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Sample records for core capping leads

  1. Devon island ice cap: core stratigraphy and paleoclimate.

    PubMed

    Koerner, R M

    1977-04-01

    Valuable paleoclimatic information can be gained by studying the distribution of melt layers in deep ice cores. A profile representing the percentage of ice in melt layers in a core drilled from the Devon Island ice cap plotted against both time and depth shows that the ice cap has experienced a period of very warm summers since 1925, following a period of colder summers between about 1600 and 1925. The earlier period was coldest between 1680 and 1730. There is a high correlation between the melt-layer ice percentage and the mass balance of the ice cap. The relation between them suggests that the ice cap mass balance was zero (accumulation equaled ablation) during the colder period but is negative in the present warmer one. There is no firm evidence of a present cooling trend in the summer conditions on the ice cap. A comparison with the melt-layer ice percentage in cores from the other major Canadian Arctic ice caps shows that the variation of summer conditions found for the Devon Island ice cap is representative for all the large ice caps for about 90 percent of the time. There is also a good correlation between melt-layer percentage and summer sea-ice conditions in the archipelago. This suggests that the search for the northwest passage was influenced by changing climate, with the 19th-century peak of the often tragic exploration coinciding with a period of very cold summers. PMID:17733504

  2. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  3. Investigation of fibrous cap stresses on vulnerable plaques leading to heart attacks.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hao-Ming; Wu, Yi-Yu; Tsai, Bo-Chian; Chen, Yung-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Han

    2015-01-01

    Rupture-prone plaques in the coronary arteries, called ``vulnerable plaques'', are recognized as the key factor in acute myocardial infarction. Vulnerable plaques have a thin fibrous cap over a large fatty core and are highly susceptible to rupture. In general, this type of plaque rupture is mainly associated with stress concentrated on the fibrous cap. Fibrous cap stresses are counted among the most important factors in the plaque rupture process and must be taken into consideration when assessing the plaque vulnerability leading to heart attacks. The objective of this paper was to investigate the effects of nitinol stent deployment on the morphological changes of vulnerable plaques and then to propose a new stent design concept for effectively reducing fibrous cap stresses and the associated rupture risk. The deployment of a self-expanding nitinol stent was modeled, and the resulting stress distribution on the fibrous cap was investigated. The fibrous cap stresses were more uniformly distributed and the maximum stress was reduced by 13% when the crown number of the stent was increased. This study demonstrates an excellent approach to stent design that could effectively reduce the risk of a vulnerable plaque rupturing and causing a heart attack. PMID:26684564

  4. Radiation exposure benefit of a lead cap in invasive cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Kuon, E; Birkel, J; Schmitt, M; Dahm, J B

    2003-01-01

    Background: Occupational head exposure to radiation in cardiologists may cause radiation induced cataracts and an increased risk of brain cancer. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of 0.5 mm lead equivalent caps, not previously used in invasive cardiology, in comparison with a 1.0 mm lead equivalent ceiling mounted lead glass screen. Design: An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom was used to represent the patient. Scatter entrance skin air kerma to the operator position (S-ESAK-O) was measured during fluoroscopy for all standard angulations and the S-ESAK-O per dose–area product (DAP) calculated, as applied to the phantom. Results: Measured mean (SD) left/right anterior oblique angulation ratios of S-ESAK-O without lead devices were 23.1 (10.1), and varied as a function of tube angulation, body height, and angle of incidence. S-ESAK-O/DAP decreased with incremental operator body height by 10 (3)% per 10 cm. A 1.0 mm lead glass shield reduced mean S-ESAK-O/DAP originating from coronary angiography from 1089 (764) to 54 (29) nSv/Gy × cm2. A 0.5 mm lead cap was effective in lowering measured levels to 1.8 (1.1) nSv/Gy × cm2. Both devices together enabled attenuation to 0.5 (0.1) nSv/Gy × cm2. The most advantageous line of vision for protection of the operator’s eyes was ⩾ 60° rightward. Conclusions: Use of 0.5 mm lead caps proved highly effective, attenuating S-ESAK-O to 2.7 (2.0) × 10−3 of baseline, and to 1.2 (1.4) × 10−3 of baseline where there was an additional 1.0 mm lead glass shield. These results could vary according to the x ray systems used, catheterisation protocols, and correct use of radiation protection devices. PMID:12975420

  5. Resident CAPS on dense-core vesicles docks and primes vesicles for fusion.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Greg; Kielar-Grevstad, D Michelle; Zhang, Xingmin; James, Declan J; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-02-15

    The Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells requires a priming step during which SNARE protein complexes assemble. CAPS (aka CADPS) is one of several factors required for vesicle priming; however, the localization and dynamics of CAPS at sites of exocytosis in live neuroendocrine cells has not been determined. We imaged CAPS before, during, and after single-vesicle fusion events in PC12 cells by TIRF micro-scopy. In addition to being a resident on cytoplasmic dense-core vesicles, CAPS was present in clusters of approximately nine molecules near the plasma membrane that corresponded to docked/tethered vesicles. CAPS accompanied vesicles to the plasma membrane and was present at all vesicle exocytic events. The knockdown of CAPS by shRNA eliminated the VAMP-2-dependent docking and evoked exocytosis of fusion-competent vesicles. A CAPS(ΔC135) protein that does not localize to vesicles failed to rescue vesicle docking and evoked exocytosis in CAPS-depleted cells, showing that CAPS residence on vesicles is essential. Our results indicate that dense-core vesicles carry CAPS to sites of exocytosis, where CAPS promotes vesicle docking and fusion competence, probably by initiating SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26700319

  6. Resident CAPS on dense-core vesicles docks and primes vesicles for fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kabachinski, Greg; Kielar-Grevstad, D. Michelle; Zhang, Xingmin; James, Declan J.; Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells requires a priming step during which SNARE protein complexes assemble. CAPS (aka CADPS) is one of several factors required for vesicle priming; however, the localization and dynamics of CAPS at sites of exocytosis in live neuroendocrine cells has not been determined. We imaged CAPS before, during, and after single-vesicle fusion events in PC12 cells by TIRF micro­scopy. In addition to being a resident on cytoplasmic dense-core vesicles, CAPS was present in clusters of approximately nine molecules near the plasma membrane that corresponded to docked/tethered vesicles. CAPS accompanied vesicles to the plasma membrane and was present at all vesicle exocytic events. The knockdown of CAPS by shRNA eliminated the VAMP-2–dependent docking and evoked exocytosis of fusion-competent vesicles. A CAPS(ΔC135) protein that does not localize to vesicles failed to rescue vesicle docking and evoked exocytosis in CAPS-depleted cells, showing that CAPS residence on vesicles is essential. Our results indicate that dense-core vesicles carry CAPS to sites of exocytosis, where CAPS promotes vesicle docking and fusion competence, probably by initiating SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26700319

  7. Imaging and analysis of microcalcifications and lipid/necrotic core calcification in fibrous cap atheroma.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Natalia; Kelly-Arnold, Adreanne; Laudier, Damien; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Cardoso, Luis

    2015-06-01

    The presence of microcalcifications (µCalcs) >5 µm within the cap of human fibroatheroma has been shown to produce a 200-700% increase in peak circumferential stress, which can transform a stable plaque into a vulnerable one, whereas µCalcs < 5 µm do not appear to increase risk. We quantitatively examine the possibility to distinguish caps with µCalcs > 5 µm based on the gross morphological features of fibroatheromas, and the correlation between the size and distribution of µCalcs in the cap and the calcification in the lipid/necrotic core beneath it. Atherosclerotic lesions (N = 72) were imaged using HR-μCT at 2.1-μm resolution for detailed analysis of atheroma morphology and composition, and validated using non-decalcified histology. At 2.1-μm resolution one observes four different patterns of calcification within the lipid/necrotic core, and is able to elucidate the 3D spatial progression of the calcification process using these four patterns. Of the gross morphological features identified, only minimum cap thickness positively correlated with the existence of µCalcs > 5 µm in the cap. We also show that µCalcs in the cap accumulate in the vicinity of the lipid/necrotic core boundary with few on the lumen side of the cap. HR-μCT enables three-dimensional assessment of soft tissue composition, lipid content, calcification patterns within lipid/necrotic cores and analysis of the axial progression of calcification within individual atheroma. The distribution of µCalcs within the cap is highly non-uniform and decreases sharply as one proceeds from the lipid pool/necrotic core boundary to the lumen. PMID:25837377

  8. Earth's polar cap ionization patches lead to ion upflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. H.; Zong, Q.; Lockwood, M. M.; Liang, J.; Zhang, B.; Moen, J. I.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Thomas, E. G.; Liu, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Yang, H. G.; Hu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lester, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth constantly losses matter through ions escaping from the polar ionosphere. This makes the ionosphere as an important source of plasma for the magnetosphere and could modulate atmospheric isotope abundances on geological timescales, depending on what fraction of the upflowing ions subsequently return to the ionosphere and what fraction are ejected into interplanetary space. It has been proposed that the magnetosphere is dynamically modulated by the presence of the ionospheric ions, particularly heavy ions O+, during magnetic substorms and storms. The origin and formation mechanism of ionospheric ion upflow is, however, poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report simultaneous direct observations of ion upflow and a patch of ionization at the center of the polar cap region during a geomagnetic storm. Our observations indicate enhanced fluxes of upwelling O+ ions originate from the patch and were accelerated by the enhanced ambipolar electric field. This enhancement is caused by soft electron precipitations. Polar cap patches therefore provide an important source of upwelling ions for accelerations mechanisms at greater altitudes which can eject the ions. These observations give new insight into the processes of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and the potential loss of terrestrial water dissociation products into space which, although extremely slow in the case of Earth, may be significant for other planets and moons.

  9. CAPS-1 promotes fusion competence of stationary dense-core vesicles in presynaptic terminals of mammalian neurons

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Margherita; van de Bospoort, Rhea; He, Enqi; Persoon, Claudia M; van Weering, Jan RT; Broeke, Jurjen H; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides released from dense-core vesicles (DCVs) modulate neuronal activity, but the molecules driving DCV secretion in mammalian neurons are largely unknown. We studied the role of calcium-activator protein for secretion (CAPS) proteins in neuronal DCV secretion at single vesicle resolution. Endogenous CAPS-1 co-localized with synaptic markers but was not enriched at every synapse. Deletion of CAPS-1 and CAPS-2 did not affect DCV biogenesis, loading, transport or docking, but DCV secretion was reduced by 70% in CAPS-1/CAPS-2 double null mutant (DKO) neurons and remaining fusion events required prolonged stimulation. CAPS deletion specifically reduced secretion of stationary DCVs. CAPS-1-EYFP expression in DKO neurons restored DCV secretion, but CAPS-1-EYFP and DCVs rarely traveled together. Synaptic localization of CAPS-1-EYFP in DKO neurons was calcium dependent and DCV fusion probability correlated with synaptic CAPS-1-EYFP expression. These data indicate that CAPS-1 promotes fusion competence of immobile (tethered) DCVs in presynaptic terminals and that CAPS-1 localization to DCVs is probably not essential for this role. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05438.001 PMID:25719439

  10. Tennis core strings of polyamide-6 modified by surface-capped nano-silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Yi, Hongling; Lin, Heng; Zheng, Baicun

    2013-01-01

    A new method that modified silica nanoparticles were infused into PA6 is to produce tennis core string through a melt-extrusion process. The idea was to produce a highly strong and elastic tennis core string of PA6, utilizing the interactions between modified silica and polymer. The effects of surface-capped nano-silica on the strength and elongation of tennis core string were studied. It has been observed that with the infusion of silica nanoparticles modified by γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPS), the stress at breaking and E-modulus of tennis core string is enhanced by 46.24% and 15.17% comparing with neat PA6 with changeless elongation at breaking at a critical concentration. The source of this improvement has been traced to the produced strong covalent bond and hydrogen bond between epoxy groups and-COOH and-NH2 in polyamide. Besides, compared with kinds of others strings of previous research results, tennis core string added nano-silica modified by γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPS) has a strength at breaking at 352.43 MPa exceeding the natural gut string, the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), Monofil string and integrated nylon string by 42.05%, 4.49% and 9.38%, respectively. Meanwhile, tennis core string of polyamide modified by surface-capped nanosilica (PGMNS) has a higher elastic ratio at 0.15 than the other four strings.

  11. Snap-through anti-ignition vent cap for lead acid storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Erb, E.M.; Heiser, J.I.

    1980-11-11

    A vented battery cap is provided which is adapted to engage at least one of a plurality of fill holes in an automotive storage battery or similar lead acid battery and which has pressure release means for venting the combustible gases produced within that storage battery under conditions such as overcharge conditions into the atmosphere. The cap itself is comprised of substantially two portions, a base member which fits into at least one of the fill holes and a top member which snap-fits through the base member. The pressure release means comprises a plurality of extremely narrow slits on both the top and underside of the cap which have widths in the order of 0.003 to 0.005 of an inch. The remainder of the battery cap is tightly sealed to prevent any extraneous leaks of battery gases received from the automotive battery from leaking into the atmosphere. The slits are so constructed to facilitate the safe expulsion of any volume of gas normally produced by an automotive storage battery, while virtually eliminating the likelihood that ignition of gases within the atmosphere will result in explosive consequences either within the battery cap or within the battery itself.

  12. Leading Change: Transitioning to the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    For many school districts in the United States, making the transition to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) is proving to be a challenge at a time when they are already facing many obstacles, not the least of which is dwindling financial resources. A change of this magnitude cannot be made haphazardly; to be successful in its goal of helping…

  13. Studies on the chemical synthesis and characterization of lead oxide nanoparticles with different organic capping agents

    SciTech Connect

    Arulmozhi, K. T.; Mythili, N.

    2013-12-15

    Lead oxide (PbO) nanoparticles were chemically synthesized using Lead (II) acetate as precursor. The effects of organic capping agents such as Oleic acid, Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) and Cetryl Tri Methyl Butoxide (CTAB) on the size and morphology of the nanoparticles were studied. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Photoluminescence (PL) Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to analyse the prepared nanoparticles for their physical, structural and optical properties. The characterization studies reveal that the synthesized PbO nanoparticles had well defined crystalline structure and sizes in the range of 25 nm to 36 nm for capping agents used and 40 nm for pure PbO nanoparticles.

  14. The addition of red lead to flat plate and tubular valve regulated miners cap lamp lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferg, E. E.; Loyson, P.; Poorun, A.

    The study looked at the use of red lead in the manufacturing of valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) miners cap lamp (MCL) batteries that were made with either flat plate or tubular positive electrodes. A problem with using only grey oxide in the manufacture of thick flat plate or tubular electrodes is the poor conversion of the active material to the desired lead dioxide. The addition of red lead to the initial starting material improves the formation efficiency but is considerably more expensive thereby increasing the cost of manufacturing. The study showed that by carefully controlling the formation conditions in terms of the voltage and temperature of a battery, good capacity performance can be achieved for cells made with flat plate electrodes that contain up to 25% red lead. The small amount of red lead in the active cured material reduces the effect of electrode surface sulphate formation and allows the battery to achieve its rated capacity within the first few cycles. Batteries made with flat plate positive electrodes that contained more that 50% red lead showed good initial capacity but had poor structural active material bonding. The study showed that MCL batteries made with tubular positive electrodes that contained less than 75% red lead resulted in a poorly formed electrode with limited capacity utilization. Pickling and soaking times of the tubular electrodes should be kept at a minimum thereby allowing higher active material utilization during subsequent capacity cycling. The study further showed that it is beneficial to use higher formation rates in order to reduce manufacturing time and to improve the active material characteristics.

  15. The Earth's missing lead may not be in the core.

    PubMed

    Lagos, M; Ballhaus, C; Münker, C; Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, C; Berndt, J; Kuzmin, Dmitry V

    2008-11-01

    Relative to the CI chondrite class of meteorites (widely thought to be the 'building blocks' of the terrestrial planets), the Earth is depleted in volatile elements. For most elements this depletion is thought to be a solar nebular signature, as chondrites show depletions qualitatively similar to that of the Earth. On the other hand, as lead is a volatile element, some Pb may also have been lost after accretion. The unique (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (207)Pb/(204)Pb ratios of the Earth's mantle suggest that some lead was lost about 50 to 130 Myr after Solar System formation. This has commonly been explained by lead lost via the segregation of a sulphide melt to the Earth's core, which assumes that lead has an affinity towards sulphide. Some models, however, have reconciled the Earth's lead deficit with volatilization. Whichever model is preferred, the broad coincidence of U-Pb model ages with the age of the Moon suggests that lead loss may be related to the Moon-forming impact. Here we report partitioning experiments in metal-sulphide-silicate systems. We show that lead is neither siderophile nor chalcophile enough to explain the high U/Pb ratio of the Earth's mantle as being a result of lead pumping to the core. The Earth may have accreted from initially volatile-depleted material, some lead may have been lost to degassing following the Moon-forming giant impact, or a hidden reservoir exists in the deep mantle with lead isotope compositions complementary to upper-mantle values; it is unlikely though that the missing lead resides in the core. PMID:18987741

  16. UNC-31/CAPS docks and primes dense core vesicles in C. elegans neurons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Guang; Ming, Min; Chen, Mao-Rong; Niu, Wei-Pin; Zhang, Yong-Deng; Liu, Bei; Jiu, Ya-Ming; Yu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Tao; Wu, Zheng-Xing

    2010-07-01

    UNC-31 or its mammalian homologue, Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS), is indispensable for exocytosis of dense core vesicle (DCV) and synaptic vesicle (SV). From N- to the C-terminus, UNC-31 contains putative functional domains, including dynactin 1 binding domain (DBD), C2, PH, (M)UNC-13 homology domain (MHD) and DCV binding domain (DCVBD), the last four we examined in this study. We employed UNC-31 null mutant C. elegans worms to examine whether UNC-31 functions could be rescued by ectopic expression of full length UNC-31 vs each of these four domain-deleted mutants. Full length UNC-31 cDNA rescued the phenotypes of C. elegans null mutants in response to Ca(2+)-elevation in ALA neurons. Surprisingly, MHD deletion also rescued UNC-31 exocytotic function in part because the relatively high Ca(2+) level (pre-flash Ca(2+) was 450 nM) used in the capacitance study could bypass the MHD defect. Nonetheless, the three other domain-truncation cDNAs had almost no rescue on Ca(2+) evoked secretion. Importantly, this genetic null mutant rescue strategy enabled physiological studies at levels of whole organism to single cells, such as locomotion assay, pharmacological study of neurotransmission at neuromuscular junction, in vivo neuropeptide release measurement and analysis of vesicular docking. Our results suggest that each of these UNC-31 domains support distinct sequential molecular actions of UNC-31 in vesicular exocytosis, including steps in vesicle tethering and docking that bridge vesicle with plasma membrane, and subsequently priming vesicle by initiating the formation of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) core complex. PMID:20515653

  17. Fluorescence signals of core-shell quantum dots enhanced by single crystalline gold caps on silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, S. H.; Chou, J. W.; Becker, M.; Sivakov, V.; Ehrhold, K.; Berger, A.; Chou, W. C.; Chuu, D. S.; Gösele, U.

    2009-04-01

    We use nanoscale (20-300 nm in diameter) single crystalline gold (Au)-caps on silicon nanowires (NWs) grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism to enhance the fluorescence photoluminescence (PL) signals of highly dilute core/shell CdSeTe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in aqueous solution (10-5 M). For NWs without Au-caps, as they appear, for example, after Au etching in aqua regia or buffered KI/I2-solution, essentially no fluorescence signal of the same diluted QDs could be observed. Fluorescence PL signals were measured using excitation with a laser wavelength of 633 nm. The signal enhancement by single crystalline, nanoscale Au-caps is discussed and interpreted based on finite element modeling (FEM).

  18. Snow algae in an ice core drilled on Grigoriev Ice cap in the Kyrgyz Tien Shen Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Sera, S.; Fujita, K.; Okamoto, S.; Naoki, K.; Aizen, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Snow algae are photosynthetic microorganisms and are living on the surfase of glaciers. They grow on melting surface from spring to summer and their biomass and community structure are changed with physical and chemical conditions on glaciers. Ice cores drilled from glaciers also contain snow algae that grew in the past. Studying biomass and community structure of snow algae in ice cores could reveal the temporal variation in snow algae in the past, and also environmental conditions relating propagation of snow algae. In this study, we anlalyzed snow algae preserved in an ice core of Grigoriev Ice cap located in eastern Kyrgyzstan of the central Asia, and to describe their temporal variations for the last 200 years. The ice core drilling was carried out on September in 2007 on the Grigoriev Ice cap in the Kyrgyz Tien Shen Mountains. A 87 m long ice core from the surface to the bedrock was recovered at the top of the ice cap. The core was horizontally cut every 5 cm (total 1212 samples). The samples were melted and preserved as a 3% formalin solution. After the sample water was filtered through a hydrophilized PTFE membrane filter, observed by microscope. Snow algae in the sample water were counting. The algal biomass was represented by the cell number per unit water volume. Here, we showed the results between the surface to the 64 m in depth. We also analyzed the snow algal communities on the surface of the ice cap collected from five different sites from the top down to the terminus. Microscopy revealed that the ice core contained three taxa of filamentous cyanobacteria, an unicellular cyanobacterium, and two green algae. They were also found on the ice or snow surface of the i Ice cap. The quantitative analyses of the algae in the part of upper 64 m deep of the ice core samples revealed that the algal biomass varied significantly and showed many peaks. Furthermore, the biomass profile differed among the taxa. The filamentous cyanobacterium varied from 0.0 to 4

  19. VENUS-F: A fast lead critical core for benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Kochetkov, A.; Wagemans, J.; Vittiglio, G.

    2011-07-01

    The zero-power thermal neutron water-moderated facility VENUS at SCK-CEN has been extensively used for benchmarking in the past. In accordance with GEN-IV design tasks (fast reactor systems and accelerator driven systems), the VENUS facility was modified in 2007-2010 into the fast neutron facility VENUS-F with solid core components. This paper introduces the projects GUINEVERE and FREYA, which are being conducted at the VENUS-F facility, and it presents the measurement results obtained at the first critical core. Throughout the projects other fast lead benchmarks also will be investigated. The measurement results of the different configurations can all be used as fast neutron benchmarks. (authors)

  20. Investigating the effect of modifying the EEG cap lead configuration on the gradient artifact in simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mullinger, Karen J; Chowdhury, Muhammad E H; Bowtell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    EEG data recorded during simultaneous fMRI are contaminated by large voltages generated by time-varying magnetic field gradients. Correction of the resulting gradient artifact (GA) generally involves low-pass filtering to attenuate the high-frequency voltage fluctuations of the GA, followed by subtraction of a GA template produced by averaging over repeats of the artifact waveforms. This average artifact subtraction (AAS) process relies on the EEG amplifier having a large enough dynamic range to characterize the artifact voltages and on invariance of the artifact waveform over repeated image acquisitions. Saturation of the amplifiers and changes in subject position can leave unwanted residual GA after AAS. Previous modeling work suggested that modifying the lead layout and the exit position of the cable bundle on the EEG cap could reduce the GA amplitude. Here, we used simulations and experiments to evaluate the effect of modifying the lead paths on the magnitude of the GA and on the residual artifact after AAS. The modeling work showed that for wire paths following great circles, the smallest overall GA occurs when the leads converge at electrode Cz. The performance of this new cap design was compared with a standard cap in experiments on a spherical agar phantom and human subjects. Using gradient pulses applied separately along the three Cartesian axes, we found that the GA due to the foot-head gradient was most significantly reduced relative to a standard cap for the phantom, whereas the anterior-posterior GA was most attenuated for human subjects. In addition, there was an overall 37% reduction in the RMS GA amplitude produced by a standard EPI sequence when comparing the two caps on the phantom. In contrast, the subjects showed an 11% increase in the average RMS of the GA. This work shows that the optimal design reduces the GA on a spherical phantom however; these gains are not translated to human subjects, probably due to the differences in geometry. PMID

  1. Investigating the effect of modifying the EEG cap lead configuration on the gradient artifact in simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Mullinger, Karen J.; Chowdhury, Muhammad E. H.; Bowtell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    EEG data recorded during simultaneous fMRI are contaminated by large voltages generated by time-varying magnetic field gradients. Correction of the resulting gradient artifact (GA) generally involves low-pass filtering to attenuate the high-frequency voltage fluctuations of the GA, followed by subtraction of a GA template produced by averaging over repeats of the artifact waveforms. This average artifact subtraction (AAS) process relies on the EEG amplifier having a large enough dynamic range to characterize the artifact voltages and on invariance of the artifact waveform over repeated image acquisitions. Saturation of the amplifiers and changes in subject position can leave unwanted residual GA after AAS. Previous modeling work suggested that modifying the lead layout and the exit position of the cable bundle on the EEG cap could reduce the GA amplitude. Here, we used simulations and experiments to evaluate the effect of modifying the lead paths on the magnitude of the GA and on the residual artifact after AAS. The modeling work showed that for wire paths following great circles, the smallest overall GA occurs when the leads converge at electrode Cz. The performance of this new cap design was compared with a standard cap in experiments on a spherical agar phantom and human subjects. Using gradient pulses applied separately along the three Cartesian axes, we found that the GA due to the foot-head gradient was most significantly reduced relative to a standard cap for the phantom, whereas the anterior-posterior GA was most attenuated for human subjects. In addition, there was an overall 37% reduction in the RMS GA amplitude produced by a standard EPI sequence when comparing the two caps on the phantom. In contrast, the subjects showed an 11% increase in the average RMS of the GA. This work shows that the optimal design reduces the GA on a spherical phantom however; these gains are not translated to human subjects, probably due to the differences in geometry. PMID

  2. Controlling Surface Ligand Density and Core Size of Alkanethiolate-Capped Pd Nanoparticles and Their Effects on Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gavia, Diego J.; Shon, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    This article presents systematic investigations on the relationship between the catalytic property and the surface ligand density/core size of thiolate ligand-capped Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs). The systematic variations in the two-phase synthesis of PdNPs generated from sodium S-dodecylthiosulfate were performed. The resulting PdNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and 1H NMR and UV–vis spectroscopy. The decrease in the molar equivalent of sodium S-dodecylthiosulfate (Bunte salts) resulted in the formation of nanoparticles with lower surface ligand density and larger particle core size. A decrease in the molar equivalent of tetra-n-octylammonium bromide or an increase in reaction temperature generated nanoparticles with higher surface ligand density and smaller particle core size. As the molar equivalent of NaBH4 decreased, the particle core size increased. The catalysis studies on various PdNPs with different surface ligand density and average core size showed a strong correlation between the PdNP composition and the turnover frequency (TOF) of the isomerization of allyl alcohol. Optimized “good” PdNPs with lower surface ligand coverage and larger core size catalyzed the isomerization of various allyl alcohols to carbonyl analogues with high activity and selectivity. PMID:22924990

  3. Ability of combined Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Intravascular Ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS) imaging to detect lipid core plaques and estimate cap thickness in human autopsy coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grainger, S. J.; Su, J. L.; Greiner, C. A.; Saybolt, M. D.; Wilensky, R. L.; Raichlen, J. S.; Madden, S. P.; Muller, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to determine plaque cap thickness during catheterization is thought to be of clinical importance for plaque vulnerability assessment. While methods to compositionally assess cap integrity are in development, a method utilizing currently available tools to measure cap thickness is highly desirable. NIRS-IVUS is a commercially available dual imaging method in current clinical use that may provide cap thickness information to the skilled reader; however, this is as yet unproven. Ten autopsy hearts (n=15 arterial segments) were scanned with the multimodality NIRS-IVUS catheter (TVC Imaging System, Infraredx, Inc.) to identify lipid core plaques (LCPs). Skilled readers made predictions of cap thickness over regions of chemogram LCP, using NIRS-IVUS. Artery segments were perfusion fixed and cut into 2 mm serial blocks. Thin sections stained with Movat's pentachrome were analyzed for cap thickness at LCP regions. Block level predictions were compared to histology, as classified by a blinded pathologist. Within 15 arterial segments, 117 chemogram blocks were found by NIRS to contain LCP. Utilizing NIRSIVUS, chemogram blocks were divided into 4 categories: thin capped fibroatheromas (TCFA), thick capped fibroatheromas (ThCFA), pathological intimal thickening (PIT)/lipid pool (no defined cap), and calcified/unable to determine cap thickness. Sensitivities/specificities for thin cap fibroatheromas, thick cap fibroatheromas, and PIT/lipid pools were 0.54/0.99, 0.68/0.88, and 0.80/0.97, respectively. The overall accuracy rate was 70.1% (including 22 blocks unable to predict, p = 0.075). In the absence of calcium, NIRS-IVUS imaging provided predictions of cap thickness over LCP with moderate accuracy. The ability of this multimodality imaging method to identify vulnerable coronary plaques requires further assessment in both larger autopsy studies, and clinical studies in patients undergoing NIRS-IVUS imaging.

  4. Offshore Extent of the Iceland Ice Cap During the Last Glacial Maximum Inferred from Multibeam Bathymetric Data and Sediment Cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgadottir, G.; Brandsdottir, B.; Geirsdottir, A.; Björnsson, H.

    2005-12-01

    The insular margin of Iceland is incised by several major troughs, which mark the pathways of outlet glaciers during the last glaciations. Multibeam bathymetric data have revealed features of glacial erosion and sedimentation pertinent to the extent of the Iceland ice cap during the Last Glacial Maximum. Marginal moraines have been identified at the southern, western and northwestern edge of the insular margin. Furthermore, glacial erosion and sedimentation along the Kolbeinsey Ridge, North Iceland, indicates that the Iceland ice cap extended beyond 67°30'N. The ridge axis is made up of various types of seamounts, crater rows and hummocky ridges whereas older seamounts have been sculptured into roche moutonnées by glacial erosion. The far extent of the ice cap to the north is also supported by sediment studies on cores that have been retrieved from the troughs on the northern and northwestern part of the insular margin. Numerous smaller moraines exist closer to land marking stepwise retreat of the ice cap during deglacial times. Such moraines have been identified at 400-500 m depth within a 3-6 km wide, U-shaped valley along the western margin of the Kolbeinsey ridge (at 66°55'N) and within many of the costal fjords. Many of the offshore features resemble those known from land, such as streamlined bedrock features elongated in the regional direction of ice flow, eskers and subglacial meltwater channels together with erosional channels possibly formed by jökulhlaups. Extensive number of ice plough marks are revealed on bank areas and landslides on the marginal slope. Fluted surfaces and subglacially formed meltwater channels suggest formation underneath fast flowing, warm-based ice streams. These newly identified glacial features reveal new information on the spatial extent, dynamics and retreat of the Iceland ice cap during the last glaciation and deglaciation. Eustatic and isostatic contributions can be predicted from models of ice sheets and mantle rheology

  5. Msh2 deficiency leads to chromosomal abnormalities, centrosome amplification, and telomere capping defect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2006-01-01

    Msh2 is a key mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene and mutations or deficiencies in mammalian Msh2 gene result in microsatellite instability (MSI+) and the development of cancer. Here, we report that primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient in the murine MMR gene Msh2 (Msh2-/-) showed a significant increase in chromosome aneuploidy, centrosome amplification, and defective mitotic spindle organization and unequal chromosome segregation. Although Msh2-/- mouse tissues or primary MEFs had no apparent change in telomerase activity, telomere length, or recombination at telomeres, Msh2-/- MEFs showed an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA. These data suggest that MSH2 helps to maintain genomic stability through the regulation of the centrosome and normal telomere capping in vivo and that defects in MMR can contribute to oncogenesis through multiple pathways.

  6. Effects of zinc, copper, and lead toxicity on. cap alpha. -aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shafiq-ur-Rehman

    1984-07-01

    The distribution of lead, zinc and copper in the human environment has been recognized as a major toxicological factor. Lead ions have been shown to inhibit the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD), which is involved in the biosynthesis of heme. Copper also has its inhibitory effect on delta-ALAD activity. A study has shown that the delta-ALAD was activated by zinc ions at physiological concentrations. In view of these reports, it was considered worthwhile to study the poisoning effects of lead, zinc and copper on delta-ALAD activity along with the concentrations of these metal ions in the blood. A possible role of Zn/sup + +/, Cu/sup + +/, and Pb/sup + +/ interaction and their influence on delta-ALAD has been explored in the present paper.

  7. Highly efficient siRNA delivery from core-shell mesoporous silica nanoparticles with multifunctional polymer caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Karin; Müller, Katharina; Engelke, Hanna; Bräuchle, Christoph; Wagner, Ernst; Bein, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    A new general route for siRNA delivery is presented combining porous core-shell silica nanocarriers with a modularly designed multifunctional block copolymer. Specifically, the internal storage and release of siRNA from mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with orthogonal core-shell surface chemistry was investigated as a function of pore-size, pore morphology, surface properties and pH. Very high siRNA loading capacities of up to 380 μg per mg MSN were obtained with charge-matched amino-functionalized mesoporous cores, and release profiles show up to 80% siRNA elution after 24 h. We demonstrate that adsorption and desorption of siRNA is mainly driven by electrostatic interactions, which allow for high loading capacities even in medium-sized mesopores with pore diameters down to 4 nm in a stellate pore morphology. The negatively charged MSN shell enabled the association with a block copolymer containing positively charged artificial amino acids and oleic acid blocks, which acts simultaneously as capping and endosomal release agent. The potential of this multifunctional delivery platform is demonstrated by highly effective cell transfection and siRNA delivery into KB-cells. A luciferase reporter gene knock-down of up to 80-90% was possible using extremely low cell exposures with only 2.5 μg MSN containing 0.5 μg siRNA per 100 μL well.A new general route for siRNA delivery is presented combining porous core-shell silica nanocarriers with a modularly designed multifunctional block copolymer. Specifically, the internal storage and release of siRNA from mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with orthogonal core-shell surface chemistry was investigated as a function of pore-size, pore morphology, surface properties and pH. Very high siRNA loading capacities of up to 380 μg per mg MSN were obtained with charge-matched amino-functionalized mesoporous cores, and release profiles show up to 80% siRNA elution after 24 h. We demonstrate that adsorption and desorption of

  8. Mechanistic insight into the nucleation and growth of oleic acid capped lead sulphide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Aabhash; Spooner, Nigel A; Qiao, Shi Zhang; Dai, Sheng

    2016-05-18

    The quantum dots (QDs) of lead sulphide (PbS) are attractive near-infrared (NIR) active materials and have promising applications in a wide variety of applications. Till date many efforts have been made on optimizing its synthesis; however, current mechanistic understanding involving the nucleation and growth of these QDs has not reached the same level as that for other QDs. In this study, we present a detailed understanding on synthesis mechanism of PbS QDs so as to provide guidance for future QDs synthesis. The synthesis of PbS QDs is largely independent of classical nucleation process and the hot-injection of precursors may not be necessary for the successful synthesis of PbS QDs. The synthesis is basically a growth dominated process and is controlled by the Ostwald ripening of PbS QDs. In addition, reaction temperature and ligand are the key parameters for controlling QD growth. Temperature provides energy for overcoming activation barrier of QD growth while the ligands enhance QD growth via altering the environment for QD growth. Following the mechanism governing the synthesis of PbS QDs, we demonstrate that the size tuning of PbS QDs in ultra-small (<2 nm) can be achieved, which has been typically challenging following the hot injection synthesis. PMID:27156571

  9. Avidin-biotin capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles as an ion-responsive release system to determine lead(II).

    PubMed

    Song, Weiling; Li, Jingyu; Li, Qing; Ding, Wenyao; Yang, Xiaoyan

    2015-02-15

    We have developed DNAzyme-functionalized silica nanoparticles for the rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of lead ion (Pb(2+)). The specific binding between avidin and biotinylated DNAzymes was used to cap the pore of dye-trapped silica nanoparticles. In the presence of Pb(2+), DNAzymes were catalytically cleaved to uncap the pore, releasing the dye cargo with detectable enhancements of fluorescence signal. This method enables rapid (15 min) and sensitive (limit of detection=8.0 nM) detection. Moreover, the Pb(2+)-responsive behavior shows high selectivity with other metal ions. The superior properties of the as-designed DNAzyme-functionalized silica nanoparticles can be attributed to the large loading capacity and highly ordered pore structure of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as well as the catalytical cleaving of DNAzymes with Pb(2+). The recoveries obtained by standard Pb(II) addition to real samples-tap water, commercial mineral water, and lake water-were all from 98 to 101%. Our design serves as a new prototype for metal-ion sensing systems, and it also has promising potential for detection of various targets in stimulus-release systems. PMID:25447495

  10. Angular and velocity distributions of secondary particles emitted in interaction of 3. 6-GeV/nucleon. cap alpha. particles and lead nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, V.G.; Vinogradov, A.A.; Galitskii, V.M.; Grigor'yan, Y.I.; Ippolitov, M.S.; Karadzhev, K.V.; Kuz'min, E.A.; Man'ko, V.I.; Ogloblin, A.A.; Paramonov, V.V.; Tsvetkov, A.A.

    1980-04-01

    The technique is described and results presented of measurements of the velocity and angular distributions of pions, protons, and deuterons, and tritons emitted in bombardment of lead nuclei by ..cap alpha.. particles with energy 3.6 GeV/nucleon.

  11. The CAP cancer protocols – a case study of caCORE based data standards implementation to integrate with the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Jonathan; Chilukuri, Ram; Komatsoulis, George A; Mohanty, Sambit; Sioutos, Nicholas; Warzel, Denise B; Wright, Lawrence W; Crowley, Rebecca S

    2006-01-01

    Background The Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG™) is a network of individuals and institutions, creating a world wide web of cancer research. An important aspect of this informatics effort is the development of consistent practices for data standards development, using a multi-tier approach that facilitates semantic interoperability of systems. The semantic tiers include (1) information models, (2) common data elements, and (3) controlled terminologies and ontologies. The College of American Pathologists (CAP) cancer protocols and checklists are an important reporting standard in pathology, for which no complete electronic data standard is currently available. Methods In this manuscript, we provide a case study of Cancer Common Ontologic Representation Environment (caCORE) data standard implementation of the CAP cancer protocols and checklists model – an existing and complex paper based standard. We illustrate the basic principles, goals and methodology for developing caBIG™ models. Results Using this example, we describe the process required to develop the model, the technologies and data standards on which the process and models are based, and the results of the modeling effort. We address difficulties we encountered and modifications to caCORE that will address these problems. In addition, we describe four ongoing development projects that will use the emerging CAP data standards to achieve integration of tissue banking and laboratory information systems. Conclusion The CAP cancer checklists can be used as the basis for an electronic data standard in pathology using the caBIG™ semantic modeling methodology. PMID:16787533

  12. Glycerol capped PbS/CdS core/shell nanoparticles at different molar ratio and its application in biosensors: An optical properties study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Hussain, A. M. P.

    2016-05-01

    Glycerol capped PbS/CdS core/shell type nanoparticles fabricated with two different molar ratios are characterized for study of structural and optical properties. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern exhibits cubic phased polycrystalline nanocrystals. The calculated grain sizes from Williamson-Hall plot were found to be around 6 nm with increased strain. HRTEM investigation confirms the formation of core/shell nanostructures and the sizes of the particles were found to be around 7 nm which is in good agreement with the results of the W-H plot. An increase of band gap with the decrease in precursor concentration is confirmed from the blue shift in the absorption spectra and also from Tauc plot. A clear blue shifted intense emission is observed in the photoluminescence spectra with decrease in particle size. Intense luminescence from the core/shell nanostructure may be applied in bio labelling and biosensors.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical characterization of lead selenide sub-micron particles capped with a benzoate ligand and prepared at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Weyshla A.; Colón, Jadiel; Guzmán, Roger; Rivera, Harry; Santiago-Berríos, Mitk'El B.

    2014-09-01

    Semiconductor materials offer several potential benefits as active elements in the development of harvesting-energy conversion technologies. In particular, lead selenide (PbSe) semiconductors have been used and proposed to design solar energy harvesting devices, IR sensors, FET devices, etc. Lead salts have drawn particular attention from the applied and fundamental research communities due to their exceptionally strong quantum confinement effects. Several syntheses of PbSe have been proposed using long chain surfactants to allow the formation of particles and nanoparticles. Here we present a synthesis using benzoic acid as the capping ligand in ambient atmosphere. Although the particles are not in nanometric size, we compare the crystal structure (using x-ray powder diffraction data), the near infrared and mid-infrared absorption properties of PbSe using oleic acid as the capping ligand with PbSe using benzoic acid as the capping ligand. The new synthetized particles were shown to have similar crystal structure and absorb light in the near infrared region at 1410 nm. We also performed cyclic voltammetry of these particles drop-casted in the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The particles showed electrochemical behavior with an oxidation peak near (-402 ± 5 mV) versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The particles seem to form a polymeric film at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode.

  14. Core Practices and Problems of Practice in Learning to Lead Classroom Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghousseini, Hala

    2015-01-01

    Given the current interest in organizing teacher education around core instructional practices that help preservice teachers enact ambitious aspects of teaching like leading classroom discussions, this article investigates an example from the experience of a preservice teacher as she works on orienting students to each other's ideas. Resulting…

  15. Highly stable, luminescent core-shell type methylammonium-octylammonium lead bromide layered perovskite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Saikat; Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Ng, Yan Fong; Li, Mingjie; Muduli, Subas Kumar; Sum, Tze Chien; Damodaran, Bahulayan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan

    2016-06-01

    A new protocol for the synthesis of a highly stable (over 2 months under ambient conditions) solution-processed core-shell type structure of mixed methylammonium-octylammonium lead bromide perovskite nanoparticles (5-12 nm), having spherical shape, color tunability in the blue to green spectral region (438-521 nm) and a high photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of up to 92% is described. The color tunability, high PLQY and stability are due to the quantum confinement imparted by the crystal engineering associated with core-shell nanoparticle formation during growth. PMID:27165565

  16. Measurement of the spectra of doubly charged particles emitted in bombardment of lead nuclei by. cap alpha. particles with energy 3. 6 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Ad'yasevich, B.P.; Antonenko, V.G.; Vinogradov, A.A.; Grigor'yan, Y.I.; Dukhanov, V.I.; Ippolitov, M.S.; Karadzhev, K.V.; Lebedev, A.L.; Man'ko, V.I.; Nikolaev, S.A.; Polunin, Y.P.; Tsvetkov, A.A.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the spectra of double charged particles emitted in interaction of 3.6 GeV/nucleon ..cap alpha.. particles with lead nuclei. Spectra were measured at emission angles from 10 to 95/sup 0/ in the range of secondary-particle velocities 0.37<..beta..<0.55. Angular distributions were obtained, the total cross section for emission of doubly charged particles was evaluated, and the ratios of the contributions of doubly and singly charged particles were determined. The rapidity distributions of the invariant cross sections for production of doubly charged particles reveal maxima at a rapidity yroughly-equal0.15--0.20.

  17. A theory for the core of a three-dimensional leading-edge vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theory is presented for the flow in the core of a separation-induced leading-edge vortex. The theory is based on matching inner and outer representations of the vortex. The inner representation models continuously distributed vorticity and includes an asymptotic viscous subcore. The outer representation models concentrated spiral sheets of vorticity and is fully three dimensional. A parameter is identified which closely tracks the vortex breakdown stability boundary for delta, arrow, and diamond wings.

  18. Investigations of Alternative Steam Generator Location and Flatter Core Geometry for Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Johan; Tucek, Kamil; Wider, Hartmut

    2006-07-01

    This paper concerns two independent safety investigations on critical and sub-critical heavy liquid metal cooled fast reactors using simple flow paths. The first investigation applies to locating the steam generators in the risers instead of the down-comers of a simple flow path designed sub-critical reactor of 600 MW{sub th} power. This was compared to a similar design, but with the steam generators located in the downcomers. The transients investigated were Total-Loss-of-Power and unprotected Loss-Of-Flow. It is shown that this reactor peaks at 1041 K after 29 hours during a Total-Loss-Of-Power accident. The difference between locating the steam generators in the risers and the downcomers is insignificant for this accident type. During an unprotected Loss-Of-Flow accident at full power, the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 1010 K, which is 337 K above nominal outlet temperature. The second investigation concerns a 1426 MW{sub th} critical reactor where the influence of the core height versus the core outlet temperature is studied during an unprotected Loss-Of-Flow and Total-Loss-Of-Power accident. A pancake type core geometry of 1.0 m height and 5.8 m diameter, is compared to a compact core of 2 m height and 4.5 m diameter. Moderators, like BeO and hydrides, and their influence on safety coefficients and burnup swings are also presented. Both cores incinerate transuranics from spent LWR fuel with minor actinide fraction of 5%. We show that LFRs can be designed both to breed and burn transuranics from LWRs. It is shown that the hydrides lead to the most favorable reactivity feedbacks, but the poorest reactivity swing. The computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CD was used for all thermal hydraulic calculations, and the MCNP and MCB for neutronics, and burn-up calculations. (authors)

  19. Reduced Biosynthesis of Digalactosyldiacylglycerol, a Major Chloroplast Membrane Lipid, Leads to Oxylipin Overproduction and Phloem Cap Lignification in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang-Tsung; Chen, Lih-Jen; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Li, Hsou-Min

    2016-01-01

    DIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL SYNTHASE1 (DGD1) is a chloroplast outer membrane protein responsible for the biosynthesis of the lipid digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) from monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG). The Arabidopsis thaliana dgd1 mutants have a greater than 90% reduction in DGDG content, reduced photosynthesis, and altered chloroplast morphology. However, the most pronounced visible phenotype is the extremely short inflorescence stem, but how deficient DGDG biosynthesis causes this phenotype is unclear. We found that, in dgd1 mutants, phloem cap cells were lignified and jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes were highly upregulated under normal growth conditions. The coronative insensitive1 dgd1 and allene oxide synthase dgd1 double mutants no longer exhibited the short inflorescence stem and lignification phenotypes but still had the same lipid profile and reduced photosynthesis as dgd1 single mutants. Hormone and lipidomics analyses showed higher levels of JA, JA-isoleucine, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and arabidopsides in dgd1 mutants. Transcript and protein level analyses further suggest that JA biosynthesis in dgd1 is initially activated through the increased expression of genes encoding 13-lipoxygenases (LOXs) and phospholipase A-Iγ3 (At1g51440), a plastid lipase with a high substrate preference for MGDG, and is sustained by further increases in LOX and allene oxide cyclase mRNA and protein levels. Our results demonstrate a link between the biosynthesis of DGDG and JA. PMID:26721860

  20. Photogenerated carriers transport behaviors in L-cysteine capped ZnSe core-shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Qingsong; Li, Kuiying; Xue, Zhenjie; Lin, Yingying; Yin, Hua; Zhu, Ruiping

    2016-02-01

    The photoexcited carrier transport behavior of zinc selenide (ZnSe) quantum dots (QDs) with core-shell structure is studied because of their unique photoelectronic characteristics. The surface photovoltaic (SPV) properties of self-assembled ZnSe/ZnS/L-Cys core-shell QDs were probed via electric field induced surface photovoltage and transient photovoltage (TPV) measurements supplemented by Fourier transform infrared, laser Raman, absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopies. The ZnSe QDs displayed p-type SPV characteristics with a broader stronger SPV response over the whole ultraviolet-to-near-infrared range compared with those of other core-shell QDs in the same group. The relationship between the SPV phase value of the QDs and external bias was revealed in their SPV phase spectrum. The wide transient photovoltage response region from 3.3 × 10-8 to 2 × 10-3 s was closely related to the long diffusion distance of photoexcited free charge carriers in the interfacial space-charge region of the QDs. The strong SPV response corresponding to the ZnSe core mainly originated from an obvious quantum tunneling effect in the QDs.

  1. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... and remove the cap. How Much Does It Cost? A cervical cap costs about $70 and should be replaced every year. In addition, there is also the cost of the doctor's visit. Many health insurance plans ...

  2. A theory for the core flow of leading-edge vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    1986-01-01

    Separation-induced leading-edge vortices can dominate the flow about slender wings at moderate to high angles of attack, often with favorable aerodynamic effects. However, at the high angles of attack which are desirable for takeoff and landing as well as subsonic-transonic maneuver the vortices can breakdown or burst in the vicinity of the aircraft causing many adverse effects; these include lift loss, pitchup, and buffet. The flow in the core of leading-edge vortices is generally affiliated with the vortex breakdown phenomenon. A theory is presented for the flow in the core of separation-induced, leading-edge vortices at practical Reynolds numbers. The theory is based on matching inner and outer representations of the vortex. The inner representation models continuously distributed vorticity and includes an asymptotic viscous subcore. The outer representation models concentrated spiral sheets of vorticity and is fully three dimensional. A parameter is identified which closely tracks the vortex breakdown stability boundary for delta, arrow, and diamond wings.

  3. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on luminophore capped Pd@Au core-shell nanoparticles as signal tracers and ferrocenyl compounds as signal enhancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuting; Wang, Haijun; Xiong, Chengyi; Yuan, Yali; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-07-15

    In this work, N-(aminobutyl)-N-(ethylisoluminol) (ABEI), an analogue of luminol, is served as both the reductant and luminescence reagent to synthesize ABEI capped Pd@Au core-shell nanoparticles (ABEI-Pd@AuNPs). The nanoparticles not only exhibit inherent electrochemiluminescence (ECL) property, but also possess advantages of noble-metal nanomaterials such as outstanding electronic property, high specific surface area and good biocompatibility. In order to enhance the luminescence efficiency, ferrocene monocarboxylic acid (Fc) as catalyzer is grafted on the surface of ABEI-Pd@AuNPs with the aid of l-cysteine (l-Cys). When the Fc is electrochemically oxidized to ferricinium cation species (Fc(+)), the decomposition of H2O2 which existed in detection solution can be catalyzed by Fc(+) to generate oxygen-related free radicals, resulting effective signal amplification for ABEI-H2O2 system. For potential applications, the Pd@Au core-shell nanoparticles bifunctionalized by ABEI and catalyzer are employed as nano-carriers to immobilize detection antibody (Ab2). Based on sandwiched immunoreactions, a "signal-on" ECL immunosensor is developed for detection of human collagen type IV (Col IV), a potential biomarker associated with diabetic nephropathy. Consequently, the proposed immunosensor provides a wide linear detection ranging from 1pgmL(-1) to 10ngmL(-1) with a relatively low detection limit of 0.3pgmL(-1) (S/N=3). PMID:26985586

  4. The GUINEVERE experiment: First PNS measurements in a lead moderated sub-critical fast core

    SciTech Connect

    Thyebault, H. E.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Lehaut, G.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) experimental program is dedicated to the study of Accelerator Driven System reactivity monitoring. It was partly carried out within the EUROTRANS integrated project (EURATOM FP6). GUINEVERE consists in coupling the fast core of the VENUS-F reactor (SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)), composed of enriched uranium and solid lead, with a T(d,n) neutron source provided by the GENEPI-3C deuteron accelerator. This neutron source can be operated in several modes: pulsed mode, continuous mode and also continuous mode with short beam interruptions (the so called 'beam trips'). In the past, the key questions of the reactivity control and monitoring in a subcritical system were studied in the MUSE experiments (1998-2004). These experiments highlighted the difficulty to determine precisely the reactivity with a single technique. This led to investigate a new strategy which is based on the combination of the relative reactivity monitoring via the core power to beam current relationship with absolute reactivity cross-checks during programmed beam interruptions. Consequently, to determine the reactivity, several dynamical techniques of reactivity determination have to be compared. In addition, their accuracy for absolute reactivity determination must be evaluated using a reference reactivity determination technique (from a critical state: rod drop and MSM measurements). The first sub-critical configuration which was studied was around k{sub eff} = 0.96 (SCI). Pulsed Neutron Source experiments (PNS) were carried out. The neutron population decrease was measured using fission chambers in different locations inside the core and the reflector. Neutron population time decrease was analyzed using fitting techniques and the Area Method Results obtained for the SCI reactivity will be shown, discussed and compared to the reference value given by the MSM method. (authors)

  5. Assessing post-depositional alteration and the integrity of ice core nitrate-N and -O isotopic records at the Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffen, A. M.; Hastings, M. G.; Thompson, L. G.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a common chemical species found in snow and ice. Both nitrate and its atmospheric precursor NOx (NO and NO2) are of importance to climate, biogeochemistry and the composition of the atmosphere. For instance, nitrate is a critical biological nutrient, while NOx regulates concentrations of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl (OH) and thus influences the chemical and radiative properties of Earth's atmosphere. NOx sources include fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, soil microbial processes and lightning. Past changes in NOx emissions, tropospheric distributions and consequent effects on the atmosphere, however, are unknown. Interpreting stable nitrogen (δ15N) and oxygen (δ18O and Δ17O) isotope ratios in nitrate preserved in ice cores can address these issues as they contain diagnostic signatures of NOx sources and oxidation processes, respectively. The potential caveat to this is that nitrate can be lost from snow and firn via photolysis (as NOx) and/or volatilization (as nitric acid). Because these processes are isotopically fractionating, it is necessary to determine if, or to what degree, such post-depositional alteration takes place at a given site before an isotopic record from ice core nitrate can be utilized as a paleoenvironmental proxy. This work addresses post-depositional alteration at the Quelccaya Ice Cap (5670 masl) in southeastern Peru in order to assess the integrity of the nitrate record in an 1800-year ice core from the site. This work represents the first of its kind outside the polar regions and is significant in that natural NOx sources and OH production are dominantly located in the Tropics. Additionally, because nitrate and NOx are not uniformly distributed in the troposphere, low-latitude records are needed to bridge ongoing polar work in order to establish a global perspective.

  6. Studies Conducted of Sodium Carbonate Contaminant Found on the Wing Leading Edge and the Nose Cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Palou, Jaime J.

    2003-01-01

    In early 2001, three of the space shuttle orbiters were found to have a sodium carbonate contaminant on the wing leading edge and nose cap. These parts are made of a reinforced carbon/carbon material protected by silicon carbide (SiC) and a glass coating. The glass coating is known as Type A and is primarily sodium silicate with particles of SiC. NASA Glenn Research Center's Environmental Durability Branch was asked to determine the chemistry of this deposit formation and assess any possible detrimental effects. At low temperatures, the reverse reaction is favorable. Previous studies of the corrosion of glass show that carbon dioxide in the presence of water does form sodium carbonate on sodium silicate glass (ref. 1). It is quite likely that a similar scenario exists for the orbiter wing leading edge. All three orbiters that formed sodium carbonate were exposed to rain. This formation of sodium carbonate was duplicated in the laboratory. The Type A glass, which coats the wing leading edge and nose cap, was made in a freestanding form and exposed to water in two separate experiments. In one set of experiments, the coating was placed in a petri dish filled with water. As the water evaporated, sodium carbonate formed. In another case, water was slowly dripped on the coating and sodium carbonate formed. The sodium carbonate was detected by chemical analysis and, in some cases, xray diffraction showed a hydrated sodium carbonate. The next step was to examine possible detrimental effects of this sodium carbonate. There are three likely scenarios for the sodium carbonate deposit: (1) it may be removed with a simple rinse, (2) it may remain and flow back into the Type A glass after heating during reentry, or (3) it may remain and flow onto unprotected SiC and/or other parts after heating during reentry. The effect of case 1 is to remove the Na2O constituent from the Type A glass, thus decreasing its effectiveness as a sealant. Even so, overall, it is probably the best

  7. Engineering of lead chalcogenide nanostructures for carrier multiplication: Core/shell, 1D, and 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qianglu

    Near infrared emitting semiconductors have been used widely in industry especially in solar-cell fabrications. The efficiency of single junction solar-cell can reach the Shockley-Queisser limit by using optimum band gap material such as silicon and cadmium telluride. The theoretical efficiency can be further enhanced through carrier multiplication, in which a high energy photon is absorbed and more than one electron-hole pair can be generated, reaching more than 100% quantum efficiency in the high energy region of sunlight. The realization of more than unity external quantum efficiency in lead selenide quantum dots solar cell has motivated vast investigation on lowering the carrier multiplication threshold and further improving the efficiency. This dissertation focuses on synthesis of lead chalcogenide nanostructures for their optical spectroscopy studies. PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots were synthesized by cation exchange to obtain thick shells (up to 14 monolayers) for studies of visible and near infrared dual band emissions and carrier multiplication efficiency. By examining the reaction mechanism, a thermodynamic and a kinetic model are introduced to explain the vacancy driven cation exchange. As indicated by the effective mass model, PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots has quasi-type-II band alignment, possessing electron delocalized through the entire quantum dot and hole localized in the core, which breaks down the symmetry of energy levels in the conduction and valence band, leading to hot-hole-assisted efficient multi-exciton generation and a lower carrier multiplication threshold to the theoretical value. For further investigation of carrier multiplication study, PbTe, possessing the highest efficiency among lead chalcogenides due to slow intraband cooling, is synthesized in one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanostructures. By using dodecanethiol as the surfactant, PbTe NRs can be prepared with high uniformity in width and resulted in fine quantum

  8. Core--strategy leading to high reversible hydrogen storage capacity for NaBH4.

    PubMed

    Christian, Meganne L; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-François

    2012-09-25

    Owing to its high storage capacity (10.8 mass %), sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) is a promising hydrogen storage material. However, the temperature for hydrogen release is high (>500 °C), and reversibility of the release is unachievable under reasonable conditions. Herein, we demonstrate the potential of a novel strategy leading to high and stable hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling for NaBH(4) under mild pressure conditions (4 MPa). By an antisolvent precipitation method, the size of NaBH(4) particles was restricted to a few nanometers (<30 nm), resulting in a decrease of the melting point and an initial release of hydrogen at 400 °C. Further encapsulation of these nanoparticles upon reaction of nickel chloride at their surface allowed the synthesis of a core--shell nanostructure, NaBH(4)@Ni, and this provided a route for (a) the effective nanoconfinement of the melted NaBH(4) core and its dehydrogenation products, and (b) reversibility and fast kinetics owing to short diffusion lengths, the unstable nature of nickel borohydride, and possible modification of reaction paths. Hence at 350 °C, a reversible and steady hydrogen capacity of 5 mass % was achieved for NaBH(4)@Ni; 80% of the hydrogen could be desorbed or absorbed in less than 60 min, and full capacity was reached within 5 h. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such performances have been achieved with NaBH(4). This demonstrates the potential of the strategy in leading to major advancements in the design of effective hydrogen storage materials from pristine borohydrides. PMID:22873406

  9. Analysis of vanillic acid in polar ice cores as a biomass burning proxy - preliminary results from the Akademii Nauk Ice Cap in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieman, M. M.; Jimenez, R.; McConnell, J. R.; Fritzsche, D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning influences global climate change and the composition of the atmosphere. The drivers, effects, and climate feedbacks related to fire are poorly understood. Many different proxies have been used to reconstruct past fire frequency from lake sediments and polar ice cores. Reconstruction of historical trends in biomass burning is challenging because of regional variability and the qualitative nature of various proxies. Vanillic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid) is a product of the combustion of conifer lignin that is known to occur in biomass burning aerosols. Biomass burning is likely the only significant source of vanillic acid in polar ice. In this study we describe an analytical method for quantifying vanillic acid in polar ice using HPLC with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometric detection. The method has a detection limit of 100 pM and a precision of × 10% at the 100 pM level for analysis of 100 μl of ice melt water. The method was used to analyze more than 1000 discrete samples from the Akademii Nauk ice cap on Severnaya Zemlya in the high Russia Arctic (79°30'N, 97°45'E) (Fritzsche et al., 2002; Fritzsche et al., 2005; Weiler et al., 2005). The samples range in age over the past 2,000 years. The results show a mean vanillic acid concentration of 440 × 710 pM (1σ), with elevated levels during the periods from 300-600 and 1450-1550 C.E.

  10. The effect of varying the capping agent of magnetic/luminescent Fe3O4-InP/ZnSe core-shell nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Zuraan; Onani, Martin O.; Allard, Garvin R. J.; Kiplagat, Ayabei; Okil, Joseph O.; Dejene, Francis B.; Mahanga, Geoffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic-luminescent nanoparticles have shown great promise in various biomedical applications namely: contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, multifunctional drug carrier system, magnetic separation of cells, cell tracking, immunoassay, and magnetic bioseparation. This experiment describes the synthesis of a nanocomposite material, which is composed of an iron oxide (Fe3O4) superparamagnetic core and an indium phosphide/zinc selenide (InP/ZnSe) quantum dot shell. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNP's) and quantum dots (QD's) were synthesized separately before allowing them to conjugate. The MNP's were functionalized with a thiol-group allowing the QD shell to bind to the surface of the MNP by the formation of a thiol-metal bond. The nanocomposite was capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid, oleylamine, β-cyclodextrin and their influence on the photoluminescence investigated. The synthesized nanocomposite was characterized with high- resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), selective electron area diffraction (SAED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and photoluminescence. These techniques yielded particle size, morphology, dispersion, and chemical composition including luminescence and florescence.

  11. Statistical survey of pitch angle distributions in core (0-50 eV) ions from Dynamics Explorer 1: Outflow in the auroral zone, polar cap, and cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, B. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Moore, T. E.; Comfort, R. H.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Core (0-50 eV) ion pitch angle measurements from the retarding ion mass spectrometer on Dynamics Explorer 1 are examined with respect to magnetic disturbance, invariant latitude, magnetic local time, and altitude for ions H(+), He(+), O(+), M/Z = 2 (D(+) or He(++)), and O(++). Included are outflow events in the auroral zone, polar cap, and cusp, separated into altitude regions below and above 3 R(sub E). In addition to the customary division into beam, conic, and upwelling distributions, the high-latitude observations fall into three categories corresponding to ion bulk speeds that are (1) less than, (2) comparable to, or (3) faster than that of the spacecraft. This separation, along with the altitude partition, serves to identify conditions under which ionospheric source ions are gravita- tionally bound and when they are more energetic and able to escape to the outer magnetosphere. Features of the cleft ion fountain inferred from single event studies are clearly identifiable in the statistical results. In addition, it is found that the dayside pre-noon cleft is a dayside afternoon cleft, or auroral zone, becomes an additional source for increased activity. The auroral oval as a whole appears to be a steady source of escape velocity H(+), a steady source of escape velocity He(+) ions for the dusk sector, and a source of escape velocity heavy ions for dusk local times primarily during increased activity. The polar cap above the auroral zone is a consistent source of low-energy ions, although only the lighter mass particles appear to have sufficient velocity, on average, to escape to higher altitudes. The observations support two concepts for outflow: (1) The cleft ion fountain consists of ionospheric plasma of 1-20 eV energy streaming upward into the magnetosphere where high-latitude convection electric fields cause poleward dispersion. (2) The auroral ion fountain involves field-aligned beams which flow out along auroral latitude field lines; and, in addition, for

  12. Embrittlement phenomenon of Ag core MP35N cable as lead conductor in medical device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Li, Bernie; Zhang, Haitao

    2013-02-01

    Ag core MP35N (Ag/MP35N) wire has been used in lead electric conductor wires in the medical device industry for many years. Recently it was noticed that the combination of silver and MP35N restricts its wire drawing process. The annealing temperature in Ag/MP35N has to be lower than the melting temperature of pure Ag (960 °C), which cannot fully anneal MP35N. The lower annealing temperature results in a highly cold worked MP35N, which significantly reduces Ag/MP35N ductility. The embrittlement phenomenon of Ag/MP35N cable was observed in tension and bending deformation. The effect of the embrittlement on the wire flex fatigue life was evaluated using a newly developed flex fatigue testing method. The Ag/MP35N cable fatigue results was analyzed with a Coffin-Manson approach and compared to the MP35N cable fatigue results. The root causes of the Ag/Mp35N embrittlement phenomenon are discussed. PMID:23231759

  13. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  14. Helix capping.

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R.; Rose, G. D.

    1998-01-01

    Helix-capping motifs are specific patterns of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions found at or near the ends of helices in both proteins and peptides. In an alpha-helix, the first four >N-H groups and last four >C=O groups necessarily lack intrahelical hydrogen bonds. Instead, such groups are often capped by alternative hydrogen bond partners. This review enlarges our earlier hypothesis (Presta LG, Rose GD. 1988. Helix signals in proteins. Science 240:1632-1641) to include hydrophobic capping. A hydrophobic interaction that straddles the helix terminus is always associated with hydrogen-bonded capping. From a global survey among proteins of known structure, seven distinct capping motifs are identified-three at the helix N-terminus and four at the C-terminus. The consensus sequence patterns of these seven motifs, together with results from simple molecular modeling, are used to formulate useful rules of thumb for helix termination. Finally, we examine the role of helix capping as a bridge linking the conformation of secondary structure to supersecondary structure. PMID:9514257

  15. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  16. Caps Capsule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAPS CAPSULE, 1970

    1970-01-01

    The main article in this issue of ERIC/CAPS' expanded newsletter is based on an interview with the presidents-elect of three national organizations--Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), The American School Counselor Association (ASCA), and the American Personnel and Guidance Association (APGA). They discuss the role of the…

  17. Designing, Leading and Managing the Transition to the Common Core: A Strategy Guidebook for Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brentt; Vargo, Merrill

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core provides districts an opportunity to renew their focus on teaching and learning. But it also poses a number of design and implementation challenges for school districts. The "Leadership and Design Cycles" described in this guidebook offers an evidenced-based and structured process for leaders to design and implement…

  18. Leading Change for the Implementation of Common Core State Standards in Rural School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Paul; Wise, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Rural school districts across the nation, with their limited resources, face daunting challenges posed by the implementation of the Common Core State Standards. This article presents a recent study of 13 rural school districts in the Central Valley of California and how these districts are responding to those challenges. A total of 352 teachers…

  19. Leading the Common Core State Standards: From Common Sense to Common Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkle, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    Many educators agree that we already know how to foster student success, so what is keeping common sense from becoming common practice? The author provides step-by-step guidance for overcoming the barriers to adopting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and achieving equity and excellence for all students. As an experienced teacher and…

  20. A simple and facile synthesis of MPA capped CdSe and CdSe/CdS core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sukanya, D.; Sagayaraj, P.

    2015-06-24

    II-VI semiconductor nanostructures, in particular, CdSe quantum dots have drawn a lot of attention because of their promising potential applications in biological tagging, photovoltaic, display devices etc. due to their excellent optical properties, high emission quantum yield, size dependent emission wavelength and high photostability. In this paper, we describe the synthesis and properties of mercaptopropionic acid capped CdSe and CdSe/CdS nanoparticles through a simple and efficient co-precipitation method followed by hydrothermal treatment. The growth process, characterization and the optical absorption as a function of wavelength for the synthesized MPA capped CdSe and CdSe/CdS nanoparticles have been determined using X-ray diffraction study (XRD), Ultraviolet-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM)

  1. Residual Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions. The variation in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors including, but not limited to, varying proportions of dust and solid carbon dioxide, undulating topography, and differences in the roughness of the slopes versus the flat surfaces.

    Location near: 86.7oS, 343.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  2. Lead isotope ratios in six lake sediment cores from Japan Archipelago: Historical record of trans-boundary pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Kuwae, Michinobu

    2016-07-15

    Sediment cores from six lakes situated from north to south on the Japanese Archipelago were collected during 2009-2010 to investigate the hypothesis that deposition of lead (Pb) was coming from East Asia (including China, South Korea and eastern part of Russia). Accumulation rates and ages of the lake sediment were estimated by the (210)Pb constant rate of supply model and (137)Cs inputs to reconstruct the historical trends of Pb accumulation. Cores from four lakes located in the north and central Japan, showed clear evidence of Pb pollution with a change in the (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios in the recent sediment as compared to the deeper sediment. Among the six studied lakes, significant inputs of anthropogenic lead emissions were observed at Lake Mikazuki (north Hokkaido in north Japan), Lake Chokai (north of Honshu), and Lake Mikuriga (central part of Honshu). Pb isotopic comparison of collected core sediment and previously reported data for wet precipitation and aerosols from different Asian regions indicate that, before 1900, Pb accumulated in these three lakes was not affected by trans-boundary sources. Lake Mikazuki started to receive Pb emissions from Russia in early 1900s, and during the last two decades, this lake has been affected by trans-boundary Pb pollution from northern China. Lake Chokai has received Pb pollutant from northern China since early 1900s until 2009, whereas for the Lake Mikuriga the major Pb contaminant was transported from southern China during the past 100years. The results of our study demonstrate that Japan Archipelago has received trans-boundary Pb emissions from different parts of East Asian region depending on location, and the major source region has changed historically. PMID:27058126

  3. Macromolecular Systems with MSA-Capped CdTe and CdTe/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots as Superselective and Ultrasensitive Optical Sensors for Picric Acid Explosive.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Priyanka; Saikia, Dilip; Adhikary, Nirab Chandra; Sarma, Neelotpal Sen

    2015-11-11

    This work reports the development of highly fluorescent materials for the selective and efficient detection of picric acid explosive in the nanomolar range by fluorescence quenching phenomenon. Poly(vinyl alcohol) grafted polyaniline (PPA) and its nanocomposites with 2-mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (PPA-Q) and with MSA-capped CdTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (PPA-CSQ) are synthesized in a single step free radical polymerization reaction. The thermal stability and photo stability of the polymer increases in the order of PPA < PPA-Q < PPA-CSQ. The polymers show remarkably high selectivity and efficient sensitivity toward picric acid, and the quenching efficiency for PPA-CSQ reaches up to 99%. The detection limits of PPA, PPA-Q, and PPA-CSQ for picric acid are found to be 23, 1.6, and 0.65 nM, respectively, which are remarkably low. The mechanism operating in the quenching phenomenon is proposed to be a combination of a strong inner filter effect and ground state electrostatic interaction between the polymers and picric acid. A portable and cost-effective electronic device for the visual detection of picric acid by the sensory system is successfully fabricated. The device is further employed for quantitative detection of picric acid in real water samples. PMID:26484725

  4. Reduced Biosynthesis of Digalactosyldiacylglycerol, a Major Chloroplast Membrane Lipid, Leads to Oxylipin Overproduction and Phloem Cap Lignification in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lih-Jen; Herrfurth, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    DIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL SYNTHASE1 (DGD1) is a chloroplast outer membrane protein responsible for the biosynthesis of the lipid digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) from monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG). The Arabidopsis thaliana dgd1 mutants have a greater than 90% reduction in DGDG content, reduced photosynthesis, and altered chloroplast morphology. However, the most pronounced visible phenotype is the extremely short inflorescence stem, but how deficient DGDG biosynthesis causes this phenotype is unclear. We found that, in dgd1 mutants, phloem cap cells were lignified and jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes were highly upregulated under normal growth conditions. The coronative insensitive1 dgd1 and allene oxide synthase dgd1 double mutants no longer exhibited the short inflorescence stem and lignification phenotypes but still had the same lipid profile and reduced photosynthesis as dgd1 single mutants. Hormone and lipidomics analyses showed higher levels of JA, JA-isoleucine, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and arabidopsides in dgd1 mutants. Transcript and protein level analyses further suggest that JA biosynthesis in dgd1 is initially activated through the increased expression of genes encoding 13-lipoxygenases (LOXs) and phospholipase A-Iγ3 (At1g51440), a plastid lipase with a high substrate preference for MGDG, and is sustained by further increases in LOX and allene oxide cyclase mRNA and protein levels. Our results demonstrate a link between the biosynthesis of DGDG and JA. PMID:26721860

  5. Prominent expression of sialyl Lewis X-capped core 2-branched O-glycans on high endothelial venule-like vessels in gastric MALT lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Motohiro; Mitoma, Junya; Hoshino, Hitomi; Yu, Shin-Yi; Shimojo, Yasuyo; Suzawa, Kenichi; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Fukuda, Minoru; Nakayama, Jun

    2011-01-01

    High endothelial venule (HEV)-like vessels have been observed in gastric B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type (MALT lymphoma), as well as in its preceding lesion, chronic Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Previously we reported that glycans on HEV-like vessels in the latter lesion served as L-selectin ligands. However, the biochemical and functional nature of glycans on HEV-like vessels in gastric MALT lymphoma remained to be determined. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical analysis for sialyl Lewis X (sLeX)-related glycoepitopes using three monoclonal antibodies MECA-79, HECA-452, and NCC-ST-439, and found that MECA-79−/HECA-452+/NCC-ST-439+ HEV-like vessels preferentially appears in gastric MALT lymphoma compared to chronic H. pylori gastritis, suggesting that appearance of MECA-79−/HECA-452+/NCC-ST-439+ HEV-like vessels marks gastric MALT lymphoma. We then constructed a set of CHO cell lines expressing possible MECA-79−/HECA-452+/NCC-ST-439+ glycans, as well as other sLeX-type glycans, on CD34, and evaluated L-selectin binding to those cells using L-selectin•IgM chimera binding and lymphocyte adhesion assays. L-selectin•IgM chimeras bound to CHO cells expressing 6-sulfo sLeX attached to core 2-branched O-glycans with or without 6-sulfo sLeX attached to extended core 1 O-glycans but only marginally to other CHO cell lines. On the other hand, CHO cells expressing 6-sulfo sLeX attached to extended core 1 and/or core 2-branched O-glycans, and also non-sulfated sLeX attached to core 2-branched O-glycans showed substantial lymphocyte binding, while binding was negligible on cell lines expressing 6-sulfo and non-sulfated sLeX attached to N-glycans and non-sulfated sLeX attached to extended core 1 O-glycans. These results indicate that MECA-79−/HECA-452+/NCC-ST-439+ glycans, namely 6-sulfo and non-sulfated sLeXs attached to core 2-branched O-glycans, expressed on HEV-like vessels in gastric MALT lymphoma, function as L

  6. Historical records of mercury, lead, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons depositions in a dated sediment core from the Eastern Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Azoury, S; Tronczyński, J; Chiffoleau, J-F; Cossa, D; Nakhlé, K; Schmidt, S; Khalaf, G

    2013-07-01

    Depth profiles of mercury, lead and its stable isotopes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were determined in a dated sediment core from the Levantine basin. Sedimentary records show that preindustrial fluxes and levels of Hg, Pb, and PAHs remained generally constant in the region before 1850. An almost concurrent uniform increase of both metals and PAHs deposition occurring at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution suggests coal combustion as a main source of these contaminants in the Levantine basin after the 1850s. However, none of the contaminant profiles indicates a decline after 1950-60, the characteristic period of coal use reduction. The modern fluxes of Hg and Pb reveal a 3- to 5-fold increase over preindustrial loads, while the contemporaneous flux of PAHs rises by 4-7 times. On the whole, records in the Eastern Mediterranean suggest atmospheric inputs from relatively distant sources, likely from Central and Eastern Europe. PMID:23725373

  7. First steps toward development of a stable isotope forward model for tropical ice cores: cold air incursions and snow days at Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, J. V.; Vuille, M. F.; Hardy, D. R.; Burns, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We are working towards a forward-model reconstruction of the South American Summer Monsoon (SASM) for the last millennium from the Quelccaya Ice Cap (QIC) d18O record. QIC receives precipitation almost exclusively during the SASM season. Initial efforts focus on dynamics that yield precipitation at this receding tropical ice cap, and how they relate to the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes. We present over a decade of daily snow-height change observations from the summit of QIC. Accumulation of snow (~2 m yr-1) at the summit occurs October through April, peaking in December. Net monthly snow-height change is negative May through September, though positive snow height change days do occur throughout the year. Snow height change time-series are used to develop d18O age-models for annual snow collected in vertical profiles near the summit of QIC since 2003. Snow d18O decreases during austral summer from about -17 to -24 per mil VSMOW. Post-depositional alteration of late summer snow during austral winter elevates d18O from about -24 to about -15 per mil VSMOW. Timing of 90thpercentile positive snow-height change events at QIC corresponds with regional precipitation and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) anomalies that are dynamically triggered by cold air incursions propagating from the midlatitudes east of the Andes into the Amazon Basin. Precipitation and OLR anomalies migrate northwest in about 2-3 days from near Rio de la Plata to central Peru. The convective anomalies are the result of southerly horizontal wind anomalies in the lower troposphere that advect cold extratropical air equatorward. Composite analysis of satellite measurements shows that cold air incursions are associated with negative water vapor dD (~ -40 per mil) anomalies at QIC. We expect that snow stable isotope values from QIC are thus not only records of the deep overturning component of the monsoon circulation but also of synoptic scale monsoon disturbances. Cold air incursions into the South

  8. [A newly designed salt bridge cap-type, a variable, and non-invasive EEG lead electrode and the analytical power spectrum].

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, K; Mikawa, J

    1992-03-01

    A newly devised, variable EEG cap-style electrode that has an electrical salt bridge with 2% agarose gel and 5% NaCl solution was developed. The number of electrodes can be increased as required. The weight of 15 electrodes is about 100g. The electrode is simple, fast and in a one-touch form for measuring the EEG. An EEG using this electrode system was recorded in a healthy man in a sitting position on a chair, at rest, and with eyes closed. The power spectrum showed different patterns for the power at different concentrations of aqueous solution in the matrix of the salt bridge. The power changed to a pattern of J-type with 20% NaCl solution, to a pattern of U-type with 5% NaCl solution, and to a pattern of L-type with 0.9% NaCl solution, respectively. The matrix of the salt bridge that has a concentration higher than 0.9% NaCl, is a hypertonic solution for the isotonic body liquid. One person felt pain in half of the part of the experiment when a 20% NaCl hypertonic solution was applied to the scalp, so a 20% NaCl solution of the salt bridge was used in experiments concerning osmosis. When a salt bridge of 5% NaCl solution was used, the same results of the wave measurement was obtained 10 times. It was a value close to the expected measurement so it has a high probability of being correct. At this time the power spectrum shows a U-type pattern consistently. PMID:1591099

  9. Leading Common Core Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Terry; Smith, Felicia C.

    2012-01-01

    Kentucky is no stranger to education reform, having worked for the better part of 20 years on raising standards to improve student achievement. In 2009, the Kentucky General Assembly called for more rigorous standards to address high school graduates' college and career readiness. So when the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief…

  10. Sensitivity enhancement in the colorimetric detection of lead(II) ion using gallic acid-capped gold nanoparticles: improving size distribution and minimizing interparticle repulsion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Wei; Yu, Cheng-Ju; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2010-01-15

    We have developed a colorimetric assay for the highly sensitive and selective detection of Pb(2+) by narrowing the size distribution of gallic acid-capped gold nanoparticles (GA-AuNPs) and minimizing electrostatic repulsion between each GA-AuNP. We unveil that the particle size and size distribution of GA-AuNPs could be controlled by varying the pH of HAuCl(4) with fixed concentrations of HAuCl(4) and GA. When the pH of the precursor solution (i.e., HAuCl(4)) was adjusted from 2.2 to 11.1, the average diameter of GA-AuNPs was decreased from 75.1 nm to 9.3 nm and their size distribution was reduced from 56.6-93.6 nm to 9.0-9.6 nm. The colorimetric sensitivity of the Pb(2+)-induced aggregation of GA-AuNPs could be improved using narrow size distribution of GA-AuNPs. Moreover, further enhancement of the colorimetric sensitivity of GA-AuNPs toward Pb(2+) could be achieved by adding NaClO(4) to minimize electrostatic repulsion between GA-AuNPs, which provide a small energy barrier for Pb(2+) to overcome. Under the optimum conditions (1.0 mM NaClO(4) and 20 mM formic acid at pH 4.5), the selectivity of 9.3 nm GA-AuNPs for Pb(2+) over other metal ions in aqueous solutions is remarkably high, and its minimum detectable concentration for Pb(2+) is 10nM. We demonstrate the practicality of 9.3 nm GA-AuNPs for the determination of Pb(2+) in drinking water. This approach offers several advantages, including simplicity (without temperature control), low cost (no enzyme or DNA), high sensitivity, high selectivity, and a large linear range (10.0-1000.0 nM). PMID:19782557

  11. Fitting the cervical cap.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, A K; Baker, N N; Haney, S L

    1988-07-01

    The cervical cap is now available for general use by American women. Several steps are necessary to select women who are good candidates for cap usage and to successfully fit the cap. Many women are not good candidates for the cap. The cap is generally not suitable for women who have recently become sexually active or who are first-time contraceptors. Many users are women who cannot use more widely available contraceptives. Successful cap use requires a highly motivated, persistent woman who will correctly insert and remove her cap. The size, shape, length, position and location of the cervix must be assessed by the clinician prior to fitting the cap. The cervix should be visually inspected for lesions or cervicitis and a Pap smear should be taken. After an initial cap is selected, the stability of the cap, gaps between the cap and cervix, areas of uncovered cervix and the adequacy of the suction seal should be assessed. The woman should be taught how to insert and remove the cap. Additionally, she should be instructed to use a backup method of contraception until she is sure that the cap will remain in place during sexual intercourse. Successful cap fitting requires a careful, methodical approach by the clinician and a carefully selected, highly motivated client. This article presents the steps of cervical cap fitting. PMID:3405494

  12. Two Millennia of Pb Pollution Related to Altiplano Metallurgical Activities and Leaded Gasoline in South America from Illimani Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Schwikowski, M.

    2014-12-01

    The exploitation of the extended polymetallic deposits of the Altiplano in South America led to significant emissions of the neurotoxic Pb into the atmosphere already since pre-Colonial times. Long-term histories of Pb pollution in Eastern and Western Europe, Asia, and North America suggest that within the Northern Hemisphere emissions from metallurgy and coal combustion are minor compared to that from leaded gasoline during the second half of the 20th century. However, there is no equivalent data for Southern America. Here we present the first comprehensive, high-resolution two millennia Pb emission history for South America, based on an ice core record from Illimani glacier in Bolivia. Illimani is the highest mountain of the eastern Bolivian Andes and is located at the northeastern margin of the Bolivian Altiplano. The 2000 year ice-core based decadal Pb deposition history revealed highest Pb Enrichment Factors (EFs) during the period 1965-85. Metallurgical processing for silver production during periods of the Tiwanaku culture (400-900 AD), the Inca empire (1450-1532 AD), colonial times (1532-1900 AD), and the tin production at the beginning of the 20th century were identified as major sources for enhanced Pb EFs before the 1960s. Gasoline related Pb emissions in 1965-85, however, led to a threefold increase of the Pb EFs compared to the emission level from metal production, considerably preceding those of the past 2000 years. This finding is complementary to the local air pollution signal preserved in lake sediments and in good agreement with various studies from the Northern Hemisphere.

  13. Historical lead isotope record of a sediment core from the Derwent River (Tasmania, Australia): a multiple source environment.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Ashley T; Seen, Andrew J

    2012-05-01

    A 105 cm sediment core from the Derwent River (Tasmania, Australia) was collected in 2004 and was characterised considering both physical (loss on ignition at 550 °C and grain size) and chemical (Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations, Pb isotope ratios and (210)Pb dating) properties. The core was analysed to (i) investigate the historical profiles of some important elements associated with the Risdon zinc refinery adjacent to the Derwent River, (ii) determine Pb isotopic signatures of sediment samples, and (iii) assess the veracity of Pb isotope ratios as indicators of contaminant Pb input. Extractable metal concentrations were (all values as mgkg(-1), non-normalised for grain size) Fe: 20,000-35,000, Zn: 42-4500, Pb: 5-1090, Cu: 13-141, and Cd: 1-31; with a close correlation between Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Metal enrichment factors (normalised to Al) were Pb: 0.9-144, Zn: 0.8-93, Cd: 0.8-30, Cu: 0.8-8.9 and Fe: 0.9-1.3, confirming anthropogenic contributions of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd to the sediments. The onset of metal contamination above background levels occurred at a depth between 43 and 49 cm, with maximum concentrations noted near 20 cm for Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Lead isotope ratios were determined in sediments using sector field ICP-MS, and were found to be 36.5-38.8, 16.5-18.7 and 1.07-1.20 for (208)Pb/(204)Pb, (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios, respectively. Major Australian ores processed at the refinery over the previous ~90 years include those from Broken Hill, Rosebery, Mt Isa, Elura, Hellyer and Century deposits. Anthropogenic impact by Pb with Broken Hill type isotopic ratio was initially evident in the core at 43-49 cm. The introduction of Rosebery and Elura ores to the refinery was also clearly noted. Pb isotope ratios further highlight that the Derwent River has been exposed to a greater impact by anthropogenic Pb in comparison to other major Tasmanian rivers, namely the Huon and Tamar. PMID:22444061

  14. Historical and Future Black Carbon Deposition on the Three Ice Caps: Ice Core Measurements and Model Simulations from 1850 to 2100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Bausch, Alexandra; Nazarenko, Larissa; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Xu, Baiqing; Edwards. Ross; Bisiaux, Marion; McConnell, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Ice core measurements in conjunction with climate model simulations are of tremendous value when examining anthropogenic and natural aerosol loads and their role in past and future climates. Refractory black carbon (BC) records from the Arctic, the Antarctic, and the Himalayas are analyzed using three transient climate simulations performed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE. Simulations differ in aerosol schemes (bulk aerosols vs. aerosol microphysics) and ocean couplings (fully coupled vs. prescribed ocean). Regional analyses for past (1850-2005) and future (2005-2100) carbonaceous aerosol simulations focus on the Antarctic, Greenland, and the Himalayas. Measurements from locations in the Antarctic show clean conditions with no detectable trend over the past 150 years. Historical atmospheric deposition of BC and sulfur in Greenland shows strong trends and is primarily influenced by emissions from early twentieth century agricultural and domestic practices. Models fail to reproduce observations of a sharp eightfold BC increase in Greenland at the beginning of the twentieth century that could be due to the only threefold increase in the North American emission inventory. BC deposition in Greenland is about 10 times greater than in Antarctica and 10 times less than in Tibet. The Himalayas show the most complicated transport patterns, due to the complex terrain and dynamical regimes of this region. Projections of future climate based on the four CMIP5 Representative Concentration Pathways indicate further dramatic advances of pollution to the Tibetan Plateau along with decreasing BC deposition fluxes in Greenland and the Antarctic.

  15. Development of an unbonded capping system for clay masonry prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, L.K.; Henderson, R.C.; Sneed, W.A. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    To ascertain if an unbonded capping system was feasible for clay masonry prisms, the compressive strengths of thirty clay masonry prisms capped with an unbonded capping system modeled after ASTM C 1231 were compared with those of thirty masonry prisms capped with ASTM C 67 approved high-strength gypsum cement at the ages of 7 and 28 days. All prisms were constructed by a professional mason using Grade SW, Type FBS cored face brick from the same lot and ASTM C 270 Type S PC-lime mortar. There was no significant difference in mean compressive strength for the two capping methods at either age. In addition, capping with the unbonded capping system was faster and easier. Further, 28-day results obtained using the unbonded capping system had a lower coefficient of variation and higher mean compressive strength than those obtained with high-strength gypsum.

  16. Lead and sulfur isotopes of Guarn Halfaya and Bou Grine deposits associated to salt dome cap rocks (Diapirs zone, Northern Tunisia): sources of metals and genetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmali, N.; Souissi, F.; Carranza, E. J. M.; Vennemann, T. W.

    2012-04-01

    The Pb-Zn ores districts at Guarn Halfaya and Bou Grine are hosted mainly by the dolostones in the contact breccias between Triassic and Upper Cretaceous and by Upper Cretaceous limestones. The mineralization occurs as lenticular, impregnations, substitutions, replacements, stratiform, vein, dissemination, and stockwork. A complex polymetallic sulfide assemblage typifies the main ore stage, dominated by sphalerite and galena, pyrite with minor chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and sulfosalt (grey copper). Limestone, barite and celestite dominate the gangue, with lesser calcite. Barite and celestite intergrown with main ore-stage sulfides of Oum Edeboua has δ34S values of 12.7 to 15.0 ‰, consistent with the derivation of sulfate from Triassic evaporites form the study area (12.8<δ34S<14.0 ‰). The δ34S values for sulfides of the both study area range from 2.6 to 9.5 ‰. These positive δ34S values are likely due to abiotic thermally-driven abiotic sulfate reduction (TSR) of Triassic sulfates at depth. However, the presence of bacterial relics suggests involvement of bacterially-mediated sulfate reduction (BSR). The lead isotope composition is homogeneous with 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb ratio ranging between from 18.723 to 18.783, 15.667 to 15.685, and 38.806 to 38.889, respectively, and plot between the upper crust and orogene curves of Zartman and Doe (1981) which imply involvement of a well-mixed multi-source reservoir of Pb at depth. The syn-diagenetic mineralization in the Bahloul Formation and the calculate of model age suggest a Late Cretaceous age, correspond to a NE-SW to ENE-WSS regional extensional tectonic events, which likely favored migration of mineralizing fluids and eventual deposition at Guarn Halfaya and Bou Grine.

  17. Using lead isotopes and trace element records from two contrasting Lake Tanganyika sediment cores to assess watershed – Lake exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odigie, Kingsley; Cohen, A.D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Flegal, R

    2014-01-01

    Lead isotopic and trace element records of two contrasting sediment cores were examined to reconstruct historic, industrial contaminant inputs to Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Observed fluxes of Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in age-dated sediments collected from the lake varied both spatially and temporally over the past two to four centuries. The fluxes of trace elements were lower (up to 10-fold) at a mid-lake site (MC1) than at a nearshore site (LT-98-58), which is directly downstream from the Kahama and Nyasanga River watersheds and adjacent to the relatively pristine Gombe Stream National Park. Trace element fluxes at that nearshore site did not measurably change over the last two centuries (1815–1998), while the distal, mid-lake site exhibited substantial changes in the fluxes of trace elements – likely caused by changes in land use – over that period. For example, the flux of Pb increased by ∼300% from 1871 to 1991. That apparent accelerated weathering and detrital mobilization of lithogenic trace elements was further evidenced by (i) positive correlations (r = 0.77–0.99, p < 0.05) between the fluxes of Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn and those of iron (Fe) at both sites, (ii) positive correlations (r = 0.82–0.98, p < 0.01, n = 9) between the fluxes of elements (Al, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and the mass accumulation rates at the offshore site, (iii) the low enrichment factors (EF < 5) of those trace elements, and (iv) the temporal consistencies of the isotopic composition of Pb in the sediment. These measurements indicate that accelerated weathering, rather than industrialization, accounts for most of the increases in trace element fluxes to Lake Tanganyika in spite of the development of mining and smelting operations within the lake’s watershed over the past century. The data also indicate that the mid-lake site is a much more sensitive and useful recorder of environmental changes than the nearshore site. Furthermore, the lead isotopic compositions

  18. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  19. Health-care cap.

    PubMed

    1996-05-01

    Dallas Avionics agreed to discontinue its cap on HIV-related medical expenses. The Texas company offered employees $1 million worth of lifetime medical benefits, with the exception of HIV-related expenses. Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund intervened, demanding that the cap be removed and the company pay an employee's $82,000 outstanding HIV-related medical bills. According to Lambda, the cap violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). PMID:11363454

  20. Kinetics Parameters of VVER-1000 Core with 3 MOX Lead Test Assemblies To Be Used for Accident Analysis Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A.M.

    2000-03-08

    The present work is a part of Joint U.S./Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactor and presents the neutronics calculations of kinetics parameters of VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs. MOX LTA design has been studied in [1] for two options of MOX LTA: 100% plutonium and of ''island'' type. As a result, zoning i.e. fissile plutonium enrichments in different plutonium zones, has been defined. VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs of chosen design has been calculated in [2]. In present work, the neutronics data for transient analysis codes (RELAP [3]) has been obtained using the codes chain of RRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' [5] that is to be used for exploitation neutronics calculations of VVER. Nowadays the 3D assembly-by-assembly code BIPR-7A and 2D pin-by-pin code PERMAK-A, both with the neutronics constants prepared by the cell code TVS-M, are the base elements of this chain. It should be reminded that in [6] TVS-M was used only for the constants calculations of MOX FAs. In current calculations the code TVS-M has been used both for UOX and MOX fuel constants. Besides, the volume of presented information has been increased and additional explications have been included. The results for the reference uranium core [4] are presented in Chapter 2. The results for the core with 3 MOX LTAs are presented in Chapter 3. The conservatism that is connected with neutronics parameters and that must be taken into account during transient analysis calculations, is discussed in Chapter 4. The conservative parameters values are considered to be used in 1-point core kinetics models of accident analysis codes.

  1. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 1. Academy of the Pacific Rim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  2. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 2. Noble Street Charter High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  3. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 3. University Park Campus School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  4. Co-incubation with core proteins of HBV and HCV leads to modulation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amogh; Samrat, Subodh K; Agrawal, Babita; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV) are hepatotropic viruses in humans with approximately 350 and 170 million chronic carriers respectively. Since both viruses have similar modes of transmission, many people are co-infected. Co-infection is common in intravenous drug users, HIV-positive individuals, and transplant recipients. Compared to mono-infected patients, co-infected patients exhibit exacerbated liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. Some of the pathogenic effects may be attributed in part to the structural core proteins of both viruses-ones that have displayed immunomodulatory properties. Yet, the effects of their combined interaction on the human immune system remain a mystery. We aimed to elucidate the combined effects of HBV and HCV core proteins on human dendritic cells' (DCs) ability to present antigens and stimulate antigen-specific T-cells. We observed that when DCs, differentiated from human peripheral blood monocytes, were co-incubated with both core proteins, IL-10 production was dramatically enhanced, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12 production was significantly reduced, and HLA-DR expression was downregulated. This instant functional and phenotypic modulation of DCs induced by a combination of HBV and HCV core proteins can allow them to behave like tolerizing DCs, inefficiently presenting antigens to CD4+ T-cells and even suppressing induction of the cellular immune response. These results reveal an important mechanism by which HBV and HCV synergistically induce immune tolerance early in infection that may be instrumental in establishing chronic, persistent infections. PMID:25148301

  5. Antarctic-wide array of high-resolution ice core records reveals pervasive lead pollution began in 1889 and persists today.

    PubMed

    McConnell, J R; Maselli, O J; Sigl, M; Vallelonga, P; Neumann, T; Anschütz, H; Bales, R C; Curran, M A J; Das, S B; Edwards, R; Kipfstuhl, S; Layman, L; Thomas, E R

    2014-01-01

    Interior Antarctica is among the most remote places on Earth and was thought to be beyond the reach of human impacts when Amundsen and Scott raced to the South Pole in 1911. Here we show detailed measurements from an extensive array of 16 ice cores quantifying substantial toxic heavy metal lead pollution at South Pole and throughout Antarctica by 1889 - beating polar explorers by more than 22 years. Unlike the Arctic where lead pollution peaked in the 1970s, lead pollution in Antarctica was as high in the early 20(th) century as at any time since industrialization. The similar timing and magnitude of changes in lead deposition across Antarctica, as well as the characteristic isotopic signature of Broken Hill lead found throughout the continent, suggest that this single emission source in southern Australia was responsible for the introduction of lead pollution into Antarctica at the end of the 19(th) century and remains a significant source today. An estimated 660 t of industrial lead have been deposited over Antarctica during the past 130 years as a result of mid-latitude industrial emissions, with regional-to-global scale circulation likely modulating aerosol concentrations. Despite abatement efforts, significant lead pollution in Antarctica persists into the 21(st) century. PMID:25068819

  6. Antarctic-Wide Array of High-Resolution Ice Core Records Reveals Pervasive Lead Pollution Began in 1889 and Persists Today

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnell, J. R.; Maselli, O. J.; Sigl, M.; Vallelonga, P.; Neumann, Thomas Allen; Anschutz, H.; Bales, R. C.; Curran, M. A. J.; Das, S. B.; Edwards, R.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Layman, L.; Thomas, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Interior Antarctica is among the most remote places on Earth and was thought to be beyond the reach of human impacts when Amundsen and Scott raced to the South Pole in 1911. Here we show detailed measurements from an extensive array of 16 ice cores quantifying substantial toxic heavy metal lead pollution at South Pole and throughout Antarctica by 1889 - beating polar explorers by more than 22 years. Unlike the Arctic where lead pollution peaked in the 1970s, lead pollution in Antarctica was as high in the early 20th century as at any time since industrialization. The similar timing and magnitude of changes in lead deposition across Antarctica, as well as the characteristic isotopic signature of Broken Hill lead found throughout the continent, suggest that this single emission source in southern Australia was responsible for the introduction of lead pollution into Antarctica at the end of the 19th century and remains a significant source today. An estimated 660 t of industrial lead have been deposited over Antarctica during the past 130 years as a result of mid-latitude industrial emissions, with regional-to-global scale circulation likely modulating aerosol concentrations. Despite abatement efforts, significant lead pollution in Antarctica persists into the 21st century.

  7. Lead users’ ideas on core features to support physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis: a first step in the development of an internet service using participatory design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the growing evidence of the benefits of physical activity (PA) in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the majority is not physically active enough. An innovative strategy is to engage lead users in the development of PA interventions provided over the internet. The aim was to explore lead users’ ideas and prioritization of core features in a future internet service targeting adoption and maintenance of healthy PA in people with RA. Methods Six focus group interviews were performed with a purposively selected sample of 26 individuals with RA. Data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis and quantification of participants’ prioritization of most important content. Results Six categories were identified as core features for a future internet service: up-to-date and evidence-based information and instructions, self-regulation tools, social interaction, personalized set-up, attractive design and content, and access to the internet service. The categories represented four themes, or core aspects, important to consider in the design of the future service: (1) content, (2) customized options, (3) user interface and (4) access and implementation. Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study involving people with RA in the development of an internet service to support the adoption and maintenance of PA. Participants helped identifying core features and aspects important to consider and further explore during the next phase of development. We hypothesize that involvement of lead users will make transfer from theory to service more adequate and user-friendly and therefore will be an effective mean to facilitate PA behavior change. PMID:24655757

  8. Synthesis of a des-B-Ring Bryostatin Analogue Leads to an Unexpected Ring Expansion of the Bryolactone Core

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A convergent synthesis of a des-B-ring bryostatin analogue is described. This analogue was found to undergo an unexpected ring expansion of the bryolactone core to generate the corresponding 21-membered macrocycle. The parent analogue and the ring-expanded product both displayed nanomolar binding affinity for PKC. Despite containing A-ring substitution identical to that of bryostatin 1 and displaying bryostatin-like biological function, the des-B-ring analogues displayed a phorbol-like biological function in cells. These studies shed new light on the role of the bryostatin B-ring in conferring bryo-like biological function to bryostatin analogues. PMID:25207434

  9. Synthesis of a des-B-ring bryostatin analogue leads to an unexpected ring expansion of the bryolactone core.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Matthew B; Poudel, Yam B; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Peach, Megan L; Blumberg, Peter M; Keck, Gary E

    2014-09-24

    A convergent synthesis of a des-B-ring bryostatin analogue is described. This analogue was found to undergo an unexpected ring expansion of the bryolactone core to generate the corresponding 21-membered macrocycle. The parent analogue and the ring-expanded product both displayed nanomolar binding affinity for PKC. Despite containing A-ring substitution identical to that of bryostatin 1 and displaying bryostatin-like biological function, the des-B-ring analogues displayed a phorbol-like biological function in cells. These studies shed new light on the role of the bryostatin B-ring in conferring bryo-like biological function to bryostatin analogues. PMID:25207434

  10. CCiCap: Boeing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA announced today its plans to partner with The Boeing Company for the next phase of the agency's Commercial Crew Program (CCP). Called Commercial Crew integrated Capability (CCiCap), the initia...

  11. Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) Design: Safety, Neutronics, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Mechanics, Fuel, Core, and Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C

    2010-02-22

    The idea of developing fast spectrum reactors with molten lead (or lead alloy) as a coolant is not a new one. Although initially considered in the West in the 1950s, such technology was not pursued to completion because of anticipated difficulties associated with the corrosive nature of these coolant materials. However, in the Soviet Union, such technology was actively pursued during the same time frame (1950s through the 1980s) for the specialized role of submarine propulsion. More recently, there has been a renewal of interest in the West for such technology, both for critical systems as well as for Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) systems. Meanwhile, interest in the former Soviet Union, primarily Russia, has remained strong and has expanded well beyond the original limited mission of submarine propulsion. This section reviews the past and current status of LFR development.

  12. ROTOR END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1959-02-01

    An improved end cap is described for the cylindrical rotor or bowl of a high-speed centrifugal separator adapted to permit free and efficient continuous counter current flow of gas therethrough for isotope separation. The end cap design provides for securely mounting the same to the hollow central shaft and external wall of the centrifuge. Passageways are incorporated and so arranged as to provide for continuous counter current flow of the light and heavy portions of the gas fed to the centrifuge.

  13. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  14. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal leads to adaptations in nucleus accumbens core postsynaptic density proteome and dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; McGuier, Natalie S; Gass, Justin T; Griffin, William C; Ball, Lauren E; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Alcohol use disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease characterized by the loss of ability to control alcohol (ethanol) intake despite knowledge of detrimental health or personal consequences. Clinical and pre-clinical models provide strong evidence for chronic ethanol-associated alterations in glutamatergic signaling and impaired synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, the neural mechanisms that contribute to aberrant glutamatergic signaling in ethanol-dependent individuals in this critical brain structure remain unknown. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on neuroadaptations in postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched proteins in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice. Compared with controls, CIE exposure significantly changed expression levels of 50 proteins in the PSD-enriched fraction. Systems biology and functional annotation analyses demonstrated that the dysregulated proteins are expressed at tetrapartite synapses and critically regulate cellular morphology. To confirm this latter finding, the density and morphology of dendritic spines were examined in the NAc core of ethanol-dependent mice. We found that CIE exposure and withdrawal differentially altered dendrite diameter and dendritic spine density and morphology. Through the use of quantitative proteomics and functional annotation, these series of experiments demonstrate that ethanol dependence produces neuroadaptations in proteins that modify dendritic spine morphology. In addition, these studies identified novel PSD-related proteins that contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms of ethanol dependence that drive maladaptive structural plasticity of NAc neurons. PMID:25787124

  15. Correlation of the neutron star crust-core properties with the slope of the symmetry energy and the lead skin thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, H.; Sulaksono, A.; Agrawal, B. K.; Providência, C.

    2016-04-01

    The correlations of the crust-core transition density and pressure in neutron stars with the slope of the symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness are investigated, using different families of relativistic mean-field parametrizations with constant couplings and nonlinear terms mixing the σ - , ω - , and ρ -meson fields. It is shown that the modification of the density dependence of the symmetry energy, involving the σ or the ω meson, gives rise to different behaviors: the effect of the ω meson may also be reproduced within nonrelativistic phenomenological models, while the effect of the σ meson is essentially relativistic. Depending on the parametrization with σ -ρ or ω -ρ mixing terms, different values of the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation must be considered in order to obtain a neutron matter equation of state compatible with results from chiral effective field theory. This difference leads to different pressures at the crust-core transition density. A linear correlation between the transition density and the symmetry energy slope or the neutron skin thickness of the 208Pb nucleus is obtained, only when the ω meson is used to describe the density dependence of the symmetry energy. A comparison is made between the crust-core transition properties of neutron stars obtained by three different methods, the relativistic random phase approximation (RRPA), the Vlasov equation, and thermodynamical method. It is shown that the RRPA and the Vlasov methods predict similar transition densities for p n e β -equilibrium stellar matter.

  16. CAPS Simulation Environment Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Douglas G.; Hoffman, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The final design for an effective Comet/Asteroid Protection System (CAPS) will likely come after a number of competing designs have been simulated and evaluated. Because of the large number of design parameters involved in a system capable of detecting an object, accurately determining its orbit, and diverting the impact threat, a comprehensive simulation environment will be an extremely valuable tool for the CAPS designers. A successful simulation/design tool will aid the user in identifying the critical parameters in the system and eventually allow for automatic optimization of the design once the relationships of the key parameters are understood. A CAPS configuration will consist of space-based detectors whose purpose is to scan the celestial sphere in search of objects likely to make a close approach to Earth and to determine with the greatest possible accuracy the orbits of those objects. Other components of a CAPS configuration may include systems for modifying the orbits of approaching objects, either for the purpose of preventing a collision or for positioning the object into an orbit where it can be studied or used as a mineral resource. The Synergistic Engineering Environment (SEE) is a space-systems design, evaluation, and visualization software tool being leveraged to simulate these aspects of the CAPS study. The long-term goal of the SEE is to provide capabilities to allow the user to build and compare various CAPS designs by running end-to-end simulations that encompass the scanning phase, the orbit determination phase, and the orbit modification phase of a given scenario. Herein, a brief description of the expected simulation phases is provided, the current status and available features of the SEE software system is reported, and examples are shown of how the system is used to build and evaluate a CAPS detection design. Conclusions and the roadmap for future development of the SEE are also presented.

  17. A Phrygian Cap

    PubMed Central

    van Kamp, Marie-Janne S.; Bouman, Donald E.; Steenvoorde, Pascal; Klaase, Joost M.

    2013-01-01

    A Phrygian cap is a congenital anomaly of the gallbladder with an incidence of 4%. It can simulate a mass in the liver during hepatobiliary imaging and is sometimes mistaken for pathology. A Phrygian cap, however, has no pathological significance and normally causes no symptoms. A case will be presented where a Phrygian cap was found by coincidence during surgery. The patient was operated for colon cancer with liver metastasis in segment V. He underwent a simultaneous right hemicolectomy and wedge resection of the liver lesion. During perioperative inspection, a gallbladder with a folded fundus was seen. This deformity was, in retrospective, detected on the preoperative MRI scan. The patient underwent cholecystectomy to make the wedge resection easier to perform. Otherwise, cholecystectomy for a Phrygian cap is only indicated in case of symptoms. Radiographic imaging can be helpful in narrowing the differential diagnosis. To our knowledge, there is no recent literature about the Phrygian cap and its imaging aspects. Nowadays, multiphase MRI, or multiphase CT in case of MRI contraindication, are the first choices of hepatobiliary imaging. PMID:24019768

  18. Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny C. Servo, Ph.D.

    2004-07-12

    In order to fulfill the objective of Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR), the Department of Energy funds an initiative referred to as the Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP). The over-arching purpose of the CAP is to facilitate transition of the SBIR-funded technology to Phase III defined as private sector investment or receipt of non-sbir dollars to further the commercialization of the technology. Phase III also includes increased sales. This report summarizes the stages involved in the implementation of the Commercialization Assistance Program, a program which has been most successful in fulfilling its objectives.

  19. [Capping strategies in RNA viruses].

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Mickaël; Ferron, François; Imbert, Isabelle; Gluais, Laure; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2012-04-01

    Most viruses use the mRNA-cap dependent cellular translation machinery to translate their mRNAs into proteins. The addition of a cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA is therefore an essential step for the replication of many virus families. Additionally, the cap protects the viral RNA from degradation by cellular nucleases and prevents viral RNA recognition by innate immunity mechanisms. Viral RNAs acquire their cap structure either by using cellular capping enzymes, by stealing the cap of cellular mRNA in a process named "cap snatching", or using virus-encoded capping enzymes. Many viral enzymes involved in this process have recently been structurally and functionally characterized. These studies have revealed original cap synthesis mechanisms and pave the way towards the development of specific inhibitors bearing antiviral drug potential. PMID:22549871

  20. Mechanical properties at high strain-rate of lead core and brass jacket of a NATO 7.62 mm ball bullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroni, L.; Scapin, M.; Fichera, C.; Manes, A.; Giglio, M.

    2012-08-01

    Numerical simulations are now an actual option in order to try to reproduce and understand the mechanical response in components subjected to extreme loading conditions, like in a ballistic impact. A correct materials calibration is therefore necessary in order to extract the materials parameters. In this work the simple and widely used Johnson-Cook model was used to analyse the experimental data obtained for the characterization of the bullet materials. The bullet under investigation is a full metal jacket ball, with a lead-antimony alloy core and a brass jacket. The experimental tests cover a wide range in strain-rate, starting from quasi-static tests up to high dynamic tests performed on a standard Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar setup. In general, there is a great lack in strain-rate sensitivity and failure data. Pure lead is very soft and ductile, so antimony is used to give greater hardness and strength. The results of this study show a significant strain-rate influence for this alloy that can be associated with the presence of the lead-antimony phases and their structures. Also in case of the brass the results showed significant strain-rate sensitivity in the material response.

  1. Guard For Fuse Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    L-shaped guard attached to fuse holder. Guard prevents casual tampering with fuses in electrical junction box or fuse block. Protects fuses from being damaged by handling or by rope or string used to secure them. With fuse-cap guard, only responsible people have access to fuses.

  2. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, Longitude 64.5 East (295.5 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  3. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information:VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  4. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.3, Longitude 314.4 East (45.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  5. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.2, Longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  6. Cap-Independent Translation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Horvilleur, Emilie; Wilson, Lindsay A.; Bastide, Amandine; Piñeiro, David; Pöyry, Tuija A. A.; Willis, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are a heterogeneous group of diseases deriving from blood cells progenitors. Although many genes involved in blood cancers contain internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), there has been only few studies focusing on the role of cap-independent translation in leukemia and lymphomas. Expression of IRES trans-acting factors can also be altered, and interestingly, BCL-ABL1 fusion protein expressed from “Philadelphia” chromosome, found in some types of leukemia, regulates several of them. A mechanism involving c-Myc IRES and cap-independent translation and leading to resistance to chemotherapy in multiple myeloma emphasize the contribution of cap-independent translation in blood cancers and the need for more work to be done to clarify the roles of known IRESes in pathology and response to chemotherapeutics. PMID:26734574

  7. Fastener Caps For Electronic Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    Simple devices indicate fasteners disturbed. Lid on fastener cap bent to cover fastener head. Caps then wired together in pairs. Used in place of older paper or plastic tape seals, providing greater security and presenting neater appearance.

  8. A Method for Computing the Core Flow in Three-Dimensional Leading-Edge Vortices. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theory is presented for calculating the flow in the core of a separation-induced leading-edge vortex. The method is based on matching inner and outer representations of the vortex. The inner model of the vortex is based on the quasicylindrical Navier-Stokes equations; the flow is assumed to be steady, axially symmetric, and incompressible and in addition, gradients in the radial direction are assumed to be much larger then gradients in the axial direction. The outer model is based on the three-dimensional free-vortex-sheet theory, a higher-order panel method which solves the Prandtl-Glauert equation including nonlinear boundary conditions pertinent to the concentrated vorticity representation of the leading edge vortex. The resultant flow is evaluated a posteriori for evidence of incipient vortex breakdown and the critical helix angle concept, in conjunction with an adverse longitudinal pressure gradient, is found to correlate well with the occurrence of vortex breakdown at the trailing edge of delta, arrow, and diamond wings.

  9. Designing Smart Charter School Caps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Erin

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, Andrew J. Rotherham proposed a new approach to the contentious issue of charter school caps, the statutory limits on charter school growth in place in several states. Rotherham's proposal, termed "smart charter school caps," called for quality sensitive caps that allow the expansion of high-performing charter schools while also…

  10. The size of the EB cap determines instantaneous microtubule stability

    PubMed Central

    Duellberg, Christian; Cade, Nicholas I; Holmes, David; Surrey, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The function of microtubules relies on their ability to switch between phases of growth and shrinkage. A nucleotide-dependent stabilising cap at microtubule ends is thought to be lost before this switch can occur; however, the nature and size of this protective cap are unknown. Using a microfluidics-assisted multi-colour TIRF microscopy assay with close-to-nm and sub-second precision, we measured the sizes of the stabilizing cap of individual microtubules. We find that the protective caps are formed by the extended binding regions of EB proteins. Cap lengths vary considerably and longer caps are more stable. Nevertheless, the trigger of instability lies in a short region at the end of the cap, as a quantitative model of cap stability demonstrates. Our study establishes the spatial and kinetic characteristics of the protective cap and provides an insight into the molecular mechanism by which its loss leads to the switch from microtubule growth to shrinkage. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13470.001 PMID:27050486

  11. Performance of blasting caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Schimmel, Morry L. (Inventor); Perry, Ronnie B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Common blasting caps are made from an aluminum shell in the form of a tube which is closed at both ends. One end, which is called the output end, terminates in a principal side or face, and contains a detonating agent which communicates with a means for igniting the detonating agent. The improvement of the present invention is a flat, steel foil bonded to the face in a position which is aligned perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the tube.

  12. North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    North polar ice cap of Mars, as seen during mid summer in the northern hemisphere. The reddish areas consist of eolian dust, bright white areas consist of a mixture of water ice and dust, and the dark blue areas consist of sand dunes forming a huge 'collar' around the polar ice cap. (The colors have been enhanced with a decorrelation stretch to better show the color variability.) Shown here is an oblique view of the polar region, as seen with the Viking 1 spacecraft orbiting Mars over latitude 39 degrees north. The spiral bands consist of valleys which form by a combination of the Coriolis forces, wind erosion, and differential sublimation and condensation. In high-resolution images the polar caps are seen to consist of thick sequences of layered deposits, suggesting that cyclical climate changes have occurred on Mars. Cyclical climate changes are readily explained by quasi-periodic changes in the amount and distribution of solar heating resulting from perturbations in orbital and axial elements. Variations in the Earth's orbit have also been linked to the terrestrial climate changes during the ice ages.

  13. Synextensional magmatism leading to crustal flow in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex, northeastern Basin and Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, Alexandros; Strickland, Ariel; Miller, Elizabeth; Vervoort, Jeffrey; Fisher, Christopher M.; Wooden, Joseph; Valley, John

    2013-09-01

    study addresses the origin of granitic magmas in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek (ARG) metamorphic core complex and environs and how these inform us about the deep crustal processes leading to crustal flow and the formation of the ARG. SHRIMP-RG U-Pb zircon ages, whole-rock geochemical data (major and trace element data, as well as Sr and Nd isotopes), and zircon geochemistry (in situ O-isotope, Hf-isotope, and trace element compositions) from Eocene to Oligocene magmas now exposed at three structural levels of the ARG show that the 41-32 Ma Emigrant Pass and the 32-25 Ma Cassia plutonic complexes have a common origin, sharing a deep crustal "hot zone" that remained above solidus temperatures for at least 16 Myr. This magmatism is part of the protracted magmatism that swept southward across the western U.S. between ˜42 and 21 Ma, inferred to be the result of foundering of the shallow Farallon slab. Isotopic modeling of geochemical data from these magmas suggests that between 41 and 32 Ma, the influx of mantle-derived basalt into the lower crust triggered large-scale hybrid magmatism generating calc-alkaline magmas that erupted and intruded the upper crust and significantly weakened the lower and middle crust. Between 32 and 25 Ma, this "hot zone" incorporated large amounts of continental crustal melts, resulting in greater mobility of the lower and middle crust, driving middle crustal flow and the formation of granitic plutons that rose to shallower levels of the crust forming the granite-cored gneiss domes of the ARG.

  14. Lack of parvalbumin in mice leads to behavioral deficits relevant to all human autism core symptoms and related neural morphofunctional abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Wöhr, M; Orduz, D; Gregory, P; Moreno, H; Khan, U; Vörckel, K J; Wolfer, D P; Welzl, H; Gall, D; Schiffmann, S N; Schwaller, B

    2015-01-01

    Gene mutations and gene copy number variants are associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affected gene products are often part of signaling networks implicated in synapse formation and/or function leading to alterations in the excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance. Although the network of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons has gained particular attention in ASD, little is known on PV's putative role with respect to ASD. Genetic mouse models represent powerful translational tools for studying the role of genetic and neurobiological factors underlying ASD. Here, we report that PV knockout mice (PV−/−) display behavioral phenotypes with relevance to all three core symptoms present in human ASD patients: abnormal reciprocal social interactions, impairments in communication and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. PV-depleted mice also showed several signs of ASD-associated comorbidities, such as reduced pain sensitivity and startle responses yet increased seizure susceptibility, whereas no evidence for behavioral phenotypes with relevance to anxiety, depression and schizophrenia was obtained. Reduced social interactions and communication were also observed in heterozygous (PV+/−) mice characterized by lower PV expression levels, indicating that merely a decrease in PV levels might be sufficient to elicit core ASD-like deficits. Structural magnetic resonance imaging measurements in PV−/− and PV+/− mice further revealed ASD-associated developmental neuroanatomical changes, including transient cortical hypertrophy and cerebellar hypoplasia. Electrophysiological experiments finally demonstrated that the E/I balance in these mice is altered by modification of both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission. On the basis of the reported changes in PV expression patterns in several, mostly genetic rodent models of ASD, we propose that in these models downregulation of PV might represent one of the points of convergence, thus

  15. Lack of parvalbumin in mice leads to behavioral deficits relevant to all human autism core symptoms and related neural morphofunctional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Wöhr, M; Orduz, D; Gregory, P; Moreno, H; Khan, U; Vörckel, K J; Wolfer, D P; Welzl, H; Gall, D; Schiffmann, S N; Schwaller, B

    2015-01-01

    Gene mutations and gene copy number variants are associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affected gene products are often part of signaling networks implicated in synapse formation and/or function leading to alterations in the excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance. Although the network of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons has gained particular attention in ASD, little is known on PV's putative role with respect to ASD. Genetic mouse models represent powerful translational tools for studying the role of genetic and neurobiological factors underlying ASD. Here, we report that PV knockout mice (PV(-/-)) display behavioral phenotypes with relevance to all three core symptoms present in human ASD patients: abnormal reciprocal social interactions, impairments in communication and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. PV-depleted mice also showed several signs of ASD-associated comorbidities, such as reduced pain sensitivity and startle responses yet increased seizure susceptibility, whereas no evidence for behavioral phenotypes with relevance to anxiety, depression and schizophrenia was obtained. Reduced social interactions and communication were also observed in heterozygous (PV(+/-)) mice characterized by lower PV expression levels, indicating that merely a decrease in PV levels might be sufficient to elicit core ASD-like deficits. Structural magnetic resonance imaging measurements in PV(-/-) and PV(+/-) mice further revealed ASD-associated developmental neuroanatomical changes, including transient cortical hypertrophy and cerebellar hypoplasia. Electrophysiological experiments finally demonstrated that the E/I balance in these mice is altered by modification of both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission. On the basis of the reported changes in PV expression patterns in several, mostly genetic rodent models of ASD, we propose that in these models downregulation of PV might represent one of the points of convergence, thus providing a

  16. Saltstone Clean Cap Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C

    2005-04-22

    The current operation strategy for using Saltstone Vault 4 to receive 0.2 Ci/gallon salt solution waste involves pouring a clean grout layer over the radioactive grout prior to initiating pour into another cell. This will minimize the radiating surface area and reduce the dose rate at the vault and surrounding area. The Clean Cap will be used to shield about four feet of Saltstone poured into a Z-Area vault cell prior to moving to another cell. The minimum thickness of the Clean Cap layer will be determined by the cesium concentration and resulting dose levels and it is expected to be about one foot thick based on current calculations for 0.1 Ci Saltstone that is produced in the Saltstone process by stabilization of 0.2 Ci salt solution. This report documents experiments performed to identify a formulation for the Clean Cap. Thermal transient calculations, adiabatic temperature rise measurements, pour height, time between pour calculations and shielding calculations were beyond the scope and time limitations of this study. However, data required for shielding calculations (composition and specific gravity) are provided for shielding calculations. The approach used to design a Clean Cap formulation was to produce a slurry from the reference premix (10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash) and domestic water that resembled as closely as possible the properties of the Saltstone slurry. In addition, options were investigated that may offer advantages such as less bleed water and less heat generation. The options with less bleed water required addition of dispersants. The options with lower heat contained more fly ash and less slag. A mix containing 10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash with a water to premix ratio of 0.60 is recommended for the Clean Cap. Although this mix may generate more than 3 volume percent standing water (bleed water), it has rheological, mixing and flow properties that are similar to previously processed Saltstone. The recommended

  17. The polar cap environment of outflowing O(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Moore, T. E.; Peterson, W. K.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Persoon, A.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the core (0-50 eV) and 'energetic' (0-1 keV) ions, plasma waves, and auroral images obtained from Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE-1) and those of electrons, obtained from DE-2, are examined in the context of the polar cap environment. Results indicate the presence of two populations: high-speed (10-30 eV, or higher, streaming energies) polar beams and low-speed (generally less than 10-eV streaming energies) streams. The high-speed polar beams show an auroral connection (i.e., they are observed on or near the field lines threading auroral arcs), while the low-speed streams are on or near the field lines threading the dark polar cap and may be converted from the cleft ion fountain. Compared to the high-speed streams, the low-speed streams are significantly more stable with respect to energy and flux.

  18. Environmental exposure to lead, but not other neurotoxic metals, relates to core elements of ADHD in Romanian children: performance and questionnaire data.

    PubMed

    Nicolescu, Rodica; Petcu, Cristian; Cordeanu, Aurelia; Fabritius, Klaus; Schlumpf, Margret; Krebs, Rolf; Krämer, Ursula; Winneke, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Neurobehavioral measures of attention, and clinical features of the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been studied in pediatric environmental lead research. However rarely, if ever, have performance measures of attention or executive functions and questionnaire-based quantitative ADHD-observations been studied in the same subjects. We examined associations between pediatric blood lead concentrations (PbB), as well as those of mercury (Hg), and aluminum (Al), and performance in four different attention tasks, as well as behavioral ratings from an ICD-10 (hyperactivity) and DSM-IV-coded (attention deficit) German questionnaire (FBB-ADHS). Asymptomatic, 8-12 year old children from two Romanian cities were studied, namely Bucharest and Pantelimon, a city near a metal-processing plant. Blood was analyzed for Pb, Al, and Hg. Data from 83 children were available for final analysis. We assessed attention performance by means of four tasks of the computer-based ADHD-taylored German KITAP-battery. We also received questionnaire ratings from parents and teachers covering three ADHD-dimensions. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to estimate associations between the three neurotoxic trace metals in blood and the different ADHD features. After adjusting for eleven potentially confounding variables we found consistent borderline to significant associations between Pb, but not other metals, in blood and various performance- and questionnaire data. False alarm responses (FAR) in the KITAP subtests rather than response latencies exhibited positive associations with PbB. Questionnaire ratings for ADHD dimensions also revealed PbB-related adversity. With any two-fold increase of PbB outcome changed markedly, namely up to 35%. Restriction to children with PbBs<10mug/dl had only a marginal influence on outcome.The converging evidence from performance- and questionnaire data confirms that core elements of ADHD are adversely affected by low environmental Pb

  19. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Polyimide resins having improved thermo-oxidative stability are provided having aromatic vinyl end-caps. The polyimides are prepared by the reaction of a mixture of monomers comprising (1) a diamine, (2) an ester of tetracarboxylic acid and (3) an aromatic vinyl compound in a molar ratio of 1:2:3 of n: (n + 1):2 when the aromatic vinyl compound contains nitrogen and in a ratio of (n + 1):n:2 when the aromatic vinyl compound does not contain nitrogen, wherein n ranges from about 5 to about 20.

  20. The effects of plaque morphology and material properties on peak cap stress in human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Akyildiz, Ali C; Speelman, Lambert; Nieuwstadt, Harm A; van Brummelen, Harald; Virmani, Renu; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Steen, Anton F W; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-01-01

    Heart attacks are often caused by rupture of caps of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries. Cap rupture occurs when cap stress exceeds cap strength. We investigated the effects of plaque morphology and material properties on cap stress. Histological data from 77 coronary lesions were obtained and segmented. In these patient-specific cross sections, peak cap stresses were computed by using finite element analyses. The finite element analyses were 2D, assumed isotropic material behavior, and ignored residual stresses. To represent the wide spread in material properties, we applied soft and stiff material models for the intima. Measures of geometric plaque features for all lesions were determined and their relations to peak cap stress were examined using regression analyses. Patient-specific geometrical plaque features greatly influence peak cap stresses. Especially, local irregularities in lumen and necrotic core shape as well as a thin intima layer near the shoulder of the plaque induce local stress maxima. For stiff models, cap stress increased with decreasing cap thickness and increasing lumen radius (R = 0.79). For soft models, this relationship changed: increasing lumen radius and increasing lumen curvature were associated with increased cap stress (R = 0.66). The results of this study imply that not only accurate assessment of plaque geometry, but also of intima properties is essential for cap stress analyses in atherosclerotic plaques in human coronary arteries. PMID:26237279

  1. Multiplicity of 5′ Cap Structures Present on Short RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Taoka, Masato; de Hoon, Michiel; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Isobe, Toshiaki; Carninci, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Most RNA molecules are co- or post-transcriptionally modified to alter their chemical and functional properties to assist in their ultimate biological function. Among these modifications, the addition of 5′ cap structure has been found to regulate turnover and localization. Here we report a study of the cap structure of human short (<200 nt) RNAs (sRNAs), using sequencing of cDNA libraries prepared by enzymatic pretreatment of the sRNAs with cap sensitive-specificity, thin layer chromatographic (TLC) analyses of isolated cap structures and mass spectrometric analyses for validation of TLC analyses. Processed versions of snoRNAs and tRNAs sequences of less than 50 nt were observed in capped sRNA libraries, indicating additional processing and recapping of these annotated sRNAs biotypes. We report for the first time 2,7 dimethylguanosine in human sRNAs cap structures and surprisingly we find multiple type 0 cap structures (mGpppC, 7mGpppG, GpppG, GpppA, and 7mGpppA) in RNA length fractions shorter than 50 nt. Finally, we find the presence of additional uncharacterized cap structures that wait determination by the creation of needed reference compounds to be used in TLC analyses. These studies suggest the existence of novel biochemical pathways leading to the processing of primary and sRNAs and the modifications of their RNA 5′ ends with a spectrum of chemical modifications. PMID:25079783

  2. Edge of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  3. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  4. Post-Wisconsinan Chemical Weathering Rates and Trajectories From a 13,400-Year Sediment Core Record of Lead Isotopic Ratios in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R. H.; Norton, S. A.; Koons, P. O.; Handley, M.

    2008-12-01

    Lead isotopic ratios recorded in a 5.3-m 13.4-ka 14C-dated lake sediment core from Sargent Mountain Pond, Maine (USA) are interpreted as an archive of post-glacial chemical weathering. Early weathering yielded highly radiogenic sediment from the preferential release of U and Th decay products (206Pb, 207Pb, and 208Pb) from accessory mineral phases in the catchment's predominantly-granitic till and bedrock relative to non-radiogenic 204Pb from the more abundant primary minerals. Values for 207Pb/206Pb in the sediment increased rapidly from 0.799 to 0.814 in the catchment's first 4,000 years of post-Wisconsinan weathering, and thereafter increased only slightly to just prior to the 19th century. Values for 208Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 206Pb/204Pb decline over the same time-scale, as a result of decreasing radiogenic Pb being released from catchment weathering. Our results are consistent with: (1) the published interpretation of Pb isotopic variation in ferromanganese ocean crusts as a reflection of continental-scale glacial-interglacial chemical weathering cycles, (2) bench-scale whole-rock weathering experiments, and (3) soil chronosequence Pb isotope dissolution experiments and bridge the gap between short-term, mineral-scale experiments and long-term, ocean sediment records. We establish a time-scale for depletion of accessory minerals, and loss of their Pb isotopic signature at one catchment, and document the concurrent shift to slower primary mineral-controlled chemical weathering after deglaciation.

  5. South Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-337, 21 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the 'swiss cheese' pattern of frozen carbon dioxide on the south polar residual cap. Observation of these materials over two Mars years has revealed that the scarps that bound the mesas and small buttes are retreating-the carbon dioxide ice is subliming away-at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per Mars year in some places. The picture covers an area about 900 m (about 900 yards) wide near 87.1oS, 93.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  6. Polar Cap Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    17 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows kidney bean-shaped pits, and other pits, formed by erosion in a landscape of frozen carbon dioxide. This images shows one of about a dozen different patterns that are common in various locations across the martian south polar residual cap, an area that has been receiving intense scrutiny by the MGS MOC this year, because it is visible on every orbit and in daylight for most of 2005.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 6.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  7. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  8. Hats Off to Thinking Caps!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Lynne E.

    2005-01-01

    This document describes a third grade teachers' new twist to get her students' minds motivated for another school year. She purchased some "thinking caps." The purpose of the caps was to help students focus on various academic tasks. The children were thrilled to have a new tool to help them concentrate.

  9. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap results in complete unfolding of PP32. Removing the N-cap has a much less severe effect, decreasing stability but retaining much of its secondary structure. In contrast, the dynamics and tertiary structure of the first two repeats are significantly perturbed, based on (1)H-(15)N relaxation studies, chemical shift perturbations, and residual dipolar couplings. However, more distal repeats (3 to C-cap) retain their native tertiary structure. In this regard, the N-cap drives the folding of adjacent repeats from what appears to be a molten-globule-like state. This interpretation is supported by extensive analysis using core packing substitutions in the full-length and N-cap-truncated PP32. This work highlights the importance of caps to the stability and structural integrity of β-strand-containing LRR proteins, and emphasizes the different contributions of the N- and C-terminal caps. PMID:24659532

  10. Myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy is regulated through dual phosphorylation and acetylation of the actin capping protein CapZ.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hsi; Warren, Chad M; Li, Jieli; McKinsey, Timothy A; Russell, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    The mechanotransduction signaling pathways initiated in heart muscle by increased mechanical loading are known to lead to long-term transcriptional changes and hypertrophy, but the rapid events for adaptation at the sarcomeric level are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that actin filament assembly during cardiomyocyte growth is regulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs) of CapZβ1. In rapidly hypertrophying neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) stimulated by phenylephrine (PE), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) of CapZβ1 revealed a shift toward more negative charge. Consistent with this, mass spectrometry identified CapZβ1 phosphorylation on serine-204 and acetylation on lysine-199, two residues which are near the actin binding surface of CapZβ1. Ectopic expression of dominant negative PKCɛ (dnPKCɛ) in NRVMs blunted the PE-induced increase in CapZ dynamics, as evidenced by the kinetic constant (Kfrap) of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and concomitantly reduced phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1. Furthermore, inhibition of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) increased lysine-199 acetylation on CapZβ1, which increased Kfrap of CapZ and stimulated actin dynamics. Finally, we show that PE treatment of NRVMs results in decreased binding of HDAC3 to myofibrils, suggesting a signal-dependent mechanism for the regulation of sarcomere-associated CapZβ1 acetylation. Taken together, this dual regulation through phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1 provides a novel model for the regulation of myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27185186

  11. Marine productivity leads organic matter preservation in sapropel S1: palynological evidence from a core east of the Nile River outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helmond, Niels A. G. M.; Hennekam, Rick; Donders, Timme H.; Bunnik, Frans P. M.; de Lange, Gert J.; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sangiorgi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The formation of Eastern Mediterranean organic matter rich deposits known as sapropels is the results of two mechanisms: (enhanced) marine productivity and preservation of organic material at depth. However, their relative contribution and their leads and lags with respect to each other remain elusive. Here, we address these questions by studying sediments deposited prior to, during, and after the most recent sapropel (S1, ˜10-6 calibrated ka before present, BP) with an integrated marine and terrestrial palynological approach, combined with existing and newly generated geochemical data. The studied core was retrieved from an area under strong influence of the Nile outflow and has high average sediment accumulation rates allowing a high temporal resolution (of several decades to centuries). Marine productivity, as reconstructed with total dinocyst accumulation rates (ARs) and biogenic CaCO3 content, starts to increase ˜1 ka prior to sapropel formation. A shift in the dinocyst taxa contributing to the productivity signal at sapropel onset indicates the rapid development of (seasonal) water column stratification. Pollen and spore ARs also increase prior to sapropel onset, but a few centuries after the increase in marine productivity. Hence, the first shift to a high marine productivity system before sapropel deposition may have been mostly favoured by the injection of nutrients via shoaling of the nutricline with a minor contribution of nutrients from land via river input and flooding of the shelves. Pollen assemblages indicate a gradual change across the sapropel onset from a savanna-like, through coastal marsh expansion, toward an open woodland assemblage, which is consistent with enhanced Nile influence and delta development. At sapropel onset a marked shift in pollen ARs could suggest increased preservation under anoxia. However, major shifts in pollen assemblages and signs of selective- or partial decomposition of terrestrial palynomorphs are absent. We

  12. Regulation of phytochrome message abundance in root caps of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. M.; Pao, L. I.; Feldman, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    In many cultivars of maize (Zea mays L.) red light affects root development via the photomorphogenetic pigment phytochrome. The site of perception for the light is the root cap. In the maize cultivar Merit, we investigated phytochrome-mediated events in the cap. We established that the message encoded by the phyA1 gene was most abundant in dark-grown tissue and was asymmetrically distributed in the root cap, with greatest expression in the cells which make up the central columella core of the cap. Phytochrome message was negatively autoregulated in a specific region within the root cap. This autoregulation was sensitive to very-low-fluence red light, and thus was characterized as a phytochrome-mediated, very-low-fluence event. The kinetics of message reaccumulation in the dark were also examined and compared to the kinetics of the light requirement for root gravitropism in this cultivar. Similarly, the degree of autoregulation present in two other maize cultivars with different light requirements for gravitropic sensitivity was investigated. It appears that the Merit cultivar expresses a condition of hypersensitivity to phytochrome-mediated light regulation in root tissues. We conclude that phytochrome regulates many activities within the cap, but the degree to which these activities share common phytochrome-mediated steps is not known.

  13. General RNA binding proteins render translation cap dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Svitkin, Y V; Ovchinnikov, L P; Dreyfuss, G; Sonenberg, N

    1996-01-01

    Translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate is relatively independent of the presence of the mRNA m7G cap structure and the cap binding protein, eIF-4E. In addition, initiation occurs frequently at spurious internal sites. Here we show that a critical parameter which contributes to cap-dependent translation is the amount of general RNA binding proteins in the extract. Addition of several general RNA binding proteins, such as hnRNP A1, La autoantigen, pyrimidine tract binding protein (hnRNP I/PTB) and the major core protein of cytoplasmic mRNP (p50), rendered translation in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate cap dependent. These proteins drastically inhibited the translation of an uncapped mRNA, but had no effect on translation of a capped mRNA. Based on these and other results, we suggest that one function of general mRNA binding proteins in the cytoplasm is to promote ribosome binding by a 5' end, cap-mediated mechanism, and prevent spurious initiations at aberrant translation start sites. Images PMID:9003790

  14. Refilin holds the cap.

    PubMed

    Gay, Olivia; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Baudier, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    The Refilins (RefilinA and RefilinB) are a novel family of short-lived actin regulatory proteins that are expressed during changes in cellular phenotype such as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). The Refilins promote to the formation of actin- and myosin-rich perinuclear bundles that are characteristic of cellular phenotypic switches. In epithelial cells, RefilinB is up-regulated in response to TGF-β stimulation and function in organization of apical perinuclear actin fibers during early stage of the EMT process1. In fibroblasts, RefilinB stabilizes perinuclear parallel actin bundles which resemble actin cap 2. Refilins bind and modulate the function of Filamin A (FLNA). Upon binding to Refilins, FLNA is capable of assembling actin filaments into parallel bundles, possibly by undergoing conformational changes at the C-terminal. Perinuclear actin structures determine nuclear shape, cell morphology, cell adhesion and possibly cell proliferation and gene regulation. Identifying the role of Refilins in organizing perinuclear actin networks provides additional insight in the process of intracellular mechanotransduction that regulate changes in cellular phenotype such as those observed during EMT. PMID:22446558

  15. Numerical modeling of experimental human fibrous cap delamination.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiaochang; Davis, Lindsey A; Deng, Xiaomin; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    Fibrous cap delamination is a critical process during the rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, which often leads to severe life-threatening clinical consequences such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this study a finite element modeling and simulation approach is presented that enables the study of fibrous cap delamination experiments for the purpose of understanding the fibrous cap delamination process. A cohesive zone model (CZM) approach is applied to simulate delamination of the fibrous cap from the underlying plaque tissue. A viscoelastic anisotropic (VA) model for the bulk arterial material behavior is extended from existing studies so that the hysteresis phenomenon observed in the fibrous cap delamination experiments can be captured. A finite element model is developed for the fibrous cap delamination experiments, in which arterial layers (including the fibrous cap and the underlying plaque tissue) are represented by solid elements based on the VA model and the fibrous cap-underlying plaque tissue interface is characterized by interfacial CZM elements. In the CZM, the delamination process is governed by an exponential traction-separation law which utilizes critical energy release rates obtained directly from the fibrous cap delamination experiments. A set of VA model parameter values and CZM parameter values is determined based on values suggested in the literature and through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with one set of experimental measurements. Using this set of parameter values, simulation predictions for other sets of experimental measurements are obtained and good agreement between simulation predictions and experimental measurements is observed. Results of this study demonstrate the applicability of the viscoelastic anisotropic model and the CZM approach for the simulation of diseased arterial tissue failure processes. PMID:26897094

  16. Researchers dodge UK migration cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2011-03-01

    Research scientists are among those to be prioritized under the UK government's new immigration rules that will impose an annual cap on the number of work visas issued to those from outside the European Union (EU).

  17. Genetics Home Reference: cap myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groote C, de Jonghe P, Marttila M, Laing NG, Pelin K, Wallgren-Pettersson C. Cap disease caused ... E, Wallefeld W, Memo M, Donner K, Laing NG, Marston S, Grönholm M, Wallgren-Pettersson C. Abnormal actin ...

  18. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  19. Which Core Matters More? Differences in Definitions of Quality Lead to New Debates over the Importance of Teaching Practical Skills versus Specific Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrett, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Potential students hoping to gauge the quality of courses at Portland State University might be forgiven for feeling confused. On the one hand, the University Studies program, which uses interdisciplinary seminars during the first two years to develop students' core skills, has been widely praised and emulated. The Council for Higher Education…

  20. Ferroelectric capped magnetization in multiferroic PZT/LSMO tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashok Shukla, A. K.; Barrionuevo, D.; Ortega, N.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Shannigrahi, Santiranjan; Scott, J. F.

    2015-03-30

    Self-poled ultra-thin ferroelectric PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} (PZT) (5 and 7 nm) films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition technique on ferromagnetic La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) (30 nm) to check the effect of polar capping on magnetization for ferroelectric tunnel junction devices. PZT/LSMO heterostructures with thick polar PZT (7 nm) capping show nearly 100% enhancement in magnetization compared with thin polar PZT (5 nm) films, probably due to excess hole transfer from the ferroelectric to the ferromagnetic layers. Core-level x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed the presence of larger Mn 3s exchange splitting and higher Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} ion ratio in the LSMO with 7 nm polar capping.

  1. Northern Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 13 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on November 26, 2002 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Cap Edge.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80, Longitude 43.2 East (316.8 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for

  2. Polar Cap Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on June 6, 2003 during the Southern Spring season near the South Polar Cap Edge.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -77.8, Longitude 195 East (165 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  3. Investigation about the influence of the mechanical properties of lead core and brass jacket of a NATO 7.62 mm ball bullet in numerical simulations of ballistic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, M.; Gilioli, A.; Manes, A.; Peroni, L.; Scapin, M.

    2012-08-01

    In the present work a validated numerical approach has been used in order to build a robust and reliable FE model of the impact of a NATO 7.62 mm ball bullet, against an aluminium transmission shaft. The bullet is a full metal jacket type, with a lead alloy core and a brass jacket. Target shaft is made by an Al6061-T6 aluminium alloy. According to the soft core (lead alloy) of the bullet, most effort has been spent in order to evaluate the effect of bullet materials mechanical properties on the numerical results. Numerical analyses, carried out using the non-linear dynamic finite element solver Abaqus∖Explicit 6.10, have been performed focusing on core and jacket material behaviour (target material, Al6061-T6, has been previously calibrated by the authors). Thus numerical analyses have been performed considering for the mechanical behaviour of the bullet both a simplified approach (as reported in literature) and new material data (with strain rate effect) obtained by means of experimental tests on the two materials (lead and brass) with specimens cut directly from the bullet. Finally the results of the analyses have been compared with real experimental ballistic tests.

  4. Model-observation comparison study of multiple polar cap arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Valladares, C. E.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Crain, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative model-observation comparison of multiple polar cap arcs has been conducted by using a time-dependent theoretical model of polar cap arcs. In particular, the electrodynamical features of multiple polar cap arcs with various spacings are simulated and the results are compared with the images obtained from the All-Sky Intensified Photometer at Qaanaaq. The results show that the observed and simulated arcs are quite similar, both spatially and temporally. The results support the theory proposed by Zhu et al. [1993a, 1994b] that the structure of polar cap arcs is mainly determined by the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling processes and that the spacing of multiple polar cap arcs is closely related to the hardness of the primary magnetospheric precipitation. It is found that for the multiple polar cap arcs with both narrow and wide spacings, the associated field-aligned currents are mainly closed by Pedersen currents. It is also found that a hard precipitation can lead to a highly structured secondary arc because of the nonlinear M-I coupling processes.

  5. INFLUENCE OF THE POLAR CAP CURRENT ON PULSAR POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, D.; Gangadhara, R. T. E-mail: ganga@iiap.res.in

    2012-07-20

    We have developed a model for the polarization of curvature radiation by taking into account the polar-cap-current-induced perturbation on the dipolar magnetic field. We present the effects of the polar cap current on the pulsar radio emission in an artificial case when the rotation effects, such as aberration and retardation, are absent. Our model indicates that the intensity components and the polarization angle inflection point can be shifted to either the leading or the trailing side depending upon the prevailing conditions in the viewing geometry, the non-uniformity in source distribution (modulation), and the polar-cap-current-induced perturbation. Also, we find evidence for the origin of symmetric-type circular polarization in addition to the antisymmetric type. Our model predicts a stronger trailing component compared to that on the leading side of a given cone under some specific conditions.

  6. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  7. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-14

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  8. Nuclear power cap opposed

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-17

    This article is a review of litigation in Canada that challenges the country`s Nuclear Liability Act. Both parties agree that repeal of this law would raise operating costs, lead to earlier closing of older units, and reduce the likelihood of future plant construction. The suit is brought by the city of Toronto and the Energy Probe watchdog group. Comments by the plaintiffs and several Canadian nuclear utilities are offered.

  9. Creation of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Polar cap patches, which are islands of enhanced plasma density drifting anti-sunward, are one of the outstanding phenomena in the polar cap F region ionosphere. In the last decade, data from all-sky airglow imagers have been extensively used for better understanding the propagation of patches in the central polar cap region. But still, it has been rather difficult to capture the birth of patches in their generation region near the dayside cusp, because, in most places, the dayside part of the polar cap ionosphere is sunlit even in winter. In Longyearbyen (78.1N, 15.5E), Norway, however, optical observations are possible near the dayside cusp region in a limited period around the winter solstice. This enables us to directly image how polar cap patches are born in the cusp. In this paper, we present a few intervals of daytime optical observations, during which polar cap patches were generated within the field-of-view of an all-sky imager in Longyearbyen. During all the intervals studied here, we identified several signatures of poleward moving auroral forms (PMAF) in the equatorward half of the field-of-view, which are known as ionospheric manifestations of dayside reconnection. Interestingly, patches were directly produced from such poleward moving auroral signatures and propagated poleward along the anti-sunward convection near the cusp. In the literature, Lorentzen et al. (2012) first reported such a direct production of patches from PMAFs. During the current observations, however, we succeeded in tracking the propagation of patches until they reached the poleward edge of the field-of-view of the imager. This confirms that the faint airglow structures produced from PMAFs were actually transported for a long distance towards the central polar cap area; thus, polar cap patches were produced. From this set of observations, we suggest that polar cap patches during moderately disturbed conditions (i.e, non-storm time conditions) can be directly produced by the

  10. South Polar Cap, Summer 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the south polar cap of Mars as it appeared to the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on April 17, 2000. In winter and early spring, this entire scene would be covered by frost. In summer, the cap shrinks to its minimum size, as shown here. Even though it is summer, observations made by the Viking orbiters in the 1970s showed that the south polar cap remains cold enough that the polar frost (seen here as white) consists of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide freezes at temperatures around -125o C (-193o F). Mid-summer afternoon sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left from about 11.2o above the horizon. Soon the cap will experience sunsets; by June 2000, this pole will be in autumn, and the area covered by frost will begin to grow. Winter will return to the south polar region in December 2000. The polar cap from left to right is about 420 km (260 mi) across.

  11. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  12. The Drangajökull ice cap, northwest Iceland, persisted into the early-mid Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomacker, Anders; Brynjólfsson, Skafti; Andreassen, Julie M.; Gudmundsdóttir, Esther Ruth; Olsen, Jesper; Odgaard, Bent V.; Håkansson, Lena; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Larsen, Nicolaj K.

    2016-09-01

    Most glaciers and ice caps in Iceland experienced rapid deglaciation in the early Holocene, reaching a minimum extent during the Holocene Thermal Maximum. Here we present evidence of the Holocene glacial history from lake sediment cores retrieved from seven threshold lakes around the Drangajökull ice cap in the Vestfirðir peninsula, NW Iceland. The sediment cores show on/off signals of glacial meltwater activity, as minerogenic material deposited from glacial meltwater alternates with organic-rich material (gyttja) deposited without glacial meltwater. We base the chronology of the sediment cores on 14C ages and geochemical identification of key tephra layers with known ages. A 25-cm thick layer of the Saksunarvatn tephra in Lake Skorarvatn indicates that the northern part of the ice cap had reached a similar size as today or was smaller already by 10.2 cal kyr BP. However, 14C ages of lake sediment cores from the highlands southeast of Drangajökull suggest that this part of the ice cap was larger than today until 7.8-7.2 cal kyr BP. Even today, the Drangajökull ice cap has a different behavior than the main ice caps in Iceland, characterized by a very low glaciation limit. Because palaeoclimatic proxies show an early-mid Holocene temperature optimum in this part of Iceland, we suggest that the persistence of Drangajökull into the early Holocene and, possibly, also the entire Holocene was due to high winter precipitation.

  13. Estimated bedrock topography and ice thickness of the Renland Ice Cap, East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldtoft, Iben; Hvidberg, Christine; Panton, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The Renland Ice Cap in East Greenland (71.30°N, 26.72°W) is a separate ice cap located on a high mountain plateau in the Scoresbysund Fjord, with the highest elevation of 2340 m. In 1988 a 324.35 m long ice core was drilled near summit on the eastern dome of the ice cap. The recovered ice core contains a climate record reaching back to the Eemian. In the spring 2015 a new ice core (584 m) was drilled on Renland during the RECAP project. Knowledge of the basal topography of the Renland Ice Cap is very limited. However, old airborne radar surveys show that the bedrock topography is very mountainous. Knowledge of the bedrock topography and ice thickness was needed to locate the best possible drilling site for the new ice core. An iterative inverse method was used to present a modelled estimate of the subglacial topography and ice thickness of the Renland Ice Cap based on the knowledge of the surface topography and climate forcing. The modelled estimate showed initially twice as large ice thickness as expected, but having improved the surface topography with data from the field work on Renland Ice Cap, the modelled ice thickness are in the same order as radar measurements shows.

  14. Polar Cap Formation on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, C. B.; Shaya, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Since thermal migration is not an effective mechanism for water transport in the polar regions at the Galilean satellites, some other process must be responsible for the formation of Ganymede's polar caps. It is proposed that Ganymede's polar caps are the optical manifestation of a process that began with the distribution of an ice sheet over the surface of Ganymede. The combined processes of impact gardening and thermal migration led, in regions at latitudes less than 40 to 45 deg., to the burial of some fraction of this ice, the migration of some to the polar caps margins, and a depletion of free ice in the optical surface. At higher latitudes, no process was effective in removing ice from the optical surface, so the remanants of the sheet are visible today.

  15. Immunization with Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing HCV Core or F Proteins Leads to T Cells with Reduced Effector Molecules Granzyme B and IFN-γ: A Potential New Strategy for Immune Evasion in HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Vedi, Satish; Singh, Shakti; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Multispecific, broad, and potent T cell responses have been correlated with viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the majority of infected patients develop chronic infection, suggesting that natural infection mostly leads to development of inefficient T cell immunity. Multiple mechanisms of immune modulation and evasion have been shown in HCV infection through various investigations. This study examined the generation and modulation of T cell responses against core and frameshift (F) proteins of HCV. A single immunization of mice with replication incompetent recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding for F or core antigens induces poor T cell responses and leads to generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with low granzyme B (GrB) expression. These T cells have impaired GrB enzyme activity and are unable to kill peptide loaded target cells. The low intracellular expression of GrB is not due to degranulation of cytotoxic granules containing cytotoxic T cells. Addition of exogenous IL-2 in in vitro cultures leads to partial recovery of GrB production, whereas immunization with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly I:C leads to complete restoration of GrB expression in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, a possible new strategy of T cell modulation is recognized wherein effector T cells are caused to be dysfunctional by HCV-derived antigens F or core, and strategies are also delineated to overcome this dysfunction. These studies are important in the investigation of prophylactic vaccine and immunotherapy strategies for HCV infection. PMID:26133045

  16. Polar cap formation on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaya, E. J.; Pilcher, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    It is argued that Ganymede's polar caps are the remnants of a more extensive covering of water ice that formed during a period in which the satellite was geologically active. It is inferred that the initial thickness of this covering was a significant fraction of the gardening depth since the covering formed. This suggests an initial thickness of at least a few meters over heavily cratered regions such as the south polar grooved terrain. The absence of similar polar caps on Callisto apparently reflects the absence of comparable geologic activity in the history of this satellite.

  17. The Enigmatic Martian Polar Caps

    SciTech Connect

    James, Philip

    2005-08-17

    The Martian polar caps have puzzled astronomers for over a century. Extensive study by many instruments on various spacecraft has resolved many questions but has at the same time created a new generation of puzzles. The polar caps are intimately coupled to the current Martian climate and volatile cycles. They also hold clues to climate variations on a variety of longer time scales. The results of recent missions will be reviewed, and the potential outlook for resolution of the outstanding questions will be examined.

  18. Radiation characterization summary : ACRR 44-inch lead-boron bucket located in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect

    Parma, Edward J.,; Quirk, Thomas J.; Lippert, Lance L.; Griffin, Patrick Joseph; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer Michael

    2013-04-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the 44-inch-long lead-boron bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray flux profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse and steady-state operations are presented with conversion examples.

  19. Gold nanoparticles with different capping systems: an electronic and structural XAS analysis.

    PubMed

    López-Cartes, C; Rojas, T C; Litrán, R; Martínez-Martínez, D; de la Fuente, J M; Penadés, S; Fernández, A

    2005-05-12

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with three different capping systems: a tetralkylammonium salt, an alkanethiol, and a thiol-derivatized neoglycoconjugate. Also gold NPs supported on a porous TiO(2) substrate have been investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to determine the electronic behavior of the different capped/supported systems regarding the electron/hole density of d states. Surface and size effects, as well as the role of the microstructure, have been also studied through an exhaustive analysis of the EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) data. Very small gold NPs functionalized with thiol-derivatized molecules show an increase in d-hole density at the gold site due to Au-S charge transfer. This effect is overcoming size effects (which lead to a slightly increase of the d-electron density) for high S:Au atomic ratios and core-shell microstructures where an atomically abrupt Au-S interface likely does not exist. It has been also shown that thiol functionalization of very small gold NPs is introducing a strong distortion as compared to fcc order. To the contrary, electron transfer from reduced support oxides to gold NPs can produce a higher increase in d-electron density at the gold site, as compared to naked gold clusters. PMID:16852039

  20. Holocene fluctuations of Bregne ice cap, Scoresby Sund, eastern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, L.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Hall, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    TML. 10Be ages of boulders and bedrock just outside these moraines indicate that deglaciation occurred at 10.4±0.5 ka and that the moraines mark the maximum ice extent during the Holocene. Beginning in the early Holocene, the ice cap then had either entirely retreated from the TML basin or contributed minimal sediment input until ~2,800 cal yr BP when clay-rich, finely laminated sediments begin to occur. This chronology is in contrast to small ice caps located in Liverpool Land, 130 km east of Milne Land. In Liverpool Land, lake sediment records indicate that the onset of Neoglaciation occurred at ~800 cal yr BP. The difference between the onset of Neoglaciation in western and eastern Scoresby Sund may be due to differences in basin position relative to the ice cap or may represent a temperature gradient between the inland, high elevation of Bregne ice cap and the coastal, low elevation Liverpool Land ice caps. Other records, such as GRIP borehole temperatures and the δ18O record from the Renland ice cap show cooling from ~4,500-2,000 yr BP suggesting that the terrestrial advances of ice caps in Scoresby Sund lagged behind temperatures registered in ice cores or ice core records are not good proxies for changes at the ice margins.

  1. CAP Self-Inventory Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This booklet of Self-Inventory Cards is one of the 14 components of the Career Alert Planning (CAP) program (see note), a set of individualized materials designed to help participants find out about themselves and about the kind of work for which they are suited. In this program, participants become acquainted with occupations that are…

  2. From Blogs to Bottle Caps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edinger, Ted

    2012-01-01

    There is a wonderful community of art educators connecting a once-isolated profession through blogging. Art educators around the world are sharing ideas and communicating with their peers through this amazing resource. In this article, the author describes the bottle cap mural at Tulip Grove Elementary School which was inspired by this exchange of…

  3. Ultrastable BSA-capped gold nanoclusters with a polymer-like shielding layer against reactive oxygen species in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjuan; Cao, Yuqing; Sui, Dandan; Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Chao; Xie, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells. PMID:27102116

  4. Functional end-capped conducting poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, V.; Farina, H.; Ortenzi, Marco A.

    2016-05-01

    Methacrylate-terminated Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymers with controlled degree of polymerization were successfully prepared by direct oxidative polycondensation between Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and a cross-linkable methacrylate end-capper monomer, obtained via Friedel Crafts acylation starting from EDOT and Methacryloyl chloride. The new polymer was synthesized in order to overcome the well-known technical problems of PEDOT, i.e. difficult processability and patterning, due to its poor solubility in common organic and inorganic solvents. The chemical structure and the degree of polymerization of the end-capped polymers were determined by 1H NMR spectra. A new synthesis of Methacrylate end-capped PEDOT with controlled degree of polymerization, soluble in common organic and chlorinated solvents and with improved conductivity, 210 S/cm, was performed. This method includes: direct oxidative polycondensation of 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in the presence of a cross-linkable end-capper, i.e. Methacrylate end-capped EDOT prepared via Friedel Crafts acylation with Methacryloyl chloride and oxidant species, i.e. ferric sulfate. Furthermore, the oxidative polycondensation of EDOT monomer and Methacrylate end-capped EDOT in the presence of Sulfonated Polyethersulfone (SPES)- characterized by different degree of Sulfonation (DS)- as dopant agent was performed, leading to functional end-capped conducting PEDOT, easy to process and pattern, with conductivity of 210 S/cm, 50 S/cm higher than the one of commercial PEDOT.

  5. Is Vitamin C Beneficial to Patients with CAP?

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Li, Guoping

    2016-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly and children. Vitamin C is known as a physiological antioxidant, regulating innate immune system in the lung. Vitamin C has been used to prevent and treat CAP. However, the use of vitamin C for preventing and treating CAP has been a subject of controversy. We aim to review the most significant findings about vitamin C supplementation in patients with pneumonia based on literature from the PubMed. First, we reviewed recent advances about the role of oxidative stress in CAP. Oxidative stress is a crucial component of the host defense system and inflammatory response. However, excessive oxidative stress can cause a systemic inflammatory response leading to tissue damage. The degree of oxidative stress has been associated with the severity of CAP. Vitamin C is beneficial to the host defense system by regulating the innate immunity in the lungs. We also discuss the prophylactic use of vitamin C for pneumonia. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the pneumonia risk in patients with vitamin C deficiency. However, it is not beneficial for prophylactic use of vitamin C to prevent pneumonia in the well-nourished population. Finally, we summarize the effect of vitamin C on mechanical ventilation used during respiratory failure. Administration of vitamin C decreases the duration of mechanical ventilation by decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:27363830

  6. Ultrastable BSA-capped gold nanoclusters with a polymer-like shielding layer against reactive oxygen species in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjuan; Cao, Yuqing; Sui, Dandan; Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Chao; Xie, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells.The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental materials, apparatus, experimental procedures and characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02178f

  7. Tip cap for a rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofel, W. K.; Tuley, E. N.; Gay, C. H., Jr.; Troeger, R. E.; Sterman, A. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A replaceable tip cap for attachment to the end of a rotor blade is described. The tip cap includes a plurality of walls defining a compartment which, if desired, can be divided into a plurality of subcompartments. The tip cap can include inlet and outlet holes in walls thereof to permit fluid communication of a cooling fluid there through. Abrasive material can be attached with the radially outer wall of the tip cap.

  8. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) Bucket Located in the Central Cavity on the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-PLG-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect

    Parma, Edward J.,; Vehar, David W.; Lippert, Lance L.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2015-06-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the polyethylene-lead-graphite (PLG) bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-PLG-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra, uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples. Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work. Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  9. Dynamic Modeling of an Evapotranspiration Cap

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Steven Piet; Rafael Soto; Gerald Sehlke; Harold Heydt; John Visser

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is scheduled to design and install hundreds of landfill caps/barriers over the next several decades and these caps will have a design life expectancy of up to 1,000 years. Other landfill caps with 30 year design lifetimes are reaching the end of their original design life; the changes to these caps need to be understood to provide a basis for lifetime extension. Defining the attributes that make a successful cap (one that isolates the waste from the environment) is crucial to these efforts. Because cap systems such as landfill caps are dynamic in nature, it is impossible to understand, monitor, and update lifetime predictions without understanding the dynamics of cap degradation, which is most often due to multiple interdependent factors rather than isolated independent events. In an attempt to understand the dynamics of cap degradation, a computer model using system dynamics is being developed to capture the complex behavior of an evapotranspiration cap. The specific objectives of this project are to capture the dynamic, nonlinear feedback loop structures underlying an evapotranspiration cap and, through computer simulation, gain a better understanding of long-term behavior, influencing factors, and, ultimately, long-term cap performance.

  10. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3000 - Bone cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bone cap. 888.3000 Section 888.3000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3000 Bone cap. (a) Identification. A bone cap is a...

  15. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z.; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J.; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K.; Chung, Daniel C.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2−/cap2− males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2−/cap2− females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease. PMID:26616005

  16. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K; Chung, Daniel C; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2(-)/cap2(-) males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2(-)/cap2(-) females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease. PMID:26616005

  17. Neuronal Actin Dynamics, Spine Density and Neuronal Dendritic Complexity Are Regulated by CAP2

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atul; Paeger, Lars; Kosmas, Kosmas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Noegel, Angelika A.; Peche, Vivek S.

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2gt/gt mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2gt/gt with increased number of excitatory synapses. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2gt/gt neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin Ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics. PMID:27507934

  18. Neuronal Actin Dynamics, Spine Density and Neuronal Dendritic Complexity Are Regulated by CAP2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Paeger, Lars; Kosmas, Kosmas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Noegel, Angelika A; Peche, Vivek S

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2(gt/gt) mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2(gt/gt) with increased number of excitatory synapses. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2(gt/gt) neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin Ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics. PMID:27507934

  19. Cold air incursions, δ18O variability, and monsoon dynamics associated with snow days at Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, John V.; Vuille, Mathias; Hardy, Douglas R.; Burns, Stephen J.; Thompson, Lonnie G.

    2015-08-01

    Quelccaya Ice Cap in the Andes of Peru contains an annually resolved δ18O record covering the past 1800 years; yet atmospheric dynamics associated with snow deposition and δ18O variability at this site are poorly understood. Here we make use of 10 years of snow pit and short core δ18O data and hourly snow-height measurements obtained by an automated weather station deployed at the ice cap's summit to analyze linkages between snowfall, δ18O, and the South American summer monsoon (SASM). Snow accumulation peaks in December and is negative May-September. Snow δ18O values decrease gradually through austral summer from about -17 to -24‰. Surface snow δ18O is altered after deposition during austral winter from about -24 to -15‰. More than 70% of the total snow accumulation is tied to convection along the leading edge of cold air incursions of midlatitude air advected equatorward from southern South America. Snowfall amplitude at Quelccaya Ice Cap varies systematically with regional precipitation, atmospheric dynamics, midtroposphere humidity, and water vapor δD. Strongest snowfall gains correspond with positive precipitation anomalies over the western Amazon Basin, increased humidity, and lowered water vapor δD values, consistent with the "amount effect." We discuss ventilation of the monsoon, modulated by midlatitude cold air advection, as potentially diagnostic of the relationship between SASM dynamics and Quelccaya snowfall. Results will serve as a basis for development of a comprehensive isotopic forward model to reconstruct past monsoon dynamics using the ice core δ18O record.

  20. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  1. Condensin II Subunit dCAP-D3 Restricts Retrotransposon Mobilization in Drosophila Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Andrew T.; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Murphy, Eain A.; Longworth, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Retrotransposon sequences are positioned throughout the genome of almost every eukaryote that has been sequenced. As mobilization of these elements can have detrimental effects on the transcriptional regulation and stability of an organism's genome, most organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress their movement. Here, we identify a novel role for the Drosophila melanogaster Condensin II subunit, dCAP-D3 in preventing the mobilization of retrotransposons located in somatic cell euchromatin. dCAP-D3 regulates transcription of euchromatic gene clusters which contain or are proximal to retrotransposon sequence. ChIP experiments demonstrate that dCAP-D3 binds to these loci and is important for maintaining a repressed chromatin structure within the boundaries of the retrotransposon and for repressing retrotransposon transcription. We show that dCAP-D3 prevents accumulation of double stranded DNA breaks within retrotransposon sequence, and decreased dCAP-D3 levels leads to a precise loss of retrotransposon sequence at some dCAP-D3 regulated gene clusters and a gain of sequence elsewhere in the genome. Homologous chromosomes exhibit high levels of pairing in Drosophila somatic cells, and our FISH analyses demonstrate that retrotransposon-containing euchromatic loci are regions which are actually less paired than euchromatic regions devoid of retrotransposon sequences. Decreased dCAP-D3 expression increases pairing of homologous retrotransposon-containing loci in tissue culture cells. We propose that the combined effects of dCAP-D3 deficiency on double strand break levels, chromatin structure, transcription and pairing at retrotransposon-containing loci may lead to 1) higher levels of homologous recombination between repeats flanking retrotransposons in dCAP-D3 deficient cells and 2) increased retrotransposition. These findings identify a novel role for the anti-pairing activities of dCAP-D3/Condensin II and uncover a new way in which dCAP-D3/Condensin II influences local

  2. Structural characterisation of alkyl amine-capped zinc sulphide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Gabriele; Rath, Thomas; Kunert, Birgit; Edler, Michael; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Resel, Roland; Letofsky-Papst, Ilse; Grogger, Werner; Trimmel, Gregor

    2012-03-01

    Nanoparticles capped with amine ligands with different steric properties, dodecylamine and oleylamine, respectively, are investigated in the solid state as well as in solution. A combined X-ray diffraction, small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy investigation showed that the nanoparticles exhibit the sphalerite modification of ZnS as crystal phase with a diameter of 3-5 nm. A close packing of the monocrystalline nanoparticles in the solid state is observed. However, in the dodecylamine sample, besides spherical particles, a fraction of the nanoparticles is elongated. The nanoparticles are readily resoluble in apolar solvents like hexane. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and SAXS investigations of the solutions reveal that the nanoparticles are dissolved as singular particles. In the case of oleylamine-capped ZnS, a defined core-shell structure with a ZnS core with a diameter of 4 nm and an organic shell with a thickness of approximately 2 nm have been found. Dodecylamine-capped nanoparticles slightly tend to form agglomerates with a diameter of approximately 40 nm. PMID:22239986

  3. Microscopic reversal behavior of magnetically capped nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, C. M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Hellwig, O.; Menzel, A.; Radu, F.; Makarov, D.; Albrecht, M.; Goncharov, A.; Schrefl, T.; Schlotter, W. F.; Rick, R.; Luening, J.

    2010-02-01

    The magnetic switching behavior of Co/Pd multilayer-capped nanospheres is investigated by x-ray spectro-holography. Images of the magnetic state of individual nanocaps are recorded as a function of externally applied magnetic field and the angle under which the field is applied, pertaining to magnetic data storage applications with patterned, tilted, and perpendicular storage media. Dispersed nanospheres with different coverage in the submonolayer regime are investigated simultaneously in a multiplexed experiment. In clustered nanosphere arrangements, we find that individual switching events are influenced by dipolar magnetostatic interactions. Micromagnetic simulations of the switching behavior complement the experimental observations, corroborating the influence of thermal activation processes and magnetostatic interactions in this system. Such magnetostatic interactions could lead to undesired cross-talk between bits in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording applications.

  4. Benzonorbornadiene end caps for PMR resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panigot, Michael J.; Waters, John F.; Varde, Uday; Sutter, James K.; Sukenik, Chaim N.

    1992-01-01

    Several ortho-disubstituted benzonorbornadiene derivatives are described. These molecules contain acid, ester, or anhydride functionality permitting their use as end caps in PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide systems. The replacement of the currently used norbornenyl end caps with benzonorbornadienyl end caps affords resins of increased aromatic content. It also allows evaluation of some mechanistic aspects of PMR cross-linking. Initial testing of N-phenylimide model compounds and of actual resin formulations using the benzonorbornadienyl end cap reveals that they undergo efficient thermal crosslinking to give oligomers with physical properties and thermal stability comparable to commercial norbornene-end-capped PMR systems.

  5. Dithiocarbamates as capping ligands for water-soluble quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjie; Schnoes, Allison M; Clapp, Aaron R

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the suitability of dithiocarbamate (DTC) species as capping ligands for colloidal CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs). DTC ligands are generated by reacting carbon disulfide (CS(2)) with primary or secondary amines on appropriate precursor molecules. A biphasic exchange procedure efficiently replaces the existing hydrophobic capping ligands on the QD surface with the newly formed DTCs. The reaction conversion is conveniently monitored by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Due to their inherent water solubility and variety of side chain functional groups, we used several amino acids as precursors in this reaction/exchange procedure. The performance of DTC-ligands, as evaluated by the preservation of luminescence and colloidal stability, varied widely among amino precursors. For the best DTC-ligand and QD combinations, the quantum yield of the water-soluble QDs rivaled that of the original hydrophobic-capped QDs dispersed in organic solvents. The mean density of DTC-ligands per nanocrystal was estimated through a mass balance calculation which suggested nearly complete coverage of the available nanocrystal surface. The accessibility of the QD surface was evaluated by self-assembly of His-tagged dye-labeled proteins and peptides using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. DTC-capped QDs were also exposed to cell cultures to evaluate their stability and potential use for biological applications. In general, DTC-capped CdSe-ZnS QDs have many advantages over other water-soluble QD formulations and provide a flexible chemistry for controlling the QD surface functionalization. Despite previous literature reports of DTC-stabilized nanocrystals, this study is the first formal investigation of a biphasic exchange method for generating biocompatible core-shell QDs. PMID:21053924

  6. EEG electrode caps can reduce SAR induced in the head by GSM900 mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Denise L; Anderson, Vitas; McIntosh, Robert L; McKenzie, Ray J; Wood, Andrew W; Iskra, Steve; Croft, Rodney J

    2007-05-01

    This paper investigates the influence of EEG electrode caps on specific absorption rate (SAR) in the head from a GSM900 mobile phone (217-Hz modulation, peak power output 2 W). SAR measurements were recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom using a precision robotic system. Peak 10 g average SAR in the whole head and in just the temporal region was compared for three phantom arrangements; no cap, 64-electrode "Electro-Cap," and 64-electrode "Quick-Cap". Relative to the "no cap" arrangement, the Electro-Cap and Quick-Cap caused a peak SAR (10 g) reduction of 14% and 18% respectively in both the whole head and in the temporal region. Additional computational modeling confirmed that SAR (10 g) is reduced by the presence of electrode leads and that the extent of the effect varies according to the orientation of the leads with respect to the radiofrequency (RF) source. The modeling also indicated that the nonconductive shell between the electrodes and simulated head material does not significantly alter the electrode lead shielding effect. The observed SAR reductions are not likely to be sufficiently large to have accounted for null EEG findings in the past but should nonetheless be noted in studies aiming to measure and report human brain activity under similar exposure conditions. PMID:17518289

  7. Where Will LEAD Lead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    After setting forth eight assumptions concerning the education of educational administrators, findings about the Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD) program are discussed. The analysis is based on the first-year applications, telephone conversations with staff at a majority of the project sites, and additional material…

  8. Crystal chemistry of layered structures formed by linear rigid silyl-capped molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lumpi, Daniel; Kautny, Paul; Stöger, Berthold; Fröhlich, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of methylthio- or methylsulfonyl-containing spacer extended Z,Z-bis-ene–yne molecules capped with trimethylsilyl groups obtained by (tandem) thiophene ring fragmentation and of two non-spacer extended analogs were investigated. The rigid and linear molecules generally crystallized in layers whereby the flexibility of the layer interfaces formed by the silyl groups leads to a remarkably rich crystal chemistry. The molecules with benzene and thiophene spacers both crystallized with C2/c symmetry and can be considered as merotypes. Increasing the steric bulk of the core by introduction of ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) gave a structure incommensurately modulated in the [010] direction. Further increase of steric demand in the case of a dimethoxythiophene restored periodicity along [010] but resulted in a doubling of the c vector. Two different polytypes were observed, which feature geometrically different layer interfaces (non-OD, order–disorder, polytypes), one with a high stacking fault probability. Oxidation of the methylthio groups of the benzene-based molecule to methylsulfonyl groups led to three polymorphs (two temperature-dependent), which were analyzed by Hirshfeld surface d e/d i fingerprint plots. The analogously oxidized EDOT-based molecule crystallized as systematic twins owing to its OD polytypism. Shortening of the backbone by removal of the aryl core resulted in an enantiomorphic structure and a further shortening by removal of a methylthio-ene fragment again in a systematically twinned OD polytype. PMID:26306200

  9. Relationship between cap structure and energy gap in capped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shota; Tanikawa, Kousei; Kuwahara, Riichi; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-07-01

    Revealing a universal relation between geometrical structures and electronic properties of capped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is one of the current objectives in nanocarbon community. Here, we investigate the local curvature of capped CNTs and define the cap region by a crossover behavior of the curvature energy versus the number of carbon atoms integrated from the tip to the tube region. Clear correlations among the energy gap of the cap localized states, the curvature energy, the number of carbon atoms in the cap region, and the number of specific carbon clusters are observed. The present analysis opens the way to understand the cap states.

  10. Relationship between cap structure and energy gap in capped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shota; Tanikawa, Kousei; Kuwahara, Riichi; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-07-14

    Revealing a universal relation between geometrical structures and electronic properties of capped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is one of the current objectives in nanocarbon community. Here, we investigate the local curvature of capped CNTs and define the cap region by a crossover behavior of the curvature energy versus the number of carbon atoms integrated from the tip to the tube region. Clear correlations among the energy gap of the cap localized states, the curvature energy, the number of carbon atoms in the cap region, and the number of specific carbon clusters are observed. The present analysis opens the way to understand the cap states. PMID:27421422

  11. Holocene history of North Ice Cap, northwestern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, L. B.; Kelly, M. A.; Osterberg, E. C.; Axford, Y.; Bigl, M.; Roy, E. P.; Thompson, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    Although much research has focused on the past extents of the Greenland Ice Sheet, less is known about the smaller ice caps on Greenland and how they have evolved over time. These small ice caps respond sensitively to summer temperatures and, to a lesser extent, winter precipitation, and provide valuable information about climatic conditions along the Greenland Ice Sheet margins. Here, we investigate the Holocene history of North Ice Cap (76°55'N 68°00'W), located in the Nunatarssuaq region near Thule, northwest Greenland. Our results are based on glacial geomorphic mapping, 10Be dating, and analyses of sediment cores from a glacially fed lake. Fresh, unweathered and unvegetated boulders comprise moraines and drift that mark an extent of North Ice Cap ~25 m outboard of the present ice margin. It is likely that these deposits were formed during late Holocene time and we are currently employing 10Be surface exposure dating to examine this hypothesis. Just outboard of the fresh moraines and drift, boulders and bedrock show significant weathering and are covered with lichen. Based on glacial geomorphic mapping and detailed site investigations, including stone counts, we suggest that the weathered boulders and bedrock were once covered by erosive Greenland Ice Sheet flow from southeast to northwest over the Nunatarssuaq region. Five 10Be ages from the more weathered landscape only 100-200 m outboard of the modern North Ice Cap margin are 52 and 53 ka (bedrock) and 16, 23, and 31 ka (boulders). These ages indicate that recent ice cover has likely been cold-based and non-erosive, failing to remove inherited cosmogenic nuclides from previous periods of exposure, although the youngest boulder may provide a maximum limiting deglaciation age. Sediment cores collected from Delta Sø, a glacially-fed lake ~1.5 km outside of the modern North Ice Cap margin, contain 130 cm of finely laminated sediments overlying coarse sands and glacial till. Radiocarbon ages from just above

  12. Seismic explosion sources on an ice cap - Technical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Thybo, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Controlled source seismic investigation of crustal structure below ice covers is an emerging technique. We have recently conducted an explosive refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic experiment on the ice cap in east-central Greenland. The data-quality is high for all shot points and a full crustal model can be modelled. A crucial challenge for applying the technique is to control the sources. Here, we present data that describe the efficiency of explosive sources in the ice cover. Analysis of the data shows, that the ice cap traps a significant amount of energy, which is observed as a strong ice wave. The ice cap leads to low transmission of energy into the crust such that charges need be larger than in conventional onshore experiments to obtain reliable seismic signals. The strong reflection coefficient at the base of the ice generates strong multiples which may mask for secondary phases. This effect may be crucial for acquisition of reflection seismic profiles on ice caps. Our experience shows that it is essential to use optimum depth for the charges and to seal the boreholes carefully.

  13. Damages Caps in Medical Malpractice Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Leonard J; Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the empirical literature on the effects of damages caps and concludes that the better-designed studies show that damages caps reduce liability insurance premiums. The effects of damages caps on defensive medicine, physicians’ location decisions, and the cost of health care to consumers are less clear. The only study of whether consumers benefit from lower health insurance premiums as a result of damages caps found no impact. Some state courts have based decisions declaring damages caps legislation unconstitutional on the lack of evidence of their effectiveness, thereby ignoring the findings of conflicting research studies or discounting their relevance. Although courts should be cautious in rejecting empirical evidence that caps are effective, legislators should consider whether they benefit consumers enough to justify limiting tort recoveries for those most seriously injured by malpractice. PMID:17517115

  14. Periodicities of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Aoki, T.

    2013-01-01

    A highly sensitive all-sky electron multiplier charge-coupled device airglow imager has been operative in Longyearbyen, Norway since October 2011. The imager captures 630.0 nm all-sky images with an exposure time of 4 s, which is about 10 times shorter than that achieved by conventional cooled CCD imagers. This allows us to visualize the structure of polar cap patches without blurring effects and better estimate their periodicities. We present, as one of the first results from the imager, an event of successive appearance of patches on the night of 21 December 2011. A time series of the optical intensity at zenith showed modulations having two distinguished periods, one at 40 min and the other at 5-12 min. One possible explanation is that such a coexistence of two different periodicities is a manifestation of simultaneous occurrence of patch generation processes on the 40 min periodicity was created by large-scale reconfiguration of the dayside convection pattern while the 5-12 min modulations were closely associated with mechanisms driven by pulsed reconnection on the dayside magnetopause. Such a combined effect of multiple patch generation processes may play a role in structuring patches; thus, it would be of particular importance for evaluating the space weather effects in the trans-ionospheric communications environment in the polar cap.

  15. Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ananichheva, Maria; Arendt, Anthony; Hagen, Jon-Ove; Hock, Regine; Josberger, Edward G.; Moore, R. Dan; Pfeffer, William Tad; Wolken, Gabriel J.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of future rates of mass loss from mountain glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic focus primarily on projections of changes in the surface mass balance. Current models are not yet capable of making realistic forecasts of changes in losses by calving. Surface mass balance models are forced with downscaled output from climate models driven by forcing scenarios that make assumptions about the future rate of growth of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Thus, mass loss projections vary considerably, depending on the forcing scenario used and the climate model from which climate projections are derived. A new study in which a surface mass balance model is driven by output from ten general circulation models (GCMs) forced by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) A1B emissions scenario yields estimates of total mass loss of between 51 and 136 mm sea-level equivalent (SLE) (or 13% to 36% of current glacier volume) by 2100. This implies that there will still be substantial glacier mass in the Arctic in 2100 and that Arctic mountain glaciers and ice caps will continue to influence global sea-level change well into the 22nd century.

  16. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-27

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  17. LEAD IN CANDLE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The candle-using public should be made aware that the core of candle wicks may contain lead. Used as a stiffening agent to keep the wick out of the molten wax, lead can be emitted as particulate to the air and then deposited on indoor surfaces. To define the problem, 100 sets of ...

  18. Ocular injuries from flying bottle caps.

    PubMed

    Fonseka, C

    1993-12-01

    Three cases of serious eye injury are described from flying metal caps of carbonated drink bottles. The injuries occurred while attempting to open the bottle in an unconventional and dangerous way. Though injuries from flying bottle caps have been described before, they have occurred when the bottle exploded. This is the first report of eye injuries caused by bottle caps while opening and are similar to the injuries caused by champagne corks. PMID:8143337

  19. Improving CAP-TSD steady pressure solutions through airfoil slope modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitterer, Kent F.; Maughmer, Mark D.; Silva, Walter A.; Batina, John T.

    1996-01-01

    A modification of airfoil section geometry is examined for improvement of the leading edge pressures predicted by the Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD). Results are compared with Eppler solutions to assess improvement. Preliminary results indicate that a fading function modification of section slopes is capable of significant improvements in the pressures near the leading edge computed by CAP-TSD. Application of this modification to airfoil geometry before use in CAP-TSD is shown to reduce the nonphysical pressure peak predicted by the transonic small disturbance solver. A second advantage of the slope modification is the substantial reduction in sensitivity of CAP-TSD steady pressure solutions to the computational mesh.

  20. Structural characterisation of alkyl amine-capped zinc sulphide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kremser, Gabriele; Rath, Thomas; Kunert, Birgit; Edler, Michael; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Resel, Roland; Letofsky-Papst, Ilse; Grogger, Werner; Trimmel, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles capped with amine ligands with different steric properties, dodecylamine and oleylamine, respectively, are investigated in the solid state as well as in solution. A combined X-ray diffraction, small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy investigation showed that the nanoparticles exhibit the sphalerite modification of ZnS as crystal phase with a diameter of 3–5 nm. A close packing of the monocrystalline nanoparticles in the solid state is observed. However, in the dodecylamine sample, besides spherical particles, a fraction of the nanoparticles is elongated. The nanoparticles are readily resoluble in apolar solvents like hexane. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and SAXS investigations of the solutions reveal that the nanoparticles are dissolved as singular particles. In the case of oleylamine-capped ZnS, a defined core–shell structure with a ZnS core with a diameter of 4 nm and an organic shell with a thickness of approximately 2 nm have been found. Dodecylamine-capped nanoparticles slightly tend to form agglomerates with a diameter of approximately 40 nm. PMID:22239986

  1. Structure-activity relationships for in vitro diuretic activity of CAP2b in the housefly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of truncated and Ala-replacement analogs of the peptide Manse-CAP2b (pELYAFPRV-NH2) were assayed for diuretic activity on Malpighian tubules of the housefly Musca domestica. The C-terminal hexapeptide proved to be the active core, the minimum sequence required to retain significant diureti...

  2. Capping and methylation of mRNA by purified recombinant VP4 protein of bluetongue virus

    PubMed Central

    Ramadevi, N.; Burroughs, Nicholas J.; Mertens, Peter P. C.; Jones, Ian M.; Roy, Polly

    1998-01-01

    The core of bluetongue virus (BTV) is a multienzyme complex composed of two major proteins (VP7 and VP3) and three minor proteins (VP1, VP4, and VP6) in addition to the viral genome. The core is transcriptionally active and produces capped mRNA from which all BTV proteins are translated, but the relative role of each core component in the overall reaction process remains unclear. Previously we showed that the 76-kDa VP4 protein possesses guanylyltransferase activity, a necessary part of the RNA capping reaction. Here, through the use of highly purified (>95%) VP4 and synthetic core-like particles containing VP4, we have investigated the extent to which this protein is also responsible for other activities associated with cap formation. We show that VP4 catalyzes the conversion of unmethylated GpppG or in vitro-produced uncapped BTV RNA transcripts to m7GpppGm in the presence of S-adenosyl-l-methionine. Analysis of the methylated products of the reaction by HPLC identified both methyltransferase type 1 and type 2 activities associated with VP4, demonstrating that the complete BTV capping reaction is associated with this one protein. PMID:9811835

  3. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  4. The cervical cap: a barrier contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Hastings-Tolsma, M T

    1982-01-01

    The cervical cap may eventually prove to be a safe, satisfactory, noninvasive, and nonhormonal contraceptive alternative for women in the US. The cap is currently approved for investigational use only, and is available from a limited number of providers. The Prentif cavity rim cap is the most commonly used and is available in 4 sizes. The soft rubber device is thimble shaped, approximately 1 1/4 inches long, with a narrow groove along the inner surface that creates a suction seal when fitted over the cervix. The inability to match cap and cervical circumferences precisely is a recognized drawback. Theoretically, the cap alone should prevent sperm entry into the uterus, however, the use of a spermicide placed in the dome before insertion is recommended. The cap's effectiveness is not yet documented. Estimates from a 1953 study of 143 users were 92.4/100 women years of use for use effectiveness, and the theoretical effectiveness is believed to be more than 98%. Failures with the cap may result from a variety of reasons, particularly dislodgement. The advantage of the cap over other barrier methods is that it can be inserted any time prior to intercourse and left in place longer. The ideal safety period for placement has not been validated, but a range of 1-7 days has been recommended. The length of time the spermicide remains effective and the cervical effects of prolonged contact are of prime concern. The cap may be used by some women who cannot be properly fitted for a diaphragm due to vaginal or uterine anomalies. Sexual arousal and orgasmic response are reported by some cap users to be more pleasurable with the cap than with the diaphragm. Reported problems with use include discomfort during intercourse and improper fit during some days of the menstrual cycle. Contraindications for use include cervical inconsistencies, infection, allergy to the spermicide or the rubber, and inability to learn proper insertion and removal techniques. Insertion and removal may be

  5. The Martian polar caps: Stability and water transport at low obliquities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, B. G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1992-12-01

    The seasonal cycle of water on Mars is regulated by the two polar caps. In the winter hemisphere, the seasonal CO2 deposits at a temperature near 150 K acts as a cold trap to remove water vapor from the atmosphere. When summer returns, water is pumped back into the atmosphere by a number of mechanisms, including release from the receding CO2 frost, diffusion from the polar regolith, and sublimation from a water-ice residual cap. These processes drive an exchange of water vapor between the polar caps that helps shape the Martian climate. Thus, understanding the behavior of the polar caps is important for interpreting the Martian climate both now and at other epochs. Mars' obliquity undergoes large variations over large time scales. As the obliquity decreases, the poles receive less solar energy so that more CO2 condenses from the atmosphere onto the poles. It has been suggested that permanent CO2 condenses from the atmosphere onto the poles. It has been suggested that permanent CO2 caps might form at the poles in response to a feedback mechanism existing between the polar cap albedo, the CO2 pressure, and the dust storm frequency. The year-round presence of the CO2 deposits would effectively dry out the atmosphere, while diffusion of water from the regolith would be the only source of water vapor to the atmosphere. We have reviewed the CO2 balance at low obliquity taking into account the asymmetries which make the north and south hemispheres different. Our analysis linked with a numerical model of the polar caps leads us to believe that one summertime cap will always lose its CO2 cover during a Martian year, although we cannot predict which cap this will be. We conclude that significant amounts of water vapor will sublime from the exposed cap during summer, and the Martian atmosphere will support an active water cycle even at low obliquity.

  6. Numerical Modeling of the Last Glacial Maximum Yellowstone Ice Cap Captures Asymmetry in Moraine Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. S.; Wickert, A. D.; Colgan, W. T.; Anderson, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    thickness of 4 km (McQuarrie and Rogers, 1998)). Furthermore, subsidence in the foredeep formed by the weight of the Yellowstone Ice Cap may be responsible for the deep alluviation (30+ m) of the Yellowstone valley and Jackson Hole, with subsequent ice retreat and glacial isostatic adjustment leading to exhumation and incision of these fill packages.

  7. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  8. Unbonded capping for concrete masonry units

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, L.K.; Knight, M.L.; Henderson, R.C.; Sneed, W.A. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Due to the manufacturing process, the bearing surfaces of concrete masonry units are often somewhat rough and uneven. Therefore, concrete masonry units must be capped when tested in compression according to ASTM C 140-96, Standard Test Methods of Sampling and Testing Concrete Masonry Units. Capping of concrete masonry units is time consuming and expensive. Several studies of compression tests on concrete cylinders indicate that use of elastic pads in rigid retaining caps give similar compressive strength results to approved capping methods.An unbonded capping system for concrete masonry units similar to that described in ASTM C 1231-93, Standard Practice for Use of Unbonded Caps in Determination of Compressive Strength of Hardened Concrete Cylinders, was developed. The average compressive strength results obtained when using the unbonded capping system ranged from 92--94% of the average compressive strength results obtained when using ASTM C 140-96 approved methods. Further, use of the unbonded capping system was found to increase productivity and substantially reduce testing cost.

  9. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  10. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  11. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  12. 31 CFR 50.15 - Cap disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cap disclosure. 50.15 Section 50.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.15 Cap disclosure. (a) General. Under section 103(e)(2)...

  13. Seasonal Changes in Mars' North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    , noted previously by HST in 1995 and Mariner 9 in 1972; this may be due to topography, which isn't well known, or to wave structure in the circulation. This map was assembled from WFPC2 images obtained between Dec. 30, 1996 and Jan. 4, 1997.

    March 30, 1997 (early summer): The cap has fully retreated to its remnant core of water-ice. This residual cap is actually almost cut into two by a large, horn-shaped canyon called Chasma Borealis which is cut deeply into the polar terrain. The HST images also reveal a curious layered terrain which is evidence of past climatic changes on Mars. The sublimation of all of the carbon dioxide has exposed the ring of dark sand dunes which encircle the North Polar Cap. Outliers of ice persist south of the polar sand sea (between the 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock positions). The bright circular features at 3, 6, and 9 o'clock are ice-filled craters.

    All images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color is constructed from images taken in red (673 nm) , blue (410 nm) and green (502 nm) light. The resolution at the North Pole ranges from about 115 km/pixel in October '96 to about 45 km/pixel in March '97.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  14. The small ice cap instability in diffusive climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    Simple climate models which invoke diffusive heat transport and ice cap albedo feedback have equilibrium solutions with no stable ice cap smaller than a radius of about 20 deg on a great circle. Attention is presently given to a solution of this phenomenon which is physically appealing. The ice-free solution has a thermal minimum, and if the minimum temperature is just above the critical value for ice formation, then the artificial addition of a patch of ice leads to a widespread depression of the temperature below the critical freezing temperature. A second stable solution will then exist whose spatial extent is determined by the range of the influence function of a point sink of heat, due to the albedo shift in the patch.

  15. Capping of rare earth silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelfeller, Stephan; Franz, Martin; Kubicki, Milan; Reiß, Paul; Niermann, Tore; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Lehmann, Michael; Dähne, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The capping of Tb and Dy silicide nanowires grown on Si(001) was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Several nanometers thick amorphous Si films deposited at room temperature allow an even capping, while the nanowires maintain their original structural properties. Subsequent recrystallization by thermal annealing leads to more compact nanowire structures and to troughs in the Si layer above the nanowires, which may even reach down to the nanowires in the case of thin Si films, as well as to V-shaped stacking faults forming along {111} lattice planes. This behavior is related to strain due to the lattice mismatch between the Si overlayer and the nanowires.

  16. Myc and mRNA capping.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sianadh; Cowling, Victoria H

    2015-05-01

    c-Myc is upregulated in response to growth factors and transmits the signal to proliferate by altering the gene expression landscape. When genetic alterations result in growth factor-independent c-Myc expression, it can become an oncogene. The majority of human tumour types exhibit a degree of c-Myc deregulation, resulting in unrestrained cell proliferation. c-Myc binds proximal to the promoter region of genes and recruits co-factors including histone acetyltransferases and RNA pol II kinases, which promote transcription. c-Myc also promotes formation of the cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA. The cap is 7-methylguanosine linked to the first transcribed nucleotide of RNA pol II transcripts via a 5' to 5' triphosphate bridge. The cap is added to the first transcribed nucleotide by the capping enzymes, RNGTT and RNMT-RAM. During the early stages of transcription, the capping enzymes are recruited to RNA pol II phosphorylated on Serine-5 of the C-terminal domain. The mRNA cap protects transcripts from degradation during transcription and recruits factors which promote RNA processing including, splicing, export and translation initiation. The proportion of transcripts with a cap structure is increased by elevating c-Myc expression, resulting in increased rates of translation. c-Myc promotes capping by promoting RNA pol II phosphorylation and by upregulating the enzyme SAHH which neutralises the inhibitory bi-product of methylation reactions, SAH. c-Myc-induced capping is required for c-Myc-dependent gene expression and cell proliferation. Targeting capping may represent a new therapeutic opportunity to inhibit c-Myc function in tumours. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Myc proteins in cell biology and pathology. PMID:24681440

  17. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU Lead Poisoning Kids Homepage Topics Pollution Lead Poisoning What is ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was used ...

  18. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine lead sources, educating family members about lead poisoning , and instituting follow-up testing to monitor the ... high levels of lead, see the article on Lead Poisoning . The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has ...

  19. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead Poisoning What is it and who is affected? Lead is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which ... and children can suffer from the effects of lead poisoning, but childhood lead poisoning is much more frequent. ...

  20. Origin of interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shouzhong; Wang, Mengxing; Yang, Hongxin; Zeng, Lang; Nan, Jiang; Zhou, Jiaqi; Zhang, Youguang; Hallal, Ali; Chshiev, Mairbek; Wang, Kang L; Zhang, Qianfan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-01-01

    Spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) attracts extensive attentions due to its non-volatility, high density and low power consumption. The core device in STT-MRAM is CoFeB/MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which possesses a high tunnel magnetoresistance ratio as well as a large value of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). It has been experimentally proven that a capping layer coating on CoFeB layer is essential to obtain a strong PMA. However, the physical mechanism of such effect remains unclear. In this paper, we investigate the origin of the PMA in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures by using a first-principles computation scheme. The trend of PMA variation with different capping materials agrees well with experimental results. We find that interfacial PMA in the three-layer structures comes from both the MgO/CoFe and CoFe/capping layer interfaces, which can be analyzed separately. Furthermore, the PMAs in the CoFe/capping layer interfaces are analyzed through resolving the magnetic anisotropy energy by layer and orbital. The variation of PMA with different capping materials is attributed to the different hybridizations of both d and p orbitals via spin-orbit coupling. This work can significantly benefit the research and development of nanoscale STT-MRAM. PMID:26656721

  1. Origin of interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shouzhong; Wang, Mengxing; Yang, Hongxin; Zeng, Lang; Nan, Jiang; Zhou, Jiaqi; Zhang, Youguang; Hallal, Ali; Chshiev, Mairbek; Wang, Kang L.; Zhang, Qianfan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-01-01

    Spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) attracts extensive attentions due to its non-volatility, high density and low power consumption. The core device in STT-MRAM is CoFeB/MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which possesses a high tunnel magnetoresistance ratio as well as a large value of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). It has been experimentally proven that a capping layer coating on CoFeB layer is essential to obtain a strong PMA. However, the physical mechanism of such effect remains unclear. In this paper, we investigate the origin of the PMA in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures by using a first-principles computation scheme. The trend of PMA variation with different capping materials agrees well with experimental results. We find that interfacial PMA in the three-layer structures comes from both the MgO/CoFe and CoFe/capping layer interfaces, which can be analyzed separately. Furthermore, the PMAs in the CoFe/capping layer interfaces are analyzed through resolving the magnetic anisotropy energy by layer and orbital. The variation of PMA with different capping materials is attributed to the different hybridizations of both d and p orbitals via spin-orbit coupling. This work can significantly benefit the research and development of nanoscale STT-MRAM. PMID:26656721

  2. Mars Seasonal Polar Caps as a Test of the Equivalence Principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, Daivd Parry

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal polar caps of Mars can be used to test the equivalence principle in general relativity. The north and south caps, which are composed of carbon dioxide, wax and wane with the seasons. If the ratio of the inertial to gravitational masses of the caps differs from the same ratio for the rest of Mars, then the equivalence principle fails, Newton's third law fails, and the caps will pull Mars one way and then the other with a force aligned with the planet's spin axis. This leads to a secular change in Mars's along-track position in its orbit about the Sun, and to a secular change in the orbit's semimajor axis. The caps are a poor E6tv6s test of the equivalence principle, being 4 orders-of-magnitude weaker than laboratory tests and 7 orders-of-magnitude weaker than that found by lunar laser ranging; the reason is the small mass of the caps compared to Mars as a whole. The principal virtue of using Mars is that the caps contain carbon, an element not normally considered in such experiments. The Earth with its seasonal snow cover can also be used for a similar test.

  3. Mars seasonal polar caps as a test of the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2011-08-01

    The seasonal polar caps of Mars can be used to test the equivalence principle in general relativity. The north and south caps, which are composed of carbon dioxide, wax and wane with the seasons. If the ratio of the inertial (passive) to gravitational (active) masses of the caps differs from the same ratio for the rest of Mars, then the equivalence principle fails, Newton’s third law fails, and the caps will pull Mars one way and then the other with a force aligned with the planet’s spin axis. This leads to a secular change in Mars’s along-track position in its orbit about the Sun, and to a secular change in the orbit’s semimajor axis. The caps are a poor Eötvös test of the equivalence principle, being 4 orders-of-magnitude weaker than laboratory tests and 7 orders-of-magnitude weaker than that found by lunar laser ranging; the reason is the small mass of the caps compared to Mars as a whole. The principal virtue of using Mars is that the caps contain carbon, an element not normally considered in such experiments. The Earth with its seasonal snow cover can also be used for a similar test.

  4. Innovation under cap-and-trade programs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Margaret R

    2012-03-27

    Policies incentivizing the private sector to reach its innovative potential in "clean" technologies are likely to play a key role in achieving climate stabilization. This article explores the relationship between innovation and cap-and-trade programs (CTPs)--the world's most prominent climate policy instrument--through empirical evidence drawn from successful CTPs for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide control. The article shows that before trading began for these CTPs, analysts overestimated the value of allowances in a pattern suggestive of the frequent a priori overestimation of the compliance costs of regulation. When lower-than-expected allowance prices were observed, in part because of the unexpected range of abatement approaches used in the lead-up to trading, emissions sources chose to bank allowances in significant numbers and reassess abatement approaches going forward. In addition, commercially oriented inventive activity declined for emissions-reducing technologies with a wide range of costs and technical characteristics, dropping from peaks before the establishment of CTPs to nadirs a few years into trading. This finding is consistent with innovators deciding during trading that their research and development investments should be reduced, based on assessments of future market conditions under the relevant CTPs. The article concludes with a discussion of the results and their implications for innovation and climate policy. PMID:22411797

  5. Innovation under cap-and-trade programs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Margaret R.

    2012-01-01

    Policies incentivizing the private sector to reach its innovative potential in “clean” technologies are likely to play a key role in achieving climate stabilization. This article explores the relationship between innovation and cap-and-trade programs (CTPs)—the world's most prominent climate policy instrument—through empirical evidence drawn from successful CTPs for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide control. The article shows that before trading began for these CTPs, analysts overestimated the value of allowances in a pattern suggestive of the frequent a priori overestimation of the compliance costs of regulation. When lower-than-expected allowance prices were observed, in part because of the unexpected range of abatement approaches used in the lead-up to trading, emissions sources chose to bank allowances in significant numbers and reassess abatement approaches going forward. In addition, commercially oriented inventive activity declined for emissions-reducing technologies with a wide range of costs and technical characteristics, dropping from peaks before the establishment of CTPs to nadirs a few years into trading. This finding is consistent with innovators deciding during trading that their research and development investments should be reduced, based on assessments of future market conditions under the relevant CTPs. The article concludes with a discussion of the results and their implications for innovation and climate policy. PMID:22411797

  6. The role of rotation and polar-cap currents on pulsar radio emission and polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, D.; Gangadhara, R. T. E-mail: ganga@iiap.res.in

    2013-06-01

    Perturbations such as rotation and polar-cap current (PC-current) have been believed to greatly affect the pulsar radio emission and polarization. The two effects have not been considered simultaneously in the literature; each one of these has been considered separately, and a picture has been deduced by simply superposing them, but such an approach can lead to spurious results. Hence, by considering pulsar rotation and PC-current perturbations together instead of one at a time, we have developed a single particle curvature radiation model, which is expected to be much more realistic. By simulating a set of typical pulse profiles, we have made an attempt to explain most of the observational results of pulsar radio emission and polarization. The model predicts that due to the perturbations the leading side component can become either stronger or weaker than the corresponding trailing one in any given cone, depending on the passage of the sight line and modulation (nonuniform source distribution). Further, we find that the phase delay of the polarization angle inflection point with respect to the core component greatly depends on the viewing geometry. The correlation between the sign reversal of circular polarization and the polarization angle swing in the case of core-dominated pulsars becomes obscure once the perturbations and modulation become significant. However, the correlation between the negative circular polarization and the increasing polarization angle and vice versa is very clear in the case of conal-double pulsars. The 'kinky'-type distortions in polarization angle swing could be due to the incoherent superposition of modulated emission in the presence of strong perturbations.

  7. Pediatric burns with snap-cap fireworks.

    PubMed

    Karamanoukian, Raffy L; Kilani, Marwa; Lozano, Daniel; Sundine, Michael; Karamanoukian, Hratch L; Delarosa, Jacob; Behnam, Shahdad; Evans, Gregory R D

    2006-01-01

    Snap-caps are marketed as a relatively safe pyrotechnic (explosive) device for children 8 years and older. Individually, the snap-caps pose very little threat because the amount of explosive compounds contained in each is limited to 1 mg. However, the accidental explosion of numerous snap-caps may cause significant burns. This study highlights a series of pediatric patients who presented with severe second- and third-degree burns as a result of accidental explosion of snap-caps. Seven patients with snap-caps-related injuries were treated at the University of California, San Diego Regional Burn Center from January 1996 to April 1999. Study foci included 1) mode and extent of injury, 2) management, 3) associated morbidity, and 4) functional outcome. Six patients (84%) required hospital admission. Four patients (57%) underwent split-thickness skin grafting to repair mean TBSA burns of 4.1% (range, 2-8%). Three patients (43%) received aggressive management of burns with topical medications and dressing changes. The nature and extent of snap-cap injuries support the contention that snap-caps have the potential to harm children to whom they are marketed. PMID:16566570

  8. Physical verification of contaminated sediment remediation: Capping, confined aquatic disposal, and enhanced natural recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, D.

    1995-12-31

    Dredging and disposal in a confined aquatic disposal (CAD) site, capping with clean sediment, and natural recovery are commonly used, cost-effective remedial practices for contaminated sediments. Recent projects in Puget Sound, Washington and Southern California involved dredging and use of the material for capping and CAD fill. Both of these projects required physical monitoring to document sediment placement. Dredged sediments placed at these sites were optically identified using sediment vertical profile system (SVPS) photography. Optical criteria to distinguish cap/construction materials include grain-size, reflectance, and texture. Environmental parameters such as the extent and thickness of the CAD material or sediment cap deposits are evaluated against design and performance goals, typically the isolation of contaminants from the biologically active portion of the sediment column. Using SVPS, coring and other technologies, the stratigraphic contact between the capping/CAD sediment and the native sediment can be discerned. These measurements observations can ground-truth and be coupled with remote sensing to provide a more complete characterization of the entire remedial area. Physical isolation of the benthic community can be discerned by examining SVPS images for depth of bioturbation and sediment stratigraphy. On the periphery of cap/CAD deposits, thin layers of clean sediment ranging upwards from 1 mm thick can be identified. Dependent on the pre-remediation benthic community at the site, these thin layers of CAP/CAD sediment can be bioturbated by resident benthic infauna immediately after placement. The deposition and subsequent assimilation of the clean cap material into the contaminated sediments effectively reduces the concentration of contaminants in the biologically active zone thereby enhancing natural recovery in areas where regulatory criteria are focused on the biologically active zone.

  9. Evidence for episodic basin dewatering in salt-dome cap rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hallager, W.S. ); Ulrich, M.R. ); Kyle, J.R.; Gose, W.A. ); Price, P.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A detailed record of episodic basin-dewatering events is preserved in the anhydrite cap rocks to two Gulf Coast salt domes. Metal rich brines were intermittently expelled geopressured zones deep in the stratigraphic section and were channeled upward along escape structures bounding the salt diapirs. Overhanging anhydrite cap rock helped to focus some escaping fluid into the zone of dissolution between the top of salt and overlying residual anhydrite cap rock. Iron, lead, and zinc sulfide solubilities were exceeded in this zone, possibly in response to dissolution and reduction of cap-rock sulfates. Because the metalliferous brines entered the dissolution zone intermittently, they were recorded as relatively thin horizontal bands of sulfide sandwiched between thicker accumulations of anhydrite. Continued dissolution of salt and underplating of residual anhydrite caused the sulfide bands to be displaced upward relative to the base of the cap, leading to an inverted stratigraphic record of basin-dewatering events. Paleomagnetic data from the Winnfield salt dome suggest the sulfide-producing basin-dewatering events and anhydrite cap-rock accumulation occurred between 157 and 145 Ma.

  10. The pharmaceutical vial capping process: Container closure systems, capping equipment, regulatory framework, and seal quality tests.

    PubMed

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Buettiker, Jean-Pierre; Roehl, Holger; Lam, Philippe; Brown, Helen; Luemkemann, Joerg; Adler, Michael; Huwyler, Joerg; Streubel, Alexander; Mohl, Silke

    2016-02-01

    Parenteral drug products are protected by appropriate primary packaging to protect against environmental factors, including potential microbial contamination during shelf life duration. The most commonly used CCS configuration for parenteral drug products is the glass vial, sealed with a rubber stopper and an aluminum crimp cap. In combination with an adequately designed and controlled aseptic fill/finish processes, a well-designed and characterized capping process is indispensable to ensure product quality and integrity and to minimize rejections during the manufacturing process. In this review, the health authority requirements and expectations related to container closure system quality and container closure integrity are summarized. The pharmaceutical vial, the rubber stopper, and the crimp cap are described. Different capping techniques are critically compared: The most common capping equipment with a rotating capping plate produces the lowest amount of particle. The strength and challenges of methods to control the capping process are discussed. The residual seal force method can characterize the capping process independent of the used capping equipment or CCS. We analyze the root causes of several cosmetic defects associated with the vial capping process. PMID:26654992

  11. Why is the north polar cap on Mars different than the south polar cap?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    One of the most puzzling mysteries about the planet Mars is the hemispherical asymmetry in the polar caps. Every spring the seasonal polar cap of CO2 recedes until the end of summer, when only a small part, the residual polar cap, remains. During the year that Viking observed Mars, the residual polar cap was composed of water ice in the northern hemisphere but was primarily carbon dioxide ice in the southern hemisphere. Scientists have sought to explain this asymmetry by modeling observations of the latitudinal recession of the polar cap and seasonal variations in atmospheric pressure (since the seasonal polar caps are primarily frozen atmosphere, they are directly related to changes in atmospheric mass). These models reproduce most aspects of the observed annual variation in atmospheric pressure fairly accurately. Furthermore, the predicted latitudinal recession of the northern polar cap in the spring agrees well with observations, including the fact that the CO2 ice is predicted to completely sublime away. However, these models all predict that the carbon dioxide ice will also sublime away during the summer in the southern hemisphere, unlike what is observed. This paper will show how the radiative effects of ozone, clouds, airborne dust, light penetration into and through the polar cap, and the dependence of albedo on solar zenith angle affect CO2 ice formation and sublimation, and how they help explain the hemispherical asymmetry in the residual polar caps. These effects have not been studied with prior polar cap models.

  12. Towards implementation of hollow core fibres for surgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urich, Artur; Delmonte, Tiina; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2011-03-01

    Presently, there is no truly flexible delivery system for light from Er:Yag medical lasers (λ = 2.94 μm) which allows surgeons to work unrestricted. Instead, either a relatively inflexible articulated arm or multi-mode fibre, limited to large bend radii, must be used. One proposed solution is the use of novel types of hollow core - band gap optical fibre rather than more traditional large area solid core fibres. In these silica based fibres, material absorption and damage limitations are overcome by using a photonic band gap structure. This confines radiation to lower order modes, that are guided in a small diameter air core. The overall fibre diameter is also smaller, which allows a smaller mechanical bend radius. Together with the guidance in air, this improves the laser power damage threshold. However, there are many practical hurdles that must be overcome to achieve a robust system for use in surgery. One of the main problems is that the fibre structure is hollow and ingress of dust, vapour, fluids and other contaminants need to be prevented to ensure safe in-vivo usage. Additionally, any infibre contamination will degrade the laser damage resistance of the fibre leading to potential catastrophic failure. The development of a robust and hermetically sealed end cap for the fibre, without adversely affecting beam quality or damage threshold is an essential prerequisite for the safe and efficient use of such fibres in surgery. In this paper we report on the progress on implementing end caps and describe novel methods of sealing off these hollow fibres in particular for surgical applications. This work will demonstrate that the use of these superior fibres with low loss guidance at 2.94 μm in surgery is feasible.

  13. Ice-core evidence of abrupt climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Richard B.

    2000-01-01

    Ice-core records show that climate changes in the past have been large, rapid, and synchronous over broad areas extending into low latitudes, with less variability over historical times. These ice-core records come from high mountain glaciers and the polar regions, including small ice caps and the large ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. PMID:10677460

  14. Synthesis of convex hexoctahedral palladium@gold core-shell nanocrystals with {431} high-index facets with remarkable electrochemiluminescence activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Niu, Wenxin; Gao, Wenyue; Qi, Liming; Lai, Jianping; Zhao, Jianming; Xu, Guobao

    2014-06-24

    Convex hexoctahedral nanocrystals have been synthesized through fast growth kinetics and the use of cetylpyridinium chloride as a capping agent. Monodisperse convex hexoctahedral Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals with {431} high-index facets are obtained at high reaction rates by using high concentrations of ascorbic acid in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride. In contrast, octahedral nanocrystals with {111} low-index facets and their {100}-truncated counterparts are formed at low ascorbic acid concentrations. The substitute of cetylpyridinium chloride with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride leads to the generation of concave trisoctahedral Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals with {331} high-index facets, indicating that cetylpyridinium plays an important role in the formation of convex hexoctahedral nanocrystals. The as-prepared convex hexoctahedral Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals exhibit remarkable catalytic performances toward electrochemiluminescence compared with truncated octahedral and concave trisoctahedral Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals. PMID:24878293

  15. cap alpha. -Methyl-p-tyrosine shifts circadian temperature rhythms

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, A.L.; Ehret, C.F.

    1982-09-01

    ..cap alpha..-Methyl-p-tyrosine shifts the acrophase (time of highest temperature) of the circadian temperature rhythm of the rat to earlier or later times of day depending on the phase of the cicadian cycle at which the drug is administered. When ..cap alpha..-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester HCl is injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 100 mg/kg late in the projected 8-h light phase, the acrophase of the intraperitoneal temperature rhythm is delayed by up to 3 h.However, when the same dose of drug is given 9-10 h into the projected 16-h dark phase of the daily cycle, the acrophase of the temperature rhythm occurs about 2 h earlier than expected. The times of ..cap alpha..-methyl-p-tyrosine administration leading to maximal phase delays or advances are correlated with the times of minimal and maximal turnover of norepinephrine in the hypothalamus. These results suggest that changing rates of norepinephrine turnover in the hypothalamus may regulate the circadian temperature rhythm in rats. The results also emphasize the fact that the effects of drugs may vary as a function of the time of administration. This fact must be taken into account in pharmacologic testing.

  16. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  17. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallows a lead object or breathes in lead dust, some of the poison can stay in the ... a health problem. Lead is everywhere, including dirt, dust, new toys, and old house paint. Unfortunately, you ...

  18. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... homes. • Most people, especially children, who suffer from lead poisoning are exposed through lead-contaminated household dust or ... and six if they are at risk of lead poisoning (see: ). Who can I call to get more ...

  19. Commercial Crew Program CCiCap Partners

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program and its newest Commercial Crew Integrated Capability (CCiCap) partners are embracing the American spirit as they advance their integrated rocket and spacecraft design...

  20. CCiCap: Sierra Nevada Corporation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA announced today its plans to partner with Sierra Nevada Corp. (SNC) for the next phase of the agency's Commercial Crew Program (CCP). Called Commercial Crew integrated Capability (CCiCap), the...

  1. Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

  2. Subsea tree cap well choke system

    SciTech Connect

    Bednar, J.M.

    1991-04-30

    This patent describes an apparatus useful in subsea well completions requiring a subsea choke. It comprises: a wellhead connector; a tree flow passage; a tree annulus passage; a tree cap; a choke; and a production line.

  3. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  4. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  5. Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Russell N.; Senum, Gunnar I.

    1981-01-01

    A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

  6. Tip cap for a turbine rotor blade

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2014-03-25

    A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, and a tip cap that includes a row of lugs extending from a bottom side that form dovetail grooves that engage with similar shaped lugs and grooves on a tip end of the spar to secure the tip cap to the spar against radial displacement. The lug on the trailing edge end of the tip cap is aligned perpendicular to a chordwise line of the blade in the trailing edge region in order to minimize stress due to the lugs wanting to bend under high centrifugal loads. A two piece tip cap with lugs at different angles will reduce the bending stress even more.

  7. Textures in south polar ice cap #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Textures of the south polar permanent residual ice cap and polar layered terrains. This 15 x 14 km area image (frame 7306) is centered near 87 degrees south, 341 degrees west.

    Figure caption from Science Magazine

  8. Textures in south polar ice cap #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Textures of the south polar permanent residual ice cap and polar layered terrains. This 30 x 29 km area image (frame 7709) is centered near 87 degrees south, 77 degrees west.

    Figure caption from Science Magazine

  9. Enhanced gravitropism of roots with a disrupted cap actin cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Guichuan; Mohamalawari, Deepti R.; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2003-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be a major player in plant gravitropism. However, understanding the role of actin in this process is far from complete. To address this problem, we conducted an analysis of the effect of Latrunculin B (Lat B), a potent actin-disrupting drug, on root gravitropism using various parameters that included detailed curvature kinetics, estimation of gravitropic sensitivity, and monitoring of curvature development after extended clinorotation. Lat B treatment resulted in a promotion of root curvature after a 90 degrees reorientation in three plant species tested. More significantly, the sensitivity of maize (Zea mays) roots to gravity was enhanced after actin disruption, as determined from a comparison of presentation time of Lat B-treated versus untreated roots. A short 10-min gravistimulus followed by extended rotation on a 1-rpm clinostat resulted in extensive gravitropic responses, manifested as curvature that often exceeded 90 degrees. Application of Lat B to the cap or elongation zone of maize roots resulted in the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, which was confined to the area of localized Lat B application. Only roots with Lat B applied to the cap displayed the strong curvature responses after extended clinorotation. Our study demonstrates that disrupting the actin cytoskeleton in the cap leads to the persistence of a signal established by a previous gravistimulus. Therefore, actin could function in root gravitropism by providing a mechanism to regulate the proliferation of a gravitropic signal originating from the cap to allow the root to attain its correct orientation or set point angle.

  10. Truncated Dual-Cap Nucleation Site Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Douglas M.; Sander, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    During heterogeneous nucleation within a metastable mushy-zone, several geometries for nucleation site development must be considered. Traditional spherical dual cap and crevice models are compared to a truncated dual cap to determine the activation energy and critical cluster growth kinetics in ternary Fe-Cr-Ni steel alloys. Results of activation energy results indicate that nucleation is more probable at grain boundaries within the solid than at the solid-liquid interface.