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Sample records for core catalytic domain

  1. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    PubMed

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA. PMID:21857987

  2. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  3. The core histone N-terminal domains are required for multiple rounds of catalytic chromatin remodeling by the SWI/SNF and RSC complexes.

    PubMed

    Logie, C; Tse, C; Hansen, J C; Peterson, C L

    1999-02-23

    SWI/SNF and RSC are large, distinct multi-subunit complexes that use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to disrupt nucleosome structure, facilitating the binding of transcription factors or restriction enzymes to nucleosomes [Cote, J., Quinn, J., Workman, J. L., and Peterson, C. L. (1994) Science 265, 53-60 (1); Lorch, Y., Cairns, B. R., Zhang, M., and Kornberg, R. D. (1998) Cell 94, 29-34 (2)]. Here we have used a quantitative assay to measure the activities of these ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes using nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with hypoacetylated, hyperacetylated, or partially trypsinized histones. This assay is based on measuring the kinetics of restriction enzyme digestion of a site located within the central nucleosome of a positioned 11-mer array [Logie, C., and Peterson, C. L. (1997) EMBO J. 16, 6772-6782 (3)]. We find that the DNA-stimulated ATPase activities of SWI/SNF and RSC are not altered by the absence of the histone N-termini. Furthermore, ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling is also equivalent on all three substrate arrays under reaction conditions where the concentrations of nucleosomal array and either SWI/SNF or RSC are equivalent. However, SWI/SNF and RSC cannot catalytically remodel multiple nucleosomal arrays in the absence of the histone termini, and this catalytic activity of SWI/SNF is decreased by histone hyperacetylation. These results indicate that the histone termini are important for SWI/SNF and RSC function; and, furthermore, our data defines a step in the remodeling cycle where the core histone termini exert their influence. This step appears to be after remodeling, but prior to intermolecular transfer of the remodelers to new arrays. PMID:10029546

  4. The catalytic core of RNase P.

    PubMed Central

    Green, C J; Rivera-León, R; Vold, B S

    1996-01-01

    A deletion mutant of the catalytic RNA component of Escherichia coli RNase P missing residues 87-241 retains the ability to interact with the protein component to form a functional catalyst. The deletion of this phylogenetically conserved region significantly increases the Km, indicating that the deleted structures may be important for binding to the precursor tRNA substrate but not for the cleavage reaction. Under some reaction conditions, this RNase P deletion mutant can become a relatively non-specific nuclease, indicating that this RNA's catalytic center may be more exposed. The catalytic core of the RNase P is formed by less than one third of the 377 residues of the RNase P RNA. PMID:8628683

  5. Evolving Catalytic Properties of the MLL Family SET Domain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Mittal, Anshumali; Reid, James; Reich, Stephanie; Gamblin, Steven J.; Wilson, Jon R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Methylation of histone H3 lysine-4 is a hallmark of chromatin associated with active gene expression. The activity of H3K4-specific modification enzymes, in higher eukaryotes the MLL (or KMT2) family, is tightly regulated. The MLL family has six members, each with a specialized function. All contain a catalytic SET domain that associates with a core multiprotein complex for activation. These SET domains segregate into three classes that correlate with the arrangement of targeting domains that populate the rest of the protein. Here we show that, unlike MLL1, the MLL4 SET domain retains significant activity without the core complex. We also present the crystal structure of an inactive MLL4-tagged SET domain construct and describe conformational changes that account for MLL4 intrinsic activity. Finally, our structure explains how the MLL SET domains are able to add multiple methyl groups to the target lysine, despite having the sequence characteristics of a classical monomethylase. PMID:26320581

  6. Isolation of an Active Catalytic Core of Streptococcus downei MFe28 GTF-I Glucosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Monchois, Vincent; Arguello-Morales, Martha; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1999-01-01

    Truncated variants of GTF-I from Streptococcus downei MFe28 were purified by means of a histidine tag. Sequential deletions showed that the C-terminal domain was not directly involved in the catalytic process but was required for primer activation. A fully active catalytic core of only 100 kDa was isolated. PMID:10094712

  7. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  8. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  9. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; et al

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  10. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the HIV-1 Integrase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Briggs, J. M.; Straatsma, TP; Carlson, Heather A.; Greenwald, Jason; Choe, Senyon; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-30

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome, thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Two 1-ns molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on completely hydrated models of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, one with no metal ions and another with one magnesium ion in the catalytic site. The simulations predict that the region of the active site that is missing in the published crystal structures has (at the time of this work) more secondary structure than previously thought. The flexibility of this region has been discussed with respect to the mechanistic function of the enzyme. The results of these simulations will be used as part of inhibitor design projects directed against the catalytic domain of the enzyme.

  11. Core-size-dependent catalytic properties of bimetallic Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Kundu, Simanta; Patra, Amitava

    2014-12-24

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles have recently emerged as a new class of functional materials because of their potential applications in catalysis, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate and photonics etc. Here, we have synthesized Au/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles with varying the core diameter. The red-shifting of the both plasmonic peaks of Ag and Au confirms the core-shell structure of the nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, line scan EDS measurement and UV-vis study confirm the formation of core-shell nanoparticles. We have examined the catalytic activity of these core-shell nanostructures in the reaction between 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and NaBH4 to form 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and the efficiency of the catalytic reaction is found to be increased with increasing the core size of Au/Ag core-shell nanocrystals. The catalytic efficiency varies from 41.8 to 96.5% with varying core size from 10 to 100 nm of Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles, and the Au100/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticle is found to be 12-fold more active than that of the pure Au nanoparticles with 100 nm diameter. Thus, the catalytic properties of the metal nanoparticles are significantly enhanced because of the Au/Ag core-shell structure, and the rate is dependent on the size of the core of the nanoparticles. PMID:25456348

  12. Biogenesis and Assembly of Eukaryotic Cytochrome c Oxidase Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin which assembly is intricate and highly regulated. The COX catalytic core is formed by three mitochondrial DNA encoded subunits, Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, conserved in the bacterial enzyme. Their biogenesis requires the action of messenger-specific and subunit-specific factors which facilitate the synthesis, membrane insertion, maturation or assembly of the core subunits. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to identify these ancillary factors. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the biogenesis and assembly of the eukaryotic COX catalytic core and discuss the degree of conservation of the players and mechanisms operating from yeast to human. PMID:21958598

  13. Porous Core-Shell Nanostructures for Catalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewers, Trevor David

    Porous core-shell nanostructures have recently received much attention for their enhanced thermal stability. They show great potential in the field of catalysis, as reactant gases can diffuse in and out of the porous shell while the core particle is protected from sintering, a process in which particles coalesce to form larger particles. Sintering is a large problem in industry and is the primary cause of irreversible deactivation. Despite the obvious advantages of high thermal stability, porous core-shell nanoparticles can be developed to have additional interactive properties from the combination of the core and shell together, rather than just the core particle alone. This dissertation focuses on developing new porous core-shell systems in which both the core and shell take part in catalysis. Two types of systems are explored; (1) yolk-shell nanostructures with reducible oxide shells formed using the Kirkendall effect and (2) ceramic-based porous oxide shells formed using sol-gel chemistry. Of the Kirkendall-based systems, Au FexOy and Cu CoO were synthesized and studied for catalytic applications. Additionally, ZnO was explored as a potential shelling material. Sol-gel work focused on optimizing synthetic methods to allow for coating of small gold particles, which remains a challenge today. Mixed metal oxides were explored as a shelling material to make dual catalysts in which the product of a reaction on the core particle becomes a reactant within the shell.

  14. The Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Plant Cellulose Synthase and Its Assembly into Dimers[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  15. Translocation of the Catalytic Domain of Diphtheria Toxin across Planar Phospholipid Bilayers by Its Own T Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyoung Joon; Senzel, Lisa; Collier, R. John; Finkelstein, Alan

    1999-07-01

    The T domain of diphtheria toxin is known to participate in the pH-dependent translocation of the catalytic C domain of the toxin across the endosomal membrane, but how it does so, and whether cellular proteins are also required for this process, remain unknown. Here, we report results showing that the T domain alone is capable of translocating the entire C domain across model, planar phospholipid bilayers in the absence of other proteins. The T domain therefore contains the entire molecular machinery for mediating transfer of the catalytic domain of diphtheria toxin across membranes.

  16. Stromelysin-1: three-dimensional structure of the inhibited catalytic domain and of the C-truncated proenzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, J. W.; Marcy, A. I.; Rokosz, L. L.; Axel, M. G.; Burbaum, J. J.; Fitzgerald, P. M.; Cameron, P. M.; Esser, C. K.; Hagmann, W. K.; Hermes, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The proteolytic enzyme stromelysin-1 is a member of the family of matrix metalloproteinases and is believed to play a role in pathological conditions such as arthritis and tumor invasion. Stromelysin-1 is synthesized as a pro-enzyme that is activated by removal of an N-terminal prodomain. The active enzyme contains a catalytic domain and a C-terminal hemopexin domain believed to participate in macromolecular substrate recognition. We have determined the three-dimensional structures of both a C-truncated form of the proenzyme and an inhibited complex of the catalytic domain by X-ray diffraction analysis. The catalytic core is very similar in the two forms and is similar to the homologous domain in fibroblast and neutrophil collagenases, as well as to the stromelysin structure determined by NMR. The prodomain is a separate folding unit containing three alpha-helices and an extended peptide that lies in the active site of the enzyme. Surprisingly, the amino-to-carboxyl direction of this peptide chain is opposite to that adopted by the inhibitor and by previously reported inhibitors of collagenase. Comparison of the active site of stromelysin with that of thermolysin reveals that most of the residues proposed to play significant roles in the enzymatic mechanism of thermolysin have equivalents in stromelysin, but that three residues implicated in the catalytic mechanism of thermolysin are not represented in stromelysin. PMID:8535233

  17. Crystal Structure of Yeast DNA Polymerase ε Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rinku; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Buku, Angeliki; Johnson, Robert E.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerase ε (Polε) is a multi-subunit polymerase that contributes to genomic stability via its roles in leading strand replication and the repair of damaged DNA. Here we report the ternary structure of the Polε catalytic subunit (Pol2) bound to a nascent G:C base pair (Pol2G:C). Pol2G:C has a typical B-family polymerase fold and embraces the template-primer duplex with the palm, fingers, thumb and exonuclease domains. The overall arrangement of domains is similar to the structure of Pol2T:A reported recently, but there are notable differences in their polymerase and exonuclease active sites. In particular, we observe Ca2+ ions at both positions A and B in the polymerase active site and also observe a Ca2+ at position B of the exonuclease site. We find that the contacts to the nascent G:C base pair in the Pol2G:C structure are maintained in the Pol2T:A structure and reflect the comparable fidelity of Pol2 for nascent purine-pyrimidine and pyrimidine-purine base pairs. We note that unlike that of Pol3, the shape of the nascent base pair binding pocket in Pol2 is modulated from the major grove side by the presence of Tyr431. Together with Pol2T:A, our results provide a framework for understanding the structural basis of high fidelity DNA synthesis by Pol2. PMID:24733111

  18. Direct Measurement of Hg(II) Removal from Organomercurial Lyase (MerB) by Tryptophan Fluorescence: NmerA Domain of Co-evolved γ -Proteobacterial Mercuric Ion Reductase (MerA) Is More Efficient than MerA Catalytic Core or Glutathione†

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Baoyu; Nauss, Rachel; Harwood, Ian; Miller, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea harboring mer loci exhibit resistance to the toxic effects of Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I)]. In broad spectrum resistance, RHg(I) is converted to less toxic Hg(0) in the cytosol by the sequential action of organomercurial lyase (MerB: RHg(I) --> RH + Hg(II)) and mercuric ion reductase (MerA: Hg(II) --> Hg(0)) enzymes, requiring transfer of Hg(II) from MerB to MerA. Although previous studies with γ-proteobacterial versions of MerA and a non-physiological Hg(II)-DTT-MerB complex qualitatively support a pathway for direct transfer between proteins, assessment of the relative efficiencies of Hg(II) transfer to the two different di-cysteine motifs in γ-proteobacterial MerA and to competing cellular thiol is lacking. Here we show the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of γ-proteobacterial MerB is sensitive to Hg(II) binding and use this to probe the kinetics of Hg(II) removal from MerB by the N-terminal domain (NmerA) and catalytic core C-terminal cysteine pairs of its co-evolved MerA, and by glutathione (GSH), the major competing cellular thiol in γ-proteobacteria. At physiologically relevant concentrations, reaction with a 10-fold excess NmerA over HgMerB removes ≥ 92% Hg(II), while similar extents of reaction require more than 1000-fold excess of GSH. Kinetically, the apparent second order rate constant for Hg(II) transfer from MerB to NmerA, at 2.3 ± 0.1 × 104 M−1 s−1 is ~ 100-fold greater than that for GSH (1.2 ± 0.2 × 102 M−1 s−1) or the MerA catalytic core (1.2 × 102 M−1 s−1), establishing transfer to the metallochaperone-like NmerA domain as the kinetically favored pathway in this co-evolved system. PMID:20722420

  19. Direct measurement of mercury(II) removal from organomercurial lyase (MerB) by tryptophan fluorescence: NmerA domain of coevolved γ-proteobacterial mercuric ion reductase (MerA) is more efficient than MerA catalytic core or glutathione .

    PubMed

    Hong, Baoyu; Nauss, Rachel; Harwood, Ian M; Miller, Susan M

    2010-09-21

    Aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea harboring mer loci exhibit resistance to the toxic effects of Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I)]. In broad spectrum resistance, RHg(I) is converted to less toxic Hg(0) in the cytosol by the sequential action of organomercurial lyase (MerB: RHg(I) → RH + Hg(II)) and mercuric ion reductase (MerA: Hg(II) → Hg(0)) enzymes, requiring transfer of Hg(II) from MerB to MerA. Although previous studies with γ-proteobacterial versions of MerA and a nonphysiological Hg(II)-DTT-MerB complex qualitatively support a pathway for direct transfer between proteins, assessment of the relative efficiencies of Hg(II) transfer to the two different dicysteine motifs in γ-proteobacterial MerA and to competing cellular thiol is lacking. Here we show the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of γ-proteobacterial MerB is sensitive to Hg(II) binding and use this to probe the kinetics of Hg(II) removal from MerB by the N-terminal domain (NmerA) and catalytic core C-terminal cysteine pairs of its coevolved MerA and by glutathione (GSH), the major competing cellular thiol in γ-proteobacteria. At physiologically relevant concentrations, reaction with a 10-fold excess of NmerA over HgMerB removes ≥92% Hg(II), while similar extents of reaction require more than 1000-fold excess of GSH. Kinetically, the apparent second-order rate constant for Hg(II) transfer from MerB to NmerA, at (2.3 ± 0.1) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), is ∼100-fold greater than that for GSH ((1.2 ± 0.2) × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) or the MerA catalytic core (1.2 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)), establishing transfer to the metallochaperone-like NmerA domain as the kinetically favored pathway in this coevolved system. PMID:20722420

  20. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  1. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    PubMed Central

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  2. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S; Okafor, C Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2'OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  3. PROPERTIES OF CATALYTIC, LINKER AND CHITIN-BINDING DOMAINS OF INSECT CHITINASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manduca sexta (tobacco hornworm) chitinase is a glycoprotein that consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain, a Ser/Thr-rich linker region, and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain. To delineate the properties of these domains, we have generated truncated forms of chitinase, which were expressed in i...

  4. The DUSP–Ubl domain of USP4 enhances its catalytic efficiency by promoting ubiquitin exchange

    PubMed Central

    Clerici, Marcello; Luna-Vargas, Mark P. A.; Faesen, Alex C.; Sixma, Titia K.

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease USP4 is emerging as an important regulator of cellular pathways, including the TGF-β response, NF-κB signalling and splicing, with possible roles in cancer. Here we show that USP4 has its catalytic triad arranged in a productive conformation. Nevertheless, it requires its N-terminal DUSP–Ubl domain to achieve full catalytic turnover. Pre-steady-state kinetics measurements reveal that USP4 catalytic domain activity is strongly inhibited by slow dissociation of ubiquitin after substrate hydrolysis. The DUSP–Ubl domain is able to enhance ubiquitin dissociation, hence promoting efficient turnover. In a mechanism that requires all USP4 domains, binding of the DUSP–Ubl domain promotes a change of a switching loop near the active site. This ‘allosteric regulation of product discharge’ provides a novel way of regulating deubiquitinating enzymes that may have relevance for other enzyme classes. PMID:25404403

  5. The growth and enhanced catalytic performance of Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haihua; Sun, Zhenhua; Yang, Yi; Su, Dangsheng

    2012-12-01

    Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites were synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with ascorbic acid onto the surface of Au polyhedra at room temperature. The Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites consisting of a Au core and nanoporous Pd shell, exhibited plasmonic properties and higher catalytic activity in comparison with Au@Pd core-shell nanocubes.Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites were synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with ascorbic acid onto the surface of Au polyhedra at room temperature. The Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites consisting of a Au core and nanoporous Pd shell, exhibited plasmonic properties and higher catalytic activity in comparison with Au@Pd core-shell nanocubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization and catalytic performance measurement of Au nanopolyhedra and Au@Pd core-shell nanostructures, TEM image of Au nanopolyhedra and Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites after four cycles of the Suzuki coupling reaction, TEM and high-resolution images of a single Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrite, and XRD pattern of Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites, UV-vis spectrum of Au@Pd nanodendrites in the range 200-400 nm, references. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32849f

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of the extracellular cellulase CBHI from Trichoderma harzianum

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Francieli; Textor, Larissa C.; Serpa, Viviane; Maeda, Roberto Nobuyuki; Pereira, Nei; Polikarpov, Igor

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum has a considerable cellulolytic activity that is mediated by a complex of enzymes which are essential for the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose. These enzymes were produced by the induction of T. harzianum with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) under submerged fermentation in a bioreactor. The catalytic core domain (CCD) of cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) was purified from the extracellular extracts and submitted to robotic crystallization. Diffraction-quality CBHI CCD crystals were grown and an X-ray diffraction data set was collected under cryogenic conditions using a synchrotron-radiation source. PMID:20823521

  7. Structure-function relationships in the catalytic and starch binding domains of glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, P M; Reilly, P J

    1994-03-01

    Sixteen primary sequences from five sub-families of fungal, yeast and bacterial glucoamylases were related to structural information from the model of the catalytic domain of Aspergillus awamori var. X100 glucoamylase obtained by protein crystallography. This domain is composed of thirteen alpha-helices, with five conserved regions defining the active site. Interactions between methyl alpha-maltoside and active site residues were modelled, and the importance of these residues on the catalytic action of different glucoamylases was shown by their presence in each primary sequence. The overall structure of the starch binding domain of some fungal glucoamylases was determined based on homology to the C-terminal domains of Bacillus cyclodextrin glucosyl-transferases. Crystallography indicated that this domain contains 6-8 beta-strands and homology allowed the attribution of a disulfide bridge in the glucoamylase starch binding domain. Glucoamylase residues Thr525, Asn530 and Trp560, homologous to Bacillus stearothermophilus cyclodextrin glucosyltransferase residues binding to maltose in the C-terminal domain, could be involved in raw-starch binding. The structure and length of the linker region between the catalytic and starch binding domains in fungal glucoamylases can vary substantially, a further indication of the functional independence of the two domains. PMID:8177888

  8. The NMR structure of the inhibited catalytic domain of human stromelysin-1.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Bush, B L; Hermes, J D; Esser, C K; Hagmann, W K; Springer, J P

    1994-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with an N-carboxyl alkyl inhibitor has been determined by NMR methods. The global fold consists of three helices, a five stranded beta-sheet and a methionine located in a turn near the catalytic histidines, classifying stromelysin-1 as a metzincin. Stromelysin-1 is unique in having two independent zinc binding sites: a catalytic site and a structural site. The inhibitor binds in an extended conformation. The S1' subsite is a deep hydrophobic pocket, whereas S2' appears shallow and S3' open. PMID:7656014

  9. Time domain computational modeling of viscothermal acoustic propagation in catalytic converter substrates with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, N. S.; Selamet, A.; Miazgowicz, K. D.; Tallio, K. V.; Parks, S. J.

    2005-08-01

    Models for viscothermal effects in catalytic converter substrates are developed for time domain computational methods. The models are suitable for use in one-dimensional approaches for the prediction of exhaust system performance (engine tuning characteristics) and radiated sound levels. Starting with the ``low reduced frequency'' equations for viscothermal acoustic propagation in capillary tubes, time domain submodels are developed for the frequency-dependent wall friction, frequency-dependent wall heat transfer, and porous wall effects exhibited by catalytic converter substrates. Results from a time domain computational approach employing these submodels are compared to available analytical solutions for the low reduced frequency equations. The computational results are shown to agree well with the analytical solutions for capillary geometries representative of automotive catalytic converter substrates.

  10. Activities of human RRP6 and structure of the human RRP6 catalytic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Januszyk, Kurt; Liu, Quansheng; Lima, Christopher D.

    2011-08-29

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a highly conserved multi-subunit complex that catalyzes degradation and processing of coding and noncoding RNA. A noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core interacts with Rrp44 and Rrp6, two subunits that possess processive and distributive 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity, respectively. While both Rrp6 and Rrp44 are responsible for RNA processing in budding yeast, Rrp6 may play a more prominent role in processing, as it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by stable RNA secondary structure in vitro and because the null allele in budding yeast leads to the buildup of specific structured RNA substrates. Human RRP6, otherwise known as PM/SCL-100 or EXOSC10, shares sequence similarity to budding yeast Rrp6 and is proposed to catalyze 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity on a variety of nuclear transcripts including ribosomal RNA subunits, RNA that has been poly-adenylated by TRAMP, as well as other nuclear RNA transcripts destined for processing and/or destruction. To characterize human RRP6, we expressed the full-length enzyme as well as truncation mutants that retain catalytic activity, compared their activities to analogous constructs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6, and determined the X-ray structure of a human construct containing the exoribonuclease and HRDC domains that retains catalytic activity. Structural data show that the human active site is more exposed when compared to the yeast structure, and biochemical data suggest that this feature may play a role in the ability of human RRP6 to productively engage and degrade structured RNA substrates more effectively than the analogous budding yeast enzyme.

  11. N-Terminal Region of the Catalytic Domain of Human N-Myristoyltransferase 1 Acts as an Inhibitory Module

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajendra K.

    2015-01-01

    N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) plays critical roles in the modulation of various signaling molecules, however, the regulation of this enzyme in diverse cellular states remains poorly understood. We provide experimental evidence to show for the first time that for the isoform 1 of human NMT (hNMT1), the regulatory roles extend into the catalytic core. In our present study, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant devoid of 28 N-terminal amino acids from the catalytic module (Δ28-hNMT1s) and compared its properties to the full-length catalytic domain of hNMT1. The deletion of the N-terminal peptide had no effect on the enzyme stability. Our findings suggest that the N-terminal region in the catalytic module of hNMT1 functions serves as a regulatory control element. The observations of an ~3 fold increase in enzymatic efficiency following removal of the N-terminal peptide of hNMT1s indicates that N-terminal amino acids acts as an inhibitory segment and negatively regulate the enzyme activity. Our findings that the N-terminal region confers control over activity, taken together with the earlier observations that the N-terminal of hNMT1 is differentially processed in diverse cellular states, suggests that the proteolytic processing of the peptide segment containing the inhibitory region provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of myristoyltransferase activity. PMID:26000639

  12. Domain function dissection and catalytic properties of Listeria monocytogenes p60 protein with bacteriolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minfeng; Zuo, Jinrong; Gu, Hao; Guo, Minliang; Yin, Yuelan

    2015-12-01

    The major extracellular protein p60 of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm-p60) is an autolysin that can hydrolyze the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell wall and has been shown to be required for L. monocytogenes virulence. The predicted three-dimensional structure of Lm-p60 showed that Lm-p60 could be split into two independent structural domains at the amino acid residue 270. Conserved motif analysis showed that V30, D207, S395, and H444 are the key amino acid residues of the corresponding motifs. However, not only the actual functions of these two domains but also the catalytic properties of Lm-p60 are unclear. We try to express recombinant Lm-p60 and identify the functions of two domains by residue substitution (V30A, D207A, S395A, and H444A) and peptide truncation. The C-terminal domain was identified as catalytic element and N-terminal domain as substrate recognition and binding element. Either N-terminal domain truncation or C-terminal domain truncation presents corresponding biological activity. The catalytic activity of Lm-p60 with a malfunctioned substrate-binding domain was decreased, while the substrate binding was not affected by a mulfunctioned catalytic domain. With turbidimetric method, we determined the optimal conditions for the bacteriolytic activity of Lm-p60 against Micrococcus lysodeikficus. The assay for the effect of Lm-p60 on the bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme revealed that the combined use of Lm-p60 protein with lysozyme showed a strong synergistic effect on the bacteriolytic activity. PMID:26363556

  13. Robust and tunable circadian rhythms from differentially sensitive catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Connie; Markson, Joseph S.; Wilhoite, Crystal M.; Rust, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are ubiquitous biological oscillators that coordinate an organism’s behavior with the daily cycling of the external environment. To ensure synchronization with the environment, the period of the clock must be maintained near 24 h even as amplitude and phase are altered by input signaling. We show that, in a reconstituted circadian system from cyanobacteria, these conflicting requirements are satisfied by distinct functions for two domains of the central clock protein KaiC: the C-terminal autokinase domain integrates input signals through the ATP/ADP ratio, and the slow N-terminal ATPase acts as an input-independent timer. We find that phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain followed by an ATPase cycle in the N-terminal domain is required to form the inhibitory KaiB•KaiC complexes that drive the dynamics of the clock. We present a mathematical model in which this ATPase-mediated delay in negative feedback gives rise to a compensatory mechanism that allows a tunable phase and amplitude while ensuring a robust circadian period. PMID:23277568

  14. Robust and tunable circadian rhythms from differentially sensitive catalytic domains.

    PubMed

    Phong, Connie; Markson, Joseph S; Wilhoite, Crystal M; Rust, Michael J

    2013-01-15

    Circadian clocks are ubiquitous biological oscillators that coordinate an organism's behavior with the daily cycling of the external environment. To ensure synchronization with the environment, the period of the clock must be maintained near 24 h even as amplitude and phase are altered by input signaling. We show that, in a reconstituted circadian system from cyanobacteria, these conflicting requirements are satisfied by distinct functions for two domains of the central clock protein KaiC: the C-terminal autokinase domain integrates input signals through the ATP/ADP ratio, and the slow N-terminal ATPase acts as an input-independent timer. We find that phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain followed by an ATPase cycle in the N-terminal domain is required to form the inhibitory KaiB•KaiC complexes that drive the dynamics of the clock. We present a mathematical model in which this ATPase-mediated delay in negative feedback gives rise to a compensatory mechanism that allows a tunable phase and amplitude while ensuring a robust circadian period. PMID:23277568

  15. Dynamics of endoglucanase catalytic domains: implications towards thermostability.

    PubMed

    Yennamalli, Ragothaman M; Wolt, Jeffrey D; Sen, Taner Z

    2011-12-01

    Thermostable endoglucanases play a crucial role in the production of biofuels to breakdown plant cellulose. Analyzing their structure-dynamics relationship can inform about the origins of their thermostability. Although tertiary structures of many endoglucanase proteins are available, the relationship between thermostability, structure, and dynamics is not explored fully. We have generated elastic network models for thermostable and mesostable endoglucanases with the (αβ)₈ fold in substrate bound and unbound states. The comparative analyses shed light on the relation between protein dynamics, thermostability, and substrate binding. We observed specific differences in the dynamic behavior of catalytic residues in slow modes: while both the nucleophile and the acid/base donor residues show positively correlated motions in the thermophile, their dynamics is uncoupled in the mesophile. Our proof-of-concept comparison study suggests that global dynamics can be harnessed to further our understanding of thermostability. PMID:22066537

  16. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  17. Structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from Hypocrea jecorina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from the fungus Hypocrea jecorina was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Angstroms. This is the first structure of the newly established carbohydrate esterase family 15. The structure has revealed the residues Ser278–His411–Glu301 pre...

  18. The Non-Catalytic Domains of Drosophila Katanin Regulate Its Abundance and Microtubule-Disassembly Activity

    PubMed Central

    Grode, Kyle D.; Rogers, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules. PMID:25886649

  19. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  20. Expression, purification, and characterization of human osteoclastic protein-tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huan; Sui, Yuan; Cui, Yue; Lin, Peng; Li, Wannan; Xing, Shu; Wang, Deli; Hu, Min; Fu, Xueqi

    2015-03-01

    Osteoclastic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-oc) is a structurally unique transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that contains only a relatively small intracellular PTP catalytic domain, does not have an extracellular domain, and lacks a signal peptide proximal to the NH2 terminus. The present study reports the expression, purification, and characterization of the intracellular catalytic domain of PTP-oc (ΔPTP-oc). ΔPTP-oc was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion with a six-histidine tag and was purified via nickel affinity chromatography. When with para-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) as a substrate, ΔPTP-oc exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Its responses to temperature and ionic strength were similar to those of other PTPs. The optimal pH value of ΔPTP-oc is approximately 7.0, unlike other PTPs, whose optimal pH values are approximately 5.0. PMID:25462809

  1. Conservation and Covariance in Small Bacterial Phosphoglycosyltransferases Identify the Functional Catalytic Core.

    PubMed

    Lukose, Vinita; Luo, Lingqi; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Allen, Karen N; Imperiali, Barbara

    2015-12-22

    Phosphoglycosyltransferases (PGTs) catalyze the transfer of a C1'-phosphosugar from a soluble sugar nucleotide diphosphate to a polyprenol phosphate. These enzymes act at the membrane interface, forming the first membrane-associated intermediates in the biosynthesis of cell-surface glycans and glycoconjugates, including glycoproteins, glycolipids, and the peptidoglycan in bacteria. PGTs vary greatly in both their membrane topologies and their substrate preferences. PGTs, such as MraY and WecA, are polytopic, while other families of uniquely prokaryotic enzymes have only a single predicted transmembrane helix. PglC, a PGT involved in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycoproteins in the enteropathogen Campylobacter jejuni, is representative of one of the structurally most simple members of the diverse family of small bacterial PGT enzymes. Herein, we apply bioinformatics and covariance-weighted distance constraints in geometry- and homology-based model building, together with mutational analysis, to investigate monotopic PGTs. The pool of 15000 sequences that are analyzed include the PglC-like enzymes, as well as sequences from two other related PGTs that contain a "PglC-like" domain embedded in their larger structures (namely, the bifunctional PglB family, typified by PglB from Neisseria gonorrheae, and WbaP-like enzymes, typified by WbaP from Salmonella enterica). Including these two subfamilies of PGTs in the analysis highlights key residues conserved across all three families of small bacterial PGTs. Mutagenesis analysis of these conserved residues provides further information about the essentiality of many of these residues in catalysis. Construction of a structural model of the cytosolic globular domain utilizing three-dimensional distance constraints, provided by conservation covariance analysis, provides additional insight into the catalytic core of these families of small bacterial PGT enzymes. PMID:26600273

  2. Dealloying-based facile synthesis and highly catalytic properties of Au core/porous shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minho; Ko, Sung Min; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-06-01

    Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts. PMID:27221241

  3. Dealloying-based facile synthesis and highly catalytic properties of Au core/porous shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho; Ko, Sung Min; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-06-01

    Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts.Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01321j

  4. Biochemical properties and catalytic domain structure of the CcmH protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue-Ming; Hong, Jing; Li, Hai-Yin; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    In the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli, eight genes organized as a ccm operon (ccmABCDEFGH) are involved in the maturation of c-type cytochromes. The proteins encoded by the last three genes ccmFGH are believed to form a lyase complex functioning in the reduction of apocytochrome c and haem attachment. Among them, CcmH is a membrane-associated protein; its N-terminus is a catalytic domain with the active CXXC motif and the C-terminus is predicted as a TPR-like domain with unknown function. By using SCAM (scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis) and Gaussia luciferase fusion assays, we provide experimental evidence for the entire topological structure of E. coli CcmH. The mature CcmH is a periplasm-resident oxidoreductase anchored to the inner membrane by two transmembrane segments. Both N- and C-terminal domains are located and function in the periplasmic compartment. Moreover, the N-terminal domain forms a monomer in solution, while the C-terminal domain is a compact fold with helical structures. The NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain in reduced form exhibits mainly a three-helix bundle, providing further information for the redox mechanism. The redox potential suggests that CcmH exhibits a strong reductase that may function in the last step of reduction of apocytochrome c for haem attachment. PMID:22789558

  5. Synthesis of mesoporous silica hollow nanospheres with multiple gold cores and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junchen; Xue, Zhaoteng; Feng, Shanshan; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2014-09-01

    The core-shell Au@resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) nanospheres with multiple cores have been successfully synthesized by a modified Stöber method. After coating mesoporous silica and the calcination, the Au@meso-SiO2 hollow nanospheres with multiple gold cores can be obtained, which have a high surface area (∼537 m(2)/g) and uniform pore size (∼2.5 nm). The Au@meso-SiO2 hollow nanospheres can be used as a catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4 into 4-aminophenol, and exhibit excellent catalytic performance. PMID:24935190

  6. Expression and purification of correctly processed, active human TACE catalytic domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H R; Wolfson, M F; Rauch, C T; Castner, B J; Huang, C P; Gerhart, M J; Johnson, R S; Cerretti, D P; Paxton, R J; Price, V L; Black, R A

    1998-06-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) converting enzyme (TACE) releases soluble TNF alpha from cells. It is a member of the adamalysin family of metalloproteases. A truncated form of TACE cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified to homogeneity in order to study TACE structure and function. Recombinant TACE was expressed as a preproprotein including the pro- and catalytic (PROCAT) domains fused to the yeast alpha-factor leader. A C-terminal immunoreactive FLAG peptide was added for Western blot detection and anti-FLAG antibody column purification. We constructed two glycosylation mutant PROCAT TACE isoforms to facilitate purification. A PROCAT isoform, mutated to eliminate two N-linked glycosylation sites, was buffer exchanged and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange chromatography and an anti-FLAG antibody affinity step. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that the mutant preproprotein was processed in yeast at the furin protease cleavage site and yielded an active catalytic domain which has TNF alpha peptide-specific protease activity. Mass spectrometry of the purified catalytic domain showed that removal of both N-linked sites results in a homogeneous sized polypeptide lacking further posttranslational modifications. PMID:9631522

  7. Expression, characterization, and crystallization of the catalytic core of rat phosphatidylinositide-specific phospholipase C delta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, J. A.; Hurley, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositide-specific phospholipase Cs (PI-PLCs) catalyze the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositides in response to diverse stimuli in higher eukaryotes. Mammalian PI-PLCs contain divergent regulatory regions, but all share three conserved regions: an N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, X, and Y. We report the high-level expression and characterization of a recombinant "catalytic core" of rat PI-PLC delta 1 that contains the catalytically essential X and Y regions, but not the PH domain. The expressed protein, PI-PLC delta delta 1-134, is catalytically active versus phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in deoxycholate micelles with a K(m) of 182 microM and a Vmax of 27 mumol/min/mg. PI-PLC delta delta 1-134 is monomeric and monodisperse as judged by dynamic light scattering. Far-UV CD indicates a structure with approximately 35% alpha-helix. A reversible change in the near-UV CD spectrum is observed on addition of calcium, suggesting that calcium can bind PI-PLC delta delta 1-134 in the absence of phospholipid. Triclinic crystals of PI-PLC delta delta 1-134 have been obtained that diffract beyond 2.4 A resolution under cryogenic conditions. Based on Vm = 2.72 Da/A3 and on the self-rotation function, there are two PI-PLC delta delta 1-134 molecules per asymmetric unit that are related to each other by a noncrystallographic axis of approximate twofold symmetry parallel to a. PMID:8845757

  8. IRBIT Interacts with the Catalytic Core of Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase Type Iα and IIα through Conserved Catalytic Aspartate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Hideaki; Hirose, Matsumi; Gainche, Laura; Kawaai, Katsuhiro; Bonneau, Benjamin; Ijuin, Takeshi; Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs) are lipid kinases that generate phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), a critical lipid signaling molecule that regulates diverse cellular functions, including the activities of membrane channels and transporters. IRBIT (IP3R-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) is a multifunctional protein that regulates diverse target proteins. Here, we report that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with members of the PIPK family. IRBIT bound to all PIPK isoforms in heterologous expression systems and specifically interacted with PIPK type Iα (PIPKIα) and type IIα (PIPKIIα) in mouse cerebellum. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that two conserved catalytic aspartate residues of PIPKIα and PIPKIIα are involved in the interaction with IRBIT. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, Mg2+, and/or ATP interfered with the interaction, suggesting that IRBIT interacts with catalytic cores of PIPKs. Mutations of phosphorylation sites in the serine-rich region of IRBIT affected the selectivity of its interaction with PIPKIα and PIPKIIα. The structural flexibility of the serine-rich region, located in the intrinsically disordered protein region, is assumed to underlie the mechanism of this interaction. Furthermore, in vitro binding experiments and immunocytochemistry suggest that IRBIT and PIPKIα interact with the Na+/HCO3− cotransporter NBCe1-B. These results suggest that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with PIPKIα and NBCe1-B, whose activity is regulated by PI(4,5)P2. PMID:26509711

  9. Studies on the catalytic domains of multiple JmjC oxygenases using peptide substrates

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sophie T; Walport, Louise J; Hopkinson, Richard J; Madden, Sarah K; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Schofield, Christopher J; Kawamura, Akane

    2014-01-01

    The JmjC-domain-containing 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases catalyze protein hydroxylation and Nε-methyllysine demethylation via hydroxylation. A subgroup of this family, the JmjC lysine demethylases (JmjC KDMs) are involved in histone modifications at multiple sites. There are conflicting reports as to the substrate selectivity of some JmjC oxygenases with respect to KDM activities. In this study, a panel of modified histone H3 peptides was tested for demethylation against 15 human JmjC-domain-containing proteins. The results largely confirmed known Nε-methyllysine substrates. However, the purified KDM4 catalytic domains showed greater substrate promiscuity than previously reported (i.e., KDM4A was observed to catalyze demethylation at H3K27 as well as H3K9/K36). Crystallographic analyses revealed that the Nε-methyllysine of an H3K27me3 peptide binds similarly to Nε-methyllysines of H3K9me3/H3K36me3 with KDM4A. A subgroup of JmjC proteins known to catalyze hydroxylation did not display demethylation activity. Overall, the results reveal that the catalytic domains of the KDM4 enzymes may be less selective than previously identified. They also draw a distinction between the Nε-methyllysine demethylation and hydroxylation activities within the JmjC subfamily. These results will be of use to those working on functional studies of the JmjC enzymes. PMID:25625844

  10. Purification and biophysical characterization of the core protease domain of anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gkazonis, Petros V.; Dalkas, Georgios A.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2010-06-04

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) stands for the major virulence factor of the anthrax disease. It comprises a 90 kDa highly specific metalloprotease, the anthrax lethal factor (LF). LF possesses a catalytic Zn{sup 2+} binding site and is highly specific against MAPK kinases, thus representing the most potent native biomolecule to alter and inactivate MKK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) kinases] signalling pathways. Given the importance of the interaction between LF and substrate for the development of anti-anthrax agents as well as the potential treatment of nascent tumours, the analysis of the structure and dynamic properties of the LF catalytic site are essential to elucidate its enzymatic properties. Here we report the recombinant expression and purification of a C-terminal part of LF (LF{sub 672-776}) that harbours the enzyme's core protease domain. The biophysical characterization and backbone assignments ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) of the polypeptide revealed a stable, well folded structure even in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}, suitable for high resolution structural analysis by NMR.

  11. Structure of the catalytic domain of avian sarcoma virus integrase with a bound HIV-1 integrase-targeted inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lubkowski, Jacek; Yang, Fan; Alexandratos, Jerry; Wlodawer, Alexander; Zhao, He; Burke, Terrence R.; Neamati, Nouri; Pommier, Yves; Merkel, George; Skalka, Anna Marie

    1998-01-01

    The x-ray structures of an inhibitor complex of the catalytic core domain of avian sarcoma virus integrase (ASV IN) were solved at 1.9- to 2.0-Å resolution at two pH values, with and without Mn2+ cations. This inhibitor (Y-3), originally identified in a screen for inhibitors of the catalytic activity of HIV type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), was found in the present study to be active against ASV IN as well as HIV-1 IN. The Y-3 molecule is located in close proximity to the enzyme active site, interacts with the flexible loop, alters loop conformation, and affects the conformations of active site residues. As crystallized, a Y-3 molecule stacks against its symmetry-related mate. Preincubation of IN with metal cations does not prevent inhibition, and Y-3 binding does not prevent binding of divalent cations to IN. Three compounds chemically related to Y-3 also were investigated, but no binding was observed in the crystals. Our results identify the structural elements of the inhibitor that likely determine its binding properties. PMID:9560188

  12. Thermodynamic Properties of the Kinesin Neck-Region Docking to the Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Rice, S.; Cui, Y.; Sindelar, C.; Naber, N.; Matuska, M.; Vale, R.; Cooke, R.

    2003-01-01

    Kinesin motors move on microtubules by a mechanism that involves a large, ATP-triggered conformational change in which a mechanical element called the neck linker docks onto the catalytic core, making contacts with the core throughout its length. Here, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of this conformational change using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. We placed spin probes at several locations on the human kinesin neck linker and recorded EPR spectra in the presence of microtubules and either 5′-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMPPNP) or ADP at temperatures of 4–30°C. The free-energy change (ΔG) associated with AMPPNP-induced docking of the neck linker onto the catalytic core is favorable but small, about 3 kJ/mol. In contrast, the favorable enthalpy change (ΔH) and unfavorable entropy change (TΔS) are quite large, about 50 kJ/mol. A mutation in the neck linker, V331A/N332A, results in an unfavorable ΔG for AMPPNP-induced zipping of the neck linker onto the core and causes motility defects. These results suggest that the kinesin neck linker folds onto the core from a more unstructured state, thereby paying a large entropic cost and gaining a large amount of enthalpy. PMID:12609886

  13. Insertion of Endocellulase Catalytic Domains into Thermostable Consensus Ankyrin Scaffolds: Effects on Stability and Cellulolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Eva S.; Hatem, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of cellulose for biofuels production holds promise in solving important environmental and economic problems. However, the low activities (and thus high enzyme-to-substrate ratios needed) of hydrolytic cellulase enzymes, which convert cellulose into simple sugars, remain a major barrier. As a potential strategy to stabilize cellulases and enhance their activities, we have embedded cellulases of extremophiles into hyperstable α-helical consensus ankyrin domain scaffolds. We found the catalytic domains CelA (CA, GH8; Clostridium thermocellum) and Cel12A (C12A, GH12; Thermotoga maritima) to be stable in the context of the ankyrin scaffold and to be active against both soluble and insoluble substrates. The ankyrin repeats in each fusion are folded, although it appears that for the C12A catalytic domain (CD; where the N and C termini are distant in the crystal structure), the two flanking ankyrin domains are independent, whereas for CA (where termini are close), the flanking ankyrin domains stabilize each other. Although the activity of CA is unchanged in the context of the ankyrin scaffold, the activity of C12A is increased between 2- and 6-fold (for regenerated amorphous cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose substrates) at high temperatures. For C12A, activity increases with the number of flanking ankyrin repeats. These results showed ankyrin arrays to be a promising scaffold for constructing designer cellulosomes, preserving or enhancing enzymatic activity and retaining thermostability. This modular architecture will make it possible to arrange multiple cellulase domains at a precise spacing within a single polypeptide, allowing us to search for spacings that may optimize reactivity toward the repetitive cellulose lattice. PMID:23974146

  14. [Molecular engineering of cellulase catalytic domain based on glycoside hydrolase family].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Li, Dandan; Wang, Lushan; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Guanjun

    2013-04-01

    Molecular engineering of cellulases can improve enzymatic activity and efficiency. Recently, the Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes Database (CAZy), including glycoside hydrolase (GH) families, has been established with the development of Omics and structural measurement technologies. Molecular engineering based on GH families can obviously decrease the probing space of target sequences and structures, and increase the odds of experimental success. Besides, the study of cellulase active-site architecture paves the way toward the explanation of catalytic mechanism. This review focuses on the main GH families and the latest progresses in molecular engineering of catalytic domain. Based on the combination of analysis of a large amount of data in the same GH family and their conservative active-site architecture information, rational design will be an important direction for molecular engineering and promote the rapid development of the conversion of biomass. PMID:23894816

  15. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human bile salt activated lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Terzyan, S.; Wang, C. S.; Downs, D.; Hunter, B.; Zhang, X. C.

    2000-01-01

    Bile-salt activated lipase (BAL) is a pancreatic enzyme that digests a variety of lipids in the small intestine. A distinct property of BAL is its dependency on bile salts in hydrolyzing substrates of long acyl chains or bulky alcoholic motifs. A crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human BAL (residues 1-538) with two surface mutations (N186D and A298D), which were introduced in attempting to facilitate crystallization, has been determined at 2.3 A resolution. The crystal form belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one monomer per asymmetric unit, and the protein shows an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. In the absence of bound bile salt molecules, the protein possesses a preformed catalytic triad and a functional oxyanion hole. Several surface loops around the active site are mobile, including two loops potentially involved in substrate binding (residues 115-125 and 270-285). PMID:11045623

  16. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  17. Structure of USP7 catalytic domain and three Ubl-domains reveals a connector α-helix with regulatory role.

    PubMed

    Kim, Robbert Q; van Dijk, Willem J; Sixma, Titia K

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquitin conjugation is an important signal in cellular pathways, changing the fate of a target protein, by degradation, relocalisation or complex formation. These signals are balanced by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which antagonize ubiquitination of specific protein substrates. Because ubiquitination pathways are critically important, DUB activity is often carefully controlled. USP7 is a highly abundant DUB with numerous targets that plays complex roles in diverse pathways, including DNA regulation, p53 stress response and endosomal protein recycling. Full-length USP7 switches between an inactive and an active state, tuned by the positioning of 5 Ubl folds in the C-terminal HUBL domain. The active state requires interaction between the last two Ubls (USP7(45)) and the catalytic domain (USP7(CD)), and this can be promoted by allosteric interaction from the first 3 Ubl domains of USP7 (USP7(123)) interacting with GMPS. Here we study the transition between USP7 states. We provide a crystal structure of USP7(CD123) and show that CD and Ubl123 are connected via an extended charged alpha helix. Mutational analysis is used to determine whether the charge and rigidity of this 'connector helix' are important for full USP7 activity. PMID:27183903

  18. Systematic literature review of domains assessed in psoriatic arthritis to inform the update of the psoriatic arthritis core domain set

    PubMed Central

    Kalyoncu, Umut; Ogdie, Alexis; Campbell, Willemina; Bingham, Clifton O; de Wit, Maarten; Gladman, Dafna D; Mease, Philip; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Strand, Vibeke; Riese, Victoria G; Orbai, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this systematic literature review (SLR) were to identify domains and outcome measures used in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) studies in the past 5 years, and to compare the measurement of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 2006 PsA Core Domain Set in studies published in 2010–2015 vs those published in 2006–2010. We performed a systematic literature search in two databases, PubMed and Embase, to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in PsA. We also identified PsA longitudinal observational studies (LOS). Three patient research partners provided input into study conception, and data collection and interpretation. We identified 41 studies representing 22 unique RCTs, 27 LOS and 12 registries. Across all studies, we identified 24 domains and 169 outcome measures. In addition to the PsA Core Domain Set (6 domains), the following domains were also assessed in more than 30% of RCTs: acute phase reactants, dactylitis, enthesitis, fatigue and work productivity. We identified a range of 1–15 outcome measures per domain with a mean (SD) of 7 (4.7) per domain. The complete PsA Core Domain Set was assessed in 59% of RCTs in 2010–2015 compared to 23.5% RCTs in 2006–2010. There has been increased measurement of the PsA Core Domain Set in RCTs and LOS in the past 5 years. Numerous additional outcomes were also measured. The PsA Core Domain Set needs an update to standardise PsA outcome assessments. This SLR will inform the development of an updated PsA Core Domain Set with patient research partner input. PMID:26966554

  19. Correlated Mutation Analysis on the Catalytic Domains of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Du, Pan; Shen, Hongbo; Hu, Hairong; Wu, Qi; Xie, Jun; Yu, Long

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein kinases (PKs) have emerged as the largest family of signaling proteins in eukaryotic cells and are involved in every aspect of cellular regulation. Great progresses have been made in understanding the mechanisms of PKs phosphorylating their substrates, but the detailed mechanisms, by which PKs ensure their substrate specificity with their structurally conserved catalytic domains, still have not been adequately understood. Correlated mutation analysis based on large sets of diverse sequence data may provide new insights into this question. Methodology/Principal Findings Statistical coupling, residue correlation and mutual information analyses along with clustering were applied to analyze the structure-based multiple sequence alignment of the catalytic domains of the Ser/Thr PK family. Two clusters of highly coupled sites were identified. Mapping these positions onto the 3D structure of PK catalytic domain showed that these two groups of positions form two physically close networks. We named these two networks as θ-shaped and γ-shaped networks, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The θ-shaped network links the active site cleft and the substrate binding regions, and might participate in PKs recognizing and interacting with their substrates. The γ-shaped network is mainly situated in one side of substrate binding regions, linking the activation loop and the substrate binding regions. It might play a role in supporting the activation loop and substrate binding regions before catalysis, and participate in product releasing after phosphoryl transfer. Our results exhibit significant correlations with experimental observations, and can be used as a guide to further experimental and theoretical studies on the mechanisms of PKs interacting with their substrates. PMID:19526051

  20. Solution structure of the catalytic domain of human stromelysin complexed with a hydrophobic inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, S. R.; Kurochkin, A. V.; Hu, W.; Ye, Q. Z.; Johnson, L. L.; Hupe, D. J.; Zuiderweg, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Stromelysin, a representative matrix metalloproteinase and target of drug development efforts, plays a prominent role in the pathological proteolysis associated with arthritis and secondarily in that of cancer metastasis and invasion. To provide a structural template to aid the development of therapeutic inhibitors, we have determined a medium-resolution structure of a 20-kDa complex of human stromelysin's catalytic domain with a hydrophobic peptidic inhibitor using multinuclear, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. This domain of this zinc hydrolase contains a mixed beta-sheet comprising one antiparallel strand and four parallel strands, three helices, and a methionine-containing turn near the catalytic center. The ensemble of 20 structures was calculated using, on average, 8 interresidue NOE restraints per residue for the 166-residue protein fragment complexed with a 4-residue substrate analogue. The mean RMS deviation (RMSD) to the average structure for backbone heavy atoms is 0.91 A and for all heavy atoms is 1.42 A. The structure has good stereochemical properties, including its backbone torsion angles. The beta-sheet and alpha-helices of the catalytic domains of human stromelysin (NMR model) and human fibroblast collagenase (X-ray crystallographic model of Lovejoy B et al., 1994b, Biochemistry 33:8207-8217) superimpose well, having a pairwise RMSD for backbone heavy atoms of 2.28 A when three loop segments are disregarded. The hydroxamate-substituted inhibitor binds across the hydrophobic active site of stromelysin in an extended conformation. The first hydrophobic side chain is deeply buried in the principal S'1 subsite, the second hydrophobic side chain is located on the opposite side of the inhibitor backbone in the hydrophobic S'2 surface subsite, and a third hydrophobic side chain (P'3) lies at the surface. PMID:8580839

  1. Structure and function of the catalytic domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component in Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaran, Sowmini; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Reynolds, Shelley; Calero, Guillermo; Brukh, Roman; Kakalis, Lazaros; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-05-30

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) catalyzing conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA comprises three components: E1p, E2p, and E3. The E2p is the five-domain core component, consisting of three tandem lipoyl domains (LDs), a peripheral subunit binding domain (PSBD), and a catalytic domain (E2pCD). Herein are reported the following. 1) The x-ray structure of E2pCD revealed both intra- and intertrimer interactions, similar to those reported for other E2pCDs. 2) Reconstitution of recombinant LD and E2pCD with E1p and E3p into PDHc could maintain at least 6.4% activity (NADH production), confirming the functional competence of the E2pCD and active center coupling among E1p, LD, E2pCD, and E3 even in the absence of PSBD and of a covalent link between domains within E2p. 3) Direct acetyl transfer between LD and coenzyme A catalyzed by E2pCD was observed with a rate constant of 199 s(-1), comparable with the rate of NADH production in the PDHc reaction. Hence, neither reductive acetylation of E2p nor acetyl transfer within E2p is rate-limiting. 4) An unprecedented finding is that although no interaction could be detected between E1p and E2pCD by itself, a domain-induced interaction was identified on E1p active centers upon assembly with E2p and C-terminally truncated E2p proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The inclusion of each additional domain of E2p strengthened the interaction with E1p, and the interaction was strongest with intact E2p. E2p domain-induced changes at the E1p active site were also manifested by the appearance of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the canonical 4'-aminopyrimidine tautomer of bound thiamin diphosphate (AP). PMID:24742683

  2. Structure and Function of the Catalytic Domain of the Dihydrolipoyl Acetyltransferase Component in Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaran, Sowmini; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Reynolds, Shelley; Calero, Guillermo; Brukh, Roman; Kakalis, Lazaros; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) catalyzing conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA comprises three components: E1p, E2p, and E3. The E2p is the five-domain core component, consisting of three tandem lipoyl domains (LDs), a peripheral subunit binding domain (PSBD), and a catalytic domain (E2pCD). Herein are reported the following. 1) The x-ray structure of E2pCD revealed both intra- and intertrimer interactions, similar to those reported for other E2pCDs. 2) Reconstitution of recombinant LD and E2pCD with E1p and E3p into PDHc could maintain at least 6.4% activity (NADH production), confirming the functional competence of the E2pCD and active center coupling among E1p, LD, E2pCD, and E3 even in the absence of PSBD and of a covalent link between domains within E2p. 3) Direct acetyl transfer between LD and coenzyme A catalyzed by E2pCD was observed with a rate constant of 199 s−1, comparable with the rate of NADH production in the PDHc reaction. Hence, neither reductive acetylation of E2p nor acetyl transfer within E2p is rate-limiting. 4) An unprecedented finding is that although no interaction could be detected between E1p and E2pCD by itself, a domain-induced interaction was identified on E1p active centers upon assembly with E2p and C-terminally truncated E2p proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The inclusion of each additional domain of E2p strengthened the interaction with E1p, and the interaction was strongest with intact E2p. E2p domain-induced changes at the E1p active site were also manifested by the appearance of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the canonical 4′-aminopyrimidine tautomer of bound thiamin diphosphate (AP). PMID:24742683

  3. High Resolution Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of ADAMTS-5 (Aggrecanase-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Mathis, Karl J.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Hills, Robert L.; Wiese, Joe F.; Benson, Timothy E.; Kiefer, James R.; Marino, Margaret H.; Carroll, Jeffery N.; Leone, Joseph W.; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Arner, Elizabeth C.; Tortorella, Micky D.; Tomasselli, Alfredo

    2008-06-30

    Aggrecanase-2 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5 (ADAMTS-5)), a member of the ADAMTS protein family, is critically involved in arthritic diseases because of its direct role in cleaving the cartilage component aggrecan. The catalytic domain of aggrecanase-2 has been refolded, purified, and crystallized, and its three-dimensional structure determined to 1.4{angstrom} resolution in the presence of an inhibitor. A high resolution structure of an ADAMTS/aggrecanase protein provides an opportunity for the development of therapeutics to treat osteoarthritis.

  4. Stability and solubility engineering of the EphB4 tyrosine kinase catalytic domain using a rationally designed synthetic library.

    PubMed

    Overman, R C; Green, I; Truman, C M; Read, J A; Embrey, K J; McAlister, M S B; Attwood, T K

    2013-10-01

    The inability to generate soluble, correctly folded recombinant protein is often a barrier to successful structural and functional studies. Access to affordable synthetic genes has, however, made it possible to design, make and test many more variants of a target protein to identify suitable constructs. We have used rational design and gene synthesis to create a controlled randomised library of the EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase, with the aim of obtaining soluble, purifiable and active catalytic domain material at multi-milligram levels in Escherichia coli. Three main parameters were tested in designing the library--construct length, functional mutations and stability grafting. These variables were combined to generate a total of 9720 possible variants. The screening of 480 clones generated a 3% hit rate, with a purifiable solubility of up to 15 mg/L for some EphB4 constructs that was largely independent of construct length. Sequencing of the positive clones revealed a pair of hydrophobic core mutations that were key to obtaining soluble material. A minimal kinase domain construct containing these two mutations exhibited a +4.5°C increase in thermal stability over the wild-type protein. These approaches will be broadly applicable for solubility engineering of many different protein target classes. Atomic coordinates and structural factors have been deposited in PDB under the accession 2yn8 (EphB4 HP + staurosporine). PMID:23840071

  5. Structure of the HHARI Catalytic Domain Shows Glimpses of a HECT E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Donald E.; Mercier, Pascal; Shaw, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-signaling pathway utilizes E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligase enzymes to sequentially transfer the small modifier protein ubiquitin to a substrate protein. During the last step of this cascade different types of E3 ligases either act as scaffolds to recruit an E2 enzyme and substrate (RING), or form an ubiquitin-thioester intermediate prior to transferring ubiquitin to a substrate (HECT). The RING-inBetweenRING-RING (RBR) proteins constitute a unique group of E3 ubiquitin ligases that includes the Human Homologue of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI). These E3 ligases are proposed to use a hybrid RING/HECT mechanism whereby the enzyme uses facets of both the RING and HECT enzymes to transfer ubiquitin to a substrate. We now present the solution structure of the HHARI RING2 domain, the key portion of this E3 ligase required for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism. The structure shows the domain possesses two Zn2+-binding sites and a single exposed cysteine used for ubiquitin catalysis. A structural comparison of the RING2 domain with the HECT E3 ligase NEDD4 reveals a near mirror image of the cysteine and histidine residues in the catalytic site. Further, a tandem pair of aromatic residues exists near the C-terminus of the HHARI RING2 domain that is conserved in other RBR E3 ligases. One of these aromatic residues is remotely located from the catalytic site that is reminiscent of the location found in HECT E3 enzymes where it is used for ubiquitin catalysis. These observations provide an initial structural rationale for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism for ubiquitination used by the RBR E3 ligases. PMID:24058416

  6. Assay and Inhibition of the Purified Catalytic Domain of Diacylglycerol Lipase Beta.

    PubMed

    Singh, Praveen K; Markwick, Rachel; Lu, Leanne; Howell, Fiona V; Williams, Gareth; Doherty, Patrick

    2016-05-17

    The diacylglycerol lipases (DAGLα and DAGLβ) hydrolyze DAG to generate 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), the principal endocannabinoid and main precursor of arachidonic acid (AA). The DAGLs make distinct tissue specific contributions toward 2-AG and AA levels, and therefore, selective modulators for these enzymes could play crucial roles toward harnessing their therapeutic potential. Relatively high-throughput assays have recently been reported for DAGLα and have proven useful toward the characterization of inhibitors of this enzyme. Similar assays are also warranted for DAGLβ which was the aim of this study. We first adapted previously reported DAGLα membrane assays (using PNPB and DiFMUO as substrates) to measure recombinant DAGLβ activity in membranes. In contrast to results with DAGLα, both substrates provided a relatively limited signal window for measuring DAGLβ activity, however, an improved window was obtained when employing a third commercially available substrate, EnzChek. In order to further improve on the assay parameters, we successfully purified the glutathione S-transferase (GST) tagged catalytic domain of DAGLβ. Activity of the enzyme was confirmed using EnzChek as well as two DAGL inhibitors (THL and OMDM-188). The purified DAGLβ catalytic domain assay described here provides the basis for a relatively clean and convenient assay with the potential to be adapted for high-throughput drug discovery efforts. PMID:27115711

  7. A Novel Catalytic Function of Synthetic IgG-Binding Domain (Z Domain) from Staphylococcal Protein A: Light Emission with Coelenterazine.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic IgG-binding domain (Z domain) of staphylococcal protein A catalyzes the oxidation of coelenterazine to emit light like a coelenterazine-utilizing luciferase. The Z domain derivatives (ZZ-gCys, Z-gCys and Z-domain) were purified and the luminescence properties were characterized by comparing with coelenterazine-utilizing luciferases, including Renilla luciferase, Gaussia luciferase and the catalytic 19 kDa protein of Oplophorus luciferase. Three Z domain derivatives showed luminescence activity with coelenterazine and the order of the initial maximum intensity of luminescence was ZZ-gCys (100%) > Z-gCys (36.8%) > Z-domain (1.1%) > bovine serum albumin (BSA; 0.9%) > staphylococcal protein A (0.1%) and the background value of coelenterazine (0.1%) in our conditions. The luminescence properties of ZZ-gCys showed the similarity to that of Gaussia luciferase, including the luminescence pattern, the emission spectrum, the stimulation by halogen ions and nonionic detergents and the substrate specificity for coelenterazine analogues. In contrast, the luminescence properties of Z-gCys were close to the catalytic 19 kDa protein of Oplophorus luciferase. The catalytic region of the Z domain for the luminescence reaction might be different from the IgG-binding region of the Z domain. PMID:24138575

  8. Catalytic Efficiency of Chitinase-D on Insoluble Chitinous Substrates Was Improved by Fusing Auxiliary Domains

    PubMed Central

    Madhuprakash, Jogi; El Gueddari, Nour Eddine; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.; Podile, Appa Rao

    2015-01-01

    Chitin is an abundant renewable polysaccharide, next only to cellulose. Chitinases are important for effective utilization of this biopolymer. Chitinase D from Serratia proteamaculans (SpChiD) is a single domain chitinase with both hydrolytic and transglycosylation (TG) activities. SpChiD had less of hydrolytic activity on insoluble polymeric chitin substrates due to the absence of auxiliary binding domains. We improved catalytic efficiency of SpChiD in degradation of insoluble chitin substrates by fusing with auxiliary domains like polycystic kidney disease (PKD) domain and chitin binding protein 21 (CBP21). Of the six different SpChiD fusion chimeras, two C-terminal fusions viz. ChiD+PKD and ChiD+CBP resulted in improved hydrolytic activity on α- and β-chitin, respectively. Time-course degradation of colloidal chitin also confirmed that these two C-terminal SpChiD fusion chimeras were more active than other chimeras. More TG products were produced for a longer duration by the fusion chimeras ChiD+PKD and PKD+ChiD+CBP. PMID:25615694

  9. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Zhenxing, H.; Swaathi, J.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Sivaraman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine ({psi}) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E. coli RluF at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of {psi}-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  10. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. PMID:27208174

  11. Crystal structures of tubulin acetyltransferase reveal a conserved catalytic core and the plasticity of the essential N terminus.

    PubMed

    Kormendi, Vasilisa; Szyk, Agnieszka; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2012-12-01

    Tubulin acetyltransferase (TAT) acetylates Lys-40 of α-tubulin in the microtubule lumen. TAT is inefficient, and its activity is enhanced when tubulin is incorporated in microtubules. Acetylation is associated with stable microtubules and regulates the binding of microtubule motors and associated proteins. TAT is important in neuronal polarity and mechanosensation, and decreased tubulin acetylation levels are associated with axonal transport defects and neurodegeneration. We present the first structure of TAT in complex with acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) at 2.7 Å resolution. The structure reveals a conserved stable catalytic core shared with other GCN5 superfamily acetyltransferases consisting of a central β-sheet flanked by α-helices and a C-terminal β-hairpin unique to TAT. Structure-guided mutagenesis establishes the molecular determinants for Ac-CoA and tubulin substrate recognition. The wild-type TAT construct is a monomer in solution. We identify a metastable interface between the conserved core and N-terminal domain that modulates the oligomerization of TAT in solution and is essential for activity. The 2.45 Å resolution structure of an inactive TAT construct with an active site point mutation near this interface reveals a domain-swapped dimer in which the functionally essential N terminus shows evidence of marked structural plasticity. The sequence segment corresponding to this structurally plastic region in TAT has been implicated in substrate recognition in other GCN5 superfamily acetyltransferases. Our structures provide a rational platform for the mechanistic dissection of TAT activity and the design of TAT inhibitors with therapeutic potential in neuronal regeneration. PMID:23105108

  12. In Situ Synthesis of Catalytic Active Au Nanoparticles onto Gibbsite-Polydopamine Core-Shell Nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jie; Mei, Shilin; Jia, He; Ott, Andreas; Ballauff, Matthias; Lu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    We report a facile method to synthesize anisotropic platelike gibbsite-polymer core-shell particles. Dopamine is self-polymerized on the surface of gibbsite nanoplates and forms a homogeneous layer on it. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the resulting latexes demonstrates the formation of well-defined platelike core-shell particles. Reaction time and ultrasonification are found to be important factors to control the thickness of the polymer shell and avoid aggregation. Good control over the platelike morphology and 100% encapsulation efficiency have been achieved via this novel route. The resulting well-defined gibbsite-polydamine (G-PDA) core-shell nanoplates show excellent colloidal stability and can form opal-like columnar crystal with iridescent Bragg reflection after modest centrifugation. In addition, G-PDA core-shell nanoplates can serve both as reductant and stabilizer for the generation of Au nanoparticles (NPs) in situ. Au NPs with tunable size have been formed on the G-PDA particle surface, which show efficient catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and Rhodamine B (RhB) in the presence of borohydride. Such nanocatalysts can be easily deposited on silicon substrate by spin-coating due to the large contact area of platelike G-PDA particles and the strong adhesive behavior of the PDA layer. The substrate-deposited nanocatalyst can be easily recycled which show excellent reusability for the reduction of RhB. PMID:26266398

  13. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the Resuscitation Promoting Factor RpfC Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Vincenzo; Ruggiero, Alessia; Russo, Luigi; De Simone, Alfonso; Pedone, Paolo Vincenzo; Malgieri, Gaetano; Berisio, Rita; Isernia, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent infection is maintained for years with no clinical symptoms and no adverse effects for the host. The mechanism through which dormant M. tuberculosis resuscitates and enters the cell cycle leading to tuberculosis is attracting much interest. The RPF family of proteins has been found to be responsible for bacteria resuscitation and normal proliferation. This family of proteins in M. tuberculosis is composed by five homologues (named RpfA-E) and understanding their conformational, structural and functional peculiarities is crucial to the design of therapeutic strategies.Therefore, we report the structural and dynamics characterization of the catalytic domain of RpfC from M. tubercolosis by combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism and Molecular Dynamics data. We also show how the formation of a disulfide bridge, highly conserved among the homologues, is likely to modulate the shape of the RpfC hydrophobic catalytic cleft. This might result in a protein function regulation via a “conformational editing” through a disulfide bond formation. PMID:26576056

  14. 1.92 Angstrom Zinc-Free APOBEC3F Catalytic Domain Crystal Structure.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Nadine M; Shi, Ke; Li, Ming; Aihara, Hideki; Harris, Reuben S

    2016-06-01

    The APOBEC3 family of DNA cytosine deaminases is capable of restricting the replication of HIV-1 and other pathogens. Here, we report a 1.92 Å resolution crystal structure of the Vif-binding and catalytic domain of APOBEC3F (A3F). This structure is distinct from the previously published APOBEC and phylogenetically related deaminase structures, as it is the first without zinc in the active site. We determined an additional structure containing zinc in the same crystal form that allows direct comparison with the zinc-free structure. In the absence of zinc, the conserved active site residues that normally participate in zinc coordination show unique conformations, including a 90 degree rotation of His249 and disulfide bond formation between Cys280 and Cys283. We found that zinc coordination is influenced by pH, and treating the protein at low pH in crystallization buffer is sufficient to remove zinc. Zinc coordination and catalytic activity are reconstituted with the addition of zinc only in a reduced environment likely due to the two active site cysteines readily forming a disulfide bond when not coordinating zinc. We show that the enzyme is active in the presence of zinc and cobalt but not with other divalent metals. These results unexpectedly demonstrate that zinc is not required for the structural integrity of A3F and suggest that metal coordination may be a strategy for regulating the activity of A3F and related deaminases. PMID:27139641

  15. Conformational selection in the recognition of phosphorylated substrates by the catalytic domain of human Pin1.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Hector A; Hamelberg, Donald

    2011-11-01

    Post-translational phosphorylation and the related conformational changes in signaling proteins are responsible for regulating a wide range of subcellular processes. Human Pin1 is central to many of these cell signaling pathways in normal and aberrant subcellular processes, catalyzing cis-trans isomerization of the peptide ω-bond in phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline motifs in many proteins. Pin1 has therefore been identified as a possible drug target in many diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's. The effects of phosphorylation on Pin1 substrates, and the atomistic basis for Pin1 recognition and catalysis, are not well understood. Here, we determine the conformational consequences of phosphorylation on Pin1 substrate analogues and the mechanism of recognition by the catalytic domain of Pin1 using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that phosphorylation induces backbone conformational changes on the peptide substrate analogues. We also show that Pin1 recognizes specific conformations of its substrate by conformational selection. Furthermore, dynamical correlated motions in the free Pin1 enzyme are present in the enzyme of the enzyme-substrate complex when the substrate is in the transition state configuration, suggesting that these motions play significant roles during catalytic turnover. These results provide a detailed atomistic picture of the mechanism of Pin1 recognition that can be exploited for drug design purposes and further our understanding of the synergistic complexities of post-translational phosphorylation and cis-trans isomerization. PMID:21967280

  16. Structure of the catalytic domain of the hepatitis C virus NS2-3 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz,I.; Marcotrigiano, J.; Dentzer, T.; Rice, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a major global health problem affecting an estimated 170 million people worldwide. Chronic infection is common and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is no vaccine available and current therapies have met with limited success. The viral RNA genome encodes a polyprotein that includes two proteases essential for virus replication. The NS2-3 protease mediates a single cleavage at the NS2/NS3 junction, whereas the NS3-4A protease cleaves at four downstream sites in the polyprotein. NS3-4A is characterized as a serine protease with a chymotrypsin-like fold, but the enzymatic mechanism of the NS2-3 protease remains unresolved. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the NS2-3 protease at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. The structure reveals a dimeric cysteine protease with two composite active sites. For each active site, the catalytic histidine and glutamate residues are contributed by one monomer, and the nucleophilic cysteine by the other. The carboxy-terminal residues remain coordinated in the two active sites, predicting an inactive post-cleavage form. Proteolysis through formation of a composite active site occurs in the context of the viral polyprotein expressed in mammalian cells. These features offer unexpected insights into polyprotein processing by hepatitis C virus and new opportunities for antiviral drug design.

  17. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Salmonella virulence factor SseI

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskaran, Shyam S.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2012-01-01

    SseI is secreted into host cells by Salmonella and contributes to the establishment of systemic infections. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of SseI has been solved to 1.70 Å resolution, revealing it to be a member of the cysteine protease superfamily with a catalytic triad consisting of Cys178, His216 and Asp231 that is critical to its virulence activities. Structure-based analysis revealed that SseI is likely to possess either acyl hydrolase or acyltransferase activity, placing this virulence factor in the rapidly growing class of enzymes of this family utilized by bacterial pathogens inside eukaryotic cells. PMID:23151626

  18. Essential lysine residues within transmembrane helix 1 of diphtheria toxin facilitate COPI binding and catalytic domain entry

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Carolina; Taylor-Parker, Julian; Harrison, Robert; Murphy, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The translocation of the diphtheria toxin catalytic domain from the lumen of early endosomes into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells is an essential step in the intoxication process. We have previously shown that the in vitro translocation of the catalytic domain from the lumen of toxin pre-loaded endosomal vesicles to the external medium requires the addition of cytosolic proteins including coatomer protein complex I (COPI) to the reaction mixture. Further, we have shown that transmembrane helix 1 plays an essential, but as yet undefined role in the entry process. We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and a COPI complex precipitation assay to demonstrate that interaction(s) between at least three lysine residues in transmembrane helix 1 are essential for both COPI complex binding and the delivery of the catalytic domain into the target cell cytosol. Finally, a COPI binding domain swap was used to demonstrate that substitution of the lysine-rich transmembrane helix 1with the COPI binding portion of the p23 adaptor cytoplasmic tail results in a mutant that displays full wild type activity. Thus, irrespective of sequence, the ability of transmembrane helix 1 to bind to COPI complex appears to be the essential feature for catalytic domain delivery to the cytosol. PMID:20398220

  19. Expression, purification, and structural analysis of the trimeric form of the catalytic domain of the Escherichia coli dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, J. E.; Carroll, D.; Lawson, J. E.; Ernst, S. R.; Reed, L. J.; Hackert, M. L.

    2000-01-01

    The dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (E2o) component of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the transfer of a succinyl group from the S-succinyldihydrolipoyl moiety to coenzyme A. E2o is normally a 24-mer, but is found as a trimer when E2o is expressed with a C-terminal [His]6 tag. The crystal structure of the trimeric form of the catalytic domain (CD) of the Escherichia coli E2o has been solved to 3.0 A resolution using the Molecular Replacement method. The refined model contains an intact trimer in the asymmetric unit and has an R-factor of 0.257 (Rfree = 0.286) for 18,699 reflections between 10.0 and 3.0 A resolution. The core of tE2oCD (residues 187-396) superimposes onto that of the cubic E2oCD with an RMS difference of 0.4 A for all main-chain atoms. The C-terminal end of tE2oCD (residues 397-404) rotates by an average of 37 degrees compared to cubic E2oCD, disrupting the normal twofold interface. Despite the alteration of quaternary structure, the active site of tE2oCD shows no significant differences from that of the cubic E2oCD, although several side chains in the active site are more ordered in the trimeric form of E2oCD. Analysis of the available sequence data suggests that the majority of E2 components have active sites that resemble that of E. coli E2oCD. The remaining E2 components can be divided into three groups based on active-site sequence similarity. Analysis of the surface properties of both crystal forms of E. coli E2oCD suggests key residues that may be involved in the protein-protein contacts that occur between the catalytic and lipoyl domains of E2o. PMID:10739245

  20. Redox-Linked Domain Movements in the Catalytic Cycle of Cytochrome P450 Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Cheng; Ellis, Jacqueline; Moody, Peter C.E.; Raven, Emma L.; Roberts, Gordon C.K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase is a key component of the P450 mono-oxygenase drug-metabolizing system. There is evidence for a conformational equilibrium involving large-scale domain motions in this enzyme. We now show, using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering, that delivery of two electrons to cytochrome P450 reductase leads to a shift in this equilibrium from a compact form, similar to the crystal structure, toward an extended form, while coenzyme binding favors the compact form. We present a model for the extended form of the enzyme based on nuclear magnetic resonance and SAXS data. Using the effects of changes in solution conditions and of site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the conversion to the extended form leads to an enhanced ability to transfer electrons to cytochrome c. This structural evidence shows that domain motion is linked closely to the individual steps of the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450 reductase, and we propose a mechanism for this. PMID:23911089

  1. Diversity between mammalian tolloid proteinases: Oligomerisation and non-catalytic domains influence activity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, Christopher P.; Ruiz Nivia, Hilda D.; Dajani, Rana; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Collins, Richard F.; Rada, Heather; Bird, Louise E.; Baldock, Clair

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian tolloid family of metalloproteinases is essential for tissue patterning and extracellular matrix assembly. The four members of the family: bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1), mammalian tolloid (mTLD), tolloid-like (TLL)-1 and TLL-2 differ in their substrate specificity and activity levels, despite sharing similar domain organization. We have previously described a model of substrate exclusion by dimerisation to explain differences in the activities of monomeric BMP-1 and dimers of mTLD and TLL-1. Here we show that TLL-2, the least active member of the tolloid family, is predominantly monomeric in solution, therefore it appears unlikely that substrate exclusion via dimerisation is a mechanism for regulating TLL-2 activity. X-ray scattering and electron microscopy structural and biophysical analyses reveal an elongated shape for the monomer and flexibility in the absence of calcium. Furthermore, we show that TLL-2 can cleave chordin in vitro, similar to other mammalian tolloids, but truncated forms of TLL-2 mimicking BMP-1 are unable to cleave chordin. However, both the N- and C-terminal non-catalytic domains from all mammalian tolloids bind chordin with high affinity. The mechanisms underlying substrate specificity and activity in the tolloid family are complex with variation between family members and depend on both multimerisation and substrate interaction. PMID:26902455

  2. Explorations of Catalytic Domains in Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase Enzymology

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Gene H.; Vickery, Christopher R.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Many pharmaceuticals on the market today belong to a large class of natural products called nonribosomal peptides (NRPs). Originating from bacteria and fungi, these peptide-based natural products consist not only of the 20 canonical L-amino acids, but also non-proteinogenic amino acids, heterocyclic rings, sugars, and fatty acids, generating tremendous chemical diversity. As a result, these secondary metabolites exhibit a broad array of bioactivity ranging from antimicrobial to anticancer. The biosynthesis of these complex compounds is carried out by large multimodular megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Each module is responsible for incorporation of a monomeric unit into the natural product peptide and is composed of individual domains that perform different catalytic reactions. Biochemical and bioinformatic investigations of these enzymes have uncovered the key principles of NRP synthesis, expanding the pharmaceutical potential of their enzymatic processes. Progress has been made in the manipulation of this biosynthetic machinery to develop new chemoenzymatic approaches for synthesizing novel pharmaceutical agents with increased potency. This review focuses on the recent discoveries and breakthroughs in the structural elucidation, molecular mechanism, and chemical biology underlying the discrete domains within NRPSs. PMID:22802156

  3. Catalytic properties of two Rhizopus oryzae 99-880 glucoamylase enzymes without starch binding domains expressed in Pichia pastoris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalytic properties of the two glucoamylases, AmyC and AmyD, without starch binding domains from Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 were heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. AmyC and AmyD demonstrate pH optima of 5.5 and 6.0, respectively, nearly 1 unit higher than most fungal glucoamy...

  4. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Glucuronoyl Esterase Catalytic Domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was over-expressed, purified, and crystallized by sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. Crystals had space group P212121 and X-ray diffraction data were...

  5. Prediction of hammerhead ribozyme intracellular activity with the catalytic core fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Gabryelska, Marta Magdalena; Wyszko, Eliza; Szymański, Maciej; Popenda, Mariusz; Barciszewski, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Hammerhead ribozyme is a versatile tool for down-regulation of gene expression in vivo. Owing to its small size and high activity, it is used as a model for RNA structure-function relationship studies. In the present paper we describe a new extended hammerhead ribozyme HH-2 with a tertiary stabilizing motif constructed on the basis of the tetraloop receptor sequence. This ribozyme is very active in living cells, but shows low activity in vitro. To understand it, we analysed tertiary structure models of substrate-ribozyme complexes. We calculated six unique catalytic core geometry parameters as distances and angles between particular atoms that we call the ribozyme fingerprint. A flanking sequence and tertiary motif change the geometry of the general base, general acid, nucleophile and leaving group. We found almost complete correlation between these parameters and the decrease of target gene expression in the cells. The tertiary structure model calculations allow us to predict ribozyme intracellular activity. Our approach could be widely adapted to characterize catalytic properties of other RNAs. PMID:23418809

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of cystathionine β-synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ereño-Orbea, June; Majtan, Tomas; Oyenarte, Iker; Kraus, Jan P.; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS; EC 4.2.1.22) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine and serine to form cystathionine, with the release of water. In humans, deficiency in CBS activity is the most common cause of hyperhomocysteinaemia and homocystinuria. More than 160 pathogenic mutations in the human CBS gene have been described to date. Here, the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of CBS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScCBS) is described which, in contrast to other eukaryotic CBSs, lacks the N-terminal haem-binding domain and is considered to be a useful model for investigation of the pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-mediated reactions of human CBS (hCBS). The purified protein yielded two different crystal forms belonging to space groups P41212 and P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 72.390, c = 386.794 Å and a = 58.156, b = 89.988, c = 121.687 Å, respectively. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray data suggests the presence of ScCBS homodimers in both types of crystals. PMID:24598918

  7. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Drosophila [beta]1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K.

    2010-11-03

    The {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the {beta}4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member {beta}4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of {beta}4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of {beta}4Gal-T7 and {beta}4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH{sub 2}OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the {beta}4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr{sup 177} interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  8. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans.

  9. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans. PMID:25939779

  10. Structures of the Human Poly (ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Catalytic Domain Confirm Catalytic Mechanism and Explain Inhibition by ADP-HPD Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Julie A.; Bennett, Neil; Brassington, Claire; Durant, Stephen T.; Hassall, Giles; Holdgate, Geoff; McAlister, Mark; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Truman, Caroline; Watson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG). Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD) and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:23251397

  11. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. PMID:26725083

  12. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas JD; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12095.001 PMID:26725083

  13. The DbpA catalytic core unwinds double-helix substrates by directly loading on them.

    PubMed

    Childs, Jared J; Gentry, Riley C; Moore, Anthony F T; Koculi, Eda

    2016-03-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. Similar to all the members of the DEAD-box family, the DbpA protein has two N-terminal RecA-like domains, which perform the RNA unwinding. However, unlike other members of this family, the DbpA protein also possesses a structured C-terminal RNA-binding domain that mediates specific tethering of DbpA to hairpin 92 of the Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA. Previous studies using model RNA molecules containing hairpin 92 show that the RNA molecules support the DbpA protein's double-helix unwinding activity, provided that the double helix has a 3' single-stranded region. The 3' single-stranded region was suggested to be the start site of the DbpA protein's catalytic unwinding activity. The data presented here demonstrate that the single-stranded region 3' of the double-helix substrate is not required for the DbpA protein's unwinding activity and the DbpA protein unwinds the double-helix substrates by directly loading on them. PMID:26755693

  14. Phosphatidylserine-containing membranes alter the thermal stability of prothrombin's catalytic domain: a differential scanning calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Lentz, B R; Zhou, C M; Wu, J R

    1994-05-10

    Denaturation profiles of bovine prothrombin and its isolated fragments were examined in the presence of Na2EDTA, 5 mM CaCl2, and CaCl2 plus membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) in combination with bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS). We have shown previously [Lentz, B. R., Wu, J. R., Sorrentino, A. M., & Carleton, J. A. (1991) Biophys. J. 60, 70] that binding to PS/POPC (25/75) large unilamellar vesicles resulted in an enthalpy loss in the main endotherm of prothrombin denaturation (Tm approximately 57-58 degrees C) and a comparable enthalpy gain in a minor endotherm (Tm approximately 59 degrees C) accompanying an upward shift in peak temperature (Tm approximately 73 degrees C). This minor endotherm was also responsive to Ca2+ binding and, in the absence of PS/POPC membranes, corresponded to melting of the N-terminal, Ca2+ and membrane binding domain (fragment 1). Peak deconvolution analysis of the prothrombin denaturation profile and extensive studies of the denaturation of isolated prothrombin domains in the presence and absence of PS/POPC vesicles suggested that membrane binding induced changes in the C-terminal catalytic domain of prothrombin (prethrombin 2) and in a domain that links fragment 1 with the catalytic domain (fragment 2). Specifically, the results have confirmed that the fragment 2 domain interacts with the stabilizes the prethrombin 2 domain and also have shown that fragment 2 interacts directly with the membrane. In addition, the results have demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized interaction between the catalytic and membrane binding domains. This interaction can account for another portion of the denaturation enthalpy that appears at high temperatures in the presence of membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180168

  15. Synthesis of triple-layered Ag@Co@Ni core-shell nanoparticles for the catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fangyuan; Liu, Guang; Li, Li; Wang, Ying; Xu, Changchang; An, Cuihua; Chen, Chengcheng; Xu, Yanan; Huang, Yanan; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2014-01-01

    Triple-layered Ag@Co@Ni core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) containing a silver core, a cobalt inner shell, and a nickel outer shell were formed by an in situ chemical reduction method. The thickness of the double shells varied with different cobalt and nickel contents. Ag0.04 @Co0.48 @Ni0.48 showed the most distinct core-shell structure. Compared with its bimetallic core-shell counterparts, this catalyst showed higher catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of NH3 BH3 (AB). The synergetic interaction between Co and Ni in Ag0.04 @Co0.48 @Ni0.48 NPs may play a critical role in the enhanced catalytic activity. Furthermore, cobalt-nickel double shells surrounding the silver core in the special triple-layered core-shell structure provided increasing amounts of active sites on the surface to facilitate the catalytic reaction. These promising catalysts may lead to applications for AB in the field of fuel cells. PMID:24302541

  16. Adventitious Arsenate Reductase Activity of the Catalytic Domain of the Human Cdc25B and Cdc25C Phosphatases†

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Sheng, Ju; Ajees, A. Abdul; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of eukaryotic enzymes that function as arsenate reductases are homologues of the catalytic domain of the human Cdc25 phosphatase. For example, the Leishmania major enzyme LmACR2 is both a phosphatase and an arsenate reductase, and its structure bears similarity to the structure of the catalytic domain of human Cdc25 phosphatase. These reductases contain an active site C-X5-R signature motif, where C is the catalytic cysteine, the five X residues form a phosphate binding loop, and R is a highly conserved arginine, which is also present in human Cdc25 phosphatases. We therefore investigated the possibility that the three human Cdc25 isoforms might have adventitious arsenate reductase activity. The sequences for the catalytic domains of Cdc25A, -B, and -C were cloned individually into a prokaryotic expression vector, and their gene products were purified from a bacterial host using nickel affinity chromatography. While each of the three Cdc25 catalytic domains exhibited phosphatase activity, arsenate reductase activity was observed only with Cdc25B and -C. These two enzymes reduced inorganic arsenate but not methylated pentavalent arsenicals. Alteration of either the cysteine and arginine residues of the Cys-X5-Arg motif led to the loss of both reductase and phosphatase activities. Our observations suggest that Cdc25B and -C may adventitiously reduce arsenate to the more toxic arsenite and may also provide a framework for identifying other human protein tyrosine phosphatases containing the active site Cys-X5-Arg loop that might moonlight as arsenate reductases. PMID:20025242

  17. Involvement of tryptophans at the catalytic and subunit-binding domains of transcarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G K; Beegen, H; Wood, H G

    1988-08-01

    Transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii is a multisubunit enzyme. It consists of one central hexameric subunit to which six outer dimeric subunits are attached through twelve biotinyl subunits. Both the central and the outer subunits are multi-tryptophan (Trp) proteins, and each contains 5 Trps per monomer. The roles of the Trps during catalysis and assembly of the enzyme have been studied by using N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) oxidation as a probe. Modification of approximately 10 Trps of the total 90 Trps of the intact enzyme results in loss of activity. Both the substrates, viz., methylmalonyl-CoA and pyruvate, afford protection (approximately 50%) against inactivation caused by NBS. Analyses of tryptic peptide maps and intrinsic fluorescence studies have indicated that modification of 10 Trps of the whole enzyme does not cause extensive conformational changes. Therefore, the Trps appear to be essential for catalytic activity. NBS modification of the individual subunits at pH 6.5 has demonstrated differential reactivity of their Trps. Modification of the exposed/reactive Trps of either one of the subunits significantly affects the subunit assembly with the complementary unmodified subunits to form active enzyme. It is proposed that Trps are involved at the subunit-binding domains of either the central or the outer subunit of transcarboxylase, in addition to those critical for catalysis. PMID:3191102

  18. Crystal Structure of the APOBEC3G Catalytic Domain Reveals Potential Oligomerization Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, Johnathan C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Royer, William E.; Harjes, Elena; Kono, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-02-11

    APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has antiviral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 {angstrom}. This structure corroborates features previously observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, a bulge in the second {beta} strand and a lengthening of the second {alpha} helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed, suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function.

  19. Expression and characterization of catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum subtilisin-like protease 3.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asrar; Bhatnagar, Raj K; Chauhan, Virander S

    2012-05-01

    PfSUB3 is the third subtilisin-like protease annotated in Plasmodium genome database "PlasmoDB". The other two members, PfSUB1 and PfSUB2 have been implicated in merozoite egress and invasion in asexual blood stages. In this study, we recombinantly expressed a region of PfSUB3 spanning from Asn(334) to Glu(769) (PfSUB3c) which encompassed the predicted catalytic domain with all the active site residues and predicted mature region spanning from Thr(516) to Glu(769) (PfSUB3m) in E. coli. PfSUB3m showed PMSF-sensitive proteolytic activity in in vitro assays. Replacement of active site serine with alanine in PfSUB3m resulted in inactive protein. We found that PfSUB3c and PfSUB3m undergo truncation to produce a 25-kDa species which was sufficient for proteolytic activity. Quantitative real-time PCR, immnufluorescence assay and Western blot analyses revealed that PfSUB3 is expressed at late asexual blood stages. Serine protease activity of PfSUB3 and its expression in the late stages of erythrocytic schizogony are indicative of some possible role of the protease in merozoite egress and/or invasion processes. PMID:22285468

  20. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of the catalytic domain of MMP16 (cdMMP16).

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan; Yang, Hao; Aitha, Mahesh; George, Sam; Tierney, David L; Crowder, Michael W

    2016-07-01

    Membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase 16 (MMP16/MT3-MMP) is considered a drug target due to its role(s) in disease processes such as cancer and inflammation. Biochemical characterization of MMP16 is critical for developing new generation MMP inhibitors (MMPi), which exhibit high efficacies and selectivities. Herein, a modified over-expression and purification protocol was used to prepare the catalytic domain of MMP16 (cdMMP16). The resulting recombinant enzyme exhibited steady-state kinetic constants of K m = 10.6 ± 0.7 μM and k cat = 1.14 ± 0.02 s(-1), when using FS-6 as substrate, and the enzyme bound 1.8 ± 0.1 eq of Zn(II). The enzymatic activity of cdMMP16 is salt concentration-dependent, and cdMMP16 exhibits autoproteolytic activity under certain conditions, which may be related to an in vivo regulatory mechanism of MMP16 and of other membrane-type MMPs (MT-MMPs). Co(II)-substituted analogs (Co2- and ZnCo) of cdMMP16 were prepared and characterized using several spectroscopic techniques, such as UV-Vis, (1)H NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies. A well-characterized cdMMP16 is now available for future inhibitor screening efforts. PMID:27229514

  1. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of the catalytic domain of sika deer MMP-13.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Jiawen; Liu, Meichen; Wang, Siming; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 13 is one of three mammalian collagenases that are capable of initiating the degradation of interstitial collagens during wound healing. Herein, we report for the first time the molecular cloning of the catalytic domain (CD) of sika deer MMP-13, followed by protein expression in Escherichia coli and purification by affinity chromatography. The final yield was approximately 90.4 mg per liter of growth culture with a purity of 91.6%. The mass recovery during the purification and renaturation were 70.2% and 81.5%, respectively. Using gelatin zymography and a degradation assay, we found that the refolded sika deer MMP-13 (CD) could digest gelatin. The optimal pH and temperature for the enzyme bioactivity was 8.0 and 37 °C, respectively. The Km value for the enzyme-catalyzed digestion of gelatin was 136+/-8 μg/mL, and the Vmax was 4.12 × 10(3) U/μg. sdMMP13 (CD) was able to completely degrade collagen II and gelatin, and partially degrade fibronectin. The sdMMP-13 (CD) activity was significantly inhibited by several chemicals including 1, 10-phenanthroline, EDTA, Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Mn(2+). PMID:27338011

  2. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Subsequently, the Ag component is removed from the alloy shell using saturated NaCl solution to form core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a Pd shell. In comparison with the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles upon directly depositing Pd shell on the Au seeds and commercial Pd/C catalysts, the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles via their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd templates display superior activity and durability in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction, mainly due to the larger lattice tensile effect in Pd shell induced by the Au core and Ag removal. PMID:26144550

  3. The Role of Catalytic Substrate Morphology on the Shape and Domain Size of Two-Dimensional Boron Nitride Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griep, Mark; Tay, Roland; Tumlin, Travis; Teo, Edwin; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, including graphene and boron nitride (BN), has been of intense interest in recent years due to their exceptional electronic, thermal, and mechanical properties. Tailoring these novel properties to their maximum potential requires precise control of the atomic layer growth process. In recent years, catalytic growth of 2-D nanomaterials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has emerged as an attractive approach due to their low-cost, scalalibility, and ability totransfer the grown materials on various substrates. In this approach, The the morphology and purity of the catalytic surface plays a critical role on the shape, size, and growth kintectics of the 2D nanomaterial. In this work, we present the results of our systematic studies of the role of catalytic surface morphology on the shape and domain size of CVD grown hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) films. The present work clearly demonstrates that that the presence of surface roghness in the form of ridges leads to a preferential growth of small-domain triangular BN sheets. A 10 to 100-fold reduction in the surfcae roughness leads to increased domain BN triangles, eventually transitioning to large-domain hexagonal shaped hBN sheets.

  4. Mutational analysis of predicted interactions between the catalytic and P domains of prohormone convertase 3 (PC3/PC1)

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kazuya; Lipkind, Gregory M.; Zhou, An; Zhu, Xiaorong; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Philipson, Louis; Gardner, Paul; Zhang, Chunling; Steiner, Donald F.

    2003-01-01

    The subtilisin-like prohormone convertases (PCs) contain an essential downstream domain (P domain), which has been predicted to have a β-barrel structure that interacts with and stabilizes the catalytic domain (CAT). To assess possible sites of hydrophobic interaction, a series of mutant PC3–enhanced GFP constructs were prepared in which selected nonpolar residues on the surface of CAT were substituted by the corresponding polar residues in subtilisin Carlsberg. To investigate the folding potential of the isolated P domain, signal peptide–P domain–enhanced GFP constructs with mutated and/or truncated P domains were also made. All mutants were expressed in βTC3 cells, and their subcellular localization and secretion were determined. The mutants fell into three main groups: (i) Golgi/secreted, (ii) ER/nonsecreted, and (iii) apoptosis inducing. The destabilizing CAT mutations indicate that the side chains of V292, T328, L351, Q408, H409, V412, and F441 and nonpolar fragments of the side chains of R405 and W413 form a hydrophobic patch on CAT that interacts with the P domain. We also have found that the P domain can fold independently, as indicated by its secretion. Interestingly, T594, which is near the P domain C terminus, was not essential for P domain secretion but is crucial for the stability of intact PC3. T594V produced a stable enzyme, but T594D did not, which suggests that T594 participates in important hydrophobic interactions within PC3. These findings support our conclusion that the catalytic and P domains contribute to the folding and thermodynamic stability of the convertases through reciprocal hydrophobic interactions. PMID:12721373

  5. The xynC gene from Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 codes for a xylanase with two similar catalytic domains.

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, F W; Zhu, H; Krell, P J; Phillips, J P; Forsberg, C W

    1993-01-01

    The xynC gene of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 codes for a 66.4-kDa xylanase which consists of three distinct domains separated by two flexible regions rich in serine residues. Domains A and B of XynC code for catalytic domains with 56.5% identity and 9.6% similarity with each other, and both domains share homology with xylanases of Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Neocallimastix patriciarum, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus circulans. More than 88% of the xylanase activity of Escherichia coli cells carrying the original 13-kb recombinant plasmid was released from intact cells by cold water washes. The major products of hydrolysis of xylan by both domains were xylose and xylobiose, indicating that the xynC gene product exhibits catalytic properties similar to those of the XynA xylanases from R. flavefaciens and N. patriciarum. So far, these features are not shared broadly with bacteria from other environments and may indicate specific selection for this domain structure in the highly competitive environment of the rumen. Images PMID:8244936

  6. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Brian C.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Cannon, Richard D.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  7. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer.

    PubMed

    Monk, Brian C; Tomasiak, Thomas M; Keniya, Mikhail V; Huschmann, Franziska U; Tyndall, Joel D A; O'Connell, Joseph D; Cannon, Richard D; McDonald, Jeffrey G; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S; Stroud, Robert M

    2014-03-11

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X.-L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.

    2008-04-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from H. jecorina was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  9. Dimerization of cAMP phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) in living cells requires interfaces located in both the UCR1 and catalytic unit domains

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Graeme B.; Dunlop, Allan J.; Meng, Dong; Day, Jon P.; Klussmann, Enno; Baillie, George S.; Adams, David R.; Houslay, Miles D.

    2015-01-01

    PDE4 family cAMP phosphodiesterases play a pivotal role in determining compartmentalised cAMP signalling through targeted cAMP breakdown. Expressing the widely found PDE4D5 isoform, as both bait and prey in a yeast 2-hybrid system, we demonstrated interaction consistent with the notion that long PDE4 isoforms form dimers. Four potential dimerization sites were uncovered using a scanning peptide array approach, where a recombinant purified PDE4D5 fusion protein was used to probe a 25-mer library of overlapping peptides covering the entire PDE4D5 sequence. Key residues involved in PDE4D5 dimerization were defined using a site-directed mutagenesis programme directed by an alanine scanning peptide array approach. Critical residues stabilising PDE4D5 dimerization were defined within the regulatory UCR1 region found in long, but not short, PDE4 isoforms, namely the Arg173, Asn174 and Asn175 (DD1) cluster. Disruption of the DD1 cluster was not sufficient, in itself, to destabilise PDE4D5 homodimers. Instead, disruption of an additional interface, located on the PDE4 catalytic unit, was also required to convert PDE4D5 into a monomeric form. This second dimerization site on the conserved PDE4 catalytic unit is dependent upon a critical ion pair interaction. This involves Asp463 and Arg499 in PDE4D5, which interact in a trans fashion involving the two PDE4D5 molecules participating in the homodimer. PDE4 long isoforms adopt a dimeric state in living cells that is underpinned by two key contributory interactions, one involving the UCR modules and one involving an interface on the core catalytic domain. We propose that short forms do not adopt a dimeric configuration because, in the absence of the UCR1 module, residual engagement of the remaining core catalytic domain interface provides insufficient free energy to drive dimerization. The functioning of PDE4 long and short forms is thus poised to be inherently distinct due to this difference in quaternary structure. PMID

  10. The type II pullulanase of Thermococcus hydrothermalis: molecular characterization of the gene and expression of the catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Erra-Pujada, M; Debeire, P; Duchiron, F; O'Donohue, M J

    1999-05-01

    The gene encoding a hyperthermostable type II pullulanase produced by Thermococcus hydrothermalis (Th-Apu) has been isolated. Analysis of a total of 5.2 kb of genomic DNA has revealed the presence of three open reading frames, one of which (apuA) encodes the pullulanase. This enzyme is composed of 1,339 amino acid residues and exhibits a multidomain structure. In addition to a typical N-terminal signal peptide, Th-Apu possesses a catalytic domain, a domain bearing S-layer homology-like motifs, a Thr-rich region, and a potential C-terminal transmembrane domain. The presence of these noncatalytic domains suggests that Th-Apu may be anchored to the cell surface and be O glycosylated. PMID:10322035

  11. Cooperation between catalytic and DNA binding domains enhances thermostability and supports DNA synthesis at higher temperatures by thermostable DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Andrey R; Pavlova, Nadejda V; Kozyavkin, Sergei A; Slesarev, Alexei I

    2012-03-13

    We have previously introduced a general kinetic approach for comparative study of processivity, thermostability, and resistance to inhibitors of DNA polymerases [Pavlov, A. R., et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.99, 13510-13515]. The proposed method was successfully applied to characterize hybrid DNA polymerases created by fusing catalytic DNA polymerase domains with various sequence-nonspecific DNA binding domains. Here we use the developed kinetic analysis to assess basic parameters of DNA elongation by DNA polymerases and to further study the interdomain interactions in both previously constructed and new chimeric DNA polymerases. We show that connecting helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains to catalytic polymerase domains can increase thermostability, not only of DNA polymerases from extremely thermophilic species but also of the enzyme from a faculatative thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus. We also demonstrate that addition of Topo V HhH domains extends efficient DNA synthesis by chimerical polymerases up to 105 °C by maintaining processivity of DNA synthesis at high temperatures. We found that reversible high-temperature structural transitions in DNA polymerases decrease the rates of binding of these enzymes to the templates. Furthermore, activation energies and pre-exponential factors of the Arrhenius equation suggest that the mechanism of electrostatic enhancement of diffusion-controlled association plays a minor role in binding of templates to DNA polymerases. PMID:22320201

  12. Dependence of Localized Electronic Structure on Ligand Configuration in the [2Fe] Hydrogenase Catalytic Core^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher H.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-03-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme is found in a variety of organisms, including Archaea, Eubacteria, and green algae^1,2, and crystallographically determined atomic position data is available for two examples. The biologically unusual catalytic H-cluster, responsible for proton reduction to H2 in vivo, is conserved in the known structures and includes two bis-thiolato bridged iron ions with extensive cyano- and carbonyl ligation. To address the configurational specificity of the diatomic ligand ligation, density functional theoretical calculations were done on [2Fe] core models of the active center, with varying CO and CN^- ligation patterns. Bonding in each complex has been characterized within the Natural Bond Orbital formalism. The effect of ligand configuration on bonding and charge distribution as well as Kohn-Sham orbital structure will be presented. [1] M. Forestier, P. King, L. Zhang, M. Posewitz, S. Schwarzer, T. Happe, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Eur. J. Biochem. 270, 2750 (2003). [2] Posewitz, M.C., P.W. King, S.L. Smolinski, R.D. Smith, II, A.R. Ginley, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Biochem. Soc. Trans. 33, 102 (2005). ^*This work was supported by the US DOE-SC-BES Hydrogen Fuels Initiative, and done in collaboration with the NREL Chemical and Biosciences Center.

  13. Core knowledge and its limits: The domain of food

    PubMed Central

    Shutts, Kristin; Condry, Kirsten F.; Santos, Laurie R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Adults, preschool children, and nonhuman primates detect and categorize food objects according to substance information, conveyed primarily by color and texture. In contrast, they perceive and categorize artifacts primarily by shape and rigidity. The present experiments investigated the origins of this distinction. Using a looking time procedure, Experiment 1 extended previous findings that rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) generalize learning about novel food objects by color over changes in shape. Six additional experiments then investigated whether human infants show the same signature patterns of perception and generalization. Nine-month-old infants failed to detect food objects in accord with their intrinsic properties, in contrast to rhesus monkeys tested in previous research with identical displays. Eight-month-old infants did not privilege substance information over other features when categorizing foods, even though they detected and remembered this information. Moreover, infants showed the same property generalization patterns when presented with foods and tools. The category-specific patterns of perception and categorization shown by human adults, children, and adult monkeys therefore were not found in human infants, providing evidence for limits to infants’ domains of knowledge. PMID:19409538

  14. The Evolutionarily Conserved Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), Lysin Motif (LysM), Domain Catalytic (TLDc) Domain Is Neuroprotective against Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Mattéa J.; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Liu, Kevin X; Davies, Kay E.; Oliver, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathological feature of many neurological disorders; therefore, utilizing proteins that are protective against such cellular insults is a potentially valuable therapeutic approach. Oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) has been shown previously to be critical for oxidative stress resistance in neuronal cells; deletion of this gene causes neurodegeneration in mice, yet conversely, overexpression of OXR1 is protective in cellular and mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. OXR1 contains the Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), lysin motif (LysM), domain catalytic (TLDc) domain, a motif present in a family of proteins including TBC1 domain family member 24 (TBC1D24), a protein mutated in a range of disorders characterized by seizures, hearing loss, and neurodegeneration. The TLDc domain is highly conserved across species, although the structure-function relationship is unknown. To understand the role of this domain in the stress response, we carried out systematic analysis of all mammalian TLDc domain-containing proteins, investigating their expression and neuroprotective properties in parallel. In addition, we performed a detailed structural and functional study of this domain in which we identified key residues required for its activity. Finally, we present a new mouse insertional mutant of Oxr1, confirming that specific disruption of the TLDc domain in vivo is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration. Our data demonstrate that the integrity of the TLDc domain is essential for conferring neuroprotection, an important step in understanding the functional significance of all TLDc domain-containing proteins in the cellular stress response and disease. PMID:26668325

  15. Enzymatic specificities and modes of action of the two catalytic domains of the XynC xylanase from Fibrobacter succinogenes S85.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, H; Paradis, F W; Krell, P J; Phillips, J P; Forsberg, C W

    1994-01-01

    The xylanase XynC of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 was recently shown to contain three distinct domains, A, B, and C (F. W. Paradis, H. Zhu, P. J. Krell, J. P. Phillips, and C. W. Forsberg, J. Bacteriol. 175:7666-7672, 1993). Domains A and B each bear an active site capable of hydrolyzing xylan, while domain C has no enzymatic activity. Two truncated proteins, each containing a single catalytic domain, named XynC-A and XynC-B were purified to homogeneity. The catalytic domains A and B had similar pH and temperature parameters of 6.0 and 50 degrees C for maximum hydrolytic activity and extensively degraded birch wood xylan to xylose and xylobiose. The Km and Vmax values, respectively, were 2.0 mg ml-1 and 6.1 U mg-1 for the intact enzyme, 1.83 mg ml-1 and 689 U mg-1 for domain A, and 2.38 mg ml-1 and 91.8 U mg-1 for domain B. Although domain A had a higher specific activity than domain B, domain B exhibited a broader substrate specificity and hydrolyzed rye arabinoxylan to a greater extent than domain A. Furthermore, domain B, but not domain A, was able to release xylose at the initial stage of the hydrolysis. Both catalytic domains cleaved xylotriose, xylotetraose, and xylopentaose but had no activity on xylobiose. Bond cleavage frequencies obtained from hydrolysis of xylo-alditol substrates suggest that while both domains have a strong preference for internal linkages of the xylan backbone, domain B has fewer subsites for substrate binding than domain A and cleaves arabinoxylan more efficiently. Chemical modification with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide methiodide and N-bromosuccinimide inactivated both XynC-A and XynC-B in the absence of xylan, indicating that carboxyl groups and tryptophan residues in the catalytic site of each domain have essential roles. Images PMID:8021170

  16. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C). The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6 ~ 7 kDa fragments. Thus

  17. Crystal structure of the anti-viral APOBEC3G catalytic domain and functional implications

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Lauren G.; Prochnow, Courtney; Chang, Y. Paul; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chelico, Linda; Sen, Udayaditya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Goodman, Myron F.; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2009-04-07

    The APOBEC family members are involved in diverse biological functions. APOBEC3G restricts the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and retroelements by cytidine deamination on single-stranded DNA or by RNA binding. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3G (APOBEC3G-CD2) purified from Escherichia coli. The APOBEC3G-CD2 structure has a five-stranded {beta}-sheet core that is common to all known deaminase structures and closely resembles the structure of another APOBEC protein, APOBEC2. A comparison of APOBEC3G-CD2 with other deaminase structures shows a structural conservation of the active-site loops that are directly involved in substrate binding. In the X-ray structure, these APOBEC3G active-site loops form a continuous 'substrate groove' around the active centre. The orientation of this putative substrate groove differs markedly (by 90 degrees) from the groove predicted by the NMR structure. We have introduced mutations around the groove, and have identified residues involved in substrate specificity, single-stranded DNA binding and deaminase activity. These results provide a basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms of substrate specificity for the APOBEC family.

  18. Cobinamides Are Novel Coactivators of Nitric Oxide Receptor That Target Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida; Sobolevsky, Michael; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Gryko, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a ubiquitously expressed heme-containing receptor for nitric oxide (NO), is a key mediator of NO-dependent processes. In addition to NO, a number of synthetic compounds that target the heme-binding region of sGC and activate it in a NO-independent fashion have been described. We report here that dicyanocobinamide (CN2-Cbi), a naturally occurring intermediate of vitamin B12 synthesis, acts as a sGC coactivator both in vitro and in intact cells. Heme depletion or heme oxidation does not affect CN2-Cbi-dependent activation. Deletion mutagenesis demonstrates that CN2-Cbi targets a new regulatory site and functions though a novel mechanism of sGC activation. Unlike all known sGC regulators that target the N-terminal regulatory regions, CN2-Cbi directly targets the catalytic domain of sGC, resembling the effect of forskolin on adenylyl cyclases. CN2-Cbi synergistically enhances sGC activation by NO-independent regulators 3-(4-amino-5-cyclopropylpyrimidine-2-yl)-1-(2-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine (BAY41-2272), 4-[((4-carboxybutyl){2-[(4-phenethylbenzyl)oxy]phenethyl}amino) methyl [benzoic]-acid (cinaciguat or BAY58-2667), and 5-chloro-2-(5-chloro-thiophene-2-sulfonylamino-N-(4-(morpholine-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl)-benzamide sodium salt (ataciguat or HMR-1766). BAY41-2272 and CN2-Cbi act reciprocally by decreasing the EC50 values. CN2-Cbi increases intracellular cGMP levels and displays vasorelaxing activity in phenylephrine-constricted rat aortic rings in an endothelium-independent manner. Both effects are synergistically potentiated by BAY41-2272. These studies uncover a new mode of sGC regulation and provide a new tool for understanding the mechanism of sGC activation and function. CN2-Cbi also offers new possibilities for its therapeutic applications in augmenting the effect of other sGC-targeting drugs. PMID:22171090

  19. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein–DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein–DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting. PMID:27279732

  20. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein-DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting. PMID:27279732

  1. Crystal Structure of the Protease-Resistant Core Domain of Yersinia Pestis Virulence Factor Yopr

    SciTech Connect

    Schubot,F.; Cherry, S.; Austin, B.; Tropea, J.; Waugh, D.

    2005-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to secrete and translocate virulence factors into the cytoplasm of mammalian host cells. One of the secreted virulence factors is YopR. Little is known about the function of YopR other than that it is secreted into the extracellular milieu during the early stages of infection and that it contributes to virulence. Hoping to gain some insight into the function of YopR, we determined the crystal structure of its protease-resistant core domain, which consists of residues 38--149 out of 165 amino acids. The core domain is composed of five {alpha}-helices that display unexpected structural similarity with one domain of YopN, a central regulator of type III secretion in Y. pestis. This finding raises the possibility that YopR may play a role in the regulation of type III secretion.

  2. Calpain-Mediated Processing of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Generates a Cytosolic Soluble Catalytically Active N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ostolaza, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough pathogen, secretes several virulence factors among which adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is essential for establishment of the disease in the respiratory tract. ACT weakens host defenses by suppressing important bactericidal activities of the phagocytic cells. Up to now, it was believed that cell intoxication by ACT was a consequence of the accumulation of abnormally high levels of cAMP, generated exclusively beneath the host plasma membrane by the toxin N-terminal catalytic adenylate cyclase (AC) domain, upon its direct translocation across the lipid bilayer. Here we show that host calpain, a calcium-dependent Cys-protease, is activated into the phagocytes by a toxin-triggered calcium rise, resulting in the proteolytic cleavage of the toxin N-terminal domain that releases a catalytically active “soluble AC”. The calpain-mediated ACT processing allows trafficking of the “soluble AC” domain into subcellular organella. At least two strategic advantages arise from this singular toxin cleavage, enhancing the specificity of action, and simultaneously preventing an indiscriminate activation of cAMP effectors throughout the cell. The present study provides novel insights into the toxin mechanism of action, as the calpain-mediated toxin processing would confer ACT the capacity for a space- and time-coordinated production of different cAMP “pools”, which would play different roles in the cell pathophysiology. PMID:23840759

  3. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-02-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1-x Si x induced by the influence of an "edge" of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion "Σ7" domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders. PMID:26933690

  4. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1−xSix induced by the influence of an “edge” of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion “Σ7” domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders. PMID:26933690

  5. Hematite homogeneous core/shell hierarchical spheres: Surfactant-free solvothermal preparation and their improved catalytic property of selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Suoyuan; Li Haitao; He Xiaodie; Kang Zhenhui; Liu Yang; Lee, Shuit Tong

    2012-01-15

    Solvothermal synthesis is an efficient synthetic method for preparing nano and micromaterials. Preparation of hematite through alcoholysis of ferric ion under solvothermal condition has been carried out at low concentrations. In this paper, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/shell hierarchical nanostructures were synthesized via solvothermal treatment of FeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O and ethanol. The achievements of such structures can be attributed to two important factors: high temperature and high concentration. Besides, the crystal water and reaction time were also important factors to the synthesis of hematite. The prepared samples were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and pore size distribution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a satellite peak at 719.8 eV, which is the characteristic peak of Fe(III). The formation mechanism of the spheres and the effects of the reactant concentrations and reaction temperatures have been discussed. Moreover, the enhanced catalytic activity of the spheres has also been investigated through oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high conversion (42%) and selectivity (95%). - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/shell hierarchical microspheres were synthesized by solvothermal method. Owing to the special structure, the synthesized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} microspheres exhibit a superior catalytic activity in benzyl oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hierarchical Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core/shell microspheres were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microspheres were assembled by {beta}-FeOOH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample exhibits a superior catalytic activity and selectivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high activity and selectivity are due to the hierarchical core/shell structure.

  6. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  7. Insight into the Catalytic Mechanism of Bimetallic Platinum-Copper Core-Shell Nanostructures for Nonaqueous Oxygen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Luo, Xiangyi; Kropf, A Jeremy; Wen, Jianguo; Wang, Xiaoping; Lee, Sungsik; Myers, Deborah J; Miller, Dean; Wu, Tianpin; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-13

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a critical role in multiple energy conversion and storage applications. However, its sluggish kinetics usually results in large voltage polarization and unnecessary energy loss. Therefore, designing efficient catalysts that could facilitate this process has become an emerging topic. Here, we present a unique Pt-Cu core-shell nanostructure for catalyzing the nonaqueous OER. The catalysts were systematically investigated with comprehensive spectroscopic techniques, and applied in nonaqueous Li-O2 electrochemical cells, which exhibited dramatically reduced charging overpotential (<0.2 V). The superior performance is explained by the robust Cu(I) surface sites stabilized by the Pt core in the nanostructure. The insights into the catalytic mechanism of the unique Pt-Cu core-shell nanostructure gained in this work are expected to serve as a guide for future design of other nanostructured bimetallic OER catalysts. PMID:26709945

  8. Core-hole-clock spectroscopies in the tender x-ray domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novella Piancastelli, Maria; Goldsztejn, Gildas; Marchenko, Tatiana; Guillemin, Renaud; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Journel, Loïc; Carniato, Stéphane; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Céolin, Denis; Simon, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The core-hole-clock method to observe dynamical phenomena in molecular photoexcitation on the 1 fs-hundreds-of-attoseconds time scale is illustrated with examples from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) and resonant-Auger-emission experiments on the prototypical CH3Cl system in the tender x-ray domain. In particular, a direct comparison between RIXS and resonant-Auger data allows us to unravel subtle details of nuclear motion and interplay of potential curves of the intermediate and final states reached upon deep-core excitation.

  9. Cancer associated missense mutations in BAP1 catalytic domain induce amyloidogenic aggregation: A new insight in enzymatic inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sushmita; Hanpude, Pranita; Maiti, Tushar Kanti

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a nuclear deubiquitinase that regulates tumor suppressor activity and widely involves many cellular processes ranging from cell cycle regulation to gluconeogenesis. Impairment of enzymatic activity and nuclear localization induce abnormal cell proliferation. It is considered to be an important driver gene, which undergoes frequent mutations in several cancers. However the role of mutation and oncogenic gain of function of BAP1 are poorly understood. Here, we investigated cellular localization, enzymatic activity and structural changes for four missense mutants of the catalytic domain of BAP1, which are prevalent in different types of cancer. These mutations triggered cytoplasmic/perinuclear accumulation in BAP1 deficient cells, which has been observed in proteins that undergo aggregation in cellular condition. Amyloidogenic activity of mutant BAP1 was revealed from its reactivity towards anti oligomeric antibody in HEK293T cells. We have also noted structural destabilization in the catalytic domain mutants, which eventually produced beta amyloid structure as indicated in atomic force microscopy study. The cancer associated mutants up-regulate heat shock response and activates transcription of genes normally co-repressed by BAP1. Overall, our results unambiguously demonstrate that structural destabilization and subsequent aggregation abrogate its cellular mechanism leading to adverse outcome. PMID:26680512

  10. Absence of catalytic domain in a putative protein kinase C (PkcA) suppresses tip dominance in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Wasima; Ray, Sibnath; Brazill, Derrick; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-09-01

    A number of organisms possess several isoforms of protein kinase C but little is known about the significance of any specific isoform during embryogenesis and development. To address this we characterized a PKC ortholog (PkcA; DDB_G0288147) in Dictyostelium discoideum. pkcA expression switches from prestalk in mound to prespore in slug, indicating a dynamic expression pattern. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of PkcA (pkcA(-)) did not exhibit tip dominance. A striking phenotype of pkcA- was the formation of an aggregate with a central hollow, and aggregates later fragmented to form small mounds, each becoming a fruiting body. Optical density wave patterns of cAMP in the late aggregates showed several cAMP wave generation centers. We attribute these defects in pkcA(-) to impaired cAMP signaling, altered cell motility and decreased expression of the cell adhesion molecules - CadA and CsaA. pkcA(-) slugs showed ectopic expression of ecmA in the prespore region. Further, the use of a PKC-specific inhibitor, GF109203X that inhibits the activity of catalytic domain phenocopied pkcA(-). PMID:26183108

  11. N- vs. C-Domain Selectivity of Catalytic Inactivation of Human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates were tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of the M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and orientation factors (double-filter effect). PMID:24228790

  12. Autoinhibition of a calmodulin-dependent calcium pump involves a structure in the stalk that connects the transmembrane domain to the ATPase catalytic domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, A. C.; Hwang, I.; Corbin, J.; Martinez, S.; Rayle, D.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of Ca(2+)-pumps is important for controlling [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol and organelles of all eukaryotes. Here, we report a genetic strategy to identify residues that function in autoinhibition of a novel calmodulin-activated Ca(2+)-pump with an N-terminal regulatory domain (isoform ACA2 from Arabidopsis). Mutant pumps with constitutive activity were identified by complementation of a yeast (K616) deficient in two Ca(2+)-pumps. Fifteen mutations were found that disrupted a segment of the N-terminal autoinhibitor located between Lys(23) and Arg(54). Three mutations (E167K, D219N, and E341K) were found associated with the stalk that connects the ATPase catalytic domain (head) and with the transmembrane domain. Enzyme assays indicated that the stalk mutations resulted in calmodulin-independent activity, with V(max), K(mATP), and K(mCa(2+)) similar to that of a pump in which the N-terminal autoinhibitor had been deleted. A highly conservative substitution at Asp(219) (D219E) still produced a deregulated pump, indicating that the autoinhibitory structure in the stalk is highly sensitive to perturbation. In plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases from yeast and plants, similarly positioned mutations resulted in hyperactive pumps. Together, these results suggest that a structural feature of the stalk is of general importance in regulating diverse P-type ATPases.

  13. Recombinant expression of the precursor of the hemorrhagic metalloproteinase HF3 and its non-catalytic domains using a cell-free synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Milene C; Imbert, Lionel; Kitano, Eduardo S; Vernet, Thierry; Serrano, Solange M T

    2016-09-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) participate in snakebite pathology such as hemorrhage, inflammation, and necrosis. They are synthesized as latent multi-domain precursors whose processing generates either catalytically active enzymes or free non-enzymatic domains. Recombinant expression of the precursor of P-III class SVMPs has failed due to the instability of the multi-domain polypeptide structure. Conversely, functional recombinant non-catalytic domains were obtained by prokaryotic expression systems. Here, we show for the first time the recombinant expression of the precursor of HF3, a highly hemorrhagic SVMP from Bothrops jararaca, and its non-catalytic domains, using an E. coli-based cell-free synthesis system. The precursor of HF3, composed of pro-, metalloproteinase-, disintegrin-like-, and cysteine-rich domains, and containing 38 Cys residues, was successfully expressed and purified. A protein composed of the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domains (DC protein) and the cysteine-rich domain alone (C protein) were expressed in vitro individually and purified. Both proteins were shown to be functional in assays monitoring the interaction with matrix proteins and in modulating the cleavage of fibrinogen by HF3. These data indicate that recombinant expression using prokaryotic-based cell-free synthesis emerges as an attractive alternative for the study of the structure and function of multi-domain proteins with a high content of Cys residues. PMID:27209197

  14. Redox state of p63 and p73 core domains regulates sequence-specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tichý, Vlastimil; Navrátilová, Lucie; Adámik, Matej; Fojta, Miroslav; Brázdová, Marie

    2013-04-19

    Cysteine oxidation and covalent modification of redox sensitive transcription factors including p53 are known, among others, as important events in cell response to oxidative stress. All p53 family proteins p53, p63 and p73 act as stress-responsive transcription factors. Oxidation of p53 central DNA binding domain destroys its structure and abolishes its sequence-specific binding by affecting zinc ion coordination at the protein-DNA interface. Proteins p63 and p73 can bind the same response elements as p53 but exhibit distinct functions. Moreover, all three proteins contain highly conserved cysteines in central DNA binding domain suitable for possible redox modulation. In this work we report for the first time the redox sensitivity of p63 and p73 core domains to a thiol oxidizing agent azodicarboxylic acid bis[dimethylamide] (diamide). Oxidation of both p63 and p73 abolished sequence-specific binding to p53 consensus sequence, depending on the agent concentration. In the presence of specific DNA all p53 family core domains were partially protected against loss of DNA binding activity due to diamide treatment. Furthermore, we detected conditional reversibility of core domain oxidation for all p53 family members and a role of zinc ions in this process. We showed that p63 and p73 proteins had greater ability to resist the diamide oxidation in comparison with p53. Our results show p63 and p73 as redox sensitive proteins with possible functionality in response of p53 family proteins to oxidative stress. PMID:23501101

  15. Domain 3 of Hepatitis C Core Protein is Sufficient for Intracellular Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Ravi; Qiang, Guan; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide with steatosis, or “fatty liver”, being a frequent histologic finding. In previous work, we identified sequence polymorphisms within domain 3 (d3) of genotype 3 HCV Core protein that correlated with steatosis and in vitro lipid accumulation. In this study, we investigated the sufficiency of d3 to promote lipid accumulation, the role of HCV genotype in d3 lipid accumulation and the subcellular distribution of d3. Methods Stable cell lines expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions with HCV Core d3 from genotype 3 steatosis (d3S), non-steatosis (d3NS) and genotype 1 (d3G1) isolates were analyzed by immunofluorescence (IF), Oil Red O (ORO) staining and triglyceride (TG) quantitation Results Cells expressing d3S had significantly more ORO than d3NS or d3G1 cells (p values: 0.02 and <0.0001 respectively) as well as TG (p=0.03 and 0.003 respectively). IF analysis showed domain 3 does not co-localize to lipid droplets but partially co-localizes to the Golgi. Conclusions Our results suggest that HCV Core d3 is sufficient to mediate the accumulation of lipid by a mechanism that is independent of domains 1 and 2. Our results also suggest that altered lipid trafficking may be involved. PMID:19852667

  16. Re-refinement of the spliceosomal U4 snRNP core-domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jade; Leung, Adelaine K.; Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The core domain of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), comprised of a ring of seven paralogous proteins bound around a single-stranded RNA sequence, functions as the assembly nucleus in the maturation of U1, U2, U4 and U5 spliceosomal snRNPs. The structure of the human U4 snRNP core domain was initially solved at 3.6 Å resolution by experimental phasing using data with tetartohedral twinning. Molecular replacement from this model followed by density modification using untwinned data recently led to a structure of the minimal U1 snRNP at 3.3 Å resolution. With the latter structure providing a search model for molecular replacement, the U4 core-domain structure has now been re-refined. The U4 Sm site-sequence AAUUUUU has been shown to bind to the seven Sm proteins SmF–SmE–SmG–SmD3–SmB–SmD1–SmD2 in an identical manner as the U1 Sm-site sequence AAUUUGU, except in SmD1 where the bound U replaces G. The progression from the initial to the re-refined structure exemplifies a tortuous route to accuracy: where well diffracting crystals of complex assemblies are initially unavailable, the early model errors are rectified by exploiting preliminary interpretations in further experiments involving homologous structures. New insights are obtained from the more accurate model. PMID:26894541

  17. A conserved motif in transmembrane helix 1 of diphtheria toxin mediates catalytic domain delivery to the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Ratts, Ryan; Trujillo, Carolina; Bharti, Ajit; vanderSpek, Johanna; Harrison, Robert; Murphy, John R.

    2005-01-01

    A 10-aa motif in transmembrane helix 1 of diphtheria toxin that is conserved in anthrax edema factor, anthrax lethal factor, and botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, C, and D was identified by blast, clustal w, and meme computational analysis. Using the diphtheria toxin-related fusion protein toxin DAB389IL-2, we demonstrate that introduction of the L221E mutation into a highly conserved residue within this motif results in a nontoxic catalytic domain translocation deficient phenotype. To further probe the function of this motif in the process by which the catalytic domain is delivered from the lumen of early endosomes to the cytosol, we constructed a gene encoding a portion of diphtheria toxin transmembrane helix 1, T1, which carries the motif and is expressed from a CMV promoter. We then isolated stable transfectants of Hut102/6TG cells that express the T1 peptide, Hut102/6TG-T1. In contrast to the parental cell line, Hut102/6TG-T1 cells are ca. 104-fold more resistant to the fusion protein toxin. This resistance is completely reversed by coexpression of small interfering RNA directed against the gene encoding the T1 peptide in Hut102/6TG-T1 cells. We further demonstrate by GST-DT140-271 pull-down experiments in the presence and absence of synthetic T1 peptides the specific binding of coatomer protein complex subunit β to this region of the diphtheria toxin transmembrane domain. PMID:16230620

  18. The deposition of Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide and their catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiu; Wu, Shengnan; Jungwirth, Scott; Chen, Zhibing; Wang, Zhenghua; Wang, Lun; Li, Yongxin

    2013-07-01

    Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles have been synthesized on a reduced graphene oxide (RGO) surface by an under-potential deposition (UPD) redox replacement technique, which involves redox replacement of a copper UPD monolayer by {{PtCl}}_{4}^{2-} that could be reduced and deposited simultaneously. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods have been used to characterize the graphene decorated with Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles. The electrochemical experiments show that the materials exhibit excellent catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction and the methanol oxidation reaction. It is believed that the high-performance of this new catalyst is due to the ultrathin Pt shell on the Au nanoparticles surface and the oxygen-containing functional groups on the RGO surface.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies on the catalytic domain of the chick retinal neurite-inhibitory factor CRYP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Girish, T. S.; Gopal, B.

    2005-04-01

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase CRYP-2 has been shown to be an inhibitory factor for the growth of retinal axons in the chick. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic domain of CRYP-2 are reported here. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase CRYP-2 has been shown to be an inhibitory factor for the growth of retinal axons in the chick. The extracellular receptor domain of CRYP-2 contains eight fibronectin repeats and studies using the extracellular domain alone demonstrated the chemorepulsive effect on retinal neurons. The precise role of the intracellular catalytic domain and the mechanism by which its activity is regulated is not known. Determination of the structure of the catalytic domain of CRYP-2 was proposed in an effort to understand the downstream signal transduction mechanism in this system. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic domain of CRYP-2 are now reported. Preliminary crystallographic studies were performed on the diamond-shaped crystals, which grew under oil using the microbatch method at 298 K. Native X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution on a home source. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.26, c = 244.95 Å. Assuming the presence of two molecules per asymmetric unit, the V{sub M} value was 2.7 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content was 54.8%.

  20. The catalytic region and PEST domain of PTPN18 distinctly regulate the HER2 phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Xu, Yun-Fei; Ning, Shang-Lei; Yang, Du-Xiao; Li, Yi; Du, Yu-Jie; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ya; Liang, Nan; Yao, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Li; Gu, Li-Chuan; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Pang, Qi; Chen, Yu-Xin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Ma, Rong; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-09-01

    The tyrosine phosphorylation barcode encoded in C-terminus of HER2 and its ubiquitination regulate diverse HER2 functions. PTPN18 was reported as a HER2 phosphatase; however, the exact mechanism by which it defines HER2 signaling is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that PTPN18 regulates HER2-mediated cellular functions through defining both its phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes. Enzymologic characterization and three crystal structures of PTPN18 in complex with HER2 phospho-peptides revealed the molecular basis for the recognition between PTPN18 and specific HER2 phosphorylation sites, which assumes two distinct conformations. Unique structural properties of PTPN18 contribute to the regulation of sub-cellular phosphorylation networks downstream of HER2, which are required for inhibition of HER2-mediated cell growth and migration. Whereas the catalytic domain of PTPN18 blocks lysosomal routing and delays the degradation of HER2 by dephosphorylation of HER2 on pY(1112), the PEST domain of PTPN18 promotes K48-linked HER2 ubiquitination and its rapid destruction via the proteasome pathway and an HER2 negative feedback loop. In agreement with the negative regulatory role of PTPN18 in HER2 signaling, the HER2/PTPN18 ratio was correlated with breast cancer stage. Taken together, our study presents a structural basis for selective HER2 dephosphorylation, a previously uncharacterized mechanism for HER2 degradation and a novel function for the PTPN18 PEST domain. The new regulatory role of the PEST domain in the ubiquitination pathway will broaden our understanding of the functions of other important PEST domain-containing phosphatases, such as LYP and PTPN12. PMID:25081058

  1. The catalytic region and PEST domain of PTPN18 distinctly regulate the HER2 phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Xu, Yun-Fei; Ning, Shang-Lei; Yang, Du-Xiao; Li, Yi; Du, Yu-Jie; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ya; Liang, Nan; Yao, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Li; Gu, Li-Chuan; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Pang, Qi; Chen, Yu-Xin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Ma, Rong; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphorylation barcode encoded in C-terminus of HER2 and its ubiquitination regulate diverse HER2 functions. PTPN18 was reported as a HER2 phosphatase; however, the exact mechanism by which it defines HER2 signaling is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that PTPN18 regulates HER2-mediated cellular functions through defining both its phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes. Enzymologic characterization and three crystal structures of PTPN18 in complex with HER2 phospho-peptides revealed the molecular basis for the recognition between PTPN18 and specific HER2 phosphorylation sites, which assumes two distinct conformations. Unique structural properties of PTPN18 contribute to the regulation of sub-cellular phosphorylation networks downstream of HER2, which are required for inhibition of HER2-mediated cell growth and migration. Whereas the catalytic domain of PTPN18 blocks lysosomal routing and delays the degradation of HER2 by dephosphorylation of HER2 on pY1112, the PEST domain of PTPN18 promotes K48-linked HER2 ubiquitination and its rapid destruction via the proteasome pathway and an HER2 negative feedback loop. In agreement with the negative regulatory role of PTPN18 in HER2 signaling, the HER2/PTPN18 ratio was correlated with breast cancer stage. Taken together, our study presents a structural basis for selective HER2 dephosphorylation, a previously uncharacterized mechanism for HER2 degradation and a novel function for the PTPN18 PEST domain. The new regulatory role of the PEST domain in the ubiquitination pathway will broaden our understanding of the functions of other important PEST domain-containing phosphatases, such as LYP and PTPN12. PMID:25081058

  2. The conserved lysine of the catalytic domain of protein kinases is actively involved in the phosphotransfer reaction and not required for anchoring ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, A C; Alexandrov, K; Roberts, T M

    1993-01-01

    The study of the various protein kinases reveals that, despite their considerably diversity, they have evolved from a common origin. Eleven conserved subdomains have been described that encompass the catalytic core of these enzymes. One of these conserved regions, subdomain II, contains an invariant lysine residue present in all known protein kinase catalytic domains. Two facts have suggested that this conserved lysine of subdomain II is essential for binding ATP: (i) several investigators have demonstrated that this residue is physically proximal to the ATP molecule, and (ii) conservative substitutions at this site render the kinase inactive. However, these results are also consistent with a functional role of the conserved lysine of subdomain II in orienting or facilitating the transfer of phosphate. To study in more detail the role of subdomain II, we have generated mutants of the protein-tyrosine kinase pp56lck that have single amino acid substitutions within the area surrounding the conserved residue Lys-273 in subdomain II. When compared with wild-type pp56lck, these mutants displayed profound reductions in their phosphotransfer efficiencies and small differences in their affinities for ATP. Further, the substitution of arginine for Lys-273 resulted in a mutant protein unable to transfer the gamma-phosphate of ATP but able to bind 8-azido-ATP with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type pp56lck. These results suggest that the region including Lys-273 of subdomain II is involved in the enzymatic process of phosphate transfer, rather than in anchoring ATP. Images PMID:8421674

  3. Crystal structures of the catalytic domains of pseudouridine synthases RluC and RluD from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Kenji; Machida, Yoshitaka; Unzai, Satoru; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2004-04-20

    The most frequent modification of RNA, the conversion of uridine bases to pseudouridines, is found in all living organisms and often in highly conserved locations in ribosomal and transfer RNA. RluC and RluD are homologous enzymes which each convert three specific uridine bases in Escherichia coli ribosomal 23S RNA to pseudouridine: bases 955, 2504, and 2580 in the case of RluC and 1911, 1915, and 1917 in the case of RluD. Both have an N-terminal S4 RNA binding domain. While the loss of RluC has little phenotypic effect, loss of RluD results in a much reduced growth rate. We have determined the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of RluC, and full-length RluD. The S4 domain of RluD appears to be highly flexible or unfolded and is completely invisible in the electron density map. Despite the conserved topology shared by the two proteins, the surface shape and charge distribution are very different. The models suggest significant differences in substrate binding by different pseudouridine synthases. PMID:15078091

  4. Characterization of Solanum tuberosum Multicystatin and the Significance of Core Domains[C

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abigail R.; Nissen, Mark S.; Kumar, G.N. Mohan; Knowles, N. Richard; Kang, ChulHee

    2013-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) multicystatin (PMC) is a unique cystatin composed of eight repeating units, each capable of inhibiting cysteine proteases. PMC is a composite of several cystatins linked by trypsin-sensitive (serine protease) domains and undergoes transitions between soluble and crystalline forms. However, the significance and the regulatory mechanism or mechanisms governing these transitions are not clearly established. Here, we report the 2.2-Å crystal structure of the trypsin-resistant PMC core consisting of the fifth, sixth, and seventh domains. The observed interdomain interaction explains PMC’s resistance to trypsin and pH-dependent solubility/aggregation. Under acidic pH, weakening of the interdomain interactions exposes individual domains, resulting in not only depolymerization of the crystalline form but also exposure of cystatin domains for inhibition of cysteine proteases. This in turn allows serine protease–mediated fragmentation of PMC, producing ∼10-kD domains with intact inhibitory capacity and faster diffusion, thus enhancing PMC’s inhibitory ability toward cysteine proteases. The crystal structure, light-scattering experiments, isothermal titration calorimetry, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the critical role of pH and N-terminal residues in these dynamic transitions between monomer/polymer of PMC. Our data support a notion that the pH-dependent structural regulation of PMC has defense-related implications in tuber physiology via its ability to regulate protein catabolism. PMID:24363310

  5. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide that supports catalytic activity in the hammerhead ribozyme domain.

    PubMed Central

    Chartrand, P; Harvey, S C; Ferbeyre, G; Usman, N; Cedergren, R

    1995-01-01

    A study of the activity of deoxyribonucleotide-substituted analogs of the hammerhead domain of RNA catalysis has led to the design of a 14mer oligomer composed entirely of deoxyribonucleotides that promotes the cleavage of an RNA substrate. Characterization of this reaction with sequence variants and mixed DNA/RNA oligomers shows that, although the all-deoxyribonucleotide oligomer is less efficient in catalysis, the DNA/substrate complex shares many of the properties of the all-RNA hammerhead domain such as multiple turnover kinetics and dependence on Mg2+ concentration. On the other hand, the values of kinetic parameters distinguish the DNA oligomer from the all-RNA oligomer. In addition, an analog of the oligomer having a single ribonucleotide in a strongly conserved position of the hammerhead domain is associated with more efficient catalysis than the all-RNA oligomer. Images PMID:7479070

  6. Identification of three critical acidic residues of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase involved in catalysis: determining the PARG catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chandra N.; Koh, David W.; Jacobson, Myron K.; Oliveira, Marcos A.

    2005-01-01

    PARG [poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase] catalyses the hydrolysis of α(1″→2′) or α(1‴→2″) O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers to produce free ADP-ribose. We investigated possible mechanistic similarities between PARG and glycosidases, which also cleave O-glycosidic linkages. Glycosidases typically utilize two acidic residues for catalysis, thus we targeted acidic residues within a conserved region of bovine PARG that has been shown to contain an inhibitor-binding site. The targeted glutamate and aspartate residues were changed to asparagine in order to minimize structural alterations. Mutants were purified and assayed for catalytic activity, as well as binding, to an immobilized PARG inhibitor to determine ability to recognize substrate. Our investigation revealed residues essential for PARG catalytic activity. Two adjacent glutamic acid residues are found in the conserved sequence Gln755-Glu-Glu757, and a third residue found in the conserved sequence Val737-Asp-Phe-Ala-Asn741. Our functional characterization of PARG residues, along with recent identification of an inhibitor-binding residue Tyr796 and a glycine-rich region Gly745-Gly-Gly747 important for PARG function, allowed us to define a PARG ‘signature sequence’ [vDFA-X3-GGg-X6–8-vQEEIRF-X3-PE-X14-E-X12-YTGYa], which we used to identify putative PARG sequences across a range of organisms. Sequence alignments, along with our mapping of PARG functional residues, suggest the presence of a conserved catalytic domain of approx. 185 residues which spans residues 610–795 in bovine PARG. PMID:15658938

  7. Refined molecular hinge between allosteric and catalytic domain determines allosteric regulation and stability of fungal chorismate mutase

    PubMed Central

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Lipscomb, William N.; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2002-01-01

    The yeast chorismate mutase is regulated by tyrosine as feedback inhibitor and tryptophan as crosspathway activator. The monomer consists of a catalytic and a regulatory domain covalently linked by the loop L220s (212–226), which functions as a molecular hinge. Two monomers form the active dimeric enzyme stabilized by hydrophobic interactions in the vicinity of loop L220s. The role of loop L220s and its environment for enzyme regulation, dimerization, and stability was analyzed. Substitution of yeast loop L220s in place of the homologous loop from the corresponding and similarly regulated Aspergillus enzyme (and the reverse substitution) changed tyrosine inhibition to activation. Yeast loop L220s substituted into the Aspergillus enzyme resulted in a tryptophan-inhibitable enzyme. Monomeric yeast chorismate mutases could be generated by substituting two hydrophobic residues in and near the hinge region. The resulting Thr-212→Asp–Phe-28→Asp enzyme was as stable as wild type, but lost allosteric regulation and showed reduced catalytic activity. These results underline the crucial role of this molecular hinge for inhibition, activation, quaternary structure, and stability of yeast chorismate mutase. PMID:11997452

  8. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O.

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of the catalytic domain of major extracellular endoglucanase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Rosseto, Flávio R.; Puhl, Ana C.; Andrade, Maxuel O.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Cellulases, such as endoglucanases, exoglucanases and β-glucosidases, are important enzymes used in the process of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass. The bacteria Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris expresses a large number of hydrolases and the major endoglucanase (XccEG), a member of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5), is the most strongly secreted extracellularly. In this work, the native XccEG was purified from the extracellular extract and crystallization assays were performed on its catalytic domain. A complete data set was collected on an in-house X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 174.66, b = 141.53, c = 108.00 Å, β = 110.49°. The Matthews coefficient suggests a solvent content of 70.1% and the presence of four protein subunits in the asymmetric unit. PMID:23385754

  10. Protein 4.1R core domain structure and insights into regulation of cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Han, B G; Nunomura, W; Takakuwa, Y; Mohandas, N; Jap, B K

    2000-10-01

    The crystal structure of the core domain (N-terminal 30 kDa domain) of cytoskeletal protein 4.1R has been determined and shows a cloverleaf-like architecture. Each lobe of the cloverleaf contains a specific binding site for either band 3, glycophorin C/D or p55. At a central region of the molecule near where the three lobes are joined are two separate calmodulin (CaM) binding regions. One of these is composed primarily of an alpha-helix and is Ca 2+ insensitive; the other takes the form of an extended structure and its binding with CaM is dramatically enhanced by the presence of Ca 2+, resulting in the weakening of protein 4.1R binding to its target proteins. This novel architecture, in which the three lobes bind with three membrane associated proteins, and the location of calmodulin binding sites provide insight into how the protein 4.1R core domain interacts with membrane proteins and dynamically regulates cell shape in response to changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels. PMID:11017195

  11. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K.; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T.; Nixon, B. Tracy; Haigler, Candace H.; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C.; Meiler, Jens; O’Neill, Hugh

    2015-11-10

    In a cellulose synthesis complex a "rosette" shape is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. Our work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. Moreover, the conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. Finally, this study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.

  12. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K.; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T.; Nixon, B. Tracy; Haigler, Candace H.; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; et al

    2015-11-10

    In a cellulose synthesis complex a "rosette" shape is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. Our work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer inmore » solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. Moreover, the conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. Finally, this study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.« less

  13. A Novel Family of Soluble Minimal Scaffolds Provides Structural Insight into the Catalytic Domains of Integral Membrane Metallopeptidases*

    PubMed Central

    López-Pelegrín, Mar; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Cintas-Pedrola, Anna; Canals, Albert; Peinado, Juan R.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; López-Otín, Carlos; Arolas, Joan L.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    In the search for structural models of integral-membrane metallopeptidases (MPs), we discovered three related proteins from thermophilic prokaryotes, which we grouped into a novel family called “minigluzincins.” We determined the crystal structures of the zymogens of two of these (Pyrococcus abyssi proabylysin and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii projannalysin), which are soluble and, with ∼100 residues, constitute the shortest structurally characterized MPs to date. Despite relevant sequence and structural similarity, the structures revealed two unique mechanisms of latency maintenance through the C-terminal segments previously unseen in MPs as follows: intramolecular, through an extended tail, in proabylysin, and crosswise intermolecular, through a helix swap, in projannalysin. In addition, structural and sequence comparisons revealed large similarity with MPs of the gluzincin tribe such as thermolysin, leukotriene A4 hydrolase relatives, and cowrins. Noteworthy, gluzincins mostly contain a glutamate as third characteristic zinc ligand, whereas minigluzincins have a histidine. Sequence and structural similarity further allowed us to ascertain that minigluzincins are very similar to the catalytic domains of integral membrane MPs of the MEROPS database families M48 and M56, such as FACE1, HtpX, Oma1, and BlaR1/MecR1, which are provided with trans-membrane helices flanking or inserted into a minigluzincin-like catalytic domain. In a time where structural biochemistry of integral-membrane proteins in general still faces formidable challenges, the minigluzincin soluble minimal scaffold may contribute to our understanding of the working mechanisms of these membrane MPs and to the design of novel inhibitors through structure-aided rational drug design approaches. PMID:23733187

  14. Solubility of the catalytic domains of Botulinum neurotoxin serotype E subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent protein toxins known to humans. There are seven serotypes of the BoNTs (A-G), among which serotypes A, B, E and F are known to cause natural human intoxication. To date, eleven subtypes of LC/E, termed E1∼E11, have been identified. The LCs of BoNT/E were insoluble, prohibiting studies towards understanding the mechanisms of toxin action and substrate recognition. In this work, the molecular basis of insolubility of the recombinant LCs of two representative subtypes of BoNT/E, E1(Beluga) and E3 (Alaska), was determined. Hydrophobicity profile and structural modeling predicted a C-terminal candidate region responsible for the insolubility of LC/Es. Deletion of C-terminal 19 residues of LC/E(1-400) resulted in enhanced solubility, from 2 to ∼50% for LC/EAlaska and from 16 to ∼95% for LC/EBeluga. In addition, resides 230-236 were found to contribute to a different solubility level of LC/EAlaska when compared to LC/EBeluga. Substituting residues (230)TCI(232) in LC/EAlaska to the corresponding residues of (230)KYT(232) in LC/EBeluga enhanced the solubility of LC/EAlaska to a level approaching that of LC/EBeluga. Among these LC/Es and their derivatives, LC/EBeluga 1-400 was the most soluble and stable protein. Each LC/E derivative possessed similar catalytic activity, suggesting that the C-terminal region of LC/Es contributed to protein solubility, but not catalytic activity. In conclusion, this study generated a soluble and stable recombinant LC/E and provided insight into the structural components that govern the solubility and stability of the LCs of other BoNT serotypes and Tetanus toxin. PMID:26477500

  15. In vitro selection of RNase P RNA reveals optimized catalytic activity in a highly conserved structural domain.

    PubMed

    Frank, D N; Ellington, A E; Pace, N R

    1996-12-01

    In vitro selection techniques are useful means of dissecting the functions of both natural and artificial ribozymes. Using a self-cleaving conjugate containing the Escherichia coli ribonuclease P RNA and its substrate, pre-tRNA (Frank DN, Harris ME, Pace NR, 1994, Biochemistry 33:10800-10808), we have devised a method to select for catalytically active variants of the RNase P ribozyme. A selection experiment was performed to probe the structural and sequence constraints that operate on a highly conserved region of RNase P: the J3/4-P4-J2/4 region, which lies within the core of RNase P and is thought to bind catalytically essential magnesium ions (Harris ME et al., 1994, EMBO J 13:3953-3963; Hardt WD et al., 1995, EMBO J 14:2935-2944; Harris ME, Pace NR, 1995, RNA 1:210-218). We sought to determine which, if any, of the nearly invariant nucleotides within J3/4-P4-J2/4 are required for ribozyme-mediated catalysis. Twenty-two residues in the J3/4-P4-J2/4 component of RNase P RNA were randomized and, surprisingly, after only 10 generations, each of the randomized positions returned to the wild-type sequence. This indicates that every position in J3/4-P4-J2/4 contributes to optimal catalytic activity. These results contrast sharply with selections involving other large ribozymes, which evolve improved catalytic function readily in vitro (Chapman KB, Szostak JW, 1994, Curr Opin Struct Biol 4:618-622; Joyce GF, 1994, Curr Opin Struct Biol 4:331-336; Kumar PKR, Ellington AE, 1995, FASEB J 9:1183-1195). The phylogenetic conservation of J3/4-P4-J2/4, coupled with the results reported here, suggests that the contribution of this structure to RNA-mediated catalysis was optimized very early in evolution, before the last common ancestor of all life. PMID:8972768

  16. Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  17. Predicting different losses of photonic crystal fibers in material and hetero-core domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dimpi; Biswas, Rajib; Bhattacharyya, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    In order to develop the effective transmission in photonic crystal fiber (PCF), the (realizable fiber i.e.,) losses arising from bending as well as splicing are very vital issues. We report here macrobending loss of PCFs in different material composites. Further, we make comprehensive numerical analysis related to splice loss issues arising from joining PCF with PCF and single mode fiber as well. We additionally investigate dependence of all these losses with respect to structural parameters of PCF. Hetero core systems are found to yield lower losses as compared to their identical counterpart. The numerical estimates reported here will provide a base for engineering effective communication guides in the context of material and hybrid core domain.

  18. Poliovirus Replication Requires the N-terminus but not the Catalytic Sec7 Domain of ArfGEF GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Jackson, Catherine L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites whose reproduction relies on factors provided by the host. The cellular protein GBF1 is critical for poliovirus replication. Here we show that the contribution of GBF1 to virus replication is different from its known activities in uninfected cells. Normally GBF1 activates the Arf GTPases necessary for formation of COPI transport vesicles. GBF1 function is modulated by p115 and Rab1b. However, in polio-infected cells, p115 is degraded and neither p115 nor Rab1b knock-down affects virus replication. Poliovirus infection is very sensitive to BFA, an inhibitor of Arf activation by GBF1. BFA targets the catalytic Sec7 domain of GBF1. Nevertheless the BFA block of polio replication is rescued by expression of only the N-terminal region of GBF1 lacking the Sec7 domain. Replication of BFA-resistant poliovirus in the presence of BFA is uncoupled from Arf activation but is dependent on GBF1. Thus the function(s) of this protein essential for viral replication can be separated from those required for cellular metabolism. PMID:20497182

  19. In vitro mutagenesis and functional expression in Escherichia coli of a cDNA encoding the catalytic domain of human DNA ligase I.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, K; Barnes, D E; Lindahl, T

    1991-01-01

    Human cDNAs encoding fragments of DNA ligase I, the major replicative DNA ligase in mammalian cells, have been expressed as lacZ fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. A cDNA encoding the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain of human DNA ligase I was able to complement a conditional-lethal DNA ligase mutation in E. coli as measured by growth of the mutant strain at the non-permissive temperature. Targeted deletions of the amino and carboxyl termini of the catalytic domain identified a minimum size necessary for catalytic function and a maximum size for optimal complementing activity in E. coli. The human cDNA was subjected to systematic site-directed mutagenesis in vitro and mutant polypeptides assayed for functional expression in the E. coli DNA ligase mutant. Such functional analysis of the active site of DNA ligase I identified specific residues required for the formation of an enzyme-adenylate reaction intermediate. Images PMID:1956768

  20. Mechanistic studies on full length and the catalytic domain of the tandem SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase: analysis of phosphoenzyme levels and Vmax stimulatory effects of glycerol and of a phosphotyrosyl peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Walsh, C T

    1997-03-11

    SHP-1, a protein tyrosine phosphatase containing two tandem SH2 domains, is autoinhibited at rest by its N-terminal SH2 (N-SH2) domain. Relief from autoinhibition and a subsequent 10-60-fold increase in V(max) have been observed upon N-SH2 domain engagement by a specific phosphotyrosyl ligand or upon deletion of the SH2 domains to yield the catalytic PTPase domain. In this study, we observed that glycerol and propane-1,2-diols, at concentrations of 4-6 M, accelerated the k(cat) of the full length enzyme by 47-fold and of the PTPase domain by 8-fold. Glycerol also increases the rate of proteolytic cleavage between the SH2 and catalytic PTPase domains. In stopped-flow studies using p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) as a substrate, a burst of p-nitrophenolate in the full length enzyme was not observed; however, a 50-70% stoichiometric burst was observed with the PTPase domain. Rapid quench studies using [32P]pNPP as a substrate showed a very low level of covalent [32P]phosphocysteinyl enzyme intermediate accumulation: 0.06% in the full length enzyme and 1% in the PTP domain. Stimulation by glycerol reduced the accumulating levels of phosphocysteinyl enzyme in both cases of full length SHP-1 and the PTPase domain; however, glycerol is not acting as a cosubstrate since no glycerophosphate product was detectable. It is likely that, for full length SHP-1, with pNPP as a model substrate, enzyme-substrate complex (ES) accumulates in its basal autoinhibited state, whereas enzyme-product complex (EP(i)) accumulates in its pY ligand-bound activated state. Glycerol probably relaxes the compact structure of SHP-1 and the PTP domain, thereby accelerating the catalytic rates in both cases by increasing forward reaction rates of ES and EP(i). PMID:9062130

  1. Unraveling Surface Plasmon Decay in Core-Shell Nanostructures toward Broadband Light-Driven Catalytic Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Zhiheng; Long, Ran; Zhang, Chao; Lin, Yue; Wei, Kecheng; Wang, Chengming; Chen, Lu; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-06-01

    Harnessing surface plasmon of metal nanostructures to promote catalytic organic synthesis holds great promise in solar-to-chemical energy conversion. High conversion efficiency relies not only on broadening the absorption spectrum but on coupling the harvested energy into chemical reactions. Such coupling undergoes hot-electron transfer and photothermal conversion during the decay of surface plasmon; however, the two plasmonic effects are unfortunately entangled, making their individual roles still under debate. Here, we report that in a model system of bimetallic Au-Pd core-shell nanostructures the two effects can be disentangled through tailoring the shell thickness at atomic-level precision. As demonstrated by our ultrafast absorption spectroscopy characterizations, the achieved tunability of the two effects in a model reaction of Pd-catalyzed organic hydrogenation offers a knob for enhancing energy coupling. In addition, the two intrinsic plasmonic modes at 400-700 and 700-1000 nm in the bar-shaped nanostructures allow for utilizing photons to a large extent in full solar spectrum. This work establishes a paradigmatic guidance toward designing plasmonic-catalytic nanomaterials for enhanced solar-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27175744

  2. Production of the catalytic core of human peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (hPHMcc) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Sumit; Spradling, Tyler J.; Dempsey, Daniel R.; Merkler, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Most mammalian bioactive peptides possess a C-terminal amino acid amide moiety. The presence of the C-terminal amide is a significant impediment to the recombinant production of α-amidated peptides. α-Amidated peptides are produced in vivo by the enzymatic cleavage of a precursor with a C-terminal glycine residue. Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase catalyzes the key step in the oxidation of the glycine-extended precursors to the α-amidated peptide. Herein, we detail the production of the catalytic core of human peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (hPHMcc) in Escherichia coli possessing a N-terminal fusion to thioredoxin (Trx). Trx was fused to hPHMcc to enhance the yield of the resulting 52 kDa protein as a soluble and catalytically active enzyme. The Trx-hPHMcc-His6 fusion was purified to homogeneity and exhibited steady-state kinetic parameters that were similar to purified rat PHMcc. The bacterial production of recombinant hPHMcc will foster efforts to generate α-amidated peptides by the co-expression of hPHMcc and the α-amidated peptide precursors in E. coli or the in vitro amidation of recombinantly expressed α-amidated peptide precursors. PMID:22554821

  3. The Metabolic Core and Catalytic Switches Are Fundamental Elements in the Self-Regulation of the Systemic Metabolic Structure of Cells

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Perez-Pinilla, Martin B.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Vicente; Veguillas, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality). Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. Conclusions/Significance We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub –with a high degree of effective connectivity- exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the Systemic

  4. Accessing Elaborated 2,1-Borazaronaphthalene Cores Using Photoredox/Nickel Dual-Catalytic Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Davies, Geraint H M; Molander, Gary A

    2016-04-01

    A highly effective method for derivatizing 2,1-borazaronaphthalene cores using ammonium alkylbis(catecholato)silicates via photoredox/nickel dual catalysis is reported. By forging Csp(3)-Csp(2) bonds via this approach, alkyl fragments with various functional groups can be introduced to the azaborine core, affording previously inaccessible heterocyclic isosteres in good to excellent yields. The base-free, room-temperature conditions outlined allow sensitive functional group tolerance, even permitting the cross-coupling of unprotected primary and secondary amines. PMID:26986819

  5. The contribution of adenines in the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme improved by the 6-amino group modifications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfei; Li, Zhiwen; Wang, Qi; Liu, Yang; He, Junlin

    2016-09-15

    In the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme, its five adenine residues are moderate conservative, but with highly conserved functional groups like 6-amino group and 7-nitrogen atom. It is this critical conservation that these two groups could be modified for better contribution. With 2'-deoxyadenosine analogues, several functional groups were introduced at the 6-amino group of the five adenine residues. 3-Aminopropyl substituent at 6-amino group of A15 resulted in a five-fold increase of kobs. More efficient DNAzymes are expected by delicate design of the linkage and the external functional groups for this 6-amino group of A15. With this modification approach, other functional groups or residues could be optimized for 10-23 DNAzyme. PMID:27506560

  6. Domain structure and magnetization loss in a toroidal core based on an Fe-based amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Daichi; Hasegawa, Ryusuke; Saito, Shin; Takahashi, Migaku

    2012-04-01

    By utilizing a wide-view Kerr-effect magnetic domain observation system designed for domain observation on curved surfaces, domain images were taken on the surface of a toroidal core based on an Fe-based amorphous alloy. The results of the observation are discussed in terms of Bertotti's eddy-current loss model, helping to clarify the concept of magnetic objects proposed by the model.

  7. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors. PMID:25286857

  8. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.

  9. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; et al

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, themore » high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.« less

  10. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  11. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy. PMID:26801740

  12. Calpain cleavage of the B isoform of Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase separates the catalytic domain from the membrane anchoring domain.

    PubMed Central

    Pattni, Krupa; Millard, Thomas H; Banting, George

    2003-01-01

    Inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] is one of the key intracellular second messengers in cells and mobilizes Ca2+ stores in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum). Ins(1,4,5)P3 has a short half-life within the cell, and is rapidly metabolized through one of two pathways, one of which involves further phosphorylation of the inositol ring: Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase (IP3-3K) phosphorylates Ins(1,4,5)P3, resulting in the formation of inositol (1,3,4,5)-tetrakisphosphate [Ins(1,3,4,5)P4]. There are three known isoforms of IP3-3K, designated IP3-3KA, IP3-3KB and IP3-3KC. These have differing N-termini, but highly conserved C-termini harbouring the catalytic domain. The three IP3-3K isoforms have different subcellular locations and the B-kinase is uniquely present in both cytosolic and membrane-bound pools. As it is the N-terminus of the B-kinase that differs most from the A- and C-kinases, we have hypothesized that this portion of the protein may be responsible for membrane localization. Although there are no known membrane-targeting protein motifs within the sequence of IP3-3KB, it is found to be tightly associated with the ER membrane. Here, we show that specific regions of the N-terminus of IP3-3KB are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane localization of the protein. We also report that, in the presence of Ca2+, the kinase domain of IP3-3KB is cleaved from the membrane-anchoring region by calpain. PMID:12906709

  13. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; de Diego, Iñaki; Riise, Erik; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18) to matrix metallo­proteinases suggests that karilysin was acquired by horizontal gene transfer from an animal host. Previous studies by phage display identified peptides with the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG (single-letter amino-acid codes; X represents any residue) as karilysin inhibitors with low-micromolar binding affinities. Subsequent refinement revealed that inhibition comparable to that of longer peptides could be achieved using the tetrapeptide SWFP. To analyze its binding, the high-resolution crystal structure of the complex between Kly18 and SWFP was determined and it was found that the peptide binds to the primed side of the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. The catalytic zinc ion is clamped by the α-amino group and the carbonyl O atom of the serine, thus distantly mimicking the general manner of binding of hydroxamate inhibitors to metallopeptidases and contributing, together with three zinc-binding histidines from the protein scaffold, to an octahedral-minus-one metal-coordination sphere. The tryptophan side chain penetrates the deep partially water-filled specificity pocket of Kly18. Together with previous serendipitous product complexes of Kly18, the present results provide the structural determinants of inhibition of karilysin and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies aimed at the treatment of human periodontal disease based on a peptidic hit molecule. PMID:23695557

  14. A single domain of human prostatic acid phosphatase shows antibody-mediated restoration of catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, B K; Dong, M K; Walz, D; Gleason, S; Rose, N R

    1982-01-01

    By limited proteolysis with mouse submaxillaris protease, human prostatic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) was cleaved into three fragments, Sp1, Sp2, and Sp3, which individually had no enzymatic activity. One of the fragments, Sp3, regained enzymatic activity after interaction with rabbit antibody to prostatic acid phosphatase. The Sp3 fragment was purified and characterized as to its molecular weight, amino acid composition, and carbohydrate content. The Sp3 fragment behaved like the parent molecule in L(+)-tartrate affinity and in trapping of a phosphoryl intermediate. The same Sp3 fragment also bears the most prominent antigenic determinants. This evidence suggest that Sp3 is the enzymatically active domain of prostatic acid phosphatase. Images PMID:6193513

  15. Establishing a Core Domain Set to Measure Rheumatoid Arthritis Flares: Report of the OMERACT 11 RA Flare Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Bykerk, Vivian P.; Lie, Elisabeth; Bartlett, Susan J.; Alten, Rieke; Boonen, Annelies; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E.; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye L.; Lyddiatt, Anne; March, Lyn; May, James E.; Montie, Pam; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Pohl, Christoph; Voshaar, Marieke Scholte; Woodworth, Thasia; Bingham, Clifton O.; Choy, Ernest H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Flare Group (FG) is developing a data-driven, patient-inclusive, consensus-based RA flare definition for use in clinical trials, longterm observational studies, and clinical practice. At OMERACT 11, we sought endorsement of a proposed core domain set to measure RA flare. Methods Patient and healthcare professional (HCP) qualitative studies, focus groups, and literature review, followed by patient and HCP Delphi exercises including combined Delphi consensus at Outcome Measures in Rheumatology 10 (OMERACT 10), identified potential domains to measure flare. At OMERACT 11, breakout groups discussed key domains and instruments to measure them, and proposed a research agenda. Patients were active research partners in all focus groups and domain identification activities. Processes for domain selection and patient partner involvement were case studies for OMERACT Filter 2.0 methodology. Results A pre-meeting combined Delphi exercise for defining flare identified 9 domains as important (> 70% consensus from patients or HCP). Four new patient-reported domains beyond those included in the RA disease activity core set were proposed for inclusion (fatigue, participation, stiffness, and self-management). The RA FG developed preliminary flare questions (PFQ) to measure domains. In combined plenary voting sessions, OMERACT 11 attendees endorsed the proposed RA core set to measure flare with ≥ 78% consensus and the addition of 3 additional domains to the research agenda for OMERACT 12. Conclusion At OMERACT 11, a core domain set to measure RA flare was ratified and endorsed by attendees. Domain validation aligning with Filter 2.0 is ongoing in new randomized controlled clinical trials and longitudinal observational studies using existing and new instruments including a set of PFQ. PMID:24584927

  16. Structure of the C-Terminal Half of UvrC Reveals an RNase H Endonuclease Domain with an Argonaute-like Catalytic Triad

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Truglio, J.; Croteau, D.; Rhau, B.; Wang, L.; Van Houten, B.; Kisker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Removal and repair of DNA damage by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires two sequential incision reactions, which are achieved by the endonuclease UvrC in eubacteria. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of UvrC, which contains the catalytic domain responsible for 5' incision and a helix-hairpin-helix-domain that is implicated in DNA binding. Surprisingly, the 5' catalytic domain shares structural homology with RNase H despite the lack of sequence homology and contains an uncommon DDH triad. The structure also reveals two highly conserved patches on the surface of the protein, which are not related to the active site. Mutations of residues in one of these patches led to the inability of the enzyme to bind DNA and severely compromised both incision reactions. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how UvrC forms a productive protein-DNA complex to excise the damage from DNA.

  17. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of UCHL5, a proteasome-associated human deubiquitinating enzyme, reveals an unproductive form of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Tushar K.; Permaul, Michelle; Boudreaux, David A.; Mahanic, Christina; Mauney, Sarah; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-10-25

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 (UCHL5) is a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, which, along with RPN11 and USP14, is known to carry out deubiquitination on proteasome. As a member of the ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) family, UCHL5 is unusual because, unlike UCHL1 and UCHL3, it can process polyubiquitin chain. However, it does so only when it is bound to the proteasome; in its free form, it is capable of releasing only relatively small leaving groups from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. Such a behavior might suggest at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, an apo form incapable of chain processing activity, and a proteasome-induced activated form capable of cleaving polyubiquitin chain. Through the crystal structure analysis of two truncated constructs representing the catalytic domain (UCH domain) of this enzyme, we were able to visualize a state of this enzyme that we interpret as its inactive form, because the catalytic cysteine appears to be in an unproductive orientation. While this work was in progress, the structure of a different construct representing the UCH domain was reported; however, in that work the structure reported was that of an inactive mutant [catalytic Cys to Ala; Nishio K et al. (2009) Biochem Biophys Res Commun390, 855-860], which precluded the observation that we are reporting here. Additionally, our structures reveal conformationally dynamic parts of the enzyme that may play a role in the structural transition to the more active form.

  18. Hollow ruthenium nanoparticles with small dimensions derived from Ni@Ru core@shell structure: synthesis and enhanced catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guozhu; Desinan, Stefano; Rosei, Renzo; Rosei, Federico; Ma, Dongling

    2012-08-18

    Hollow Ru nanoparticles with ~14 nm diameter and ~2 nm shell thickness are reported for the first time, by removal of Ni from the delicately designed Ni@Ru core@shell NPs. Such hollow Ru NPs exhibit enhanced catalytic activity in the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane with respect to solid ones. PMID:22773309

  19. Truncation of the Catalytic Domain of the Cylindromatosis Tumor Suppressor Impairs Lung Maturation1

    PubMed Central

    Trompouki, Eirini; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Kosmidis, Stylianos K; Dollé, Pascal; Qian, Jun; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Cardoso, Wellington V; Mosialos, George

    2009-01-01

    Cyld encodes a 956-amino acid deubiquitinating enzyme (CYLD), which is a negative regulator of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Mutations that truncate and inactivate the carboxyl-terminal deubiquitinating domain of CYLD underlie the development of skin appendage tumors in humans, whereas down-regulation of Cyld expression has been associated with the development of various types of human malignancies including lung cancer. To establish an animal model of human CYLD inactivation and characterize the biological role of CYLD in vivo, we generated mice carrying a homozygous deletion of Cyld exon 9 (CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice) using a conditional approach. Deletion of exon 9 would cause a carboxyl-terminal truncation of CYLD and inactivation of its deubiquitinating activity. In accordance with previous studies, fibroblasts from CyldΔ9/Δ9 embryos had hyperactive nuclear factor κB and c-Jun kinase pathways compared with control fibroblasts. CyldΔ9/Δ9 newborn mice were smaller than wild-type littermates with a short and kinky tail and nomajor developmental defects. However, CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice died shortly after birth from apparent respiratory dysfunction. Histological examination of E18.5 CyldΔ9/Δ9 lungs demonstrated an immature phenotype characterized by hyperplasic mesenchyme but apparently normal epithelial, smooth muscle. and endothelial structures. Our study identifies an important role of CYLD in lung maturation, which may underlie the development of many cases of lung cancer. PMID:19412431

  20. Antibodies against recombinant catalytic domain of lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii neutralize lethal toxin toxicity in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Arya, Preetika; Ponmariappan, S; Singh, Lokendra; Prasad, G B K S

    2013-02-01

    Lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii (MLD 150 ng/kg) is one of the most potent Clostridial toxins and is responsible for most of the diseases including sudden death syndrome in cattle, sheep and toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing faciitis, neonatal omphalitis and gangrene in humans. Lethal toxin (TcsL) is a single chain protein of about 270 kDa. In the present study, 1.6 kb DNA fragment encoding for the catalytic domain of TcsL was PCR amplified, cloned in pQE30 UA vector and expressed in E. coli SG 13009. The expression of recombinant lethal toxin protein (rTcsL) was optimized and it was purified under native conditions using a single step Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified recombinant protein was used for the production of polyclonal antibodies in mice and rabbit. The raised antibodies reacted specifically with the purified rTcsL and intact native lethal toxin on Western blot. The biological activity of the recombinant protein was tested in HeLa cells where it showed the cytotoxicity. Further, the polyclonal antibodies were used for in-vitro neutralization of purified rTcsL, acid precipitated C. sordellii and C. difficile native toxins in HeLa cells. Mice and rabbit anti-rTcsL sera effectively neutralized the cytotoxicity of rTcsL and C. sordellii native toxin but it did not neutralize the cytotoxicity of C. difficile toxin in HeLa cells. PMID:22894159

  1. Factor IX Amagasaki: A new mutation in the catalytic domain resulting in the loss of both coagulant and esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Toshiyuki; Iwanaga, Sadaaki ); Sakai, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Naka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazukuni; Yoshioka, Akira; Fukui, Hiromu ); Mitsui, Kotoko; Kamiya, Kensyu; Umeyama, Hideaki )

    1991-11-26

    Factor IX Amagasaki (AMG) is a naturally occurring mutant of factor IX having essentially no coagulant activity, even though normal levels of antigen are detected in plasma. Factor IX AMG was purified from the patient's plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography with an anti-factor IX monoclonal antibody column. Factor IX AMG was cleaved normally by factor VIIa-tissue factor complex, yielding a two-chain factor IXa. Amino acid composition and sequence analysis of one of the tryptic peptides isolated from factor IX AMG revealed that Gly-311 had been replaced by Glu. The authors identified a one-base substitution of guanine to adenine in exon VIII by amplifying exon VIII using the polymerase chain reaction method and sequencing the product. This base mutation also supported the replacement of Gly-311 by Glu. In the purified system, factor IXa AMG did not activate for factor X in the presence of factor VIII, phospholipids, and Ca{sup 2+}, and no esterase activity toward Z-Arg-p-nitrobenzyl ester was observed. The model building of the serine protease domain of factor IXa suggests that the Gly-311 {yields} Glu exchange would disrupt the specific conformational state in the active site environment, resulting in the substrate binding site not forming properly. This is the first report to show the experimental evidence for importance of a highly conserved Gly-142 (chymotrypsinogen numbering) located in the catalytic site of mammalian serine proteases so far known.

  2. Data for ion and seed dependent fibril assembly of a spidroin core domain.

    PubMed

    Humenik, Martin; Smith, Andrew M; Arndt, Sina; Scheibel, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    This data article includes size exclusion chromatography data of soluble eADF4(C16), an engineered spider silk variant based on the core domain sequence of the natural dragline silk protein ADF4 of Araneus diadematus, in combination with light scattering; the protein is monomeric before assembly. The assembled mature fibrils were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Sonicated fibrils were used as seeds to by-pass the nucleation lag phase in eADF4(C16) assembly. We also provide data on the sedimentation kinetics of spider silk in the presence of different NaCl concentrations revealing very slow protein aggregation in comparison to the fast assembly triggered by phosphate ions published previously [1]. Experiments in the Data article represent supporting material for our work published recently [1], which described the assembly mechanism of recombinant eADF4(C16) fibrils. PMID:26322321

  3. Death Domain Assembly Mechanism Revealed by Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric PIDDosome Core Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park,H.; Logette, E.; Raunser, S.; Cuenin, S.; Walz, T.; Tschopp, J.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Proteins of the death domain (DD) superfamily mediate assembly of oligomeric signaling complexes for the activation of caspases and kinases via unknown mechanisms. Here we report the crystal structure of the PIDD DD and RAIDD DD complex, which forms the core of the caspase-2-activating complex PIDDosome. Although RAIDD DD and PIDD DD are monomers, they assemble into a complex that comprises seven RAIDD DDs and five PIDD DDs. Despite the use of an asymmetric assembly mechanism, all DDs in the complex are in quasi-equivalent environments. The structure provided eight unique asymmetric interfaces, which can be classified into three types. These three types of interactions together cover a majority of the DD surface. Mutagenesis on almost all interfaces leads to disruption of the assembly, resulting in defective caspase-2 activation. The three types of interactions may represent most, if not all, modes of interactions in the DD superfamily for assembling complexes of different stoichiometry.

  4. Death Domain Assembly Mechanism Revealed by Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric PIDDosome Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Ho; Logette, Emmanuelle; Raunser, Stefan; Cuenin, Solange; Walz, Thomas; Tschopp, Jurg; Wu, Hao

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Proteins of the death domain (DD) superfamily mediate assembly of oligomeric signaling complexes for the activation of caspases and kinases via unknown mechanisms. Here we report the crystal structure of the PIDD DD and RAIDD DD complex, which forms the core of the caspase-2 activating complex PIDDosome. While RAIDD DD and PIDD DD are monomers, they assemble into a complex that comprises seven RAIDD DDs and five PIDD DDs. Despite the use of an asymmetric assembly mechanism, all DDs in the complex are in quasi-equivalent environments. The structure provided eight unique asymmetric interfaces, which can be classified into three types. These three types of interactions together cover a majority of the DD surface. Mutagenesis on almost all interfaces leads to disruption of the assembly resulting in defective caspase-2 activation. The three types of interactions may represent most, if not all, modes of interactions in the DD superfamily for assembling complexes of different stoichiometry. PMID:17289572

  5. Generation of a Maize B Centromere Minimal Map Containing the Central Core Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Nathanael A.; Douglas, Ryan N.; Jackson, Caroline E.; Birchler, James A.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The maize B centromere has been used as a model for centromere epigenetics and as the basis for building artificial chromosomes. However, there are no sequence resources for this important centromere. Here we used transposon display for the centromere-specific retroelement CRM2 to identify a collection of 40 sequence tags that flank CRM2 insertion points on the B chromosome. These were confirmed to lie within the centromere by assaying deletion breakpoints from centromere misdivision derivatives (intracentromere breakages caused by centromere fission). Markers were grouped together on the basis of their association with other markers in the misdivision series and assembled into a pseudocontig containing 10.1 kb of sequence. To identify sequences that interact directly with centromere proteins, we carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation using antibodies to centromeric histone H3 (CENH3), a defining feature of functional centromeric sequences. The CENH3 chromatin immunoprecipitation map was interpreted relative to the known transmission rates of centromere misdivision derivatives to identify a centromere core domain spanning 33 markers. A subset of seven markers was mapped in additional B centromere misdivision derivatives with the use of unique primer pairs. A derivative previously shown to have no canonical centromere sequences (Telo3-3) lacks these core markers. Our results provide a molecular map of the B chromosome centromere and identify key sequences within the map that interact directly with centromeric histone H3. PMID:26511496

  6. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  7. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-07-15

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  8. Plasmodium falciparum CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase possesses two functional catalytic domains and is inhibited by a CDP-choline analog selected from a virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Contet, Alicia; Pihan, Emilie; Lavigne, Marina; Wengelnik, Kai; Maheshwari, Sweta; Vial, Henri; Douguet, Dominique; Cerdan, Rachel

    2015-04-13

    Phosphatidylcholine is the major lipid component of the malaria parasite membranes and is required for parasite multiplication in human erythrocytes. Plasmodium falciparum CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (PfCCT) is the rate-limiting enzyme of the phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis pathway and thus considered as a potential antimalarial target. In contrast to its mammalian orthologs, PfCCT contains a duplicated catalytic domain. Here, we show that both domains are catalytically active with similar kinetic parameters. A virtual screening strategy allowed the identification of a drug-size molecule competitively inhibiting the enzyme. This compound also prevented phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis in parasites and exerted an antimalarial effect. This study constitutes the first step towards a rationalized design of future new antimalarial agents targeting PfCCT. PMID:25771858

  9. Non-Catalytic Site HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Disrupt Core Maturation and Induce a Reverse Transcription Block in Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Luong; O’Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A.; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M.; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  10. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Yant, Stephen R; Tsai, Luong; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  11. Regulation of ASPP2 Interaction with p53 Core Domain by an Intramolecular Autoinhibitory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Katz, Chen; Friedler, Assaf

    2013-01-01

    ASPP2 is a key protein in regulating apoptosis both in p53-dependent and-independent pathways. The C-terminal part of ASPP2 contains four ankyrin repeats and an SH3 domain (Ank-SH3) that mediate the interactions of ASPP2 with apoptosis related proteins such as p53, Bcl-2 and the p65 subunit of NFκB. p53 core domain (p53CD) binds the n-src loop and the RT loop of ASPP2 SH3. ASPP2 contains a disordered proline rich domain (ASPP2 Pro) that forms an intramolecular autoinhibitory interaction with the Ank-SH3 domains. Here we show how this intramolecular interaction affects the intermolecular interactions of ASPP2 with p53, Bcl-2 and NFkB. We used biophysical methods to obtain better understanding of the relationship between ASPP2 and its partners for getting a comprehensive view on ASPP2 pathways. Fluorescence anisotropy competition experiments revealed that both ASPP2 Pro and p53CD competed for binding the n-src loop of the ASPP2 SH3, indicating regulation of p53CD binding to this loop by ASPP2 Pro. Peptides derived from the ASPP2-binding interface of Bcl-2 did not compete with p53CD or NFkB peptides for binding the ASPP2 n-src loop. However, p53CD displaced the NFκB peptide (residues 303–332) from its complex with ASPP2 Ank-SH3, indicating that NFκB 303–332 and p53CD bind a partly overlapping site in ASPP2 SH3, mostly in the RT loop. These results are in agreement with previous docking studies, which showed that ASPP2 Ank-SH3 binds Bcl-2 and NFκB mostly via distinct sites from p53. However they show some overlap between the binding sites of p53CD and NFkB in ASPP2 Ank-SH3. Our results provide experimental evidence that the intramolecular interaction in ASPP2 regulates its binding to p53CD and that ASPP2 Ank-SH3 binds Bcl-2 and NFκB via distinct sites. PMID:23472201

  12. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ser/thr kinase PknA from M. tuberculosis shows an Src-like autoinhibited conformation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Tristan; Alexandre, Matthieu; Duran, Rosario; Barilone, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Alzari, Pedro M; Bellinzoni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Signal transduction mediated by Ser/Thr phosphorylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been intensively studied in the last years, as its genome harbors eleven genes coding for eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases. Here we describe the crystal structure and the autophosphorylation sites of the catalytic domain of PknA, one of two protein kinases essential for pathogen's survival. The structure of the ligand-free kinase domain shows an auto-inhibited conformation similar to that observed in human Tyr kinases of the Src-family. These results reinforce the high conservation of structural hallmarks and regulation mechanisms between prokaryotic and eukaryotic protein kinases. PMID:25586004

  13. Improved catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, anti-salt and detergent tolerance of keratinase KerSMD by partially truncation of PPC domain.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The keratinase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (KerSMD) is known for its high activity and pH stability in keratin degradation. However, catalytic efficiency and detergent tolerability need to be improved in order to be used for industrial application. In this work, we obtained several keratinase variants with enhanced catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, and anti-salt and detergent tolerability by partially truncating the PPC domain of KerSMD. The variants all showed improved catalytic efficiency to synthetic substrate AAPF, with the V355 variant having the highest kcat /Km value of 143.6 s(-1) mM(-1). The truncation of keratinase had little effect on alkaline stability but obviously decreased collagenase activity, developing its potential application in leather treatment. The variants V380, V370, and V355 were thermophilic, with a 1.7-fold enhancement of keratinlytic activity at 60 °C when compared to the wild type. The entire truncation of PPC domain obtained the variant V355 with improved tolerance to alkalinity, salt, chaotropic agents, and detergents. The V355 variant showed more than a 40% improvement in activity under 15% (w/v) NaCl or 4% (w/v) SDS solution, showing excellent stability under harsh washing and unhairing conditions. Our work investigated how protein engineering affects the function of PPC domain of KerSMD. PMID:27298079

  14. Improved catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, anti-salt and detergent tolerance of keratinase KerSMD by partially truncation of PPC domain

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The keratinase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (KerSMD) is known for its high activity and pH stability in keratin degradation. However, catalytic efficiency and detergent tolerability need to be improved in order to be used for industrial application. In this work, we obtained several keratinase variants with enhanced catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, and anti-salt and detergent tolerability by partially truncating the PPC domain of KerSMD. The variants all showed improved catalytic efficiency to synthetic substrate AAPF, with the V355 variant having the highest kcat /Km value of 143.6 s−1 mM−1. The truncation of keratinase had little effect on alkaline stability but obviously decreased collagenase activity, developing its potential application in leather treatment. The variants V380, V370, and V355 were thermophilic, with a 1.7-fold enhancement of keratinlytic activity at 60 °C when compared to the wild type. The entire truncation of PPC domain obtained the variant V355 with improved tolerance to alkalinity, salt, chaotropic agents, and detergents. The V355 variant showed more than a 40% improvement in activity under 15% (w/v) NaCl or 4% (w/v) SDS solution, showing excellent stability under harsh washing and unhairing conditions. Our work investigated how protein engineering affects the function of PPC domain of KerSMD. PMID:27298079

  15. A single catalytic domain of the junction-resolving enzyme T7 endonuclease I is a non-specific nicking endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Chudi; Kumar, Sanjay

    2005-01-01

    A stable heterodimeric protein containing a single correctly folded catalytic domain (SCD) of T7 endonuclease I was produced by means of a trans-splicing intein system. As predicted by a model presented earlier, purified SCD protein acts a non-specific nicking endonuclease on normal linear DNA. The SCD retains some ability to recognize and cleave a deviated DNA double-helix near a nick or a strand-crossing site. Thus, we infer that the non-specific and nicked-site cleavage activities observed for the native T7 endonuclease I (as distinct from the resolution activity) are due to uncoordinated actions of the catalytic domains. The positively charged C-terminus of T7 Endo I is essential for the enzymatic activity of SCD, as it is for the native enzyme. We propose that the preference of the native enzyme for the resolution reaction is achieved by cooperativity in the binding of its two catalytic domains when presented with two of the arms across a four-way junction or cruciform structure. PMID:16264086

  16. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  17. Recombinant expression and biochemical characterization of the catalytic domain of acetylcholinesterase-1 from the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haobo; Liu, Siwei; Zhao, Picheng; Pope, Carey

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) and their genes from susceptible and resistant insects have been extensively studied to understand the molecular basis of target site insensitivity. Due to the existence of other resistance mechanisms, however, it can be problematic to correlate directly a mutation with the resistant phenotype. An alternative approach involves recombinant expression and characterization of highly purified wild-type and mutant AChEs, which serves as a reliable platform for studying structure-function relationships. We expressed the catalytic domain of Anopheles gambiae AChE1 (r-AgAChE1) using the baculovirus system and purified it 26,000-fold from the conditioned medium to near homogeneity. While KM's of r-AgAChE1 were comparable for ATC, AβMTC, PTC, and BTC, Vmax's were substantially different. The IC50's for eserine, carbaryl, paraoxon, BW284C51, malaoxon, and ethopropazine were 8.3, 72.5, 83.6, 199, 328, and 6.59×104 nM, respectively. We determined kinetic constants for inhibition of r-AgAChE1 by four of these compounds. The enzyme bound eserine or paraoxon stronger than carbaryl or malaoxon. Because the covalent modification of r-AgAChE1 by eserine occurred faster than that by the other compounds, eserine is more potent than paraoxon, carbaryl, and malaoxon. Furthermore, we found that choline inhibited r-AgAChE1, a phenomenon related to the enzyme activity decrease at high concentrations of acetylcholine. PMID:19607916

  18. Structure-guided studies of the SHP-1/JAK1 interaction provide new insights into phosphatase catalytic domain substrate recognition

    PubMed Central

    Alicea-Velázquez, Nilda L.; Jakoncic, Jean; Boggon, Titus J.

    2013-01-01

    SHP-1 (PTPN6) is a member of the SHP sub-family of protein tyrosine phosphatases and plays a critical role in the regulation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. Previous studies suggested that SHP-1 contains a PTP1B-like second phosphotyrosine pocket that allows for binding of tandem phosphotyrosine residues, such as those found in the activation loop of JAK kinases. To discover the structural nature of the interaction between SHP-1 and the JAK family member, JAK1, we determined the 1.8 Å co-crystal structure of the SHP-1 catalytic domain and a JAK1-derived substrate peptide. This structure reveals electron density for only one bound phosphotyrosine residue. To investigate the role of the predicted second site pocket we determined the structures of SHP-1 in complex with phosphate and sulfate to 1.37 Å and 1.7 Å, respectively, and performed anomalous scattering experiments for a selenate-soaked crystal. These crystallographic data suggest that SHP-1 does not contain a PTP1B-like second site pocket. This conclusion is further supported by analysis of the relative dephosphorylation and binding affinities of mono-and tandem-phosphorylated peptide substrates. The crystal structures instead indicate that SHP-1 contains an extended C-terminal helix α2′ incompatible with the predicted second phosphotyrosine binding site. This study suggests that SHP-1 defines a new category of PTP1B-like protein tyrosine phosphatases with a hindered second phosphotyrosine pocket. PMID:23296072

  19. Reversible Aggregation Plays a Crucial Role on the Folding Landscape of p53 Core Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Daniella; Lima, Luis M. T. R.; Maia, Lenize F.; Lopez, Priscila M.; Ano Bom, Ana P.; Valente, Ana P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2004-01-01

    The role of tumor suppressor protein p53 in cell cycle control depends on its flexible and partially unstructured conformation, which makes it crucial to understand its folding landscape. Here we report an intermediate structure of the core domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53 (p53C) during equilibrium and kinetic folding/unfolding transitions induced by guanidinium chloride. This partially folded structure was undetectable when investigated by intrinsic fluorescence. Indeed, the fluorescence data showed a simple two-state transition. On the other hand, analysis of far ultraviolet circular dichroism in 1.0 M guanidinium chloride demonstrated a high content of secondary structure, and the use of an extrinsic fluorescent probe, 4,4′-dianilino-1,1′ binaphthyl-5,5′-disulfonic acid, indicated an increase in exposure of the hydrophobic core at 1 M guanidinium chloride. This partially folded conformation of p53C was plagued by aggregation, as suggested by one-dimensional NMR and demonstrated by light-scattering and gel-filtration chromatography. Dissociation by high pressure of these aggregates reveals the reversibility of the process and that the aggregates have water-excluded cavities. Kinetic measurements show that the intermediate formed in a parallel reaction between unfolded and folded structures and that it is under fine energetic control. They are not only crucial to the folding pathway of p53C but may explain as well the vulnerability of p53C to undergo departure of the native to an inactive state, which makes the cell susceptible to malignant transformation. PMID:15298872

  20. Highly retentive core domains in K-feldspar preserve argon ages from high temperature stages of granite exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Lister, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Retentive core domains are characterized by diffusion parameters that imply K-feldspar should be able to retain argon even at temperatures near or above the granite solidus. In this case it should be possible to date granite emplacement using argon geochronology, and the same answer should be obtained as by using other methods. We present one case study where this is the case, from the elevated Capoas granite stock on Palawan, in the Philippines, and another where it is not, from the South Cyclades Shear Zone, on Ios, Greece. We attempt to determine the factors such as the role of fluid ingress in triggering the in situ recrystallization that can eliminate and/or modify the core domains, leading to relatively youthful ages. Thermochronology is still possible, because less retentive diffusion domains exist, but different methods need to be applied to interpret the data. The work also demonstrates that K-feldspar can be sufficiently retentive as to allow direct dating of processes that reduce the dimensions of diffusion domains, e.g., cataclased and/or recrystallized K-feldspar in fault rock and/or mylonite. These are important developments in the methodology of 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but to further advance we need to clarify the nature of these highly retentive core domains. In particular, we need better understand how they are modified by microstructural processes during deformation and metamorphism. We need also to assess the role of any crystal structural changes during step-heating in vacuo.

  1. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of UCHL5, a proteasome-associated human deubiquitinating enzyme, reveals an unproductive form of the enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Tushar K.; Permaul, Michelle; Boudreaux, David A.; Mahanic, Christina; Mauney, Sarah; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 (UCHL5) is a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, which, along with RPN11 and USP14, is known to carry out deubiquitination on proteasome. As a member of UCH family, UCHL5 is unusual because, unlike UCHL1 and UCHL3, it can process polyubiquitin chain. However, it does so only when it is bound to the proteasome; in its free form, it is capable of releasing only relatively small leaving groups from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. Such a behavior might suggest at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, an apo form incapable of chain processing activity, and a proteasome-induced activated form capable of cleaving polyubiquitin chain. Through the crystal structure analysis of two truncated constructs representing the catalytic domain (UCH domain) of this enzyme, we are able to visualize a state of this enzyme that we interpret as its inactive form, because the catalytic cysteine appears to be in an unproductive orientation. While this work was in progress, the structure of a different construct representing the UCH domain was reported; however, in that work the structure reported was that of an inactive mutant (catalytic Cys to Ala, Nishio K, Kim SW, Kawai K, Mizushima T, Yamane T, Hamazaki J, Murata S, Tanaka K and Morimoto Y (2009) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 390, 855-860), which precluded the observation that we are reporting here. Additionally, our structures reveal conformationally dynamic parts of the enzyme that may play a role in the structural transition to the more active form. PMID:21995438

  2. Synthesis Dependent Core Level Binding Energy Shift in the Oxidation State of Platinum Coated on Ceria–Titania and its Effect on Catalytic Decomposition of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, A. S.; King, Jessica; Vincent, Abhilash; Seal, Sudipta

    2010-11-20

    Synergistic interaction of catalyst and support has attracted the interest of the catalytic community for several decades. The decomposition/oxidation of alcohols for the production of hydrogen as a source of fuel requires such support catalyst interaction. Recent studies have suggested the active role of oxide based supports on the catalytic ability of noble metals such as gold, platinum and palladium. Herein, we report the effect of synthesis technique on the catalytic activity of platinum coated on mixed ceria-titania support system. Wet impregnation technique followed by calcination was compared with the chemical reduction of platinum during the coating over oxide support. Methanol decomposition studied using an in-house built catalytic reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer showed that catalyst prepared by thermal reduction of platinum demonstrated better catalytic ability than the catalyst prepared by chemical reduction of platinum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the size of both platinum and ceria-titania particles remained unchanged, while the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the oxidation state of platinum was modified by different coating procedures. A shift in the core level binding energy of the Pt 4f towards lower binding energy was observed with chemical reduction. Based on the XPS data it was found that platinum (on ceria-titania supports) in mixed oxidation state outperformed the Pt in reduced metallic state. Results from catalysis and in situ Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy are presented and discussed.

  3. Solution structure of p53 core domain: Structural basis for its instability

    PubMed Central

    Cañadillas, José Manuel Pérez; Tidow, Henning; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Rutherford, Trevor J.; Ang, Hwee Ching; Fersht, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    The 25-kDa core domain of the tumor suppressor p53 is inherently unstable and melts at just above body temperature, which makes it susceptible to oncogenic mutations that inactivate it by lowering its stability. We determined its structure in solution using state-of-the-art isotopic labeling techniques and NMR spectroscopy to complement its crystal structure. The structure was very similar to that in the crystal but far more mobile than expected. Importantly, we were able to analyze by NMR the structural environment of several buried polar groups, which indicated structural reasons for the instability. NMR spectroscopy, with its ability to detect protons, located buried hydroxyl and sulfhydryl groups that form suboptimal hydrogen-bond networks. We mutated one such buried pair, Tyr-236 and Thr-253 to Phe-236 and Ile-253 (as found in the paralogs p63 and p73), and stabilized p53 by 1.6 kcal/mol. We also detected differences in the conformation of a mobile loop that might reflect the existence of physiologically relevant alternative conformations. The effects of temperature on the dynamics of aromatic residues indicated that the protein also experiences several dynamic processes that might be related to the presence of alternative hydrogen-bond patterns in the protein interior. p53 appears to have evolved to be dynamic and unstable. PMID:16461916

  4. Ion and seed dependent fibril assembly of a spidroin core domain.

    PubMed

    Humenik, Martin; Smith, Andrew M; Arndt, Sina; Scheibel, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Recombinant eADF4(C16) represents an engineered spider silk variant based on the sequence of the core domain of the natural dragline silk protein ADF4 of Araneus diadematus. Previously eADF4(C16) has been shown to self-assemble into cross-β fibrils in a two-step process of nucleus formation and fibril growth. Here, it is shown that structurally converted low molecular weight oligomers can act as nuclei. Further, it could be determined that specifically potassium and phosphate ions strongly influence both nucleus formation as well as fibril growth. Nucleation of fibril assembly could be surpassed by seeding soluble protein with pre-assembled fibrils but also, unexpectedly, with eADF4(C16) sub-micrometer particles. The latter finding reveals that spider silk fibril assembly seems to be rather dependent on the protein sequence than on the structural features, since cross-seeding with other proteins was not possible. PMID:26123261

  5. Use of RNA tertiary interaction modules for the crystallisation of the spliceosomal snRNP core domain.

    PubMed

    Leung, Adelaine K W; Kambach, Christian; Kondo, Yasushi; Kampmann, Martin; Jinek, Martin; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2010-09-10

    RNA is known to perform diverse roles in the cell, often as ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. While the crystal structure of these RNP particles could provide crucial insights into their functions, crystallographic work on RNP complexes is often hampered by difficulties in obtaining well-diffracting crystals. The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) core domain, acting as an assembly nucleus for the maturation of snRNPs, plays a crucial role in the biogenesis of four of the spliceosomal snRNPs. We have succeeded in crystallising the human U4 snRNP core domain containing seven Sm proteins and a truncated U4 snRNA variant. The most critical factor in our success in the crystallisation was the introduction of various tertiary interaction modules into the RNA that could promote crystal packing without altering the core structure. Here, we describe various strategies employed in our crystallisation effort that could be applied to crystallisation of other RNP particles. PMID:20643141

  6. CORE Knowledge Domain C.4 Employment and Career Development: Application for Rehabilitation Counselor Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire-Kuletz, Maureen; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    The Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) CORE revised the standards for rehabilitation counseling master's degree program accreditation in 2004. These standards seek to promote effective rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities in both private and public programs (CORE, 2008). This article focuses on the new CORE standard…

  7. One-Pot Synthesis of Monodisperse Noble Metal @ Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (M@RF) and M@Carbon Core-Shell Nanostructure and Their Catalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peipei; Xu, Yong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xuchun; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-10-27

    We demonstrate that noble metal @ RF core-shell nanostructures can be obtained through a facile one-pot synthesis approach in the absence of any additional surfactants. Monodisperse metal@RF core-shell nanostructures can be produced within 1 h on a large scale. Both the core size and shell thickness can be readily tuned by altering the reaction parameters. Systematic studies reveal that resorcinol could have several functions: it could act as a reactant to form RF resin, and it also could passivate the surface of metallic nanoparticles to prevent them from aggregating. Additionally, for the first time, our results suggest that resorcinol may act as a reducing agent that can reduce metal salts to form metal nanoparticles. The core-shell nanoparticles can be carbonized into M@carbon nanostructures, which have shown great performance in the catalytic hydrogenation of chlorobenzene. This work not only will help to achieve the controllable synthesis of noble metal@RF resin and M@carbon core-shell nanostructures but also will promote research into other RF-based nanostructures and their catalytic applications. PMID:26434608

  8. Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core-shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yu-jin; Ma, Rory; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium (Pd) core-shell nanospheres were produced via pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in acetonitrile. The microstructural features and optical properties of these nanospheres were characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis indicated that the core-shell nanostructures consisted of single-crystalline cubic metallic Pd spheres that serve as the core material, over which graphitized carbon was anchored as a heterogeneous shell. The absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a broad (absorption) band at ∼264 nm; this band corresponded to the typical inter-band transition of a metallic system and resulted possibly from the absorbance of the ionic Pd2+. The catalytic properties of the Pd and Pd@C core-shell nanostructures were investigated using the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline by an excess amount of NaBH4 in an aqueous solution at room temperature, as a model reaction. Owing to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area, the resulting Pd@C nanostructures exhibited higher conversion efficiencies than their bare Pd counterparts. In fact, the layered structure provided access to the surface of the Pd nanostructures for the hydrogenation reaction, owing to the synergistic effect between graphitized carbon and the nanostructures. Their unique structure and excellent catalytic performance render Pd@C core-shell nanostructures highly promising candidates for catalysis applications.

  9. Catalytic domain of plasmid pAD1 relaxase TraX defines a group of relaxases related to restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Francia, María Victoria; Clewell, Don B.; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid pAD1 is a 60-kb conjugative element commonly found in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. The relaxase TraX and the primary origin of transfer oriT2 are located close to each other and have been shown to be essential for conjugation. The oriT2 site contains a large inverted repeat (where the nic site is located) adjacent to a series of short direct repeats. TraX does not show any of the typical relaxase sequence motifs but is the prototype of a unique family of relaxases (MOBC). The present study focuses on the genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of TraX, whose 3D structure could be predicted by protein threading. The structure consists of two domains: (i) an N-terminal domain sharing the topology of the DNA binding domain of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators and (ii) a C-terminal catalytic domain related to the PD-(D/E)XK family of restriction endonucleases. Alignment of MOBC relaxase amino acid sequences pointed to several conserved polar amino acid residues (E28, D152, E170, E172, K176, R180, Y181, and Y203) that were mutated to alanine. Functional analysis of these mutants (in vivo DNA transfer and cleavage assays) revealed the importance of these residues for relaxase activity and suggests Y181 as a potential catalytic residue similarly to His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. We also show that TraX binds specifically to dsDNA containing the oriT2 direct repeat sequences, confirming their role in transfer specificity. The results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of MOBC relaxases, which differs radically from that of His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. PMID:23904483

  10. Changes in Protein Domains outside the Catalytic Site of the Bacteriophage Qβ Replicase Reduce the Mutagenic Effect of 5-Azacytidine

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Laura; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The high genetic heterogeneity and great adaptability of RNA viruses are ultimately caused by the low replication fidelity of their polymerases. However, single amino acid substitutions that modify replication fidelity can evolve in response to mutagenic treatments with nucleoside analogues. Here, we investigated how two independent mutants of the bacteriophage Qβ replicase (Thr210Ala and Tyr410His) reduce sensitivity to the nucleoside analogue 5-azacytidine (AZC). Despite being located outside the catalytic site, both mutants reduced the mutation frequency in the presence of the drug. However, they did not modify the type of AZC-induced substitutions, which was mediated mainly by ambiguous base pairing of the analogue with purines. Furthermore, the Thr210Ala and Tyr410His substitutions had little or no effect on replication fidelity in untreated viruses. Also, both substitutions were costly in the absence of AZC or when the action of the drug was suppressed by adding an excess of natural pyrimidines (uridine or cytosine). Overall, the phenotypic properties of these two mutants were highly convergent, despite the mutations being located in different domains of the Qβ replicase. This suggests that treatment with a given nucleoside analogue tends to select for a unique functional response in the viral replicase. IMPORTANCE In the last years, artificial increase of the replication error rate has been proposed as an antiviral therapy. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which two substitutions in the Qβ replicase confer partial resistance to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue AZC. As opposed to previous work with animal viruses, where different mutations selected sequentially conferred nucleoside analogue resistance through different mechanisms, our results suggest that there are few or no alternative AZC resistance phenotypes in Qβ. Also, despite resistance mutations being highly costly in the absence of the drug, there was no sequential

  11. Theoretical models of catalytic domains of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A with Zn2+ and Mn2+ metal dications and putative bioligands in their catalytic centers.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Celmer, E; Ołdziej, S; Ciarkowski, J

    2001-01-01

    The oligomeric metalloenzymes protein phosphatases dephosphorylate OH groups of Ser/Thr or Tyr residues of proteins whose actions depend on the phosphorus signal. The catalytic units of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1, 2A and 2B (PP1c, PP2Ac and PP2Bc, respectively), which exhibit about 45% sequence similarity, have their active centers practically identical. This feature strongly suggests that the unknown structure of PP2Ac could be successfully homology-modeled from the known structures of PP1c and/or PP2Bc. Initially, a theoretical model of PP1c was built, including a phosphate and a metal dication in its catalytic site. The latter was modeled, together with a structural hydroxyl anion, as a triangular pseudo-molecule (Zno or Mno), composed of two metal cations (double Zn2+ or Mn2+, respectively) and the OH- group. To the free PP1c two inhibitor sequences R29RRRPpTPAMLFR40 of DARPP-32 and R30RRRPpTPATLVLT42 of Inhibitor-1, and two putative substrate sequences LRRApSVA and QRRQRKpRRTI were subsequently docked. In the next step, a free PP2Ac model was built via homology re-modeling of the PP1c template and the same four sequences were docked to it. Thus, together, 20 starting model complexes were built, allowing for combination of the Zno and Mno pseudo-molecules, free enzymes and the peptide ligands docked in the catalytic sites of PP1c and PP2Ac. All models were subsequently subjected to 250-300 ps molecular dynamics using the AMBER 5.0 program. The equilibrated trajectories of the final 50 ps were taken for further analyses. The theoretical models of PP1c complexes, irrespective of the dication type, exhibited increased mobilities in the following residue ranges: 195-200, 273-278, 287-209 for the inhibitor sequences and 21-25, 194-200, 222-227, 261, 299-302 for the substrate sequences. Paradoxically, the analogous PP2Ac models appeared much more stable in similar simulations, since only their "prosegment" residues 6-10 and 14-18 exhibited an increased mobility

  12. Polyglutamine Amyloid Core Boundaries and Flanking Domain Dynamics in Huntingtin Fragment Fibrils Determined by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In Huntington’s disease, expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) domain in the huntingtin (htt) protein leads to misfolding and aggregation. There is much interest in the molecular features that distinguish monomeric, oligomeric, and fibrillar species that populate the aggregation pathway and likely differ in cytotoxicity. The mechanism and rate of aggregation are greatly affected by the domains flanking the polyQ segment within exon 1 of htt. A “protective” C-terminal proline-rich flanking domain inhibits aggregation by inducing polyproline II structure (PPII) within an extended portion of polyQ. The N-terminal flanking segment (httNT) adopts an α-helical structure as it drives aggregation, helps stabilize oligomers and fibrils, and is seemingly integral to their supramolecular assembly. Via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), we probe how, in the mature fibrils, the htt flanking domains impact the polyQ domain and in particular the localization of the β-structured amyloid core. Using residue-specific and uniformly labeled samples, we find that the amyloid core occupies most of the polyQ domain but ends just prior to the prolines. We probe the structural and dynamical features of the remarkably abrupt β-sheet to PPII transition and discuss the potential connections to certain htt-binding proteins. We also examine the httNT α-helix outside the polyQ amyloid core. Despite its presumed structural and demonstrated stabilizing roles in the fibrils, quantitative ssNMR measurements of residue-specific dynamics show that it undergoes distinct solvent-coupled motion. This dynamical feature seems reminiscent of molten-globule-like α-helix-rich features attributed to the nonfibrillar oligomeric species of various amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:25280367

  13. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F.; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  14. Crystal Structures of the p21-Activated Kinases PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 Reveal Catalytic Domain Plasticity of Active Group II PAKs

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Lee, Wen Hwa; Debreczeni, Judit É.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Turnbull, Andrew; Fedorov, Oleg; Deacon, Sean W.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.; Knapp, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Summary p21-activated kinases have been classified into two groups based on their domain architecture. Group II PAKs (PAK4–6) regulate a wide variety of cellular functions, and PAK deregulation has been linked to tumor development. Structural comparison of five high-resolution structures comprising all active, monophosphorylated group II catalytic domains revealed a surprising degree of domain plasticity, including a number of catalytically productive and nonproductive conformers. Rearrangements of helix αC, a key regulatory element of kinase function, resulted in an additional helical turn at the αC N terminus and a distortion of its C terminus, a movement hitherto unseen in protein kinases. The observed structural changes led to the formation of interactions between conserved residues that structurally link the glycine-rich loop, αC, and the activation segment and firmly anchor αC in an active conformation. Inhibitor screening identified six potent PAK inhibitors from which a tri-substituted purine inhibitor was cocrystallized with PAK4 and PAK5. PMID:17292838

  15. Studies on the photo-catalytic activity of semiconductor nanostructures and their gold core-shell on the photodegradation of malathion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamdouh Fouad, Dina; Bakr Mohamed, Mona

    2011-11-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of different semiconductor nanoparticles and their metal core-shell nanocomposites such as TiO2, Au/TiO2, ZnO, and Au/ZnO. The morphology and crystal structures of the developed nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). These materials were used as catalysts for the photodegradation of malathion, which is one of the most commonly used pesticides in developing countries. The degradation of 10 ppm malathion under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light in the presence of different synthesized nanocomposites was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-visible spectra. A comprehensive study was carried out for the catalytic efficiency of the prepared nanoparticles. Moreover, the effects of different factors that could influence catalytic photodegradation, such as different light sources, surface coverage and the nature of the organic contaminants, were investigated. The results indicate that the core-shell nanocomposite of semiconductor-gold serves as a better catalytic system than the semiconductor nanoparticles themselves.

  16. Metal-organic framework-immobilized polyhedral metal nanocrystals: reduction at solid-gas interface, metal segregation, core-shell structure, and high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aijaz, Arshad; Akita, Tomoki; Tsumori, Nobuko; Xu, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, this work presents surfactant-free monometallic and bimetallic polyhedral metal nanocrystals (MNCs) immobilized to a metal-organic framework (MIL-101) by CO-directed reduction of metal precursors at the solid-gas interface. With this novel method, Pt cubes and Pd tetrahedra were formed by CO preferential bindings on their (100) and (111) facets, respectively. PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals showed metal segregation, leading to Pd-rich core and Pt-rich shell. Core-shell Pt@Pd nanocrystals were immobilized to MIL-101 by seed-mediated two-step reduction, representing the first example of core-shell MNCs formed using only gas-phase reducing agents. These MOF-supported MNCs exhibited high catalytic activities for CO oxidation. PMID:24138338

  17. Magnetic Co@g-C3N4 Core-Shells on rGO Sheets for Momentum Transfer with Catalytic Activity toward Continuous-Flow Hydrogen Generation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shasha; Han, Guosheng; Su, Yongheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yanyan; Wu, Xianli; Li, Baojun

    2016-06-28

    Magnetic core-shell structures provide abundant opportunities for the construction of multifunctional composites. In this article, magnetic core-shells were fabricated with Co nanoparticles (NPs) as cores and g-C3N4 as shells. In the fabrication process, the Co@g-C3N4 core-shells were anchored onto the rGO nanosheets to form a Co@g-C3N4-rGO composite (CNG-I). For hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of NaBH4 or NH3BH3, the Co NP cores act as catalytic active sites. The g-C3N4 shells protect Co NPs cores from aggregating or growing. The connection between Co NPs and rGO was strengthened by the g-C3N4 shells to prevent them from leaching or flowing away. The g-C3N4 shells also work as a cocatalyst for hydrogen generation. The magnetism of Co NPs and the shape of rGO nanosheets achieve effective momentum transfer in the external magnetic field. In the batch reactor, a higher catalytic activity was obtained for CNG-I in self-stirring mode than in magneton stirring mode. In the continuous-flow process, stable hydrogen generation was carried out with CNG-I being fixed and propelled by the external magnetic field. The separation film is unnecessary because of magnetic momentum transfer. This idea of the composite design and magnetic momentum transfer will be useful for the development of both hydrogen generation and multifunctional composite materials. PMID:27276187

  18. Domain motions of glucosamine-6P synthase: Comparison of the anisotropic displacements in the crystals and the catalytic hinge-bending rotation

    PubMed Central

    Mouilleron, Stéphane; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2007-01-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase channels ammonia over 18 Å from glutamine at the glutaminase site to fructose-6P at the synthase site. We have modeled the anisotropic displacements of the glutaminase and synthase domains from the two crystallized states, the enzyme in complex with fructose-6P or in complex with glucose-6P and a glutamine affinity analog, using TLS (rigid-body motion in terms of translation, libration, and screw motions) refinement implemented in REFMAC. The domains displacements in the crystal lattices are compared to the movement of the glutaminase domain relative to the synthase domain that occurs during the catalytic cycle upon glutamine binding, which was visualized by comparing the two structures. This movement was analyzed by the program DYNDOM as a 22.8° rotation around an effective hinge axis running approximately parallel to helix 300–317 of the synthase domain, the glutaminase loop that covers the glutaminase site upon glutamine binding acting as the mechanical hinge. PMID:17322533

  19. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  20. Structure of Core Domain of Fibril-Forming PHF/Tau Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Hideyo; Sharma, Deepak; Goux, Warren J.; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2006-01-01

    Short peptide sequences within the microtubule binding domain of the protein Tau are proposed to be core nucleation sites for formation of amyloid fibrils displaying the paired helical filament (PHF) morphology characteristic of neurofibrillary tangles. To study the structure of these proposed nucleation sites, we analyzed the x-ray diffraction patterns from the assemblies formed by a variety of PHF/tau-related peptide constructs containing the motifs VQIINK (PHF6*) in the second repeat and VQIVYK (PHF6) in the third repeat of tau. Peptides included: tripeptide acetyl-VYK-amide (AcVYK), tetrapeptide acetyl-IVYK-amide (AcPHF4), hexapeptide acetyl-VQIVYK-amide (AcPHF6), and acetyl-GKVQIINKLDLSNVQKDNIKHGSVQIVYKPVDLSKVT-amide (AcTR4). All diffraction patterns showed reflections at spacings of 4.7 Å, 3.8 Å, and ∼8–10 Å, which are characteristic of an orthogonal unit cell of β-sheets having dimensions a = 9.4 Å, b = 6.6 Å, and c = ∼8–10 Å (where a, b, and c are the lattice constants in the H-bonding, chain, and intersheet directions). The sharp 4.7 Å reflections indicate that the β-crystallites are likely to be elongated along the H-bonding direction and in a cross-β conformation. The assembly of the AcTR4 peptide, which contains both the PHF6 and PHF6* motifs, consisted of twisted sheets, as indicated by a unique fanning of the diffuse equatorial scattering and meridional accentuation of the (210) reflection at 3.8 Å spacing. The diffraction data for AcVYK, AcPHF4, and AcPHF6 all were consistent with ∼50 Å-wide tubular assemblies having double-walls, where β-strands constitute the walls. In this structure, the peptides are H-bonded together in the fiber direction, and the intersheet direction is radial. The positive-charged lysine residues face the aqueous medium, and tyrosine-tyrosine aromatic interactions stabilize the intersheet (double-wall) layers. This particular contact, which may be involved in PHF fibril formation, is proposed here as a

  1. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  2. Catalytic domains of the LAR and CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatases from Escherichia coli expression systems: Purification and characterization for specificity and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyeongjin; Ramer, S.E.; Itoh, Michiyasu; Saito, Haruo; Walsh, C.T. ); Kitas, E.; Bannwarth, W.; Burn, P. )

    1992-01-14

    The cytoplasmic domains of two human transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), LAR and CD45, have been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to near-homogeneity, and compared for catalytic efficiency toward several phosphotyrosine-containing peptide substrates. A 615-residue LAR fragment (LAR-D1D2) containing both tandemly repeated PTPase domains shows almost identical specific activity and high catalytic efficiency as the 40-kDa single-domain LAR-D1 fragment, consistent with a single functional active site in the 70-kDa LAR-D1D2 enzyme. A 90-kDa fragment of the human leukocyte CD45 PTPase, containing two similar tandemly repeated PTPase domains, shows parallel specificity to LAR-D1 and LAR-D1D2 with a high k{sub cat}/K{sub M} value for a phosphotyrosyl undecapeptide. Sufficient purified LAR-D1 and LAR-D1D2 PTPases were available to demonstrate enzymatic exchange of {sup 18}O from {sup 18}O{sub 4} inorganic phosphate into H{sub 2} {sup 16}O at rates of {approximately}1 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The oxygen-18 exchange probably proceeds via a phosphoenzyme intermediate. Brief incubation of all three PTPase fragments with a ({sup 32}P)phosphotyrosyl peptide substrate prior to quench with SDS sample buffer and gel electrophoresis led to autoradiographic detection of {sup 32}P-labeled enzymes. Pulse/chase studies on the LAR {sup 32}P-enzyme showed turnover of the labeled phosphoryl group.

  3. Structure of the Brachydanio Rerio Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1) Catalytic Domain in Complex With An Extended Inhibitor Targeting the Adaptive Pocket of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, R.A.; Fucini, R.V.; Hanan, E.J.; Barr, K.J.; Zhu, J.; Paulvannan, K.; Yang, W.; Romanowski, M.J.

    2009-05-18

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a member of the Polo-like kinase family of serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cytokinesis and is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. The catalytic domain of this enzyme shares significant primary amino-acid homology and structural similarity with another mitotic kinase, Aurora A. While screening an Aurora A library of ATP-competitive compounds, a urea-containing inhibitor with low affinity for mouse Aurora A but with submicromolar potency for human and zebrafish Plk1 (hPlk1 and zPlk1, respectively) was identified. A crystal structure of the zebrafish Plk1 kinase domain-inhibitor complex reveals that the small molecule occupies the purine pocket and extends past the catalytic lysine into the adaptive region of the active site. Analysis of the structures of this protein-inhibitor complex and of similar small molecules cocrystallized with other kinases facilitates understanding of the specificity of the inhibitor for Plk1 and documents for the first time that Plk1 can accommodate extended ATP-competitive compounds that project toward the adaptive pocket and help the enzyme order its activation segment.

  4. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A complexed with a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analog: implications for the activation process and for ADP ribosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Li, M; Dyda, F; Benhar, I; Pastan, I; Davies, D R

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic, or third domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PEIII) catalyzes the transfer of ADP ribose from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to elongation factor-2 in eukaryotic cells, inhibiting protein synthesis. We have determined the structure of PEIII crystallized in the presence of NAD to define the site of binding and mechanism of activation. However, NAD undergoes a slow hydrolysis and the crystal structure revealed only the hydrolysis products, AMP and nicotinamide, bound to the enzyme. To better define the site of NAD binding, we have now crystallized PEIII in the presence of a less hydrolyzable NAD analog, beta-methylene-thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-TAD), and refined the complex structure at 2.3 angstroms resolution. There are two independent molecules of PEIII in the crystal, and the conformations of beta-TAD show some differences in the two binding sites. The beta-TAD attached to molecule 2 appears to have been hydrolyzed between the pyrophosphate and the nicotinamide ribose. However molecule 1 binds to an intact beta-TAD and has no crystal packing contacts in the vicinity of the binding site, so that the observed conformation and interaction with the PEIII most likely resembles that of NAD bound to PEIII in solution. We have compared this complex with the catalytic domains of diphtheria toxin, heat labile enterotoxin, and pertussis toxin, all three of which it closely resembles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8692916

  5. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P

    2015-09-25

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min(-1), respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2'/3'-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μM, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg(2+) ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3-6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  6. Processing of the yellow fever virus nonstructural polyprotein: a catalytically active NS3 proteinase domain and NS2B are required for cleavages at dibasic sites.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, T J; Grakoui, A; Rice, C M

    1991-01-01

    The vaccinia virus-T7 transient expression system was used to further examine the role of the NS3 proteinase in processing of the yellow fever (YF) virus nonstructural polyprotein in BHK cells. YF virus-specific polyproteins and cleavage products were identified by immunoprecipitation with region-specific antisera, by size, and by comparison with authentic YF virus polypeptides. A YF virus polyprotein initiating with a signal sequence derived from the E protein fused to the N terminus of NS2A and extending through the N-terminal 356 amino acids of NS5 exhibited processing at the 2A-2B, 2B-3, 3-4A, 4A-4B, and 4B-5 cleavage sites. Similar results were obtained with polyproteins whose N termini began within NS2A (position 110) or with NS2B. When the NS3 proteinase domain was inactivated by replacing the proposed catalytic Ser-138 with Ala, processing at all sites was abolished. The results suggest that an active NS3 proteinase domain is necessary for cleavage at the diabasic nonstructural cleavage sites and that cleavage at the proposed 4A-4B signalase site requires prior cleavage at the 4B-5 site. Cleavages were not observed with a polyprotein whose N terminus began with NS3, but cleavage at the 4B-5 site could be restored by supplying the the NS2B protein in trans. Several experimental results suggested that trans cleavage at the 4B-5 site requires association of NS2B and the NS3 proteinase domain. Coexpression of different proteinases and catalytically inactive polyprotein substrates revealed that trans cleavage at the 2B-3 and 4B-5 sites was relatively efficient when compared with trans cleavage at the 2A-2B and 3-4A sites. Images PMID:1833562

  7. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. PMID:26405031

  8. In situ facile synthesis of Ru-based core-shell nanoparticles supported on carbon black and their high catalytic activity in the dehydrogenation of amine-boranes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Nan; Su, Jun; Hong, Xinlin; Luo, Wei; Cheng, Gongzhen

    2014-02-01

    Well-dispersed core-shell Ru@M (M=Co, Ni, Fe) nanoparticles (NPs) supported on carbon black have been synthesized via a facile in situ one-step procedure under ambient condition. Core-shell Ru@Co NPs were synthesized and characterized for the first time. The as-synthesized Ru@Co and Ru@Ni NPs exhibit superior catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of ammonia borane compared with their monometallic and alloy counterparts. The Ru@Co/C NPs are the most reactive, with a turnover frequency (TOF) value of 320 (mol H 2 min(-1)) molRu (-1) and activation energy (Ea) of 21.16 kJ mol(-1). Ru@Ni/C NPs are the next most active, whereas Ru@Fe/C NPs are almost inactive. Additionally, the as-synthesized NPs supported on carbon black exhibit higher catalytic activity than catalysts on other conventional supports, such as SiO2 and γ-Al2O3. PMID:24288206

  9. The type II and X cellulose-binding domains of Pseudomonas xylanase A potentiate catalytic activity against complex substrates by a common mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, J; Rixon, J E; Bolam, D N; McQueen-Mason, S; Simpson, P J; Williamson, M P; Hazlewood, G P; Gilbert, H J

    1999-01-01

    Xylanase A (Pf Xyn10A), in common with several other Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa polysaccharidases, consists of a Type II cellulose-binding domain (CBD), a catalytic domain (Pf Xyn10A(CD)) and an internal domain that exhibits homology to Type X CBDs. The Type X CBD of Pf Xyn10A, expressed as a discrete entity (CBD(X)) or fused to the catalytic domain (Pf Xyn10A'), bound to amorphous and bacterial microcrystalline cellulose with a K(a) of 2.5 x 10(5) M(-1). CBD(X) exhibited no affinity for soluble forms of cellulose or cello-oligosaccharides, suggesting that the domain interacts with multiple cellulose chains in the insoluble forms of the polysaccharide. Pf Xyn10A' was 2-3 times more active against cellulose-hemicellulose complexes than Pf Xyn10A(CD); however, Pf Xyn10A' and Pf Xyn10A(CD) exhibited the same activity against soluble substrates. CBD(X) did not disrupt the structure of plant-cell-wall material or bacterial microcrystalline cellulose, and did not potentiate Pf Xyn10A(CD) when not covalently linked to the enzyme. There was no substantial difference in the affinity of full-length Pf Xyn10A and the enzyme's Type II CBD for cellulose. The activity of Pf Xyn10A against cellulose-hemicellulose complexes was similar to that of Pf Xyn10A', and a derivative of Pf Xyn10A in which the Type II CBD is linked to the Pf Xyn10A(CD) via a serine-rich linker sequence [Bolam, Cireula, McQueen-Mason, Simpson, Williamson, Rixon, Boraston, Hazlewood and Gilbert (1998) Biochem J. 331, 775-781]. These data indicate that CBD(X) is functional in Pf Xyn10A and that no synergy, either in ligand binding or in the potentiation of catalysis, is evident between the Type II and X CBDs of the xylanase. PMID:10455036

  10. Unusual Domain Structure and Filamentary Superfluidity for 2D Hard-Core Bosons in Insulating Charge-Ordered Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Yu. D.; Moskvin, A. S.; Rybakov, F. N.; Borisov, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    We made use of a special algorithm for compute unified device architecture for NVIDIA graphics cards, a nonlinear conjugate-gradient method to minimize energy functional, and Monte-Carlo technique to directly observe the forming of the ground state configuration for the 2D hard-core bosons by lowering the temperature and its evolution with deviation away from half-filling. The novel technique allowed us to examine earlier implications and uncover novel features of the phase transitions, in particular, look upon the nucleation of the odd domain structure, emergence of filamentary superfluidity nucleated at the antiphase domain walls of the charge-ordered phase, and nucleation and evolution of different topological structures.

  11. In vitro catalytic activity of N-terminal and C-terminal domains in NukM, the post-translational modification enzyme of nukacin ISK-1.

    PubMed

    Shimafuji, Chinatsu; Noguchi, Megumi; Nishie, Mami; Nagao, Jun-Ichi; Shioya, Kouki; Zendo, Takeshi; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Lantibiotics are antibacterial peptides containing unique thioether cross-links termed lanthionine and methyllanthionine. NukM, the modifying enzyme of nukacin ISK-1, which is produced by Staphylococcus warneri ISK-1, catalyzes the dehydration of specific Ser/Thr residues in a precursor peptide, followed by conjugative addition of intramolecular Cys to dehydrated residues to generate a cyclic structure. By contrast, the precursor peptide of nisin is modified by 2 enzymes, NisB and NisC, which mediate dehydration and cyclization, respectively. While the C-terminal domain of NukM is homologous to NisC, the N-terminal domain has no homology with other known proteins. We expressed and characterized the N- and C-terminal domains of NukM, NukMN, and NukMC, separately. In vitro reconstitution revealed that full-length NukM fully modified the substrate peptide NukA. NukMN partially phosphorylated, dehydrated, and cyclized NukA. By contrast, NukMC did not catalyze dehydration, phosphorylation, or cyclization reactions. Interaction studies using surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that NukM and NukMN can bind NukA with high affinity, whereas NukMC has low substrate-recognition activity. These results suggest that NukMN is mainly responsible for substrate recognition and dehydration and that the whole NukM structure, including the C-terminal domain, is required for the complete modification of NukA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report providing insights into the in vitro catalytic activity of individual domains of a LanM-type modification enzyme. PMID:25971839

  12. Factor Analysis of the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire: Identifying Core Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Sunnquist, Madison; Brown, Abigail; Furst, Jacob; Cid, Marjoe; Farietta, Jillianna; Kot, Bobby; Bloomer, Craig; Nicholson, Laura; Williams, Yolonda; Jantke, Rachel; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle

    2015-01-01

    The present study attempted to identify critical symptom domains of individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Using patient and control samples collected in the United States, Great Britain, and Norway, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to establish the underlying factor structure of ME and CFS symptoms. The EFA suggested a four-factor solution: post-exertional malaise, cognitive dysfunction, sleep difficulties, and a combined factor consisting of neuroendocrine, autonomic, and immune dysfunction symptoms. The use of empirical methods could help better understand the fundamental symptom domains of this illness. PMID:27088131

  13. Residues in the membrane-spanning domain core modulate conformation and fusogenicity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2010-09-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for its biological activity. Initial studies have defined an almost invariant 'core' structure in the MSD and demonstrated that it is crucial for anchoring Env in the membrane and virus entry. We show here that amino acid substitutions in the MSD 'core' do not influence specific virus-cell attachment, nor CD4 receptor and CXCR4 coreceptor recognition by Env. However, substitutions within the MSD 'core' delayed the kinetics and reduced the efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by Env. Although we observed no evidence that membrane fusion mediated by the MSD core mutants was arrested at a hemifusion stage, impaired Env fusogenicity was correlated with minor conformational changes in the V2, C1, and C5 regions in gp120 and the immunodominant loop in gp41. These changes could delay initiation of the conformational changes required in the fusion process.

  14. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1. PMID:23663131

  15. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Salfeld, J.; Pfaff, E.; Noah, M.; Schaller, H.

    1989-02-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen (HBcAg)) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen (HBeAg)). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid.

  16. Roles of the propeptide and metal ions in the folding and stability of the catalytic domain of stromelysin (matrix metalloproteinase 3).

    PubMed

    Wetmore, D R; Hardman, K D

    1996-05-28

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are an unique class of zinc metalloproteases in that 12 A from the catalytic zinc site is a second zinc site, the function of which has yet to be determined. In the pro form, the protease is inactive. Here we show that the heat-induced autocatalytic activation of pro to mature MMP3 is bimolecular. Further, the process is modulated by a low-affinity zinc. A mechanism is proposed by which the second zinc site may act as an enzymatic activator for the mature protease. A method for preparing completely metal-free protein is described. Surprisingly, there is a much more dramatic structural change between the apo and holo forms of the mature protein than there is between apo and holo proprotein. Apo mature MMP3 appears to form a native-like stable intermediate structure in which one or more of the tryptophan side chains is more solvent-exposed than in the holo form. Apo MMP3 is remarkably stable to thermal unfolding as monitored by CD; thus the metal ions do not appear to significantly stabilize the secondary structure of the catalytic domain. The apo mature MMP3 intermediate can be unfolded with heat, subsequently refolded, and reactivated by addition of zinc and calcium. Thus for MMP3, unlike subtilisin or alpha-lytic protease, the propeptide is not required for protein folding in a timely fashion and the role of intramolecular chaperone is not a universal one for the propeptides of proteases. PMID:8639603

  17. Human cap methyltransferase (RNMT) N-terminal non-catalytic domain mediates recruitment to transcription initiation sites

    PubMed Central

    Aregger, Michael; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotes is dependent on the mRNA methyl cap which mediates mRNA processing and translation initiation. Synthesis of the methyl cap initiates with the addition of 7-methylguanosine to the initiating nucleotide of RNA pol II (polymerase II) transcripts, which occurs predominantly during transcription and in mammals is catalysed by RNGTT (RNA guanylyltransferase and 5′ phosphatase) and RNMT (RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase). RNMT has a methyltransferase domain and an N-terminal domain whose function is unclear; it is conserved in mammals, but not required for cap methyltransferase activity. In the present study we report that the N-terminal domain is necessary and sufficient for RNMT recruitment to transcription initiation sites and that recruitment occurs in a DRB (5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole)-dependent manner. The RNMT-activating subunit, RAM (RNMT-activating miniprotein), is also recruited to transcription initiation sites via an interaction with RNMT. The RNMT N-terminal domain is required for transcript expression, translation and cell proliferation. PMID:23863084

  18. Mutations in the Catalytic Domain of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) That Allow for Regulated Activity through the Use of Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Paladini, Rudolph D.; Wei, Ge; Kundu, Anirban; Zhao, Qiping; Bookbinder, Louis H.; Keller, Gilbert A.; Shepard, H. Michael; Frost, Gregory I.

    2013-01-01

    Conditionally active proteins regulated by a physiological parameter represent a potential new class of protein therapeutics. By systematically creating point mutations in the catalytic and linker domains of human MMP-1, we generated a protein library amenable to physiological parameter-based screening. Mutants screened for temperature-sensitive activity had mutations clustered at or near amino acids critical for metal binding. One mutant, GVSK (Gly159 to Val, Ser208 to Lys), contains mutations in regions of the catalytic domain involved in calcium and zinc binding. The in vitro activity of GVSK at 37 °C in high Ca2+ (10 mm) was comparable with MMP-1 (wild type), but in low Ca2+ (1 mm), there was an over 10-fold loss in activity despite having similar kinetic parameters. Activity decreased over 50% within 15 min and correlated with the degradation of the activated protein, suggesting that GVSK was unstable in low Ca2+. Varying the concentration of Zn2+ had no effect on GVSK activity in vitro. As compared with MMP-1, GVSK degraded soluble collagen I at the high but not the low Ca2+ concentration. In vivo, MMP-1 and GVSK degraded collagen I when perfused in Zucker rat ventral skin and formed higher molecular weight complexes with α2-macroglobulin, an inhibitor of MMPs. In vitro and in vivo complex formation and subsequent enzyme inactivation occurred faster with GVSK, especially at the low Ca2+ concentration. These data suggest that the activity of the human MMP-1 mutant GVSK can be regulated by Ca2+ both in vitro and in vivo and may represent a novel approach to engineering matrix-remodeling enzymes for therapeutic applications. PMID:23322779

  19. Crystal Structure of DNA Cytidine Deaminase ABOBEC3G Catalytic Deamination Domain Suggests a Binding Mode of Full-length Enzyme to Single-stranded DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Tianlong; Xu, Zeng; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a DNA cytidine deaminase (CD) that demonstrates antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogenic virus. It has an inactive N-terminal CD1 virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein binding domain (A3G-CD1) and an actively catalytic C-terminal CD2 deamination domain (A3G-CD2). Although many studies on the structure of A3G-CD2 and enzymatic properties of full-length A3G have been reported, the mechanism of how A3G interacts with HIV-1 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is still not well characterized. Here, we reported a crystal structure of a novel A3G-CD2 head-to-tail dimer (in which the N terminus of the monomer H (head) interacts with the C terminus of monomer T (tail)), where a continuous DNA binding groove was observed. By constructing the A3G-CD1 structural model, we found that its overall fold was almost identical to that of A3G-CD2. We mutated the residues located in or along the groove in monomer H and the residues in A3G-CD1 that correspond to those seated in or along the groove in monomer T. Then, by performing enzymatic assays, we confirmed the reported key elements and the residues in A3G necessary to the catalytic deamination. Moreover, we identified more than 10 residues in A3G essential to DNA binding and deamination reaction. Therefore, this dimer structure may represent a structural model of full-length A3G, which indicates a possible binding mode of A3G to HIV-1 ssDNA. PMID:25542899

  20. Crystal structure of DNA cytidine deaminase ABOBEC3G catalytic deamination domain suggests a binding mode of full-length enzyme to single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Tianlong; Xu, Zeng; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-02-13

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a DNA cytidine deaminase (CD) that demonstrates antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogenic virus. It has an inactive N-terminal CD1 virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein binding domain (A3G-CD1) and an actively catalytic C-terminal CD2 deamination domain (A3G-CD2). Although many studies on the structure of A3G-CD2 and enzymatic properties of full-length A3G have been reported, the mechanism of how A3G interacts with HIV-1 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is still not well characterized. Here, we reported a crystal structure of a novel A3G-CD2 head-to-tail dimer (in which the N terminus of the monomer H (head) interacts with the C terminus of monomer T (tail)), where a continuous DNA binding groove was observed. By constructing the A3G-CD1 structural model, we found that its overall fold was almost identical to that of A3G-CD2. We mutated the residues located in or along the groove in monomer H and the residues in A3G-CD1 that correspond to those seated in or along the groove in monomer T. Then, by performing enzymatic assays, we confirmed the reported key elements and the residues in A3G necessary to the catalytic deamination. Moreover, we identified more than 10 residues in A3G essential to DNA binding and deamination reaction. Therefore, this dimer structure may represent a structural model of full-length A3G, which indicates a possible binding mode of A3G to HIV-1 ssDNA. PMID:25542899

  1. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis: reliability and construct validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set

    PubMed Central

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H; Lin, Daming; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn; Woodworth, Thasia; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C; Pope, Janet; Tin, Diane; Thorne, J Carter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of concurrent flare identification using 3 methods (patient, rheumatologist and Disease Activity Score (DAS)28 criteria), and construct validity of candidate items representing the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Core Domain Set. Methods Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares was assessed using the agreement coefficient. Construct validity of flare questions was examined: convergent (Spearman's r); discriminant (mean differences between flaring/non-flaring patients); and consequential (proportions with prior treatment reductions and intended therapeutic change postflare). Results The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16–32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low–strong (κ's 0.17–0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0.70) with each other, patient global (r's≥0.66) and corresponding measures (r's 0.49–0.92); and moderately highly with MD and patient-reported joint counts (r's 0.29–0.62). When MD/patients agreed the patient was flaring, mean flare domain between-group differences were 2.1–3.0; 36% had treatment reductions prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. Conclusions Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with/without flare and have strong evidence of construct and consequential validity. Ongoing work will identify optimal scoring and cut points to identify RA flares. PMID

  2. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-28

    We investigate the origin of "secondary disclinations" that were recently described as new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. Using an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in a uniaxial nematic phase during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bounding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a moderate electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangentially tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. This study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrates yet another mechanism (formation of "secondary disclinations") by which a uniaxial nematic phase can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour. PMID:25820380

  3. Expression divergence of the AGL6 MADS domain transcription factor lineage after a core eudicot duplication suggests functional diversification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of their known role as transcriptional regulators of key plant developmental processes, the diversification of MADS-box gene function is thought to be a major driving force in the developmental evolution of plants. Yet the function of some MADS-box gene subfamilies has remained elusive thus far. One such lineage, AGL6, has now been functionally characterized in three angiosperm species, but a phylogenetic framework for comparison of AGL6 gene function is currently missing. Results Based on phylogenetic analyses of newly isolated and EST-based sequences, we describe the duplication history of the AGL6 subfamily in angiosperms. Our analyses provide support for four ancient duplications in the evolution of the AGL6 lineage: one at the base of core eudicots resulting in euAGL6 and AGL6-like gene clades, one during basal angiosperm diversification and two in monocot evolution. To investigate whether the spatial domains in which AGL6 genes function have diverged after duplication, we use quantitative Real Time PCR. We show that the core eudicot AGL6-like clade acquired expression in vegetative tissues, while its paralog euAGL6 remains predominantly confined to reproductive tissues. Conclusions These and previous data lead us to propose that the AGL6 lineage in core eudicots, in addition to functions related to the expression in reproductive structures, may have acquired a function in developmental transitions of vegetative shoots. PMID:20633275

  4. Purification and crystallization of the catalytic PRONE domain of RopGEF8 and its complex with Rop4 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christoph; Weyand, Michael; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Berken, Antje

    2006-06-01

    Crystals of the catalytic PRONE domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RopGEF8 and its complex with the Rho-family protein Rop4 from A. thaliana were obtained that diffract to 2.2 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively. The PRONE domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RopGEF8 (PRONE8) was purified and crystallized free and in complex with the Rho-family protein Rop4 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. PRONE8 crystals were obtained using NaCl as precipitating agent and belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22. Native and anomalous data sets were collected using synchrotron radiation at 100 K to 2.2 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively. Crystals of the Rop4–PRONE8 complex belonging to space group P6{sub 3} were obtained using Tacsimate and PEG 3350 as precipitating agents and diffracted to 3.1 Å resolution.

  5. Plasmonic enhancement of the optical absorption and catalytic efficiency of BiVO₄ photoanodes decorated with Ag@SiO₂ core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Fatwa F; Dabirian, Ali; Dam, Bernard; van de Krol, Roel

    2014-08-01

    Recent progress in the development of bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) photoanodes has firmly established it as a promising material for solar water splitting applications. Performance limitations due to intrinsically poor catalytic activity and slow electron transport have been successfully addressed through the application of water oxidation co-catalysts and novel doping strategies. The next bottleneck to tackle is the modest optical absorption in BiVO4, particularly close to its absorption edge of 2.4 eV. Here, we explore the modification of the BiVO4 surface with Ag@SiO2 core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles. A photocurrent enhancement by a factor of ~2.5 is found under 1 sun illumination (AM1.5). We show that this enhancement consists of two contributions: optical absorption and catalysis. The optical absorption enhancement is induced by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances in the Ag nanoparticles, and agrees well with our full-field electromagnetic simulations. Far-field effects (scattering) are found to be dominant, with a smaller contribution from near-field plasmonic enhancement. In addition, a significant catalytic enhancement is observed, which is tentatively attributed to the electrocatalytic activity of the Ag@SiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:24942363

  6. New experimental treatments for core social domain in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Canitano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Current therapeutics in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) only treat the associated symptoms, without addressing core social dysfunctions. A paradigm shift in research of the pathogenesis of ASD, its synaptic abnormalities and altered signaling in multiple dynamic systems, have led to new experimental treatments for treating the core social abnormalities of ASD. NMDA antagonists, especially memantine, have been introduced in clinical trials addressing glutamatergic transmission in children and adolescents with ASD. GABAergic signaling has been targeted in trials using the GABAB receptor agonist arbaclofen for ASD patients with promising results. Oxytocin has been recognized as implicated in social development and affiliative behaviors. Preliminary findings from clinical trials using oxytocin in children with ASD show encouraging improvements in social cognition, but larger studies are needed. In two of the single gene disorders associated with ASD, Insulin Growth Factor (IGF-1) is a new treatment that has been tested in Rett syndrome and Phelan-McDermid syndrome (Chromosome 22 deletion syndrome). IGF-1 has been demonstrated to reverse the reduction in the number of excitatory synapses and the density of neurons that characterize these conditions in animal studies and it is being introduced as an experimental treatment. As a novel approach to verify treatment efficacy, neural processing modifications were recently evaluated by fMRI after a pivotal response training intervention. Another study of neural changes in response to treatment examined variations in EEG signaling in patients after an Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) intervention. PMID:24999471

  7. Dissociation of Bak α1 helix from the core and latch domains is required for apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Amber E; Fennell, Stephanie C; Bartolo, Ray C; Tan, Iris K L; Dewson, Grant; Kluck, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    During apoptosis, Bak permeabilizes mitochondria after undergoing major conformational changes, including poorly defined N-terminal changes. Here, we characterize those changes using 11 antibodies that were epitope mapped using peptide arrays and mutagenesis. After Bak activation by Bid, epitopes throughout the α1 helix are exposed indicating complete dissociation of α1 from α2 in the core and from α6-α8 in the latch. Moreover, disulfide tethering of α1 to α2 or α6 blocks cytochrome c release, suggesting that α1 dissociation is required for further conformational changes during apoptosis. Assaying epitope exposure when α1 is tethered shows that Bid triggers α2 movement, followed by α1 dissociation. However, α2 reaches its final position only after α1 dissociates from the latch. Thus, α1 dissociation is a key step in unfolding Bak into three major components, the N terminus, the core (α2-α5) and the latch (α6-α8). PMID:25880232

  8. The catalytic subunit of shiga-like toxin 1 interacts with ribosomal stalk proteins and is inhibited by their conserved C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Andrew J; Poon, Gregory M K; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Srikumar, Tharan; Jeram, Stanley M; Raught, Brian; Gariépy, Jean

    2008-04-25

    Shiga-like toxin 1 (SLT-1) is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein; its A(1) domain blocks protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells by catalyzing the depurination of a single adenine base in 28 S rRNA. The molecular mechanism leading to this site-specific depurination event is thought to involve interactions with eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. Here, we present evidence that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 binds to the ribosomal proteins P0, P1, and P2. These proteins were identified from a HeLa cell lysate by tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequently confirmed to bind to SLT-1 A(1) chain by yeast-two-hybrid and pull-down experiments using candidate full-length proteins. Moreover, the removal of the last 17 amino acids of either protein P1 or P2 abolishes the interaction with the A(1) chain, whereas P0, lacking this common C terminus, still binds to the A(1) domain. In vitro pull-down experiments using fusion protein-tagged C-terminal peptides corresponding to the common 7, 11, and 17 terminal residues of P1 and P2 confirmed that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 as well as the A chain of ricin bind to this shared C-terminal peptide motif. More importantly, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 17 amino acid C terminus of P1 and P2 was shown to inhibit the ribosome-inactivating function of the A(1) chain of SLT-1 in an in vitro transcription and translation-coupled assay. These results suggest a role for the ribosomal stalk in aiding the A(1) chain of SLT-1 and other type II ribosome-inactivating proteins in localizing its catalytic domain near the site of depurination in the 28 S rRNA. PMID:18358491

  9. Structural Insight into the Mechanism of Substrate Specificity and Catalytic Activity of an HD-Domain Phosphohydrolase: The 5;#8242;-Deoxyribonucleotidase YfbR from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Proudfoot, Michael; Yakunin, Alexander; Minor, Wladek

    2011-08-16

    HD-domain phosphohydrolases have nucleotidase and phosphodiesterase activities and play important roles in the metabolism of nucleotides and in signaling. We present three 2.1-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structures (one in the free state and two complexed with natural substrates) of an HD-domain phosphohydrolase, the Escherichia coli 5'-nucleotidase YfbR. The free-state structure of YfbR contains a large cavity accommodating the metal-coordinating HD motif (H33, H68, D69, and D137) and other conserved residues (R18, E72, and D77). Alanine scanning mutagenesis confirms that these residues are important for activity. Two structures of the catalytically inactive mutant E72A complexed with Co{sup 2+} and either thymidine-5'-monophosphate or 2'-deoxyriboadenosine-5'-monophosphate disclose the novel binding mode of deoxyribonucleotides in the active site. Residue R18 stabilizes the phosphate on the Co{sup 2+}, and residue D77 forms a strong hydrogen bond critical for binding the ribose. The indole side chain of W19 is located close to the 2'-carbon atom of the deoxyribose moiety and is proposed to act as the selectivity switch for deoxyribonucleotide, which is supported by comparison to YfdR, another 5'-nucleotidase in E. coli. The nucleotide bases of both deoxyriboadenosine-5'-monophosphate and thymidine-5'-monophosphate make no specific hydrogen bonds with the protein, explaining the lack of nucleotide base selectivity. The YfbR E72A substrate complex structures also suggest a plausible single-step nucleophilic substitution mechanism. This is the first proposed molecular mechanism for an HD-domain phosphohydrolase based directly on substrate-bound crystal structures.

  10. Parasite-specific inserts in the bifunctional S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase/ornithine decarboxylase of Plasmodium falciparum modulate catalytic activities and domain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Wrenger, Carsten; Joubert, Fourie; Wells, Gordon A; Walter, Rolf D; Louw, Abraham I

    2004-01-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is regulated by a single, hinge-linked bifunctional PfAdoMetDC/ODC [ P. falciparum AdoMetDC (S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase)/ODC (ornithine decarboxylase)] with a molecular mass of 330 kDa. The bifunctional nature of AdoMetDC/ODC is unique to Plasmodia and is shared by at least three species. The PfAdoMetDC/ODC contains four parasite-specific regions ranging in size from 39 to 274 residues. The significance of the parasite-specific inserts for activity and protein-protein interactions of the bifunctional protein was investigated by a single- and multiple-deletion strategy. Deletion of these inserts in the bifunctional protein diminished the corresponding enzyme activity and in some instances also decreased the activity of the neighbouring, non-mutated domain. Intermolecular interactions between AdoMetDC and ODC appear to be vital for optimal ODC activity. Similar results have been reported for the bifunctional P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase [Yuvaniyama, Chitnumsub, Kamchonwongpaisan, Vanichtanankul, Sirawaraporn, Taylor, Walkinshaw and Yuthavong (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 357-365]. Co-incubation of the monofunctional, heterotetrameric approximately 150 kDa AdoMetDC domain with the monofunctional, homodimeric ODC domain (approximately 180 kDa) produced an active hybrid complex of 330 kDa. The hinge region is required for bifunctional complex formation and only indirectly for enzyme activities. Deletion of the smallest, most structured and conserved insert in the ODC domain had the biggest impact on the activities of both decarboxylases, homodimeric ODC arrangement and hybrid complex formation. The remaining large inserts are predicted to be non-globular regions located on the surface of these proteins. The large insert in AdoMetDC in contrast is not implicated in hybrid complex formation even though distinct interactions between this insert and the two domains