra-high burn-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkina, K.; Savchenko, A.; Skupov, M.; Glushenkov, A.; Vatulin, A.; Uferov, O.; Ivanov, Y.; Kulakov, G.; Ershov, S.; Maranchak, S.; Kozlov, A.; Maynikov, E.; Konova, K.

    2014-09-01

    The advantages of using Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) in a design of an isolated arrangement of fuel are considered, with emphasis on, low temperatures in the fuel center, achievement of high burn-ups, and an environment friendly process for the fuel element fabrication. Changes in the currently existing concept of IMF usage are suggested, involving novel IMF design in the nuclear fuel cycle.

  16. WBGT Calculator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  17. WBGT Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Charles H.

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulate the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.

  18. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1998-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aid core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile, akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core; (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core relative to the mantle is calculated to be at most 1.5 deg./yr.

  19. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  20. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation and breeder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    This work consists of design power plant studies for four types of reactor systems: uranium plasma core breeder, uranium plasma core actinide transmuter, UF6 breeder and UF6 actinide transmuter. The plasma core systems can be coupled to MHD generators to obtain high efficiency electrical power generation. A 1074 MWt UF6 breeder reactor was designed with a breeding ratio of 1.002 to guard against diversion of fuel. Using molten salt technology and a superheated steam cycle, an efficiency of 39.2% was obtained for the plant and the U233 inventory in the core and heat exchangers was limited to 105 Kg. It was found that the UF6 reactor can produce high fluxes (10 to the 14th power n/sq cm-sec) necessary for efficient burnup of actinide. However, the buildup of fissile isotopes posed severe heat transfer problems. Therefore, the flux in the actinide region must be decreased with time. Consequently, only beginning-of-life conditions were considered for the power plant design. A 577 MWt UF6 actinide transmutation reactor power plant was designed to operate with 39.3% efficiency and 102 Kg of U233 in the core and heat exchanger for beginning-of-life conditions.

  1. Benchmark data for validating irradiated fuel compositions used in criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.; Talbert, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    To establish criticality safety margins utilizing burnup credit in the storage and transport of spent reactor fuels requires a knowledge of the uncertainty in the calculated fuel composition used in making the reactivity assessment. To provide data for validating such calculated burnup fuel compositions, radiochemical assays have been obtained as part of the United States Department of Energy From-Reactor Cask Development Program. Assay results and associated operating histories on the initial three samples analyzed in this effort are presented. The three samples were taken from different axial regions of a Pressurized Water Reactor fuel rod and represent radiation exposures of about 37, 27, and 44 GWd/MTU. The data are presented in a benchmark type format to facilitate identification/referencing and computer code input.

  2. Hydrides reorientation investigation of high burn-up PWR fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valance, Stéphane; Bertsch, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    The direction of formation of hydride in fuel cladding tube is a major issue for the assessment of the cladding remaining ductility after service. This behavior is quite well known for fresh material, but few results exist for irradiated material. The reorientation behavior of a Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding (AREVA duplex DX-D4) at a burn-up of around 72 GWd t-1 is investigated here. The increase of the fraction of reoriented hydrides through repeated thermo-mechanical loading is inspected; as well, the possibility to recover a state with a minimized quantity of reoriented hydrides is tested using pure thermal loading cycles. The study is completed by a qualitative assessment of the hydrogen density in the duplex layer, where a dependence of the hydrides density on the hoop stress state is observed.

  3. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly Renee; Fugate, Michael Lynn; Tobin, Stephen Joesph

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  4. Qualification of the B and W Mark B fuel assembly for high burnup. Third semi-annual progress report, July-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, T.A.

    1980-03-01

    Five Babcock and Wilcox-designed Mark B (15 x 15) pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies were irradiated to extended burnups in Duke Power Company's Oconee Unit 1 reactor. An assembly average burnup of 40,000 MWd/mtU, which is about 29% greater than previous discharge burnups at Oconee 1, was attained. The nondestructive examination of these five assemblies, which have been irradiated for four fuel cycles, was begun. Data obtained included fuel assembly and fuel dimensions, water channel spacings, fuel rod surface deposit samples, and holddown spring preload forces. Visual examination of the assemblies indicated that good fuel performance was maintained through four cycles of irradiation.

  5. Fission-detector determination of D-D triton burnup fraction in beam-heated TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Hendel, H.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Bosch, S.; Cecil, F.E.; McCune, D.C.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Strachan, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    After the end of a neutral-beam injection pulse into a low-density TFTR plasma, once the beam-injected deuterons have thermalized, the neutron emission is dominated by the 14-MeV neutron production from D-D triton burnup. Ordinary fission detectors can measure the 14-MeV emission rate, which can be extrapolated back in time to estimate the equilibrium triton burnup fraction. The fractional burnup determined by this method is in the range of 0.3 to 1.5% for TFTR discharges to date, and is consistent with classical confinement and slowing down. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Pressure Vessel Calculations for VVER-440 Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordósy, G.; Hegyi, Gy.; Keresztúri, A.; Maráczy, Cs.; Temesvári, E.; Vértes, P.; Zsolnay, É.

    2003-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were performed for a selected cycle of the Paks NPP Unit II to test a computational model. In the model the source term was calculated by the core design code KARATE and the neutron transport calculations were performed by the MCNP. Different forms of the source specification were examined. The calculated results were compared with measurements and in most cases fairly good agreement was found.

  7. Buckling of Sandwich Composites; Effects of Core-Skin Debonding and Core Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Islam, Syful; Saha, Mrinal; Carlsson, Leif; Jeelani, Shaik

    2005-03-01

    Foam-core sandwich composites have been fabricated using innovative co-injection resin infusion technique and tested under in-plane compression. The sandwich construction consisted of Klegcell foam as core materials and S2-glass/vinyl ester composites as face sheets. Tests were conducted with various foam densities and also with implanted delamination between the core and the face sheet. The intent was to investigate the effect of core density, and the effect of core-skin debonds on the overall buckling behavior of the sandwich. Analytical and finite element calculations were also performed to augment the experimental observations. It has been observed that core density has direct influence on the global buckling of the sandwich panel, while embedded delamination seem to have minimal effect on both global as well as local buckling. Detailed description of the experimental work, finite element modeling and analytical calculations are presented in this paper.

  8. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature for high-burnup cladding alloys exposed to simulated drying-storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billone, M. C.; Burtseva, T. A.; Einziger, R. E.

    2013-02-01

    Structural analyses of dry casks containing high-burnup fuel require cladding mechanical properties and failure limits to assess fuel behavior. Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage subject cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to in-reactor operation and pool storage. Under these conditions, radial hydrides may precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). A test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of drying-storage temperature histories. Following drying-storage simulation, samples were subjected to ring-compression test (RCT) loading, which was used as a ductility screening test and to simulate pinch-type loading that may occur during cask transport. RCT samples with <2% offset strain prior to >50% wall cracking were assessed as brittle. Prior to testing high-burnup cladding, many tests were conducted with pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) and ZIRLO™ to determine target 400 °C hoop stresses for high-burnup rodlets. Zry-4 cladding segments, from a 67-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 520-620 wppm hydrogen and ZIRLO™ cladding segments from a 70-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 350-650 wppm hydrogen were defueled and tested. Following drying-storage simulation, the extent of radial-hydride precipitation was characterized by the radial-hydride continuity factor. It was found that the DBTT was dependent on: cladding material, irradiation conditions, and drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature). High-burnup ZIRLO™ exhibited higher susceptible to radial-hydride formation and embrittlement than high-burnup Zry-4. It was also observed that uniformly pre-hydrided, non-irradiated cladding was not a good surrogate for high-burnup cladding because of the high density of circumferential hydrides across the wall and the high metal-matrix ductility for pre-hydrided cladding.

  9. Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing.

  10. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  11. Conceptual Design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor With Modified CANDLE Burn-up Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Nur Asiah, A.; Su'ud, Zaki; Ferhat, A.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-22

    In this paper, conceptual design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. In this study Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is slightly modified by employing modified CANDLE burn-up scheme so that it can use Natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Due to their hard spectrum, GCFR in this study showed very good performance in converting U-238 to plutonium in order to maintain the operation condition requirement of long-life reactors. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. With such condition we got an optimal design of 325 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input. The average discharge burn-up is about 290 GWd/ton HM.

  12. Gross Thermodynamics of 2-component Core Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbins, D.; Alfe, D.; Alfe, D.; Masters, G.; Price, D.; Gillan, M.

    2001-12-01

    We model the inner core by an alloy of iron and 8 percent sulphur or silicon and the outer core by the same mix with an additional 8 percent oxygen. When the liquid core freezes S and Si remain with the Fe to form the solid and excess O is ejected into the liquid. Properties of Fe, diffusion constants for S, Si, O, and chemical potentials are calculated by first principles methods under the assumption that S, O, Si react with the Fe but not with each other. This gives the parameters required to calculate the power supply to the geodynamo as the Earth's core cools. Compositional convection, driven by light O released at the inner core boundary on freezing, accounts for almost half the entropy balance and 13 percent of the heat balance. This means the same magnetic field can be generated with about half the heat throughput needed if the geodynamo were driven by heat alone. Chemical effects are small. Cooling rates below 69 K/Gyr are too low to maintain thermal convection everywhere; when the cooling rate lies between 30 and 69 K/Gyr convection at the top of the core is maintained compositionally against a stabilising temperature gradient; below 30 K/Gyr the dynamo fails completely. All cooling rates freeze the inner core in less than 1.5 Gyr. A very large amount of radioactive heating is needed to extend the life of the inner core to 3.5 Ga.

  13. Enhancement of REBUS-3/DIF3D for whole-core neutronic analysis of prismatic very high temperature reactor (VHTR).

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C. H.; Zhong, Z.; Taiwo, T.A.; Yang, W.S.; Khalil, H.S.; Smith, M.A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-10-13

    Enhancements have been made to the REBUS-3/DIF3D code suite to facilitate its use for the design and analysis of prismatic Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs). A new cross section structure, using table-lookup, has been incorporated to account for cross section changes with burnup and fuel and moderator temperatures. For representing these cross section dependencies, three new modules have been developed using FORTRAN 90/95 object-oriented data structures and implemented within the REBUS-3 code system. These modules provide a cross section storage procedure, construct microscopic cross section data for all isotopes, and contain a single block of banded scattering data for efficient data management. Fission products other than I, Xe, Pm, and Sm, can be merged into a single lumped fission product to save storage space, memory, and computing time without sacrificing the REBUS-3 solution accuracy. A simple thermal-hydraulic (thermal-fluid) feedback model has been developed for prismatic VHTR cores and implemented in REBUS-3 for temperature feedback calculations. Axial conduction was neglected in the formulation because of its small magnitude compared to radial (planar) conduction. With the simple model, the average fuel and graphite temperatures are accurately estimated compared to reference STAR-CD results. The feedback module is currently operational for the non-equilibrium fuel cycle analysis option of REBUS-3. Future work should include the extension of this capability to the equilibrium cycle option of the code and additional verification of the feedback module. For the simulation of control rods in VHTR cores, macroscopic cross section deviations (deltas) have been defined to account for the effect of control rod insertion. The REBUS-3 code has been modified to use the appropriately revised cross sections when control rods are inserted in a calculation node. In order to represent asymmetric core blocks (e.g., fuel blocks or reflector blocks containing asymmetric absorber rods), surface-dependent discontinuity factors based on nodal equivalence theory have been introduced into the nodal diffusion theory option of the DIF3D code (DIF3D-nodal) to improve modeling accuracy. Additionally, the discontinuity factors based on the Simplified Equivalence Theory (SET) have been incorporated as an alternative and may be employed for both the DIF3D-nodal and DIF3D-VARIANT (nodal transport) solution options. Two- and three-dimensional core calculations have been performed using the routines developed and modified in this work, along with cross sections generated from single fuel block and one-dimensional or two-dimensional fuel-reflector model. Generally, REBUS-3/DIF3D results for the core multiplication factor and power distribution are found to be in good agreement with reference results (generated with MCNP continuous energy calculations) particularly when discontinuity factors are applied. The DIF3D-VARIANT option was found to provide a more accurate solution in its diffusion approximation than the DIF3D-nodal option. Control rod worths can be estimated with acceptably small errors compared to MCNP results. However, estimation of the core power tilt needs to be improved by introducing the surface-dependent discontinuity factor capability in DIF3D-VARIANT.

  14. Characterization of the non-uniqueness of used nuclear fuel burnup signatures through a Mesh-Adaptive Direct Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skutnik, Steven E.; Davis, David R.

    2016-05-01

    The use of passive gamma and neutron signatures from fission indicators is a common means of estimating used fuel burnup, enrichment, and cooling time. However, while characteristic fission product signatures such as 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, and others are generally reliable estimators for used fuel burnup within the context where the assembly initial enrichment and the discharge time are known, in the absence of initial enrichment and/or cooling time information (such as when applying NDA measurements in a safeguards/verification context), these fission product indicators no longer yield a unique solution for assembly enrichment, burnup, and cooling time after discharge. Through the use of a new Mesh-Adaptive Direct Search (MADS) algorithm, it is possible to directly probe the shape of this "degeneracy space" characteristic of individual nuclides (and combinations thereof), both as a function of constrained parameters (such as the assembly irradiation history) and unconstrained parameters (e.g., the cooling time before measurement and the measurement precision for particular indicator nuclides). In doing so, this affords the identification of potential means of narrowing the uncertainty space of potential assembly enrichment, burnup, and cooling time combinations, thereby bounding estimates of assembly plutonium content. In particular, combinations of gamma-emitting nuclides with distinct half-lives (e.g., 134Cs with 137Cs and 154Eu) in conjunction with gross neutron counting (via 244Cm) are able to reasonably constrain the degeneracy space of possible solutions to a space small enough to perform useful discrimination and verification of fuel assemblies based on their irradiation history.

  15. Feasibility assessment of burnup credit in the criticality analysis of shipping casks with boiling water reactor spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-08-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Recently, analyses have demonstrated the technical feasibility and estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This report summarizes the extension of the previous PWR technical feasibility assessment to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. Two different aspects of fuel characterization were considered:l first, the generation of burn- up dependent material interaction probabilities; second, the prediction of material inventories over time (depletion). After characterizing the spent fuel at various stages of exposure and decay, three dimensional (3-D) models for an infinite array of assemblies and, in several cases, infinite arrays of assemblies in a typical shipping cask basket were analyzed. Results for assemblies without a basket provide reactivity control requirements as a function of burnup and decay, while results including the basket allow assessment of typical basket configurations to provide sufficient reactivity control for spent BWR fuel. Resulting basket worths and reactivity trends over time are then evaluated to determine whether burnup credit is needed and feasible in BWR applications.

  16. Benchmark Calculations for Standard and DUPIC CANDU Fuel Lattices Compared with the MCNP-4B Code

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, Gyuhong; Choi, Hangbok

    2000-10-15

    Cell-code benchmark calculations have been performed for the standard CANDU and DUPIC CANDU fuel lattices compared with the MCNP-4B code. To consider the full isotopic composition and the temperature effect, new MCNP libraries have been generated from ENDF/B-VI release 3 and validated for typical benchmark problems. The lattice codes WIMS-AECL and HELIOS were then benchmarked by the MCNP code for the major physics parameters such as burnup reactivity, coolant void reactivity, fuel temperature coefficient, etc. The calculations have shown that the physics parameters estimated by the lattice codes are consistent with those by MCNP. However, there is a tendency that the error increases slightly when the fuel burnup is high. This study has shown that the WIMS-AECL produces reliable results for CANDU fuel analysis. However, it is recommended that the cross-section library be updated to be used for the high-burnup fuels even though the current results are generally acceptable. This study has also shown that the HELIOS code has the potential to be used for CANDU fuel lattice analysis in the future.

  17. FORMOSA-B: A boiling water reactor in-core fuel management optimization package

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.R.; Turinsky, P.J.; Karve, A.A.

    1999-05-01

    The computational capability to determine optimal core loading patterns (LPs) for boiling water reactors (BWRs) given a reference control rod program has been developed. The design and fidelity of the reference BWR core simulator are presented. The placement of feed and reload fuel is solved by an adaptive optimization by simulated annealing (OSA) objective algorithm. Objective functions available for BWR fuel management are maximization of end-of-cycle core reactivity, minimization of peak linear power density, maximization of critical power ratio, maximization of region average discharge burnup, and minimization of total reload cost. Constraints include thermal and fuel exposure related limits and cycle energy production, when appropriate. The results presented demonstrate the utility of OSA to improve LPs in this highly nonlinear and constrained search space.

  18. Reactor whole core transport calculations without fuel assembly homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas Tsoulfanidis; Elmer Lewis; M.A. Smith; G. Palmiotti; T.A. Taiwo

    2002-10-18

    The variational nodal method is generalized by dividing each spatial node into a number of triangular finite elements designated as subelements. The finite subelement trail functions allow for explicit geometry representations within each node, thus eliminating the need for nodal homogenization. The method is implemented within the Argonne National Laboratory code VARIANT and applied to two-dimensional multigroup problems. Eigenvalue and pin-power results are presented for a four-assembly OECD/NEA benchmark problem containing enriched U{sub 2} and MOX fuel pins. Our seven-group model combines spherical or simplified spherical harmonic approximations in angle with isoparametric linear or quadratic subelement basis functions, thus eliminating the need for fuel-coolant homogenization. Comparisons with reference seven-group Monte Carlo solutions indicate that in the absence of pin-cell homogenization, high-order angular approximations are required to obtain accurate eigenvalues, while the results are substantially less sensitive to the refinement of the finite subelement grids.

  19. High Burn-Up Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study 15134

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Hao; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L; Scaglione, John M

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) approach to successfully demonstrate the controllable fatigue fracture on high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a normal vibration mode. CIRFT enables examination of the underlying mechanisms of SNF system dynamic performance. Due to the inhomogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, the detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, finite element analyses (FEAs) are used to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles for further investigation. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance. Fuel structure contributes to SNF system stiffness. There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interactions. SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous.

  20. SEM Characterization of the High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Adam Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; M. Teague

    2014-04-01

    During irradiation, the microstructure of U-7Mo evolves until at a fission density near 5x1021 f/cm3 a high-burnup microstructure exists that is very different than what was observed at lower fission densities. This microstructure is dominated by randomly distributed, relatively large, homogeneous fission gas bubbles. The bubble superlattice has collapsed in many microstructural regions, and the fuel grain sizes, in many areas, become sub-micron in diameter with both amorphous fuel and crystalline fuel present. Solid fission product precipitates can be found inside the fission gas bubbles. To generate more information about the characteristics of the high-fission density microstructure, three samples irradiated in the RERTR-7 experiment have been characterized using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a focused ion beam. The FIB was used to generate samples for SEM imaging and to perform 3D reconstruction of the microstructure, which can be used to look for evidence of possible fission gas bubble interlinkage.

  1. Blind prediction exercise on modeling of PHWR fuel at extended burnup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, D. N.; Viswanathan, U. K.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Unnikrishnan, K.; Rath, B. N.

    2008-12-01

    A blind prediction exercise was organised on Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel to investigate the predictive capability of existing codes for their application at extended burnup and to identify areas of improvement. The blind problem for this exercise was based on a PHWR fuel bundle irradiated in Kakrapar Atomic Power Station-I (KAPS-I) up to about 15 000 MWd/tU and subjected to detailed post-irradiation examination (PIE) in the hot cells facility at BARC. Eleven computer codes from seven countries participated in this exercise. The participants provided blind predictions of fuel temperature, fission gas release, internal gas pressure and other performance parameters for the fuel pins. The predictions were compared with the experimental PIE data which included fuel temperature derived from fuel restructuring, fission gas release measured by fuel pin puncturing, internal gas pressure in pin, cladding oxidation and fuel microstructural data. The details of the blind problem and an analysis of the results of blind predictions by the codes vis-à-vis measured data are provided in this paper.

  2. In-Situ Safeguards Verification of Low Burn-up Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S; Park, I; Kim, J; Ahn, G

    2008-04-16

    A novel in-situ gross defect verification method for light water reactor spent fuel assemblies was developed and investigated by a Monte Carlo study. This particular method is particularly effective for old pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies that have natural uranium in their upper fuel zones. Currently there is no method or instrument that does verification of this type of spent fuel assemblies without moving the spent fuel assemblies from their storage positions. The proposed method uses a tiny neutron detector and a detector guiding system to collect neutron signals inside PWR spent fuel assemblies through guide tubes present in PWR assemblies. The data obtained in such a manner are used for gross defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. The method uses 'calibration curves' which show the expected neutron counts inside one of the guide tubes of spent fuel assemblies as a function of fuel burn-up. By examining the measured data in the 'calibration curves', the consistency of the operator's declaration is verified.

  3. TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

  4. Fuel failure and fission gas release in high burnup PWR fuels under RIA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Sasajima, Hideo; Mori, Yukihide; Ishijima, Kiyomi

    1997-09-01

    To study the fuel behavior and to evaluate the fuel enthalpy threshold of fuel rod failure under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, a series of experiments using pulse irradiation capability of the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) has been performed. During the experiments with 50 MWd/kg U PWR fuel rods (HBO test series; an acronym for high burnup fuels irradiated in Ohi unit 1 reactor), significant cladding failure occurred. The energy deposition level at the instant of the fuel failure in the test is 60 cal/g fuel, and is considerably lower than those expected and pre-evaluated. The result suggests that mechanical interaction between the fuel pellets and the cladding tube with decreased integrity due to hydrogen embrittlement causes fuel failure at the low energy deposition level. After the pulse irradiation, the fuel pellets were found as fragmented debris in the coolant water, and most of these were finely fragmented. This paper describes several key observations in the NSRR experiments, which include cladding failure at the lower enthalpy level, possible post-failure events and large fission gas release.

  5. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  6. Core Competence and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gary; Hooper, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the concept of core competence and applies it to postcompulsory education in the United Kingdom. Adopts an educational perspective that suggests accreditation as the core competence of universities. This economic approach suggests that the market trend toward lifetime learning might best be met by institutions developing a core competence…

  7. Thermal property change of MOX and UO2 irradiated up to high burnup of 74 GWd/t

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Nobuo; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Miura, Hiromichi; Baba, Toshikazu; Kamimura, Katsuichiro; Kurematsu, Shigeru; Kosaka, Yuji; Yoshino, Aya; Kitagawa, Takaaki

    2013-09-01

    Thermal property is important because it controls fuel behavior under irradiation. The thermal property change at high burnup of more than 70 GWd/t is examined. Two kinds of MOX fuel rods, which were fabricated by MIMAS and SBR methods, and one referenced UO2 fuel rod were used in the experiment. These rods were taken from the pre-irradiated rods (IFA 609/626, of which irradiation test were carried out by Japanese PWR group) and re-fabricated and re-irradiated in HBWR as IFA 702 by JNES. The specification of fuel corresponds to that of 17 × 17 PWR type fuel and the axially averaged linear heat rates (LHR) of MOX rods are 25 kW/m (BOL of IFA 702) and 20 kW/m (EOL of IFA 702). The axial peak burnups achieved are about 74 GWd/t for both of MOX and UO2. Centerline temperature and plenum gas pressure were measured in situ during irradiation. The measured centerline temperature is plotted against LHR at the position where thermocouples are fixed. The slopes of MOX are corresponded to each other, but that of UO2 is higher than those of MOX. This implies that the thermal conductivity of MOX is higher than that of UO2 at high burnup under the condition that the pellet-cladding gap is closed during irradiation. Gap closure is confirmed by the metallography of the postirradiation examinations. It is understood that thermal conductivity of MOX is lower than that of UO2 before irradiation since phonon scattering with plutonium in MOX becomes remarkable. A phonon scattering with plutonium decreases in MOX when burnup proceeds. Thus, thermal conductivity of MOX becomes close to that of UO2. A reverse phenomenon is observed at high burnup region. The phonon scattering with fission products such as Nd and Zr causes a degradation of thermal conductivity of burnt fuel. It might be speculated that this scattering effect causes the phenomenon and the mechanism is discussed here.

  8. A FEASIBILITY AND OPTIMIZATION STUDY TO DETERMINE COOLING TIME AND BURNUP OF ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FUELS USING A NONDESTRUCTIVE TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method for ATR applications the technique was tested using one-isotope, multi-isotope and fuel simulated sources. Burnup calibrations were perfomed using convoluted and deconvoluted data. The calibrations results showed burnup prediction by this method improves using deconvolution. The final stage of the deconvolution method development was to perform an irradiation experiment in order to create a surrogate fuel source to test the deconvolution method using experimental data. A conceptual design of the fuel scan system is path forward using the rugged LaBr3 detector in an above the water configuration and deconvolution algorithms.

  9. Regulatory Perspective on Potential Fuel Reconfiguration and Its Implication to High Burnup Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation - 13042

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhian; Rahimi, Meraj; Tang, David; Aissa, Mourad; Flaganan, Michelle; Wagner, John C.

    2013-07-01

    The recent experiments conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on high burnup fuel cladding material property show that the ductile to brittle transition temperature of high burnup fuel cladding is dependent on: (1) cladding material, (2) irradiation conditions, and (3) drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature) [1]. The experiment results also show that the ductile to brittle temperature increases as the fuel burnup increases. These results indicate that the current knowledge in cladding material property is insufficient to determine the structural performance of the cladding of high burnup fuel after it has been stored in a dry cask storage system for some time. The uncertainties in material property and the elevated ductile to brittle transition temperature impose a challenge to the storage cask and transportation packaging designs because the cask designs may not be able to rely on the structural integrity of the fuel assembly for control of fissile material, radiation source, and decay heat source distributions. The fuel may reconfigure during further storage and/or the subsequent transportation conditions. In addition, the fraction of radioactive materials available for release from spent fuel under normal condition of storage and transport may also change. The spent fuel storage and/or transportation packaging vendors, spent fuel shippers, and the regulator may need to consider this possible fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the packages' ability to meet the safety requirements of Part 72 and Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is working with the scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the impact of fuel reconfiguration on the safety of the dry storage systems and transportation packages. The NRC Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation has formed a task force to work on the safety and regulatory concerns in relevance to high burnup fuel storage and transportation. This paper discusses the staff's preliminary considerations on the safety implication of fuel reconfiguration with respect to nuclear safety (subcriticality control), radiation shielding, containment, the performance of the thermal functions of the packages, and the retrievability of the contents from regulatory perspective. (authors)

  10. Stellar core collapse and supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Mayle, R.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.

    1985-04-01

    Massive stars that end their stable evolution as their iron cores collapse to a neutron star or black hole long been considered good candidates for producing Type II supernovae. For many years the outward propagation of the shock wave produced by the bounce of these iron cores has been studied as a possible mechanism for the explosion. For the most part, the results of these studies have not been particularly encouraging, except, perhaps, in the case of very low mass iron cores or very soft nuclear equations of state. The shock stalls, overwhelmed by photodisintegration and neutrino losses, and the star does not explode. More recently, slow late time heating of the envelope of the incipient neutron star has been found to be capable of rejuvenating the stalled shock and producing an explosion after all. The present paper discusses this late time heating and presents results from numerical calculations of the evolution, core collapse, and subsequent explosion of a number of recent stellar models. For the first time they all, except perhaps the most massive, explode with reasonable choices of input physics. 39 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  12. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dumberry, M.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2015-10-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is shallower than the core liquidus, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steeper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first enter a solid stability field near the core mantle boundary and produce ironrich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, crystallization initiated near the top might generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection.In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for an internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high-pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials. We use a 1-dimensional parametrized thermal evolution model in the stagnant lid regime for the mantle (e.g. [1]) that is coupled to the core. The model for the mantle takes into account the formation of the crust due to melting at depth. Mantle convection is driven by heat producing radioactive elements, heat loss from secular cooling and from the heat supplied by the core. The heat generated inside the core is mainly provided from secular cooling, from the latent heat released at iron freezing, and from gravitational energy resulting form the release of light elements at the inner core-outer core boundary as well as from the sinking of iron-rich snow and subsequent upwellings of light elements in the snow zone. If the heat flow out of the core is smaller than the heat transported along the core isentrope a thermal boundary will from at the top of the outer core. To determine the extension of the convecting region inside the liquid core we calculate the convective power [2]. Finally, we use the entropy budget of the core (e.g. [3]) together with the core mantle boundary heat flow to assess whether a magnetic filed can be generated and sustained inside Mercury's core.

  13. "Snowing" Core in Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Cormier, V.; Gao, L.; Gubbins, D.; Kharlamova, S. A.; He, K.; Yang, H.

    2008-12-01

    As a planet cools, an initially molten core gradually solidifies. Solidification occurs at shallow depths in the form of "snow", if the liquidus temperature gradient of the core composition is smaller than the adiabatic temperature gradient in the core. Experimental data on the melting behavior of iron-sulfur binary system suggest that the cores of Mercury and Ganymede are probably snowing at the present time. The Martian core is predicted to snow in the future, provided that the sulfur content falls into the range of 10 to 14 weight percent. Is the Earth's core snowing? If so, what are the surface manifestations? If the Earth's core snowed in the past, how did it affect the formation of the solid inner core and the geodynamo? Here, we evaluate the likelihood and consequences of a snowing core throughout the Earth's history, on the basis of mineral physics data describing the melting behavior, equation-of-state, and thermodynamic properties of iron-rich alloys at high pressures. We discuss if snowing in the present-day Earth can reproduce the shallow gradients of compressional wave velocity above the inner-core boundary, and whether or not snowing in the early Earth may reconcile the apparent young age of the solid inner core with a long-lived geodynamo.

  14. Core sample orientation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Heinicke, J.H.; Stewart, D.R.

    1982-01-19

    A core sample orientation tool is disclosed for coupling to push rods or wire lines for use in obtaining core impressions in bore holes. The tool includes a putty cup and mark receiving surface which are removably attached to a sleeve housing a pendulum-oriented marker which marks the mark receiving surface when a core impression is taken to indicate a chosen directional reference. The removed putty cup and mark receiving surface can be used to orient a previously drilled core or the core to be drilled next, and when the core is laid out on a table in the proper up-down relationship, and considered in conjunction with bore hole logging techniques, the strike and dip of planar core features can be translated into actual attitudes in space.

  15. Core stability exercise principles.

    PubMed

    Akuthota, Venu; Ferreiro, Andrea; Moore, Tamara; Fredericson, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Core stability is essential for proper load balance within the spine, pelvis, and kinetic chain. The so-called core is the group of trunk muscles that surround the spine and abdominal viscera. Abdominal, gluteal, hip girdle, paraspinal, and other muscles work in concert to provide spinal stability. Core stability and its motor control have been shown to be imperative for initiation of functional limb movements, as needed in athletics. Sports medicine practitioners use core strengthening techniques to improve performance and prevent injury. Core strengthening, often called lumbar stabilization, also has been used as a therapeutic exercise treatment regimen for low back pain conditions. This article summarizes the anatomy of the core, the progression of core strengthening, the available evidence for its theoretical construct, and its efficacy in musculoskeletal conditions. PMID:18296944

  16. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large-grain sand in ice. Results with this core showed that the viscosity of the drilling fluid must also be carefully controlled. When coarse sand was being cored, the core barrel became stuck because the drilling fluid was not viscous enough to completely remove the large grains of sand. These tests were very valuable to the project by showing the difficulties in coring permafrost or hydrates in a laboratory environment (as opposed to a field environment where drilling costs are much higher and the potential loss of equipment greater). Among the conclusions reached from these simulated hydrate coring tests are the following: Frozen hydrate core samples can be recovered successfully; A spring-finger core catcher works best for catching hydrate cores; Drilling fluid can erode the core and reduces its diameter, making it more difficult to capture the core; Mud must be designed with proper viscosity to lift larger cuttings; and The bottom 6 inches of core may need to be drilled dry to capture the core successfully.

  17. Dispersion properties of liquid-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Naoki

    2012-07-20

    Dispersion properties of liquid-core photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with large air fraction in clads between 300 to 2000 nm have been calculated by a multipole method for various liquids including CS(2), toluene, chloroform, and water for different core diameters. In calculations, air holes are assumed to be arranged in a regular hexagonal array in fused silica, and a central hole is filled with liquid to create a core. The results are compared with those obtained by a fully vectorial effective index method, and fitting parameters for core sizes are found for each liquid except for water, where the latter method does not give correct dispersions at short wavelengths. Also, the power ratios inside liquid cores and effective core areas were calculated at different wavelengths. PMID:22858970

  18. FY14 Status Report: CIRFT Testing Results on High Burnup UNF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Hao

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of SNF/UNF (spent nuclear fuel/or used nuclear fuel) integrity under simulated transportation environments by using hot cell testing technology developed recently at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), CIRFT (Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester). Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmarking tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. With support from the US Department of Energy and the NRC, CIRFT testing has been continued. The CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods (R3, R4, and R5), with two specimens failed and one specimen un-failed. The total number of cycles in the test of un-failed specimens went over 2.23 107; the test was stopped as because the specimen did not show any sign of failure. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of used fuel rods in terms of both the curvature amplitude and the maximum of absolute of curvature extremes. The latter is significant because the maxima of extremes signify the maximum of tensile stress of the outer fiber of the bending rod. So far, a large variety of hydrogen contents has been covered in the CIRFT testing on HBR rods. It has been shown that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the lifetime of bending rods, but the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained, according to the load range tested.

  19. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and, hence, with the frictional drag acting on the outer sleeve. As the wire cuts toward the center of the core, the inner sleeve rotates farther with respect to the outer sleeve. Once the wire has cut to the center of the core, the tool and the core can be removed from the hole. The proper choice of cutting wire depends on the properties of the core material. For a sufficiently soft core material, a nonmetallic monofilament can be used. For a rubber-like core material, a metal wire can be used. For a harder core material, it is necessary to use an abrasive wire, and the efficiency of the tool can be increased greatly by vacuuming away the particles generated during cutting. For a core material that can readily be melted or otherwise cut by use of heat, it could be preferable to use an electrically heated cutting wire. In such a case, electric current can be supplied to the cutting wire, from an electrically isolated source, via rotating contact rings mounted on the sleeves.

  1. EXPOSED LONG-LIFETIME FIRST CORE: A NEW MODEL OF FIRST CORES BASED ON RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.j E-mail: saigo.kazuya@nao.ac.j

    2010-12-20

    A first adiabatic core is a transient object formed in the early phase of star formation. The observation of a first core is believed to be difficult because of its short lifetime and low luminosity. On the basis of radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we propose a novel theoretical model of first cores, the Exposed Long-lifetime First core (ELF). In the very low-mass molecular core, the first core evolves slowly and lives longer than 10,000 years because the accretion rate is considerably low. The evolution of ELFs is different from that of ordinary first cores because radiation cooling has a significant effect there. We also carry out a radiation-transfer calculation of dust-continuum emission from ELFs to predict their observational properties. ELFs have slightly fainter but similar spectral energy distributions to ordinary first cores in radio wavelengths, therefore they can be observed. Although the probabilities that such low-mass cores become gravitationally unstable and start to collapse are low, we still can expect that a considerable number of ELFs can be formed because there are many low-mass molecular cloud cores in star-forming regions that could be progenitors of ELFs.

  2. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  3. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  4. Nuclide Importance to Criticality Safety, Decay Heating, and Source Terms Related to Transport and Interim Storage of High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I. C.; Ryman, J. C.

    2000-12-11

    This report investigates trends in the radiological decay properties and changes in relative nuclide importance associated with increasing enrichments and burnup for spent LWR fuel as they affect the areas of criticality safety, thermal analysis (decay heat), and shielding analysis of spent fuel transport and storage casks. To facilitate identifying the changes in the spent fuel compositions that most directly impact these application areas, the dominant nuclides in each area have been identified and ranked by importance. The importance is investigated as a function of increasing burnup to assist in identifying the key changes in spent fuel characteristics between conventional- and extended-burnup regimes. Studies involving both pressurized water-reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies and boiling-water-reactor (BWR) assemblies are included. This study is seen to be a necessary first step in identifying the high-burnup spent fuel characteristics that may adversely affect the accuracy of current computational methods and data, assess the potential impact on previous guidance on isotopic source terms and decay-heat values, and thus help identify areas for methods and data improvement. Finally, several recommendations on the direction of possible future code validation efforts for high-burnup spent fuel predictions are presented.

  5. Integrated calculator programs for pharmacokinetic calculations.

    PubMed

    Robb, R A; Bauer, L A; Koup, J R

    1982-05-01

    A package of integrated programs for calculating pharmacokinetic variables and drug-dosing regimens using a hand-held programmable calculator is described. Twelve pharmacokinetic programs, which were based on previously published pharmacokinetic equations, were developed for use in a HP-41C hand-held calculator (Hewlett-Packard). The programs perform, pharmacokinetic calculations for many drugs, including digoxin, theophylline, phenytoin, nd the aminoglycosides. Also programs for ideal body weight, body surface area, and creatinine clearance calculations are included. Eleven of the 12 programs can be stored in the calculator at any time. Values generated in one program are stored in memory registers and can be recalled directly for use in other programs. The calculator has a continuous memory; therefore, all stored data, programs, and functions are maintained when the calculator is turned off. The integrated calculator programs provide a quick and reliable means of applying pharmacokinetic principles to everyday hospital pharmacy practice. PMID:7081256

  6. Core Forensics: Earth's Accretion and Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.; Siebert, J.; Piet, H.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's accretion and its primitive differentiation are intimately interlinked processes. One way to constrain accretionary processes is by looking at the major differentiation event that took place during accretion: core formation. Understanding core formation and core composition can certainly shed a new light on early and late accretionary processes. On the other hand, testing certain accretionary models and hypothesis (fluxes, chemistries, timing) allows -short of validating them- at the very least to unambiguously refute them, through the 'filter'' of core formation and composition. Earth's core formed during accretion as a result of melting, phase-separation, and segregation of accretionary building blocks (from meteorites to planetesimals). The bulk composition of the core and mantle depends on the evolution (pressure, temperature, composition) of core extraction during accretion. The entire process left a compositional imprint on both reservoirs: (1) in the silicate Earth, in terms of siderophile trace-element (Ni, Co, V, Cr, among others) concentrations and isotopic fractionation (Si, Cu, among others), a record that is observed in present-day mantle rocks; and (2) on the core, in terms of major element composition and light elements dissolved in the metal, a record that is observed by seismology through the core density-deficit. This imprint constitutes actually a fairly impressive set of evidence (siderophile element concentration and fractionation, volatile and siderophile element isotopic fractionation), can be used today to trace back the primordial processes that occurred 4.5 billion years ago. We are seeking to provide an overhaul of the standard core formation/composition models, by using a new rationale that bridges geophysics and geochemistry. The new ingredients are (1) new laser-heated diamond anvil cell partitioning data, dramatically extending the previous P-T conditions for experimental work, (2) ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to estimate outer-core density and bulk sound velocity, and combine it with seismology to define a range of possible compositions of the core that satisfies the observations, (3) a refined core formation model bringing together the continuousness of the overall process with the discreetness of the final impacts, and equilibrium thermodynamics with the non-equilibrium nature of certain processes (giant impacts, deep magma ocean). We propose a few strong constraints that come out from our models: (1) the Earth accreted in a rather oxidizing environment, (2) yielding an oxygen-rich core, in a (3) deep magma ocean (~1500 km) that could have (4) never been fully molten or fully equilibrated, at least during core extraction, despite the giant impacts.

  7. Determination of initial fuel state and number of reactor shutdowns in archived low-burnup uranium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Byerly, Benjamin; Tandon, Lav; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna; Martinez, Patrick; Keller, Russ; Stanley, Floyd; Spencer, Khalil; Thomas, Mariam; Xu, Ning; Schappert, Michael; Fulwyler, James

    2015-10-26

    This article presents a method for destructive analysis of irradiated uranium (U) targets, with a focus on collection and measurement of long-lived (t1/2 > ~10 years) and stable fission product isotopes of ruthenium and cesium. Long-lived and stable isotopes of these elements can provide information on reactor conditions (e.g. flux, irradiation time, cooling time) in old samples (> 5–10 years) whose short-lived fission products have decayed away. The separation and analytical procedures were tested on archived U reactor targets at Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of an effort to evaluate reactor models at low-burnup.

  8. Determination of initial fuel state and number of reactor shutdowns in archived low-burnup uranium targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Byerly, Benjamin; Tandon, Lav; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna; Martinez, Patrick; Keller, Russ; Stanley, Floyd; Spencer, Khalil; Thomas, Mariam; Xu, Ning; Schappert, Michael; et al

    2015-10-26

    This article presents a method for destructive analysis of irradiated uranium (U) targets, with a focus on collection and measurement of long-lived (t1/2 > ~10 years) and stable fission product isotopes of ruthenium and cesium. Long-lived and stable isotopes of these elements can provide information on reactor conditions (e.g. flux, irradiation time, cooling time) in old samples (> 5–10 years) whose short-lived fission products have decayed away. The separation and analytical procedures were tested on archived U reactor targets at Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of an effort to evaluate reactor models at low-burnup.

  9. The compactness of presupernova stellar cores

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E.

    2014-03-01

    The success or failure of the neutrino-transport mechanism for producing a supernova in an evolved massive star is known to be sensitive not only to the mass of the iron core that collapses, but also to the density gradient in the silicon and oxygen shells surrounding that core. Here we study the systematics of a presupernova core's 'compactness' as a function of the mass of the star and the physics used in its calculation. Fine-meshed surveys of presupernova evolution are calculated for stars from 15 to 65 M {sub ☉}. The metallicity and the efficiency of semiconvection and overshoot mixing are both varied and bare carbon-oxygen cores are explored as well as full hydrogenic stars. Two different codes, KEPLER and MESA, are used for the study. A complex interplay of carbon and oxygen burning, especially in shells, can cause rapid variations in the compactness for stars of very nearly the same mass. On larger scales, the distribution of compactness with main sequence mass is found to be robustly non-monotonic, implying islands of 'explodabilty,' particularly around 8-20 M {sub ☉} and 25-30 M {sub ☉}. The carbon-oxygen (CO) core mass of a presupernova star is a better, (though still ambiguous) discriminant of its core structure than the main sequence mass.

  10. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  11. Parallel plasma fluid turbulence calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboeuf, J. N.; Carreras, B. A.; Charlton, L. A.; Drake, J. B.; Lynch, V. E.; Newman, D. E.; Sidikman, K. L.; Spong, D. A.

    The study of plasma turbulence and transport is a complex problem of critical importance for fusion-relevant plasmas. To this day, the fluid treatment of plasma dynamics is the best approach to realistic physics at the high resolution required for certain experimentally relevant calculations. Core and edge turbulence in a magnetic fusion device have been modeled using state-of-the-art, nonlinear, three-dimensional, initial-value fluid and gyrofluid codes. Parallel implementation of these models on diverse platforms--vector parallel (National Energy Research Supercomputer Center's CRAY Y-MP C90), massively parallel (Intel Paragon XP/S 35), and serial parallel (clusters of high-performance workstations using the Parallel Virtual Machine protocol)--offers a variety of paths to high resolution and significant improvements in real-time efficiency, each with its own advantages. The largest and most efficient calculations have been performed at the 200 Mword memory limit on the C90 in dedicated mode, where an overlap of 12 to 13 out of a maximum of 16 processors has been achieved with a gyrofluid model of core fluctuations. The richness of the physics captured by these calculations is commensurate with the increased resolution and efficiency and is limited only by the ingenuity brought to the analysis of the massive amounts of data generated.

  12. Core Knowledge Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA.

    This resource guide is an annotated bibliography of books and other print sources relevant to the content specified in the Core Knowledge Sequences for grades 1 through 6, which are curricular guidelines published by the Core Knowledge Foundation. Entries are organized by subject area and grade level. Within each grade and subject area, entries…

  13. The Common Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.

    Current curricula in institutions of higher education are criticized in this speech for their lack of a common core of education. Several possibilities for developing such a common core include education centered around our common heritage and the challenges of the present. It is suggested that all students must be introduced to the events,…

  14. Protein Chemistry Core

    Cancer.gov

    The Protein Chemistry Core has expertise in the analysis of protein modifications via radioactive and non-radioactive methods.  The core provides the following services to the NCI community:  Protein and peptide sequencing Protein phosphorylation site map

  15. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air

  16. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  17. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  18. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  19. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  20. Modular core holder

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.; Cole, C.W.; Hamid, S.; Lucas, J.K.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a modular core holder. It comprises: a sleeve, forming an internal cavity for receiving a core. The sleeve including segments; support means, overlying the sleeve, for supporting the sleeve; and access means, positioned between at least two of the segments of the sleeve, for allowing measurement of conditions within the internal cavity.

  1. Calculation Study of the Wwer Decommissioning Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzevich, Oleg; Klinov, Dmitry; Kurachenko, Yury; Yavshits, Sergei

    2003-06-01

    Several Russian WWER units are to be removed from service in the near future. To study the main calculation problems concerned with decommissioning, the typical WWER-440 unit was selected. The 1D & 2D models of a core, vessel and shielding were designed to apply in transport and inventory calculations. The 2D KASKAD code based on the discrete ordinates technique was applied in criticality and transport calculations. To confirm the results at the mid-plane, the 1D ROZ-6 discrete ordinates code was used as well as the MCNP Monte-Carlo code. The most important inventory calculations were performed with the ORIGEN-S code.

  2. Evolution of the core physics concept for the Canadian supercritical water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pencer, J.; Colton, A.; Wang, X.; Gaudet, M.; Hamilton, H.; Yetisir, M.

    2013-07-01

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the advanced reactor concepts chosen by the GEN-IV International Forum (GIF) for research and development efforts. Canada's contribution is the Canadian SCWR, a heavy water moderated, pressure tube supercritical light water cooled reactor. Recent developments in the SCWR lattice and core concepts, primarily the introduction of a large central flow tube filled with coolant combined with a two-ring fuel assembly, have enabled significant improvements compared to earlier concepts. These improvements include a reduction in coolant void reactivity (CVR) by more than 10 mk, and an almost 40% increase in fuel exit burnup, which is achieved via balanced power distribution between the fuel pins in the fuel assembly. In this paper the evolution of the physics concept is reviewed, and the present lattice and core physics concepts are presented.

  3. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Uhmeyer, Uwe

    2009-08-04

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  4. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhmeyer, Uwe

    2009-08-01

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  5. Calculation of kinetic spatial weighting factors in power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; Renier, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Ex-core neutron detector kinetic (frequency-dependent) spatial sensitivities (weighting factors) for in-core neutron sources were determined by performing space-dependent, transport and diffusion theory, kinetic detector adjoint calculations in which both source propagation through fission processes and the frequency dependence of the reactivity-to-power transfer function were considered. This study was pursued to overcome the shortcomings of previous calculations of ex-core detector weighting factors for in-core neutron sources using discrete-ordinate shielding or point kernel techniques.

  6. Enhancement of the inherent self-protection of the fast sodium reactor cores with oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, V.A.; Malisheva, I.V.; Matveev, V.I.; Egorov, A.V.; Maslov, P.A.

    2013-07-01

    With the development and research into the generation IV fast sodium reactors, great attention is paid to the enhancement of the core inherent self-protection characteristics. One of the problems dealt here is connected with the reduction of the reactivity margin so that the control rods running should not result in the core overheating and melting. In this paper we consider the possibilities of improving the core of BN-1200 with oxide fuel by a known method of introducing an axial fertile layer into the core. But unlike earlier studies this paper looks at the possibility of using such a layer not only for improving breeding, but also for reducing sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE). This proposed improvement of the BN-1200 core does not solve the problem of strong interference in control and protection system (CPS) rods of BN-1200, but they reduce significantly the reactivity margin for burn-up compensation. This helps compensate all the reactivity balances in the improved core configurations without violating constraints on SVRE value.

  7. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  8. Protostellar core instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscharnuter, W. M.

    An axisymmetric collapse model for the formation of the presolar nebula and a spherically symmetric, Larson-type protostellar evolution is discussed. Particular attention is paid to the dynamical behavior of the starlike core. It has been found that, subsequent to their formation, protostellar core embryos containing only a few percents of a solar mass tend to undergo oscillations of large amplitudes. Dynamical oscillations and even disruptive core expansion ('hiccups') have also been observed to occur in spherically symmetric models. On the basis of Baker's (1966) one-zone-model, it can be argued that protostellar cores are vibrationally unstable and may even become dynamically unstable. Thus, oscillations of protostellar cores are to be expected, but their amplitudes, as observed in the model sequences, could be very sensitive to the accuracy achieved by the numerical solution of the discretized structure equations.

  9. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  10. VLBI Observations of the Free Core Nutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smylie, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    At core scale lengths with periods from a few hours to days, the Coriolis acceleration dominates the Lorentz force density and core modes can be considered as purely mechanical. One of the most interesting core modes is the spin-over mode, which reflects the ability of the outer core to rotate about an axis different from that of either the inner core or the shell. It has a nearly diurnal period. In the Earth frame of reference, this mode produces the nearly diurnal retrograde wobble. In the space frame of reference it is accompanied by the free core nutations. When the flattening of the boundaries of the fluid outer core and the figure-figure gravitational coupling are taken into account, as well as the deformability of the boundaries, both a retrograde free core nutation and a prograde free core nutation are found. The retrograde free core nutation was first predicted by Poincare (1910) for a completly fluid, incompressible core bounded by a rigid shell. In a variational calculation of wobble-nutation modes in realistic Earth models, Jiang (1993) found the classical retrograde free core nutation (RFCN) but discovered a prograde free core nutation (PFCN) as well. VLBI residuals in longitude and obliquity compared to the 1980 IAU nutation series, and their standard errors, were downloaded from the Goddard Space Flight Center website, for the period August 3, 1979 to March 6, 2003, giving 3343 points over a span of 8617 days. In an overlapping segment analysis, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) for each segment was found for the corresponding series of unequally spaced nutation residuals by singular value decomposition (SVD), with the number of singular values eliminated determined by the satisfaction of Parseval's theorem. Both the RFCN and the PFCN resonances were found in the resulting power spectrum. The nutation resonances were found to be in free decay, the half-life of the PFCN at 2620 days and that of the RFCN at 2229 days, with Ekman boundary layer theory leading to viscosities at the top of the core of 3124 Pa s and 3611 Pa s, respectively.

  11. Full core analysis of IRIS reactor by using MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Amin, E A; Bashter, I I; Hassan, Nabil M; Mustafa, S S

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes neutronic analysis for fresh fuelled IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor by MCNPX code. The analysis included criticality calculations, radial power and axial power distribution, nuclear peaking factor and axial offset percent at the beginning of fuel cycle. The effective multiplication factor obtained by MCNPX code is compared with previous calculations by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, modified CORD-2 nodal calculations and SAS2H/KENO-V code systems. It is found that k-eff value obtained by MCNPX is closer to CORD-2 value. The radial and axial powers are compared with other published results carried out using SAS2H/KENO-V code. Moreover, the WIMS-D5 code is used for studying the effect of enriched boron in form of ZrB2 on the effective multiplication factor (K-eff) of the fuel pin. In this part of calculation, K-eff is calculated at different concentrations of Boron-10 in mg/cm at different stages of burnup of unit cell. The results of this part are compared with published results performed by HELIOS code. PMID:27135607

  12. Generally Contracted Valence-Core/Valence Basis Sets for Use with Relativistic Effective Core Potentials and Spin-Orbit Coupling Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Ermler, Walter V.; Tilson, Jeffrey L.

    2012-12-15

    A procedure for structuring generally contracted valence-core/valence basis sets of Gaussian-type functions for use with relativistic effective core potentials (gcv-c/v-RECP basis sets) is presented. Large valence basis sets are enhanced using a compact basis set derived for outer core electrons in the presence of small-core RECPs. When core electrons are represented by relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs), and appropriate levels of theory, these basis sets are shown to provide accurate representations of atomic and molecular valence and outer-core electrons. Core/valence polarization and correlation effects can be calculated using these basis sets through standard methods for treating electron correlation. Calculations of energies and spectra for Ru, Os, Ir, In and Cs are reported. Spectroscopic constants for RuO2+, OsO2+, Cs2 and InH are calculated and compared with experiment.

  13. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  14. PRIZMA predictions of in-core detection indications in the VVER-1000 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandiev, Yadgar Z.; Kashayeva, Elena A.; Malyshin, Gennady N.; Modestov, Dmitry G.; Khatuntsev, Kirill E.

    2014-06-01

    The paper describes calculations which were done by the PRIZMA code(1) to predict indications of in-core rhodium detectors in the VVER-1000 reactor for some core fragments with allowance for fuel and rhodium burnout.

  15. Evolution of prestellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Robert J.

    In this thesis I re-analyse the SCUBA archive data for the L1688 main cloud of Ophiuchus, incorporating all available scan-map and jiggle-map data. I create a new core mass function (CMF) for L1688 using updated values for the distance to this region, as well as new estimates for the temperatures and masses of the cores. I show that the CMF for LI688 is consistent with a three part power-law, with slopes the same as those seen in the stellar IMF. The deeper maps allows the discovery of a turnover in the CMF at 0.7A/, which shows that the core mass function appears to mimic the stellar initial mass function. This concordance is indicative that the stellar IMF is determined at the prestellar core phase. I also present HCO* (J=4 > 3) spectral line observations from HARP on the JCMT. Data are presented for 59 of the prestellar cores mapped using SCUBA. Using these data. I present a proposed evolutionary diagram for prestellar cores in the form of a radius-mass plot. I hypothesise that a core is formed in the low-mass, low-radius region of the plot. It then accretes quasi-statically, increasing in both mass and radius. When it crosses the limit of gravitational instability it begins to collapse, decreasing in radius, towards the region of the diagram where protostellar cores are seen. My predictions are borne out when I plot the collapsing cores on this diagram. I outline an analytical model, created by Whitworth & Ward-Thompson (2001), describing the collapse of a starless core with a Plummer-like density profile. I describe my addition of a simple radiative transfer code, which allows simulated spectral line profiles to be created for such cores. The model is shown to be consistent with previous models, and with the observed physical properties of prestellar cores. This model is applied to 20 of the spectral line profiles from the HCO+ (J=4 + 3) data. These 20 modelled cores are placed onto the proposed evolutionary diagram. Their modelled physical states are found to be consistent with the proposed evolutionary track. In conjunction with the SCUBA and HARP data, these fits allow a potential timeline for the LI688 cloud to be established for the first time.

  16. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Iron diffusion from first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wann, E.; Ammann, M. W.; Vocadlo, L.; Wood, I. G.; Lord, O. T.; Brodholt, J. P.; Dobson, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The cores of Earth and other terrestrial planets are made up largely of iron1 and it is therefore very important to understand iron's physical properties. Chemical diffusion is one such property and is central to many processes, such as crystal growth, and viscosity. Debate still surrounds the explanation for the seismologically observed anisotropy of the inner core2, and hypotheses include convection3, anisotropic growth4 and dendritic growth5, all of which depend on diffusion. In addition to this, the main deformation mechanism at the inner-outer core boundary is believed to be diffusion creep6. It is clear, therefore, that to gain a comprehensive understanding of the core, a thorough understanding of diffusion is necessary. The extremely high pressures and temperatures of the Earth's core make experiments at these conditions a challenge. Low-temperature and low-pressure experimental data must be extrapolated across a very wide gap to reach the relevant conditions, resulting in very poorly constrained values for diffusivity and viscosity. In addition to these dangers of extrapolation, preliminary results show that magnetisation plays a major role in the activation energies for diffusion at low pressures therefore creating a break down in homologous scaling to high pressures. First principles calculations provide a means of investigating diffusivity at core conditions, have already been shown to be in very good agreement with experiments7, and will certainly provide a better estimate for diffusivity than extrapolation. Here, we present first principles simulations of self-diffusion in solid iron for the FCC, BCC and HCP structures at core conditions in addition to low-temperature and low-pressure calculations relevant to experimental data. 1. Birch, F. Density and composition of mantle and core. Journal of Geophysical Research 69, 4377-4388 (1964). 2. Irving, J. C. E. & Deuss, A. Hemispherical structure in inner core velocity anisotropy. Journal of Geophysical Research 116, B04307 (2011). 3. Buffett, B. A. Onset and orientation of convection in the inner core. Geophysical Journal International 179, 711-719 (2009). 4. Bergman, M. Measurements of electric anisotropy due to solidification texturing and the implications for the Earth's inner core. Nature 389, 60-63 (1997). 5. Deguen, R. & Cardin, P. Thermochemical convection in Earth's inner core. Geophysical Journal International 187, 1101-1118 (2011). 6. Reaman, D. M., Daehn, G. S. & Panero, W. R. Predictive mechanism for anisotropy development in the Earth's inner core. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 312, 437-442 (2011). 7. Ammann, M. W., Brodholt, J. P., Wookey, J. & Dobson, D. P. First-principles constraints on diffusion in lower-mantle minerals and a weak D'' layer. Nature 465, 462-5 (2010).

  18. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    SciTech Connect

    Díez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J.S.

    2015-01-15

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties.

  19. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khericha, S.T.

    2002-06-30

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to {approx}42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5%) as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: {approx}50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies ({at} {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  20. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khericha, Soli T

    2002-06-01

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to ~42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5% as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: ~50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies (@ ~40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches ~40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  1. Core shroud corner joints

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  2. Chemical Models of Star-Forming Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.

    2013-10-01

    We review chemical models of low-mass star forming cores including our own work. Chemistry in molecular clouds are not in equilibrium. Molecular abundances in star forming cores change not only with physical conditions in cores but also with time. In prestellar cores, temperature stays almost constant ˜ 10 K, while the gas density increases as the core collapses. Three chemical phenomena are observed in this cold phase: molecular depletion, chemical fractionation, and deuterium enrichment. They are reproduced by chemical models combined with isothermal gravitational collapse. The collapse timescale of prestellar cores depends on the initial ratios of thermal, turbulent and magnetic pressure to gravitational energy. Since the chemical timescales, such as adsorption timescale of gas particle onto grains, are comparable to the collapse timescale, molecular abundances in cores should vary depending on the collapse timescale. Observations found that molecular abundances in some cores deviate from those in other cores, in spite of their similar central densities; it could originate in the pressure to gravity ratio in the cores. As the core contraction proceeds, compressional heating eventually overwhelms radiative cooling, and the core starts to warm up. Temperature of the infalling gas rises, as it approaches the central region. Grain-surface reactions of adsorbed molecules occur in this warm-up phase, as well as in prestellar phase. Hydrogenation is efficient at T ≤ 20 K, whereas radicals can migrate on grain surface and react with each other to form complex organic molecules (COMs) at T ≥ 30 K. Grain-surface species are sublimated to the gas phase and re-start gas-phase reactions; e.g. unsaturated carbon chains are formed from sublimated methane. Our model calculation predicts that COMs increases as the warm region extends outwards and the abundances of unsaturated carbon chains depend on the gas density in the CH4 sublimation zone. Recent detection of COMs in prestellar cores may indicate that a fraction of COMs formed in the vicinity of a protostar could be distributed to ambient clouds by outflows. COMs and carbon chains in protostellar phase inherit the high D/H ratio of their mother molecules, which originate mostly in cold prestellar phase.

  3. Neutronics calculations on the impact of burnable poisons to safety and non-proliferation aspects of inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistner, C.; Liebert, W.; Fujara, F.

    2006-06-01

    Inert matrix fuels (IMF) with plutonium may play a significant role to dispose of stockpiles of separated plutonium from military or civilian origin. For reasons of reactivity control of such fuels, burnable poisons (BP) will have to be used. The impact of different possible BP candidates (B, Eu, Er and Gd) on the achievable burnup as well as on safety and non-proliferation aspects of IMF are analyzed. To this end, cell burnup calculations have been performed and burnup dependent reactivity coefficients (boron worth, fuel temperature and moderator void coefficient) were calculated. All BP candidates were analyzed for one initial BP concentration and a range of different initial plutonium-concentrations (0.4-1.0 g cm-3) for reactor-grade plutonium isotopic composition as well as for weapon-grade plutonium. For the two most promising BP candidates (Er and Gd), a range of different BP concentrations was investigated to study the impact of BP concentration on fuel burnup. A set of reference fuels was identified to compare the performance of uranium-fuels, MOX and IMF with respect to (1) the fraction of initial plutonium being burned, (2) the remaining absolute plutonium concentration in the spent fuel and (3) the shift in the isotopic composition of the remaining plutonium leading to differences in the heat and neutron rate produced. In the case of IMF, the remaining Pu in spent fuel is unattractive for a would be proliferator. This underlines the attractiveness of an IMF approach for disposal of Pu from a non-proliferation perspective.

  4. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY CORE TEMPERATURE INSTABILITY IN RODENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to quantify instability of autonomic systems such as temperature regulation should be important in toxicant and drug safety studies. Stability of core temperature (Tc) in laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of stimuli. Calculating the temperature differential o...

  5. Enhanced transferability for Bethe-Salpeter Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Eric L.

    2015-03-01

    We have systematized projector-augmented-wave methods to reliably augment plane-wave/pseudopotential Bloch functions in atomic core regions for purposes of performing screening calculations, evaluating transition matrix elements, and evaluating Slater integrals in the condensed matter environment. This has improved the accuracy of core-hole screening, adherence to sum rules, and control of the strength of absorption features. This also ensures that transition matrix elements and concomitant core excitation spectra are reliable over significant energy ranges. To accomplish this, we improve the quality of the pseudopotentials (which become harder), extending norm conservation, and increasing the number of ``valence electrons.'' We present results for both insulators and metals, and for both core and valence excitations. Comparison to experimental data is a key part of this work. We also emphasize what approximations remain to be tackled in the treatment of electronic excitation spectra, many of which are more difficult to treat than what is within the scope of this work.

  6. An innovative optical and chemical drill core scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, A. S. L.; Arthursson, M.; Lundström, A.; Calderón Estrada, E.; Inerfeldt, A.; Lorenz, H.

    2015-05-01

    We describe a new innovative drill core scanner that semi-automatedly analyses drill cores directly in drill core trays with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, without the need for much sample preparation or operator intervention. The instrument is fed with entire core trays, which are photographed at high resolution and scanned by a 3-D profiling laser. Algorithms recognise the geometry of the core tray, number of slots, location of the drill cores, calculate the optimal scanning path, and execute a continuous XRF analysis of 2 cm width along the core. The instrument is equipped with critical analytical components that allow an effective QA/QC routine to be implemented. It is a mobile instrument that can be manoeuvred by a single person with a manual pallet jack.

  7. Azimuthal-spin-wave-mode-driven vortex-core reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-01-14

    We studied, by micromagnetic numerical calculations, asymmetric vortex-core reversals driven by the m = −1 and m = +1 azimuthal spin-wave modes' excitations in soft magnetic circular nano-disks. We addressed the similarities and differences between the asymmetric core reversals in terms of the temporal evolutions of the correlated core-motion speed, locally concentrated perpendicular gyrofield, and magnetization dip near the original vortex core. The criterion for the core reversals was found to be the magnetization dip that must reach the out-of-plane magnetization component, m{sub z} = −p, with the initial polarization p, where p = +1 (−1) for the upward (downward) core magnetization. The core-motion speed and the associated perpendicular gyrofield, variable and controllable with static perpendicular field, H{sub z}, applied perpendicularly to the disk plane, must reach their threshold values to meet the ultimate core-reversal criterion. Also, we determined the H{sub z} strength and direction dependence of the core-switching time and threshold exciting field strength required for the core reversals, whose parameters are essential in the application aspect. This work offers deeper insights into the azimuthal spin-wave-driven core-reversal dynamics as well as an efficient means of controlling the azimuthal-modes-driven core reversals.

  8. Azimuthal-spin-wave-mode-driven vortex-core reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-01-01

    We studied, by micromagnetic numerical calculations, asymmetric vortex-core reversals driven by the m = -1 and m = +1 azimuthal spin-wave modes' excitations in soft magnetic circular nano-disks. We addressed the similarities and differences between the asymmetric core reversals in terms of the temporal evolutions of the correlated core-motion speed, locally concentrated perpendicular gyrofield, and magnetization dip near the original vortex core. The criterion for the core reversals was found to be the magnetization dip that must reach the out-of-plane magnetization component, mz = -p, with the initial polarization p, where p = +1 (-1) for the upward (downward) core magnetization. The core-motion speed and the associated perpendicular gyrofield, variable and controllable with static perpendicular field, Hz, applied perpendicularly to the disk plane, must reach their threshold values to meet the ultimate core-reversal criterion. Also, we determined the Hz strength and direction dependence of the core-switching time and threshold exciting field strength required for the core reversals, whose parameters are essential in the application aspect. This work offers deeper insights into the azimuthal spin-wave-driven core-reversal dynamics as well as an efficient means of controlling the azimuthal-modes-driven core reversals.

  9. Core materials development for the fuel cycle R&D program

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M; Maloy, S; Cole, James I.; Byun, Thak Sang

    2011-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (>300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350 750 C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress (400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 C) for specimens irradiated at 383 C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

  10. Core materials development for the fuel cycle R&D program

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, S. A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Cole, J. I.; Byun, Thak Sang

    2011-12-31

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels’ fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (>300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350– 750 °C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 °C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress (~400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 °C) for specimens irradiated at 383 °C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 °C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

  11. Core Materials Development for the Fuel Cycle R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Maloy; M. Toloczko; J. Cole; T. S. Byun

    2011-08-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (greater than 300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350-750 C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress ({approx}400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 C) for specimens irradiated at 383 C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

  12. Core materials development for the fuel cycle R&D program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, S. A.; Toloczko, M.; Cole, J.; Byun, T. S.

    2011-08-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels' fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (>300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350-750 °C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 °C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress (˜400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 °C) for specimens irradiated at 383 °C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 °C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

  13. Core catcher device. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, L.; Fourest, B.; Kayser, G.; Martin, R.

    1981-07-28

    In a fast reactor having a diagrid structure supported on the bottom wall of a reactor vessel containing the core and liquid metal coolant, a core catcher serves in the event of core meltdown to prevent hot debris carried down by the liquid metal from coming into contact with the vessel walls. The core catcher comprises a single collecting tray having a large area, a central chimney and a bearing shell extending parallel to the bottom wall of the reactor vessel. An enclosed space is formed between the bottom wall, the diagrid support structure and the diagrid and contains the collecting tray. Under melt-down conditions, the temperature differences produced by the molten fuel deposited on the tray and the presence of the central chimney have the effect of setting up a natural circulation of liquid metal and consequently of cooling the fuel.

  14. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  15. Confocal Microscopy Core Facility

    Cancer.gov

    The Confocal Microscopy Core Facility is supported by CCR and there is no charge to individual users for confocal time. Collaborations with laboratories outside the CCR are also considered, time permitting. Please refer to our publications list for exampl

  16. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  17. Confocal Microscopy Core Facility

    Cancer.gov

    The Confocal Microscopy Core Facility provides "open access" confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM) services to all CCR investigators. The Facility's equipment includes a: Zeiss LSM 510 META NLO for 2-photon imaging system Zeiss LSM 710 NLO for 2-photon

  18. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Quiet-Aircraft Subproject aims to develop concepts and technologies to reduce perceived community noise attributable to aircraft with minimal impact on weight and performance. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic.

  19. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  20. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  1. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  2. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  3. The iron alloys of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracas, R.; Verstraete, M. J.; Vargas Calderon, A.; Labrosse, S.; Hernlund, J. W.; Gomi, H.; Ohta, K.; Hirose, K.

    2012-12-01

    We estimate the necessary amount of several light elements - C, S, P, O, Si - as major alloying components to match the observed seismic properties of the Earth's inner core. For this we compute the elastic constants tensors and determine the seismic properties of Fe3X compounds, with X = C, S, P, O and Si, using first-principles calculations. Assuming linear relations and similar temperature corrections of velocities, we obtain as most reasonable silicon and oxygen. We perform the same exercise on Fe-Ni alloys and see a minor effect of Ni on the seismic properties of iron. We compute the electrical conductivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions from electron-phonon coupling in the ABINIT implementation. We find an excellent agreement with experimental results for pure hcp iron below 1 mbars. We confidently use our results up to core pressure conditions. We show that the conductivity exhibits saturation at high pressures. We treat in detail the effect of Si on hcp iron and show a marked saturation effect, an increase in anisotropy and a strong dependence with the substitution pattern. The computed values suggest that the outer core should have conductivities in excess of 90 W/K/m, which is considerably larger than current estimates. This implies an inner core younger than 1 bil. years and stratification of the outer core.

  4. Hybrid Analysis of Engine Core Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Kim, Jeonglae; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Core noise, or the noise generated within an aircraft engine, is becoming an increasing concern for the aviation industry as other noise sources are progressively reduced. The prediction of core noise generation and propagation is especially challenging for computationalists since it involves extensive multiphysics including chemical reaction and moving blades in addition to the aerothermochemical effects of heated jets. In this work, a representative engine flow path is constructed using experimentally verified geometries to simulate the physics of core noise. A combustor, single-stage turbine, nozzle and jet are modeled in separate calculations using appropriate high fidelity techniques including LES, actuator disk theory and Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings surfaces. A one way coupling procedure is developed for passing fluctuations downstream through the flowpath. This method effectively isolates the core noise from other acoustic sources, enables straightforward study of the interaction between core noise and jet exhaust, and allows for simple distinction between direct and indirect noise. The impact of core noise on the farfield jet acoustics is studied extensively and the relative efficiency of different disturbance types and shapes is examined in detail.

  5. Experimental constraints on Mercury's core composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, Nancy L.; Wollack, E. Alex; Klima, Rachel L.; Minitti, Michelle E.

    2014-03-01

    The recent discovery of high S concentrations on the surface of Mercury by spacecraft measurements from the MESSENGER mission provides the potential to place new constraints on the composition of Mercury's large metallic core. In this work, we conducted a set of systematic equilibrium metal-silicate experiments that determined the effect of different metallic compositions in the Fe-S-Si system on the S concentration in the coexisting silicate melt. We find that metallic melts with a range of S and Si combinations can be in equilibrium with silicate melts with S contents consistent with Mercury's surface, but that such silicate melts contain Fe contents lower than measured for Mercury's surface. If Mercury's surface S abundance is representative of the planet's bulk silicate composition and if the planet experienced metal-silicate equilibrium during planetary core formation, then these results place boundaries on the range of possible combinations of Si and S that could be present as the light elements in Mercury's core and suggest that Mercury's core likely contains Si. Except for core compositions with extreme abundances of Si, bulk Mercury compositions calculated by using the newly determined range of potential S and Si core compositions do not resemble primitive meteorite compositions.

  6. Magic Polyicosahedral Core-Shell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G.; Rapallo, A.; Mottet, C.; Fortunelli, A.; Baletto, F.; Ferrando, R.

    2004-09-01

    A new family of magic cluster structures is found by genetic global optimization, whose results are confirmed by density functional calculations. These clusters are Ag-Ni and Ag-Cu nanoparticles with an inner Ni or Cu core and an Ag external shell, as experimentally observed for Ag-Ni, and present a polyicosahedral character. The interplay of the core-shell chemical ordering with the polyicosahedral structural arrangement gives high-symmetry clusters of remarkable structural, thermodynamic, and electronic stability, which can have high melting points (they melt higher than pure clusters of the same size), large energy gaps, and (in the case of Ag-Ni) nonzero magnetic moments.

  7. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the

  8. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  9. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase the combustion-noise component. The trend towards high-power-density cores also means that the noise generated in the low-pressure turbine will likely increase. Consequently, the combined result from these emerging changes will be to elevate the overall importance of turbomachinery core noise, which will need to be addressed in order to meet future noise goals.

  10. Neutronics and Thermal Hydraulics Study for Using a Low-Enriched Uranium Core in the Advanced Test Reactor -- 2008 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. A. Lillo; R. G. Ambrosek

    2008-06-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis was performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff versus effective full power days (EFPDs) between the HEU and the LEU cores. The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was used to optimize the U 235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profiles between the HEU and LEU cores were minimized. The depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar to the ATR reference HEU case study. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, the proposed LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt% is used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness from 0.191 mm (7.0 mil) to 0.330 mm (13.0 mil) at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19). A 0.8g of Boron-10, a burnable absorber, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the peak to average ratio of the inner/outer heat flux more effectively. Because the B-10 (n,a) reaction will produce Helium-4 (He-4), which might degrade the LEU foil type fuel performance, an alternative absorber option is proposed. The proposed LEU case study will have 6.918 g of Cadmium (Cd) mixed with the LEU at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19) as a burnable absorber to achieve peak to average ratios similar to those for the ATR reference HEU case study.

  11. Evaluation of the Start-Up Core Physics Tests at Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (Annular Core Loadings)

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2010-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The Japanese government approved construction of the HTTR in the 1989 fiscal year budget; construction began at the Oarai Research and Development Center in March 1991 and was completed May 1996. Fuel loading began July 1, 1998, from the core periphery. The first criticality was attained with an annular core on November 10, 1998 at 14:18, followed by a series of start-up core physics tests until a fully-loaded core was developed on December 16, 1998. Criticality tests were carried out into January 1999. The first full power operation with an average core outlet temperature of 850ºC was completed on December 7, 2001, and operational licensing of the HTTR was approved on March 6, 2002. The HTTR attained high temperature operation at 950 ºC in April 19, 2004. After a series of safety demonstration tests, it will be used as the heat source in a hydrogen production system by 2015. Hot zero-power critical, rise-to-power, irradiation, and safety demonstration testing , have also been performed with the HTTR, representing additional means for computational validation efforts. Power tests were performed in steps from 0 to 30 MW, with various tests performed at each step to confirm core characteristics, thermal-hydraulic properties, and radiation shielding. The high-temperature test operation at 950 ºC represented the fifth and final phase of the rise-to-power tests. The safety tests demonstrated inherent safety features of the HTTR such as slow temperature response during abnormal events due to the large heat capacity of the core and the negative reactivity feedback. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for the annular core criticals from the initial six isothermal, annular and fully-loaded, core critical measurements performed at the HTTR. Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core is compiled elsewhere (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001).

  12. MOX capsule post-irradiation examination. Volume 2: Test plan for 30-GWd/MT burnup fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.N.

    1997-12-01

    This test plan is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. The planned post-irradiation examination (PIE) work to be performed on the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide fuel capsules that have received burnups of approximately 30 GWd/MT is described. The major emphasis of this PIE task will be material interactions, particularly indications of gallium transport and interactions. This PIE will include gamma scanning, ceramography, metallography, pellet radial gallium analysis, and clad gallium analysis. A preliminary PIE report will be generated before all the work is completed so that the progress of the fuel irradiation may be known in a timely manner.

  13. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase the combustion-noise component. The trend towards high-power-density cores also means that the noise generated in the low-pressure turbine will likely increase. Consequently, the combined result from these emerging changes will be to elevate the overall importance of turbomachinery core noise, which will need to be addressed in order to meet future noise goals.

  14. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  15. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  16. Recent developments in pressure coring

    SciTech Connect

    McFall, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

  17. Fully Coupled Modeling of Burnup-Dependent (U1- y , Pu y )O2- x Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Wenzhong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-03-01

    During the fast reactor nuclear fuel fission reaction, fission gases accumulate and form pores with the increase of fuel burnup, which decreases the fuel thermal conductivity, leading to overheating of the fuel element. The diffusion of plutonium and oxygen with high temperature gradient is also one of the important fuel performance concerns as it will affect the fuel material properties, power distribution, and overall performance of the fuel pin. In order to investigate these important issues, the (U1- y Pu y )O2- x fuel pellet is studied by fully coupling thermal transport, deformation, oxygen diffusion, fission gas release and swelling, and plutonium redistribution to evaluate the effects on each other with burnup-dependent models, accounting for the evolution of fuel porosity. The approach was developed using self-defined multiphysics models based on the framework of COMSOL Multiphysics to manage the nonlinearities associated with fast reactor mixed oxide fuel performance analysis. The modeling results showed a consistent fuel performance comparable with the previous results. Burnup degrades the fuel thermal conductivity, resulting in a significant fuel temperature increase. The fission gas release increased rapidly first and then steadily with the burnup increase. The fuel porosity increased dramatically at the beginning of the burnup and then kept constant as the fission gas released to the fuel free volume, causing the fuel temperature to increase. Another important finding is that the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen affects greatly not only the fuel properties, for example, thermal conductivity, but also the fuel performance, for example, temperature distribution, porosity evolution, grain size growth, fission gas release, deformation, and plutonium redistribution. Special attention needs to be paid to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen in fuel fabrication. Plutonium content will also affect the fuel material properties and performance. However, it is not that significant compared to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen due to the similar material properties of UO2 and PuO2.

  18. Fully Coupled Modeling of Burnup-Dependent (U1-y , Pu y )O2-x Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Wenzhong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    During the fast reactor nuclear fuel fission reaction, fission gases accumulate and form pores with the increase of fuel burnup, which decreases the fuel thermal conductivity, leading to overheating of the fuel element. The diffusion of plutonium and oxygen with high temperature gradient is also one of the important fuel performance concerns as it will affect the fuel material properties, power distribution, and overall performance of the fuel pin. In order to investigate these important issues, the (U1-y Pu y )O2-x fuel pellet is studied by fully coupling thermal transport, deformation, oxygen diffusion, fission gas release and swelling, and plutonium redistribution to evaluate the effects on each other with burnup-dependent models, accounting for the evolution of fuel porosity. The approach was developed using self-defined multiphysics models based on the framework of COMSOL Multiphysics to manage the nonlinearities associated with fast reactor mixed oxide fuel performance analysis. The modeling results showed a consistent fuel performance comparable with the previous results. Burnup degrades the fuel thermal conductivity, resulting in a significant fuel temperature increase. The fission gas release increased rapidly first and then steadily with the burnup increase. The fuel porosity increased dramatically at the beginning of the burnup and then kept constant as the fission gas released to the fuel free volume, causing the fuel temperature to increase. Another important finding is that the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen affects greatly not only the fuel properties, for example, thermal conductivity, but also the fuel performance, for example, temperature distribution, porosity evolution, grain size growth, fission gas release, deformation, and plutonium redistribution. Special attention needs to be paid to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen in fuel fabrication. Plutonium content will also affect the fuel material properties and performance. However, it is not that significant compared to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen due to the similar material properties of UO2 and PuO2.

  19. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  20. Realizing low loss air core photonic crystal fibers by exploiting an antiresonant core surround.

    PubMed

    Roberts, P; Williams, D; Mangan, B; Sabert, H; Couny, F; Wadsworth, W; Birks, T; Knight, J; Russell, P

    2005-10-01

    The modal properties of an air core photonic crystal fiber which incorporates an anti-resonant feature within the region that marks the transition between the air core and the crystal cladding are numerically calculated. The field intensity at the glass/air interfaces is shown to be reduced by a factor of approximately three compared to a fiber with more conventional core surround geometry. The reduced interface field intensity comes at the expense of an increased number of unwanted core interface modes within the band gap. When the interface field intensity is associated with modal propagation loss, the findings are in accord with recent measurements on fabricated fibers which incorporate a similar antiresonant feature. PMID:19498857

  1. Frozen core and effective core potentials in symmetry-adapted perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Patkowski, Konrad; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2007-10-28

    The application of the frozen-core approximation (FCA) and effective core potentials (ECPs) within symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) has been investigated and implemented. Unlike in the case of conventional electronic-structure theories, the development of a frozen-core version of SAPT is not straightforward. In particular, the FCA realizations neglecting excitations from core orbitals and restricting all summation indices to valence orbitals only are no longer equivalent. It is shown that it is necessary in SAPT to keep some terms containing products of the valence orbitals of one monomer and the core orbitals of the other one in the exchange-energy components. When these terms are included or, equivalently, the "infinite-excitation-energy" approximation omitting only the excitations from the core orbitals is used, the accuracy of the frozen-core approximation in SAPT matches that obtained in supermolecular perturbational and coupled-cluster methods. If these terms are neglected, i.e., within the "index-range-restriction" approximation, several exchange corrections are significantly underestimated. When ECPs are used in SAPT, the accuracy of the interaction energies is as good as in conventional supermolecular methods, provided that the residual supermolecular Hartree-Fock term is included. We have found that only some types of ECPs can be reliably used for calculations of interaction energies both in SAPT and in supermolecular approaches. For systems containing heavy atoms, both FCA and the use of ECPs lead to very significant savings of computer time. PMID:17979315

  2. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  3. Imaging of High-Z doped, Imploded Capsule Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisbrey, Shon T.; Edwards, M. John; Suter, Larry J.

    2006-10-01

    The ability to correctly ascertain the shape of imploded fusion capsules is critical to be able to achieve the spherical symmetry needed to maximize the energy yield of proposed fusion experiments for the National Ignition Facility. Implosion of the capsule creates a hot, dense core. The introduction of a high-Z dopant into the gas-filled core of the capsule increases the amount of bremsstrahlung radiation produced in the core and should make the imaging of the imploded core easier. Images of the imploded core can then be analyzed to ascertain the symmetry of the implosion. We calculate that the addition of Ne gas into a deuterium gas core will increase the amount of radiation emission while preserving the surrogacy of the radiation and hydrodynamics in the indirect drive NIF hohlraum in the proposed cryogenic hohlraums. The increased emission will more easily enable measurement of asymmetries and tuning of the implosion.

  4. CORRELATING INFALL WITH DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION IN DENSE CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, Scott; Brunetti, Nathan; Friesen, Rachel; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Pon, Andy; Caselli, Paola

    2013-11-10

    We present a survey of HCO{sup +} (3-2) observations pointed toward dense cores with previous measurements of N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}). Of the 26 cores in this survey, 5 show the spectroscopic signature of outward motion, 9 exhibit neither inward nor outward motion, 11 appear to be infalling, and 1 is not detected. We compare the degree of deuterium fractionation with infall velocities calculated from the HCO{sup +} spectra and find that those cores with [D]/[H] > 0.1 are more likely to have the signature of inward motions than cores with smaller [D]/[H] ratios. Infall motions are also much more common in cores with masses exceeding their thermal Jeans masses. The fastest infall velocity measured belongs to one of the two protostellar cores in our survey, L1521F, and the observed motions are typically on the order of the sound speed.

  5. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. VIII - Inner core formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of a variety of spherically symmetric one-dimensional (1D) calculations intended to determine the robustness of the dynamical hiccup phenomenon in protostellar cores. The 1D models show that the phenomenon is relatively insensitive to changes in the equations of state, numerical resolution, initial density and temperature, and the radiative transfer approximation. In 1D, the hiccup results in an explosive destruction of the entire inner protostellar core. Inner core formation is studied with a sequence of three-dimensional models which show that rapid inner core rotation stabilizes the hiccup instability. Instead, the inner core becomes quite flat and undergoes a cycle of binary fragmentation, binary decay into a single object surrounded by a bar, breakup of the bar into a binary, etc. When lesser amounts of rotation are involved, the inner core does hiccup somewhat, but mass is ejected in only a few directions, leading to several broad streams of ejecta.

  6. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. VIII. Inner core formation

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, A.P. )

    1989-11-01

    The results are presented of a variety of spherically symmetric one-dimensional (1D) calculations intended to determine the robustness of the dynamical hiccup phenomenon in protostellar cores. The 1D models show that the phenomenon is relatively insensitive to changes in the equations of state, numerical resolution, initial density and temperature, and the radiative transfer approximation. In 1D, the hiccup results in an explosive destruction of the entire inner protostellar core. Inner core formation is studied with a sequence of three-dimensional models which show that rapid inner core rotation stabilizes the hiccup instability. Instead, the inner core becomes quite flat and undergoes a cycle of binary fragmentation, binary decay into a single object surrounded by a bar, breakup of the bar into a binary, etc. When lesser amounts of rotation are involved, the inner core does hiccup somewhat, but mass is ejected in only a few directions, leading to several broad streams of ejecta. 29 refs.

  7. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. VIII - Inner core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1989-11-01

    The results are presented of a variety of spherically symmetric one-dimensional (1D) calculations intended to determine the robustness of the dynamical hiccup phenomenon in protostellar cores. The 1D models show that the phenomenon is relatively insensitive to changes in the equations of state, numerical resolution, initial density and temperature, and the radiative transfer approximation. In 1D, the hiccup results in an explosive destruction of the entire inner protostellar core. Inner core formation is studied with a sequence of three-dimensional models which show that rapid inner core rotation stabilizes the hiccup instability. Instead, the inner core becomes quite flat and undergoes a cycle of binary fragmentation, binary decay into a single object surrounded by a bar, breakup of the bar into a binary, etc. When lesser amounts of rotation are involved, the inner core does hiccup somewhat, but mass is ejected in only a few directions, leading to several broad streams of ejecta.

  8. Renewing the Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal A.

    2007-01-01

    The core curriculum accompanied the development of the academic discipline with multiple names such as Kinesiology, Exercise and Sport Science, and Health and Human Performance. It provides commonalties for undergraduate majors. It is timely to renew this curriculum. Renewal involves strategic reappraisals. It may stimulate change or reaffirm the…

  9. Confocal Microscopy Core Facility

    Cancer.gov

    Accessing the Web Calendar A completed "New User Form" must be sent to the Core Facility to have access to the calendars. Once approved, a NIH network user name and password is needed to gain access at the following link: http://labshare.nih.gov/nci/CCR-C

  10. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  11. Confocal Microscopy Core Facility

    Cancer.gov

    Susan H. Garfield, Facility Head Confocal Microscopy Core Facility, CCR, NCI, NIH Building 37, Room B114 E Tel: 301.435.6187 Fax: 301.496.0734 email: susan_garfield@nih.gov Poonam Mannan, Biologist Building 37, Room B114 F Tel: 301.451.7816 e-mail: mannan

  12. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  13. Why a Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Sadly, amidst a vast profusion of knowledge, universities abrogate responsibility for showing young learners what is essential. Left to select for themselves, most students arrive late, if at all, to an awareness of what they want and need out of college. Thus, according to James Bernard Murphy, a well-constructed core of courses, presented in the

  14. Core Competencies. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Beth, Comp.

    2002-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to investigate the status of core competencies (i.e., the skills, knowledge, abilities, and attributes that employees across an organization are expected to have to contribute successfully…

  15. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which the

  16. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  17. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FACILITY CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Assessment Facility Core will continue to collect environmental measures including personal and indoor air monitoring and repeat collection of dust samples from the home and biologic measures including urine and blood samples collected from the mother during pregn...

  18. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  19. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  20. Utah's New Mathematics Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Utah has adopted more rigorous mathematics standards known as the Utah Mathematics Core Standards. They are the foundation of the mathematics curriculum for the State of Utah. The standards include the skills and understanding students need to succeed in college and careers. They include rigorous content and application of knowledge and reflect…

  1. Languages for Dublin Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Focusing on languages for the Dublin Core, examines the experience of some related ways to seek semantic interoperability through simplicity: planned languages, interlingua constructs, and pidgins. Also defines the conceptual and organizational problem of maintaining a metadata standard in multiple languages. (AEF)

  2. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  3. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  5. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  6. EOSDIS core system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzek, Joseph A.

    1993-01-01

    The architecture of NASA's Earth Observation System Data Information System (EOSDIS) is described. The role of the EOSDIS Core System (ECS) is described, showing how each ECS functional category (flight operations functions, science data processing functions, and communications and system management functions) supports the five EOSDIS goals and objectives. The baseline configuration of ECS is presented and discussed.

  7. Why a Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Sadly, amidst a vast profusion of knowledge, universities abrogate responsibility for showing young learners what is essential. Left to select for themselves, most students arrive late, if at all, to an awareness of what they want and need out of college. Thus, according to James Bernard Murphy, a well-constructed core of courses, presented in the…

  8. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  9. Soil Core Sample #1

    Soil core obtained from existing goose grazing lawn along the Smith River in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area of the National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska.  The buried layer of peat beneath goose grazing lawn demonstrates that vegetation change has occurred in this area....

  10. Soil Core Sample #2

    Soil core obtained from existing goose grazing lawn along the Smith River in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area of the National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska.  Buried peat layer broken open.  Closer examination of the buried peat layer demonstrates that non-salt-tolerant vegetation from the past...

  11. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  12. The Uncommon Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will find scant mention of the words…

  13. Core-induced chaos in intrashell transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fregenal, D.; Henningsen, B.; Horsdal, E.; Foerre, M.; Richards, D.

    2007-11-15

    Intrashell transitions in Rydberg atoms with a nonhydrogenic core were studied. The degeneracy of the energy shell was lifted by constant electric and magnetic fields and transitions from initial coherent elliptic states (CES) were driven by a harmonic electric field. Evenly spaced hydrogenic resonances dominate at low eccentricities e of the CES. At high e, the hydrogenic structures disappear and new structures of a more irregular nature emerge. Classical and quantal calculations are described and are shown to agree fairly well with the experiment. Further, the classical calculations suggest that many of the observed phenomena are a consequence of the underlying classical dynamics being chaotic.

  14. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  15. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  16. Lunar polar coring lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-05-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  17. The ADNI PET Core

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Bandy, Dan; Chen, Kewei; Foster, Norman L.; Landau, Susan M.; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Reiman, Eric M.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Koeppe, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Background This is a progress report of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) PET Core. Methods The Core has supervised the acquisition, quality control, and analysis of longitudinal [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) data in approximately half of the ADNI cohort. In an “add on” study, approximately 100 subjects also underwent scanning with [11C]PIB-PET for amyloid imaging. The Core developed quality control procedures and standardized image acquisition by developing an imaging protocol that has been widely adopted in academic and pharmaceutical industry studies. Data processing provides users with scans that have identical orientation and resolution characteristics despite acquisition on multiple scanner models. The Core labs have used a number of different approaches to characterize differences between subject groups (AD, MCI, controls), to examine longitudinal change over time in glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition, and to assess the use of FDG-PET as a potential outcome measure in clinical trials. Results ADNI data indicate that FDG-PET increases statistical power over traditional cognitive measures, might aid subject selection, and could substantially reduce the sample size in a clinical trial. PIB-PET data showed expected group differences, and identified subjects with significant annual increases in amyloid load across the subject groups. The next activities of the PET core in ADNI will entail developing standardized protocols for amyloid imaging using the [18F]-labeled amyloid imaging agent AV45, which can be delivered to virtually all ADNI sites. Conclusions ADNI has demonstrated the feasibility and utility of multicenter PET studies and is helping to clarify the role of biomarkers in the study of aging and dementia. PMID:20451870

  18. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  19. Analysis of Fresh Fuel Critical Experiments Appropriate for Burnup Credit Validation

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The ANS/ANS-8.1 standard requires that calculational methods used in determining criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors be validated by comparison with appropriate critical experiments. This report provides a detailed description of 34 fresh fuel critical experiments and their analyses using the SCALE-4.2 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. The 34 critical experiments were selected based on geometry, material, and neutron interaction characteristics that are applicable to a transportation cask loaded with pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel. These 34 experiments are a representative subset of a much larger data base of low-enriched uranium and mixed-oxide critical experiments. A statistical approach is described and used to obtain an estimate of the bias and uncertainty in the calculational methods and to predict a confidence limit for a calculated neutron multiplication factor. The SCALE-4.2 results for a superset of approximately 100 criticals are included in uncertainty analyses, but descriptions of the individual criticals are not included.

  20. Analysis of fresh fuel critical experiments appropriate for burnup credit validation

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.; Bowman, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The ANS/ANS-8.1 standard requires that calculational methods used in determining criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors be validated by comparison with appropriate critical experiments. This report provides a detailed description of 34 fresh fuel critical experiments and their analyses using the SCALE-4.2 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. The 34 critical experiments were selected based on geometry, material, and neutron interaction characteristics that are applicable to a transportation cask loaded with pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel. These 34 experiments are a representative subset of a much larger data base of low-enriched uranium and mixed-oxide critical experiments. A statistical approach is described and used to obtain an estimate of the bias and uncertainty in the calculational methods and to predict a confidence limit for a calculated neutron multiplication factor. The SCALE-4.2 results for a superset of approximately 100 criticals are included in uncertainty analyses, but descriptions of the individual criticals are not included.