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Sample records for core damage frequency

  1. Core damage frequency (reactor design) perspectives based on IPE results

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, A.L.; Dingman, S.E.; Forester, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper provides perspectives gained from reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals covering 108 nuclear power plant units. Variability both within and among reactor types is examined to provide perspectives regarding plant-specific design and operational features, and C, modeling assumptions that play a significant role in the estimates of core damage frequencies in the IPEs. Human actions found to be important in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are presented and the events most frequently found important are discussed.

  2. Core damage frequency perspectives based on IPE results

    SciTech Connect

    Dingman, S.E.; Camp, A.L.; LaChance, J.L.; Drouin, M.T.

    1996-08-01

    In November 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter 88-20 requesting that all licensees perform an individual Plant Examination (IPE) to identify any plant-specific vulnerability to severe accidents and report the results to the Commission. This paper provides perspectives gained from reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals covering 108 nuclear power plant units. Variability both within and among reactor types is examined to provide perspectives regarding plant-specific design and operational features, and modeling assumptions that play a significant role in the estimates of core damage frequencies in the IPEs.

  3. Summary of core damage frequency from internal initiators: Peach Bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Cathey, N.

    1986-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) based on internal initiators are being conducted on a number of reference plants to provide the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with updated information about light-water reactor risk. The results of these analyses will be used by the NRC to prepare NUREG-1150 which will examine the NRC's current perception of risk. Peach Bottom has been chosen as one of the reference plants. The Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station has two boiling water reactor (BWR) units, each with a capacity of 1150 MW(e). The reactors are each housed in a Mark I containment. Peach Bottom Unit 2 analyzed here, was studied before as part of WASH-1400. A number of plant features tend to be important in determining the nature and frequency of the core melt scenarios for Peach Bottom. These features include the recent above-average diesel generator performance history, the single emergency service water system for both units, the numerous emergency core cooling systems, recent procedure modifications and the low volume containment.

  4. Reevaluation of core damage frequency in light of the occurrence of complex transients at B and W plants

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, R.; Hsu, C.J.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Amico, P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a unified treatment of ''complex transients'' and core damage events, with the aim of relating the frequencies if the two types of events to each other and to the frequencies of their constituent events. This framework provides a basis for relating the observed frequency of certain transient types to core damage frequency, and deciding whether the occurrence of complex transients means that core damage frequency is higher than it was previously believed to be. 5 refs.

  5. Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

    1986-10-01

    This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis.

  6. Assessment of core damage frequency owing to possible fires at NPP with RBMK type reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Vinnikov, B.

    2012-07-01

    According to Scientific and Technical Cooperation between the USA and Russia in the field of nuclear engineering the Idaho National Laboratory has transferred to the possession of the National Research Center ' Kurchatov Inst. ' the SAPHIRE software without any fee. With the help of the software Kurchatov Inst. developed a Pilot Living PSA- Model of Leningrad NPP Unit 1. Computations of core damage frequencies were carried out for additional Initiating Events. In the submitted paper such additional Initiating Events are fires in various compartments of the NPP. During the computations of each fire, structure of the PSA - Model was not changed, but Fault Trees for the appropriate systems, which are removed from service during the fire, were changed. It follows from the computations, that for ten fires Core Damaged Frequencies (CDF) are not changed. Other six fires will cause additional core damage. On the basis of the calculated results it is possible to determine a degree of importance of these fires and to establish sequence of performance of fire-prevention measures in various places of the NPP. (authors)

  7. Core damage frequency observations and insights of LWRs based on the IPEs

    SciTech Connect

    Dingman, S.E.; Camp, A.L.; Drouin, M.T.

    1995-04-01

    Seventy-eight plants are expected to submit Individual Plant Examinations (IPEs) for severe accident vulnerabilities to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The majority of the plants have elected to perform full Level 1 probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) to meet the intent of the IPEs. Because of this, it is possible to compare the results from the IPE submittals to determine general observations and {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} from the IPEs. The IPE Insights Program is performing this evaluation, and preliminary results are presented in this paper. The core damage frequency and core damage sequences are identified and compared for pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. Examination of the results indicates that variations among plant results are due to a combination of actual plant design/operational features and analysis approaches. The findings are consistent with previous NRC studies, such as WASH-1400 and NUREG-1150.

  8. Core damage frequency observations and insights of LWRs based on the IPEs

    SciTech Connect

    Dingman, S.E.; Camp, A.L.; Drouin, M.T.; Kolaczkowski, A.; Darby, J.; LaChance, J.L.; Yakle, J.

    1995-01-01

    Seventy-eight plants are expected to submit Individual Plant Examinations (IPEs) for severe accident vulnerabilities to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The majority of the plants have elected to perform full Level 1 probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) to meet the intent of the IPES. Because of this, it is possible to compare the results from the IPE submittals to determine general observations and {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} from the IPES. The IPE Insights Program is performing this evaluation, and preliminary results are presented in this paper. The core damage frequency and core damage sequences are identified and compared for pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. Examination of the results indicates that variations among plant results are due to a combination of actual plant design/operational features and analysis approaches. The findings are consistent with previous NRC studies, such as WASH-1400 and NUREG-1 150.

  9. Analysis of core damage frequency: Peach Bottom, Unit 2 internal events appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.; Maloney, K.J.; Wheeler, T.A.; Daniel, S.L.; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM )

    1989-08-01

    This document contains the appendices for the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for the Peach Bottom, Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. This is one of the five plant analyses conducted as part of the NUREG-1150 effort for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The work performed and described here is an extensive reanalysis of that published in October 1986 as NUREG/CR-4550, Volume 4. It addresses comments from numerous reviewers and significant changes to the plant systems and procedures made since the first report. The uncertainty analysis and presentation of results are also much improved, and considerable effort was expended on an improved analysis of loss of offsite power. The content and detail of this report is directed toward PRA practitioners who need to know how the work was done and the details for use in further studies. The mean core damage frequency is 4.5E-6 with 5% and 95% uncertainty bounds of 3.5E-7 and 1.3E-5, respectively. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) contributed about 46% of the core damage frequency with Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) accidents contributing another 42%. The numerical results are driven by loss of offsite power, transients with the power conversion system initially available operator errors, and mechanical failure to scram. 13 refs., 345 figs., 171 tabs.

  10. Analysis of core damage frequency due to external events at the DOE (Department of Energy) N-Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, J.A.; Bohn, M.P.; Daniel, S.L. ); Baxter, J.T. ); Johnson, J.J.; Ravindra, M.K.; Hashimoto, P.O.; Mraz, M.J.; Tong, W.H.; Conoscente, J.P. ); Brosseau, D.A. )

    1990-11-01

    A complete external events probabilistic risk assessment has been performed for the N-Reactor power plant, making full use of all insights gained during the past ten years' developments in risk assessment methodologies. A detailed screening analysis was performed which showed that all external events had negligible contribution to core damage frequency except fires, seismic events, and external flooding. A limited scope analysis of the external flooding risk indicated that it is not a major risk contributor. Detailed analyses of the fire and seismic risks resulted in total (mean) core damage frequencies of 1.96E-5 and 4.60E-05 per reactor year, respectively. Detailed uncertainty analyses were performed for both fire and seismic risks. These results show that the core damage frequency profile for these events is comparable to that found for existing commercial power plants if proposed fixes are completed as part of the restart program. 108 refs., 85 figs., 80 tabs.

  11. Review of the Oconee-3 probabilistic risk assessment: external events, core damage frequency. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, N.A.; Ilberg, D.; Xue, D.; Youngblood, R.; Reed, J.W.; McCann, M.; Talwani, T.; Wreathall, J.; Kurth, P.D.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1986-03-01

    A review of the Oconee-3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (OPRA) was conducted with the broad objective of evaluating qualitatively and quantitatively (as much as possible) the OPRA assessment of the important sequences that are ''externally'' generated and lead to core damage. The review included a technical assessment of the assumptions and methods used in the OPRA within its stated objective and with the limited information available. Within this scope, BNL performed a detailed reevaluation of the accident sequences generated by internal floods and earthquakes and a less detailed review (in some cases a scoping review) for the accident sequences generated by fires, tornadoes, external floods, and aircraft impact. 12 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.

  12. Core damage frequency prespectives for BWR 3/4 and Westinghouse 4-loop plants based on IPE results

    SciTech Connect

    Dingman, S.; Camp, S.; LaChance, J.; Mary Drouin

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the core damage frequency (CDF) insights gained by analyzing the results of the Individual Plant Examinations (IPES) for two groups of plants: boiling water reactor (BWR) 3/4 plants with Reactor Core Isolation Cooling systems, and Westinghouse 4-loop plants. Wide variability was observed for the plant CDFs and for the CDFs of the contributing accident classes. On average, transients-with loss of injection, station blackout sequences, and transients with loss of decay heat removal are important contributors for the BWR 3/4 plants, while transients, station blackout sequences, and loss-of-coolant accidents are important for the Westinghouse 4-loop plants. The key factors that contribute to the variability in the results are discussed. The results are often driven by plant-specific design and operational characteristics, but differences in modeling approaches are also important for some accident classes.

  13. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Kohut, P.

    1994-07-01

    The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%.

  14. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}6}/year.

  15. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  16. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful.

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  18. Damage detection using frequency shift path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longqi; Lie, Seng Tjhen; Zhang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel concept called FREquency Shift (FRESH) path to describe the dynamic behavior of structures with auxiliary mass. FRESH path combines the effects of frequency shifting and amplitude changing into one space curve, providing a tool for analyzing structure health status and properties. A damage index called FRESH curvature is then proposed to detect local stiffness reduction. FRESH curvature can be easily adapted for a particular problem since the sensitivity of the index can be adjusted by changing auxiliary mass or excitation power. An algorithm is proposed to adjust automatically the contribution from frequency and amplitude in the method. Because the extraction of FRESH path requires highly accurate frequency and amplitude estimators; therefore, a procedure based on discrete time Fourier transform is introduced to extract accurate frequency and amplitude with the time complexity of O (n log n), which is verified by simulation signals. Moreover, numerical examples with different damage sizes, severities and damping are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed damage index. In addition, applications of FRESH path on two steel beams with different damages are presented and the results show that the proposed method is valid and computational efficient.

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  20. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  2. TMI-2 core damage: a summary of present knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.E.; Mason, R.E.; Meininger, R.D.; Franz, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive fuel damage (oxidation and fragmentation) has occurred and the top approx. 1.5 m of the center portion of the TMI-2 core has relocated. The fuel fragmentation extends outward to slightly beyond one-half the core radius in the direction examined by the CCTV camera. While the radial extent of core fragmentation in other directions was not directly observed, control and spider drop data and in-core instrument data suggest that the core void is roughly symmetrical, although there are a few indications of severe fuel damage extending to the core periphery. The core material fragmented into a broad range of particle sizes, extending down to a few microns. APSR movement data, the observation of damaged fuel assemblies hanging unsupported from the bottom of the reactor upper plenum structure, and the observation of once-molten stainless steel immediately above the active core indicate high temperatures (up to at least 1720 K) extended to the very top of the core. The relative lack of damage to the underside of the plenum structure implies a sharp temperature demarcation at the core/plenum interface. Filter debris and leadscrew deposit analyses indicate extensive high temperature core materials interaction, melting of the Ag-In-Cd control material, and transport of particulate control material to the plenum and out of the vessel.

  3. Interim prediction method for low frequency core engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.; Clark, B. J.; Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A literature survey on low-frequency core engine noise is presented. Possible sources of low frequency internally generated noise in core engines are discussed with emphasis on combustion and component scrubbing noise. An interim method is recommended for predicting low frequency core engine noise that is dominant when jet velocities are low. Suggestions are made for future research on low frequency core engine noise that will aid in improving the prediction method and help define possible additional internal noise sources.

  4. Damage tolerance of a composite sandwich with interleaved foam core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishai, Ori; Hiel, Clement

    1992-01-01

    A composite sandwich panel consisting of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) skins and a syntactic foam core was selected as an appropriate structural concept for the design of wind tunnel compressor blades. Interleaving of the core with tough interlayers was done to prevent core cracking and to improve damage tolerance of the sandwich. Simply supported sandwich beam specimens were subjected to low-velocity drop-weight impacts as well as high velocity ballistic impacts. The performance of the interleaved core sandwich panels was characterized by localized skin damage and minor cracking of the core. Residual compressive strength (RCS) of the skin, which was derived from flexural test, shows the expected trend of decreasing with increasing size of the damage, impact energy, and velocity. In the case of skin damage, RCS values of around 50 percent of the virgin interleaved reference were obtained at the upper impact energy range. Based on the similarity between low-velocity and ballistic-impact effects, it was concluded that impact energy is the main variable controlling damage and residual strength, where as velocity plays a minor role.

  5. Precursors to potential severe core damage applications, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Minarick, J.W.; Dolan, B.W. ); Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A. )

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 x 10-6 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1991 are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1990 events. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to mnk precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  6. Natural frequency changes due to damage in composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negru, I.; Gillich, G. R.; Praisach, Z. I.; Tufoi, M.; Gillich, N.

    2015-07-01

    Transversal cracks in structures affect their stiffness as well as the natural frequency values. This paper presents a research performed to find the way how frequencies of sandwich beams change by the occurrence of damage. The influence of the locally stored energy, for ten transverse vibration modes, on the frequency shifts is derived from a study regarding the effect of stiffness decrease, realized by means of the finite element analysis. The relation between the local value of the bending moment and the frequency drop is exemplified by a concrete case. It is demonstrated that a reference curve representing the damage severity exists whence any frequency shift is derivable in respect to damage depth and location. This curve is obtained, for isotropic and multi-layer beams as well, from the stored energy (i.e. stiffness decrease), and is similar to that attained using the stress intensity factor in fracture mechanics. Also, it is proved that, for a given crack, irrespective to its depth, the frequency drop ratio of any two transverse modes is similar. This permitted separating the effect of damage location from that of its severity and to define a Damage Location Indicator as a sequence of squared of the normalized mode shape curvatures.

  7. Damage assessment of the truss system with uncertainty using frequency response function based damage identification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; DeSmidt, Hans; Yao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A novel vibration-based damage identification methodology for the truss system with mass and stiffness uncertainties is proposed and demonstrated. This approach utilizes the damaged-induced changes of frequency response functions (FRF) to assess the severity and location of the structural damage in the system. The damage identification algorithm is developed basing on the least square and Newton-Raphson methods. The dynamical model of system is built using finite element method and Lagrange principle while the crack model is based on fracture mechanics. The method is synthesized via numerical examples for a truss system to demonstrate the effectiveness in detecting both stiffness and mass uncertainty existed in the system.

  8. An examination of impact damage in glass-phenolic and aluminum honeycomb core composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.; Hodge, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    An examination of low velocity impact damage to glass-phenolic and aluminum core honeycomb sandwich panels with carbon-epoxy facesheets is presented. An instrumented drop weight impact test apparatus was utilized to inflict damage at energy ranges between 0.7 and 4.2 joules. Specimens were checked for extent of damage by cross sectional examination. The effect of core damage was assessed by subjecting impact-damaged beams to four-point bend tests. Skin-only specimens (facings not bonded to honeycomb) were also tested for comparison purposes. Results show that core buckling is the first damage mode, followed by delaminations in the facings, matrix cracking, and finally fiber breakage. The aluminum honeycomb panels exhibited a larger core damage zone and more facing delaminations than the glass-phenolic core, but could withstand more shear stress when damaged than the glass-phenolic core specimens.

  9. Variable frequency transistor inverters use multiple core transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Magnetic-coupled multivibrators containing two or more square-loop cores with multiple windings in a single transformer package, provide indirect frequency control and improved operational characteristics. This multivibrator can be used for power oscillators, nonlinear magnetic circuitry and telemetry circuits.

  10. Frequency Response of an Aircraft Wing with Discrete Source Damage Using Equivalent Plate Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2007-01-01

    An equivalent plate procedure is developed to provide a computationally efficient means of matching the stiffness and frequencies of flight vehicle wing structures for prescribed loading conditions. Several new approaches are proposed and studied to match the stiffness and first five natural frequencies of the two reference models with and without damage. One approach divides the candidate reference plate into multiple zones in which stiffness and mass can be varied using a variety of materials including aluminum, graphite-epoxy, and foam-core graphite-epoxy sandwiches. Another approach places point masses along the edge of the stiffness-matched plate to tune the natural frequencies. Both approaches are successful at matching the stiffness and natural frequencies of the reference plates and provide useful insight into determination of crucial features in equivalent plate models of aircraft wing structures.

  11. Damage Detection Using the Frequency-Response Curvature Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAMPAIO, R. P. C.; MAIA, N. M. M.; SILVA, J. M. M.

    1999-10-01

    Structural damage detection has gained increasing attention from the scientific community since unpredicted major hazards, most with human losses, have been reported. Aircraft crashes and the catastrophic bridge failures are some examples. Security and economy aspects are the important motivations for increasing research on structural health monitoring. Since damage alters the dynamic characteristics of a structure, namely its eigenproperties (natural frequencies, modal damping and modes of vibration), several techniques based on experimental modal analysis have been developed in recent years. A method that covers the four steps of the process of damage detection—existence, localization, extent and prediction—has not yet been recognized or reported. The frequency-response-function (FRF) curvature method encompasses the first three referred steps being based on only the measured data without the need for any modal identification. In this paper, the method is described theoretically and compared with two of the most referenced methods on literature. Numerically generated data, from a lumped-mass system, and experimental data, from a real bridge, are used for better illustration.

  12. Summary of core damage frequency from internal initiators: Peach Bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Cathey, N.

    1986-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) based on internal initiators are being conducted on a number of reference plants in order to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with updated information about light water reactor risk. The results of these analyses will be used by the NRC to prepare NUREG-1150 which will examine the NRC's current perception of risk. Peach Bottom has been chosen as one of the reference plants.

  13. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  14. The BWR lower head response during a large-break LOCA with core damage

    SciTech Connect

    Alammar, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Some of the important issues in severe accident management guidelines development deal with estimating the time to lower head vessel failure after core damage and the time window available for water injection that would prevent vessel failure. These issues are obviously scenario dependent, but bounding estimates are needed. The scenario chosen for this purpose was a design-basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) because it was one of the contributors to the Oyster Creek containment failure frequency. Oyster Creek is a 1930-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR)-2. The lower head response models have improved since the Three Mile Island unit 2 (TMI-2) vessel investigation project (VIP) results became known, specifically the addition of rapid- and slow-cooling models. These mechanisms were found to have taken place in the TMI-2 lower head during debris cooldown and were important contributors in preventing vessel failure.

  15. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  16. Microwave damage susceptibility trend of a bipolar transistor as a function of frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhen-Yang; Chai, Chang-Chun; Ren, Xing-Rong; Yang, Yin-Tang; Chen, Bin; Song, Kun; Zhao, Ying-Bo

    2012-09-01

    We conduct a theoretical study of the damage susceptibility trend of a typical bipolar transistor induced by a high-power microwave (HPM) as a function of frequency. The dependences of the burnout time and the damage power on the signal frequency are obtained. Studies of the internal damage process and the mechanism of the device are carried out from the variation analysis of the distribution of the electric field, current density, and temperature. The investigation shows that the burnout time linearly depends on the signal frequency. The current density and the electric field at the damage position decrease with increasing frequency. Meanwhile, the temperature elevation occurs in the area between the p-n junction and the n-n+ interface due to the increase of the electric field. Adopting the data analysis software, the relationship between the damage power and frequency is obtained. Moreover, the thickness of the substrate has a significant effect on the burnout time.

  17. Parameters affecting of Akkuyu's safety assessment for severe core damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavun, Yusuf; Karasulu, Muzaffer

    2015-07-01

    We have looked at all past core meltdowns (Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents) and postulated the fourth one might be taking place in the future most probably in a newly built reactors anywhere of the earth in any type of NPP. The probability of this observation is high considering the nature of the machine and human interaction. Operation experience is a very significant parameter as well as the safety culture of the host nation. The concerns is not just a lack of experience with industry with the new comers, but also the infrastructure and established institutions who will be dealing with the Emergencies. Lack of trained and educated Emergency Response Organizations (ERO) is a major concern. The culture on simple fire drills even makes the difference when a severe condition occurs in the industry. The study assumes the fourth event will be taking place at the Akkuyu NGS and works backwards as required by the "what went wrong " scenarios and comes up with interesting results. The differences studied in depth to determine the impact to the severe accidents. The all four design have now core catchers. We have looked at the operator errors'like in TMI); Operator errors combined with design deficiencies(like in Chernobyl) and natural disasters( like in Fukushima) and found operator errors to be more probable event on the Akkuyu's postulated next incident. With respect to experiences of the operators we do not have any data except for long and successful operating history of the Soviet design reactors up until the Chernobyl incident. Since the Akkuyu will be built, own and operated by the Russians we have found no alarming concerns at the moment. At the moment, there is no body be able to operate those units in Turkey. Turkey is planning to build the required manpower during the transition period. The resolution of the observed parameters lies to work and educate, train of the host nation and exercise together.

  18. Prediction of high frequency core loss for electrical steel using the data provided by manufacturer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rakesh; Dalal, Ankit; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine the core loss data, at high frequencies, using the loss data provided by the lamination manufacturer. Steinmetz equation is used in this proposed method to determine core loss at high frequency. This Steinmetz equation consists of static hysteresis and eddy current loss. The presented technique considers the coefficients of Steinmetz equation as variable with frequency and peak magnetic flux density. The high frequency core loss data, predicted using this model is compared with the catalogue data given by manufacturer and very good accuracy has been obtained for a wide range of frequency.

  19. Precursors to potential severe core damage applications, 1991. A status report, main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Minarick, J.W.; Dolan, B.W.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 x 10-6 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1991 are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1990 events. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to mnk precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  20. Calculation of core loss and copper loss in amorphous/nanocrystalline core-based high-frequency transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Wang, Youhua; Zhu, Jianguo; Guo, Youguang; Lei, Gang; Liu, Chengcheng

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous and nanocrystalline alloys are now widely used for the cores of high-frequency transformers, and Litz-wire is commonly used as the windings, while it is difficult to calculate the resistance accurately. In order to design a high-frequency transformer, it is important to accurately calculate the core loss and copper loss. To calculate the core loss accurately, the additional core loss by the effect of end stripe should be considered. It is difficult to simulate the whole stripes in the core due to the limit of computation, so a scale down model with 5 stripes of amorphous alloy is simulated by the 2D finite element method (FEM). An analytical model is presented to calculate the copper loss in the Litz-wire, and the results are compared with the calculations by FEM.

  1. Core damage severity evaluation for pressurized water reactors by artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironidis, Anastasios Pantelis

    1998-12-01

    During the course of nuclear power evolution, accidents have occurred. However, in the western world, none of them had a severe impact on the public because of the design features of nuclear plants. In nuclear reactors, barriers constitute physical obstacles to uncontrolled fission product releases. These barriers are an important factor in safety analysis. During an accident, reactor safety systems become actuated to prevent the barriers from been breached. In addition, operators are required to take specified actions, meticulously depicted in emergency response procedures. In an accident, on-the-spot knowledge regarding the condition of the core is necessary. In order to make the right decisions toward mitigating the accident severity and its consequences, we need to know the status of the core [1, 3]. However, power plant instrumentation that can provide a direct indication of the status of the core during the time when core damage is a potential outcome, does not exist. Moreover, the information from instruments may have large uncertainty of various types. Thus, a very strong potential for misinterpreting incoming information exists. This research endeavor addresses the problem of evaluating the core damage severity of a Pressurized Water Reactor during a transient or an accident. An expert system has been constructed, that incorporates knowledge and reasoning of human experts. The expert system's inference engine receives incoming plant data that originate in the plethora of core-related instruments. Its knowledge base relies on several massive, multivariate fuzzy logic rule-sets, coupled with several artificial neural networks. These mathematical models have encoded information that defines possible core states, based on correlations of parameter values. The inference process classifies the core as intact, or as experiencing clad damage and/or core melting. If the system detects a form of core damage, a quantification procedure will provide a numerical

  2. Performance of High-frequency High-flux Magnetic Cores at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Scott S.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Patterson, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Three magnetic powder cores and one ferrite core, which are commonly used in inductor and transformer design for switch mode power supplies, were selected for investigation at cryogenic temperatures. The powder cores are Molypermalloy Core (MPC), High Flux Core (HFC), and Kool Mu Core (KMC). The performance of four inductors utilizing these cores has been evaluated as a function of temperature from 20 C to -180 C. All cores were wound with the same wire type and gauge to obtain equal values of inductance at room temperature. Each inductor was evaluated in terms of its inductance, quality (Q) factor, resistance, and dynamic hysteresis characteristics (B-H loop) as a function of temperature and frequency. Both sinusoidal and square wave excitations were used in these investigations. Measured data obtained on the inductance showed that both the MPC and the HFC cores maintain a constant inductance value, whereas with the KMC and ferrite core hold a steady value in inductance with frequency but decrease as temperature is decreased. All cores exhibited dependency, with varying degrees, in their quality factor and resistance on test frequency and temperature. Except for the ferrite, all cores exhibited good stability in the investigated properties with temperature as well as frequency. Details of the experimental procedures and test results are presented and discussed in the paper.

  3. Cosmic ray radiography of the damaged cores of the Fukushima reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borozdin, Konstantin; Greene, Steven; Lukić, Zarija; Milner, Edward; Miyadera, Haruo; Morris, Christopher; Perry, John

    2012-10-11

    The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei. The interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The interaction with nuclei leads to angle “diffusion.” Two muon-imaging methods that use flux attenuation and multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons are being studied as tools for diagnosing the damaged cores of the Fukushima reactors. Here, we compare these two methods. We conclude that the scattering method can provide detailed information about the core. Lastly, attenuation has low contrast and little sensitivity to the core.

  4. Multi-frequency local wavenumber analysis and ply correlation of delamination damage.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Peter D; Leckey, Cara A C

    2015-09-01

    Wavenumber domain analysis through use of scanning laser Doppler vibrometry has been shown to be effective for non-contact inspection of damage in composites. Qualitative and semi-quantitative local wavenumber analysis of realistic delamination damage and quantitative analysis of idealized damage scenarios (Teflon inserts) have been performed previously in the literature. This paper presents a new methodology based on multi-frequency local wavenumber analysis for quantitative assessment of multi-ply delamination damage in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite specimens. The methodology is presented and applied to a real world damage scenario (impact damage in an aerospace CFRP composite). The methodology yields delamination size and also correlates local wavenumber results from multiple excitation frequencies to theoretical dispersion curves in order to robustly determine the delamination ply depth. Results from the wavenumber based technique are validated against a traditional nondestructive evaluation method. PMID:25980617

  5. Compression-after-Impact Strength of Sandwich Panels with Core Crushing Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipsha, Andrey; Zenkert, Dan

    2005-05-01

    Compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of foam-cored sandwich panels with composite face sheets is investigated experimentally. The low-velocity impact by a semi-spherical (blunt) projectile is considered, producing a damage mainly in a form of core crushing accompanied by a permanent indentation (residual dent) in the face sheet. Instrumentation of the panels by strain gauges and digital speckle photography analysis are used to study the effect of damage on failure mechanisms in the panel. Residual dent growth inwards toward the mid-plane of a sandwich panel followed by a complete separation of the face sheet is identified as the failure mode. CAI strength of sandwich panels is shown to decrease with increasing impact damage size. Destructive sectioning of sandwich panels is used to characterise damage parameters and morphology for implementation in a finite element model. The finite element model that accounts for relevant details of impact damage morphology is developed and proposed for failure analysis and CAI strength predictions of damaged panels demonstrating a good correlation with experimental results.

  6. Selection of optimal artificial boundary condition (ABC) frequencies for structural damage identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lei; Lu, Yong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the sensitivities of artificial boundary condition (ABC) frequencies to the damages are investigated, and the optimal sensors are selected to provide the reliable structural damage identification. The sensitivity expressions for one-pin and two-pin ABC frequencies, which are the natural frequencies from structures with one and two additional constraints to its original boundary condition, respectively, are proposed. Based on the expressions, the contributions of the underlying mode shapes in the ABC frequencies can be calculated and used to select more sensitive ABC frequencies. Selection criteria are then defined for different conditions, and their performance in structural damage identification is examined with numerical studies. From the findings, conclusions are given.

  7. Plant neighborhood effects on herbivory: damage is both density and frequency dependent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tania N; Underwood, Nora

    2015-05-01

    Neighboring plants can affect the likelihood that a focal plant is attacked by herbivores. Both the density of conspecific neighbors (resource concentration or dilution effects) and the relative density of heterospecific neighbors (associational effects or effects of neighbor frequency) within the local neighborhood can affect herbivore load and plant damage. Understanding how these neighborhood effects influence processes such as plant competition or natural selection on plant resistance traits will require knowing how both plant density and frequency affect damage, but previous studies have generally confounded density and frequency effects. In this study, we independently manipulated the absolute density and frequency (i.e., relative density) of two plant species (Solanum carolinense and Solidago altissima) to characterize neighborhood composition effects on S. carolinense damage by herbivores, providing the first picture of how both density and frequency of neighbors influence damage in a single system. We found both a positive effect of S. carolinense density on S. carolinense damage (a resource concentration effect) and a nonlinear effect of S. altissima frequency on S. carolinense damage (associational susceptibility). If these types of patterns are common in nature, future studies seeking to understand neighborhood effects on damage need to incorporate both density and frequency effects and capture any nonlinear effects by selecting a range of values rather than focusing on only a pair of densities or frequencies. This type of data on neighborhood effects will allow us to understand the contribution of neighborhood effects to population-level processes such as competition, the evolution of plant resistance to herbivores, and yield gains in agricultural crop mixtures. PMID:26236855

  8. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  9. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1995 A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    Ten operational events that affected 10 commercial light-water reactors during 1995 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1995 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  10. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1997 -- A status report. Volume 26

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Muhlheim, M.D.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W.

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the five operational events in 1997 that affected five commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1997 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those events that could be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1996 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  11. Effect of Correlations of Component Failures and Cross-Connections of EDGs on Seismically Induced Core Damages of a Multi-Unit Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Ken; Liu, Qiao; Uchiyama, Tomoaki

    Aiming at proposing effective applications of seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for design and risk management of nuclear facilities, we conducted a preliminary seismic PSA study for a multi-unit site to examine core damage frequency (CDF) and core damage sequences with consideration of the effect of correlations of component failures. In addition, we also examined the effectiveness of an accident management measure, namely, cross-connections of emergency diesel generators (EDGs) between adjacent units in this study. Twin BWR-5 units of the same design were hypothesized to be located at the same site in this study and the CDF as well as the accident sequences of this two-unit site were analyzed by using SECOM2, a system reliability analysis code for seismic PSA. The results showed that the calculated CDF was dependent on the assumptions on the correlations of component failures. When the rules for assigning correlation coefficients of component responses defined in the NUREG-1150 program were adopted, the CDF of a single unit, the CDF of this two-unit site (the frequency of core damages of at least one unit at this site) and the frequency of simultaneous core damages of both units increased by factors of about 1.3, 1.2 and 2.3, respectively. In addition, it might be possible that the simultaneous core damages of both units are caused by different accident sequence pairs as well as the same sequence pairs. When cross-connections of EDGs between two units were available, the CDF of a single unit, the CDF of this two-unit site as well as the frequency of simultaneous core damages of both units decreased. In addition, the CDF of this two-unit site was smaller than the CDF of a single unit site. These results show that cross-connections of EDGs might be beneficial for a multi-unit site if the rules for assigning correlation coefficients defined in NUREG-1150 program are reasonable.

  12. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C

    SciTech Connect

    Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

  13. Field and laboratory investigations of coring-induced damage in core recovered from Marker Bed 139 at the waste isolation pilot plant underground facility

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D.J.; Zeuch, D.H.; Morin, K.; Hardy, R.; Tormey, T.V.

    1995-09-01

    A combined laboratory and field investigation was carried out to determine the extent of coring-induced damage done to samples cored from Marker Bed 139 at the WIPP site. Coring-induced damage, if present, has the potential to significantly change the properties of the material used for laboratory testing relative to the in situ material properties, resulting in misleading conclusions. In particular, connected, crack-like damage could make the permeability of cored samples orders of magnitude greater than the in situ permeabilities. Our approach compared in situ velocity and resistivity measurements with laboratory measurements of the same properties. Differences between in situ and laboratory results could be attributed to differences in the porosity due to cracks. The question of the origin of the changes could not be answered directly from the results of the measurements. Pre-existing cracks, held closed by the in situ stress, could open when the core was cut free, or new cracks could be generated by coring-induced damage. We used core from closely spaced boreholes at three orientations (0{degree}, {plus_minus}45{degrees} relative to vertical) to address the origin of cracks. The absolute orientation of pre-existing cracks would be constant, independent of the borehole orientation. In contrast, cracks induced by coring were expected to show an orientation dependent on that of the source borehole.

  14. An Investigation of Ferrite and Nanocrystalline Core Materials for Medium-Frequency Power Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Selami; Sefa, Ibrahim; Altin, Necmi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, two transformers are designed using the ferrite N87 and the nanocrystalline core materials for the same power level and operating frequency. The operating frequency is defined as 10 kHz, which is suitable␣for both materials. Modeling and simulation studies have been performed with the same finite element analysis software and the obtained results have been reported. The nanocrystalline and the ferrite N87 core materials have been compared according to both electrical and mechanical parameters. In these comparisons, many features such as core and winding losses, flux distributions, leakage flux, efficiency, and both electrical and mechanical performance have been reported comparatively in the case of rectangular waveform excitation of the transformer. Obtained results show that the weight and the volume of the transformer are reduced and more compact transformer is designed by using the nanocrystalline core material. In addition, besides the core loss, winding losses are also reduced in this design.

  15. An Investigation of Ferrite and Nanocrystalline Core Materials for Medium-Frequency Power Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Selami; Sefa, Ibrahim; Altin, Necmi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, two transformers are designed using the ferrite N87 and the nanocrystalline core materials for the same power level and operating frequency. The operating frequency is defined as 10 kHz, which is suitable for both materials. Modeling and simulation studies have been performed with the same finite element analysis software and the obtained results have been reported. The nanocrystalline and the ferrite N87 core materials have been compared according to both electrical and mechanical parameters. In these comparisons, many features such as core and winding losses, flux distributions, leakage flux, efficiency, and both electrical and mechanical performance have been reported comparatively in the case of rectangular waveform excitation of the transformer. Obtained results show that the weight and the volume of the transformer are reduced and more compact transformer is designed by using the nanocrystalline core material. In addition, besides the core loss, winding losses are also reduced in this design.

  16. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report. Volume 17, Main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W.; Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D.

    1993-12-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 {times} 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  17. Frequency response of laminated composite plates and shells with matrix cracks type of damage mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Aly A.

    The present study has been designed to tackle a new set of problems for structural composites, as these materials are finding new applications in civil engineering field. An attempt has been made to study the frequency response of laminated polymer composite plates and shallow shells containing matrix cracks type of damage with arbitrary support conditions and free vibratory motions. The shell governing equations are derived using a simplified shallow shell theory based on a first order shear deformation field. The continuum damage mechanics approach has been used to model the matrix cracks in a damaged region within the plates and shallow shells. In such approach, the damage is accounted for in the laminate constitutive equations by using a set of second order tensor internal state variables which are strain-like quantities. The simplified damage model was then used to study the changes in frequency response of laminated composite plates and shallow cylindrical shells. The Ritz method and a finite element method have been proposed and developed as approximate solution procedures to quantify the change in the free vibration frequencies due to matrix cracks type of damage under both material as well as geometrical variables such as size, shape and extent of damage, degree of curvature, ratio of orthotropy, thickness ratio as well as support conditions. The analysis of various plates and shells with a centrally located damaged-zone depicts a typical trend of reduction in the vibration frequencies. This reduction is more pronounced for higher frequency modes and it shows greater sensitivity toward the size of the damaged region and density of cracks. The results also show that the changes in the frequency, especially for the fundamental mode, appear to be less sensitive to the shell boundary conditions as well as small values of curvature. The investigation of various undamaged plates and shallow shells demonstrates the importance of a first-order shear deformation

  18. Thermal Behavior of a Medium-Frequency Ferrite-Core Power Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Selami; Sefa, Ibrahim; Altin, Necmi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, design and thermal analysis of a medium-frequency transformer with ferrite N87 core have been carried out using finite-element analysis software. A thermal model of the medium-frequency transformer is generated and analyzed with different cooling methods. In addition, it is proposed to attach additional heat sinks at the top and bottom of the transformer core. Effects of these additional heat sinks on cooling performance and sizing of the transformer are investigated. Furthermore, the cooling capacity of the proposed material is investigated, depending on the air flow velocity for the forced-air cooling method. Thus, more realistic behavior of the ferrite N87 material is obtained for a medium-frequency transformer with 35 kVA rated power and 10 kHz operating frequency. Moreover, electromagnetic and thermal analyses are carried out through linked simulations. The heat distribution in the core including saturation effect is also investigated in detail.

  19. Thermal Behavior of a Medium-Frequency Ferrite-Core Power Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Selami; Sefa, Ibrahim; Altin, Necmi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, design and thermal analysis of a medium-frequency transformer with ferrite N87 core have been carried out using finite-element analysis software. A thermal model of the medium-frequency transformer is generated and analyzed with different cooling methods. In addition, it is proposed to attach additional heat sinks at the top and bottom of the transformer core. Effects of these additional heat sinks on cooling performance and sizing of the transformer are investigated. Furthermore, the cooling capacity of the proposed material is investigated, depending on the air flow velocity for the forced-air cooling method. Thus, more realistic behavior of the ferrite N87 material is obtained for a medium-frequency transformer with 35 kVA rated power and 10 kHz operating frequency. Moreover, electromagnetic and thermal analyses are carried out through linked simulations. The heat distribution in the core including saturation effect is also investigated in detail.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Flow in Severely Damaged Core Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Meekunnasombat, Phongsan; Fichot, Florian; Quintard, Michel

    2006-07-01

    In the event of a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the oxidation, dissolution and collapse of fuel rods is likely to change dramatically the geometry of the core. A large part of the core would be damaged and would look like porous medium made of randomly distributed pellet fragments, broken claddings and relocated melts. Such a complex medium must be cooled in order to stop the accident progression. IRSN investigates the effectiveness of the water re-flooding mechanism in cooling this medium where complex two-phase flows are likely to exist. A macroscopic model for the prediction of the cooling sequence was developed for the ICARE/CATHARE code (IRSN mechanistic code for severe accidents). It still needs to be improved and assessed. It appears that a better understanding of the flow at the pore scale is necessary. As a result, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) code was developed to investigate the local features of a two-phase flow in complex geometries. In this paper, the Cahn-Hilliard model is used to simulate flows of two immiscible fluids in geometries representing a damaged core. These geometries are synthesized from experimental tomography images (PHEBUS-FP project) in order to study the effects of each degradation feature, such as displacement and fragmentation of the fuel rods and claddings, on the two-phase flow. For example, the presence of fragmented fuel claddings is likely to enhance the trapping of the residual phase (either steam or water) within the medium which leads to less flow fluctuations in the other phase. Such features are clearly shown by DNS calculations. From a series of calculations where the geometry of the porous medium is changed, conclusions are drawn for the impact of rods damage level on the characteristics of two-phase flow in the core. (authors)

  1. Time-frequency characterization of lamb waves for material evaluation and damage inspection of plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank Pai, P.; Deng, Haoguang; Sundaresan, Mannur J.

    2015-10-01

    Guided wave-based technique is one major approach for damage inspection of structures. To detect a small damage, an elastic wave's wavelength needs to be in the order of the damage size and hence the frequency needs to be high. Unfortunately, high-frequency wave dynamics always involves complicated wave reflection, refraction and diffraction, and it is difficult to separate them in order to perform detailed examination and system identification. This paper investigates dynamic characteristics of Lamb waves in plates in order to be used for material evaluation and damage inspection of thin-walled structures. A one-dimensional finite-element modeling and analysis technique is developed for computing dispersion curves and all symmetric and antisymmetric modes of Lamb waves in isotropic and multi-layer plates. Moreover, the conjugate-pair decomposition (CPD) method is introduced for time-frequency analysis of propagating Lamb waves. Results show that, under a k-cycle sine-burst excitation at a plate's edge, the time-varying frequency of a surface point's response can reveal the Lamb wave propagating inside the plate being a symmetric or an antisymmetric mode. The frequency of the measured wave packet increases from the wave front to the trailing edge if it is a symmetric mode, and the frequency decreases from the wave front to the trailing edge if it is an antisymmetric mode. Moreover, interaction of two different wave packets results in a peak in the time-frequency curve. These characteristics can be used for accurate separation of wave packets and identification of different wave speeds to enable fast and accurate material evaluation and damage inspection. Transient finite-element analysis of Lamb waves in finite plates with crack/delamination show that k-cycle sine-burst probing waves are good agents for guided wave-based damage inspection of structures. Although crack and delamination introduce different waves into and complicate the probing wave packet, time-frequency

  2. Helicopter rotor blade frequency evolution with damage growth and signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Niranjan; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2005-05-01

    Structural damage in materials evolves over time due to growth of fatigue cracks in homogenous materials and a complicated process of matrix cracking, delamination, fiber breakage and fiber matrix debonding in composite materials. In this study, a finite element model of the helicopter rotor blade is used to analyze the effect of damage growth on the modal frequencies in a qualitative manner. Phenomenological models of material degradation for homogenous and composite materials are used. Results show that damage can be detected by monitoring changes in lower as well as higher mode flap (out-of-plane bending), lag (in-plane bending) and torsion rotating frequencies, especially for composite materials where the onset of the last stage of damage of fiber breakage is most critical. Curve fits are also proposed for mathematical modeling of the relationship between rotating frequencies and cycles. Finally, since operational data are noisy and also contaminated with outliers, denoising algorithms based on recursive median filters and radial basis function neural networks and wavelets are studied and compared with a moving average filter using simulated data for improved health-monitoring application. A novel recursive median filter is designed using integer programming through genetic algorithm and is found to have comparable performance to neural networks with much less complexity and is better than wavelet denoising for outlier removal. This filter is proposed as a tool for denoising time series of damage indicators.

  3. Damage detection on the joint of steel frame through high-frequency admittance signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dansheng; Zhu, Hongping; Zhou, Huaqiang; Yang, Haiping

    2008-11-01

    The basic idea of a piezoelectric admittance (reciprocal of impedance) technique for structural health monitoring is presented in this paper. An experimental study on damage detection of a steel frame structure is operated by the use of the high-frequency piezoelectric admittance signals. In this experiment, three PZT active sensors are bonded to three different components around a joint of the steel frame separately, and the looseness of bolts is identified by monitoring the variations of piezoelectric admittance measurements. From the experimental results it is found that the PZT active sensors hold the ability to detect structural local damage, i.e. they are insensitive to the damage in far fields. Subsequently, two damage indexes, the covariance and the cross correlation coefficient between two real admittance data sets are defined respectively, by which the extent of damage of the frame structure is evaluated. It is found that the cross correlation coefficient index can correctly reflect the damage extent of the frame structure qualitatively in different frequency ranges, but the covariance index can not.

  4. Nanolaminated Permalloy Core for High-Flux, High-Frequency Ultracompact Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Kim, M; Galle, P; Herrault, F; Shafer, R; Park, JY; Allen, MG

    2013-09-01

    Metallic magnetic materials have desirable magnetic properties, including high permeability, and high saturation flux density, when compared with their ferrite counterparts. However, eddy-current losses preclude their use in many switching converter applications, due to the challenge of simultaneously achieving sufficiently thin laminations such that eddy currents are suppressed (e.g., 500 nm-1 mu m for megahertz frequencies), while simultaneously achieving overall core thicknesses such that substantial power can be handled. A CMOS-compatible fabrication process based on robot-assisted sequential electrodeposition followed by selective chemical etching has been developed for the realization of a core of substantial overall thickness (tens to hundreds of micrometers) comprised of multiple, stacked permalloy (Ni80Fe20) nanolaminations. Tests of toroidal inductors with nanolaminated cores showed negligible eddy-current loss relative to total core loss even at a peak flux density of 0.5 T in the megahertz frequency range. To illustrate the use of these cores, a buck power converter topology is implemented with switching frequencies of 1-2 MHz. Power conversion efficiency greater than 85% with peak operating flux density of 0.3-0.5 T in the core and converter output power level exceeding 5 W was achieved.

  5. Identification of characteristic frequencies of damaged railway tracks using field hammer test measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of the Frequency Response Function (FRF)-based statistical method to identify the characteristic frequencies of railway track defects is studied. The method compares a damaged track state to a healthy state based on non-destructive field hammer test measurements. First, a study is carried out to investigate the repeatability of hammer tests in railway tracks. By changing the excitation and measurement locations it is shown that the variability introduced by the test process is negligible. Second, following the concepts of control charts employed in process monitoring, a method to define an approximate healthy state is introduced by using hammer test measurements at locations without visual damage. Then, the feasibility study includes an investigation into squats (i.e. a major type of rail surface defect) of varying severity. The identified frequency ranges related to squats agree with those found in an extensively validated vehicle-borne detection system. Therefore, the FRF-based statistical method in combination with the non-destructive hammer test measurements has the potential to be employed to identify the characteristic frequencies of damaged conditions in railway tracks in the frequency range of 300-3000 Hz.

  6. Frequencies and Flutter Speed Estimation for Damaged Aircraft Wing Using Scaled Equivalent Plate Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan

    2010-01-01

    Equivalent plate analysis is often used to replace the computationally expensive finite element analysis in initial design stages or in conceptual design of aircraft wing structures. The equivalent plate model can also be used to design a wind tunnel model to match the stiffness characteristics of the wing box of a full-scale aircraft wing model while satisfying strength-based requirements An equivalent plate analysis technique is presented to predict the static and dynamic response of an aircraft wing with or without damage. First, a geometric scale factor and a dynamic pressure scale factor are defined to relate the stiffness, load and deformation of the equivalent plate to the aircraft wing. A procedure using an optimization technique is presented to create scaled equivalent plate models from the full scale aircraft wing using geometric and dynamic pressure scale factors. The scaled models are constructed by matching the stiffness of the scaled equivalent plate with the scaled aircraft wing stiffness. It is demonstrated that the scaled equivalent plate model can be used to predict the deformation of the aircraft wing accurately. Once the full equivalent plate geometry is obtained, any other scaled equivalent plate geometry can be obtained using the geometric scale factor. Next, an average frequency scale factor is defined as the average ratio of the frequencies of the aircraft wing to the frequencies of the full-scaled equivalent plate. The average frequency scale factor combined with the geometric scale factor is used to predict the frequency response of the aircraft wing from the scaled equivalent plate analysis. A procedure is outlined to estimate the frequency response and the flutter speed of an aircraft wing from the equivalent plate analysis using the frequency scale factor and geometric scale factor. The equivalent plate analysis is demonstrated using an aircraft wing without damage and another with damage. Both of the problems show that the scaled

  7. Damage Location and Quantification Indices of Shear Structures Based on Changes in the First Two or Three Natural Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes damage detection algorithms for multistory shear structures that only need the first two or three natural frequencies. The methods are able to determine the location and severity of damage on the basis of damage location indices (DLI) and damage quantification indices (DQI) consisting of the changes in the first few squared natural frequencies of the undamaged and damaged states. The damage is assumed to be represented by a reduction in stiffness. This stiffness reduction causes a shift in the natural frequencies of the structure. The uncertainty associated with system identification methods for obtaining natural frequencies is also carefully considered. The methods are accurate and cost-effective means only requiring the changes in the natural frequencies.

  8. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  9. Fast damage imaging using the time-reversal technique in the frequency-wavenumber domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Huang, G. L.; Yuan, F. G.

    2013-07-01

    The time-reversal technique has been successfully used in structural health monitoring (SHM) for quantitative imaging of damage. However, the technique is very time-consuming when it is implemented in the time domain. In this paper, we study the technique in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain for fast real-time imaging of multiple damage sites in plates using scattered flexural plate waves. Based on Mindlin plate theory, the time reversibility of dispersive flexural waves in an isotropic plate is theoretically investigated in the f-k domain. A fast damage imaging technique is developed by using the cross-correlation between the back-propagated scattered wavefield and the incident wavefield in the frequency domain. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed technique cannot only localize multiple damage sites but also potentially identify their sizes. Moreover, the time-reversal technique in the f-k domain is about two orders of magnitude faster than the method in the time domain. Finally, experimental testing of an on-line SHM system with a sparse piezoelectric sensor array is conducted for fast multiple damage identification using the proposed technique.

  10. Direct comparison of statistical damage frequency method and raster scan procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batavičiūtė, G.; Ščiuka, M.; Plerpaitė, V.; Melninkaitis, A.

    2015-11-01

    Presented study addresses the nano-size defects acting as damage precursors in nanosecond laser pulse irradiation regime. Defects embedded within the surface of glass are investigated in terms of defect ensembles. Damage frequency method and raster scan procedure are directly compared on the set of two samples: uncoated fused silica substrates and SiO2 monolayer films. The extracted defect ensembles appear to be different from each other. The limitations of compared methods such as pulse-to-pulse variation of laser intensity and sample contamination induced by laser ablation were identified as the main causes of observed differences.

  11. Metal-core piezoelectric fiber-based smart layer for damage detection using sparse virtual element boundary measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Cheng, Li; Qiu, Jinhao; Wang, Hongyuan

    2016-04-01

    Metal-core Piezoelectric Fiber (MPF) was shown to have great potential to be a structurally integrated sensor for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Compared with the typical foil strain gauge, MPF is more suitable for high frequency strain measurement and can create direct conversion of mechanical energy into electric energy without the need for complex signal conditioners or gauge bridges. In this paper, a MPF-based smart layer is developed as an embedded network of distributed strain sensors that can be surface-mounted on a thin-walled structure. Each pair of the adjacent MPFs divides the entire structure into several "virtual elements (VEs)". By exciting the structure at the natural frequency of the VE, a "weak" formulation of the previously developed Pseudo-excitation (PE) approach based on sparse virtual element boundary measurement (VEBM) is proposed to detect the damage. To validate the effectiveness of the VEBM based approach, experiments are conducted to locate a small crack in a cantilever beam by using a MPF- based smart layer and a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). Results demonstrate that the proposed VEBM approach not only inherits the enhanced noise immunity capability of the "weak" formulation of the PE approach, but also allows a significant reduction in the number of measurement points as compared to the original version of the PE approach.

  12. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  13. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  14. Spectromicroscopy of Polymers: Comparison of Radiation Damage with Electron and Photon Core Excitation Spectroscopy Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, H.; Smith, A. P.; Rightor, E. G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Urquhart, S.; Leapman, R.

    1997-03-01

    Core excitation microspectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the characterization of polymeric materials due to its sensitivity to chemical functionality. However, the excitations utilized in electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (TEM-EELS) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy can introduce radiation damage and chemically modify the sample. In order to understand the radiation damage associated with TEM-EELS and NEXAFS spectroscopy we have studied the radiation damage of the common polymer poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as exhibited by changes in the acquired C K-edge excitation spectra. By fitting gaussian functions to the spectral intensity changes as a function of dose, we have determined the critical radiation dose of PET for both NEXAFS spectroscopy and TEM-EELS under typical operating conditions. This critical radiation dose for TEM-EELS is found to be 1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^8 grey (1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^4 Mrad) compared to a critical radiation dose for NEXAFS spectroscopy of 1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^9 grey (1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^5 Mrad). By considering the G factors of the two techniques and the critical radiation dose, a rule of thumb was derived that indicates that with typical present operating conditions, NEXAFS spectroscopy can analyze areas 500 times smaller than TEM-EELS given the same amount of radiation damage. Work supported by: NSF Young Investigator Award (DMR-9458060) and Dow Chemical

  15. Composite sandwich construction with syntactic foam core - A practical assessment of post-impact damage and residual strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C.; Dittman, D.; Ishai, O.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of an inspection method that has been successfully used to assess the postimpact damage and residual strength of syntactic (glass microspheres in epoxy matrix) foam-core sandwich panels with hybrid (carbon and glass fiber-reinforced) composite skins, which inherently possess high damage tolerance. SEM establishes that the crushing of the microspheres is responsible for the absorption of most of the impact energy. Damage tolerance is a function of the localization of damage by that high impact energy absorption.

  16. Optical frequency standard using acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Triches, Marco; Michieletto, Mattia; Hald, Jan; Lyngsø, Jens K; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    2015-05-01

    Gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers are used to stabilize a fiber laser to the 13C2H2 P(16) (ν1+ν3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. Four hollow-core fibers with different crystal structure are compared in terms of long term lock-point repeatability and fractional frequency instability. The locked fiber laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 4 × 10(-12) for averaging time up to 10(4) s. The lock-point repeatability over more than 1 year is 1.3 × 10(-11), corresponding to a standard deviation of 2.5 kHz. A complete experimental investigation of the light-matter interaction between the spatial modes excited in the fibers and the frequency of the locked laser is presented. A simple theoretical model that explains the interaction is also developed. PMID:25969219

  17. Detection of sudden structural damage using blind source separation and time-frequency approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morovati, V.; Kazemi, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    Seismic signal processing is one of the most reliable methods of detecting the structural damage during earthquakes. In this paper, the use of the hybrid method of blind source separation (BSS) and time-frequency analysis (TFA) is explored to detect the changes in the structural response data. The combination of the BSS and TFA is applied to the seismic signals due to the non-stationary nature of them. Firstly, the second-order blind identification technique is used to decompose the response signal of structural vibration into modal coordinate signals which will be mono-components for TFA. Then each mono-component signal is analyzed to extract instantaneous frequency of structure. Numerical simulations and a real-world seismic-excited structure with time-varying frequencies show the accuracy and robustness of the developed algorithm. TFA of extracted sources shows that used method can be successfully applied to structural damage detection. The results also demonstrate that the combined method can be used to identify the time instant of structural damage occurrence more sharply and effectively than by the use of TFA alone.

  18. Energy-Deposition and Damage Calculations in Core-Vessel Inserts at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.

    2002-06-25

    Heat-deposition and damage calculations are described for core-vessel inserts in the target area of the Spallation Neutron Source. Two separate designs for these inserts (or neutron beam tubes) were studied; a single-unit insert and a multi-unit insert. The single unit contains a neutron guide; the multi unit does not. Both units are constructed of stainless steel. For the single unit, separate studies were carried out with the guide composed of stainless steel, glass, and aluminum. Results are also reported for an aluminum window on the front of the insert, a layer of nickel on the guide, a cadmium shield surrounding the guide, and a stainless steel plug in the beam-tube opening. The locations of both inserts were the most forward positions to be occupied by each design respectively thus ensuring that the calculations are conservative.

  19. Wide Temperature Core Loss Characteristics of Transverse Magnetically Annealed Amorphous Tapes for High Frequency Aerospace Magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1999-01-01

    100 kHz core loss properties of sample transverse magnetically annealed, cobalt-based amorphous and iron-based nanocrystalline tape wound magnetic cores are presented over the temperature range of -150 C to 150 C, at selected values of B(sub peak). For B-fields not close to saturation, the core loss is not sensitive to temperature in this range and is as low as seen in the best MnZn power ferrites at their optimum temperatures. Frequency resolved characteristics are given over the range of 50 kHz to 1 MHz, but at B(sub peak) = 0.1 T and 50 C only. For example, the 100 kHz specific core loss ranged from 50 - 70 mW/cubic cm for the 3 materials, when measured at 0.1 T and 50 C. This very low high frequency core loss, together with near zero saturation magnetostriction and insensitivity to rough handling, makes these amorphous ribbons strong candidates for power magnetics applications in wide temperature aerospace environments.

  20. Multi-damage localization in plate structure using frequency response function-based indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hai-yang; Guo, Xing-lin; Ouyang, Huajiang; Yang, Xiu-ming

    2015-07-01

    Vibration signal and its derivative have shown some promise in structural damage detection in previous research. However, the theoretical and practical difficulties of multi-damage detection in plate structures based on dynamic responses remain. In this paper, an efficient damage localization index based on frequency response function (FRF) is presented. The imaginary part of FRF (IFRF) is extracted to derive the new localization index due to its relation to modal flexibility. For avoiding the finite element model error, two-dimensional gapped smoothing method (GSM) is employed without the need for baseline data from a presumably undamaged structure. Experimental studies on a steel plate with two localized defects in different boundary conditions are performed. The results are compared with some typical damage indices in the literature, such as mode shapes, uniform load surface and IFRF. In order to mitigate the inherent disadvantages of GSM in anti-noise ability, a simple statistical treatment based on Thompson outlier analysis is finally used for noise suppression. The effect of damage level and boundary condition on the detection results is also investigated.

  1. Dating a tropical ice core by time-frequency analysis of ion concentration depth profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, M.; De Angelis, M.; Lacoume, J.-L.

    2014-09-01

    Ice core dating is a key parameter for the interpretation of the ice archives. However, the relationship between ice depth and ice age generally cannot be easily established and requires the combination of numerous investigations and/or modelling efforts. This paper presents a new approach to ice core dating based on time-frequency analysis of chemical profiles at a site where seasonal patterns may be significantly distorted by sporadic events of regional importance, specifically at the summit area of Nevado Illimani (6350 m a.s.l.), located in the eastern Bolivian Andes (16°37' S, 67°46' W). We used ion concentration depth profiles collected along a 100 m deep ice core. The results of Fourier time-frequency and wavelet transforms were first compared. Both methods were applied to a nitrate concentration depth profile. The resulting chronologies were checked by comparison with the multi-proxy year-by-year dating published by de Angelis et al. (2003) and with volcanic tie points. With this first experiment, we demonstrated the efficiency of Fourier time-frequency analysis when tracking the nitrate natural variability. In addition, we were able to show spectrum aliasing due to under-sampling below 70 m. In this article, we propose a method of de-aliasing which significantly improves the core dating in comparison with annual layer manual counting. Fourier time-frequency analysis was applied to concentration depth profiles of seven other ions, providing information on the suitability of each of them for the dating of tropical Andean ice cores.

  2. Resolution and Dynamical Core Dependence of Atmospheric River Frequency in Global Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Lu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of atmospheric river (AR) frequency simulated by a global model with different grid resolutions and dynamical cores. Analysis is performed on aquaplanet simulations using version 4 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) at 240, 120, 60 and 30 km model resolutions each with the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and High-Order Methods Modeling Environment (HOMME) dynamical cores. The frequency of AR events decreases with model resolution and the HOMME dynamical core produces more AR events than MPAS. Comparing the frequencies determined using absolute and percentile thresholds of large-scale conditions used to define an AR, model sensitivity is found to be related to the overall sensitivity of sub-tropical westerlies, atmospheric precipitable water content and profile and to a lesser extent on extra-tropical Rossby wave activity to model resolution and dynamical core. Real world simulations using MPAS at 120 km and 30 km grid resolutions also exhibit a decrease of AR frequency with increasing resolution over southern East Pacific, but there difference is smaller over northern East Pacific. This inter-hemispheric difference is related to the enhancement of convection in over the tropics with increased resolution. This anomalous convection sets off Rossby wave patterns that weaken the subtropical westerlies over southern East Pacific but have relatively little effect on those over northern East Pacific. In comparison to NCEP2 reanalysis, MPAS real world simulations are found to underestimate AR frequencies at both resolutions likely because of their climatologically drier sub-tropics and poleward shifted jets. This study highlights the important links between model climatology of large-scale conditions and extremes.

  3. Off-resonance frequency operation for power transfer in a loosely coupled air core transformer

    DOEpatents

    Scudiere, Matthew B

    2012-11-13

    A power transmission system includes a loosely coupled air core transformer having a resonance frequency determined by a product of inductance and capacitance of a primary circuit including a primary coil. A secondary circuit is configured to have a substantially same product of inductance and capacitance. A back EMF generating device (e.g., a battery), which generates a back EMF with power transfer, is attached to the secondary circuit. Once the load power of the back EMF generating device exceeds a certain threshold level, which depends on the system parameters, the power transfer can be achieved at higher transfer efficiency if performed at an operating frequency less than the resonance frequency, which can be from 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency.

  4. Long-term evolution of high-frequency ingredients of the core surface radial geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrescu, C.; Dobrica, V.; Stefan, C.

    2012-12-01

    Our previous research, based on observatory and main field models data, revealed the presence of high-frequency ingredients, at time scales of 22 and ~80 years, both in the Earth's surface field and in the core surface radial field. The results indicate that the ~80-year variation entirely accounts for the field with time-averaged axisymmetric component subtracted and high-pass-filtered with cutoff period 400 years of Finlay and Jackson (2003). The long-term evolution of the ~80-year variation of the core surface field, covering a time-span of about 320 years as given by gufm1 main field model, is illustrated and discussed in terms of displacements on the core surface of the field patterns and of their first two time-derivatives.

  5. On the separation of internal and boundary damage in slender bars using longitudinal vibration frequencies and equivalent linearization of damaged bolted joint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argatov, Ivan; Butcher, Eric A.

    2011-06-01

    The problem of detecting localized large-scale internal damage in structures with imperfect bolted joints is considered. The proposed damage detection strategy utilizes the structural damping and an equivalent linearization of the bolted lap joint response to separate the combined boundary damage from localized large-scale internal damage. The frequencies are found approximately using asymptotic analysis and a perturbation technique. The proposed approach is illustrated on an example of longitudinal vibrations in a slender elastic bar with both ends clamped by bolted lap joints with different levels of damage. It is found that while the proposed method allows for the estimation of internal damage severity once the crack location is known, it gives multiple possible crack locations so that other methods (e.g., mode shapes) are required to obtain a unique crack location.

  6. Finite Frequency Measurements of Conventional and Core-diffracted P-waves (P and Pdiff)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, K.; Sigloch, K.; Stähler, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Core-diffracted waves are body waves that dive deep enough to sense the core, and by interaction with this wave guide become dispersive. They sample the core-mantle boundary and the lower third of the mantle extensively. In ray theoretical modeling, the deepest part of the ray starts to graze the core at around 97 degrees distance, but ray theory is a very poor approximation to propagation of core-diffracted waves. In reality, finite-frequency waves with their spatially extend sensitivity regions start to sense the core at significantly smaller distances already. The actual, non-ray-like sensitivities have been difficult to model, as have been the associated synthetic seismograms. Core-diffracted waves have therefore not been used in tomography, despite abundant observations of these phases on modern broadband seismograms. Hence current global body-wave tomographies illuminate the lower third of the mantle much less well than the upper and especially the middle third. This study aims for broadband, global waveform tomography that seamlessly incorporates core-diffracted phases alongside conventional, teleseismic waves as well as regional body-waves. Here, we investigate the properties of P-diffracted waves in terms of waveform characteristics and travel-time measurements as compared to teleseismic P-wave measured by the same methods. Travel time anomalies, the primary data for tomography, are measured by waveform cross-correlation of data with synthetics, where the synthetics are calculated from fully numerical wave propagation in a spherically symmetric background model. These same numerical tools will be used to calculate the associated sensitivity kernels for tomography (figure, top). Demonstrating the extent to which waveform modeling can fit real data, we assemble and discuss a global data set of 851,905 Pdiff and 2,368,452 P-wave multi-frequency cross-correlation travel times. Findings are summarized in the Pdiff travel time map (figure, bottom) in which most

  7. Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris

    DOEpatents

    Gabor, John D.; Cassulo, John C.; Pedersen, Dean R.; Baker Jr., Louis

    1986-07-01

    The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed or sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

  8. Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris

    DOEpatents

    Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.; Pedersen, D.R.; Baker, L. Jr.

    The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and can be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed of sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

  9. Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris

    DOEpatents

    Gabor, John D.; Cassulo, John C.; Pedersen, Dean R.; Baker, Jr., Louis

    1986-01-01

    The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed or sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

  10. Damage detection and quantification in a structural model under seismic excitation using time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun-Kai; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Wu, Tzu-Hsiu

    2015-04-01

    In civil engineering, health monitoring and damage detection are typically carry out by using a large amount of sensors. Typically, most methods require global measurements to extract the properties of the structure. However, some sensors, like LVDT, cannot be used due to in situ limitation so that the global deformation remains unknown. An experiment is used to demonstrate the proposed algorithms: a one-story 2-bay reinforce concrete frame under weak and strong seismic excitation. In this paper signal processing techniques and nonlinear identification are used and applied to the response measurements of seismic response of reinforced concrete structures subject to different level of earthquake excitations. Both modal-based and signal-based system identification and feature extraction techniques are used to study the nonlinear inelastic response of RC frame using both input and output response data or output only measurement. From the signal-based damage identification method, which include the enhancement of time-frequency analysis of acceleration responses and the estimation of permanent deformation using directly from acceleration response data. Finally, local deformation measurement from dense optical tractor is also use to quantify the damage of the RC frame structure.

  11. High frequency, high temperature specific core loss and dynamic B-H hysteresis loop characteristics of soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wieserman, W.R.; Schwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop characteristics of Supermalloy and Metglass 2605SC over the frequency range of 1-50 kHz and temperature range of 23-300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The experimental setup used to conduct the investigation is described. The effects of the maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined.

  12. High frequency, high temperature specific core loss and dynamic B-H hysteresis loop characteristics of soft magnetic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop characteristics of Supermalloy and Metglas 2605SC over the frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The experimental setup used to conduct the investigation is described. The effects of the maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined.

  13. High frequency, high temperature specific core loss and dynamic B-H hysteresis loop characteristics of soft magnetic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop characteristics of Supermalloy and Metglas 2605SC over the frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The experimental setup used to conduct the investigation is described. The effects of the maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined.

  14. Development of high frequency spice models for ferrite core inductors and transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Muyshondt, G.P.; Portnoy, W.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    In this work high frequency SPICE models were developed to simulate the hysteresis and saturation effects of toroidal shaped ferrite core inductors and transformers. The models include the nonlinear, multi-valued B-H characteristic of the core material, leakage flux, stray capacitances, and core losses. The saturation effects were modeled using two diode clamping arrangements in conjunction with nonlinear dependent sources. Two possible controlling schemes were developed for the saturation switch. One of the arrangements used the current flowing through a series RC branch to control the switch, while the other used a NAND gate. The NAND gate implementation of the switch proved to be simpler and the parameters associated with it were easier to determine from the measurements and the B-H characteristics of the material. Lumped parameters were used to simulate the parasitic effects. Techniques for measuring these parasitic are described. The models were verified using manganese-zinc ferrite-type toroidal cores and they have general applicability to all circuit analysis codes equivalent function blocks such as multipliers, adders, and logic components. 7 refs., 22 figs.

  15. The sensivity of geomagnetic reversal frequency to core-mantle boundary heat flux magnitude and heterogeneity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metman, Maurits; de Groot, Lennart; Thieulot, Cedric; Biggin, Andrew; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    For a number of decades the core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux has been thought to be a key parameter controlling the geomagnetic field. A CMB heat flow increase is assumed to destabilize the geodynamo, increasing and decreasing the reversal frequency and dipole moment, respectively. The opposite case where a CMB flux decrease induces a relatively high dipole moment, as well as a low reversal frequency, would correspond to the characteristics of a superchron (Biggin et al., 2012). So far, only the magnitude of the CMB heat flux has been subject of research. However, the temporal and spatial heat flux distribution across the CMB also appears to have an influence on the geomagnetic reversal frequency. For example, the amount of heat flux heterogeneity may also be associated with a destabilization of the dynamo, increasing the reversal frequency (Olson et al., 2010). In this work we set out to assess: - (1) How the geomagnetic field intensity and reversals are predominantly sensitive to CMB heat flux magnitude or heterogeneity; - (2) what combination of magnitude and heterogeneity best reproduces the geomagnetic record on the 10 Myr timescale. To this end we use the PARODY software and test for a number of CMB heat flow modes (spherical harmonics of increasing degree and order, with an amplitude of 10 mW/m^2) and magnitudes (ranging from 20 to 100 mW/m^2). We will show our modeling results of how CMB heat flow magnitude and heterogeneity control the paleomagnetic record in terms of reversal frequency and dipole moment. Also relevant snapshots in time of outer core convection and thermal/magnetic structure will be shown. References Biggin et al. (2012). Nature Geoscience, 5(8):526-533. Olson et al. (2010). PEPI, 180(1-2):66 - 79.

  16. Spin torque resonant vortex core expulsion for an efficient radio-frequency detection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, V.; Jenkins, A. S.; Lebrun, R.; Bortolotti, P.; Grimaldi, E.; Tsunegi, S.; Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Fukushima, A.; Yuasa, S.

    It has been proposed by Tulaparkur et al.[1ref] that a high frequency detector based on the so called spin-diode effect in spin transfer oscillators could eventually replace conventional Schottky diodes, due to their nanoscale size, frequency tunability, and large output sensitivity. Although a promising candidate for ICT applications, the output voltage generated from this effect is consistently low. Here we present a scheme for a new type of spintronics-based high frequency detector based on the expulsion of the vortex core of a magnetic tunnel junction. The resonant expulsion of the core leads to a large and sharp change in resistance associated with the difference in magnetoresistance between the vortex ground state and the final C-state, which is predominantly in either the parallel or anti-parallel direction relative to the polariser layer. Interestingly, this reversible effect is independent of the incoming rf current amplitude, offering a compelling perspective for a fast real-time rf threshold detector. REF : EU FP7 Grant (MOSAIC No. ICT-FP7-317950 is acknowledged.

  17. FANCI Regulates Recruitment of the FA Core Complex at Sites of DNA Damage Independently of FANCD2

    PubMed Central

    Castella, Maria; Jacquemont, Celine; Thompson, Elizabeth L.; Yeo, Jung Eun; Cheung, Ronald S.; Huang, Jen-Wei; Sobeck, Alexandra; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2015-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway mediates repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The FA core complex, a multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase, participates in the detection of DNA lesions and monoubiquitinates two downstream FA proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI (or the ID complex). However, the regulation of the FA core complex itself is poorly understood. Here we show that the FA core complex proteins are recruited to sites of DNA damage and form nuclear foci in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. ATR kinase activity, an intact FA core complex and FANCM-FAAP24 were crucial for this recruitment. Surprisingly, FANCI, but not its partner FANCD2, was needed for efficient FA core complex foci formation. Monoubiquitination or ATR-dependent phosphorylation of FANCI were not required for the FA core complex recruitment, but FANCI deubiquitination by USP1 was. Additionally, BRCA1 was required for efficient FA core complex foci formation. These findings indicate that FANCI functions upstream of FA core complex recruitment independently of FANCD2, and alter the current view of the FA-BRCA pathway. PMID:26430909

  18. Study of laser-induced damage to large core silica fiber by Nd:YAG and Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Hokansson, Adam; Whelan, Dan; Clancy, Michael

    2009-02-01

    As a continuation of our earlier study at 2.1 μm wavelength, we have investigated the laser damage to several types of step-index, large core (1500 μm) silica fibers at two new wavelengths by high power long pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Alexandrite (755 nm) lasers. It was observed that fibers with different designs showed a significant difference in performance at these wavelengths. We will also report a correlation of damage to the fibers between the two laser wavelengths. The performance analyses of different fiber types under the given test conditions will enable optimization of fiber design for specific applications.

  19. Performance of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar on the GPM core satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Seto, Shinta; Awaka, Jun; Meneghini, Robert; Kubota, Takuji; Oki, Riko; Chandra, Venkatchalam; Kawamoto, Nozomi

    2016-04-01

    The GPM core satellite was launched on February 28, 2014. This paper describes some of the results of precipitation measurements with the Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the GPM core satellite. The DPR, which was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), consists of two radars: Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band radar (KaPR). The performance of the DPR is evaluated by comparing the level 2 products with the corresponding TRMM/PR data and surface rain measurements. The scanning geometry and footprint size of KuPR and those of PR are nearly identical. The major differences between them are the sensitivity, visiting frequency, and the rain retrieval algorithm. KuPR's sensitivity is twice as good as PR. The increase of sensitivity reduces the cases of missing light rain. Since relatively light rain prevails in Japan, the difference in sensitivity may cause a few percentage points in the bias. Comparisons of the rain estimates by GPM/DPR with AMeDAS rain gauge data over Japan show that annual KuPR's estimates over Japan agree quite well with the rain gauge estimates although the monthly or local statistics of these two kinds of data scatter substantially. KuPR's esimates are closer to the gauge estimates than the TRMM/PR. Possible sources of the differences that include sampling errors, sensitivity, and the algorithm are examined.

  20. Nanosecond-laser-induced damage in potassium titanyl phosphate: pure 532 nm pumping and frequency conversion situations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Frank R.; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2011-08-01

    Nanosecond-laser-induced damage measurements in the bulk of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystals are reported using incident 532 nm light or using incident 1064 nm light, which pumps more or less efficient second harmonic generation. No damage threshold fatigue effect is observed with pure 532 nm irradiation. The damage threshold of Z-polarized light is higher than the one for X- or Y-polarized light. During frequency doubling, the damage threshold was found to be lower than for pure 1064 or 532 nm irradiation. More data to quantify the cooperative damage mechanism were generated by performing fluence ramp experiments with varying conditions and monitoring the conversion efficiency. All damage thresholds plotted against the conversion efficiency align close to a characteristic curve.

  1. Laboratory simulation of high-frequency GPR responses of damaged tunnel liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siggins, A. F.; Whiteley, Robert J.

    2000-04-01

    Concrete lined tunnels and pipelines commonly suffer from damage due to subsidence or poor drainage in the surrounding soils, corrosion of reinforcement if present, and acid vapor leaching of the lining. There is a need to conduct tunnel condition monitoring using non-destructive testing methods (NDT) on a regular basis in many buried installations, for example sewers and storm water drains. A wide variety of NDT methods have been employed in the past to monitor these linings including closed circuit TV (CCTV) inspection, magnetic and various electromagnetic and seismic methods. Ground penetrating radar, GPR, is a promising technique for this application, however there are few systems currently available that can provide the high resolution imaging needed to test the lining. A recently developed Australian GPR system operating at 1400 MHz offers the potential to overcome many of these limitations while maintaining adequate resolution to the rear of the linings which are typically less than 0.5 meters thick. The new high frequency GPR has a nominal resolution of 0.03 m at the center of the pulse band-width. This is a significant improvement over existing radars with the possible exception of some horn based systems. This paper describes the results of a laboratory study on a model tunnel lining using the new 1.4 GHz radar. The model simulated a concrete lining with various degrees of damage including, heavily leached sections, voids and corroded reinforcing. The test results established that the new GPR was capable of imaging subtle variations in the concrete structure and that simulated damage could be detected throughout the liner depth. Furthermore, resolution was found to exceed 0.02 m which was significantly better than expected.

  2. Dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) development on the global precipitation measurement (GPM) core observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, M.; Miura, T.; Furukawa, K.; Hyakusoku, Y.; Ishikiri, T.; Kai, H.; Iguchi, T.; Hanado, H.; Nakagawa, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory is developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). GPM objective is to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately. GPM contributes to climate and water cycle change studies, flood prediction and numerical weather forecast. GPM consists of GPM core observatory and constellation satellites carrying microwave radiometers (MWRs) and/or sounders (MWSs). The frequent measurement will be achieved by constellation satellites, and the accurate measurement will be achieved by DPR with high sensitivity and dual frequency capability. GPM core observatory is jointly developed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and JAXA. NASA is developing the satellite bus and GPM microwave radiometer (GMI), and JAXA is developing DPR. GPM algorithms for data processing are developed jointly. The DPR consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) radar suitable for heavy rainfall in the tropical region, and Ka-band (35.55 GHz) radar suitable for light rainfall in higher latitude region. Drop size distribution information will be derived which contributes to the improvement of rainfall estimate accuracy. DPR will also play a key role to improve rainfall estimation accuracy of constellation satellites. DPR proto-flight test at JAXA Tsukuba space center is finished and it is delivered to NASA for integration to the GPM observatory. In this paper, DPR PFT test result at Tsukuba space center, DPR status in the GPM observatory environmental test, and DPR on-orbit calibration plan will be presented.

  3. Resonance Raman frequencies and core size for low- and high-spin nickel porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Su, Y.O.; Spiro, T.G.

    1986-10-22

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported with B- and Q-band excitation for nickel(II) complexes of octaethylporphyrin (OEP), protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (PP), and meso-tetraphenylporphine (TPP) in methylene chloride (4-coordinate, low spin) and piperidine (pip) (6-coordinate, high spin). The large core size expansion accompanying the formation of the 6-coordinate species (1.96-2.04 A) is reflected in large decreases, up to 40 cm/sup -1/ in the positions of high-frequency porphyrin skeletal modes. For NiOEP and NiPP, these are in near-quantitative accord with the core size correlations obtained previously for iron porphyrin complexes, although certain deviations due to differential coupling with the vinyl modes of protoporphyrin are noted. Contributions of a minority 5-coordinate complex to the RR spectrum of NiTPP in piperidine, previously noted on the basis of photolysis effects, are evaluated quantitatively from titration data. Formation of a monopiperidine adduct, detected previously via a RR study of NiTPP(pip)/sub 2/ photolysis, is examined for nickel meso-tetrakis(p-cyanophenyl)porphine. Equilibrium constants for successive addition of piperidine ligands, K/sub 1/ = 0.4 and K/sub 2/ = 2.5 M/sup -1/, are evaluated from optical titration data, and the absorptivities of the 5- and 6-coordinate species are found to be nearly the same, consistent with both having a high-spin configuration. The frequency of the 5-coordinate nu/sub 4/ RR band is likewise found to be much closer to the 6-coordinate than to the 4-coordinate frequency.

  4. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  5. Selection of informative frequency band in local damage detection in rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchowski, Jakub; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Zimroz, Radosław

    2014-10-01

    Problem of informative frequency band (IFB) selection in vibration signal processing for local damage detection is discussed. It is proposed to extend the concept of automatic and objective IFB selection proposed by several authors. Till now, kurtosis was preferred as criterion for IFB search. Thus, it is offered to study set of statistics, namely Jarque-Bera, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramer-von Mises, Anderson-Darling, quantile-quantile plot and a method based on the local maxima approach in order to verify their abilities of IFB selection. Also similarities between them are described. It has been proved by simulation and real data analysis that proposed selectors (because they allow us to “select” frequency band) might be equivalent to the spectral kurtosis (SK) in ordinary cases. Moreover, some of the novel selectors are better, because they are less sensitive to incidental spikes that might occur during the signal acquisition process. Proposed selectors might be (as SK) the basis for filter design for informative signal extraction.

  6. The Prp19/Pso4 Core complex Undergoes Ubiquitylation and Structural Alterations in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Legerski, Randy J.

    2007-01-01

    Prp19/Pso4, a U-box containing E3 ligase, has a demonstrated role in pre-mRNA splicing, but has also been implicated in both yeast and mammalian cells as having a direct role in DNA damage processing. In this report we provide further evidence in support of this latter assertion. We show that hPrp19 forms an ubiquitylated oligomeric species that is resistant to disruption by SDS gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions suggesting that is mediated by a thiolester between ubiquitin and a cysteine residue in Prp19. The level of this species is significantly enhanced upon treatment of cells with DNA damaging agents, and its association with chromatin is increased. In addition, hPrp19 is known to form a stable core complex with Cdc5L, Plrg1, and Spf27; however, ubiquitylated hPrp19 fails to interact with either Cdc5L or Plrg1 indicating that DNA damage can induce profound alterations to the hPrp19 core complex. Finally, we show that overexpression of hPrp19 in human cells provides a pro-survival affect in that it reduces the levels of apoptosis observed after exposure of cells to DNA damage. PMID:17276391

  7. Analysis of core damage frequency: Peach Bottom, Unit 2 internal events

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.; Maloney, K.J.; Wheeler, T.A.; Daniel, S.L.; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM )

    1989-08-01

    This document contains the appendices for the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for the Peach Bottom, Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. This is one of the five plant analyses conducted as part of the NUREG-1150 effort for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The work performed and described here is an extensive reanalysis of that published in October 1986 as NUREG/CR-4550, Volume 4. It addresses comments from numerous reviewers and significant changes to the plant systems and procedures made since the first report. The uncertainty analysis and presentation of results are also much improved, and considerable effort was expended on an improved analysis of loss of offsite power. The content and detail of this report is directed toward PRA practitioners who need to know how the work was done and the details for use in further studies. 58 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.

  8. Effects of exciting frequencies, grain sizes, and damage upon P-wave velocity for ultrasonic NDT of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jiann W.; Weng, Lisheng

    2000-05-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental study of the effects of exciting frequencies, grain (aggregate) sizes, and damage upon the ultrasonic P-wave velocity when performing the ultrasonic nondestructive testing (NDT) for concrete specimens. Two batches of concrete and mortar specimens were prepared in the laboratory for the investigation of the effects from the stated factors upon the P-wave velocity. Damage here mostly refers to microcracks and microvoids in concrete. Five different aggregate sizes, 0' (mortar), 3/8', 1/2', 3/4', and 1', were selected to demonstrate the grain (aggregate) size effect. Exciting frequencies of the ultrasonic wave were set to range from 100 kHz to 1,000 kHz, with increment of 50 kHz, to demonstrate the frequency effect. Styrofoam particles were mixed into the comparison concrete and mortar specimens to simulate the distributed microvoids (damage). Different volume fractions of styrofoam particles were mixed into the mortar specimens in order to study the effect of different porosities (damage) upon the P-wave velocity. The experimental observations show that, for mortar and concrete specimens with aggregate sizes from 0 to 1 inch, the P-wave velocity would not be affected significantly within the tested frequency range (100 - 1000 kHz). The normalized P-wave velocity exhibits almost identical pattern upon the exciting frequencies for all specimens.

  9. Geometry of the Nojima fault at Nojima-Hirabayashi, Japan - I. A simple damage structure inferred from borehole core permeability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, H.; Ikeda, R.; Omura, K.; Naka, H.

    2009-01-01

    The 1995 Kobe (Hyogo-ken Nanbu) earthquake, M = 7.2, ruptured the Nojima fault in southwest Japan. We have studied core samples taken from two scientific drillholes that crossed the fault zone SW of the epicentral region on Awaji Island. The shallower hole, drilled by the Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ), was started 75 m to the SE of the surface trace of the Nojima fault and crossed the fault at a depth of 624 m. A deeper hole, drilled by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) was started 302 m to the SE of the fault and crossed fault strands below a depth of 1140 m. We have measured strength and matrix permeability of core samples taken from these two drillholes. We find a strong correlation between permeability and proximity to the fault zone shear axes. The half-width of the high permeability zone (approximately 15 to 25 m) is in good agreement with the fault zone width inferred from trapped seismic wave analysis and other evidence. The fault zone core or shear axis contains clays with permeabilities of approximately 0.1 to 1 microdarcy at 50 MPa effective confining pressure (10 to 30 microdarcy at in situ pressures). Within a few meters of the fault zone core, the rock is highly fractured but has sustained little net shear. Matrix permeability of this zone is approximately 30 to 60 microdarcy at 50 MPa effective confining pressure (300 to 1000 microdarcy at in situ pressures). Outside this damage zone, matrix permeability drops below 0.01 microdarcy. The clay-rich core material has the lowest strength with a coefficient of friction of approximately 0.55. Shear strength increases with distance from the shear axis. These permeability and strength observations reveal a simple fault zone structure with a relatively weak fine-grained core surrounded by a damage zone of fractured rock. In this case, the damage zone will act as a high-permeability conduit for vertical and horizontal flow in the plane of the fault. The fine

  10. Finite element analysis of the dynamic behavior of a laminated windscreen with frequency dependent viscoelastic core.

    PubMed

    Bouayed, Kaïss; Hamdi, Mohamed-Ali

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents numerical and experimental validation of results obtained by a shell finite element, which has been developed for modeling of the dynamic behavior of sandwich multilayered structures with a viscoelastic core. The proposed shell finite element is very easy to implement in existing finite element solvers, since it uses only the displacements as degrees of freedom at external faces and at inter-layer interfaces. The displacement field is linearly interpolated in the thickness direction of each layer, and analytical integration is made in the thickness direction in order to avoid meshing of each sandwich layer by solid elements. Only the two dimensional mid-surface of reference is meshed, facilitating the mesh generation task. A simplified modal approach using a real modal basis is also proposed to efficiently calculate the dynamic response of the sandwich structure. The proposed method reduces the memory size and computing time and takes into account the frequency-dependence of the polymer core mechanical properties. Results obtained by the proposed element in conjunction with the simplified modal method have been numerically and experimentally validated by comparison to results obtained by commercial software codes (MSC/NASTRAN and ESI/RAYON-VTM), and to measurements done on automobile windscreens. PMID:22894198

  11. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  12. Anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe cores integrated into microinductors for high-frequency dc-dc power conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooncheol; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Jung-Kwun; Herrault, Florian; Allen, Mark G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a rectangular, anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core that possesses a magnetically hard axis in the long geometric axis direction. Previously, we have developed nanolaminated cores comprising tens to hundreds of layers of 300-1000 nm thick metallic alloys (i.e. Ni80Fe20 or Co44Ni37Fe19) based on sequential electrodeposition, demonstrating suppressed eddy-current losses at MHz frequencies. In this work, magnetic anisotropy was induced to the nanolaminated CoNiFe cores by applying an external magnetic field (50-100 mT) during CoNiFe film electrodeposition. The fabricated cores comprised tens to hundreds of layers of 500-1000 nm thick CoNiFe laminations that have the hard-axis magnetic property. Packaged in a 22-turn solenoid test inductor, the anisotropic core showed 10% increased effective permeability and 25% reduced core power losses at MHz operation frequency, compared to an isotropic core of the identical geometry. Operating the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core in a step-down dc-dc converter (15 V input to 5 V output) demonstrated 81% converter efficiency at a switching frequency of 1.1 MHz and output power of 6.5 W. A solenoid microinductor with microfabricated windings integrated with the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core was fabricated, demonstrating a constant inductance of 600 nH up to 10 MHz and peak quality factor exceeding 20 at 4 MHz. The performance of the microinductor with the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core is compared with other previously reported microinductors.

  13. Current status of the dual-frequency precipitation radar on the global precipitation measurement core spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Nio, T.; Konishi, T.; Oki, R.; Masaki, T.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.; Hanado, H.

    2015-10-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The GPM is a follow-on mission of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The objectives of the GPM mission are to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately than TRMM. The frequent precipitation measurement about every three hours will be achieved by some constellation satellites with microwave radiometers (MWRs) or microwave sounders (MWSs), which will be developed by various countries. The accurate measurement of precipitation in mid-high latitudes will be achieved by the DPR. The GPM core satellite is a joint product of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), JAXA and NICT. NASA developed the satellite bus and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and JAXA and NICT developed the DPR. JAXA and NICT developed the DPR through procurement. The configuration of precipitation measurement using active radar and a passive radiometer is similar to TRMM. The major difference is that DPR is used in GPM instead of the precipitation radar (PR) in TRMM. The inclination of the core satellite is 65 degrees, and the nominal flight altitude is 407 km. The non-sun-synchronous circular orbit is necessary for measuring the diurnal change of rainfall similarly to TRMM. The DPR consists of two radars, which are Ku-band (13.6 GHz) precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) precipitation radar (KaPR). Both KuPR and KaPR have almost the same design as TRMM PR. The DPR system design and performance were verified through the ground test. GPM core observatory was launched at 18:37:00 (UT) on February 27, 2014 successfully. DPR orbital check out was completed in May 2014. The results of orbital checkout show that DPR meets its specification on orbit. After completion of initial checkout, DPR started Normal

  14. An investigation on low frequency fatigue damage of mooring lines applied in a semi-submersible platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junfeng; Wang, Shuqing; Chang, Anteng; Li, Huajun

    2016-06-01

    Assessing the fatigue life of mooring systems is important for deep water structures. In this paper, a comprehensive fatigue analysis is conducted on the mooring lines applied in a semi-submersible platform with special focus on the low frequency (LF) fatigue damage. Several influential factors, including water depth, wave spectral parameters, and riser system, are considered. Numerical simulation of a semi-submersible platform with the mooring/riser system is executed under different conditions, and the fatigue damage of mooring lines is assessed by using the time domain analysis method as a benchmark. The effects of these factors on the mooring line tension and the fatigue damage are investigated and discussed in detail. Research results indicate that the LF fatigue damage only accounts for a very small portion of the total damage, although the LF components dominate the global motion response and the mooring line tension of the semi-submersible platform. However, it is demonstrated that the LF fatigue damage is clearly affected by the influential factors. The increase in water depth and spectral peak periods, and the existence of risers can weaken the contribution of the LF components to the mooring line fatigue damage, while the fatigue damage due to the LF components increases with the increase of significant wave height.

  15. Tailoring Sandwich Face/Core Interfaces for Improved Damage Tolerance—Part II: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2010-12-01

    A face/core debond in a sandwich structure may propagate in the interface or kink into either the face or core. It is found that certain modifications of the face/core interface region influence the kinking behavior, which is studied experimentally in the present paper. A sandwich double cantilever beam specimen loaded by uneven bending moments (DCB-UBM) allows for accurate measurements of the J integral as the crack propagates under large scale fibre bridging. By altering the mode-mixity of the loading, the crack path changes and deflects from the interface into the adjacent face or core. The transition points where the crack kinks are identified and the influence of four various interface design modifications on the propagation path and fracture resistance are investigated.

  16. Identification of Damaged Wheat Kernels and Cracked-Shell Hazelnuts with Impact Acoustics Time-Frequency Patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new adaptive time-frequency (t-f) analysis and classification procedure is applied to impact acoustic signals for detecting hazelnuts with cracked shells and three types of damaged wheat kernels. Kernels were dropped onto a steel plate, and the resulting impact acoustic signals were recorded with ...

  17. Frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm laser using hollow-core fiber CO2 frequency reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meras, Patrick; Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2010-04-01

    We have designed and built a hollow-core fiber frequency reference cell, filled it with CO2, and used it to demonstrate frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm Tm:Ho:YLF laser using frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy technique. The frequency reference cell is housed in a compact and robust hermetic package that contains a several meter long hollow-core photonic crystal fiber optically coupled to index-guiding fibers with a fusion splice on one end and a mechanical splice on the other end. The package has connectorized fiber pigtails and a valve used to evacuate, refill it, or adjust the gas pressure. We have demonstrated laser frequency standard deviation decreasing from >450MHz (free-running) to <2.4MHz (stabilized). The 2.05 μm laser wavelength is of particular interest for spectroscopic instruments due to the presence of many CO2 and H20 absorption lines in its vicinity. To our knowledge, this is the first reported demonstration of laser frequency stabilization at this wavelength using a hollow-core fiber reference cell. This approach enables all-fiber implementation of the optical portion of laser frequency stabilization system, thus making it dramatically more lightweight, compact, and robust than the traditional free-space version that utilizes glass or metal gas cells. It can also provide much longer interaction length of light with gas and does not require any alignment. The demonstrated frequency reference cell is particularly attractive for use in aircraft and space coherent lidar instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 profile.

  18. A ceramic damage model for analyses of multi-layered ceramic-core sandwich panels under blast wave pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keejoo

    2005-11-01

    A damage model for ceramic materials is developed and incorporated into the geometrically nonlinear solid shell element formulation for dynamic analyses of multi-layered ceramic armor panels under blast wave pressure loading. The damage model takes into account material behaviors observed from multi-axial dynamic tests on Aluminum Nitride (AlN) ceramic. The ceramic fails in a brittle or gradual fashion, depending upon the hydrostatic pressure and applied strain-rate. In the model, the gradual failure is represented by two states: the initial and final failure states. These states are described by two separate failure surfaces that are pressure-dependent and strain-rate-dependent. A scalar damage parameter is defined via using the two failure surfaces, based on the assumption that the local stress state determines material damage and its level. In addition, the damage model accounts for the effect of existing material damage on the new damage. The multi-layered armor panel of interest is comprised of an AlN-core sandwich with unidirectional composite skins and a woven composite back-plate. To accommodate the material damage effect of composite layers, a composite failure model in the open literature is adopted and modified into two separate failure models to address different failure mechanisms of the unidirectional and woven composites. In addition, the effect of strain-rates on the material strengths is incorporated into the composite failure models. For finite element modeling, multiple eighteen-node elements are used in the thickness direction to properly describe mechanics of the multi-layered panel. Dynamic analyses of a multi-layered armor panel are conducted under blast wave pressure loadings. The resulting dynamic responses of the panel demonstrate that dynamic analyses that do not take into account material damage and failure significantly under-predict the peak displacement. The under-prediction becomes more pronounced as the blast load level increases

  19. Accumulation of p21 proteins at DNA damage sites independent of p53 and core NHEJ factors following irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} p21 accumulated rapidly at laser-irradiated sites via its C-terminal region. {yields} p21 colocalized with the DSB marker {gamma}-H2AX and the DSB sensor Ku80. {yields} Accumulation of p21 is dependent on PCNA, but not p53 and the NHEJ core factors. {yields} Accumulation activity of p21 was conserved among human and animal cells. {yields} p21 is a useful tool as a detection marker of DNA damaged sites. -- Abstract: The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 plays key roles in p53-dependent DNA-damage responses, i.e., cell cycle checkpoints, senescence, or apoptosis. p21 might also play a role in DNA repair. p21 foci arise at heavy-ion-irradiated DNA-double-strand break (DSB) sites, which are mainly repaired by nonhomologous DNA-end-joining (NHEJ). However, no mechanisms of p21 accumulation at double-strand break (DSB) sites have been clarified in detail. Recent works indicate that Ku70 and Ku80 are essential for the accumulation of other NHEJ core factors, e.g., DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and XLF, and other DNA damage response factors, e.g., BRCA1. Here, we show that p21 foci arise at laser-irradiated sites in cells from various tissues from various species. The accumulation of EGFP-p21 was detected in not only normal cells, but also transformed or cancer cells. Our results also showed that EGFP-p21 accumulated rapidly at irradiated sites, and colocalized with the DSB marker {gamma}-H2AX and with the DSB sensor protein Ku80. On the other hand, the accumulation occurred in Ku70-, Ku80-, or DNA-PKcs-deficient cell lines and in human papillomavirus 18-positive cells, whereas the p21 mutant without the PCNA-binding region (EGFP-p21(1-146)) failed to accumulate at the irradiated sites. These findings suggest that the accumulation of p21, but not functional p53 and the NHEJ core factors, is dependent on PCNA. These findings also suggest that the accumulation activity of p21 at DNA damaged sites is conserved among human and animal cells, and p21 is a useful

  20. High frequency core localized modes in neutral beam heated plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    1995-11-01

    A band of high frequency modes in the range 50--150 kHz with intermediate toroidal mode numbers 4 < n < 10 are commonly observed in the core of supershot plasmas on TFTR. Two distinct varieties of MHD modes are identified corresponding to a flute-like mode predominantly appearing around the q = 1 surface and an outward ballooning mode for q > 1. The flute-like modes have nearly equal amplitude on the high field and low field side of the magnetic axis and are mostly observed in moderate performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub E} < 2{tau}{sub L} while the ballooning-like modes have enhanced amplitude on the low field side of the magnetic axis and tend to appear in higher performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub E} > 2{tau}{sub L}, where {tau}{sub L} is the equivalent L-mode confinement time. The modes propagate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction and are highly localized with radial widths {Delta}r {approximately} 5--10 cm, fluctuation levels {tilde n}/n, {tilde T}{sub e}/T{sub e} < 0.01, and radial displacements {zeta}{sub r} {approximately} 0.1 cm. Unlike the toroidally localized high-n activity observed just prior to major and minor disruptions on TFTR, these modes are typically much weaker, more benign, and may be indicative of kinetic ballooning modes destabilized by resonant circulating neutral beam ions.

  1. Ultrasonic method to evaluate the residual properties of thermally damaged sandstone based on time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Jin-yu; Liu, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the residual properties of thermally damaged rocks is of vital importance for rock engineering. For this study, uniaxial compression experiments and ultrasonic tests were conducted on sandstone specimens which experienced temperature treatments of different levels, including 25, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000°C. Time-frequency analysis methods were applied to evaluate the deformation and strength properties of sandstone after being exposed to high temperature, confirming the effectiveness of the ultrasonic evaluation method. Linear correlations between the peak stress, deformation modulus and the longitudinal wave velocity confirm the effectiveness of ultrasonic time-domain properties in estimating the deformation behaviour of the thermally damaged sandstone. Synchronisation in the change of the peak stress and the kurtosis of frequency spectrum as temperature rises, defined in this paper to describe the spectrum distribution, as well as the centroid frequency, demonstrates the feasibility of ultrasonic frequency-domain properties in estimating the residual strength of the thermally damaged sandstone. The results have certain guiding significance for rock engineering in a high-temperature environment.

  2. Continuous and Short Fiber Reinforced Composite in Root Post-Core System of Severely Damaged Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V.J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the static load-bearing capacity of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with post-core complex made of experimental fiber composite resin (FC) and complete crown made of particulate filler composite (PFC). Further aim was to evaluate the effect of FC resin on the failure mode of the restoration. Material and Methods: The experimental composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers (3 mm in length) and 22.5 wt% of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) resin with 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers. Thirty extracted sound upper central incisors were used. Twenty teeth were prepared by cutting the clinical crown 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction horizontally. Restorations were made by two techniques (n=10). Group A (control group) contained samples of sound incisor teeth. Group B had teeth restored using glass fiber post (everStick, Stick- Teck) and PFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) to build up core and complete crown. In Group C, the teeth were restored with FC as post-core and complete crown of PFC. The root canals were prepared and posts were cemented with a dual cure resin cement. The restorations were polymerized with a hand-light curing unit. All restored teeth were stored in water at room temperature for 24 h before they were statically loaded with speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p=0.05). Failure modes were visually examined. Results: ANOVA revealed that restored incisors (Group B and C) had a statistically significantly lower load-bearing capacity (p<0.05) than the control group. Restorations made from FC post-core and PFC coverage (Group C) gave force value of 363 N (112 SD), which was higher than the value of Group B (211 N, 50 SD). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the teeth restored with experimental fiber composite post-core demonstrated higher load bearing capacity than those with fiber post and PFC core

  3. Detection of Zero-Mean-Frequency Zonal Flows in the Core of a High-Temperature Tokamak Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. K.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Shafer, M. W.

    2006-09-22

    A low-frequency, spectrally broad ({delta}f{approx}10 kHz) poloidal flow structure that peaks near zero frequency is observed in time-resolved measurements of the turbulence velocity field in the core region (r/a{approx}0.6-0.9) of DIII-D tokamak plasmas. These flows exhibit a long poloidal wavelength (low m) and a short radial coherence length comparable to the ambient turbulence decorrelation length. Characteristics of these observed poloidal flows are consistent with the theoretically predicted residual or zero-mean-frequency zonal flows.

  4. Design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system to ensure limitation of core damage. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, N.A.; Atcheson, D.B.

    1981-09-01

    Safety-based functional requirements and design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) are derived in accordance with LOA-2 success criteria and reliability goals. The design basis transients have been defined and evaluated for the CDS Phase II design, which is a 2550 MWt mixed oxide heterogeneous core reactor. A partial set of reactor responses for selected transients is provided as a function of SASS characteristics such as reactivity worth, trip points, and insertion times.

  5. Effects of core position of locally resonant scatterers on low-frequency acoustic absorption in viscoelastic panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie; Wen, Ji-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Yin, Jian-Fei; Yang, Hai-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Locally resonant sonic materials, due to their ability to control the propagation of low-frequency elastic waves, have become a promising option for underwater sound absorption materials. In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the absorption characteristics of a viscoelastic panel periodically embedded with a type of infinite-long non-coaxially cylindrical locally resonant scatterers (LRSs). The effect of the core position in the coating layer of the LRS on the low-frequency (500 Hz-3000 Hz) sound absorption property is investigated. With increasing the longitudinal core eccentricity e, there occur few changes in the absorptance at the frequencies below 1500 Hz, however, the absorptance above 1500 Hz becomes gradually better and the valid absorption (with absorptance above 0.8) frequency band (VAFB) of the viscoelastic panel becomes accordingly broader. The absorption mechanism is revealed by using the displacement field maps of the viscoelastic panel and the steel slab. The results show two typical resonance modes. One is the overall resonance mode (ORM) caused by steel backing, and the other is the core resonance mode (CRM) caused by LRS. The absorptance of the viscoelastic panel by ORM is induced mainly by the vibration of the steel slab and affected little by core position. On the contrary, with increasing the core eccentricity, the CRM shifts toward high frequency band and decouples with the ORM, leading to two separate absorption peaks and the broadened VAFB of the panel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275519).

  6. Finite-frequency measurements of conventional and core-diffracted P-waves (P and Pdiff) for waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin; Staehler, Simon C.

    2014-05-01

    In its lowermost 200-300 km, the mantle has a complex structure resulting from accumulations of downwellings (subducted slabs), upwellings (LLSVPs and plumes), and probably phase transitions; seismic velocities and density show large variations but are not tightly constrained. Core-diffracted body waves are the seismic phases that sample the lowermost mantle extensively and are prime candidates to be used in tomography for enhancing resolution in this depth range. Since they are diffracted along the core-mantle boundary, their behavior is highly dispersive and cannot be modeled satisfactory using ray theory, nor early versions of finite-frequency modeling. Hence they have rarely been used for tomography so far, and where they have been, large imaging blur can be expected. We present a processing scheme to measure finite-frequency travel-time anomalies of arbitrary seismic body-wave phases in a fully automated way, with an initial focus on core-diffracted P waves. The aim is to extract a maximum of information from observed broadband seismograms using multi-frequency techniques. Using a matched-filtering approach, predicted and observed waveforms are compared in a cross-correlation sense in eight overlapping frequency passbands, with dominant periods ranging between 30 and 2.7sec. This method was applied to a global data set of ≡2000 teleseismic events in our waveform archive, which resulted in 1,616,184 P and 536,190 Pdiff usable multi-frequency measurements of high cross-correlation coefficient (≥ 0.8). The measurements are analyzed statistically in terms of goodness of fit, effects of epicentral distance, and frequency-dependent behavior of P and Pdiff phases. The results for Pdiff waves are displayed by projecting the measured travel time anomalies onto the phase's nominal grazing segments along the core-mantle boundary.

  7. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  8. Experimental validation of a signal-based approach for structural earthquake damage detection using fractal dimension of time frequency feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Dongwang; Mao, Chenxi; Zhang, Dongyu; Li, Hui

    2014-12-01

    This article extends a signal-based approach formerly proposed by the authors, which utilizes the fractal dimension of time frequency feature (FDTFF) of displacements, for earthquake damage detection of moment resist frame (MRF), and validates the approach with shaking table tests. The time frequency feature (TFF) of the relative displacement at measured story is defined as the real part of the coefficients of the analytical wavelet transform. The fractal dimension (FD) is to quantify the TFF within the fundamental frequency band using box counting method. It is verified that the FDTFFs at all stories of the linear MRF are identical with the help of static condensation method and modal superposition principle, while the FDTFFs at the stories with localized nonlinearities due to damage will be different from those at the stories without nonlinearities using the reverse-path methodology. By comparing the FDTFFs of displacements at measured stories in a structure, the damage-induced nonlinearity of the structure under strong ground motion can be detected and localized. Finally shaking table experiments on a 1:8 scale sixteen-story three-bay steel MRF with added frictional dampers, which generate local nonlinearities, are conducted to validate the approach.

  9. The Orbital Checkout Status of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Takeshi; Kojima, Masahiro; Furukawa, Kinji; Hyakusoku, Yasutoshi; Ishikiri, Takayuki; Kai, Hiroki; Iguchi, Toshio; Hanado, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro

    2014-05-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory is developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) with National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). GPM objective is to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately. GPM contributes to climate and water cycle change studies, flood prediction and numerical weather forecast. GPM consists of the GPM core observatory and constellation satellites carrying microwave radiometers (MWRs) and/or sounders (MWSs). The frequent measurement will be achieved by constellation satellites, and the accurate measurement will be achieved by the DPR with high sensitivity and dual frequency capability. The GPM core observatory is jointly developed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and JAXA. NASA is developing the satellite bus and GPM microwave radiometer (GMI), and JAXA is developing the DPR. The DPR consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) radar suitable for heavy rainfall in the tropical region, and Ka-band (35.55 GHz) radar suitable for light rainfall in higher latitude region. Drop size distribution information will be derived which contributes to the improvement of rainfall estimate accuracy. DPR will also play a key role to improve rainfall estimation accuracy of constellation satellites. DPR proto-flight test at JAXA Tsukuba space center has been completed in February 2012. The DPR has handed over to NASA and integrated to the core observatory in May 2012. The system test of the core observatory has completed in November 2013 and DPR test results satisfied its system requirements. The core observatory was shipped to launch site of JAXA Tanegashima space center in Japan. Launch site activities have started on November 2013 and GPM core observatory will be launched in early 2014. DPR orbital check out will be started in March 2014 and it will be completed in April 2014. In this presentation, the orbital check out

  10. Increase in the frequency of hepadnavirus DNA integrations by oxidative DNA damage and inhibition of DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J; Dandri, M; Bürkle, A; Zhang, L; Rogler, C E

    1997-01-01

    Persistent hepadnavirus infection leads to oxidative stress and DNA damage through increased production of toxic oxygen radicals. In addition, hepadnaviral DNA integrations into chromosomal DNA can promote the process of hepatocarcinogenesis (M. Feitelson, Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 5:275-301, 1992). While previous studies have identified preferred integration sites in hepadnaviral genomes and suggested integration mechanisms (M. A. Buendia, Adv. Cancer Res. 59:167-226, 1992; C. E. Rogler, Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 168:103-141, 1991; C. Shih et al., J. Virol. 61:3491-3498, 1987), very little is known about the effects of agents which damage chromosomal DNA on the frequency of hepadnaviral DNA integrations. Using a recently developed subcloning approach to detect stable new integrations of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) (S. S. Gong, A. D. Jensen, and C. E. Rogler, J. Virol. 70:2000-2007, 1996), we tested the effects of increased chromosomal DNA damage induced by H2O2, or of the disturbance in DNA repair due to the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), on the frequency of DHBV DNA integrations. Subclones of LMH-D21-6 cells, which replicate DHBV, were grown in the presence of various H2O2 concentrations and exhibited up to a threefold increase in viral DNA integration frequency in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, inhibition of PARP, which plays a role in cellular responses to DNA breakage, by 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) resulted in a sevenfold increase in the total number of new DHBV DNA integrations into host chromosomal DNA. Removal of either H2O2 or 3-AB from the culture medium in a subsequent cycle of subcloning was accompanied by a reversion back towards the original lower frequency of stable DHBV DNA integrations for LMH-D21-6 cells. These data support the hypothesis that DNA damage sites can serve as sites for hepadnaviral DNA integration, and that increasing the number of DNA damage sites dramatically increases viral integration frequency. PMID

  11. Damage-free single-mode transmission of deep-UV light in hollow-core PCF.

    PubMed

    Gebert, F; Frosz, M H; Weiss, T; Wan, Y; Ermolov, A; Joly, N Y; Schmidt, P O; Russell, P St J

    2014-06-30

    Transmission of UV light with high beam quality and pointing stability is desirable for many experiments in atomic, molecular and optical physics. In particular, laser cooling and coherent manipulation of trapped ions with transitions in the UV require stable, single-mode light delivery. Transmitting even ~2 mW CW light at 280 nm through silica solid-core fibers has previously been found to cause transmission degradation after just a few hours due to optical damage. We show that photonic crystal fiber of the kagomé type can be used for effectively single-mode transmission with acceptable loss and bending sensitivity. No transmission degradation was observed even after >100 hours of operation with 15 mW CW input power. In addition it is shown that implementation of the fiber in a trapped ion experiment increases the coherence time of the internal state transfer due to an increase in beam pointing stability. PMID:24977799

  12. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at ORNL. Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between dmaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur beause of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A parametric study was done for several uncertain variables. The study included investigating effects of plate contact area, convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity on fuel swelling, and initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects of damage propagation. Results provide useful insights into how variouss uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  13. High-frequency core localized modes in neutral beam heated plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Mazzucato, E.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, R.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Cheng, C.Z.; Janos, A.; Levinton, F.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Rewoldt, G.; Sabbagh, S.; Synakowski, E.J.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Zakharov, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    A band of high-frequency modes in the range 50{endash}150 kHz with intermediate toroidal mode numbers 4{lt}{ital n}{lt}10 are commonly observed in the core of supershot plasmas on TFTR [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 33}, 1509 (1991)]. Two distinct varieties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes are identified, corresponding to a flute-like mode predominantly appearing around the {ital q}=1 surface and an outward ballooning mode for {ital q}{approx_gt}1. The flute-like modes have nearly equal amplitude on the high-field and low-field side of the magnetic axis, and are mostly observed in moderate performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub {ital E}}{lt}2{tau}{sub L}, while the ballooning-like modes have enhanced amplitude on the low-field side of the magnetic axis and tend to appear in higher performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub {ital E}}{approx_gt}2{tau}{sub L}, where {tau}{sub L} is the equivalent L-mode confinement time. Both modes appear to propagate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction and are highly localized with radial widths {Delta}{ital r}{approximately}5{endash}10 cm, fluctuation levels {tilde {ital n}}/{ital n}, {tilde {ital T}}{sub {ital e}}/{ital T}{sub {ital e}}{lt}0.01, and radial displacements {xi}{sub {ital r}}{approximately}0.1 cm. Unlike the toroidally localized high-{ital n} activity observed just prior to major and minor disruptions on TFTR [E. D. Fredrickson {ital et} {ital al}., {ital Proceedings} {ital of} {ital the} 15{ital th} {ital International} {ital Conference} {ital on} {ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research}, Seville, Spain (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995), No. IAEA-CN-60/A-2-II-5], these modes are typically more benign and may be indicative of MHD activity excited by resonant circulating beam ions. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Renal Damage Frequency in Patients with Solitary Kidney and Factors That Affect Progression

    PubMed Central

    Basturk, T.; Koc, Y.; Ucar, Z.; Sakaci, T.; Ahbap, E.; Kara, E.; Bayraktar, F.; Sevinc, M.; Sahutoglu, T.; Kayalar, A.; Sinangil, A.; Akgol, C.; Unsal, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to assess renal damage incidence in patients with solitary kidney and to detect factors associated with progression. Methods. Medical records of 75 patients with solitary kidney were investigated retrospectively and divided into two groups: unilateral nephrectomy (group 1) and unilateral renal agenesis/dysplasia (group 2). According to the presence of kidney damage, each group was divided into two subgroups: group 1a/b and group 2a/b. Results. Patients in group 1 were older than those in group 2 (p = 0.001). 34 patients who comprise group 1a had smaller kidney size (p = 0.002) and higher uric acid levels (p = 0.028) than those in group 1b at presentation. Uric acid levels at first and last visit were associated with renal damage progression (p = 0.004, 0.019). 18 patients who comprise group 2a were compared with those in group 2b in terms of presence of DM (p = 0.038), HT (p = 0.003), baseline proteinuria (p = 0.014), and uric acid (p = 0.032) levels and group 2a showed higher rates for each. Progression was more common in patients with DM (p = 0.039), HT (p = 0.003), higher initial and final visit proteinuria (p = 0.014, for both), and higher baseline uric acid levels (p = 0.047). Conclusions. The majority of patients with solitary kidney showed renal damage at presentation. Increased uric acid level is a risk factor for renal damage and progression. For early diagnosis of renal damage and reducing the risk of progression, patients should be referred to a nephrologist as early as possible. PMID:26783458

  15. Generation of a phase-locked Raman frequency comb in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Abdolvand, A; Walser, A M; Ziemienczuk, M; Nguyen, T; Russell, P St J

    2012-11-01

    In a relatively simple setup consisting of a microchip laser as pump source and two hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers, a broad, phase-locked, purely rotational frequency comb is generated. This is achieved by producing a clean first Stokes seed pulse in a narrowband guiding photonic bandgap fiber via stimulated Raman scattering and then driving the same Raman transition resonantly with a pump and Stokes fields in a second broadband guiding kagomé-style fiber. Using a spectral interferometric technique based on sum frequency generation, we show that the comb components are phase locked. PMID:23114296

  16. Tornado risk analysis at Savannah River Plant using windspeed damage thresholds and single building strike frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.H.; McDonald, J.R.; Twisdale, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to evaluate the safety of existing structures and properly design new structures, an analysis of tornado resistance was conducted on each process building at SRP and other buildings by type. Damage estimates were cataloged for each Fujita class windspeed interval and windspeeds were cataloged as a function of increased levels of damage. The probability, for any structure, of a tornado exceeding each windspeed threshold was calculated using the TORRISK computer code which was developed for calculating the probability of a tornado strike on nuclear power generating plants.

  17. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields can impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Bruno Mendes; Ferreira Filho, Moisés Bonifacio Alves; Jimenez, George Chaves; de Morais, Rosana Nogueira; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nogueira, Romildo de Albuquerque; da Silva Junior, Valdemiro Amaro

    2014-06-01

    Male infertility is often related to reproductive age couples experiencing fertility-related issues. Men may have fertility problems associated with reversible testicular damage. Considering that men have been increasingly exposed to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields generated by the production, distribution and use of electricity, this study analyzed whether 60 Hz and 1 mT magnetic field exposure may impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat shock using rats as an experimental model. Adult male rats were subjected to a single testicular heat shock (HS, 43 °C for 12 min) and then exposed to the magnetic field for 15, 30 and 60 d after HS. Magnetic field exposure during the spermatogenesis recovery induced changes in testis components volume, cell ultrastructure and histomorphometrical parameters. Control animals had a reestablished and active spermatogenesis at 60 d after heat shock, while animals exposed to magnetic field still showed extensive testicular degeneration. Magnetic field exposure did not change the plasma testosterone. In conclusion, extremely low-frequency magnetic field may be harmful to fertility recovery in males affected by reversible testicular damage. PMID:23781997

  18. Development of a multi-frequency diffuse photon density wave device for the characterization of tissue damage at multiple depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David; Weingarten, Michael S.; Neidrauer, Michael T.; Samuels, Joshua A.; Huneke, Richard B.; Kuzmin, Vladimir L.; Lewin, Peter A.; Zubkov, Leonid A.

    2014-02-01

    The ability to determine the depth and degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is critical for medical applications such as burns and pressure ulcers. The Diffuse Photon Density Wave (DPDW) methodology at near infrared wavelengths can be used to non-invasively measure the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of tissue at depths of several millimeters. A multi-frequency DPDW system with one light source and one detector was constructed so that light is focused onto the tissue surface using an optical fiber and lens mounted to a digitally-controlled actuator which changes the distance between light source and detector. A variable RF generator enables the modulation frequency to be selected between 50 to 400MHz. The ability to digitally control both source-detector separation distance and modulation frequency allows for virtually unlimited number of data points, enabling precise selection of the volume and depth of tissue that will be characterized. Suspensions of Intralipid and india ink with known absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were used as optical phantoms to assess device accuracy. Solid silicon phantoms were formulated for stability testing. Standard deviations for amplitude and phase shift readings were found to be 0.9% and 0.2 degrees respectively, over a one hour period. The ability of the system to quantify tissue damage in vivo at multiple depths was tested in a porcine burn model.

  19. Tunable frequency-up/down conversion in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-09-15

    Based on the interplay between photoionization and Raman effects in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers, we propose a new optical device to control frequency conversion of ultrashort pulses. By tuning the input-pulse energy, the output spectrum can be either down-converted, up-converted, or even frequency-shift compensated. For low input energies, the Raman effect is dominant and leads to a redshift that increases linearly during propagation. For larger pulse energies, photoionization starts to take over the frequency-conversion process and induces a strong blueshift. The fiber-output pressure can be used as an additional degree of freedom to control the spectrum shift. PMID:26371900

  20. Linear and non-linear frequency domain techniques for processing impact echo signals to evaluate distributed damage in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorris, Nicolas

    The condition evaluation of in-situ concrete with non-destructive testing is difficult at best. The concrete deterioration processes of alkali-silica reaction (ASR), delayed ettringite formation (DEF) and freeze-thaw cycles all produce distributed damage in the form of micro-cracking which results in loss of strength or stiffness. Presently, a suitable field applicable method for determining the degree of microcracking does not exist. The impact echo test is potentially the best candidate if improvements can be made in the signal processing techniques which are crucial for accurately interpreting the data retrieved from concrete with distributed damage. In this research, two batches of concrete specimens were prepared in accordance with standard procedures. A portion of each batch was subjected to either the Modified Duggan cycle or to Freeze Thaw cycles, both proven methods of inducing DEF and micro-cracking respectively. Curing techniques and materials were also chosen to accelerate distributed damage in the concrete specimens. In addition to the impact echo, a number of secondary tests were employed to monitor the progress of distributed damage in the concrete specimens. Previous research efforts utilizing the impact echo method have attempted to characterize damage in terms of P-wave attenuation or pulse velocity. This involves signal processing in the time domain. These are inherently linear dynamics methods whereas the development of micro-cracks in concrete, an inhomogeneous material, gives rise to non-linear dynamics. Non-linear approaches to signal processing in the frequency domain are proposed herein. One involves calculating the deviation of the peak of the response spectrum from the shape of an ideal Lorentzian function model. The other calculates the second order non-linear harmonic coefficient. The results showed that the potassium content, the curing methods and the Duggan and Freeze Thaw cycles had the desired effect of inducing distributed damage

  1. Laser-induced breakdown and damage generation by nonlinear frequency conversion in ferroelectric crystals: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Hatano, Hideki; Kitamura, Kenji

    2013-11-28

    Using our experimental data for ns pulsed second harmonic generation (SHG) by periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO{sub 3} (PPSLT) crystals, we consider in detail the mechanism underlying laser-induced damage in ferroelectric crystals. This mechanism involves generation and heating of free electrons, providing an effective kinetic pathway for electric breakdown and crystal damage in ns pulsed operation via combined two-photon absorption (TPA) and induced pyroelectric field. In particular, a temperature increase in the lattice of ≈1 K induced initially by ns SHG and TPA at the rear of operating PPSLT crystal is found to induce a gradient of spontaneous polarization generating a pyroelectric field of ≈10 kV/cm, accelerating free electrons generated by TPA to an energy of ≈10 eV, followed by impact ionization and crystal damage. Under the damage threshold for ns operation, the impact ionization does not lead to the avalanche-like increase of free electron density, in contrast to the case of shorter ps and fs pulses. However, the total number of collisions by free electrons, ≈10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} (generated during the pulse and accelerated to the energy of ≈10 eV), can produce widespread structural defects, which by entrapping electrons dramatically increase linear absorption for both harmonics in subsequent pulses, creating a positive feedback for crystal lattice heating, pyroelectric field and crystal damage. Under pulse repetition, defect generation starting from the rear of the crystal can propagate towards its center and front side producing damage tracks along the laser beam and stopping SHG. Theoretical analysis leads to numerical estimates and analytical approximation for the threshold laser fluence for onset of this damage mechanism, which agree well with our (i) experiments for the input 1064 nm radiation in 6.8 kHz pulsed SHG by PPSLT crystal, (ii) pulsed low frequency 532 nm radiation transmission experiments, and also (iii) with the data

  2. A damage assessment model of slender bridge members based on 1D linear member theory with frequency dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chih-Peng; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Lai, Jiunnren; Chiang, Chih-Hung

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a linear model with frequency dependent structural property was used to generate the corresponding frequency response function and dynamic stiffness for selected dynamic problems where certain nonlinearity can be resulted from time/space varying characteristics of the bridge vibrations. Derivation of the proposed formula is based on the vibration theory of the elementary member with frequency dependent elastic properties, in which Modulus of Elasticity can be interpreted as serial and parallel connections of springs and dashpots. This paper first describes the use of the proposed formulation to reasonably depict the nonlinear cable vibration associated with the varying tension forces over time. The proposed formulation can also be used to simulate flexural vibration of damage beams in which the elastic property involves certain space varying or time varying characteristics. Simple numerical/experimental data were next used to demonstrate and confirm the potential application of such simulation idea. Consequently, it is concluded that such assessment model with frequency dependent parameters can be practically feasible and serve as a useful tool in the spectral analysis regarding dynamic problems of slender bridge members.

  3. A three-phase three-winding core-type transformer model for low-frequency transient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Venkata, S.S.

    1997-04-01

    A topology-based and duality-derived three-phase, three-winding, core-type transformer model is presented. The model treats the leakage inductances and the coupling effects of the core in a straightforward and integrated way. The long-established positive- and zero-sequence star equivalent circuits of a three-phase three-winding transformer are derived from the original equivalent magnetic circuit of the transformer by applying duality. Formulations for determining the values of the leakage inductances and the core loss resistances from transformer open- and short-circuit test data are presented. A supporting routine is written to generate the {lambda}-i curves for each segment of the core and the other input data for EMTP. Since the duality-derived model consists of only RLC elements, no device-specific code to EMTP time-step code is needed. Winding capacitances are lumped to the terminals. The model is suitable for simulation of power system low-frequency transients such as inrush currents and ferroresonance, short circuits, and abnormalities including transformer winding faults.

  4. Radio frequency radiation causes no nonthermal damage in enzymes and living cells.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Jennifer A; Wu, Bae-Ian; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2010-01-01

    The ability of radio frequency radiation (RFR) to exert irreversible nonthermal (i.e., not caused by accompanying heat) effects on biologics has been widely debated due to a relative paucity of comprehensive critical details in published reports dealing with this issue. In this study, we used rigorous control over experimental conditions to determine whether continuous RFR nonthermally affects commercially important enzymes and live bacterial and human cells using three most commonly used frequencies in current RF identification technology, namely 2.45 GHz, 915 MHz, and 13.56 MHz. Diverse biological samples were exposed to RFR under deliberately harsh conditions to increase the likelihood of observing such effects should they exist. Enzymatic activities of horseradish peroxidase and β-galactosidase in aqueous solution exhibited no statistically discernable consequences of even very intense RFR. Likewise, with putative thermal effects excluded, the viabilities of bacteria (both gram-positive and gram-negative) and of human cells were not detectably compromised by such an RFR exposure. PMID:20572294

  5. Radio-Frequency Driven Dielectric Heaters for Non-Nuclear Testing in Nuclear Core Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor); Godfroy, Thomas J. (Inventor); Bitteker, Leo (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are provided through which a radio-frequency dielectric heater has a cylindrical form factor, a variable thermal energy deposition through variations in geometry and composition of a dielectric, and/or has a thermally isolated power input.

  6. Orbital checkout result of the dual-frequency precipitation radar on the global precipitation measurement core spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Kojima, M.; Miura, T.; Hyakusoku, Y.; Kai, H.; Ishikiri, T.; Iguchi, T.; Hanado, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Okumura, M.

    2014-10-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The GPM is a follow-on mission of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The objectives of the GPM mission are to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately than TRMM. The frequent precipitation measurement about every three hours will be achieved by some constellation satellites with microwave radiometers (MWRs) or microwave sounders (MWSs), which will be developed by various countries. The accurate measurement of precipitation in mid-high latitudes will be achieved by the DPR. The GPM core satellite is a joint product of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), JAXA and NICT. NASA developed the satellite bus and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and JAXA and NICT developed the DPR. JAXA and NICT developed the DPR through procurement. The contract for DPR was awarded to NEC TOSHIBA Space Systems, Ltd. The configuration of precipitation measurement using active radar and a passive radiometer is similar to TRMM. The major difference is that DPR is used in GPM instead of the precipitation radar (PR) in TRMM. The inclination of the core satellite is 65 degrees, and the flight altitude is about 407 km. The non-sun-synchronous circular orbit is necessary for measuring the diurnal change of rainfall similarly to TRMM. The DPR consists of two radars, which are Ku-band (13.6 GHz) precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) precipitation radar (KaPR). Both KuPR and KaPR have almost the same design as TRMM PR. The DPR system design and performance were verified through the development test and the proto flight test. DPR had handed over to NASA and integration of the DPR to the GPM core spacecraft had completed in May 2012. GPM core spacecraft satellite system test had completed in November 2013

  7. Potential damage to DC superconducting magnets due to the high frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data are presented in support of the hypothesis that a dc superconducting magnet coil does not behave strictly as an inductor, but as a complicated electrodynamic device capable of supporting electromagnetic waves. Travel times of nanosecond pulses and evidence of sinusoidal standing waves were observed on a prototype four-layer solenoidal coil at room temperature. Ringing observed during switching transients appears as a sequence of multiple reflected square pulses whose durations are related to the layer lengths. With sinusoidal excitation of the coil, the voltage amplitude between a pair of points on the coil exhibits maxima at those frequencies such that the distance between these points is an odd multiple of half wavelength in free space. Evidence indicates that any disturbance, such as that resulting from switching or sudden fault, initiates multiple reflections between layers, thus raising the possibility for sufficiently high voltages to cause breakdown.

  8. Quantitative Characterisation of Fracturing Around the Damage Zone Surrounding New Zealand's Alpine Fault Using X-ray CT Scans of DFDP-1 Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. N.; Toy, V.; Massiot, C.; Mcnamara, D. D.; Wang, T.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray computer tomography (CT) scans of core recovered from the first phase of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) through the Alpine Fault provide an excellent opportunity to analyse brittle deformation around the fault. In particular, assessment can be made of the heavily fractured protolith constituting the damage zone. Damage zone structures are divided into two types that result from two distinct processes: (1) "off fault damage" formed by stress changes induced by the passage of a seismic rupture and (2) "off fault deformation" that represent structures, which accommodate strain around the fault that was not localised on the principal slip zone (PSZ). The distribution of these damage zones structures within CT scans of the recovered core was measured along a scanline parallel to the core axis and assessed using a weighted moving average technique to account for orientation bias. The results of this analysis reveal that within the part of the fault rocks sampled by DFDP-1 there is no increase in density of these structures towards the PSZ. This is in agreement with independent analysis using Borehole Televiewer Data of the DFDP-1B borehole. Instead, we consider the density of these structures to be controlled to the first order by lithology, which modulates the mechanical properties of the fault rocks such as its frictional strength and cohesion. Comparisons of fracture density to p-wave velocities obtained from wireline logs indicate they are independent of each other, therefore, for the cores sampled in this study fractures impart no influence on the elastic properties of the rock. This is consistent with the observation from core that the majority of fractures are cemented. We consider how this might influence future rupture dynamics.

  9. Portable optical frequency standard based on sealed gas-filled hollow-core fiber using a novel encapsulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triches, Marco; Brusch, Anders; Hald, Jan

    2015-12-01

    A portable stand-alone optical frequency standard based on a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is developed to stabilize a fiber laser to the ^{13}{C}_2{H}_2 P(16) (ν _1 + ν _3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. A novel encapsulation technique is developed to permanently seal the hollow-core fiber with easy light coupling, showing negligible pressure increase over two months. The locked laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 8 × 10^{-12} for an averaging time up to 104 s. The lock-point repeatability over one month is 2.6 × 10^{-11}, corresponding to a standard deviation of 5.3 kHz. The system is also assembled in a more compact and easy-to-use configuration ( Plug&Play), showing comparable performance with previously published work. The real portability of this technology is proved by shipping the system to a collaborating laboratory, showing unchanged performance after the return.

  10. Facile Hydrothermal Synthesis of Fe3O4/C Core-Shell Nanorings for Efficient Low-Frequency Microwave Absorption.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Liu, Yun; Zeng, Xiang; Cui, Tingting; Zhao, Yanting; Li, Yana; Tong, Guoxiu

    2016-03-23

    Using elliptical iron glycolate nanosheets as precursors, elliptical Fe3O4/C core-shell nanorings (NRs) [25 ± 10 nm in wall thickness, 150 ± 40 nm in length, and 1.6 ± 0.3 in long/short axis ratio] are synthesized via a one-pot hydrothermal route. The surface-poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-protected-glucose reduction/carbonization/Ostwald ripening mechanism is responsible for Fe3O4/C NR formation. Increasing the glucose/precursor molar ratio can enhance carbon contents, causing a linear decrease in saturation magnetization (Ms) and coercivity (Hc). The Fe3O4/C NRs reveal enhanced low-frequency microwave absorption because of improvements to their permittivity and impedance matching. A maximum RL value of -55.68 dB at 3.44 GHz is achieved by Fe3O4/C NRs with 11.95 wt % C content at a volume fraction of 17 vol %. Reflection loss (RL) values (≤-20 dB) are observed at 2.11-10.99 and 16.5-17.26 GHz. Our research provides insights into the microwave absorption mechanism of elliptical Fe3O4/C core-shell NRs. Findings indicate that ring-like and core-shell nanostructures are promising structures for devising new and effective microwave absorbers. PMID:26915716

  11. Age-dependent changes in spontaneous frequency of micronucleated erythrocytes in bone marrow and DNA damage in peripheral blood of Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Bhilwade, Hari N; Jayakumar, S; Chaubey, R C

    2014-08-01

    Age-dependent changes in chromosomal damage in bone marrow - a self-proliferating tissue - in the form of spontaneously occurring micronucleated erythrocytes, and DNA damage in peripheral blood were examined in male and female Swiss mice. In the erythrocyte population in the bone marrow, polychromatic (immature) erythrocytes showed a significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei as a function of age of the mice (1-20 months). The increase in micronucleus frequency was less in normochromatic (mature) erythrocytes. The female mice showed a higher frequency of micronuclei than the male mice in all the age groups examined. However, the female to male ratio of micronucleus frequencies in total erythrocytes as well as in polychromatic erythrocytes decreased with age. DNA damage, measured as tail moment in the single-cell gel electrophoresis in peripheral blood of different age groups of mice (1, 6, 12 and 18 months) showed a gradual increase with age. Female mice showed more DNA damage than 1-month and 18-month-old male mice. In conclusion, these results show that there is an accumulation of genetic damage in bone marrow and DNA damage in peripheral blood of mice during ageing, and that females show more alterations than males. PMID:25344168

  12. An Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging Core Based on Frequency Shift Keying Towards Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Laurent; Van Bavegem, David; De Winne, Sam; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach and implementation methodology for indoor ranging based on the time difference of arrival using code division multiple access with ultrasound signals. A novel implementation based on a field programmable gate array using finite impulse response filters and an optimized correlation demodulator implementation for ultrasound orthogonal signals is developed. Orthogonal codes are modulated onto ultrasound signals using frequency shift keying with carrier frequencies of 24.5 kHz and 26 kHz. This implementation enhances the possibilities for real-time, embedded and low-power tracking of several simultaneous transmitters. Due to the high degree of parallelism offered by field programmable gate arrays, up to four transmitters can be tracked simultaneously. The implementation requires at most 30% of the available logic gates of a Spartan-6 XC6SLX45 device and is evaluated on accuracy and precision through several ranging topologies. In the first topology, the distance between one transmitter and one receiver is evaluated. Afterwards, ranging analyses are applied between two simultaneous transmitters and one receiver. Ultimately, the position of the receiver against four transmitters using trilateration is also demonstrated. Results show enhanced distance measurements with distances ranging from a few centimeters up to 17 m, while keeping a centimeter-level accuracy. PMID:26263986

  13. An Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging Core Based on Frequency Shift Keying Towards Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Segers, Laurent; Van Bavegem, David; De Winne, Sam; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach and implementation methodology for indoor ranging based on the time difference of arrival using code division multiple access with ultrasound signals. A novel implementation based on a field programmable gate array using finite impulse response filters and an optimized correlation demodulator implementation for ultrasound orthogonal signals is developed. Orthogonal codes are modulated onto ultrasound signals using frequency shift keying with carrier frequencies of 24.5 kHz and 26 kHz. This implementation enhances the possibilities for real-time, embedded and low-power tracking of several simultaneous transmitters. Due to the high degree of parallelism offered by field programmable gate arrays, up to four transmitters can be tracked simultaneously. The implementation requires at most 30% of the available logic gates of a Spartan-6 XC6SLX45 device and is evaluated on accuracy and precision through several ranging topologies. In the first topology, the distance between one transmitter and one receiver is evaluated. Afterwards, ranging analyses are applied between two simultaneous transmitters and one receiver. Ultimately, the position of the receiver against four transmitters using trilateration is also demonstrated. Results show enhanced distance measurements with distances ranging from a few centimeters up to 17 m, while keeping a centimeter-level accuracy. PMID:26263986

  14. High frequency study of core-shell reusable CoFe2O4-ZnO nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuanr, Bijoy K.; Veerakumar, V.; Mishra, S. R.; Wilson, Armstrong M.; Kuanr, Alka V.; Camley, R. E.; Celinski, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, coated nanoshells combined with magnetic nanoparticles and cancer-cell-specific antibodies have been used to develop a multifunctional platform for simultaneously diagnosing and treating cancer, via magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy. For this application, core-shell nano-spheres with a low resonance frequency (low GHz range) in a strong applied field are required. In this aspect, ferromagnetic resonance experiment is an important tool for determining the dynamic properties of nano-materials. Magnetic field dependence of resonance frequency (fr) and linewidths (Δƒ and ΔH) for both the ZnO coated and uncoated CoFe2O4 hollow spheres are studied using a vector network analyzer. As compared to uncoated CoFe2O4 hollow sphere, ZnO coated CoFe2O4 showed reduced resonance frequency, larger Δƒ and ΔH, reduced gyromagnetic ratio and effective fields. The experimental results are confirmed with the effective medium theory.

  15. Interpretation Of Multifrequency Crosswell Electromagnetic Data With Frequency Dependent Core Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkendall, B; Roberts, J

    2005-06-07

    Interpretation of cross-borehole electromagnetic (EM) images acquired at enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites has proven to be difficult due to the typically complex subsurface geology. Significant problems in image interpretation include correlation of specific electrical conductivity values with oil saturations, the time-dependent electrical variation of the subsurface during EOR, and the non-unique electrical conductivity relationship with subsurface conditions. In this study we perform laboratory electrical properties measurements of core samples from the EOR site to develop an interpretation approach that combines field images and petrophysical results. Cross-borehole EM images from the field indicate resistivity increases in EOR areas--behavior contrary to the intended waterflooding design. Laboratory measurements clearly show a decrease in resistivity with increasing effective pressure and are attributed to increased grain-to-grain contact enhancing a strong surface conductance. We also observe a resistivity increase for some samples during brine injection. These observations possibly explain the contrary behavior observed in the field images. Possible mechanisms for increasing the resistivity in the region include (1) increased oil content as injectate sweeps oil toward the plane of the observation wells; (2) lower conductance pore fluid displacing the high-conductivity brine; (3) degradation of grain-to-grain contacts of the initially conductive matrix; and (4) artifacts of the complicated resistivity/time history similar to that observed in the laboratory experiments.

  16. Fault core and damage zone fracture attributes vary along strike owing to interaction of fracture growth, quartz accumulation, and differing sandstone composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, S. E.; Eichhubl, P.; Hargrove, P.; Ellis, M. A.; Hooker, J. N.

    2014-11-01

    Small, meter-to decimeter-displacement oblique-slip faults cut latest Precambrian lithic arkose to feldspathic litharenite and Cambrian quartz arenite sandstones in NW Scotland. Despite common slip and thermal histories during faulting, the two sandstone units have different fault-core and damage-zone attributes, including fracture length and aperture distributions, and location of quartz deposits. Fault cores are narrow (less than 1 m), low-porosity cataclasite in lithic arkose/feldspathic litharenites. Damage zone-parallel opening-mode fractures are long (meters or more) with narrow ranges of lengths and apertures, are mostly isolated, have sparse quartz cement, and are open. In contrast, quartz arenites, despite abundant quartz cement, have fault cores that contain porous breccia and dense, striated slip zones. Damage-zone fractures have lengths ranging from meters to centimeters or less, but with distributions skewed to short fractures, and have power-law aperture distributions. Owing to extensive quartz cement, they tend to be sealed. These attributes reflect inhibited authigenic quartz accumulation on feldspar and lithic grains, which are unfavorable precipitation substrates, and favored accumulation on detrital quartz. In quartz breccia, macropores >0.04 mm wide persist where surrounded by slow-growing euhedral quartz. Differences in quartz occurrence and size distributions are compatible with the hypothesis that cement deposits modify the probability of fracture reactivation. Existing fractures readily reactivate in focused growth where quartz accumulation is low and porosity high. Only some existing, partly cemented fractures reactivate and some deformation is manifest in new fracture formation in partitioned growth where quartz accumulation is high. Consequences include along-strike differences in permeability and locus of fluid flow between cores and damage zones and fault strength.

  17. Finite-Frequency Simulations of Core-Reflected Seismic Waves to Assess Models of General Lower Mantle Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, A.; Walker, A. M.; Wookey, J.; Kendall, J.

    2012-12-01

    The core-mantle boundary (CMB) region is the site of the largest change in properties in the Earth. Moreover, the lowermost mantle above it (known as D″) shows the largest lateral variations in seismic velocity and strength of seismic anisotropy below the upper mantle. It is therefore vital to be able to accurately forward model candidate structures in the lowermost mantle with realistic sensitivity to structure and at the same frequencies at which observations are made. We use the spectral finite-element method to produce synthetic seismograms of ScS waves traversing a model of D″ anisotropy derived from mineralogical texture calculations and show that the seismic discontinuity atop the lowermost mantle varies in character laterally purely as a function of the strength and orientation of anisotropy. The lowermost mantle is widely anisotropic, shown by numerous shear wave splitting studies using waves of dominant frequency ~0.2-1 Hz. Whilst methods exist to model the finite-frequency seismic response of the lowermost mantle, most make the problem computationally efficient by imposing a certain symmetry to the problem, and of those which do not, almost none allow for completely general elasticity. Where low frequencies are simulated to reduce computational cost, it is uncertain whether waves of that frequency have comparable sensitivity to D″ structure as those observed at shorter periods. Currently, therefore, these computational limitations precludes the ability to interpret our observations fully. We present recent developments in taking a general approach to forward-modelling waves in D″. We use a modified version of SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, which uses the spectral finite-element method to model seismic wave propagation in a fully generally-elastic (i.e., 3D-varying, arbitrarily anisotropic) Earth. The calculations are computationally challenging: to approach the frequency of the observations, up to 10,000 processor cores and up to 2 TB of memory are needed. The

  18. Core-pumped single-frequency fiber amplifier with an output power of 158  W.

    PubMed

    Theeg, Thomas; Ottenhues, Christoph; Sayinc, Hakan; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Single-frequency laser sources at a wavelength of 1 μm are typically scaled in power with Ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber amplifiers. The main limitations are stimulated Brillouin scattering, transversal mode instabilities and, from a technical point of view, the degree of fiber integration for a rugged setup. Addressing these limitations, we propose an alternative high-power single-frequency amplifier concept based on core pumping. A nonplanar ring oscillator with 2 W of output power at 1 kHz spectral linewidth was scaled by a fiber amplifier up to a power of 158 W without any indication of stimulated Brillouin scattering-using a standard Ytterbium-doped single-mode fiber with a mode field area of only ∼100  μm2. A short active fiber length and a strong temperature gradient along the gain fiber yield to efficient suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering. For deeper understanding of the Brillouin scattering mitigation mechanism, we studied the Brillouin gain spectra with a Fabry-Perot interferometer at different output power levels of the fiber amplifier. PMID:26696145

  19. Pump-beam-induced optical damage depended on repetition frequency and pulse width in 4-dimethylamino-N Prime -methyl-4 Prime -stilbazolium tosylate crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Takeshi; Nawata, Kouji; Notake, Takashi; Qi Feng; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2013-07-08

    We investigated the dependence of optical damage to an organic nonlinear optical crystal of 4-dimethylamino-N Prime -methyl-4 Prime -stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) on the repetition frequency and pulse width of the pump beam used to cause the thermal damage. For a pump beam with a pulse width of 15 ns at a wavelength of 1064 nm, the highest damage threshold of 8.0 J/cm{sup 2} was measured for repetition frequencies in the range from 10 to 40 Hz. On the other hand, DAST crystals were easily damaged under the repetition rates from 50 to 100 Hz. For 600-ps pulses, a higher damage threshold that was a factor of 11 to 28 times higher in terms of peak intensity was obtained compared with that of 15-ns pulses. In both the cases of 15-ns pulse duration and 600-ps duration, we demonstrated that the thermal effects in DAST crystals dominated the optical damage, which depended on thermal accumulation and dissipation.

  20. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation. PMID:26591599

  1. Analytical core loss calculations for magnetic materials used in high frequency high power converter applications. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triner, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The basic magnetic properties under various operating conditions encountered in the state-of-the-art DC-AC/DC converters are examined. Using a novel core excitation circuit, the basic B-H and loss characteristics of various core materials may be observed as a function of circuit configuration, frequency of operation, input voltage, and pulse-width modulation conditions. From this empirical data, a mathematical loss characteristics equation is developed to analytically predict the specific core loss of several magnetic materials under various waveform excitation conditions.

  2. Impacts of Light Precipitation Detection with Dual Frequency Radar on Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory (GPM/DPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayabu, Y. N.; Hamada, A.; Oki, R.; Kachi, M.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.; Shige, S.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on board the GPM Core Observatory consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) radars, with an improved minimum detection sensitivity of precipitation compared to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). We have studied impacts of improved detection sensitivity with the GPM DPR compared with the TRMM PR. One example of light precipitation is, a scattered rainfall around a trough over the subtropical South Pacific Ocean, which consists of weak but erect precipitation reaching over the melting level of ~2.5 km and trailing precipitation above, which reaches as high as 5km. Another example is a light anvil precipitation spreading from convective cores of a storm in the upper troposphere, overcasting shallow convective precipitation below. The ability of globally detecting such light precipitation will improve our knowledge of precipitation processes. Utilizing an early version of the DPR product, a quick evaluation on statistical impacts of increasing the detection sensitivity from 17dBZ to 12dBZ has been performed. Here, 17dBZ is the value which is mostly accepted as the performed detection sensitivity of the TRMM PR, and 12dBZ is the guaranteed sensitivity for GPM Ka-band radar. For the near surface precipitation, impacts are significant in terms of numbers, but limited to several regions in terms of the rainfall volume. Volume impacts are much larger at the upper troposphere, which is indicated by the detection of the anvil precipitation, for example. The upper level improvements are mostly found where the deep precipitation systems exist. Quantitative discussions utilizing the latest version of the DPR data, which is scheduled to be released to the public in September, will be presented at the session.

  3. Core heat convection in NSTX-U via modification of electron orbits by high frequency Alfvén eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, N. A.; Tritz, K.; White, R. B.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; NSTX-U Team

    2015-11-01

    New simulation results demonstrate that high frequency compressional (CAE) and global (GAE) Alfvén eigenmodes cause radial convection of electrons, with implications for particle and energy confinement, as well as electric field formation in NSTX-U. Simulations of electron orbits in the presence of multiple experimentally determined CAEs and GAEs, using the gyro-center code ORBIT, have revealed substantial convective transport, in addition to the expected diffusion via orbit stochastization. These results advance understanding of anomalous core energy transport expected in high performance, beam-heated NSTX-U plasmas. The simulations make use of experimentally determined density perturbation (δn) amplitudes and mode structures obtained by inverting measurements from 16 a channel reflectometer array using a synthetic diagnostic. Combined with experimentally determined mode polarizations (i.e. CAE or GAE), the δn are used to estimate the ExB displacements for use in ORBIT. Preliminary comparison of the simulation results with transport modeling by TRANSP indicate that the convection is currently underestimated. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-SC0011810, DE-FG02-99ER54527 & DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Laboratory Mid-frequency (Kilohertz) Range Seismic Property Measurements and X-ray CT Imaging of Fractured Sandstone Cores During Supercritical CO2 Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Chang, C.; Harper, E.

    2014-12-01

    During geological sequestration of CO2, fractures are expected to play a critical role in controlling the migration of the injected fluid in reservoir rock. To detect the invasion of supercritical (sc-) CO2 and to determine its saturation, velocity and attenuation of seismic waves can be monitored. When both fractures and matrix porosity connected to the fractures are present, wave-induced dynamic poroelastic interactions between these two different types of rock porosity—high-permeability, high-compliance fractures and low-permeability, low-compliance matrix porosity—result in complex velocity and attenuation changes of compressional waves as scCO2 invades the rock. We conducted core-scale laboratory scCO2 injection experiments on small (diameter 1.5 inches, length 3.5-4 inches), medium-porosity/permeability (porosity 15%, matrix permeability 35 md) sandstone cores. During the injection, the compressional and shear (torsion) wave velocities and attenuations of the entire core were determined using our Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (short-core resonant bar) technique in the frequency range of 1-2 kHz, and the distribution and saturation of the scCO2 determined via X-ray CT imaging using a medical CT scanner. A series of tests were conducted on (1) intact rock cores, (2) a core containing a mated, core-parallel fracture, (3) a core containing a sheared core-parallel fracture, and (4) a core containing a sheared, core-normal fracture. For intact cores and a core containing a mated sheared fracture, injections of scCO2 into an initially water-saturated sample resulted in large and continuous decreases in the compressional velocity as well as temporary increases in the attenuation. For a sheared core-parallel fracture, large attenuation was also observed, but almost no changes in the velocity occurred. In contrast, a sample containing a core-normal fracture exhibited complex behavior of compressional wave attenuation: the attenuation peaked as the leading edge of

  5. Assessment of core damage models in SCDAP/RELAP5 during OECD LOFT LP-FP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Coryell, E.W.

    1991-12-31

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored a program to apply the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to analysis of the transient and reflood phases of the OECD LOFT LP-FP-2 Experiment. The principal objectives of the LP-FP-2 experiment were to determine the fission product release from the fuel during the early phases of a severe fuel damage scenario and to examine the phenomena controlling fission product transport in a vapor/aerosol environment. Calculations with the SCDAP/RELAP5 code, developed at the INEL with NRC support, have been performed to (1) examine the phenomena controlling the progression of both transient and reflood phases of the experiment, (2) enhance our understanding of the phenomena occurring during reflood and add credence to the postulated phenomenological sequence, (3) assess the ability of SCDAP/RELAP5 to examine severe fuel damage issues and phenomena, and (4) identify code strengths and deficiencies with the intent of prioritizing code improvements. Results indicate that the code is able to analyze the early phases of severe fuel damage reasonably well, with potential deficiencies in modelling interaction between molten control rod material and intact fuel.

  6. Precursor/incubation of multi-scale damage state quantification in composite materials: using hybrid microcontinuum field theory and high-frequency ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sourav; Ahmed, Riaz

    2013-06-01

    A systematic framework for incubation of damage- state quantification in composites is almost absent in the current practice. Identification and quantification of the material state at its early stage has become significantly important in the field of structural health monitoring. Interaction between the intrinsic material state and ultrasonic wave signals, e.g., nonlinear ultrasonic, higher harmonic generation, etc., in metals are quite well known and well documented in the literature. However, it is extremely challenging to quantify the precursor to damage state in composite materials. Thus, in this paper, a comparatively simple but efficient novel approach is proposed to quantify the "incubation of damage" state using scanning acoustic microscopy. The proposed approach exploits the hybrid microcontinuum field theory to quantify the intrinsic (multi-scale) damage state. Defying the conventional route of bottom-up multi-scale modeling methods, a hybrid top-down approach is presented, which is then correlated to the ultrasonic signature obtained from the materials. A parameter to quantify incubation of damage at meso-scale has been identified in this paper. The intrinsic length-scale-dependent parameter called "damage entropy" closely resembles the material state resulting from fatigue, extreme environments, operational hazards or spatio-temporal variability, etc. The proposed quantification process involves a fusion between micromorphic physics and high-frequency ultrasonics in an unconventional way. The proposed approach is validated through an experimental study conducted on glass-fiber reinforced polymer composites which are mechanically fatigued. Specimens were characterized under a scanning acoustic microscope at 50 and 100 MHz. The imaging data and the sensor signals are characterized to quantify the incubation of damage state by the new parameter damage entropy. PMID:25004477

  7. Measurement of DNA damage after exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the cellular phone communication frequency band (835.62 and 847.74 MHz).

    PubMed

    Malyapa, R S; Ahern, E W; Straube, W L; Moros, E G; Pickard, W F; Roti Roti, J L

    1997-12-01

    Mouse C3H 10T1/2 fibroblasts and human glioblastoma U87MG cells were exposed to cellular phone communication frequency radiations to investigate whether such exposure produces DNA damage in in vitro cultures. Two types of frequency modulations were studied: frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW), with a carrier frequency of 835.62 MHz, and code-division multiple-access (CDMA) centered on 847.74 MHz. Exponentially growing (U87MG and C3H 10T1/2 cells) and plateau-phase (C3H 10T1/2 cells) cultures were exposed to either FMCW or CDMA radiation for varying periods up to 24 h in specially designed radial transmission lines (RTLs) that provided relatively uniform exposure with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.6 W/kg. Temperatures in the RTLs were monitored continuously and maintained at 37 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Sham exposure of cultures in an RTL (negative control) and 137Cs gamma-irradiated samples (positive control) were included with every experiment. The alkaline comet assay as described by Olive et al. (Exp. Cell Res. 198, 259-269, 1992) was used to measure DNA damage. No significant differences were observed between the test group exposed to FMCW or CDMA radiation and the sham-treated negative controls. Our results indicate that exposure of cultured mammalian cells to cellular phone communication frequencies under these conditions at an SAR of 0.6 W/kg does not cause DNA damage as measured by the alkaline comet assay. PMID:9399708

  8. Frequency and severity of western bean cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) ear damage in transgenic corn hybrids expressing different Bacillus thuringiensis cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Eichenseer, Herbert; Strohbehn, Robert; Burks, June

    2008-04-01

    The frequency and severity of corn ear damage caused by western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Smith), were measured on transgenic corn, Zea mays L., hybrids expressing two different insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) (Berliner) Cry toxins (Bt) selected to protect against damage caused by larval European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner). A field cage experiment deliberately infested with western bean cutworm egg masses resulted in less damage in the hybrid expressing the Cry1F protein and supported fewer western bean cutworm larvae than its non-Bt isoline. Corn hybrids expressing Cry1F, grown in small plot field experiments at three locations over two separate years and exposed to natural western bean cutworm infestations suffered less damage than non-Bt or Bt-hybrids expressing a Cry1Ab protein. Later maturing hybrids suffered more damage than shorter-season hybrids. Finally, corn ears observed in strip trials for several years in diverse agronomic conditions in farmer-cooperator fields corroborated the in-plant protection conferred by corn hybrids expressing the Cry1F protein in small plot field trials. PMID:18459424

  9. Increased micronucleus, nucleoplasmic bridge, nuclear bud frequency and oxidative DNA damage associated with prolactin levels and pituitary adenoma diameters in patients with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Bitgen, N; Donmez-Altuntas, H; Bayram, F; Cakir, I; Hamurcu, Z; Diri, H; Baskol, G; Senol, S; Durak, A C

    2016-01-01

    Prolactinoma is the most common pituitary tumor. Most pituitary tumors are benign, but they often are clinically significant. We investigated cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN cyt) assay parameters and oxidative DNA damage in patients with prolactinoma to assess the relations among age, prolactin level, pituitary adenoma diameter and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) level in patients with prolactinoma. We investigated 27 patients diagnosed with prolactinoma and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We measured CBMN cyt parameters and plasma 8-OHdG levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with prolactinoma and controls. The frequencies of micronucleus (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge, nuclear bud, apoptotic and necrotic cells, and plasma 8-OHdG levels in patients with prolactinoma were significantly greater than controls. MN frequency was correlated positively with age, prolactin levels and pituitary adenoma diameters in patients with prolactinoma. The increased chromosomal and oxidative DNA damage, and the positive correlation between MN frequency, prolactin levels and pituitary adenoma diameters may be associated with increased risk of cancer in patients with prolactinoma, because increased MN frequency is a predictor of cancer risk. PMID:26720589

  10. Initial and long-term frequency degradation of ring oscillators caused by plasma-induced damage in 65 nm bulk and fully depleted silicon-on-insulator processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Ryo; Oshima, Azusa; Yabuuchi, Michitarou; Kobayashi, Kazutoshi

    2015-04-01

    The degradation of reliability caused by plasma-induced damage (PID) has become a significant concern with the miniaturization of device size. In particular, it is difficult to relieve PID in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) because it contains buried oxide (BOX) layers. In this work, we compare PID between a bulk and a silicon on thin BOX (SOTB), which has BOX layers of less than 10 nm. We measure frequencies of ring oscillators with an antenna structure on a single stage. In the bulk, PID is relieved by first connecting an antenna to a drain because electric charge flows to a substrate. The difference in initial frequency is 0.79% between structures, which cause and relieve PID. SOTB also relieves the same amount of PID. Initial frequencies are affected by PID, but there is no effect of PID on the long-term degradation mainly caused by bias temperature instability (BTI).

  11. Foam core shield (FCS) systems : a new dual - purpose technology for shielding against meteoroid strike damage and for thermal control of spacecrafts/satellite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc A.; Zwissler, James G.; Hayes, Charles; Fabensky, Beth; Cornelison, Charles; Alexander, Lesley; Bishop, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A new technology is being developed that can protect spacecraft and satellite components against damage from meteoroid strikes and control the thermal environment of the protected components. This technology, called Foam Core Shield (FCS) systems, has the potential to replace the multi-layer insulation blankets (MLI) that have been used on spacecraft for decades. In order to be an attractive candidate for replacing MLI, FCS systems should not only provide superior protection against meteoroid strikes but also provide an equal or superior ability to control the temperature of the protected component. Properly designed FCS systems can provide these principal functions, meteoroid strike protection and thermal control, with lower system mass and a smaller system envelope than ML.

  12. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Taichi; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kondo, Natsuko; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Ohnishi, Ken; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z.; Thompson, Larry H.; Helleday, Thomas; Asada, Hideo; and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  13. Fully-elastic multi-granular network with space/frequency/time switching using multi-core fibres and programmable optical nodes.

    PubMed

    Amaya, N; Irfan, M; Zervas, G; Nejabati, R; Simeonidou, D; Sakaguchi, J; Klaus, W; Puttnam, B J; Miyazawa, T; Awaji, Y; Wada, N; Henning, I

    2013-04-01

    We present the first elastic, space division multiplexing, and multi-granular network based on two 7-core MCF links and four programmable optical nodes able to switch traffic utilising the space, frequency and time dimensions with over 6000-fold bandwidth granularity. Results show good end-to-end performance on all channels with power penalties between 0.75 dB and 3.7 dB. PMID:23571976

  14. Effects of temperature, frequency, flux density, and excitation waveform on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of Supermalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, G.E.; Wieserman, W.R.; Niedra, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The availability of experimental data which characterize the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of temperature and frequency over a wide flux density range for different types of excitation is almost nonexistent. An experimental investigation of an 80-20 Ni-Fe alloy (Supermalloy) was conducted over the temperature (T) range of 23 to 300 C, frequency (f) range of 1 to 50 kHz, and maximum flux densities (B{sub M}) from 0.1 T up to 0.7 T for both sine and square wave voltage excitation. The investigation focused on the effects of B{sub M}, f, T, and excitation waveform on the specific core loss (SCL) and dynamic B-H loops. The results show that the ratio (R) of sine to square wave excitation specific core loss was always greater than unity for a given f and T and identical values of B{sub M}. The values of R ranged from 1.07 to 1.34. The classical theory of core loss separation into a hysteresis and eddy current loss component was used to theoretically determine the lower and upper bounds on R, against which the experimental R-values were compared. The experimental R-values were also used to make a comparison of the core loss of a sine and square wave voltage driven transformer.

  15. Effects of temperature, frequency, flux density, and excitation waveform on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of supermalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Wieserman, William R.; Niedra, Janis M.

    1995-01-01

    The availability of experimental data which characterize the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of temperature and frequency over a wide flux density range for different types of excitation is almost nonexistent. An experimental investigation of an 80-20 Ni-Fe alloy (Supermalloy) was conducted over the temperature (T) range of 23 to 300 C, frequency (f) range of 1 to 50 kHz, and maximum flux densities (B(sub M)) from 0.1 T up to 0.7 T for both sine and square wave voltage excitation. The investigation focused on the effects of (B(sub M)), f, T, and excitation waveform on the specific core loss (SCL) and dynamic B-H loops. The results show that the ratio (R) of sine to square wave excitation specific core loss was always greater than unity for a given f and T and identical values of B(sub M). The values of R ranged from 1.07 to 1.34. The classical theory of core loss separation into a hysteresis and eddy current loss component was used to theoretically determine the lower and upper bounds on R, against which the experimental R-values were compared. The experimental R-values were also used to make a comparison of the core loss of a sine and square wave voltage driven transformer.

  16. Non-local equilibrium two-phase flow model with phase change in porous media and its application to reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Quintard, M.; Repetto, G.; Fleurot, J.

    2012-05-01

    A generalized non local-equilibrium, three-equation model was developed for the macroscopic description of two-phase flow heat and mass transfer in porous media subjected to phase change. Six pore-scale closure problems were proposed to determine all the effective transport coefficients for representative unit cells. An improved model is presented in this paper with the perspective of application to intense boiling phenomena. The objective of this paper is to present application of this model to the simulation of reflooding of severely damaged nuclear reactor cores. In case of accident at a nuclear power plant, water sources may not be available for a long period of time and the core heats up due to the residual power. Any attempt to inject water during core degradation can lead to quenching and further fragmentation of the core material. The fragmentation of fuel rods and melting of reactor core materials may result in the formation of a "debris bed". The typical particle size in a debris bed might reach few millimeters (characteristic length-scale: 1 to 5 mm), which corresponds to a high permeability porous medium. The proposed two-phase flow model is implemented in the ICARECATHARE code, developed by IRSN to study severe accident scenarios in pressurized water reactors. Currently, the French IRSN has set up two experimental facilities to study debris bed reflooding, PEARL and PRELUDE, with the objective to validate safety models. The PRELUDE program studies the complex two phase flow of water and steam in a porous medium (diameter 180 mm, height 200 mm), initially heated to a high temperature (400°C or 700°C). The series of PRELUDE experiments achieved in 2010 constitute a significant complement to the database of high temperature bottom reflood experimental data. They provide relevant data to understand the progression of the quench front and the intensity of heat transfer. Modeling accurately these experiments required improvements to the reflooding model

  17. Non-local equilibrium two-phase flow model with phase change in porous media and its application to reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Quintard, M.; Repetto, G.; Fleurot, J.

    2012-05-15

    A generalized non local-equilibrium, three-equation model was developed for the macroscopic description of two-phase flow heat and mass transfer in porous media subjected to phase change. Six pore-scale closure problems were proposed to determine all the effective transport coefficients for representative unit cells. An improved model is presented in this paper with the perspective of application to intense boiling phenomena. The objective of this paper is to present application of this model to the simulation of reflooding of severely damaged nuclear reactor cores. In case of accident at a nuclear power plant, water sources may not be available for a long period of time and the core heats up due to the residual power. Any attempt to inject water during core degradation can lead to quenching and further fragmentation of the core material. The fragmentation of fuel rods and melting of reactor core materials may result in the formation of a {sup d}ebris bed{sup .} The typical particle size in a debris bed might reach few millimeters (characteristic length-scale: 1 to 5 mm), which corresponds to a high permeability porous medium. The proposed two-phase flow model is implemented in the ICARECATHARE code, developed by IRSN to study severe accident scenarios in pressurized water reactors. Currently, the French IRSN has set up two experimental facilities to study debris bed reflooding, PEARL and PRELUDE, with the objective to validate safety models. The PRELUDE program studies the complex two phase flow of water and steam in a porous medium (diameter 180 mm, height 200 mm), initially heated to a high temperature (400 deg. C or 700 deg. C). The series of PRELUDE experiments achieved in 2010 constitute a significant complement to the database of high temperature bottom reflood experimental data. They provide relevant data to understand the progression of the quench front and the intensity of heat transfer. Modeling accurately these experiments required improvements to the

  18. 10 kHz accuracy of an optical frequency reference based on (12)C2H2-filled large-core kagome photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Knabe, Kevin; Wu, Shun; Lim, Jinkang; Tillman, Karl A; Light, Philip S; Couny, Francois; Wheeler, Natalie; Thapa, Rajesh; Jones, Andrew M; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Washburn, Brian R; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L

    2009-08-31

    Saturated absorption spectroscopy reveals the narrowest features so far in molecular gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The 48-68 mum core diameter of the kagome-structured fiber used here allows for 8 MHz full-width half-maximum sub-Doppler features, and its wavelength-insensitive transmission is suitable for high-accuracy frequency measurements. A fiber laser is locked to the (12)C2H2 nu(1); + nu(3) P(13) transition inside kagome fiber, and compared with frequency combs based on both a carbon nanotube fiber laser and a Cr:forsterite laser, each of which are referenced to a GPS-disciplined Rb oscillator. The absolute frequency of the measured line center agrees with those measured in power build-up cavities to within 9.3 kHz (1 sigma error), and the fractional frequency instability is less than 1.2 x 10(-11) at 1 s averaging time. PMID:19724600

  19. Type I interferon transcriptional signature in neutrophils and high frequency of low-density granulocytes are associated with tissue damage in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bruno Coelho; Marques, Pedro Elias; Leoratti, Fabiana Maria de Souza; Junqueira, Caroline; Pereira, Dhelio Batista; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Valle; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte population in the bloodstream, the primary compartment of Plasmodium sp. infection. Yet, the role of these polymorphonuclear cells in mediating either resistance or pathogenesis of malaria is poorly understood. We report that circulating neutrophils from malaria patients are highly activated, as indicated by a strong type I interferon transcriptional signature, increased expression of surface activation markers, the enhanced release of reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase, as well as the high frequency of low-density granulocytes. The activation of neutrophils was associated with increased levels of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicating liver damage. In a rodent malaria model, we observed an intense recruitment of neutrophils to liver sinusoids. Neutrophil migration, IL-1β and chemokine expression as well as liver damage were all dependent on type I interferon signaling. The data suggests that type I interferon signaling have a central role in neutrophil activation and malaria pathogenesis. PMID:26711347

  20. The local maxima method for enhancement of time-frequency map and its application to local damage detection in rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchowski, Jakub; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Zimroz, Radosław

    2014-06-01

    In this paper a new method of fault detection in rotating machinery is presented. It is based on a vibration time series analysis in time-frequency domain. A raw vibration signal is decomposed via the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The time-frequency map is considered as matrix (M×N) with N sub-signals with length M. Each sub-signal is considered as a time series and might be interpreted as energy variation for narrow frequency bins. Each sub-signal is processed using a novel approach called the local maxima method. Basically, we search for local maxima because they should appear in the signal if local damage in bearings or gearbox exists. Finally, information for all sub-signals is combined in order to validate impulsive behavior of energy. Due to random character of the obtained time series, each maximum occurrence has to be checked for its significance. If there are time points for which the average number of local maxima for all sub-signals is significantly higher than for the other time instances, then location of these maxima is “weighted” as more important (at this time instance local maxima create for a set of Δf a pattern on the time-frequency map). This information, called vector of weights, is used for enhancement of spectrogram. When vector of weights is applied for spectrogram, non-informative energy is suppressed while informative features on spectrogram are enhanced. If the distribution of local maxima on spectrogram creates a pattern of wide-band cyclic energy growth, the machine is suspected of being damaged. For healthy condition, the vector of the average number of maxima for each time point should not have outliers, aggregation of information from all sub-signals is rather random and does not create any pattern. The method is illustrated by analysis of very noisy both real and simulated signals.

  1. Membrane Damage and Viability Loss of Escherichia coli K-12 in Apple Juice Treated with Radio Frequency Electric Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for a nonthermal intervention technology that can achieve microbial safety without altering nutritional quality of liquid foods led to the development of radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) process. In order to understand the mechanism of inactivation of bacteria by RFEF, apple juice pur...

  2. Complex inner core boundary from frequency characteristics of the reflection coefficients of PKiKP waves observed by Hi-net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2015-12-01

    Frequency-dependent reflection coefficients of P waves at the inner core boundary (ICB) are estimated from the spectral ratios of PKiKP and PcP waves observed by the high-sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) in Japan. The corresponding PKiKP reflection locations at the ICB are distributed beneath the western Pacific. At frequencies where noise levels are sufficiently low, spectra of reflection coefficients show four distinct sets of characteristics: a flat spectrum, a spectrum with a significant spectral hole at approximately 1 or 3 Hz, a spectrum with a strong peak at approximately 2 or 3 Hz, and a spectrum containing both a sharp peak and a significant hole. The variety in observed spectra suggests complex lateral variations in ICB properties. To explain the measured differences in frequency characteristics of ICB reflection coefficients, we conduct 2D finite difference simulations of seismic wavefields near the ICB. The models tested in our simulations include a liquid layer and a solid layer above the ICB, as well as sinusoidal and spike-shaped ICB topography with varying heights and scale lengths. We find that the existence of a layer above the ICB can be excluded as a possible explanation for the observed spectra. Furthermore, we find that an ICB topographic model with wavelengths and heights of several kilometers is too extreme to explain our measurements. However, restricting the ICB topography to wavelengths and heights of 1.0-1.5 km can explain the observed frequency-related phenomena. The existence of laterally varying topography may be a sign of lateral variations in inner core solidification.

  3. Novel photoswitchable dielectric properties on nanomaterials of electronic core-shell γ-FeOx@Au@fullerosomes for GHz frequency applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Su, Chefu; Yu, Tzuyang; Tan, Loon-Seng; Hu, Bin; Urbas, Augustine; Chiang, Long Y

    2016-03-28

    We unexpectedly observed a large amplification of the dielectric properties associated with the photoswitching effect and the new unusual phenomenon of delayed photoinduced capacitor-like (i.e. electric polarization) behavior at the interface on samples of three-layered core-shell (γ-FeOx@AuNP)@[C60(>DPAF-C9)](n)2 nanoparticles (NPs) in frequencies of 0.5-4.0 GHz. The detected relative dielectric constant amplification was initiated upon switching off the light followed by relaxation to give an excellent recyclability. These NPs having e(-)-polarizable fullerosomic structures located at the outer layer were fabricated from highly magnetic core-shell γ-FeOx@AuNPs. Surface-stabilized 2 in a core-shell structure was found to be capable of photoinducing the surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) effect by white LED light. The accumulated SPR energy was subsequently transferred to the partially bilayered C60(>DPAF-C9) fullerosomic membrane layer in a near-field (∼1.5 nm) region without producing radiation heat. Since the monostatic SAR signal is dielectric property-dependent, we used these measurements to provide evidence of derived reflectivity changes on a surface coated with 2 at 0.5-4.0 GHz upon illumination of LED white light. We found that a high, >99%, efficiency of response amplification in image amplitude can be achieved. PMID:26936772

  4. Indomethacin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules reduce the damage triggered by Aβ1-42 in Alzheimer’s disease models

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Andressa; Frozza, Rudimar L; Meneghetti, André; Hoppe, Juliana B; Battastini, Ana Maria O; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Sílvia S; Salbego, Christianne G

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation, characterized by the accumulation of activated microglia and reactive astrocytes, is believed to modulate the development and/or progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Epidemiological studies suggesting that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease the risk of developing AD have encouraged further studies elucidating the role of inflammation in AD. Nanoparticles have become an important focus of neurotherapeutic research because they are an especially effective form of drug delivery. Here, we investigate the potential protective effect of indomethacin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (IndOH-LNCs) against cell damage and neuroinflammation induced by amyloid beta (Aβ)1-42 in AD models. Our results show that IndOH-LNCs attenuated Aβ-induced cell death and were able to block the neuroinflammation triggered by Aβ1-42 in organotypic hippocampal cultures. Additionally, IndOH-LNC treatment was able to increase interleukin-10 release and decrease glial activation and c-jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation. As a model of Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vivo, animals received a single intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ1-42 (1 nmol/site), and 1 day after Aβ1-42 infusion, they were administered either free IndOH or IndOH-LNCs (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) for 14 days. Only the treatment with IndOH-LNCs significantly attenuated the impairment of this behavior triggered by intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ1-42. Further, treatment with IndOH-LNCs was able to block the decreased synaptophysin levels induced by Aβ1-42 and suppress glial and microglial activation. These findings might be explained by the increase of IndOH concentration in brain tissue attained using drug-loaded lipid-core NCs. All these findings support the idea that blockage of neuroinflammation triggered by Aβ is involved in the neuroprotective effects of IndOH-LNCs. These data provide strong evidence that IndOH-LNC treatment may represent a promising approach for treating

  5. Relationships between range access as monitored by radio frequency identification technology, fearfulness, and plumage damage in free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hartcher, K M; Hickey, K A; Hemsworth, P H; Cronin, G M; Wilkinson, S J; Singh, M

    2016-05-01

    Severe feather-pecking (SFP), a particularly injurious behaviour in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is thought to be negatively correlated with range use in free-range systems. In turn, range use is thought to be inversely associated with fearfulness, where fearful birds may be less likely to venture outside. However, very few experiments have investigated the proposed association between range use and fearfulness. This experiment investigated associations between range use (time spent outside), fearfulness, plumage damage, and BW. Two pens of 50 ISA Brown laying hens (n=100) were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders (contained within silicone leg rings) at 26 weeks of age. Data were then collected over 13 days. A total of 95% of birds accessed the outdoor run more than once per day. Birds spent an average duration of 6.1 h outside each day over 11 visits per bird per day (51.5 min per visit). The top 15 and bottom 15 range users (n=30), as determined by the total time spent on the range over 13 days, were selected for study. These birds were tonic immobility (TI) tested at the end of the trial and were feather-scored and weighed after TI testing. Birds with longer TI durations spent less time outside (P=0.01). Plumage damage was not associated with range use (P=0.68). The small group sizes used in this experiment may have been conducive to the high numbers of birds utilising the outdoor range area. The RFID technology collected a large amount of data on range access in the tagged birds, and provides a potential means for quantitatively assessing range access in laying hens. The present findings indicate a negative association between fearfulness and range use. However, the proposed negative association between plumage damage and range use was not supported. The relationships between range use, fearfulness, and SFP warrant further research. PMID:26593871

  6. Nanoscale analysis of unstained biological specimens in water without radiation damage using high-resolution frequency transmission electric-field system based on FE-SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2015-04-10

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to examine biological specimens of bacteria, viruses and proteins. Until now, atmospheric and/or wet biological specimens have been examined using various atmospheric holders or special equipment involving SEM. Unfortunately, they undergo heavy radiation damage by the direct electron beam. In addition, images of unstained biological samples in water yield poor contrast. We recently developed a new analytical technology involving a frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) method based on thermionic SEM. This method is suitable for high-contrast imaging of unstained biological specimens. Our aim was to optimise the method. Here we describe a high-resolution FTE system based on field-emission SEM; it allows for imaging and nanoscale examination of various biological specimens in water without radiation damage. The spatial resolution is 8 nm, which is higher than 41 nm of the existing FTE system. Our new method can be easily utilised for examination of unstained biological specimens including bacteria, viruses and protein complexes. Furthermore, our high-resolution FTE system can be used for diverse liquid samples across a broad range of scientific fields, e.g. nanoparticles, nanotubes and organic and catalytic materials. - Highlights: • We developed a high-resolution frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) system. • High-resolution FTE system is introduced in the field-emission SEM. • The spatial resolution of high-resolution FTE method is 8 nm. • High-resolution FTE system enables observation of the intact IgM particles in water.

  7. Accurate Predictions of Mean Geomagnetic Dipole Excursion and Reversal Frequencies, Mean Paleomagnetic Field Intensity, and the Radius of Earth's Core Using McLeod's Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Conrad, Joy

    1996-01-01

    intensity, and mean geomagnetic dipole power excursion and axial dipole reversal frequencies. We conclude that McLeod's Rule helps unify geo-paleomagnetism, correctly relates theoretically predictable statistical properties of the core geodynamo to magnetic observation, and provides a priori information required for stochastic inversion of paleo-, archeo-, and/or historical geomagnetic measurements.

  8. Watershed erosion estimated from a high-resolution sediment core reveals a non-stationary frequency-magnitude relationship and importance of seasonal climate drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, D. G.; Colombaroli, D.; Morey, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The inclusion of paleo-flood events greatly affects estimates of peak magnitudes (e.g., Q100) in flood-frequency analysis. Likewise, peak events also are associated with certain synoptic climatic patterns that vary on all time scales. Geologic records preserved in lake sediments have the potential to capture the non-stationarity in frequency-magnitude relationships, but few such records preserve a continuous history of event magnitudes. We present a 10-meter 2000-yr record from Upper Squaw Lake, Oregon, that contains finely laminated silt layers that reflect landscape erosion events from the 40 km2 watershed. CT-scans of the core (<1 mm resolution) and a 14C-dated chronology yielded a pseudo-annual time series of erosion magnitudes. The most recent 80 years of the record correlates strongly with annual peak stream discharge and road construction. We examined the frequency-magnitude relationship for the entire pre-road period and show that the seven largest events fall above a strongly linear relationship, suggesting a distinct process (e.g., severe fires or earthquakes) operating at low-frequency to generate large-magnitude events. Expressing the record as cumulative sediment accumulation anomalies showed the importance of the large events in "returning the system" to the long-term mean rate. Applying frequency-magnitude analysis in a moving window showed that the Q100 and Q10 of watershed erosion varied by 1.7 and 1.0 orders of magnitude, respectively. The variations in watershed erosion are weakly correlated with temperature and precipitation reconstructions at the decadal to centennial scale. This suggests that dynamics both internal (i.e., sediment production) and external (i.e., earthquakes) to the system, as well as more stochastic events (i.e., single severe wildfires) can at least partially over-ride external climate forcing of watershed erosion at decadal to centennial time scales.

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative in vivo model to determine oral uptake, nanotoxicity, and efficacy of melatonin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules on paraquat damage

    PubMed Central

    Charão, Mariele Feiffer; Souto, Caroline; Brucker, Natália; Barth, Anelise; Jornada, Denise S; Fagundez, Daiandra; Ávila, Daiana Silva; Eifler-Lima, Vera L; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Garcia, Solange Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an alternative in vivo model that is being successfully used to assess the pharmacological and toxic effects of drugs. The exponential growth of nanotechnology requires the use of alternative in vivo models to assess the toxic effects of theses nanomaterials. The use of polymeric nanocapsules has shown promising results for drug delivery. Moreover, these formulations have not been used in cases of intoxication, such as in treatment of paraquat (PQ) poisoning. Thus, the use of drugs with properties improved by nanotechnology is a promising approach to overcome the toxic effects of PQ. This research aimed to evaluate the absorption of rhodamine B-labeled melatonin (Mel)-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) by C. elegans, the application of this model in nanotoxicology, and the protection of Mel-LNC against PQ damage. The formulations were prepared by self-assembly and characterized by particle sizing, zeta potential, drug content, and encapsulation efficiency. The results demonstrated that the formulations had narrow size distributions. Rhodamine B-labeled Mel-LNC were orally absorbed and distributed in the worms. The toxicity assessment of LNC showed a lethal dose 50% near the highest dose tested, indicating low toxicity of the nanocapsules. Moreover, pretreatment with Mel-LNC significantly increased the survival rate, reduced the reactive oxygen species, and maintained the development in C. elegans exposed to PQ compared to those worms that were either untreated or pretreated with free Mel. These results demonstrated for the first time the uptake and distribution of Mel-LNC by a nematode, and indicate that while LNC is not toxic, Mel-LNC prevents the effects of PQ poisoning. Thus, C. elegans may be an interesting alternative model to test the nanocapsules toxicity and efficacy. PMID:26300641

  10. Comparison of high frequency, high temperature core loss and B-H loop characteristics of an 80 Ni-Fe crystalline alloy and two iron-based amorphous alloys. [Ni; Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Wieserman, W.R. ); Schwarze, G.E. ); Niedra, J.M. )

    1991-01-10

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H characteristics of a nickel-iron crystalline magnetic alloy (Supermalloy) and two-iron-based amorphous magnetic materials (Metglas 2605S-3A and Metglas 2605SC) over the frequency range of 1--50 kHz and temperature range of 23--300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The effects of maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined. The Supermalloy and Metglas 2605S-3A and 2605SC data are used to compare the core loss of transformers with identical kVA and voltage ratings.

  11. Comparison of high frequency, high temperature core loss and B-H loop characteristics of an 80 Ni-Fe crystalline alloy and two iron-based amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, William R.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    1991-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H characteristics of a nickel-iron crystalline magnetic alloy (Supermalloy) and two iron-based amorphous magnetic materials (Metglas 2605S-3A and Metglas 2605SC) over the frequency range of 1-50 kHz and temperature range of 23-300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The effects of maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined. The Supermalloy and Metglass 2605S-3A and 2605SC data are used to compare the core loss of transformers with identical kVA and voltage ratings.

  12. An analysis of Late Quaternary eruption frequency as recorded by tephra-fall records from 25 sedge- Sphagnum peat cores recovered from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deruwe, A.; Wallace, K.; Berg, E.; McDonnell, K.; Loso, M.

    2007-12-01

    Tephra fall (volcanic ash) is considered the principal hazard from Aleutian Arc volcanoes in terms of volume, distribution, and environmental impact. Over sixty percent of Alaska's human population resides in the Cook Inlet region, where ash fall from nearby volcanoes, including Hayes, Spurr/Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine pose the greatest volcanic risk. Alaska's Kenai Peninsula is located generally downwind of Cook Inlet volcanoes (approx. 85 to 400 km) and other active Aleutian Arc volcanoes. Previous studies have shown that Holocene-age tephra fall is well preserved in post-glacial sediments from this region. Such studies have used individual stratigraphic records to estimate tephra-fall frequency on a regional scale, although it is unclear whether those data reflect actual eruption frequency or are biased by paleo-wind direction, basin features, geomorphology, etc. These studies have shown highly discrepant ash-fall frequency records, which may result from the restricted number of study sites (typically one or two), the lack of spatial coverage, and/or the limited preservation potential of a given location. In order to evaluate actual eruption frequency as reflected by tephra fall, our study incorporates a wider geographic range and a greater number of sample locations than previous studies. We recovered and examined 25 sedge- Sphagnum peat cores from a northeast to southwest transect of the Kenai Peninsula, directly parallel to the Cook Inlet volcanoes and covering an area of 8,050 km2 (70 km wide by 115 km long). Magnetic susceptibility (MS), petrographic and electron microprobe analyses, and radiocarbon ages have been utilized to identify, characterize, and correlate tephra deposits among cores. A total of 221 undifferentiated tephra-fall layers are preserved in our cores, of which approximately 80 percent were identified visually and 20 percent were identified by MS peaks and petrographic verification. Eighty AMS radiocarbon ages, ranging from

  13. Novel photoswitchable dielectric properties on nanomaterials of electronic core-shell γ-FeOx@Au@fullerosomes for GHz frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Su, Chefu; Yu, Tzuyang; Tan, Loon-Seng; Hu, Bin; Urbas, Augustine; Chiang, Long Y.

    2016-03-01

    We unexpectedly observed a large amplification of the dielectric properties associated with the photoswitching effect and the new unusual phenomenon of delayed photoinduced capacitor-like (i.e. electric polarization) behavior at the interface on samples of three-layered core-shell (γ-FeOx@AuNP)@[C60(>DPAF-C9)]n2 nanoparticles (NPs) in frequencies of 0.5-4.0 GHz. The detected relative dielectric constant amplification was initiated upon switching off the light followed by relaxation to give an excellent recyclability. These NPs having e--polarizable fullerosomic structures located at the outer layer were fabricated from highly magnetic core-shell γ-FeOx@AuNPs. Surface-stabilized 2 in a core-shell structure was found to be capable of photoinducing the surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) effect by white LED light. The accumulated SPR energy was subsequently transferred to the partially bilayered C60(>DPAF-C9) fullerosomic membrane layer in a near-field (~1.5 nm) region without producing radiation heat. Since the monostatic SAR signal is dielectric property-dependent, we used these measurements to provide evidence of derived reflectivity changes on a surface coated with 2 at 0.5-4.0 GHz upon illumination of LED white light. We found that a high, >99%, efficiency of response amplification in image amplitude can be achieved.We unexpectedly observed a large amplification of the dielectric properties associated with the photoswitching effect and the new unusual phenomenon of delayed photoinduced capacitor-like (i.e. electric polarization) behavior at the interface on samples of three-layered core-shell (γ-FeOx@AuNP)@[C60(>DPAF-C9)]n2 nanoparticles (NPs) in frequencies of 0.5-4.0 GHz. The detected relative dielectric constant amplification was initiated upon switching off the light followed by relaxation to give an excellent recyclability. These NPs having e--polarizable fullerosomic structures located at the outer layer were fabricated from highly magnetic core-shell

  14. Comparison of clast frequency and size in the resurge deposits at the Chesapeake Bay impact structure (Eyreville A and Langley cores): Clues to the resurge process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ormo, J.; Sturkell, E.; Horton, J.W., Jr.; Powars, D.S.; Edwards, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    Collapse and inward slumping of unconsolidated sedimentary strata expanded the Chesapeake Bay impact structure far beyond its central basement crater. During crater collapse, sediment-loaded water surged back to fill the crater. Here, we analyze clast frequency and granulometry of these resurge deposits in one core hole from the outermost part of the collapsed zone (i.e., Langley) as well as a core hole from the moat of the basement crater (i.e., Eyreville A). Comparisons of clast provenance and flow dynamics show that at both locations, there is a clear change in clast frequency and size between a lower unit, which we interpret to be dominated by slumped material, and an upper, water-transported unit, i.e., resurge deposit. The contribution of material to the resurge deposit was primarily controlled by stripping and erosion. This includes entrainment of fallback ejecta and sediments eroded from the surrounding seafloor, found to be dominant at Langley, and slumped material that covered the annular trough and basement crater, found to be dominant at Eyreville. Eyreville shows a higher content of crystalline clasts than Langley. There is equivocal evidence for an anti-resurge from a collapsing central water plume or, alternatively, a second resurge pulse, as well as a transition into oscillating resurge. The resurge material shows more of a debris-flow-like transport compared to resurge deposits at some other marine target craters, where the ratio of sediment to water has been relatively low. This result is likely a consequence of the combination of easily disaggregated host sediments and a relatively shallow target water depth. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Initial Evaluation of Dual Frequency Radar (DPR) on Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory and Global Precipitation Map (GSMaP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, R.; Kachi, M.; Kubota, T.; Masaki, T.; Kaneko, Y.; Takayabu, Y. N.; Iguchi, T.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory was successfully launched on February 28, 2014 (JST) from the JAXA Tanegashima Space Center by the H-IIA F23 rocket. The GPM mission is a satellite program led by Japan and the U.S. to measure the global distribution of precipitation accurately in a sufficient frequency. The GPM Core Observatory carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The frequent precipitation measurement about every three hours will be achieved by constellation satellites with microwave radiometers or microwave sounders, which are provided by international partners. JAXA also provides the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) - Water (GCOM-W) named "SHIZUKU," as one of the constellation satellites. The Japanese GPM research project conducts scientific activities on algorithm development, ground validation, application research. JAXA develops the DPR Level 1 algorithm, and the NASA-JAXA Joint Algorithm Team develops the DPR Level 2 and DPR-GMI combined Level 2 algorithms. JAXA also develops the new version of Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) algorithm, which is hourly and 0.1-degree spatial resolution rain map, as one of the national products.After the 2-months initial checkout of the satellite and the sensors, calibration and validation of DPR and other products have been implemented toward the public release. For DPR evaluation includes: (1) sensitivity, observation range, etc., (2) consistency with TRMM, (3) comparison with ground rain gauge data, (4) ground based Ka radar validation and others. Initial results of quick data evaluation, validation and status of data processing will be presented.

  16. Soft Magnetic Nanocomposites Assembled by Fe/Al2O3 Core-Shell Nanoparticles with Tunable High-Frequency Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Q.; Sundararajan, J. A.; Zhang, D. T.; Han, H.; Meyer, D.; Qiang, Y.

    2010-03-01

    High-frequency soft magnetic films synthesized at room temperature (RT) are significant to the growing demand for improvement of next-generation microelectronic devices. For working in the gigahertz range, it is a challenge to develop uniaxial anisotropic films with high saturation magnetization, small coercivity and large resistivity. Accordingly, new Fe/Al2O3 core-shell cluster-assembled nanocomposites are created by employing novel energetic cluster impact. By applying potentials up to 20 kV to tilted Si substrates, in-plane uniaxial anisotropy is induced and tailored at RT, which is interpreted by the uniaxial shape anisotropy of the ellipsoidal nanoparticles and the alignment of the nanoparticle assembly. Moreover, the Fe/Al2O3 core-shell ratio is adjusted to control the excellent magnetic softness and ultra-high resistivity. Consequently, the Si-integration compatible nanocomposite films demonstrate tunable magnetic dynamic properties up to 8.5 GHz, measured by a shorted transmission-line perturbation method.

  17. Detection of Successful and Unsuccessful Pregnancies in Mice within Hours of Pairing through Frequency Analysis of High Temporal Resolution Core Body Temperature Data.

    PubMed

    Smarr, Benjamin L; Zucker, Irving; Kriegsfeld, Lance J

    2016-01-01

    Many controllable factors negatively impact fetal development, underscoring the importance of early pregnancy detection and identification of events that reliably predict potential complications. Clinically, core body temperature (CBT) is used to aid family planning and pregnancy detection. However, such temperature data typically are gathered in single, daily measurements. In animal studies, interventions or cell/tissue harvesting at defined stages of fetal development are arduous, requiring timed mating by trained observers. The value of continuous temperature measurements remains largely unexplored, but the advent of small, inexpensive, and increasingly ubiquitous, accurate sensor devices makes continuous measures feasible. Here, using a mouse model, we show that continuous, 1-min resolution CBT measurements reliably allow for the earliest and most accurate detection of pregnancy (100%, within 14 h of initial pairing), without requiring interaction with the animal for data collection. This method also reveals a subset of females that exhibit a pregnancy-like response following pairing that persists for a variable number of days. Application of wavelet analysis that permits frequency analysis while preserving temporal resolution, uncovers significant differences in ultradian frequencies of CBT; these rhythms are significantly increased in the 12 h after the day of pairing for pregnancies carried to term compared to apparent pregnancies that failed. High temporal resolution CBT and wavelet analysis permit strikingly early detection and separation of successful pregnancies and pregnancy-like events. PMID:27467519

  18. Detection of Successful and Unsuccessful Pregnancies in Mice within Hours of Pairing through Frequency Analysis of High Temporal Resolution Core Body Temperature Data

    PubMed Central

    Smarr, Benjamin L.; Zucker, Irving; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.

    2016-01-01

    Many controllable factors negatively impact fetal development, underscoring the importance of early pregnancy detection and identification of events that reliably predict potential complications. Clinically, core body temperature (CBT) is used to aid family planning and pregnancy detection. However, such temperature data typically are gathered in single, daily measurements. In animal studies, interventions or cell/tissue harvesting at defined stages of fetal development are arduous, requiring timed mating by trained observers. The value of continuous temperature measurements remains largely unexplored, but the advent of small, inexpensive, and increasingly ubiquitous, accurate sensor devices makes continuous measures feasible. Here, using a mouse model, we show that continuous, 1-min resolution CBT measurements reliably allow for the earliest and most accurate detection of pregnancy (100%, within 14 h of initial pairing), without requiring interaction with the animal for data collection. This method also reveals a subset of females that exhibit a pregnancy-like response following pairing that persists for a variable number of days. Application of wavelet analysis that permits frequency analysis while preserving temporal resolution, uncovers significant differences in ultradian frequencies of CBT; these rhythms are significantly increased in the 12 h after the day of pairing for pregnancies carried to term compared to apparent pregnancies that failed. High temporal resolution CBT and wavelet analysis permit strikingly early detection and separation of successful pregnancies and pregnancy-like events. PMID:27467519

  19. Comparison of high temperature, high frequency core loss and dynamic B-H loops of two 50 Ni-Fe crystalline alloys and an iron-based amorphous alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wieserman, W.R.; Schwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The availability of experimental data that characterizes the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high temperature and high frequency is almost non-existent. An experimental investigation was conducted over the temperature range of 23 to 300 C and frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz to determine the effects of temperature and frequency on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of three different soft magnetic materials; an oriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, a nonoriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, and an iron-based amorphous material (Metglas 2605SC). A comparison of these materials show that the nonoriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy tends to have either the lowest or next lowest core loss for all temperatures and frequencies investigated.

  20. Comparison of high temperature, high frequency core loss and dynamic B-H loops of a 2V-49Fe-49Co and a grain oriented 3Si-Fe alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The design of power magnetic components such as transformers, inductors, motors, and generators, requires specific knowledge about the magnetic and electrical characteristics of the magnetic materials used in these components. Limited experimental data exists that characterizes the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high temperature and high frequency over a wide flux density range. An experimental investigation of a 2V-49-Fe-49Co (Supermendur) and a grain oriented 3 Si-Fe (Magnesil) alloy was conducted over the temperature range of 23 to 300 C and frequency range of 0.1 to 10 kHz. The effects of temperature, frequency, and maximum flux density on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops for sinusoidal voltage excitation conditions are examined for each of these materials. A comparison of the core loss of these two materials is also made over the temperature and frequency range investigated.

  1. Comparison of high temperature, high frequency core loss and dynamic B-H loops of two 50 Ni-Fe crystalline alloys and an iron-based amorphous alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The availability of experimental data that characterizes the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high temperature and high frequency is almost nonexistent. An experimental investigation was conducted over the temperature range of 23 to 300 C and frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz to determine the effects of temperature and frequency on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of three different soft magnetic materials; and oriented grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, a nonoriented grain 50Ni-Fe alloy, and an iron based amorphous material (Metglas 2605SC). A comparison of these materials shows that the nonoriented grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy tends to have either the lowest or next lowest core loss for all temperatures and frequencies investigated.

  2. Comparison of high temperature, high frequency core loss and dynamic B-H loops of two 50 Ni-Fe crystalline alloys and an iron-based amorphous alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The availability of experimental data that characterize the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high temperature and high frequency is almost nonexistent. An experimental investigation was conducted over the temperature range of 23 to 300 C and frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz to determine the effects of temperature and frequency on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of three different soft magnetic materials: an oriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, a nonoriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, and an iron-based amorphous material (Metglas 2605SC). A comparison of these materials shows that the nonoriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy tends to have either the lowest or the next lowest core loss for all temperatures and frequencies investigated.

  3. Evaluation of damage progression and mechanical behavior under compression of bone cements containing core-shell nanoparticles by using acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Salazar, O F; Wakayama, Shuichi; Sakai, Takenobu; Cauich-Rodríguez, J V; Ríos-Soberanis, C R; Cervantes-Uc, J M

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the effect of the incorporation of core-shell particles on the fracture mechanisms of the acrylic bone cements by using acoustic emission (AE) technique during the quasi-static compression mechanical test was investigated. Core-shell particles were composed of a poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) rubbery core and a methyl methacrylate/styrene copolymer (P(MMA-co-St)) outer glassy shell. Nanoparticles were prepared with different core-shell ratio (20/80, 30/70, 40/60 and 50/50) and were incorporated into the solid phase of bone cement at several percentages (5, 10 and 15 wt%). It was observed that the particles exhibited a spherical morphology averaging ca. 125 nm in diameter, and the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) thermograms revealed the desired structuring pattern of phases associated with core-shell structures. A fracture mechanism was proposed taking into account the detected AE signals and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. In this regard, core-shell nanoparticles can act as both additional nucleation sites for microcracks (and crazes) and to hinder the microcrack propagation acting as a barrier to its growth; this behavior was presented by all formulations. Cement samples containing 15 wt% of core-shell nanoparticles, either 40/60 or 50/50, were fractured at 40% deformation. This fact seems related to the coalescence of microcracks after they surround the agglomerates of core-shell nanoparticles to continue growing up. This work also demonstrated the potential of the AE technique to be used as an accurate and reliable detection tool for quasi-static compression test in acrylic bone cements. PMID:25792411

  4. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  5. Spatiotemporal character of the Bobylev-Pikin flexoelectric instability in a twisted nematic bent-core liquid crystal exposed to very low frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K S

    2014-05-01

    The Bobylev-Pikin striped-pattern state induced by a homogeneous electric field is a volume flexoelectric instability, originating in the midregion of a planarly aligned nematic liquid crystal layer. We find that the instability acquires a spatiotemporal character upon excitation by a low frequency (0.5 Hz) square wave field. This is demonstrated using a bent-core liquid crystal, initially in the 90°-twisted planar configuration. The flexoelectric modulation appears close to the cathode at each polarity reversal and, at low voltage amplitudes, decays completely as the field becomes steady. Correspondingly, at successive polarity changes, the stripe direction switches between the alignment directions at the two substrates. For large voltages, the stripes formed nearly along the alignment direction at the cathode gradually reorient toward the midplane director. These observations are generally attributed to inhomogeneous and time-dependent field conditions that come to exist after each polarity reversal. Polarity dependence of the instability is attributed to the formation of intrinsic double layers that bring about an asymmetry in surface fields. Momentary field elevation near the cathode following a voltage sign reversal and concomitant gradient flexoelectric polarization are considered the key factors in accounting for the surfacelike modulation observed at low voltages. PMID:25353816

  6. A hybrid method for damage detection and quantification in advanced X-COR composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neerukatti, Rajesh Kumar; Rajadas, Abhishek; Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Huff, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced composite structures, such as foam core carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites, are increasingly being used in applications which require high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and low weight. However, the presence of in situ damage due to manufacturing defects and/or service conditions can complicate the failure mechanisms and compromise their strength and reliability. In this paper, the capability of detecting damages such as delaminations and foam-core separations in X-COR composite structures using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques is investigated. Two NDE techniques, flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics, were used to detect and quantify the damage size and locations. Macro fiber composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors to study the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations and foam-core separations. The results indicate that both flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics were capable of detecting damage in X-COR sandwich structures, although low frequency ultrasonic methods were capable of detecting through thickness damages more accurately than flash thermography. It was also observed that the presence of foam-core separations significantly changes the wave behavior when compared to delamination, which complicates the use of wave based SHM techniques. Further, a wave propagation model was developed to model the wave interaction with damages at different locations on the X-COR sandwich plate.

  7. Visualisation of γH2AX Foci Caused by Heavy Ion Particle Traversal; Distinction between Core Track versus Non-Track Damage

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Nakako Izumi; Brunton, Holly; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Shrikhande, Amruta; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Fujimori, Akira; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Jeggo, Penny; Shibata, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Heavy particle irradiation produces complex DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) which can arise from primary ionisation events within the particle trajectory. Additionally, secondary electrons, termed delta-electrons, which have a range of distributions can create low linear energy transfer (LET) damage within but also distant from the track. DNA damage by delta-electrons distant from the track has not previously been carefully characterised. Using imaging with deconvolution, we show that at 8 hours after exposure to Fe (∼200 keV/µm) ions, γH2AX foci forming at DSBs within the particle track are large and encompass multiple smaller and closely localised foci, which we designate as clustered γH2AX foci. These foci are repaired with slow kinetics by DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in G1 phase with the magnitude of complexity diminishing with time. These clustered foci (containing 10 or more individual foci) represent a signature of DSBs caused by high LET heavy particle radiation. We also identified simple γH2AX foci distant from the track, which resemble those arising after X-ray exposure, which we attribute to low LET delta-electron induced DSBs. They are rapidly repaired by NHEJ. Clustered γH2AX foci induced by heavy particle radiation cause prolonged checkpoint arrest compared to simple γH2AX foci following X-irradiation. However, mitotic entry was observed when ∼10 clustered foci remain. Thus, cells can progress into mitosis with multiple clusters of DSBs following the traversal of a heavy particle. PMID:23967070

  8. Candu 6 severe core damage accident consequence analysis for steam generator tube rupture scenario using MAAP4-CANDU V4.0.5A: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Petoukhov, S.M.; Awadh, B.; Mathew, P.M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of the consequence analysis for a generic AECL CANDU 6 station, when it undergoes a postulated, low probability Steam Generator multiple Tube Rupture (SGTR) severe accident with assumed unavailability of several critical plant safety systems. The Modular Accident Analysis Program for CANDU (MAAP4-CANDU) code was used for this analysis. The SGTR accident is assumed to begin with the guillotine rupture of 10 steam generator tubes in one steam generator in Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) loop 1. For the reference case, the following systems were assumed unavailable: moderator and shield cooling, emergency core cooling, crash cool-down, and main and auxiliary feed water. Two additional cases were analyzed, one with the crash cool-down system available, and another with the crash cool-down and the auxiliary feed water systems available. The three scenarios considered in this study show that most of the initial fission product inventory would be retained within the containment by various fission product retention mechanisms. For the case where the crash cool-down system was credited but the auxiliary feed water systems were not credited, the total mass of volatile fission products released to the environment including stable and radioactive isotopes was about four times more than in the reference case, because fission products could be released directly from the PHTS to the environment through the Main Steam Safety Valves (MSSVs), bypassing the containment. For the case where the crash cool-down and auxiliary feed water systems were credited, the volatile fission product release to the environment was insignificant, because the fission product release was substantially mitigated by scrubbing in the water pool in the secondary side of the steam generator (SG). (authors)

  9. A new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Joussineau, G.; Aydin, A.

    2006-12-01

    Faults may either impede or enhance fluid flow in the subsurface, which is relevant to a number of economic issues (hydrocarbon migration and entrapment, formation and distribution of mineral deposits) and environmental problems (movement of contaminants). Fault zones typically comprise a low-permeability core made up of intensely deformed fault rock and a high-permeability damage zone defined by fault-related fractures. The geometry, petrophysical properties and continuity of both the fault core and the damage zone have an important influence on the mechanical properties of the fault systems and on subsurface fluid flow. Information about fault components from remote seismic methods is limited and is available only for large faults (slip larger than 20-100m). It is therefore essential to characterize faults and associated damage zones in field analogues, and to develop conceptual models of how faults and related structures form and evolve. Here we present such an attempt to better understand the evolution of fault damage zones in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone of the Valley of Fire State Park (SE Nevada). We document the formation and evolution of the damage zone associated with strike-slip faults through detailed field studies of faults of increasing slip magnitudes. The faults initiate as sheared joints with discontinuous pockets of damage zone located at fault tips and fault surface irregularities. With increasing slip (slip >5m), the damage zone becomes longer and wider by progressive fracture infilling, and is organized into two distinct components with different geometrical and statistical characteristics. The first component of the damage zone is the inner damage zone, directly flanking the fault core, with a relatively high fracture frequency and a thickness that scales with the amount of fault slip. Parts of this inner zone are integrated into the fault core by the development of the fault rock, contributing to the core's progressive widening. The second

  10. Parent-Rated Anxiety Symptoms in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Frequency and Association with Core Autism Symptoms and Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Scahill, Lawrence; Gadow, Kenneth D.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Aman, Michael G.; McDougle, Christopher J.; McCracken, James T.; Tierney, Elaine; White, Susan Williams; Lecavalier, Luc; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2008-01-01

    Background: In addition to the core symptoms, children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) often exhibit other problem behaviors such as aggression, hyperactivity, and anxiety, which can contribute to overall impairment and, therefore, become the focus of clinical attention. Limited data are available on the prevalence of anxiety in these…

  11. Effect of heat and radio frequency electric field treatments on membrane damage and intracellular leakage of UV-substances of Escherichia coli K-12 in apple juice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for a nonthermal intervention technology that can achieve microbial safety without altering nutritional quality of liquid foods led to the development of the radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) process. Previously, we documented formation of surface blebs on Escherichia coli cells treate...

  12. Efficient Visual Object and Word Recognition Relies on High Spatial Frequency Coding in the Left Posterior Fusiform Gyrus: Evidence from a Case-Series of Patients with Ventral Occipito-Temporal Cortex Damage

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Daniel J.; Woollams, Anna M.; Kim, Esther; Beeson, Pelagie M.; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent visual neuroscience investigations suggest that ventral occipito-temporal cortex is retinotopically organized, with high acuity foveal input projecting primarily to the posterior fusiform gyrus (pFG), making this region crucial for coding high spatial frequency information. Because high spatial frequencies are critical for fine-grained visual discrimination, we hypothesized that damage to the left pFG should have an adverse effect not only on efficient reading, as observed in pure alexia, but also on the processing of complex non-orthographic visual stimuli. Consistent with this hypothesis, we obtained evidence that a large case series (n = 20) of patients with lesions centered on left pFG: 1) Exhibited reduced sensitivity to high spatial frequencies; 2) demonstrated prolonged response latencies both in reading (pure alexia) and object naming; and 3) were especially sensitive to visual complexity and similarity when discriminating between novel visual patterns. These results suggest that the patients' dual reading and non-orthographic recognition impairments have a common underlying mechanism and reflect the loss of high spatial frequency visual information normally coded in the left pFG. PMID:22923086

  13. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  14. Molecular Detection of Malaria at Delivery Reveals a High Frequency of Submicroscopic Infections and Associated Placental Damage in Pregnant Women from Northwest Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Eliana M.; Samuel, Roshini; Agudelo, Olga M.; Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Maestre, Amanda; Yanow, Stephanie K.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium infection in pregnancy causes substantial maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In Colombia, both P. falciparum and P. vivax are endemic, but the impact of either species on pregnancy is largely unknown in this country. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 96 pregnant women who delivered at their local hospital. Maternal, placental, and cord blood were tested for malaria infection by microscopy and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A high frequency of infection was detected by qPCR (45%). These infections had low concentrations of parasite DNA, and 79% were submicroscopic. Submicroscopic infections were associated with placental villitis and intervillitis. In conclusion, the overall frequency of Plasmodium infection at delivery in Colombia is much higher than previously reported. These data prompt a re-examination of the local epidemiology of malaria using molecular diagnostics to establish the clinical relevance of submicroscopic infections during pregnancy as well as their consequences for mothers and newborns. PMID:23716408

  15. Up-regulation of miR-21 and 146a expression and increased DNA damage frequency in a mouse model of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

    PubMed Central

    Salimi-Asl, Mohammad; Mozdarani, Hossein; Kadivar, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a multigenic endocrine disorder, is highly associated with low-grade chronic inflammation, however its etiology remains unclear. In this study, we employed dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)-treated mice to reveal the molecular mechanism of inflammation and its correlation with oxidative stress in PCOS patients. Methods: miR-21 and miR-146a expression levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). DNA strand breakage frequency was measured using the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay (comet assay) and micronucleus test (MN). CRP levels were measured by ELISA method and ESR values were measured by means of Micro-Dispette (Fisher No: 02-675-256) tubes according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA in SPSS 21.0 software. Results: Our results showed that miR-21 and miR-146a as inflammation markers were upregulated in the sample group in comparison with control group. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C- reactive protein (CRP) levels were also increased in mouse models of PCOS (p < 0.000). Micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MNPCE) rates per 1000 polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE) significantly increased in DHEA treated mice (6.22 ± 3.28) in comparison with the controls (2.33 ± 2.23, p < 0.000). Moreover, mean arbitrary unit in DHEA treated animals (277 ± 92) was significantly higher than that in controls (184 ± 76, p = 0.005). Conclusion: To conclude, increased DNA strand breakage frequency and increased expression levels of miR-21 and miR-146a in DHEA administrated animals suggest that low grade chronic inflammation and oxidative stress can act as the main etiologies of PCOS. PMID:27525225

  16. High-frequency vibrations of sandwich plates and delamination detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Alf E.; Irgens, Fridtjov

    1998-06-01

    In multi-hull marine vehicles assembled by FRP sandwich composite materials problems with delamination and skin/core debonding are reported. High frequency vibrations in foam core sandwich materials are investigated to see if it was possible to apply them, together with bending vibrations, in an early damage warning system for delamination detection in marine vessels. This manuscript presents a theory for high frequency vibration in sandwich plates and beams. The core is modeled as a two parameter foundation with shearing interaction effects as well as normal stress effects in the core included. The skins are modeled as ordinary plates or beams on a foundation. Expressions for both anti-symmetric and symmetric modes are given. In addition to the theoretical development, experiments with a simply supported sandwich beam, using a TV-Holography technic, were performed and good accordance between theory and experiments were achieved. The results indicates that disappearance of symmetric modes may be used a parameter for delamination detection. The anti-symmetric modes may be interchangeable with higher bending modes by an early damage warning system. To avoid this, the theory presented may be applied to determine the anti-symmetric frequency values in forehand.

  17. On the evolution of high-frequency ingredients of the secular variation and of their expression at core surface, as inferred from observatory data and main field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrescu, C.; Dobrica, V.; Stefan, C.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of the first time derivative, with the residual external contribution removed, of H, Z, and D for 24 observatories world-wide with 100-150 years long time series, shows the presence in data of a so-called ~80-year variation. The geographical distribution and its temporal evolution as revealed by 400 years time span of the gufm1 field model is derived and discussed. Time-longitude, time-latitude plots and spectral analysis have been used to derive quantitative information on the ~80-year variation features. The analysis has been extended to the radial component of the geomagnetic field at the core surface. The results indicate that the ~80-year variation entirely accounts for the field with time-averaged axisymmetric component subtracted and high-pass-filtered with cutoff period 400 years of Finlay and Jackson (2003).

  18. Matched cascade of bandgap-shift and frequency-conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in a tapered hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Beaudou, B; Couny, F; Wang, Y Y; Light, P S; Wheeler, N V; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2010-06-01

    We report on a novel means which lifts the restriction of the limited optical bandwidth of photonic bandgap hollow-core photonic crystal fiber on generating high order stimulated Raman scattering in gaseous media. This is based on H(2)-filled tapered HC-PCF in which the taper slope is matched with the effective length of Raman process. Raman orders outside the input-bandwidth of the HC-PCF are observed with more than 80% quantum-conversion using a compact, low-power 1064 nm microchip laser. The technique opens prospects for efficient sources in spectral regions that are poorly covered by currently existing lasers such as mid-IR. PMID:20588364

  19. Building the Frequency Profile of the Core Promoter Element Patterns in the Three ChromHMM Promoter States at 200bp Intervals: A Statistical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lent, Heather; Lee, Kyung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Analysis Working Group converted data from ChIP-seq analyses from the Broad Histone track into 15 corresponding chromatic maps that label sequences with different kinds of histone modifications in promoter regions. Here, we publish a frequency profile of the three ChromHMM promoter states, at 200-bp intervals, with particular reference to the existence of sequence patterns of promoter elements, GC-richness, and transcription starting sites. Through detailed and diligent analysis of promoter regions, researchers will be able to uncover new and significant information about transcription initiation and gene function. PMID:26865847

  20. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  1. [The influence of ultrahigh-frequency electromagnetic radiation and low-intensity laser radiation on the body core temperature and basal metabolism in rats with systemic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronok, I P; Molchanova, A Iu; Ulashik, V S

    2012-01-01

    The effects of ultrahigh-frequency electromagnetic radiation (UHF EMR) and low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) on the body and skin temperature, oxygen consumption, production of carbon dioxide and heat release were investigated in the experiments on intact rats and during LPS-induced polyphasic fever. It was found that UHF EMR with the wavelength of 4,9 mm, 5,6 mm or 7,1 mm and LILI with the wavelength of 0.47 microm, 0.67 microm and 0.87 microm caused modulation of basal metabolism and thermal response to systemically administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These findings suggest that the most pronounced antipyretic and hypometabolic effects were observed after the treatment with UHF EMR at 7,1 mm and LILI at 470 microm. PMID:22994065

  2. Multiple-frequency C-scan bond testing for composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl, J.; Lepage, B.

    2012-05-01

    Adhesive-bonded components and structures have become an important part of manufacturing in the aerospace industry. These components often rely on honeycomb composite structures for strong yet lightweight design. However, the quality of the bonds is very important to the overall integrity of the composite structures. Due to their wide range of laminate and core configurations, these materials pose inspection challenges, especially during inspection for damage in the core, for example, disbonds and crushed core. For improved probability of detection (POD) on honeycomb composite structures, a multiple frequency C-scan-based approach exploiting both amplitude and phase C-scans is proposed.

  3. Effect of initial damage on rock pulverization along faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Mai-Linh; d'Hour, Virginie

    2012-12-01

    Pulverized rocks have been found in the damage zone around the San Andreas Fault, at distances greater than 100 m from the fault core. This damage is atypical in that it is pervasive and strain is not localized along main fractures as expected at these distances from the fault core. With high strain rate experiments, the authors have previously shown that above a strain rate threshold, the localization of strain along a few fractures is inhibited. Pulverized rocks may be generated by seismic waves at high frequency. Here we generalize these conclusions by discussing the effect of the initial fracture network in the sample on the transition from strain localization along a few fractures to diffuse damage throughout the sample. Experimental data are compared with statistical theory for fracture propagation. This analysis shows that the threshold in strain rate is a power law of initial fracture density and that a pre-damaged rock is easier to pulverize. This implies that pulverized rocks observed on the field may result from successive loadings.

  4. Acoustic emission, microstructure, and damage model of dry and wet sandstone stressed to failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Arno; Wagner, Christian F.; Dresen, Georg

    1996-08-01

    Twenty-three uniaxial compression tests were performed on dry and wet Flechtingen sandstone from Germany. Compressive strength of wet core is 60% of the strength of dry core. Before fracture, the transverse P wave speed drops by 13% and the pulse amplitude by 22% for wet and 37% for dry cores. Accumulated strain energy doubles for dry core. Acoustic emissions (AE) are detected with 10 sensors for 19 cores. AE activity starts at 84% of the fracture strength of wet cores (55 MPa) and at 91% of the strength of dry cores (87 MPa). The ratio of located to recorded AE is 0.37 for dry and 0.13 for fully wet cores. AE hypocenter patterns document the development of two opposite fracture cones. The negative slope of cumulative AE-amplitude frequency distribution drops by 50% before failure in dry cores. The slope of the wet core drops and recovers. Energy discrimination of AE detected by a broadband sensor resolves different stages of damage and captures the onset of the dilatant throughgoing macrofracture. Using the analogy to visible light microfracturing events are separated into high-energy short pulses (blue AE) and low-energy pulses with long duration times (red AE). Blue AE are explained by intragranular grain breakage, red AE by multiple stick slip on crack planes or grain boundaries. Deformed cores show highly fractured calcite cement and mostly intact quartz grains. The stochastic damage model for brittle composites developed highlights that microfracturing of the sandstone is controlled by the amount and distribution of the weak mineral (calcite).

  5. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  6. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  7. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  8. GEOS-CORE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone formore » linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.« less

  9. Frequency Response Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could leadmore » to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.« less

  10. Frequency Response Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel; Chassin, PNNL David; Zhang, PNNL Yu; PNNL,

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could lead to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.

  11. Monitoring Bearing Vibrations For Signs Of Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Carol L.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time spectral analysis of vibrations being developed for use in monitoring conditions of critical bearings in rotating machinery. Underlying concept simple and fairly well established: appearance and growth of vibrations at frequencies associated with rotations of various parts of bearing system indicate wear, damage, and imperfections of manufacture. Frequencies include fundamental and harmonics of frequency of rotation of ball cage, frequency of passage of balls, and frequency of rotation of shaft.

  12. Evaluation of modal-based damage detection techniques for composite aircraft sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Composite sandwich structures are important as structural components in modern lightweight aircraft, but are susceptible to catastrophic failure without obvious forewarning. Internal damage, such as disbonding between skin and core, is detrimental to the structures' strength and integrity and thus must be detected before reaching critical levels. However, highly directional low density cores, such as Nomex honeycomb, make the task of damage detection and health monitoring difficult. One possible method for detecting damage in composite sandwich structures, which seems to have received very little research attention, is analysis of global modal parameters. This study will investigate the viability of modal analysis techniques for detecting skin-core disbonds in carbon fiber-Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels through laboratory testing. A series of carbon fiber prepreg and Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels-representative of structural components used in lightweight composite airframes-were fabricated by means of autoclave co-cure. All panels were of equal dimensions and two were made with predetermined sizes of disbonded areas, created by substituting areas of Teflon release film in place of epoxy film adhesive during the cure. A laser vibrometer was used to capture frequency response functions (FRF) of all panels, and then real and imaginary FRFs at different locations on each plate and operating shapes for each plate were compared. Preliminary results suggest that vibration-based techniques hold promise for damage detection of composite sandwich structures.

  13. Pulsed laser damage to optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Gillies, G.T.; Magnuson, D.W.; Pagano, T.S.

    1985-10-01

    This paper describes some observations of pulsed laser damage to optical fibers with emphasis on a damage mode characterized as a linear fracture along the outer core of a fiber. Damage threshold data are presented which illustrate the effects of the focusing lens, end-surface preparation, and type of fiber. An explanation based on fiber-beam misalignment is given and is illustrated by a simple experiment and ray trace.

  14. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  15. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Core phenomenology. TEC report on CRBRP PRA Phase II, Task 6C. Final draft report, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1984-04-04

    As part of the determination of the risk potential associated with core-damage accident sequences for the CRBRP, a review of the core-damage phenomenology is necessary. How core damage proceeds, its effects on the primary system boundary, and the timing and energetic potential associated with core damage are important to determining the challenge to containment and the ultimate release of fission products to the environment. This chapter addresses the phenomenology related to the core-damage processes and by the use of a core-response event tree, estimates are made of the probability that certain core-response scenarios are followed.

  17. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  18. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect

    Nonveiller, E.; Rupcic, J. |; Sever, Z.

    1999-04-01

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  19. Damage thresholds for terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Danielle R.; McQuade, Jill; Vincelette, Rebecca; Ibey, Bennet; Payne, Jason; Thomas, Robert; Roach, W. P.; Roth, Caleb L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2010-02-01

    Several international organizations establish minimum safety standards to ensure that workers and the general population are protected against adverse health effects associated with electromagnetic radiation. Suitable standards are typically defined using published experimental data. To date, few experimental studies have been conducted at Terahertz (THz) frequencies, and as a result, current THz standards have been defined using extrapolated estimates from neighboring spectral regions. In this study, we used computational modeling and experimental approaches to determine tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies. For the computational modeling efforts, we used the Arrhenius damage integral to predict damage-thresholds. We determined thresholds experimentally for both long (minutes) and short (seconds) THz exposures. For the long exposure studies, we used an in-house molecular gas THz laser (υ= 1.89 THz, 189.92 mW/cm2, 10 minutes) and excised porcine skin. For the short exposure studies, we used the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Jefferson Laboratory (υ= 0.1-1.0 THz, 2.0-14.0 mW/cm2, 2 seconds) and wet chamois cloths. Thresholds were determined using conventional damage score determination and probit analysis techniques, and tissue temperatures were measured using infrared thermographic techniques. We found that the FEL was ideal for tissue damage studies, while our in-house THz source was not suitable to determine tissue damage thresholds. Using experimental data, the tissue damage threshold (ED50) was determined to be 7.16 W/cm2. This value was in well agreement with that predicted using our computational models. We hope that knowledge of tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies helps to ensure the safe use of THz radiation.

  20. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  1. Development of a drilling and coring test-bed for lunar subsurface exploration and preliminary experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaomeng; Deng, Zongquan; Quan, Qiquan; Tang, Dewei; Hou, Xuyan; Jiang, Shengyuan

    2014-07-01

    Drill sampling has been widely employed as an effective way to acquire deep samples in extraterrestrial exploration. A novel sampling method, namely, flexible-tube coring, was adopted for the Chang'e mission to acquire drilling cores without damaging stratification information. Since the extraterrestrial environment is uncertain and different from the terrestrial environment, automated drill sampling missions are at risk of failure. The principles of drilling and coring for the lunar subsurface should be fully tested and verified on earth before launch. This paper proposes a test-bed for conducting the aforementioned experiments on earth. The test-bed comprises a rotary-percussive drilling mechanism, penetrating mechanism, drilling medium container, and signal acquisition and control system. For granular soil, coring experiments indicate that the sampling method has a high coring rate greater than 80%. For hard rock, drilling experiments indicate that the percussive frequency greatly affects the drilling efficiency. A multi-layered simulant composed of granular soil and hard rock is built to test the adaptability of drilling and coring. To tackle complex drilling media, an intelligent drilling strategy based on online recognition is proposed to improve the adaptability of the sampling drill. The primary features of this research are the proposal of a scheme for drilling and coring a test-bed for validation on earth and the execution of drilling experiments in complex media.

  2. Proceedings of the seventh SPE symposium on formation damage control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on well bore damage. Topics considered at the symposium included perforations, acidizing sandstone formations, sand consolidation, sidewall core analysis, gravel packing, permeability damage due to fines migration, bacterial formation damage, asphaltene precipitation, HCl theories, buffered HF acid systems, brines, drilling fluids, corrosion inhibitors, and gravel pack repair with wireline devices.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gyanesh; Pachouri, U C; Khaidem, Devika Chanu; Kundu, Aman; Chopra, Chirag; Singh, Pushplata

    2015-01-01

    Various endogenous and environmental factors can cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage.  One of the reasons for enhanced mtDNA damage could be its proximity to the source of oxidants, and lack of histone-like protective proteins. Moreover, mitochondria contain inadequate DNA repair pathways, and, diminished DNA repair capacity may be one of the factors responsible for high mutation frequency of the mtDNA. mtDNA damage might cause impaired mitochondrial function, and, unrepaired mtDNA damage has been frequently linked with several diseases. Exploration of mitochondrial perspective of diseases might lead to a better understanding of several diseases, and will certainly open new avenues for detection, cure, and prevention of ailments.

  4. STS-118 Radiator Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, Dana M.; Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.; Herrin, J.; Lyons, F.

    2008-01-01

    During the August 2007 STS-118 mission to the International Space Station, a micro-meteoroid or orbital debris (MMOD) particle impacted and completely penetrated one of shuttle Endeavour s radiator panels and the underlying thermal control system (TCS) blanket, leaving deposits on (but no damage to) the payload bay door. While it is not unusual for shuttle orbiters to be impacted by small MMOD particles, the damage from this impact is larger than any previously seen on the shuttle radiator panels. A close-up photograph of the radiator impact entry hole is shown in Figure 1, and the location of the impact on Endeavour s left-side aft-most radiator panel is shown in Figure 2. The aft radiator panel is 0.5-inches thick and consists of 0.011 inch thick aluminum facesheets on the front and back of an aluminum honeycomb core. The front facesheet is additionally covered by a 0.005 inch thick layer of silver-Teflon thermal tape. The entry hole in the silver-Teflon tape measured 8.1 mm by 6.4 mm (0.32 inches by 0.25 inches). The entry hole in the outer facesheet measured 7.4 mm by 5.3 mm (0.29 inches by 0.21 inches) (0.23 inches). The impactor also perforated an existing 0.012 inch doubler that had been bonded over the facesheet to repair previous impact damage (an example that lightning can strike the same place twice, even for MMOD impact). The peeled-back edge around the entry hole, or lip , is a characteristic of many hypervelocity impacts. High velocity impact with the front facesheet fragmented the impacting particle and caused it to spread out into a debris cloud. The debris cloud caused considerable damage to the internal honeycomb core with 23 honeycomb cells over a region of 28 mm by 26 mm (1.1 inches by 1.0 inches) having either been completely destroyed or partially damaged. Figure 3 is a view of the exit hole in the rear facesheet, and partially shows the extent of the honeycomb core damage and clearly shows the jagged petaled exit hole through the backside

  5. Induction and repair of HZE induced cytogenetic damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Bao, S.; Rithidech, K.; Chrisler, W. B.; Couch, L. A.; Braby, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to high-mass, high energy (HZE) 56Fe particles (1000 GeV/AMU) using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The animals were sacrificed at 1-5 hours or after a 30-day recovery period. The frequency of micronuclei in the tracheal and the deep lung epithelial cells were evaluated. The relative effectiveness of 56Fe, for the induction of initial chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei, was compared to damage produced in the same biological system exposed to other types of high and low-LET radiation. It was demonstrated that for animals sacrificed at short times after exposure, the tracheal and lung epithelial cells, the 56Fe particles were 3.3 and 1.3 times as effective as 60Co in production of micronuclei, respectively. The effectiveness was also compared to that for exposure to inhaled radon. With this comparison, the 56Fe exposure of the tracheal epithelial cells and the lung epithelial cells were only 0.18 and 0.20 times as effective as radon in the production of the initial cytogenetic damage. It was suggested that the low relative effectiveness was related to potential for 'wasted energy' from the core of the 56Fe particles. When the animals were sacrificed after 30 days, the slopes of the dose-response relationships, which reflect the remaining level of damage, decreased by a factor of 10 for both the tracheal and lung epithelial cells. In both cases, the slope of the dose-response lines were no longer significantly different from zero, and the r2 values were very high. Lung epithelial cells, isolated from the animals sacrificed hours after exposure, were maintained in culture, and the micronuclei frequency evaluated after 4 and 6 subcultures. These cells were harvested at 24 and 36 days after the exposure. There was no dose-response detected in these cultures and no signs of genomic instability at either sample time.

  6. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  7. Optimal controller design for structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun

    2005-03-01

    The virtual passive control technique has recently been applied to structural damage detection, where the virtual passive controller only uses the existing control devices, and no additional physical elements are attached to the tested structure. One important task is to design passive controllers that can enhance the sensitivity of the identified parameters, such as natural frequencies, to structural damage. This paper presents a novel study of an optimal controller design for structural damage detection. We apply not only passive controllers but also low-order and fixed-structure controllers, such as PID controllers. In the optimal control design, the performance of structural damage detection is based on the application of a neural network technique, which uses the pattern of the correlation between the natural frequency changes of the tested system and the damaged system.

  8. High intensity anthropogenic sound damages fish ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Robert D.; Fewtrell, Jane; Popper, Arthur N.

    2003-01-01

    Marine petroleum exploration involves the repetitive use of high-energy noise sources, air-guns, that produce a short, sharp, low-frequency sound. Despite reports of behavioral responses of fishes and marine mammals to such noise, it is not known whether exposure to air-guns has the potential to damage the ears of aquatic vertebrates. It is shown here that the ears of fish exposed to an operating air-gun sustained extensive damage to their sensory epithelia that was apparent as ablated hair cells. The damage was regionally severe, with no evidence of repair or replacement of damaged sensory cells up to 58 days after air-gun exposure.

  9. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  10. Numerical analysis of impact-damaged sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Youngkeun

    Sandwich structures are used in a wide variety of structural applications due to their relative advantages over other conventional structural materials in terms of improved stability, weight savings, and ease of manufacture and repair. Foreign object impact damage in sandwich composites can result in localized damage to the facings, core, and core-facing interface. Such damage may result in drastic reductions in composite strength, elastic moduli, and durability and damage tolerance characteristics. In this study, physically-motivated numerical models have been developed for predicting the residual strength of impact-damaged sandwich composites comprised of woven-fabric graphite-epoxy facesheets and Nomex honeycomb cores subjected to compression-after-impact loading. Results from non-destructive inspection and destructive sectioning of damaged sandwich panels were used to establish initial conditions for damage (residual facesheet indentation, core crush dimension, etc.) in the numerical analysis. Honeycomb core crush test results were used to establish the nonlinear constitutive behavior for the Nomex core. The influence of initial facesheet property degradation and progressive loss of facesheet structural integrity on the residual strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels was examined. The influence of damage of various types and sizes, specimen geometry, support boundary conditions, and variable material properties on the estimated residual strength is discussed. Facesheet strains from material and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses correlated relatively well with experimentally determined values. Moreover, numerical predictions of residual strength are consistent with experimental observations. Using a methodology similar to that presented in this work, it may be possible to develop robust residual strength estimates for complex sandwich composite structural components with varying levels of in-service damage. Such studies may facilitate sandwich