Science.gov

Sample records for core junctions modelling

  1. Electrostatic model of radial pn junction nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2013-08-01

    Poisson's equation is solved for a radial pn junction nanowire (NW) with surface depletion. This resulted in a model capable of giving radial energy band and electric field profiles for any arbitrary core/shell doping density, core/shell dimensions, and surface state density. Specific cases were analyzed to extract pertinent underlying physics, while the relationship between NW specifications and the depletion of the NW were examined to optimize the built-in potential across the junction. Additionally, the model results were compared with experimental results in literature to good agreement. Finally, an optimum device design is proposed to satisfy material, optical, and electrostatic constraints in high efficiency NW solar cells.

  2. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  3. Pasiflora proteins are novel core components of the septate junction.

    PubMed

    Deligiannaki, Myrto; Casper, Abbie L; Jung, Christophe; Gaul, Ulrike

    2015-09-01

    Epithelial sheets play essential roles as selective barriers insulating the body from the environment and establishing distinct chemical compartments within it. In invertebrate epithelia, septate junctions (SJs) consist of large multi-protein complexes that localize at the apicolateral membrane and mediate barrier function. Here, we report the identification of two novel SJ components, Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2, through a genome-wide glial RNAi screen in Drosophila. Pasiflora mutants show permeable blood-brain and tracheal barriers, overelongated tracheal tubes and mislocalization of SJ proteins. Consistent with the observed phenotypes, the genes are co-expressed in embryonic epithelia and glia and are required cell-autonomously to exert their function. Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 belong to a previously uncharacterized family of tetraspan membrane proteins conserved across the protostome-deuterostome divide. Both proteins localize at SJs and their apicolateral membrane accumulation depends on other complex components. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments we demonstrate that pasiflora proteins are core SJ components as they are required for complex formation and exhibit restricted mobility within the membrane of wild-type epithelial cells, but rapid diffusion in cells with disrupted SJs. Taken together, our results show that Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 are novel integral components of the SJ and implicate a new family of tetraspan proteins in the function of these ancient and crucial cell junctions. PMID:26329602

  4. Pasiflora proteins are novel core components of the septate junction

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannaki, Myrto; Casper, Abbie L.; Jung, Christophe; Gaul, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial sheets play essential roles as selective barriers insulating the body from the environment and establishing distinct chemical compartments within it. In invertebrate epithelia, septate junctions (SJs) consist of large multi-protein complexes that localize at the apicolateral membrane and mediate barrier function. Here, we report the identification of two novel SJ components, Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2, through a genome-wide glial RNAi screen in Drosophila. Pasiflora mutants show permeable blood-brain and tracheal barriers, overelongated tracheal tubes and mislocalization of SJ proteins. Consistent with the observed phenotypes, the genes are co-expressed in embryonic epithelia and glia and are required cell-autonomously to exert their function. Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 belong to a previously uncharacterized family of tetraspan membrane proteins conserved across the protostome-deuterostome divide. Both proteins localize at SJs and their apicolateral membrane accumulation depends on other complex components. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments we demonstrate that pasiflora proteins are core SJ components as they are required for complex formation and exhibit restricted mobility within the membrane of wild-type epithelial cells, but rapid diffusion in cells with disrupted SJs. Taken together, our results show that Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 are novel integral components of the SJ and implicate a new family of tetraspan proteins in the function of these ancient and crucial cell junctions. PMID:26329602

  5. Nanooptics of Plasmonic Nanomatryoshkas: Shrinking the Size of a Core-Shell Junction to Subnanometer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Zapata, Mario; Xiong, Min; Liu, Zhonghui; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Hong; Borisov, Andrei G; Gu, Hongchen; Nordlander, Peter; Aizpurua, Javier; Ye, Jian

    2015-10-14

    Quantum effects in plasmonic systems play an important role in defining the optical response of structures with subnanometer gaps. Electron tunneling across the gaps can occur, altering both the far-field optical response and the near-field confinement and enhancement. In this study, we experimentally and theoretically investigate plasmon coupling in gold "nanomatryoshka" (NM) nanoparticles with different core-shell separations. Plasmon coupling effects between the core and the shell become significant when their separation decreases to 15 nm. When their separation decreases to below 1 nm, the near- and far-field properties can no longer be described by classical approaches but require the inclusion of quantum mechanical effects such as electron transport through the self-assembled monolayer of molecular junction. In addition, surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements indicate strong electron-transport induced charge transfer across the molecular junction. Our quantum modeling provides an estimate for the AC conductances of molecules in the junction. The insights acquired from this work pave the way for the development of novel quantum plasmonic devices and substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. PMID:26375710

  6. An improved junction capacitance model for junction field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Liou, Juin J.; Cirba, Claude R.; Green, Keith

    2006-07-01

    A new junction capacitance model for the four-terminal junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is presented. With a single expression, the model, which is valid for different temperatures and a wide range of bias conditions, describes correctly the JFET junction capacitance behavior and capacitance drop-off phenomenon. The model has been verified using experimental data measured at Texas Instruments.

  7. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  8. Perispeckles are major assembly sites for the exon junction core complex

    PubMed Central

    Daguenet, Elisabeth; Baguet, Aurélie; Degot, Sébastien; Schmidt, Ute; Alpy, Fabien; Wendling, Corinne; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Kessler, Pascal; Rio, Marie-Christine; Le Hir, Hervé; Bertrand, Edouard; Tomasetto, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is loaded onto mRNAs as a consequence of splicing and regulates multiple posttranscriptional events. MLN51, Magoh, Y14, and eIF4A3 form a highly stable EJC core, but where this tetrameric complex is assembled in the cell remains unclear. Here we show that EJC factors are enriched in domains that we term perispeckles and are visible as doughnuts around nuclear speckles. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses and EJC assembly mutants show that perispeckles do not store free subunits, but instead are enriched for assembled cores. At the ultrastructural level, perispeckles are distinct from interchromatin granule clusters that may function as storage sites for splicing factors and intermingle with perichromatin fibrils, where nascent RNAs and active RNA Pol II are present. These results support a model in which perispeckles are major assembly sites for the tetrameric EJC core. This subnuclear territory thus represents an intermediate region important for mRNA maturation, between transcription sites and splicing factor reservoirs and assembly sites. PMID:22419818

  9. Perispeckles are major assembly sites for the exon junction core complex.

    PubMed

    Daguenet, Elisabeth; Baguet, Aurélie; Degot, Sébastien; Schmidt, Ute; Alpy, Fabien; Wendling, Corinne; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Kessler, Pascal; Rio, Marie-Christine; Le Hir, Hervé; Bertrand, Edouard; Tomasetto, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is loaded onto mRNAs as a consequence of splicing and regulates multiple posttranscriptional events. MLN51, Magoh, Y14, and eIF4A3 form a highly stable EJC core, but where this tetrameric complex is assembled in the cell remains unclear. Here we show that EJC factors are enriched in domains that we term perispeckles and are visible as doughnuts around nuclear speckles. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses and EJC assembly mutants show that perispeckles do not store free subunits, but instead are enriched for assembled cores. At the ultrastructural level, perispeckles are distinct from interchromatin granule clusters that may function as storage sites for splicing factors and intermingle with perichromatin fibrils, where nascent RNAs and active RNA Pol II are present. These results support a model in which perispeckles are major assembly sites for the tetrameric EJC core. This subnuclear territory thus represents an intermediate region important for mRNA maturation, between transcription sites and splicing factor reservoirs and assembly sites. PMID:22419818

  10. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  11. Metallic Electrode: Semiconducting Nanotube Junction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in an experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube [Collins et al., Science 278, 100 ('97)]. We claim that there are two contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube semi conductor) junction depending whether the alignment of the metal and semiconductor band structure is (1) variable (vacuum-gap) or (2) fixed (touching) with V. With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube. However, the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in forward current with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, while with V > 0 for an p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type. We apply this picture to the source-drain I-V characteristics in a long nanotube-channel field-effect-transistor (Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1597 ('00)], and show that two independent metal-semiconductor junctions connected in series are responsible for the observed behavior.

  12. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016. PMID:26899144

  13. Silicon-core glass fibres as microwire radial-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsen, F. A.; Smeltzer, B. K.; Nord, M.; Hawkins, T.; Ballato, J.; Gibson, U. J.

    2014-09-01

    Vertically aligned radial-junction solar cell designs offer potential improvements over planar geometries, as carrier generation occurs close to the junction for all absorption depths, but most production methods still require a single crystal substrate. Here, we report on the fabrication of such solar cells from polycrystalline, low purity (99.98%) p-type silicon starting material, formed into silicon core, silica sheath fibres using bulk glass draw techniques. Short segments were cut from the fibres, and the silica was etched from one side, which exposed the core and formed a conical cavity around it. We then used vapour deposition techniques to create p-i-n junction solar cells. Prototype cells formed from single fibres have shown conversion efficiencies up to 3.6%, despite the low purity of the starting material. This fabrication method has the potential to reduce the energy cost and the silicon volume required for solar cell production. Simulations were performed to investigate the potential of the conical cavity around the silicon core for light collection. Absorption of over 90% of the incident light was predicted, over a wide range of wavelengths, using these structures in combination with a 10% volume fraction of silicon.

  14. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data. PMID:17839632

  15. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  16. DNA Three Way Junction Core Decorated with Amino Acids-Like Residues-Synthesis and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Addamiano, Claudia; Gerland, Béatrice; Payrastre, Corinne; Escudier, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Construction and physico-chemical behavior of DNA three way junction (3WJ) functionalized by protein-like residues (imidazole, alcohol and carboxylic acid) at unpaired positions at the core is described. One 5'-C(S)-propargyl-thymidine nucleotide was specifically incorporated on each strand to react through a post synthetic CuACC reaction with either protected imidazolyl-, hydroxyl- or carboxyl-azide. Structural impacts of 5'-C(S)-functionalization were investigated to evaluate how 3WJ flexibility/stability is affected. PMID:27563857

  17. Dynamic gap junctional communication: a delimiting model for tissue responses.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, G J; Brink, P R; Ramanan, S V

    1994-01-01

    Gap junctions are aqueous intercellular channels formed by a diverse class of membrane-spanning proteins, known as connexins. These aqueous pores provide partial cytoplasmic continuity between cells in most tissues, and are freely permeable to a host of physiologically relevant second messenger molecules/ionic species (e.g., Ca2+, IP3, cAMP, cGMP). Despite the fact that these second messenger molecules/ionic species have been shown to alter junctional patency, there is no clear basis for understanding how dynamic and transient changes in the intracellular concentration of second messenger molecules might modulate the extent of intercellular communication among coupled cells. Thus, we have modified the tissue monolayer model of Ramanan and Brink (1990) to account for both the up-regulatory and down-regulatory effects on junctions by second messenger molecules that diffuse through gap junctions. We have chosen the vascular wall as our morphological correlate because of its anisotropy and large investment of gap junctions. The model allows us to illustrate the putative behavior of gap junctions under a variety of physiologically relevant conditions. The modeling studies demonstrated that transient alterations in intracellular second messenger concentrations are capable of producing 50-125% changes in the number of cells recruited into a functional syncytial unit, after activation of a single cell. Moreover, the model conditions required to demonstrate such physiologically relevant changes in intercellular diffusion among coupled cells are commonly observed in intact tissues and cultured cells. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7811948

  18. Lunar magnetism. [primordial core model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown, for a very simple model of the moon, that the existence of a primordial core magnetic field would give rise to a present day nonzero dipole external field. In the investigation a uniformly magnetized core embedded in a permeable mantle is considered. The significance of the obtained results for the conclusions reported by Runcorn (1975) is discussed. Comments provided by Runcorn to the discussion are also presented.

  19. Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert.; Sahm, Aaron; Crawford, Clark; King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S.

    2010-03-01

    Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement.

  20. The influence of the instabilities in modelling arteriovenous junction haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Stephen P; Houston, J Graeme; Walsh, Michael T

    2015-10-15

    The arteriovenous junction is characterised by high flow rates, large pressure difference and typically a palpable thrill or audible bruit, associated with turbulent flow. However, the arteriovenous junction is frequently studied with the assumption of streamline flow. This assumption is based on the Reynolds number calculation, although other factors can contribute to turbulent generation. In this study, the presence of instabilities is examined and the influencing factors discussed. This was performed using a pseudo-realistic geometry with adapted graft angles, vein diameter, outflow split ratio and graft inlet velocity values. Correlation was performed between steady and unsteady averaged simulation cases with correlation performance ranked. Overall the arteriovenous junction is capable of possessing highly disturbed flows, in which strict modelling requirements are necessary to capture such instabilities and avoid erroneous conclusions. Vein diameter and flow split ratio contribute to turbulent generation, thus Reynolds number cannot be used as a sole turbulent criterion in the arteriovenous junction. PMID:26315920

  1. Moon model - An offset core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransford, G.; Sjogren, W.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar model proposed helps to account for the offset of the center of gravity from the center of the optical figure, the moments of inertia of the Moon, the 'mascons,' the localization of the maria basins on the near side of the Moon, the igneous nature of rocks, and the remanent magnetism. In the proposed model the Moon has a core whose center is offset from the center of the outside spheroid towards the earth. Such a core will be formed if the Moon were entirely molten at some time in its past, and on solidification was synchronous with the earth.

  2. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  3. Analytical modeling of the radial pn junction nanowire solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nouran M.; Allam, Nageh K.; Abdel Haleem, Ashraf M.; Rafat, Nadia H.

    2014-07-01

    In photovoltaic solar cells, radial p-n junctions have been considered a very promising structure to improve the carrier collection efficiency and accordingly the conversion efficiency. In the present study, the semiconductor equations, namely Poisson's and continuity equations for a cylindrical p-n junction solar cell, have been solved analytically. The analytical model is based on Green's function theory to calculate the current density, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and conversion efficiency. The model has been used to simulate p-n and p-i-n silicon radial solar cells. The validity and accuracy of the present simulator were confirmed through a comparison with previously published experimental and numerical reports.

  4. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hanqian; McMahon, John J; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Zefeng; Silver, Debra L

    2016-09-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:27618312

  5. Observation and Modeling of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bend Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Anantram, M. P.; Jaffe, R. L.; Kong, J.; Dai, H.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bends, with diameters from approx. 1.0 to 2.5 nm and bend angles from 18 deg. to 34 deg., are observed in catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons at 600 - 1200 C. An algorithm using molecular dynamics simulation (MD) techniques is developed to model these structures that are considered to be SWNT junctions formed by topological defects (i.e. pentagon-heptagon pairs). The algorithm is used to predict the tube helicities and defect configurations for bend junctions using the observed tube diameters and bend angles. The number and arrangement of the defects at the junction interfaces are found to depend on the tube helicities and bend angle. The structural and energetic calculations using the Brenner potential show a number of stable junction configurations for each bend angle with the 34 deg. bends being more stable than the others. Tight binding calculations for local density of state (LDOS) and transmission coefficients are carried out to investigate electrical properties of the bend junctions.

  6. Extension of the ADC Charge-Collection Model to Include Multiple Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    The ADC model is a charge-collection model derived for simple p-n junction silicon diodes having a single reverse-biased p-n junction at one end and an ideal substrate contact at the other end. The present paper extends the model to include multiple junctions, and the goal is to estimate how collected charge is shared by the different junctions.

  7. MCNP modelling of the PBMR equilibrium core

    SciTech Connect

    Albornoz, F.; Korochinsky, S.

    2006-07-01

    A complete MCNP model of the PBMR equilibrium core is presented, which accounts for the same fuel regions defined in the PBMR core management code, as well as for complete fuel and reflector temperature distributions. This comprehensive 3D model is the means to calculate and characterize the neutron and photon boundary sources of the equilibrium core, and is also used to support some specific core neutronic studies needing detailed geometry modelling. Due to the geometrical modelling approach followed, an unrealistic partial cutting of fuel kernels and pebbles is introduced in the model. The variations introduced by this partial cutting both on the packing fraction and on the uranium load of the modelled core and its corresponding effect on core reactivity and flux levels, have been investigated and quantified. A complete set of high-temperature cross-section data was applied to the calculation of the PBMR equilibrium core, and its effect on the calculated core reactivity is also reported. (authors)

  8. Inflow Models of Nearby Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Cruz, David; De Vries, C. H.; Arce, H. G.

    2012-01-01

    We obtained observations of nearby (d < 300 pc) isolated pre-stellar and Class 0 cores from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The optically thick HCO+ J=3-2 rotational transition was observed in order to detect the blue-asymmetric infall signature often seen in pre-stellar cores. The asymmetric spectral line profiles were analyzed by using a 1-D radiative transfer model that assumes a uniform infall velocity and a realistic radial excitation profile. The model is able to reproduce the asymmetric line profile in most cases by varying only 5 physical cloud parameters. The analysis was used to obtain a reliable estimate of the infall rate. The sources presented here and observed in the HCO+ J=3-2 rotational transition were B228, CB130 SMM2, OPH MM 126, and RCRA SMM1A. Analysis of these spectra yielded some unexpected results. Our analysis did a good job at fitting the spectral lines in some sources while it performed poorly for others. We observed infall velocities ranging from -1.1, indicating expansion, to 0.4 km/s in these sources and found line center optical depths ranging from 0.03 to 520. The peak excitation temperature for the HCO+ J=3-2 transition was found to range from 3 to 57 K.

  9. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A.

    1996-12-31

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  10. Summary of mathematical models for a conventional and vertical junction photoconverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The geometry and computer programming for mathematical models of a one-dimensional conventional photoconverter, a one-dimensional vertical junction photoconverter, a three-dimensional conventinal photoconverter, and a three-dimensional vertical junction solar cell are discussed.

  11. A Model for the Behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan John Baker

    2003-08-05

    A magnetic tunnel junction is a device that changes its electrical resistance with a change in an applied magnetic field. A typical junction consists of two magnetic electrodes separated by a nonmagnetic insulating layer. The magnetizations of the two electrodes can have two possible extreme configurations, parallel and antiparallel. The antiparallel configuration is observed to have the higher measured resistance and the parallel configuration has the lower resistance. To switch between these two configurations a magnetic field is applied to the device which is primarily used to change the orientation of the magnetization of one electrode usually called the free layer, although with sufficient high magnetic field the orientation of the magnetizations of both of the electrodes can be changed. The most commonly used models for describing and explaining the electronic behavior of tunnel junctions are the Simmons model and the Brinkman model. However, both of these models were designed for simple, spin independent tunneling. The Simmons model does not address the issue of applied magnetic fields nor does it address the form of the electronic band structure in the metallic electrodes, including the important factor of spin polarization. The Brinkman model is similar, the main difference between the two models being the shape of the tunneling barrier potential between the two electrodes. Therefore, the research conducted in this thesis has developed a new theoretical model that addresses these important issues starting from basic principles. The main features of the new model include: the development of equations for true spin dependent tunneling through the insulating barrier, the differences in the orientations of the electrode magnetizations on either side of the barrier, and the effects of the density of states function on the behavior of the junction. The present work has explored densities of states that are more realistic than the simplified free electron density

  12. Model results for graphene electrodes in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Carlo; Italo Trioni, Mario; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Lukose Sebastian, Kizhakeyil; Sánchez Portal, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is a material with a high potential for nanoelectronic applications as transparent conductive electrode. In view of a graphene-based electronics, a possible way to bridge graphene electrodes is by molecular linkers either organic molecules or graphene-derived systems such as graphene nanoribbons (GNR). In the present work, we investigated the electronic and conductive properties of such junctions for two different devices. First we modeled a photochromic switch based on diarylethene molecules, which can be activated/deactivated by light. We found a large on/off current ratio, which can be improved by modifying the functional groups of the molecule. We then investigated the properties of graphene/GNR/graphene junctions, showing that their conductive properties can be tailored by changing the length and width of the GNR. The calculations have been carried out by using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory.

  13. Accident prediction models for roads with minor junctions.

    PubMed

    Mountain, L; Fawaz, B; Jarrett, D

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method for predicting expected accidents on main roads with minor junctions where traffic counts on the minor approaches are not available. The study was based on data for some 3800 km of highway in the U.K. including more than 5000 minor junctions. The highways consisted of both single and dual-carriageway roads in urban and rural areas. Generalized linear modelling was used to develop regression estimates of expected accidents for six highway categories and an empirical Bayes procedure was used to improve these estimates by combining them with accident counts. Accidents on highway sections were shown to be a non-linear function of exposure and minor junction frequency. For the purposes of estimating expected accidents, while the regression model estimates were shown to be preferable to accident counts, the best results were obtained using the empirical Bayes method. The latter was the only method that produced unbiased estimates of expected accidents for high-risk sites. PMID:9006638

  14. Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert.; Sahm, Aaron; Crawford, Clark; King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S.

    2010-03-01

    Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement. Large photovoltaic systems are typically developed as projects which supply electricity to a utility and are owned by independent power producers. Obtaining financing at favorable rates and attracting investors requires confidence in the projected energy yield from the plant. In this paper, various performance models for projecting annual energy yield from Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems are assessed by comparing measured system output to model predictions based on measured weather and irradiance data. The results are statistically analyzed to identify systematic error sources.

  15. Modeling of dislocations in a CDW junction: Interference of the CDW and normal carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo Bravo, Alvaro; Yi, Tianyou; Kirova, Natasha; Brazovskii, Serguei

    2015-03-01

    We derive and study equations for dissipative transient processes in a constraint incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) with remnant pockets or a thermal population of normal carriers. The attention was paid to give the correct conservation of condensed and normal electrons, which was problematic at presence of moving dislocation cores if working within an intuitive Ginzburg-Landau like model. We performed a numeric modeling for stationary and transient states in a rectangular geometry when the voltage V or the normal current are applied across the conducting chains. We observe creation of an array of electronic vortices, the dislocations, at or close to the junction surface; their number increases stepwise with increasing V. The dislocation core strongly concentrates the normal carriers but the CDW phase distortions almost neutralize the total charge. At other regimes, the lines of the zero CDW amplitude flash across the sample working as phase slips. The studies were inspired by, and can be applied to experiments on mesa-junctions in NbSe3 and TaS3.

  16. The CORE Model to Student Organization Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyne, Robert K.

    Student organization development (SOD) is an emerging technology for conducting intentional student development through positive alteration of student organizations. One model (CORE) for conceptualizing SOD is in use at the Student Development Center of the University of Cincinnati. The CORE model to SOD is comprised of three concentric rings, the…

  17. A power balance model for converging and diverging flow junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Guffey, S.E. ); Fraser, D.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors propose that pressures across a junction of flows are best described by potential, kinetic, and dissipated (lost) power. It is demonstrated that differences in Bernoulli constants up- and downstream of junctions are not proportional to energy losses even in the trivial case of zero junction losses.

  18. Models and methods for in vitro testing of hepatic gap junctional communication

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to their pivotal roles in controlling all aspects of the liver cell life cycle, hepatocellular gap junctions are frequently disrupted upon impairment of the homeostatic balance, as occurs during liver toxicity. Hepatic gap junctions, which are mainly built up by connexin32, are specifically targeted by tumor promoters and epigenetic carcinogens. This renders inhibition of gap junction functionality a suitable indicator for the in vitro detection of nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenicity. The establishment of a reliable liver gap junction inhibition assay for routine in vitro testing purposes requires a cellular system in which gap junctions are expressed at an in vivo-like level as well as an appropriate technique to probe gap junction activity. Both these models and methods are discussed in the current paper, thereby focusing on connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:26420514

  19. Models and methods for in vitro testing of hepatic gap junctional communication.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Willebrords, Joost; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-12-25

    Inherent to their pivotal roles in controlling all aspects of the liver cell life cycle, hepatocellular gap junctions are frequently disrupted upon impairment of the homeostatic balance, as occurs during liver toxicity. Hepatic gap junctions, which are mainly built up by connexin32, are specifically targeted by tumor promoters and epigenetic carcinogens. This renders inhibition of gap junction functionality a suitable indicator for the in vitro detection of nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenicity. The establishment of a reliable liver gap junction inhibition assay for routine in vitro testing purposes requires a cellular system in which gap junctions are expressed at an in vivo-like level as well as an appropriate technique to probe gap junction activity. Both these models and methods are discussed in the current paper, thereby focusing on connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:26420514

  20. Core-Formation Models and Extinct Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, S. B.; Yin, Q.-Z.

    2001-01-01

    Zr and W isotope data are consistent with the Earth's core forming in a single event subsequent to about 113 Ma after the formation of the solar system. With continuous models of core formation the process can start early. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Strains at the myotendinous junction predicted by a micromechanical model

    PubMed Central

    Sharafi, Bahar; Ames, Elizabeth G.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work was to create a finite element micromechanical model of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) to examine how the structure and mechanics of the MTJ affect the local micro-scale strains experienced by muscle fibers. We validated the model through comparisons with histological longitudinal sections of muscles fixed in slack and stretched positions. The model predicted deformations of the A-bands within the fiber near the MTJ that were similar to those measured from the histological sections. We then used the model to predict the dependence of local fiber strains on activation and the mechanical properties of the endomysium. The model predicted that peak micro-scale strains increase with activation and as the compliance of the endomysium decreases. Analysis of the models revealed that, in passive stretch, local fiber strains are governed by the difference of the mechanical properties between the fibers and the endomysium. In active stretch, strain distributions are governed by the difference in cross-sectional area along the length of the tapered region of the fiber near the MTJ. The endomysium provides passive resistance that balances the active forces and prevents the tapered region of the fiber from undergoing excessive strain. These model predictions lead to the following hypotheses: (i) the increased likelihood of injury during active lengthening of muscle fibers may be due to the increase in peak strain with activation and (ii) endomysium may play a role in protecting fibers from injury by reducing the strains within the fiber at the MTJ. PMID:21945569

  2. Molecular Motion of the Junction Points in Model Networks Prepared by Acyclic Triene Metathesis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Lucas Caire; Bowers, Clifford R; Graf, Robert; Wagener, Kenneth B

    2016-03-01

    The junction dynamics in a selectively deuterated model polymer network containing junctions on every 21st chain carbon is studied by solid state (2) H echo NMR. Polymer networks are prepared via acyclic triene metathesis of deuteron-labeled symmetric trienes with deuteron probes precisely placed at the alpha carbon relative to the junction point. The effect of decreasing the cross-link density on the junction dynamics is studied by introduction of polybutadiene chains in-between junctions. The networks are characterized by swelling, gel content, and solid state (1) H MAS NMR. Line shape analysis of the (2) H quadrupolar echo spectra reveals that the degree of motion anisotropy and the distribution of motion correlation times depend on the cross-link density and structural heterogeneity of the polymer networks. A detailed model of the junction dynamics at different temperatures is proposed and explained in terms of the intermolecular cooperativity in densely-packed systems. PMID:26787457

  3. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Rubie; Seth Andrew Jacobson

    2016-03-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so must the oxygen fugacity of the equilibrating material. The latter can occur if silicon partitions into the core and through the late delivery of oxidized material. Coupled dynamical accretion and multi-stage core formation models predict the evolving mantle and core compositions of all the terrestrial planets simultaneously and also place strong constraints on the bulk compositions and oxidation states of primitive bodies in the protoplanetary disk.

  4. Negative differential resistance in GeSi core-shell transport junctions: the role of local sp(2) hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nuo; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaobin; Kong, Xianghua; Zheng, Xiaohong; Guo, Hong

    2016-09-21

    We report a theoretical investigation of nonlinear quantum transport properties of Au/GeSi/Au junctions. For GeSi semiconducting core-shell structures brought into contact with Au electrodes, a very unusual behavior is that the tunneling transport is on-resonance right at equilibrium. This resonance is not due to the alignment of a quantum level in GeSi to the electrochemical potential of Au, but due to the alignment of very sharp DOS features - hot spots, localized at the two Au/GeSi interfaces of the device. An applied bias voltage shifts the hot spots relative to each other which gives rise to substantial negative differential resistance (NDR). The hot spots localized at the two interfaces were found to be due to the unbonded pz orbital of a sp(2) hybridized interface Si atom which is surrounded by three non-sp(2) hybridized neighbors. The mechanism of inducing hot spots and NDR by a local structure unit is not limited to the GeSi. The results suggest an interesting scheme for constructing NDR devices by orbital manipulation, to be more explicit, for example, by designing local structural units having unbonded orbitals at the interfaces between electrodes and the central region of the transport junction. PMID:27546305

  5. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  6. Three-dimensional models of conventional and vertical junction laser-photovoltaic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Walker, Gilbert H.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional models of both conventional planar junction and vertical junction photovoltaic energy converters have been constructed. The models are a set of linear partial differential equations and take into account many photoconverter design parameters. The model is applied to Si photoconverters; however, the model may be used with other semiconductors. When used with a Nd laser, the conversion efficiency of the Si vertical junction photoconverter is 47 percent, whereas the efficiency for the conventional planar Si photoconverter is only 17 percent. A parametric study of the Si vertical junction photoconverter is then done in order to describe the optimum converter for use with the 1.06-micron Nd laser. The efficiency of this optimized vertical junction converter is 44 percent at 1 kW/sq cm.

  7. Chemical Models of Star-Forming Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.

    2013-10-01

    We review chemical models of low-mass star forming cores including our own work. Chemistry in molecular clouds are not in equilibrium. Molecular abundances in star forming cores change not only with physical conditions in cores but also with time. In prestellar cores, temperature stays almost constant ˜ 10 K, while the gas density increases as the core collapses. Three chemical phenomena are observed in this cold phase: molecular depletion, chemical fractionation, and deuterium enrichment. They are reproduced by chemical models combined with isothermal gravitational collapse. The collapse timescale of prestellar cores depends on the initial ratios of thermal, turbulent and magnetic pressure to gravitational energy. Since the chemical timescales, such as adsorption timescale of gas particle onto grains, are comparable to the collapse timescale, molecular abundances in cores should vary depending on the collapse timescale. Observations found that molecular abundances in some cores deviate from those in other cores, in spite of their similar central densities; it could originate in the pressure to gravity ratio in the cores. As the core contraction proceeds, compressional heating eventually overwhelms radiative cooling, and the core starts to warm up. Temperature of the infalling gas rises, as it approaches the central region. Grain-surface reactions of adsorbed molecules occur in this warm-up phase, as well as in prestellar phase. Hydrogenation is efficient at T ≤ 20 K, whereas radicals can migrate on grain surface and react with each other to form complex organic molecules (COMs) at T ≥ 30 K. Grain-surface species are sublimated to the gas phase and re-start gas-phase reactions; e.g. unsaturated carbon chains are formed from sublimated methane. Our model calculation predicts that COMs increases as the warm region extends outwards and the abundances of unsaturated carbon chains depend on the gas density in the CH4 sublimation zone. Recent detection of COMs in

  8. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-08-01

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  9. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Daijiro E-mail: research@nano.tu-dresden.de; Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-08-21

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  10. Emergent Central Pattern Generator Behavior in Gap-Junction-Coupled Hodgkin-Huxley Style Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Memelli, Heraldo; Solomon, Irene C.

    2012-01-01

    Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs) involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents (IAHP) to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus. PMID:23365558

  11. Dynamic compact model of thermally assisted switching magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Baraji, M.; Javerliac, V.; Guo, W.; Prenat, G.; Dieny, B.

    2009-12-01

    The general purpose of spin electronics is to take advantage of the electron's spin in addition to its electrical charge to build innovative electronic devices. These devices combine magnetic materials which are used as spin polarizer or analyzer together with semiconductors or insulators, resulting in innovative hybrid CMOS/magnetic (Complementary MOS) architectures. In particular, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) can be used for the design of magnetic random access memories [S. Tehrani, Proc. IEEE 91, 703 (2003)], magnetic field programmable gate arrays [Y. Guillement, International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing, 2008], low-power application specific integrated circuits [S. Matsunaga, Appl. Phys. Express 1, 091301 (2008)], and rf oscillators. The thermally assisted switching (TAS) technology requires heating the MTJ before writing it by means of an external field. It reduces the overall power consumption, solves the data writing selectivity issues, and improves the thermal stability of the written information for high density applications. The design of hybrid architectures requires a MTJ compact model, which can be used in standard electrical simulators of the industry. As a result, complete simulations of CMOS/MTJ hybrid circuits can be performed before experimental realization and testing. This article presents a highly accurate model of the MTJ based on the TAS technology. It is compatible with the Spectre electrical simulator of Cadence design suite.

  12. Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction: human disease and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Julie; Gonzalez, Julien; Miravete, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Chaaya, Rana; Decramer, Stéphane; Bandin, Flavio; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Schanstra, Joost P

    2011-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction is the most frequently observed cause of obstructive nephropathy in children. Neonatal and foetal animal models have been developed that mimic closely what is observed in human disease. The purpose of this review is to discuss how obstructive nephropathy alters kidney histology and function and describe the molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of the lesions, including inflammation, proliferation/apoptosis, renin–angiotensin system activation and fibrosis, based on both human and animal data. Also we propose that during obstructive nephropathy, hydrodynamic modifications are early inducers of the tubular lesions, which are potentially at the origin of the pathology. Finally, an important observation in animal models is that relief of obstruction during kidney development has important effects on renal function later in adult life. A major short-coming is the absence of data on the impact of UPJ obstruction on long-term adult renal function to elucidate whether these animal data are also valid in humans. PMID:20681980

  13. Synaptic dynamics at the neuromuscular junction: mechanisms and models.

    PubMed

    Van Essen, D C; Gordon, H; Soha, J M; Fraser, S E

    1990-01-01

    During development, the neuromuscular junction passes through a stage of extensive polyinnervation followed by a period of wholesale synapse elimination. In this report we discuss mechanisms and interactions that could mediate many of the key aspects of these important developmental events. Our emphasis is on (1) establishing an overall conceptual framework within which the role of many distinct cellular interactions and molecular factors can be evaluated, and (2) generating computer simulations that systematically test the adequacy of different models in accounting for a wide range of biological data. Our analysis indicates that several relatively simple mechanisms are each capable of explaining a variety of experimental observations. On the other hand, no one mechanism can account for the full spectrum of experimental results. Thus, it is important to consider models that are based on interactions among multiple mechanisms. A potentially powerful combination is one based on (1) a scaffold within the basal lamina or in the postsynaptic membrane which is induced by nerve terminals and which serves to stabilize terminals by a positive feedback mechanism; (2) a sprouting factor whose release by muscle fibers is down-regulated by activity and perhaps other factors; and (3) an intrinsic tendency of motor neurons to withdraw some connections while allowing others to grow. PMID:2181065

  14. Modeling in the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Kai Chung

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of modeling and applications into the mathematics curriculum has proven to be a challenging task over the last fifty years. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has made mathematical modeling both one of its Standards for Mathematical Practice and one of its Conceptual Categories. This article discusses the need for mathematical…

  15. Temperature Characteristics Analysis of Triple-Junction Solar Cell under Concentrated Conditions using Spice Diode Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurada, Yuya; Ota, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Kensuke

    2011-12-01

    Using spice diode model, the temperature characteristics of an InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cell under concentrated light conditions were analyzed in detail. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the single-junction solar cells (InGaP, InGaAs, and Ge solar cells) were measured at various temperatures. From dark I-V characteristics of each single-junction solar cell, the diode parameters and temperature exponents were extracted. The extracted diode parameters and temperature exponents were applied to the equivalent circuit model for the triple-junction solar cell, and the solar cell performance was calculated with considering the temperature characteristics of series resistance. There was good agreement between the measured and calculated I-V characteristics of the triple-junction solar cell at various temperatures under concentrated light conditions.

  16. Bipolar junction transistor models for circuit simulation of cosmic-ray-induced soft errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, R.; Zoutendyk, J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines bipolar junction transistor models suitable for calculating the effects of large excursions of some of the variables determining the operation of a transistor. Both the Ebers-Moll and Gummel-Poon models are studied, and the junction and diffusion capacitances are evaluated on the basis of the latter model. The most interesting result of this analysis is that a bipolar junction transistor when struck by a cosmic particle may cause a single event upset in an electronic circuit if the transistor is operated at a low forward base-emitter bias.

  17. Bipolar junction transistor models for circuit simulation of cosmic-ray-induced soft errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benumof, R.; Zoutendyk, J.

    1984-11-01

    This paper examines bipolar junction transistor models suitable for calculating the effects of large excursions of some of the variables determining the operation of a transistor. Both the Ebers-Moll and Gummel-Poon models are studied, and the junction and diffusion capacitances are evaluated on the basis of the latter model. The most interesting result of this analysis is that a bipolar junction transistor when struck by a cosmic particle may cause a single event upset in an electronic circuit if the transistor is operated at a low forward base-emitter bias.

  18. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  19. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  20. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  1. Experimental testing and modeling analysis of solute mixing at water distribution pipe junctions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Jeffrey Yang, Y; Jiang, Lijie; Yu, Tingchao; Shen, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. The effect can lead to different outcomes of water quality modeling and, hence, drinking water management in a distribution network. Here we have investigated solute mixing behavior in pipe junctions of five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for network modeling are proposed. First, based on experiments, the degree of mixing at a cross is found to be a function of flow momentum ratio that defines a junction flow distribution pattern and the degree of departure from complete mixing. Corresponding analytical solutions are also validated using computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) simulations. Second, the analytical mixing model is further extended to double-Tee junctions. Correspondingly the flow distribution factor is modified to account for hydraulic departure from a cross configuration. For a double-Tee(A) junction, CFD simulations show that the solute mixing depends on flow momentum ratio and connection pipe length, whereas the mixing at double-Tee(B) is well represented by two independent single-Tee junctions with a potential water stagnation zone in between. Notably, double-Tee junctions differ significantly from a cross in solute mixing and transport. However, it is noted that these pipe connections are widely, but incorrectly, simplified as cross junctions of assumed complete solute mixing in network skeletonization and water quality modeling. For the studied pipe junction types, analytical solutions are proposed to characterize the incomplete mixing and hence may allow better water quality simulation in a distribution network. PMID:24675269

  2. Characterizing and Modeling Ferrite-Core Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we accurately and carefully characterize a ferrite-core probe that is widely used for aircraft inspections. The characterization starts with the development of a model that can be executed using the proprietary volume-integral code, VIC-3D©, and then the model is fitted to measured multifrequency impedance data taken with the probe in freespace and over samples of a titanium alloy and aluminum. Excellent results are achieved, and will be discussed.

  3. Mucin-type core 1 glycans regulate the localization of neuromuscular junctions and establishment of muscle cell architecture in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Fuwa, Takashi J; Sato, Chikara; Komatsu, Akira; Nishihara, Shoko

    2016-04-01

    T antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), a core 1 mucin-type O-glycan structure, is synthesized by Drosophila core 1 β1,3-galactosyltrasferase 1 (dC1GalT1) and is expressed in various tissues. We previously reported that dC1GalT1 synthesizes T antigen expressed in hemocytes, lymph glands, and the central nervous system (CNS) and that dC1GalT1 mutant larvae display decreased numbers of circulating hemocytes and excessive differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in lymph glands. dC1GalT1 mutant larvae have also been shown to have morphological defects in the CNS. However, the functions of T antigen in other tissues remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that glycans contributed to the localization of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) boutons. In dC1GalT1 mutant larvae, NMJs were ectopically formed in the cleft between muscles 6 and 7 and connected with these two muscles. dC1GalT1 synthesized T antigen, which was expressed at NMJs. In addition, we determined the function of mucin-type O-glycans in muscle cells. In dC1GalT1 mutant muscles, myofibers and basement membranes were disorganized. Moreover, ultrastructural defects in NMJs and accumulation of large endosome-like structures within both NMJ boutons and muscle cells were observed in dC1GalT1 mutants. Taken together, these results demonstrated that mucin-type O-glycans synthesized by dC1GalT1 were involved in the localization of NMJ boutons, synaptogenesis of NMJs, establishment of muscle cell architecture, and endocytosis. PMID:26896591

  4. Gibbons-Hawking boundary terms and junction conditions for higher-order brane gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P. E-mail: mpdabfz@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2009-01-15

    We derive the most general junction conditions for the fourth-order brane gravity constructed of arbitrary functions of curvature invariants. We reduce these fourth-order theories to second order theories at the expense of introducing new scalar and tensor fields - the scalaron and the tensoron. In order to obtain junction conditions we apply the method of generalized Gibbons-Hawking boundary terms which are appended to the appropriate actions. After assuming the continuity of the scalaron and the tensoron on the brane, we recover junction conditions for such general brane universe models previously obtained by different methods. The derived junction conditions can serve studying the cosmological implications of the higher-order brane gravity models.

  5. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    -branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  6. Conformational model of the Holliday junction transition deduced from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Ha, Taekjip; Schulten, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination plays a key role in the restart of stalled replication forks and in the generation of genetic diversity. During this process, two homologous DNA molecules undergo strand exchange to form a four-way DNA (Holliday) junction. In the presence of metal ions, the Holliday junction folds into the stacked-X structure that has two alternative conformers. Experiments have revealed the spontaneous transitions between these conformers, but their detailed pathways are not known. Here, we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the Holliday junction at physiological and elevated (400 K) temperatures. The simulations reveal new tetrahedral intermediates and suggest a schematic framework for conformer transitions. The tetrahedral intermediates bear resemblance to the junction conformation in complex with a junction-resolving enzyme, T7 endonuclease I, and indeed, one intermediate forms a stable complex with the enzyme as demonstrated in one simulation. We also describe free energy minima for various states of the Holliday junction system, which arise during conformer transitions. The results show that magnesium ions stabilize the stacked-X form and destabilize the open and tetrahedral intermediates. Overall, our study provides a detailed dynamic model of the Holliday junction undergoing a conformer transition. PMID:15613597

  7. Josephson junction devices: Model quantum mechanical systems and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Josephine

    In this dissertation, three experiments using Josephson junction devices are described. In Part I, the effect of dissipation on tunneling between charge states in a superconducting single-electron transistor (sSET) was studied. The sSET was fabricated on top of a semi-conductor heterostructure with a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) imbedded beneath the surface. The 2DEG acted as a dissipative ground plane. The sheet resistance of the 2DEG could be varied in situ by applying a large voltage to a gate on the back of the substrate. The zero-bias conductance of the sSET was observed to increase with increasing temperature and 2DEG resistance. Some qualitative but not quantitative agreement was found with theoretical calculations of the functional dependence of the conductance on temperature and 2DEG resistance. Part II describes a series of experiments performed on magnesium diboride point-contact junctions. The pressure between the MgB2 tip and base pieces could be adjusted to form junctions with different characteristics. With light pressure applied between the two pieces, quasiparticle tunneling in superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions was measured. From these data, a superconducting gap of approximately 2 meV and a critical temperature of 29 K were estimated. Increasing the pressure between the MgB2 pieces formed junctions with superconductor-normal metal-superconductor characteristics. We used these junctions to form MgB2 superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS). Noise levels as low as 35 fT/Hz1/2 and 4 muphi 0/Hz1/2 at 1 kHz were measured. In Part III, we used a SQUID-based instrument to acquire magnetocardiograms (MCG), the magnetic field signal measured from the human heart. We measured 51 healthy volunteers and 11 cardiac patients both at rest and after treadmill exercise. We found age and sex related differences in the MCG of the healthy volunteers that suggest that these factors should be considered when evaluating the MCG for

  8. Dissipation in a simple model of a topological Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Paul; Ribeiro, Pedro; García-García, Antonio M

    2014-06-20

    The topological features of low-dimensional superconductors have created a lot of excitement recently because of their broad range of applications in quantum information and their potential to reveal novel phases of quantum matter. A potential problem for practical applications is the presence of phase slips that break phase coherence. Dissipation in nontopological superconductors suppresses phase slips and can restore long-range order. Here, we investigate the role of dissipation in a topological Josephson junction. We show that the combined effects of topology and dissipation keep phase and antiphase slips strongly correlated so that the device is superconducting even under conditions where a nontopological device would be resistive. The resistive transition occurs at a critical value of the dissipation that is 4 times smaller than that expected for a conventional Josephson junction. We propose that this difference could be employed as a robust experimental signature of topological superconductivity. PMID:24996102

  9. Dissipation in a Simple Model of a Topological Josephson Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Paul; Ribeiro, Pedro; García-García, Antonio M.

    2014-06-01

    The topological features of low-dimensional superconductors have created a lot of excitement recently because of their broad range of applications in quantum information and their potential to reveal novel phases of quantum matter. A potential problem for practical applications is the presence of phase slips that break phase coherence. Dissipation in nontopological superconductors suppresses phase slips and can restore long-range order. Here, we investigate the role of dissipation in a topological Josephson junction. We show that the combined effects of topology and dissipation keep phase and antiphase slips strongly correlated so that the device is superconducting even under conditions where a nontopological device would be resistive. The resistive transition occurs at a critical value of the dissipation that is 4 times smaller than that expected for a conventional Josephson junction. We propose that this difference could be employed as a robust experimental signature of topological superconductivity.

  10. Modeling of Memristive and Memcapacitive Behaviors in Metal-Oxide Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, M. G. A.; Kim, HyungWon; Cho, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Memristive behavior has been clearly addressed through growth and shrinkage of thin filaments in metal-oxide junctions. Capacitance change has also been observed, raising the possibility of using them as memcapacitors. Therefore, this paper proves that metal-oxide junctions can behave as a memcapacitor element by analyzing its characteristics and modeling its memristive and memcapacitive behaviors. We develop two behavioral modeling techniques: charge-dependent memcapacitor model and voltage-dependent memcapacitor model. A new physical model for metal-oxide junctions is presented based on conducting filaments variations, and its effect on device capacitance and resistance. In this model, we apply the exponential nature of growth and shrinkage of thin filaments and use Simmons' tunneling equation to calculate the tunneling current. Simulation results show how the variations of practical device parameters can change the device behavior. They clarify the basic conditions for building a memcapacitor device with negligible change in resistance. PMID:25705717

  11. Osmotic forces and gap junctions in spreading depression: a computational model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    In a computational model of spreading depression (SD), ionic movement through a neuronal syncytium of cells connected by gap junctions is described electrodiffusively. Simulations predict that SD will not occur unless cells are allowed to expand in response to osmotic pressure gradients and K+ is allowed to move through gap junctions. SD waves of [K+]out approximately 25 to approximately 60 mM moving at approximately 2 to approximately 18 mm/min are predicted over the range of parametric values reported in gray matter, with extracellular space decreasing up to approximately 50%. Predicted waveform shape is qualitatively similar to laboratory reports. The delayed-rectifier, NMDA, BK, and Na+ currents are predicted to facilitate SD, while SK and A-type K+ currents and glial activity impede SD. These predictions are consonant with recent findings that gap junction poisons block SD and support the theories that cytosolic diffusion via gap junctions and osmotic forces are important mechanisms underlying SD.

  12. Modelling the effect of gap junctions on tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Doug; Pathmanathan, Pras; Whiteley, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    When modelling tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology, a continuum approximation to the discrete cell-level equations, known as the bidomain equations, is often used to maintain computational tractability. Analysing the derivation of the bidomain equations allows us to investigate how microstructure, in particular gap junctions that electrically connect cells, affect tissue-level conductivity properties. Using a one-dimensional cable model, we derive a modified form of the bidomain equations that take gap junctions into account, and compare results of simulations using both the discrete and continuum models, finding that the underlying conduction velocity of the action potential ceases to match up between models when gap junctions are introduced at physiologically realistic coupling levels. We show that this effect is magnified by: (i) modelling gap junctions with reduced conductivity; (ii) increasing the conductance of the fast sodium channel; and (iii) an increase in myocyte length. From this, we conclude that the conduction velocity arising from the bidomain equations may not be an accurate representation of the underlying discrete system. In particular, the bidomain equations are less likely to be valid when modelling certain diseased states whose symptoms include a reduction in gap junction coupling or an increase in myocyte length. PMID:24338526

  13. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zant, Amr A.; Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can `heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power-law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realized as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a time-scale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrizations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power-law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalization of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.

  14. Modeling and theoretical efficiency of a silicon nanowire based thermoelectric junction with area enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, M; Sadhu, JS; Ma, J; Ghossoub, MG; Sinha, S

    2012-06-15

    Recent experimental work suggests that individual silicon nanowires with rough surfaces possess a thermoelectric figure of merit as high as 0.6 near room temperature. This paper addresses the possibility of using an array of such nanowires in a thermoelectric junction for generation. Employing a model of frequency dependent phonon boundary scattering, we estimate the effective thermal conductivity of the array and investigate heat flow through the junction. We show that charge transport is largely unaffected by the roughness scales considered. Enhancing the area for heat exchange at an individual 200 mu m x 200 mu m p-n junction yields significant temperature differences across the junction leading to power >0.6 mW and efficiency >1.5% for a junction with effective thermal conductivity <5 W/mK, when the source and sink are at 450 K and 300 K, respectively. We show that relatively short nanowires of similar to 50 mu m length are sufficient for obtaining peak power and reasonable efficiency. This substantially reduces the challenge of engineering low resistivity electrical contacts that critically affect power and efficiency. This paper provides insight into how fundamental transport in relation to bulk heat transfer and charge transport, affects the performance of thermoelectric junctions based on nanostructured materials. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4728189

  15. Mathematical modeling of intrinsic Josephson junctions with capacitive and inductive couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu M.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Sarhadov, I.; Andreeva, O.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the current voltage characteristics (CVC) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) with two types of couplings between junctions: capacitive and inductive. The IJJ model is described by a system of coupled sine-Gordon equations which is solved numerically by the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The method of numerical simulation and numerical results are presented. The magnetic field distribution is calculated as the function of coordinate and time at different values of the bias current. The influence of model parameters on the CVC is studied. The behavior of the IJJ in dependence on coupling parameters is discussed.

  16. Modified pressure loss model for T-junctions of engine exhaust manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhui; Lu, Xiaolu; Cui, Yi; Deng, Kangyao

    2014-11-01

    The T-junction model of engine exhaust manifolds significantly influences the simulation precision of the pressure wave and mass flow rate in the intake and exhaust manifolds of diesel engines. Current studies have focused on constant pressure models, constant static pressure models and pressure loss models. However, low model precision is a common disadvantage when simulating engine exhaust manifolds, particularly for turbocharged systems. To study the performance of junction flow, a cold wind tunnel experiment with high velocities at the junction of a diesel exhaust manifold is performed, and the variation in the pressure loss in the T-junction under different flow conditions is obtained. Despite the trend of the calculated total pressure loss coefficient, which is obtained by using the original pressure loss model and is the same as that obtained from the experimental results, large differences exist between the calculated and experimental values. Furthermore, the deviation becomes larger as the flow velocity increases. By improving the Vazsonyi formula considering the flow velocity and introducing the distribution function, a modified pressure loss model is established, which is suitable for a higher velocity range. Then, the new model is adopted to solve one-dimensional, unsteady flow in a D6114 turbocharged diesel engine. The calculated values are compared with the measured data, and the result shows that the simulation accuracy of the pressure wave before the turbine is improved by 4.3% with the modified pressure loss model because gas compressibility is considered when the flow velocities are high. The research results provide valuable information for further junction flow research, particularly the correction of the boundary condition in one-dimensional simulation models.

  17. Mouse models for core binding factor leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chin, D W L; Watanabe-Okochi, N; Wang, C Q; Tergaonkar, V; Osato, M

    2015-10-01

    RUNX1 and CBFB are among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemias. Genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, copy number variations and point mutations have been widely reported to result in the malfunction of RUNX transcription factors. Leukemias arising from such alterations in RUNX family genes are collectively termed core binding factor (CBF) leukemias. Although adult CBF leukemias generally are considered a favorable risk group as compared with other forms of acute myeloid leukemia, the 5-year survival rate remains low. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanism for CBF leukemia is imperative to uncover novel treatment options. Over the years, retroviral transduction-transplantation assays and transgenic, knockin and knockout mouse models alone or in combination with mutagenesis have been used to study the roles of RUNX alterations in leukemogenesis. Although successful in inducing leukemia, the existing assays and models possess many inherent limitations. A CBF leukemia model which induces leukemia with complete penetrance and short latency would be ideal as a platform for drug discovery. Here, we summarize the currently available mouse models which have been utilized to study CBF leukemias, discuss the advantages and limitations of individual experimental systems, and propose suggestions for improvements of mouse models. PMID:26165235

  18. Models of Isotopic Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These studies make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by high-resolution molecular line observations with ALMA.

  19. Models of Isotopic Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These studies make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by high-resolution molecular line observations with ALMA.

  20. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, Petr; Ormand, W. Erich; Caurier, Etienne; Bertulani, Carlos

    2005-10-14

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+6Li and 6He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important 7Be(p,{gamma})8B S-factor.

  1. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Caurier, E; Bertulani, C

    2005-04-29

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+{sup 6}Li and {sup 6}He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B S-factor.

  2. Theoretical values of various parameters in the Gummel-Poon model of a bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, R.; Zoutendyk, J.

    1986-01-01

    Various parameters in the Gummel-Poon model of a bipolar junction transistor are expressed in terms of the basic structure of a transistor. A consistent theoretical approach is used which facilitates an understanding of the foundations and limitations of the derived formulas. The results enable one to predict how changes in the geometry and composition of a transistor would affect performance.

  3. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    SciTech Connect

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-07

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  4. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-01

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  5. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  6. Feynman's and Ohta's Models of a Josephson Junction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Josephson equations are derived by means of the weakly coupled two-level quantum system model given by Feynman. Adopting a simplified version of Ohta's model, starting from Feynman's model, the strict voltage-frequency Josephson relation is derived. The contribution of Ohta's approach to the comprehension of the additional term given by the…

  7. EXPOSED LONG-LIFETIME FIRST CORE: A NEW MODEL OF FIRST CORES BASED ON RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.j E-mail: saigo.kazuya@nao.ac.j

    2010-12-20

    A first adiabatic core is a transient object formed in the early phase of star formation. The observation of a first core is believed to be difficult because of its short lifetime and low luminosity. On the basis of radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we propose a novel theoretical model of first cores, the Exposed Long-lifetime First core (ELF). In the very low-mass molecular core, the first core evolves slowly and lives longer than 10,000 years because the accretion rate is considerably low. The evolution of ELFs is different from that of ordinary first cores because radiation cooling has a significant effect there. We also carry out a radiation-transfer calculation of dust-continuum emission from ELFs to predict their observational properties. ELFs have slightly fainter but similar spectral energy distributions to ordinary first cores in radio wavelengths, therefore they can be observed. Although the probabilities that such low-mass cores become gravitationally unstable and start to collapse are low, we still can expect that a considerable number of ELFs can be formed because there are many low-mass molecular cloud cores in star-forming regions that could be progenitors of ELFs.

  8. Tight-binding model for amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions formed with carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok Hyeon; Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-05-01

    We measured the conductance of a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junction formed with carbon electrodes by using a scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction technique. The tight-binding model that includes the molecular backbone states accurately captured the experimentally measured the molecular conductance and the exponential decay trend of the conductance with the molecular backbone length. Furthermore, we found that this model tracked successfully the shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital toward the Fermi energy as increasing the molecular length. Finally, we found that the tight-binding model explaining more week coupling strength with the graphite electrode than that with the Au electrode is in quantitative agreement with the density functional theory calculations.

  9. Physical model of the contact resistivity of metal-graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chaves, Ferney A. Jiménez, David; Cummings, Aron W.; Roche, Stephan

    2014-04-28

    While graphene-based technology shows great promise for a variety of electronic applications, including radio-frequency devices, the resistance of the metal-graphene contact is a technological bottleneck for the realization of viable graphene electronics. One of the most important factors in determining the resistance of a metal-graphene junction is the contact resistivity. Despite the large number of experimental works that exist in the literature measuring the contact resistivity, a simple model of it is still lacking. In this paper, we present a comprehensive physical model for the contact resistivity of these junctions, based on the Bardeen Transfer Hamiltonian method. This model unveils the role played by different electrical and physical parameters in determining the specific contact resistivity, such as the chemical potential of interaction, the work metal-graphene function difference, and the insulator thickness between the metal and graphene. In addition, our model reveals that the contact resistivity is strongly dependent on the bias voltage across the metal-graphene junction. This model is applicable to a wide variety of graphene-based electronic devices and thus is useful for understanding how to optimize the contact resistance in these systems.

  10. A new model for four-terminal junction field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Liou, Juin J.; Green, Keith; Cirba, Claude R.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a compact and semi-empirical model for a four-terminal (independent top and bottom gates) junction field-effect transistor (JFET). The model describes the steady-state characteristics for all bias conditions with a unified equation. Moreover, the model provides a high degree of accuracy and continuity for the different operation regions, a critical factor for robust analog circuit simulations. Capacitance modeling is also included to describe the JFET small-signal behavior. The model has been implemented in Cadence framework via Verilog-A and compared with data measured from JFETs used at Texas Instruments.

  11. Solitons in Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. V.

    1998-11-01

    Magnetic flux quanta in Josephson junctions, often called fluxons, in many cases behave as solitons. A review of recent experiments and modelling of fluxon dynamics in Josephson circuits is presented. Classic quasi-one-dimensional junctions, stacked junctions (Josephson superlattices), and discrete Josephson transmission lines (JTLs) are discussed. Applications of fluxon devices as high-frequency oscillators and digital circuits are also addressed.

  12. Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, B R; Navratil, P; Vary, J P

    2011-04-11

    and NNN interactions, characterized by the order of the expansion retained (e.g. 'next-to-next-to leading order' is NNLO), provide a high-quality fit to the NN data and the A = 3 ground-state (g.s.) properties. The derivations of NN, NNN, etc. interactions within meson-exchange and {chi}EFT are well-established but are not subjects of this review. Our focus is solution of the non-relativistic quantum many-body Hamiltonian that includes these interactions using our no core shell model (NCSM) formalism. In the next section we will briefly outline the NCSM formalism and then present applications, results and extensions in later sections.

  13. Spontaneous calcium signals induced by gap junctions in a network model of astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, V. B.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a network model of astrocytes coupled by gap junctions is investigated. Calcium dynamics of the single cell is described by the biophysical model comprising the set of three nonlinear differential equations. Intercellular dynamics is provided by the diffusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) through gap junctions between neighboring astrocytes. It is found that the diffusion induces the appearance of spontaneous activity patterns in the network. Stability of the network steady state is analyzed. It is proved that the increase of the diffusion coefficient above a certain critical value yields the generation of low-amplitude subthreshold oscillatory signals in a certain frequency range. It is shown that such spontaneous oscillations can facilitate calcium pulse generation and provide a certain time scale in astrocyte signaling.

  14. Electron tunneling through molecule-electrode contacts of single alkane molecular junctions: experimental determination and a practical barrier model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-04-14

    An advanced understanding of the molecule-electrode contact interfaces of single-molecule junctions is a necessity for real world application of future single-molecule devices. This study aims to elucidate the change in the contact tunnelling barrier induced by junction extension and how this change affects the resulting junction conductance. The contact barrier of Au-octanedithiol/octanediamine-Au junctions was studied under triangle (TRI) mechanical modulations using the modified scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction technique. The experimental results reveal that as the junction separation extends, the contact barrier of octanedithiol follows a unique trend, a linear increase followed by a plateau in barrier height, which is in contrast to that of octanediamine, a nearly rectangle barrier. We propose a modified contact barrier model for the unique barrier shape of octanedithiol, based on which the calculation agrees well with the experimental data. This study shows unprecedented experimental features of the molecule-electrode contact barrier of single-molecule junctions and provides new insights into the nature of contact effect in determining electron transport through single-molecule junctions. PMID:26988278

  15. Opto-electronic modeling of light emission from avalanche-mode silicon p+n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Satadal; Hueting, Raymond J. E.; Annema, Anne-Johan; Qi, Lin; Nanver, Lis K.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2015-09-01

    This work presents the modeling of light emission from silicon based p+n junctions operating in avalanche breakdown. We revisit the photon emission process under the influence of relatively high electric fields in a reverse biased junction ( > 10 5 V/cm). The photon emission rate is described as a function of the electron temperature T e , which is computed from the spatial distribution of the electric field. The light emission spectra lie around the visible spectral range ( λ ˜ 300-850 nm), where the peak wavelength and the optical intensity are both doping level dependent. It is theoretically derived that a specific minimum geometrical width ( ˜ 170 nm) of the active region of avalanche is required, corresponding to a breakdown voltage of ˜5 V, below which the rate of photon emission in the desired spectrum drops. The derived model is validated using experimental data obtained from ultra-shallow p+n junctions with low absorption through a nm-thin p+ region and surface coverage of solely 3 nm of pure boron. We observe a peak in the emission spectra near 580 nm and 650 nm for diodes with breakdown voltages 7 V and 14 V, respectively, consistent with our model.

  16. Mathematical modeling of gap junction coupling and electrical activity in human β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Braun, Matthias; Filippi, Simonetta; Gram Pedersen, Morten

    2015-12-01

    Coordinated insulin secretion is controlled by electrical coupling of pancreatic β-cells due to connexin-36 gap junctions. Gap junction coupling not only synchronizes the heterogeneous β-cell population, but can also modify the electrical behavior of the cells. These phenomena have been widely studied with mathematical models based on data from mouse β-cells. However, it is now known that human β-cell electrophysiology shows important differences to its rodent counterpart, and although human pancreatic islets express connexin-36 and show evidence of β-cell coupling, these aspects have been little investigated in human β-cells. Here we investigate theoretically, the gap junction coupling strength required for synchronizing electrical activity in a small cluster of cells simulated with a recent mathematical model of human β-cell electrophysiology. We find a lower limit for the coupling strength of approximately 20 pS (i.e., normalized to cell size, ˜2 pS pF-1) below which spiking electrical activity is asynchronous. To confront this theoretical lower bound with data, we use our model to estimate from an experimental patch clamp recording that the coupling strength is approximately 100-200 pS (10-20 pS pF-1), similar to previous estimates in mouse β-cells. We then investigate the role of gap junction coupling in synchronizing and modifying other forms of electrical activity in human β-cell clusters. We find that electrical coupling can prolong the period of rapid bursting electrical activity, and synchronize metabolically driven slow bursting, in particular when the metabolic oscillators are in phase. Our results show that realistic coupling conductances are sufficient to promote synchrony in small clusters of human β-cells as observed experimentally, and provide motivation for further detailed studies of electrical coupling in human pancreatic islets.

  17. A model of dopant diffusion through a strongly correlated p-n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieteska, Jedrzej; Brierley, Richard; Guzman-Verri, Gian; Moller, Gunnar; Littlewood, Peter; Littlewood group Collaboration

    The diffusion of charged ions in a solid depends on an equation of state that balances diffusive and screened electrostatic forces, and is well understood in the case of conventional semiconductors and metals. In the case of a strongly-correlated material, the physics is different, and expected to be relevant, for example, in Li-ion battery cathodes. We propose a model of dopant ion motion through a strongly correlated p-n junction. Our approach is to consider diffusive (Nernst-Planck) dynamics of dopants under screened electrostatic interactions computed within a mean-field (Thomas-Fermi) approximation. Dopant profiles as function of time are calculated for a p-n junction held at constant voltage. In the case where filling levels are near a correlation-induced gap, Mott insulating regions can form at the p-n interface and their dynamics is studied.

  18. An improved bipolar junction transistor model for electrical and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, C.T.; Messenger, G.C.

    1982-12-01

    The use of bipolar technology in hardened electronic design requires an in-depth understanding of how the Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) behaves under normal electrical and radiation environments. Significant improvements in BJT process technology have been reported, and the successful use of sophisticated Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools has aided implementation with respect to specific families of hardened devices. The most advanced BJT model used to date is the Improved Gummel-Poon (IGP) model which is used in CAA programs such as the SPICE II and SLICE programs. The earlier Ebers-Moll model (ref 1 and 2) has also been updated to compare with the older Gummel-Poon model. This paper describes an adaptation of an existing computer model which incorporates the best features of both models into a new, more accurate model called the Improved Bipolar Junction Transistor model. This paper also describes a unique approach to data reduction for the B(I /SUB c/) and V /SUB BE/(ACT) vs I /SUB c/characterizations which has been successfully programmed in Basic using a Commodore PET computer. This model is described in the following sections.

  19. Modelling CO depletion in starless cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, Jonathan M. C.

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the observational detection of molecular depletion in star-forming dark clouds. In many cases the data is of very high quality and what was once considered a rather hypothetical process is now almost universally accepted as a (the) major cause of the presence of emission 'holes' in molecular maps of dense cores. However, the interpretation of the data can be severely undermined by uncertainties in the physics and chemistry. This is particularly true in the case of general molecular studies of active star-forming regions. For these objects there exist strong degeneracies between various chemical effects (gas-phase time-dependencies, desorption processes and efficiencies, ionization rates etc.) and poorly constrained physics (most particularly in the assumed kinematics and evolutionary history). Whilst these problems result in unacceptable ambiguities in the case of evolved sources, we can make significant progress for young, near-static cores and using molecular species with simple chemistries. A considerable set of constraints on the free parameters is now provided by the extensive sub-millimetre continuum and infra-red absorption studies of starless cores. These observations give us good descriptions of the temperature and density profiles in these sources. Moreover CO is to a large extent chemically inert, so that any decline of abundance at high densities can (primarily) be interpreted as being a consequence of freeze-out. Thus there are only two major free parameters:- the net depletion/desorption rate and the chemical age of the source. In this study CO abundance profiles are calculated as a function of time for cores whose temperature and density profiles have already been determined. The results are corrected for excitation effects and converted to synthetic maps, assuming typical single-dish beam parameters and source characteristics. A strong correlation with existing depletion maps is found and strong

  20. Important issues facing model-based approaches to tunneling transport in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bâldea, Ioan

    Extensive studies on thin films indicated a generic cubic current-voltage $I-V$ dependence as a salient feature of charge transport by tunneling. A quick glance at $I-V$ data for molecular junctions suggests a qualitatively similar behavior. This would render model-based studies almost irrelevant, since, whatever the model, its parameters can always be adjusted to fit symmetric (asymmetric) $I-V$ curves characterized by two (three) expansion coefficients. Here, we systematically examine popular models based on tunneling barrier or tight-binding pictures and demonstrate that, for a quantitative description at biases of interest ($V$ slightly higher than the transition voltage $V_t$), cubic expansions do not suffice. A detailed collection of analytical formulae as well as their conditions of applicability are presented to facilitate experimentalists colleagues to process and interpret their experimental data by obtained by measuring currents in molecular junctions. We discuss in detail the limits of applicability of the various models and emphasize that uncritically adjusting model parameters to experiment may be unjustified because the values deduced in this way may fall in ranges rendering a specific model invalid or incompatible to ab initio estimates. We exemplify with the benchmark case of oligophenylene-based junctions, for which results of ab initio quantum chemical calculations are also reported. As a specific issue, we address the impact of the spatial potential profile and show that it is not notable up to biases V somewhat larger than V_t, unlike at higher biases, where it may be responsible for negative differential resistance effects.

  1. Important issues facing model-based approaches to tunneling transport in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Bâldea, Ioan

    2015-08-21

    Extensive studies on thin films indicated a generic cubic current-voltage I-V dependence as a salient feature of charge transport by tunneling. A quick glance at I-V data for molecular junctions suggests a qualitatively similar behavior. This would render model-based studies almost irrelevant, since, whatever the model, its parameters can always be adjusted to fit symmetric (asymmetric) I-V curves characterized by two (three) expansion coefficients. Here, we systematically examine popular models based on tunneling barriers or tight-binding pictures and demonstrate that, for a quantitative description at biases of interest (V slightly higher than the transition voltage Vt), cubic expansions do not suffice. A detailed collection of analytical formulae as well as their conditions of applicability is presented to facilitate experimentalist colleagues to process and interpret their experimental data obtained by measuring currents in molecular junctions. We discuss in detail the limits of applicability of the various models and emphasize that uncritically adjusting the model parameters to experiment may be unjustified because the values deduced in this way may fall in ranges rendering a specific model invalid or incompatible to ab initio estimates. We exemplify with the benchmark case of oligophenylene-based junctions, for which the results of ab initio quantum chemical calculations are also reported. As a specific issue, we address the impact of the spatial potential profile and show that it is not notable up to biases V ≳ Vt, unlike at higher biases, where it may be responsible for negative differential resistance effects. PMID:26186139

  2. Nanomanipulation and Lithography: The Building (and Modeling) of Carbon Nanotube Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Richard Nam

    2002-12-01

    Aircraft fuselages suffer alternating stress during takeoffs and landings, and fatigue cracks begin to grow, usually at rivet holes. The detection of these fatigue cracks under installed fasteners in aging aircraft is a major goal of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) community. The use of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors in electromagnetic (EM) NDE has been increasing rapidly. For example, here at Langley Research Center, a Rotating Probe System (RPS) containing a GMR element has been incorporated into a product to detect deeply buried flaws in aerospace structures. In order to advance this eddy current probe application and many similar ones, research to create smaller, more sensitive and energy-efficient EM sensors has been aggressively pursued. Recent theoretical and experimental work on spin coherent transport supports the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) based magnetic tunnel junctions. In this study, a spatial filtering scheme is presented that improves the signal to noise ratio of the RPS and does not significantly impact the number of false alarms. Signals due to buried flaws occur at higher frequencies than do signals due to rivet tilt or probe misalignment, and the strategy purposefully targets this fact. Furthermore, the spatial filtering scheme exploits decreases in the probe output that are observed immediately preceding and following the peak in output due to a fatigue crack. Using the new filters, an enhanced probability of flaw detection is expected. In the future, even tinier, more sensitive, low-power sensors are envisioned for the rotating probe and other nondestructive inspection systems. These may be comprised of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that connect two ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Theoretical work has been done at Langley to model the electrical and magnetoconductance behavior of such junctions, for systems containing short "armchair" nanotubes. The present work facilitates the modeling of more realistic system

  3. Human alveolar epithelial cells expressing tight junctions to model the air-blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Anna; Kletting, Stephanie; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Fischer, Ulrike; Meese, Eckart; Huwer, Hanno; Wirth, Dagmar; May, Tobias; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new human alveolar epithelial cell line (hAELVi - human Alveolar Epithelial Lentivirus immortalized) with type I-like characteristics and functional tight junctions, suitable to model the air-blood barrier of the peripheral lung. Primary human alveolar epithelial cells were immortalized by a novel regimen, grown as monolayers on permeable filter supports and characterized morphologically, biochemically and biophysically. hAELVi cells maintain the capacity to form tight intercellular junctions, with high trans-epithelial electrical resistance (> 1000 Ω*cm²). The cells could be kept in culture over several days, up to passage 75, under liquid-liquid as well as air-liquid conditions. Ultrastructural analysis and real time PCR revealed type I-like cell properties, such as the presence of caveolae, expression of caveolin-1, and absence of surfactant protein C. Accounting for the barrier properties, inter-digitations sealed with tight junctions and desmosomes were also observed. Low permeability of the hydrophilic marker sodium fluorescein confirmed the suitability of hAELVi cells for in vitro transport studies across the alveolar epithelium. These results suggest that hAELVi cells reflect the essential features of the air-blood barrier, as needed for an alternative to animal testing to study absorption and toxicity of inhaled drugs, chemicals and nanomaterials. PMID:26985677

  4. Adaptive Phase-Field Modeling of Anisotropic Wetting with Line Tension at the Triple Junction.

    PubMed

    Yeh, S Y; Lan, C W

    2015-09-01

    Line tension could affect the contact angle at triple junction, especially in micro- to nanoscale wetting. We have developed an adaptive phase-field model to consider the line tension quantitatively. This model is coupled to the smoothed boundary method for treating the contact line with the solid phase, while the volume constraint is imposed. Our calculated contact angles are in good agreement with the modified Young's equation. Further examples are illustrated for the anisotropic wetting on hydrophilic/hydrophobic stripes and rectangular grooves. PMID:26274914

  5. Modeling of Schottky Barrier Modulation due to Oxidation at Metallic Electrode and Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A model is proposed for the previously reported lower Schottky barrier for holes PHI (sub bH) in air than in vacuum at a metallic electrode - semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) junction. We assume that there is a transition region between the electrode and the CNT, and an appreciable potential can drop there. The role of the oxidation is to increase this potential drop with negatively charged oxygen molecules on the CNT, leading to lower PHI(sub Bh) after oxidation. The mechanism prevails in both p- and n-CNTs, and the model consistently explains the key experimental findings.

  6. A semi-analytic dynamical friction model for cored galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petts, J. A.; Read, J. I.; Gualandris, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a dynamical friction model based on Chandrasekhar's formula that reproduces the fast inspiral and stalling experienced by satellites orbiting galaxies with a large constant density core. We show that the fast inspiral phase does not owe to resonance. Rather, it owes to the background velocity distribution function for the constant density core being dissimilar from the usually-assumed Maxwellian distribution. Using the correct background velocity distribution function and the semi-analytic model from Petts et al. (2015), we are able to correctly reproduce the infall rate in both cored and cusped potentials. However, in the case of large cores, our model is no longer able to correctly capture core-stalling. We show that this stalling owes to the tidal radius of the satellite approaching the size of the core. By switching off dynamical friction when rt(r) = r (where rt is the tidal radius at the satellite's position) we arrive at a model which reproduces the N-body results remarkably well. Since the tidal radius can be very large for constant density background distributions, our model recovers the result that stalling can occur for Ms/Menc ≪ 1, where Ms and Menc are the mass of the satellite and the enclosed galaxy mass, respectively. Finally, we include the contribution to dynamical friction that comes from stars moving faster than the satellite. This next-to-leading order effect becomes the dominant driver of inspiral near the core region, prior to stalling.

  7. Stochastic Model of Gap Junctions Exhibiting Rectification and Multiple Closed States of Slow Gates.

    PubMed

    Snipas, Mindaugas; Kraujalis, Tadas; Paulauskas, Nerijus; Maciunas, Kestutis; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2016-03-29

    Gap-junction (GJ) channels formed from connexin (Cx) proteins provide direct pathways for electrical and metabolic cell-cell communication. Earlier, we developed a stochastic 16-state model (S16SM) of voltage gating of the GJ channel containing two pairs of fast and slow gates, each operating between open (o) and closed (c) states. However, experimental data suggest that gates may in fact contain two or more closed states. We developed a model in which the slow gate operates according to a linear reaction scheme, o↔c1↔c2, where c1 and c2 are initial-closed and deep-closed states that both close the channel fully, whereas the fast gate operates between the open state and the closed state and exhibits a residual conductance. Thus, we developed a stochastic 36-state model (S36SM) of GJ channel gating that is sensitive to transjunctional voltage (Vj). To accelerate simulation and eliminate noise in simulated junctional conductance (gj) records, we transformed an S36SM into a Markov chain 36-state model (MC36SM) of GJ channel gating. This model provides an explanation for well-established experimental data, such as delayed gj recovery after Vj gating, hysteresis of gj-Vj dependence, and the low ratio of functional channels to the total number of GJ channels clustered in junctional plaques, and it has the potential to describe chemically mediated gating, which cannot be reflected using an S16SM. The MC36SM, when combined with global optimization algorithms, can be used for automated estimation of gating parameters including probabilities of c1↔c2 transitions from experimental gj-time and gj-Vj dependencies. PMID:27028642

  8. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S; Brodholt, John P

    2014-05-27

    Earth's core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain "light elements," such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe-Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle. PMID:24821817

  9. An improved bipolar junction transistor model for electrical and radiation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, C. T.; Messenger, G. C.

    1982-12-01

    A bipolar transistor model is introduced which combines most of the best features of the modified Ebers-Moll (1954) model with the Gummel-Poon (1970) model. The model is constructed of two modified Ebers-Moll models with the addition of junction and basewidth modulation to account for leakage current dependence on reverse voltage and beta dependence on collector-emitter voltage. The electrical characteristics that can be obtained with the model include: nonlinear beta and V(BE) vs normal I(C) and/or inverted I(E); increase in f(T) from low injection to peak beta and decrease in f(T) beyond peak beta; nonlinear R(CX) vs I(C) and V(CE); inclusion of base-width modulation as a function of reverse bias for V(CB) or V(EB); and inclusion of junction leakage as a function of reverse bias. Radiation characteristics that can be obtained include: photocurrent generation and saturation including photocurrent response time; dose-rate modulation of resistors; inclusion of neutron damage constant as a function of injection level and incorporation of fast annealing; inclusion of temperature dependence.

  10. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muldrew, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, ball lightning (BL) is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM) field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941). It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon - a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  11. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  12. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  13. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  14. Model-Form Uncertainty Quantification in RANS Simulation of Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinlong; Wang, Jianxun; Xiao, Heng

    2015-11-01

    Junction flow, known as one of the remaining challenges for computational aerodynamics, occurs when a boundary layer encounters an obstacle mounted on the surface. Previous studies have shown that the RANS models are not capable to provide satisfactory prediction. In this work, a novel open-box, physics-informed Bayesian framework is used to quantify the model-form uncertainties in RANS simulation of junction flow. The first objective is to correct the bias in RANS prediction, by utilizing several observation data. The second one is to quantify the model-form uncertainties, which can enable risk-informed decision-making. To begin with a standard RANS simulation, which is performed on a 3:2 elliptic nose and NACA0020 tail cylinder, uncertainties with empirical prior knowledge and physical constraints are directly injected into the Reynolds stresses term, and the unbiased knowledge from observation data is incorporated by an iterative ensemble Kalman method. Current results show that the bias in the quantities of interest (QoIs) of the RANS prediction, e.g., mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, etc, can be significantly corrected by this novel Bayesian framework. The probability density distributions of QoIs show that the model-form uncertainty can be quantified as well.

  15. Toward a mineral physics reference model for the Moon's core.

    PubMed

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Morard, Guillaume; Schmerr, Nicholas C; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Krisch, Michael; Fiquet, Guillaume; Fei, Yingwei

    2015-03-31

    The physical properties of iron (Fe) at high pressure and high temperature are crucial for understanding the chemical composition, evolution, and dynamics of planetary interiors. Indeed, the inner structures of the telluric planets all share a similar layered nature: a central metallic core composed mostly of iron, surrounded by a silicate mantle, and a thin, chemically differentiated crust. To date, most studies of iron have focused on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp, or ε) phase, as ε-Fe is likely stable across the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's core. However, at the more moderate pressures characteristic of the cores of smaller planetary bodies, such as the Moon, Mercury, or Mars, iron takes on a face-centered cubic (fcc, or γ) structure. Here we present compressional and shear wave sound velocity and density measurements of γ-Fe at high pressures and high temperatures, which are needed to develop accurate seismic models of planetary interiors. Our results indicate that the seismic velocities proposed for the Moon's inner core by a recent reanalysis of Apollo seismic data are well below those of γ-Fe. Our dataset thus provides strong constraints to seismic models of the lunar core and cores of small telluric planets. This allows us to propose a direct compositional and velocity model for the Moon's core. PMID:25775531

  16. Theoretical results on the tandem junction solar cell based on its Ebers-Moll transistor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, C.; Vaughn, J.; Baraona, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    A one-dimensional theoretical model of the tandem junction solar cell (TJC) with base resistivity greater than about 1 ohm-cm and under low level injection has been derived. This model extends a previously published conceptual model which treats the TJC as an npn transistor. The model gives theoretical expressions for each of the Ebers-Moll type currents of the illuminated TJC and allows for the calculation of the spectral response, I(sc), V(oc), FF and eta under variation of one or more of the geometrical and material parameters and 1MeV electron fluence. Results of computer calculations based on this model are presented and discussed. These results indicate that for space applications, both a high beginning of life efficiency, greater than 15% AM0, and a high radiation tolerance can be achieved only with thin (less than 50 microns) TJC's with high base resistivity (greater than 10 ohm-cm).

  17. Self-consistent model of spin accumulation magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/insulator/semiconductor tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Tinkey, Holly N.; Li, Pengke

    2014-12-01

    Spin accumulation in a paramagnetic semiconductor due to voltage-biased current tunneling from a polarized ferromagnet is experimentally manifest as a small additional spin-dependent resistance. We describe a rigorous model incorporating the necessary self-consistency between electrochemical potential splitting, spin-dependent injection current, and applied voltage that can be used to simulate this so-called "3 T " signal as a function of temperature, doping, ferromagnet bulk spin polarization, tunnel barrier features and conduction nonlinearity, and junction voltage bias.

  18. Experimental Testing and Modeling Analysis of Solute Mixing at Water Distribution Pipe Junctions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. Here we have categorized pipe junctions into five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for describing the solute mixing ...

  19. p-n Junction Photocurrent Modelling Evaluation under Optical and Electrical Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Dervos, Constantine T.; Skafidas, Panayotis D.; Mergos, John A.; Vassiliou, Panayota

    2004-01-01

    Based upon the quasi-equilibrium approximation, the validity of p-n junction modelling, has been experimentally investigated under synchronous electrical and optical excitation of silicon photo-diodes. The devices had areas of 8.2 mm2 and reverse bias saturation currents of the order of 10-10 A. Their current-voltage (I-V) response was exploited experimentally both in the dark and under various illumination levels. The quoted values for the saturation current, the ideality factor, the series resistance and the reverse-bias photocurrent are investigated for the simulation of the I-V curves via the quasi-equilibrium model. In addition, the measured I-V data have been further analysed to estimate the produced photocurrent as a function of the applied bias (forward or reverse) under given illumination levels. Comparisons between the simulated curves and the experimental data allowed a detailed photocurrent modelling validation. The proposed approach could be useful towards studying other parameters of optically activated p-n junctions such as: the bias dependence of the minority carrier diffusion lengths and/or the generated rates of electron-hole pairs (EHP).

  20. Deriving a Core Magnetic Field Model from Swarm Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, V.; Rother, M.; Wardinski, I.

    2014-12-01

    A model of the Earth's core magnetic field has been built using Swarm satellite mission data and observatory quasi-definitive data. The satellite data processing scheme, which was used to derive previous satellite field models (i.e. GRIMM series), has been modified to handle discrepancies between the satellite total intensity data derived from the vector fluxgate magnetometer and the absolute scalar instrument. Further, the Euler angles, i.e. the angles between the vector magnetometer and the satellite reference frame, have been recalculated on a series of 30-day windows to obtain an accurate model of the core field for 2014. Preliminary derivations of core magnetic field and SV models for 2014 present the same characteristics as during the CHAMP era. The acceleration (i.e. the field second time derivative) has shown a rapid evolution over the last few years, and is present in the current model, which confirms previous observations.

  1. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  2. Rapid remodeling of tight junctions during paracellular diapedesis in a human model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Winger, Ryan C; Koblinski, Jennifer E; Kanda, Takashi; Ransohoff, Richard M; Muller, William A

    2014-09-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM; diapedesis) is a critical event in immune surveillance and inflammation. Most TEM occurs at endothelial cell borders (paracellular). However, there is indirect evidence to suggest that, at the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), leukocytes migrate directly through the endothelial cell body (transcellular). Why leukocytes migrate through the endothelial cell body rather than the cell borders is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the tightness of endothelial cell junctions influences the pathway of diapedesis, we developed an in vitro model of the BBB that possessed 10-fold higher electrical resistance than standard culture conditions and strongly expressed the BBB tight junction proteins claudin-5 and claudin-3. We found that paracellular TEM was still the predominant pathway (≥98%) and TEM was dependent on PECAM-1 and CD99. We show that endothelial tight junctions expressing claudin-5 are dynamic and undergo rapid remodeling during TEM. Membrane from the endothelial lateral border recycling compartment is mobilized to the exact site of tight junction remodeling. This preserves the endothelial barrier by sealing the intercellular gaps with membrane and engaging the migrating leukocyte with unligated adhesion molecules (PECAM-1 and CD99) as it crosses the cell border. These findings provide new insights into leukocyte-endothelial interactions at the BBB and suggest that tight junctions are more dynamic than previously appreciated. PMID:25063869

  3. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-09-01

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical interest to develop simple methods controlling the emergence and the positions of QI effects like anti-resonances or Fano line shapes in conductance spectra. In this work, starting from a well-known generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecule), we propose a simple graphical method to visualize the conditions for the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti-resonances, in the conductance spectrum. By introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic diagram), we can easily visualize the relation between the electronic parameters and the positions of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. This parabolic model not only can predict the emergence and energetic position of quantum interference from a few electronic parameters but also can enable one to know the coupling between the side group and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions. PMID:23558406

  4. Implementation of total dose effects in the bipolar junction transistor Gummel-Poon model

    SciTech Connect

    Montagner, X.; Fouillat, P.; Briand, R.; Touboul, A.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Galloway, K.F.; Calvet, M.C.; Calvel, P.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of total dose on the SPICE model of bipolar junction transistors are investigated. The limitations of the standard Gummel-Poon model for simulating the radiation-induced excess base current are analyzed, and a new model based on an empirical approach is proposed. Four new SPICE rad-parameters are presented, and investigated for different dose rates. The relevant parameters are extracted using a new algorithmic procedure, combining a genetic approach and the standard optimization technique which minimizes the RMS error between measured and simulated excess base current. It is shown that the excess base current is accurately described by the same formula whatever the device type is. An empirical fitting of the rad-parameters as a function of total dose is proposed to use in hardening electronic circuits for space-like environments.

  5. A novel soft-core spherocylinder model for liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Jing; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-01

    Interaction models with soft-core repulsions that allow particle overlapping give orders of magnitude faster/better sampling of configurational space than those with hard-core repulsions (e.g., hard spherocylinders or Gay-Berne potential). While several soft-core spherocylinder models were recently proposed^1, their repulsive interaction depends only on the shortest distance between two spherocylinders. Here we present a novel, computationally efficient soft-core spherocylinder model, which gives exact treatment of the excluded-volume interactions and anisotropic shape of two particles (thus the orientational interaction between them favoring their parallel alignment). It further takes into account the degree of overlap between the two particles, thus superior to other soft-core models. This model has great potential applications in the study of liquid crystals, block copolymers containing rod blocks, and liquid crystalline polymers. [1] Z. E. Hughes et al., Comput. Phys. Commun., 178, 724 (2008); J. S. Lintuvuori and M. R. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys., 128, 044906 (2008).

  6. Seismic tomography and deformation modeling of the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorbath, C.; Oppenheimer, D.; Amelung, F.; King, G.

    1996-01-01

    Local earthquake P traveltime data is inverted to obtain a three-dimensional tomographic image of the region centered on the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults. The resulting velocity model is then used to relocate more than 17,000 earthquakes and to produce a model of fault structure in the region. These faults serve as the basis for modeling the topography using elastic dislocation methods. The region is of interest because active faults join, it marks the transition zone from creeping to locked fault behavior on the San Andreas fault, it exhibits young topography, and it has a good spatial distribution of seismicity. The tomographic data set is extensive, consisting of 1445 events, 96 stations, and nearly 95,000 travel time readings. Tomographic images are resolvable to depths of 12 km and show significant velocity contrasts across the San Andreas and Calaveras faults, a low-velocity zone associated with the creeping section of the San Andreas fault, and shallow low-velocity sediments in the southern Santa Clara valley and northern Salinas valley. Relocated earthquakes only occur where vp>5 km/s and indicate that portions of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are non vertical, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that all or part of this results from ray tracing problems. The new dips are more consistent with geological observations that dipping faults intersect the surface where surface traces have been mapped. The topographic modeling predicts extensive subsidence in regions characterized by shallow low-velocity material, presumably the result of recent sedimentation. Some details of the topography at the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are not consistent with the modeling results, suggesting that the current position of this "triple junction" has changed with time. The model also predicts those parts of the fault subject to contraction or extension perpendicular to the fault strike and hence the sense of any

  7. Modeling of Core Competencies in the Registrar's Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pikowsky, Reta

    2009-01-01

    The Office of the Registrar at the Georgia Institute of Technology, in cooperation with the Office of Human Resources, has been engaged since February 2008 in a pilot project to model core competencies for the leadership team and the staff. It is the hope of the office of Human resources that this pilot will result in a model that can be used…

  8. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  9. Core/corona modeling of diode-imploded annular loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, R. E.; Guillory, J. U.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of a tenuous exterior plasma corona with anomalous resistivity on the compression and heating of a hollow, collisional aluminum z-pinch plasma are predicted by a one-dimensional code. As the interior ("core") plasma is imploded by its axial current, the energy exchange between core and corona determines the current partition. Under the conditions of rapid core heating and compression, the increase in coronal current provides a trade-off between radial acceleration and compression, which reduces the implosion forces and softens the pitch. Combined with a heuristic account of energy and momentum transport in the strongly coupled core plasma and an approximate radiative loss calculation including Al line, recombination and Bremsstrahlung emission, the current model can provide a reasonably accurate description of imploding annular plasma loads that remain azimuthally symmetric. The implications for optimization of generator load coupling are examined.

  10. Dynamic behavior of Arabidopsis eIF4A-III, putative core protein of exon junction complex: fast relocation to nucleolus and splicing speckles under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, O A; Calder, G; Pendle, A F; Kim, S H; Lewandowska, D; Simpson, C G; Jones, I M; Brown, J W S; Shaw, P J

    2009-05-01

    Here, we identify the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the mammalian DEAD box helicase, eIF4A-III, the putative anchor protein of exon junction complex (EJC) on mRNA. Arabidopsis eIF4A-III interacts with an ortholog of the core EJC component, ALY/Ref, and colocalizes with other EJC components, such as Mago, Y14, and RNPS1, suggesting a similar function in EJC assembly to animal eIF4A-III. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-eIF4A-III fusion protein showed localization to several subnuclear domains: to the nucleoplasm during normal growth and to the nucleolus and splicing speckles in response to hypoxia. Treatment with the respiratory inhibitor sodium azide produced an identical response to the hypoxia stress. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 led to accumulation of GFP-eIF4A-III mainly in the nucleolus, suggesting that transition of eIF4A-III between subnuclear domains and/or accumulation in nuclear speckles is controlled by proteolysis-labile factors. As revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, the nucleoplasmic fraction was highly mobile, while the speckles were the least mobile fractions, and the nucleolar fraction had an intermediate mobility. Sequestration of eIF4A-III into nuclear pools with different mobility is likely to reflect the transcriptional and mRNA processing state of the cell. PMID:19435936

  11. Blockade of Gap Junction Hemichannel Suppresses Disease Progression in Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Doi, Yukiko; Jin, Shijie; Noda, Mariko; Liang, Jianfeng; Li, Hua; Zhou, Yan; Mori, Rarami; Yasuoka, Satoko; Li, Endong; Parajuli, Bijay; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Sato, Jun; Yamanaka, Koji; Sobue, Gen; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamate released by activated microglia induces excitotoxic neuronal death, which likely contributes to non-cell autonomous neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Although both blockade of glutamate receptors and inhibition of microglial activation are the therapeutic candidates for these neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate receptor blockers also perturbed physiological and essential glutamate signals, and inhibitors of microglial activation suppressed both neurotoxic/neuroprotective roles of microglia and hardly affected disease progression. We previously demonstrated that activated microglia release a large amount of glutamate specifically through gap junction hemichannel. Hence, blockade of gap junction hemichannel may be potentially beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods and Findings In this study, we generated a novel blood-brain barrier permeable gap junction hemichannel blocker based on glycyrrhetinic acid. We found that pharmacologic blockade of gap junction hemichannel inhibited excessive glutamate release from activated microglia in vitro and in vivo without producing notable toxicity. Blocking gap junction hemichannel significantly suppressed neuronal loss of the spinal cord and extended survival in transgenic mice carrying human superoxide dismutase 1 with G93A or G37R mutation as an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model. Moreover, blockade of gap junction hemichannel also significantly improved memory impairments without altering amyloid β deposition in double transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein with K595N and M596L mutations and presenilin 1 with A264E mutation as an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Conclusions Our results suggest that gap junction hemichannel blockers may represent a new therapeutic strategy to target neurotoxic microglia specifically and prevent microglia-mediated neuronal death in various

  12. Macro model for stochastic behavior of resistance distribution of magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Gyuhyun; Choi, Juntae; Song, Yunheub

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we fabricated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) samples to observe behavior of resistance variation, and investigated a stochastic behavior model for MTJ resistance from measured real data. We found the relationship between parallel resistance (RP), anti-parallel resistance (RAP), and TMR from the measurements. The variation of barrier thickness affects not only resistance but also TMR. This means that broad RAP distribution is caused by RP distribution. In addition, RAP distribution can be reduced by increasing temperature and bias voltage. We developed a macro model that can evaluate resistance distribution based on the stochastic behavior of MTJ resistance variation from only tox varied. The amount of resistance variation, which is considered with regard to the circuit performance, can be obtained from Δtox designed by designer. In addition, the impact for operating circumstance such as bias and temperature can be considered by using fit equations.

  13. Large magnetocapacitance effect in magnetic tunnel junctions based on Debye-Fröhlich model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiju, Hideo Takei, Masashi; Misawa, Takahiro; Nishii, Junji; Nagahama, Taro; Xiao, Gang

    2015-09-28

    The frequency dependence of tunneling magnetocapacitance (TMC) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is investigated theoretically and experimentally. According to the calculation based on Debye-Fröhlich model combined with Julliere formula, the TMC ratio strongly depends on the frequency and it has the maximum peak at a specific frequency. The calculated frequency dependence of TMC is in good agreement with the experimental results obtained in MgO-based MTJs with a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 108%, which exhibit a large TMC ratio of 155% at room temperature. This calculation also predicts that the TMC ratio can be as large as about 1000% for a spin polarization of 87%, while the TMR ratio is 623% for the same spin polarization. These theoretical and experimental findings provide a deeper understanding on AC spin-dependent transport in the MTJs and will open up wider opportunities for device applications, such as highly sensitive magnetic sensors and impedance-tunable devices.

  14. DATA MANAGEMENT, STATISTICS AND COMMUNITY IMPACT MODELING CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: R832141C007
    Title: Data Management, Statistics and Community Impact Modeling Core
    Investigator: Frederica P Perera
    Institution: Columbia University
    EPA Project Officer: Nigel Fields
    Project Period: No...

  15. Model for LMFBR core transient analysis in real-time

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of LMFBR core transients. It is shown that with a proper choice of shape functions a nodal approximation of the coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature distributions leads to adequately accurate power and temperature predictions, as well as adequately short computation times.

  16. Exact Analytical Solution of the Diode Ideality Factor of a pn Junction Device Using Lambert W-function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayhan, Habíbe; Sertap Kavasoglu, A.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a new analytical method for extracting the diode ideality factor of a p-n junction device using Lambert W-function model and the dark current-voltage data. The extracted values are found to be in good agreement with those calculated experimentally from dark current-voltage characteristics.

  17. A simple model for induction core voltage distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Richard J.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-07-01

    In fall 2003 T. Hughes of MRC used a full EM simulation code (LSP) to show that the electric field stress distribution near the outer radius of the longitudinal gaps between the four Metglas induction cores is very nonuniform in the original design of the DARHT-2 accelerator cells. In this note we derive a simple model of the electric field distribution in the induction core region to provide physical insights into this result. The starting point in formulating our model is to recognize that the electromagnetic fields in the induction core region of the DARHT-2 accelerator cells should be accurately represented within a quasi-static approximation because the timescale for the fields to change is much longer than the EM wave propagation time. The difficulty one faces is the fact that the electric field is a mixture of both a ''quasi-magnetostatic field'' (having a nonzero curl, with Bdot the source) and a ''quasi-electrostatic field'' (the source being electric charges on the various metal surfaces). We first discuss the EM field structure on the ''micro-scale'' of individual tape windings in Section 2. The insights from that discussion are then used to formulate a ''macroscopic'' description of the fields inside an ''equivalent homogeneous tape wound core region'' in Section 3. This formulation explicitly separates the nonlinear core magnetics from the quasi-electrostatic components of the electric field. In Section 4 a physical interpretation of the radial dependence of the electrostatic component of the electric field derived from this model is presented in terms of distributed capacitances, and the voltage distribution from gap to gap is related to various ''equivalent'' lumped capacitances. Analytic solutions of several simple multi-core cases are presented in Sections 5 and 6 to help provide physical insight into the effect of various proposed changes in the geometrical parameters of the DARHT-2 accelerator cell. Our results show that over most of the gap

  18. Effective model for a short Josephson junction with a phase discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldobin, E.; Mironov, S.; Buzdin, A.; Mints, R. G.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a short Josephson junction with a phase discontinuity κ created, e.g., by a pair of tiny current injectors, at some point x0 along the width of the junction. We derive the effective current-phase relation (CPR) for the system as a whole, i.e., reduce it to an effective pointlike junction. From the effective CPR we obtain the ground state of the system and predict the dependence of its critical current on κ . We show that in a large range of κ values the effective junction behaves as a φ0 Josephson junction, i.e., has a unique ground state phase φ0 within each 2 π interval. For κ ≈π and x0 near the middle of the junction one obtains a φ0±φ junction, i.e., a Josephson junction with degenerate ground state phase φ0±φ within each 2 π interval. Further, in view of possible escape experiments especially in the quantum domain, we investigate the scaling of the energy barrier and eigenfrequency close to the critical currents and predict the behavior of the escape histogram width σ (κ ) in the regime of the macroscopic quantum tunneling.

  19. Probiotics modify tight-junction proteins in an animal model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Briskey, David; Heritage, Mandy; Jaskowski, Lesley-Anne; Peake, Jonathan; Gobe, Glenda; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Crawford, Darrell; Campbell, Catherine; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have investigated the effects of a multispecies probiotic preparation containing a combination of probiotic bacterial genera that included Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli and a Streptococcus in a mouse model of high-fat diet or obesity-induced liver steatosis. Methods: Three groups of C57B1/6J mice were fed either a standard chow or a high-fat diet for 20 weeks, while a third group was fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks and then concomitantly administered probiotics for a further 10 weeks. Serum, liver and large bowel samples were collected for analysis. Results: The expression of the tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 was reduced (p < 0.05) in high-fat diet-fed mice compared to chow-fed mice. Probiotic supplementation helped to maintain tight ZO-1 and ZO-2 expression compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05), but did not restore ZO-1 or ZO-2 expression compared with chow-fed mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics had significant steatosis development compared with chow-fed mice (p < 0.05); steatosis was less severe in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group. Hepatic triglyceride concentration was higher in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics compared with the chow group (p < 0.05), and was lower in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05). Compared with chow-fed mice, serum glucose, cholesterol concentration and the activity of alanine transaminase were higher (p < 0.05), whereas serum triglyceride concentration was lower (p < 0.05) in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics. Conclusions: Supplementation with a multispecies probiotic formulation helped to maintain tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2, and reduced hepatic triglyceride concentration compared with a high-fat diet alone. PMID:27366215

  20. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q.; Cizek, J.

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  1. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  2. A 2-dimensional fully analytical model for design of high voltage junction barrier Schottky (JBS) diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Rahul; Zhao, Jian H.

    2011-09-01

    A physics-based closed form analytical model for the reverse leakage current of a high voltage junction barrier Schottky (JBS) diode is developed and shown to agree with experimental results. Maximum electric field "seen" by the Schottky contact is calculated from first principles by a 2-dimensional method as a function of JBS diode design parameters and confirmed by numerical simulations. Considering thermionic emission under image force barrier lowering and quantum mechanical tunneling, electric field at the Schottky contact is then related to reverse current. In combination with previously reported forward current and resistance models, this gives a complete I- V relationship for the JBS diode. A layout of interdigitated stripes of P-N and Schottky contacts at the anode is compared theoretically with a honeycomb layout and the 2-D model is extended to the 3-D honeycomb structure. Although simulation and experimental results from 4H-Silicon Carbide (SiC) diodes are used to validate it, the model itself is applicable to all JBS diodes.

  3. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  4. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  5. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  6. Experimental Analysis and Modeling of the Crushing of Honeycomb Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminanda, Y.; Castanié, B.; Barrau, J.-J.; Thevenet, P.

    2005-05-01

    In the aeronautical field, sandwich structures are widely used for secondary structures like flaps or landing gear doors. The modeling of low velocity/low energy impact, which can lead to a decrease of the structure strength by 50%, remains a designer’s main problem. Since this type of impact has the same effect as quasi-static indentation, the study focuses on the behavior of honeycomb cores under compression. The crushing phenomenon has been well identified for years but its mechanism is not described explicitly and the model proposed may not satisfy industrial purposes. To understand the crushing mechanism, honeycomb test specimens made of Nomex™, aluminum alloy and paper were tested. During the crushing, a CCD camera showed that the cell walls buckled very quickly. The peak load recorded during tests corresponded to the buckling of the common edge of three honeycomb cells. Further tests on corner structures to simulate only one vertical edge of a honeycomb cell show a similar behavior. The different specimens exhibited similar load/displacement curves and the differences observed were only due to the behavior of the different materials. As a conclusion of this phenomenological study, the hypothesis that loads are mainly taken by the vertical edge can be made. So, a honeycomb core subjected to compression can be modeled by a grid of nonlinear springs. A simple analytical model was then developed and validated by tests on Nomex™ honeycomb core indented by different sized spherical indenters. A good correlation between theory and experiment was found. This result can be used to satisfactorily model using finite elements the indentation on a sandwich structure with a metallic or composite skin and honeycomb core.

  7. Geophysical Age Dating of Seamounts using Dense Core Flexure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gyuha; Kim, Seung-Sep

    2016-04-01

    Lithospheric flexure of oceanic plate is thermo-mechanical response of an elastic plate to the given volcanic construct (e.g., seamounts and ocean islands). If the shape and mass of such volcanic loads are known, the flexural response is governed by the thickness of elastic plate, Te. As the age of oceanic plate increases, the elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere becomes thicker. Thus, we can relate Te with the age of plate at the time of loading. To estimate the amount of the driving force due to seamounts on elastic plate, one needs to approximate their density structure. The most common choice is uniform density model, which utilizes constant density value for a seamount. This approach simplifies computational processes for gravity prediction and error estimates. However, the uniform density model tends to overestimate the total mass of the seamount and hence produces more positive gravitational contributions from the load. Minimization of gravity misfits using uniform density, therefore, favors thinner Te in order to increase negative contributions from the lithospheric flexure, which can compensate for the excessive positives from the seamount. An alternative approach is dense core model, which approximate the heterogeneity nature of seamount density as three bodies of infill sediment, edifice, and dense core. In this study, we apply the dense core model to the Louisville Seamount Chain for constraining flexural deformation. We compare Te estimates with the loading time of the examined seamounts to redefine empirical geophysical age dating of seamounts.

  8. Three-dimensional thermal modeling for the Mendocino Triple Junction area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, Saskia; Govers, Rob; Schwartz, Susan; Furlong, Kevin

    1997-04-01

    Complex interaction between the Pacific, North American, and Juan de Fuca plates at the northward migrating Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) has had a profound effect on the geological evolution of western North America. This paper presents a three-dimensional thermal model for the area around the MTJ that is based on its kinematic evolution, incorporating the effects of an asthenospheric slab window, changes in relative plate motions and the trenchward migration of the Juan de Fuca-Pacific spreading ridge. The thermal equation, including conductive and advective heat transport, is solved numerically using finite differences. Surface heat flow data and the trend in the maximum depth of seismicity south of the MTJ can be quite well explained by the thermal model. A finite lithospheric thickness above the slab window is required to fit heat flow measurements; however, the lack of data west of the San Andreas Fault prevents discriminating between underthrusting and accretionary mechanisms of lithospheric thickening. A comparison between the thermal and recent seismic velocity models reveals that P-wave anomalies in the uppermost mantle have smaller wavelengths and larger amplitudes than predicted if they were purely thermal.

  9. Experimental Model of Proximal Junctional Fracture after Multilevel Posterior Spinal Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan; Petit, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk of proximal junctional fractures (PJF) with multilevel spinal instrumentation, especially in the osteoporotic spine. This problem is associated with significant morbidity and possibly the need for reoperation. Various techniques have been proposed in an attempt to decrease the risk of PJF but there is no experimental model described for in vitro production of PJF after multilevel instrumentation. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental model of PJF after multilevel posterior instrumentation. Initially, four porcine specimens including 4 vertebrae and instrumented at the 3 caudal vertebrae using a pedicle screw construct were subjected to different loading conditions. Loading conditions on porcine specimens involving cyclic loading along the axis of the center vertebral body line, with constrained flexion between 0° and 15° proximally, and fully constraining the specimen distally resulted in a fracture pattern most representative of a PJF seen clinically in humans, so to undergo human cadaveric testing with similar loading conditions was decided. Clinically relevant PJF were produced in all 3 human specimens. The experimental model described in this study will allow the evaluation of different parameters influencing the incidence and prevention of PJF after multilevel posterior spinal instrumentation. PMID:27610381

  10. Defects in neuromuscular junction remodelling in the Smn(2B/-) mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Beauvais, Ariane; Bhanot, Kunal; Kothary, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating childhood motor neuron disease caused by mutations and deletions within the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Although other tissues may be involved, motor neurons remain primary pathological targets, with loss of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) representing an early and significant event in pathogenesis. Although defects in axonal outgrowth and pathfinding have been observed in cell culture and in lower organisms upon Smn depletion, developmental defects in mouse models have been less obvious. Here, we have employed the Smn(2B/-) mouse model to investigate NMJ remodelling during SMA pathology, induced reinnervation, and paralysis. We show that whilst NMJs are capable of remodelling during pathogenesis, there is a marked reduction in paralysis-induced remodelling and in the nerve-directed re-organisation of acetylcholine receptors. This reduction in remodelling potential could not be attributed to a decreased rate of axonal growth. Finally, we have identified a loss of terminal Schwann cells which could contribute to the defects in remodelling/maintenance observed. Our work demonstrates that there are specific defects in NMJ remodelling in an intermediate SMA mouse model, which could contribute to or underlie pathogenesis in SMA. The development of strategies that can promote the remodelling potential of NMJs may therefore be of significant benefit to SMA patients. PMID:22960106

  11. Experimental Model of Proximal Junctional Fracture after Multilevel Posterior Spinal Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan; Petit, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk of proximal junctional fractures (PJF) with multilevel spinal instrumentation, especially in the osteoporotic spine. This problem is associated with significant morbidity and possibly the need for reoperation. Various techniques have been proposed in an attempt to decrease the risk of PJF but there is no experimental model described for in vitro production of PJF after multilevel instrumentation. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental model of PJF after multilevel posterior instrumentation. Initially, four porcine specimens including 4 vertebrae and instrumented at the 3 caudal vertebrae using a pedicle screw construct were subjected to different loading conditions. Loading conditions on porcine specimens involving cyclic loading along the axis of the center vertebral body line, with constrained flexion between 0° and 15° proximally, and fully constraining the specimen distally resulted in a fracture pattern most representative of a PJF seen clinically in humans, so to undergo human cadaveric testing with similar loading conditions was decided. Clinically relevant PJF were produced in all 3 human specimens. The experimental model described in this study will allow the evaluation of different parameters influencing the incidence and prevention of PJF after multilevel posterior spinal instrumentation. PMID:27610381

  12. Kinematic History of a Salient-recess Junction Explored through a Combined Approach of Field Data and Analog Sandbox Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ismat, Zeshan; Toeneboehn, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Within fold-thrust belts, the junctions between salients and recesses may hold critical clues to the overall kinematic history. The deformation history within these junctions is best preserved in areas where thrust sheets extend from a salient through an adjacent recess. We examine one such junction within the Sevier fold-thrust belt (western United States) along the Leamington transverse zone, northern Utah. Deformation within this junction took place by faulting and cataclastic flow. Here, we describe a protocol that examines these fault patterns to better understand the kinematic history of the field area. Fault data is supplemented by analog sandbox experiments. This study suggests that, in detail, deformation within the overlying thrust sheet may not directly reflect the underlying basement structure. We demonstrate that this combined field-experimental approach is easy, accessible, and may provide more details to the deformation preserved in the crust than other more expensive methods, such as computer modeling. In addition, the sandbox model may help to explain why and how these details formed. This method can be applied throughout fold-thrust belts, where upper-crustal rocks are well preserved. In addition, it can be modified to study any part of the upper crust that has been deformed via elastico-frictional mechanisms. Finally, this combined approach may provide more details as to how fold-thrust belts maintain critical-taper and serve as potential targets for natural resource exploration. PMID:27585112

  13. Coupled edge-core model of fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagórski, R.; Kulinski, S.; Scholz, M.

    1997-10-01

    A model has been developed which is capable to describe in a self consistent way the plasma dynamics in the centre and edge region of a fusion reactor. The core plasma is treated in the frame of the 0D model in which an empirical scaling law for the energy confinement time is included. The model accounts for energy losses due to Bremsstrahlung and line radiation as well as alpha particle heating. A 1D analytical model for plasma and impurity transport outside the last close magnetic surface (LCMS) is applied. The model accounts for the strong gradients of the plasma parameters along the magnetic field lines in the divertor. The sputtering phenomena at the plate and radiating cooling by injected impurities are treated self consistently in the model. The model has been used to investigate operating regimes of the ignition experiment. Analysis have been performed for different first wall materials (C, Ni, Mo, W) for ITER like tokamak.

  14. Structural and spectral studies of sunspots. [umbral core modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyller, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of umbral cores, both by multicolor photometry and by narrow band photometry in the vicinity of the sodium D lines, are described, and evidence is given which supports the validity of many umbral models, each of which describes different aspects of the observed umbral cores. Theoretical studies carried on at the observatory include the following: (1) Zeeman profiles of the sodium D sub 2 line and other lines; (2) turbulent heat conduction, sound waves, and the missing flux in sunspots; (3) chromospheric heating above spots by Alfven waves; (4) magnetic convection in the sun and solar neutrinos; (5) models of starspots on flare stars; (5) starspots on the primaries of contact binary systems; and (6) implications of starspots on red dwarfs.

  15. Toxicants target cell junctions in the testis: Insights from the indazole-carboxylic acid model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous types of junctions in the seminiferous epithelium which are integrated with, and critically dependent on the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. These include the basal tight junctions between Sertoli cells that form the main component of the blood–testis barrier, the basal ectoplasmic specializations (basal ES) and basal tubulobulbar complexes (basal TBC) between Sertoli cells; as well as apical ES and apical TBC between Sertoli cells and the developing spermatids that orchestrate spermiogenesis and spermiation. These junctions, namely TJ, ES, and TBC interact with actin microfilament-based cytoskeleton, which together with the desmosomal junctions that interact with the intermediate filament-based cytoskeleton plus the highly polarized microtubule-based cytoskeleton are working in concert to move spermatocytes and spermatids between the basal and luminal aspect of the seminiferous epithelium. In short, these various junctions are structurally complexed with the actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeleton or intermediate filaments of the Sertoli cell. Studies have shown toxicants (e.g., cadmium, bisphenol A (BPA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), phthalates, and glycerol), and some male contraceptives under development (e.g., adjudin, gamendazole), exert their effects, at least in part, by targeting cell junctions in the testis. The disruption of Sertoli–Sertoli cell and Sertoli–germ cell junctions, results in the loss of germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. Adjudin, a potential male contraceptive under investigation in our laboratory, produces loss of spermatids from the seminiferous tubules through disruption of the Sertoli cell spermatid junctions and disruption of the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. The molecular and structural changes associated with adjudin administration are described, to provide an example of the profile of changes caused by disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell and also Sertoli cell-cell junctions. PMID:26413399

  16. 98. View of IBM digital computer model 7090 magnet core ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. View of IBM digital computer model 7090 magnet core installation. ITT Artic Services, Inc., Official photograph BMEWS Site II, Clear, AK, by unknown photographer, 17 September 1965. BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-6606. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. Spectroscopic modeling and analysis of plasma conditions in implosion cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor E.

    In this dissertation we discuss the effects of opacity and plasma gradients on the analysis and interpretation of Ar K-shell line emission from Ar-doped inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and introduce a spectroscopic technique for the determination of core plasma gradients. In particular, the Ar Heβ composite spectral feature is used for core plasma temperature and density diagnostics. We present a versatile, spectroscopic-quality Non-Local-Thermodynamic- Equilibrium radiation transport model that takes into account the effects of collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, plasma gradients, Stark-broadened line shapes and radiation transport. The code computes the radiative properties of the plasma, and it can be easily adapted to treat different problems of spectra formation. We discuss the importance of high-order satellite emission in the formation of Heβ spectral feature, and the interpretation of core averaged electron temperatures and densities extracted from space integrated spectra of non- uniform plasmas. We also present an application of Genetic Algorithms to the analysis of experimental X-ray spectra. This algorithm drives the search for plasma parameters that yield the best fits to experimental spectra. We discuss the applicability of Case Injected Genetic Algorithms to accelerate analysis of spectra. Furthermore, we introduce a novel method for the determination of plasma temperature and density gradients in imploded cores. The gradients are extracted from the self-consistent analysis of time-resolved X-ray spectra and spatial emissivity distributions obtained from X-ray monochromatic images. In this case, the search in the complex parameter space of gradient functions is driven by a multi-objective Niched Pareto Genetic Algorithm. We discuss the analysis of time resolved spectra recorded during Ar-doped ICF implosions at the NOVA laser facility. Time histories of core averaged electron densities and temperatures during the collapse of the

  18. Modeling of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High Temperature Superconductors under External Radiation in the Breakpoint Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Plecenik, A.; Streltsova, O. I.; Zuev, M. I.; Ososkov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are calculated numerically in the parametric resonance region. We discuss a numerical method for calculation of the Shapiro step width on the amplitude of radiation. In order to accelerate computations we used parallelization by task parameter via Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) arrays and tested it in the case of a single junction. An analysis of the junction transitions between rotating and oscillating states in the branching region of IV-characteristics is presented.

  19. Thermal conductivity modeling of core-shell and tubular nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronggui; Chen, Gang; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2005-06-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of crystalline core-shell nanostructures of a variety of materials has become possible in recent years, allowing the realization of various novel nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. The increased surface or interface area will decrease the thermal conductivity of such nanostructures and impose challenges for the thermal management of such devices. In the meantime, the decreased thermal conductivity might benefit the thermoelectric conversion efficiency. In this paper, we present modeling results on the lattice thermal conductivity of core-shell and tubular nanowires along the wire axis direction using the phonon Boltzmann equation. We report the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the surface conditions and the core-shell geometry for silicon core-germanium shell and tubular silicon nanowires at room temperature. The results show that the effective thermal conductivity changes not only with the composition of the constituents but also with the radius of the nanowires and nanopores due to the nature of the ballistic phonon transport. The results in this work have implications for the design and operation of a variety of nanoelectronic devices, optoelectronic devices, and thermoelectric materials and devices. PMID:15943452

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Ab initio symplectic no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytrych, T.; Sviratcheva, K. D.; Draayer, J. P.; Bahri, C.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The no-core shell model (NCSM) is a prominent ab initio method that yields a good description of the low-lying states in few-nucleon systems as well as in more complex p-shell nuclei. Nevertheless, its applicability is limited by the rapid growth of the many-body basis with larger model spaces and increasing number of nucleons. The symplectic no-core shell model (Sp-NCSM) aspires to extend the scope of the NCSM beyond the p-shell region by augmenting the conventional spherical harmonic oscillator basis with the physically relevant symplectic \\SpR{3} symmetry-adapted configurations of the symplectic shell model that describe naturally the monopole-quadrupole vibrational and rotational modes, and also partially incorporate α-cluster correlations. In this review, the models underpinning the Sp-NCSM approach, namely, the NCSM, the Elliott SU(3) model and the symplectic shell model, are discussed. Following this, a prescription for constructing translationally invariant symplectic configurations in the spherical harmonic oscillator basis is given. This prescription is utilized to unveil the extent to which symplectic configurations enter into low-lying states in 12C and 16O nuclei calculated within the framework of the NCSM with the JISP16 realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. The outcomes of this proof-of-principle study are presented in detail.

  1. Quasi-exactly solvable relativistic soft-core Coulomb models

    SciTech Connect

    Agboola, Davids Zhang, Yao-Zhong

    2012-09-15

    By considering a unified treatment, we present quasi exact polynomial solutions to both the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations with the family of soft-core Coulomb potentials V{sub q}(r)=-Z/(r{sup q}+{beta}{sup q}){sup 1/q}, Z>0, {beta}>0, q{>=}1. We consider cases q=1 and q=2 and show that both cases are reducible to the same basic ordinary differential equation. A systematic and closed form solution to the basic equation is obtained using the Bethe ansatz method. For each case, the expressions for the energies and the allowed parameters are obtained analytically and the wavefunctions are derived in terms of the roots of a set of Bethe ansatz equations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relativistic bound-state solutions of the soft-core Coulomb models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quasi-exact treatments of the Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations for the soft-core Coulomb models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solutions obtained in terms of the roots to the Bethe ansatz equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hidden Lie algebraic structure discussed for the models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results useful in describing mesonic atoms and interaction of intense laser fields with atom.

  2. Evaluating nuclear physics inputs in core-collapse supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Hix, William Raphael; Baird, Mark L; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Core-collapse supernova models depend on the details of the nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs just as they depend on the details of the macroscopic physics (transport, hydrodynamics, etc.), numerical methods, and progenitors. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We also investigate the feedback between different EoSs and opacities in the context of different progenitors.

  3. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. PMID:24945433

  4. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. PMID:24945433

  5. Lattice charge models and core level shifts in disordered alloys.

    PubMed

    Underwood, T L; Cole, R J

    2013-10-30

    Differences in core level binding energies between atoms belonging to the same chemical species can be related to differences in their intra- and extra-atomic charge distributions, and differences in how their core holes are screened. With this in mind, we consider the charge-excess functional model (CEFM) for net atomic charges in alloys (Bruno et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 166401). We begin by deriving the CEFM energy function in order to elucidate the approximations which underpin this model. We thereafter consider the particular case of the CEFM in which the strengths of the 'local interactions' within all atoms are the same. We show that for binary alloys the ground state charges of this model can be expressed in terms of charge transfer between all pairs of unlike atoms analogously to the linear charge model (Magri et al 1990 Phys. Rev. B 42 11388). Hence, the model considered is a generalization of the linear charge model for alloys containing more than two chemical species. We then determine the model's unknown 'geometric factors' over a wide range of parameter space. These quantities are linked to the nature of charge screening in the model, and we illustrate that the screening becomes increasingly universal as the strength of the local interactions is increased. We then use the model to derive analytical expressions for various physical quantities, including the Madelung energy and the disorder broadening in the core level binding energies. These expressions are applied to ternary random alloys, for which it is shown that the Madelung energy and magnitude of disorder broadening are maximized at the composition at which the two species with the largest 'electronegativity difference' are equal, while the remaining species have a vanishing concentration. This result is somewhat counterintuitive with regards to the disorder broadening since it does not correspond to the composition with the highest entropy. Finally, the model is applied to CuPd and Cu

  6. Biaxial Nematic Phase in Model Bent-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Piotr; Longa, Lech

    2011-07-01

    We determine the bifurcation phase diagrams with isotropic (I), uniaxial (NU) and biaxial (NB) nematic phases for model bent-core mesogens using Onsager-type theory. The molecules comprise two or three Gay-Berne interacting ellipsoids of uniaxial and biaxial shape and a transverse central dipole. The Landau point is found to turn into an I-NB line for the three-center model with a large dipole moment. For the biaxial ellipsoids, a line of Landau points is observed even in the absence of the dipoles.

  7. Biaxial nematic phase in model bent-core systems.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Piotr; Longa, Lech

    2011-07-01

    We determine the bifurcation phase diagrams with isotropic (I), uniaxial (N(U)) and biaxial (N(B)) nematic phases for model bent-core mesogens using Onsager-type theory. The molecules comprise two or three Gay-Berne interacting ellipsoids of uniaxial and biaxial shape and a transverse central dipole. The Landau point is found to turn into an I-N(B) line for the three-center model with a large dipole moment. For the biaxial ellipsoids, a line of Landau points is observed even in the absence of the dipoles. PMID:21797641

  8. Uncovering Divergence of Rice Exon Junction Complex Core Heterodimer Gene Duplication Reveals Their Essential Role in Growth, Development, and Reproduction1[W

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Pichang; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) plays important developmental roles in animals; however, its role in plants is not well known. Here, we show various aspects of the divergence of each duplicated MAGO NASHI (MAGO) and Y14 gene pair in rice (Oryza sativa) encoding the putative EJC core subunits that form the obligate MAGO-Y14 heterodimers. OsMAGO1, OsMAGO2, and OsY14a were constitutively expressed in all tissues, while OsY14b was predominantly expressed in embryonic tissues. OsMAGO2 and OsY14b were more sensitive to different stresses than OsMAGO1 and OsY14a, and their encoded protein pair shared 93.8% and 46.9% sequence identity, respectively. Single MAGO down-regulation in rice did not lead to any phenotypic variation; however, double gene knockdowns generated short rice plants with abnormal flowers, and the stamens of these flowers showed inhibited degradation and absorption of both endothecium and tapetum, suggesting that OsMAGO1 and OsMAGO2 were functionally redundant. OsY14a knockdowns phenocopied OsMAGO1OsMAGO2 mutants, while down-regulation of OsY14b failed to induce plantlets, suggesting the functional specialization of OsY14b in embryogenesis. OsMAGO1OsMAGO2OsY14a triple down-regulation enhanced the phenotypes of OsMAGO1OsMAGO2 and OsY14a down-regulated mutants, indicating that they exert developmental roles in the MAGO-Y14 heterodimerization mode. Modified gene expression was noted in the altered developmental pathways in these knockdowns, and the transcript splicing of UNDEVELOPED TAPETUM1 (OsUDT1), a key regulator in stamen development, was uniquely abnormal. Concomitantly, MAGO and Y14 selectively bound to the OsUDT1 premessenger RNA, suggesting that rice EJC subunits regulate splicing. Our work provides novel insights into the function of the EJC locus in growth, development, and reproduction in angiosperms and suggests a role for these genes in the adaptive evolution of cereals. PMID:24820023

  9. Testing a new Free Core Nutation empirical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belda, Santiago; Ferrándiz, José M.; Heinkelmann, Robert; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-03-01

    The Free Core Nutation (FCN) is a free mode of the Earth's rotation caused by the different material characteristics of the Earth's core and mantle. This causes the rotational axes of those layers to slightly diverge from each other, resulting in a wobble of the Earth's rotation axis comparable to nutations. In this paper we focus on estimating empirical FCN models using the observed nutations derived from the VLBI sessions between 1993 and 2013. Assuming a fixed value for the oscillation period, the time-variable amplitudes and phases are estimated by means of multiple sliding window analyses. The effects of using different a priori Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) in the derivation of models are also addressed. The optimal choice of the fundamental parameters of the model, namely the window width and step-size of its shift, is searched by performing a thorough experimental analysis using real data. The former analyses lead to the derivation of a model with a temporal resolution higher than the one used in the models currently available, with a sliding window reduced to 400 days and a day-by-day shift. It is shown that this new model increases the accuracy of the modeling of the observed Earth's rotation. Besides, empirical models determined from USNO Finals as a priori ERP present a slightly lower Weighted Root Mean Square (WRMS) of residuals than IERS 08 C04 along the whole period of VLBI observations, according to our computations. The model is also validated through comparisons with other recognized models. The level of agreement among them is satisfactory. Let us remark that our estimates give rise to the lowest residuals and seem to reproduce the FCN signal in more detail.

  10. Quasiparticle energies and lifetimes in a metallic chain model of a tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Szepieniec, Mark; Yeriskin, Irene; Greer, J C

    2013-04-14

    As electronics devices scale to sub-10 nm lengths, the distinction between "device" and "electrodes" becomes blurred. Here, we study a simple model of a molecular tunnel junction, consisting of an atomic gold chain partitioned into left and right electrodes, and a central "molecule." Using a complex absorbing potential, we are able to reproduce the single-particle energy levels of the device region including a description of the effects of the semi-infinite electrodes. We then use the method of configuration interaction to explore the effect of correlations on the system's quasiparticle peaks. We find that when excitations on the leads are excluded, the device's highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital quasiparticle states when including correlation are bracketed by their respective values in the Hartree-Fock (Koopmans) and ΔSCF approximations. In contrast, when excitations on the leads are included, the bracketing property no longer holds, and both the positions and the lifetimes of the quasiparticle levels change considerably, indicating that the combined effect of coupling and correlation is to alter the quasiparticle spectrum significantly relative to an isolated molecule. PMID:24981526

  11. A model of tight junction function in central nervous system myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Gow, Alexander; Devaux, Jerome

    2008-11-01

    The insulative properties of myelin sheaths in the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS) are widely thought to derive from the high resistance and low capacitance of the constituent membranes. Although this view adequately accounts for myelin function in large diameter fibers, it poorly reflects the behavior of small fibers that are prominent in many regions of the CNS. Herein, we develop a computational model to more accurately represent conduction in small fibers. By incorporating structural features that, hitherto, have not been simulated, we demonstrate that myelin tight junctions (TJs) improve saltatory conduction by reducing current flow through the myelin, limiting axonal membrane depolarization and restraining the activation of ion channels beneath the myelin sheath. Accordingly, our simulations provide a novel view of myelin by which TJs minimize charging of the membrane capacitance and lower the membrane time constant to improve the speed and accuracy of transmission in small diameter fibers. This study establishes possible mechanisms whereby TJs affect conduction in the absence of overt perturbations to myelin architecture and may in part explain the tremor and gait abnormalities observed in Claudin 11-null mice. PMID:20102674

  12. Lattice charge models and core level shifts in disordered alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, T. L.; Cole, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Differences in core level binding energies between atoms belonging to the same chemical species can be related to differences in their intra- and extra-atomic charge distributions, and differences in how their core holes are screened. With this in mind, we consider the charge-excess functional model (CEFM) for net atomic charges in alloys (Bruno et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 166401). We begin by deriving the CEFM energy function in order to elucidate the approximations which underpin this model. We thereafter consider the particular case of the CEFM in which the strengths of the ‘local interactions’ within all atoms are the same. We show that for binary alloys the ground state charges of this model can be expressed in terms of charge transfer between all pairs of unlike atoms analogously to the linear charge model (Magri et al 1990 Phys. Rev. B 42 11388). Hence, the model considered is a generalization of the linear charge model for alloys containing more than two chemical species. We then determine the model’s unknown ‘geometric factors’ over a wide range of parameter space. These quantities are linked to the nature of charge screening in the model, and we illustrate that the screening becomes increasingly universal as the strength of the local interactions is increased. We then use the model to derive analytical expressions for various physical quantities, including the Madelung energy and the disorder broadening in the core level binding energies. These expressions are applied to ternary random alloys, for which it is shown that the Madelung energy and magnitude of disorder broadening are maximized at the composition at which the two species with the largest ‘electronegativity difference’ are equal, while the remaining species have a vanishing concentration. This result is somewhat counterintuitive with regards to the disorder broadening since it does not correspond to the composition with the highest entropy. Finally, the model is applied to Cu

  13. Modelling the carbonation of cementitious matrixes by means of the unreacted-core model, UR-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Castellote, M. Andrade, C.

    2008-12-15

    This paper presents a model for the carbonation of cementitious matrixes (UR-CORE). The model is based on the principles of the 'unreacted-core' systems, typical of chemical engineering processes, in which the reacted product remains in the solid as a layer of inert ash, adapted for the specific case of carbonation. Development of the model has been undertaken in three steps: 1) Establishment of the controlling step in the global carbonation rate, by using data of fractional conversion of different phases of the cementitious matrixes, obtained by the authors through neutron diffraction data experiments, and reported in [M. Castellote, C. Andrade, X. Turrillas, J. Campo, G. Cuello, Accelerated carbonation of cement pastes in situ monitored by neutron diffraction, Cem. Concr. Res. (2008), doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2008.07.002]. 2) Then, the model has been adapted and applied to the cementitious materials using different concentrations of CO{sub 2}, with the introduction of the needed assumptions and factors. 3) Finally, the model has been validated with laboratory data at different concentrations (taken from literature) and for long term natural exposure of concretes. As a result, the model seems to be reliable enough to be applied to cementitious materials, being able to extrapolate the results from accelerated tests in any conditions to predict the rate of carbonation in natural exposure, being restricted, at present stage, to conditions with a constant relative humidity.

  14. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a global, continuous in value and gradient, representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities and temperatures in the plasmasphere for five ion species. These and other works enable a new more robust empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  15. Holomorphic solutions of the double confluent Heun equation associated with the RSJ model of the Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchstaber, V. M.; Tertychnyi, S. I.

    2015-03-01

    This work is a continuation of research on a first-order nonlinear differential equation applied in the overshunted model of the Josephson junction. The approach is based on the relation between this equation and the double confluent Heun equation, which is a second-order linear homogeneous equation with two irregular singular points. We describe the conditions on the equation parameters under which its general solution is an analytic function on the Riemann sphere except at 0 and ∞. We construct an explicit basis of the solution space. One of the functions in this basis is regular everywhere except 0, and the other is regular everywhere except ∞. We show that in the framework of the RSJ model of Josephson junction dynamics, the described situation corresponds to the condition that the Shapiro step vanishes if all the solutions of the double confluent Heun equation are single-valued on the Riemann sphere without 0 and ∞.

  16. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  17. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  18. Bimetallic junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcella, F. G.; Lessmann, G. G.; Lindberg, R. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The formation of voids through interdiffusion in bimetallic welded structures exposed to high operating temperatures is inhibited by utilizing an alloy of the parent materials in the junction of the parent materials or by preannealing the junction at an ultrahigh temperature. These methods are also used to reduce the concentration gradient of a hardening agent.

  19. The Candy Wrapper Velocity Model for the Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattesini, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent global expansion of seismic data motivated a number of seismological studies of the Earth's inner core that proposed the existence of increasingly complex structure and anisotropy. In the meantime, new hypotheses of dynamic mechanisms have been put forward to interpret seismological results. Here, the nature of hemispherical dichotomy and anisotropy is re-investigated by bridging the observations of PKP(bc-df) differential travel-times with the iron bcc/hcp elastic properties computed from first-principles methods.The Candy Wrapper velocity model introduced here accounts for a dynamic picture of the inner core (i.e., the eastward drift of material), where different iron crystal shapes can be stabilized at the two hemispheres. We show that seismological data are best explained by a rather complicated, mosaic-like, structure of the inner core, where well-separated patches of different iron crystals compose the anisotropic western hemispherical region, and a conglomerate of almost indistinguishable iron phases builds-up the weakly anisotropic eastern side.

  20. Modelling dislocation cores in MgSiO3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Kraych, A.

    2012-12-01

    MgSiO3 perovskite is the most abundant mineral of the Earth's lower mantle (i.e. between 700 and 2900 km depth) and accounts for half of Earth's mass. At lower mantle pressures (25-135 GPa) MgSiO3 crystallises in a distorted (orthorhombic) perovskite structure (described in the following using the Pbnm space group). In this structure, SiO6 octahedra are tilted with tilt angles increasing with increasing pressure. Since it is very difficult to perform deformation experiments under the extreme P, T conditions of the lower mantle, little is known about plastic deformation of MgSiO3 perovskite and its slip systems are still a matter of debate. To overcome this difficulty, we model dislocation core structures in this mineral taking into account the influence of pressure. In this study, we focus on dislocation core structures of dislocations with [100] and [010] Burgers vectors (which derive from <110> Burgers vectors of the underlying pseudo-cubic structure). Atomistic calculations are performed using pair-wise potentials as implemented in the LAMMPS code. The choice of potentials was initially validated by comparing generalized stacking fault (GSF) energies to similar calculations performed with the density functional theory (DFT). The core structures of screw dislocations are calculated using two independent methods. The first one is based on Peierls-Nabarro-Galerkin simulations involving GSF as an input. Direct calculations have also bee performed using cluster approach. It turns out that screw dislocations with [100] Burgers vector are characterised by a core mostly spread in the (010) plane. The core exhibits two edge-sharing octahedra in a configuration very similar to that modelled in SrTiO3 cubic perovskite. The structure of [010] screw dislocations is more complex with dissociation into two, non-collinear partial dislocations with a significant non-screw component. Both dislocations exhibit high Peierls stresses. This illustrates the effect of orthorhombic

  1. IR Emission Models from High-Mass Star Formation Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Deutsch, L. K.

    2001-12-01

    Recognition that high-mass stars form only in clusters has motivated us to make new radiative transfer models for infrared emission from compact, dense cloud cores surrounding very young high-mass stars. We assume outer cloud radii are limited by the formation of stars in clusters to 0.1 pc. Since there is a high efficiency of conversion of gas into stars within clusters, we assumed the mass of gas and dust in the cloud models is equal or less than the mass of the central star. We assumed Draine and Lee (1984) dust properties with 100:1 gas to dust mass ratio, and used the Egan, Leung, and Spagna (1988) radiative transfer code. The central star in all models is an O8 ZAMS type at 1700 pc distance (the distance to NGC6334). The dust emitting clouds were assumed to have inner cavities of radius 0.006 pc, just outside an ultracompact HII region. Density distributions were taken as uniform or proportional to r-3/2. Except for the highest mass clouds, the models showed the 10 micron silicate feature in emission rather than self absorption. All models' spectral energy distributions peak shortward of 50 microns. The lack of silicate self absorption and the SEDs peaking shortward of 50 microns are apparently due to the small size of these models. In order to match observed silicate absorption in UCHIIs, an external cold absorbing component must be added to the models. The results suggest that individual high mass star-formation cores should be searched for in mid-infrared rather than far-infrared wavelengths, and that SEDs which peak in the far- infrared are at least partly produced by separate, larger outer cloud envelopes. Draine, B. T. & Lee, H. M. 1984 ApJ, 285, 89; Egan, M.P., Leung, C.M., & Spagna, G.F, Jr. 1988 Comput. Phys. Comm., 48, 271

  2. Mix and match: Investigating heteromeric and heterotypic gap junction channels in model systems and native tissues

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Michael; Molina, Samuel A.; Burt, Janis M.

    2014-01-01

    This review is based in part on a roundtable discussion session: “Physiological roles for heterotypic/heteromeric channels” at the 2013 International Gap Junction Conference (IGJC 2013) in Charleston, South Carolina. It is well recognized that multiple connexins can specifically co-assemble to form mixed gap junction channels with unique properties as a means to regulate intercellular communication. Compatibility determinants for both heteromeric and heterotypic gap junction channel formation have been identified and associated with specific connexin amino acid motifs. Hetero-oligomerization is also a regulated process; differences in connexin quality control and monomer stability are likely to play integral roles to control interactions between compatible connexins. Gap junctions in oligodendrocyte:astrocyte communication and in the cardiovascular system have emerged as key systems where heterotypic and heteromeric channels have unique physiologic roles. There are several methodologies to study heteromeric and heterotypic channels that are best applied to either heterologous expression systems, native tissues or both. There remains a need to use and develop different experimental approaches in order to understand the prevalence and roles for mixed gap junction channels in human physiology. PMID:24561196

  3. Ab-Initio Shell Model with a Core

    SciTech Connect

    Lisetskiy, A F; Barrett, B R; Kruse, M; Navratil, P; Stetcu, I; Vary, J P

    2008-06-04

    We construct effective 2- and 3-body Hamiltonians for the p-shell by performing 12{h_bar}{Omega} ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) calculations for A=6 and 7 nuclei and explicitly projecting the many-body Hamiltonians onto the 0{h_bar}{Omega} space. We then separate these effective Hamiltonians into 0-, 1- and 2-body contributions (also 3-body for A=7) and analyze the systematic behavior of these different parts as a function of the mass number A and size of the NCSM basis space. The role of effective 3- and higher-body interactions for A > 6 is investigated and discussed.

  4. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  5. Astrocytic gap junctional networks suppress cellular damage in an in vitro model of ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shinotsuka, Takanori; Yasui, Masato; Nuriya, Mutsuo

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Astrocytes exhibit characteristic changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} under OGD. • Astrocytic [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase is synchronized with a neuronal anoxic depolarization. • Gap junctional couplings protect neurons as well as astrocytes during OGD. - Abstract: Astrocytes play pivotal roles in both the physiology and the pathophysiology of the brain. They communicate with each other via extracellular messengers as well as through gap junctions, which may exacerbate or protect against pathological processes in the brain. However, their roles during the acute phase of ischemia and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we imaged changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytes in mouse cortical slices under oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) condition using two-photon microscopy. Under OGD, astrocytes showed [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} oscillations followed by larger and sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases. While the pharmacological blockades of astrocytic receptors for glutamate and ATP had no effect, the inhibitions of gap junctional intercellular coupling between astrocytes significantly advanced the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase after OGD exposure. Interestingly, the simultaneous recording of the neuronal membrane potential revealed that the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes was synchronized with the appearance of neuronal anoxic depolarization. Furthermore, the blockade of gap junctional coupling resulted in a concurrent faster appearance of neuronal depolarizations, which remain synchronized with the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocytes delay the appearance of the pathological responses of astrocytes and neurons through their gap junction-mediated intercellular network under OGD. Thus, astrocytic gap junctional networks provide protection against tissue damage

  6. A compact model for magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switched by thermally assisted Spin transfer torque (TAS + STT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weisheng; Duval, Julien; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Chappert, Claude

    2011-12-01

    Thermally assisted spin transfer torque [TAS + STT] is a new switching approach for magnetic tunnel junction [MTJ] nanopillars that represents the best trade-off between data reliability, power efficiency and density. In this paper, we present a compact model for MTJ switched by this approach, which integrates a number of physical models such as temperature evaluation and STT dynamic switching models. Many experimental parameters are included directly to improve the simulation accuracy. It is programmed in the Verilog-A language and compatible with the standard IC CAD tools, providing an easy parameter configuration interface and allowing high-speed co-simulation of hybrid MTJ/CMOS circuits.

  7. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  8. MCNP/MCNPX model of the annular core research reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Cooper, Philip J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2006-10-01

    Many experimenters at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) have a need to predict the neutron/gamma environment prior to testing. In some cases, the neutron/gamma environment is needed to understand the test results after the completion of an experiment. In an effort to satisfy the needs of experimenters, a model of the ACRR was developed for use with the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport codes MCNP [Br03] and MCNPX [Wa02]. The model contains adjustable safety, transient, and control rods, several of the available spectrum-modifying cavity inserts, and placeholders for experiment packages. The ACRR model was constructed such that experiment package models can be easily placed in the reactor after being developed as stand-alone units. An addition to the 'standard' model allows the FREC-II cavity to be included in the calculations. This report presents the MCNP/MCNPX model of the ACRR. Comparisons are made between the model and the reactor for various configurations. Reactivity worth curves for the various reactor configurations are presented. Examples of reactivity worth calculations for a few experiment packages are presented along with the measured reactivity worth from the reactor test of the experiment packages. Finally, calculated neutron/gamma spectra are presented.

  9. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  10. Electromagnetic model for near-field microwave microscope with atomic resolution: Determination of tunnel junction impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Reznik, Alexander N.

    2014-08-25

    An electrodynamic model is proposed for the tunneling microwave microscope with subnanometer space resolution as developed by Lee et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 183111 (2010)]. Tip-sample impedance Z{sub a} was introduced and studied in the tunneling and non-tunneling regimes. At tunneling breakdown, the microwave current between probe and sample flows along two parallel channels characterized by impedances Z{sub p} and Z{sub t} that add up to form overall impedance Z{sub a}. Quantity Z{sub p} is the capacitive impedance determined by the near field of the probe and Z{sub t} is the impedance of the tunnel junction. By taking into account the distance dependences of effective tip radius r{sub 0}(z) and tunnel resistance R{sub t}(z) = Re[Z{sub t}(z)], we were able to explain the experimentally observed dependences of resonance frequency f{sub r}(z) and quality factor Q{sub L}(z) of the microscope. The obtained microwave resistance R{sub t}(z) and direct current tunnel resistance R{sub t}{sup dc}(z) exhibit qualitatively similar behavior, although being largely different in both magnitude and the characteristic scale of height dependence. Interpretation of the microwave images of the atomic structure of test samples proved possible by taking into account the inductive component of tunnel impedance ImZ{sub t} = ωL{sub t}. Relation ωL{sub t}/R{sub t} ≈ 0.235 was obtained.

  11. Development of CFD model for augmented core tripropellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth M.

    1994-10-01

    The Space Shuttle era has made major advances in technology and vehicle design to the point that the concept of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle appears more feasible. NASA presently is conducting studies into the feasibility of certain advanced concept rocket engines that could be utilized in a SSTO vehicle. One such concept is a tripropellant system which burns kerosene and hydrogen initially and at altitude switches to hydrogen. This system will attain a larger mass fraction because LOX-kerosene engines have a greater average propellant density and greater thrust-to-weight ratio. This report describes the investigation to model the tripropellant augmented core engine. The physical aspects of the engine, the CFD code employed, and results of the numerical model for a single modular thruster are discussed.

  12. Systems Modeling for Crew Core Body Temperature Prediction Postlanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Cynthia; Ochoa, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, NASA s latest crewed spacecraft project, presents many challenges to its designers including ensuring crew survivability during nominal and off nominal landing conditions. With a nominal water landing planned off the coast of San Clemente, California, off nominal water landings could range from the far North Atlantic Ocean to the middle of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. For all of these conditions, the vehicle must provide sufficient life support resources to ensure that the crew member s core body temperatures are maintained at a safe level prior to crew rescue. This paper will examine the natural environments, environments created inside the cabin and constraints associated with post landing operations that affect the temperature of the crew member. Models of the capsule and the crew members are examined and analysis results are compared to the requirement for safe human exposure. Further, recommendations for updated modeling techniques and operational limits are included.

  13. LOW MACH NUMBER MODELING OF CORE CONVECTION IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilet, C.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Zingale, M.

    2013-08-20

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 M{sub Sun} star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. To perform the necessary long-time calculations, we use the low Mach number code MAESTRO, with initial conditions taken from a one-dimensional stellar model. We first identify several key factors that the one-dimensional initial model must satisfy to ensure efficient simulation of the convection process. We then use the three-dimensional simulations to examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a fixed composition approximation and using a reduced domain size. We find that using a fixed composition model actually increases the computational cost relative to using the full multi-species model because the fixed composition system takes longer to reach convection that is in a quasi-static state. Using a reduced (octant rather than full sphere) simulation domain yields flow with statistical properties that are within a factor of two of the full sphere simulation values. Both the octant and full sphere simulations show similar mixing across the convection zone boundary that is consistent with the turbulent entrainment model. However, the global character of the flow is distinctly different in the octant simulation, showing more rapid changes in the large-scale structure of the flow and thus a more isotropic flow on average.

  14. Shrinking-core modeling of binary chromatographic breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Traylor, Steven J; Xu, Xuankuo; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2011-04-22

    Most chromatographic processes involve separation of two or more species, so development of a simple, accurate multicomponent chromatographic model can be valuable for improving process efficiency and yield. We consider the case of breakthrough chromatography, which has been considered in great depth for single-component modeling but to a much more limited degree for multicomponent breakthrough. We use the shrinking core model, which provides a reasonable approximation of particle uptake for proteins under strong binding conditions. Analytical column solutions for single-component systems are extended here to predict binary breakthrough chromatographic behavior for conditions under which the external transport resistance is negligible. Analytical results for the location and profile of displacement effects and expected breakthrough curves are derived for limiting cases. More generally, straightforward numerical results have also been obtained through simultaneous solution of a set of simple ordinary differential equations. Exploration of the model parameter space yields results consistent with theoretical expectations. Additionally, both analytical and numerical predictions compare favorably with experimental column breakthrough data for lysozyme-cytochrome c mixtures on the strong cation exchanger SP Sepharose FF. Especially significant is the ability of the model to predict experimentally observed displacement profiles of the more weakly adsorbed species (in this case cytochrome c). The ability to model displacement behavior using simple analytical and numerical techniques is a significant improvement over current methods. PMID:21411102

  15. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We review the Nijmegen extended-soft-core (ESC) models for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons (N, Lambda, Sigma, and Xi). The interactions are basically studied from the meson-exchange point of view, in the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem [H. Yukawa, ``On the interaction of Elementary Particles I'', Proceedings of the Physico-Mathematical Society of Japan 17 (1935), 48], using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. We present in some detail the most recent extended-soft-core model, henceforth referred to as ESC08, which is the most complete, sophisticated, and successful interaction-model. Furthermore, we discuss briefly its predecessor the ESC04-model [Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044007; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Ph ys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044008; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, nucl-th/0608074]. For the soft-core one-boson-exchange (OBE) models we refer to the literature [Th. A. Rijken, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Few-Body Problems in Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quebec, 1974, ed. R. J. Slobodrian, B. Cuec and R. Ramavataram (Presses Universitè Laval, Quebec, 1975), p. 136; Th. A. Rijken, Ph. D. thesis, University of Nijmegen, 1975; M. M. Nagels, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. D 17 (1978), 768; P. M. M. Maessen, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. C 40 (1989), 2226; Th. A. Rijken, V. G. J. Stoks and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 21; V. G. J. Stoks and Th. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 3009]. All ingredients of these latter models are also part of ESC08, and so a description of ESC08 comprises all models so far in principle. The extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of

  16. Impaired Astrocytic Gap Junction Coupling and Potassium Buffering in a Mouse Model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Zeng, Ling-Hui; Wong, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in astrocytes occur in the brains of patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurological dysfunction in this disease. Here, we report that knock-out mice with Tsc1 gene inactivation in glia (Tsc1GFAPCKO mice) exhibit decreased expression of the astrocytic connexin protein, Cx43, and an associated impairment in gap junction coupling between astrocytes. Correspondingly, hippocampal slices from Tsc1GFAPCKO mice have increased extracellular potassium concentration in response to stimulation. This impaired potassium buffering can be attributed to abnormal gap junction coupling, as a gap junction inhibitor elicits an additional increase in potassium concentration in control, but not Tsc1GFAPCKO slices. Furthermore, treatment with a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor reverses the deficient Cx43 expression and impaired potassium buffering. These findings suggest that Tsc1 inactivation in astrocytes causes defects in astrocytic gap junction coupling and potassium clearance, which may contribute to epilepsy in Tsc1GFAPCKO mice. PMID:19385061

  17. Beyond the Lorentzian Model in Quantum Transport: Energy-Dependent Resonance Broadening in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenfei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    In quantum transport calculations, transmission functions of molecular junctions, as well as spectral functions of metal-organic interfaces, often feature peaks originating from molecular resonances. These resonance peaks are often assumed to be Lorentzian, with an energy-independent broadening function Γ. However, in the general case, the wide-band-limit breaks down, and the Lorentzian approximation is no longer valid. Here, we develop a new energy-dependent broadening function Γ (E) , based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices within a non-equilbrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. As defined, Γ (E) can describe resonances of non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively; and it is particularly useful in understanding transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals in asymmetric junctions. We compute this quantity via an ab initio NEGF approach based on density functional theory and illustrate its utility with several junctions of experimental relevance, including recent work on rectification in Au-graphite junctions. This work is supported by the DOE, and computational resources are provided by NERSC.

  18. Stochastic 16-state model of voltage gating of gap-junction channels enclosing fast and slow gates.

    PubMed

    Paulauskas, Nerijus; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Mockus, Jonas; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2012-06-01

    Gap-junction (GJ) channels formed of connexin (Cx) proteins provide a direct pathway for electrical and metabolic cell-cell interaction. Each hemichannel in the GJ channel contains fast and slow gates that are sensitive to transjunctional voltage (Vj). We developed a stochastic 16-state model (S16SM) that details the operation of two fast and two slow gates in series to describe the gating properties of homotypic and heterotypic GJ channels. The operation of each gate depends on the fraction of Vj that falls across the gate (VG), which varies depending on the states of three other gates in series, as well as on parameters of the fast and slow gates characterizing 1), the steepness of each gate's open probability on VG; 2), the voltage at which the open probability of each gate equals 0.5; 3), the gating polarity; and 4), the unitary conductances of the gates and their rectification depending on VG. S16SM allows for the simulation of junctional current dynamics and the dependence of steady-state junctional conductance (gj,ss) on Vj. We combined global coordinate optimization algorithms with S16SM to evaluate the gating parameters of fast and slow gates from experimentally measured gj,ss-Vj dependencies in cells expressing different Cx isoforms and forming homotypic and/or heterotypic GJ channels. PMID:22713562

  19. Stochastic 16-State Model of Voltage Gating of Gap-Junction Channels Enclosing Fast and Slow Gates

    PubMed Central

    Paulauskas, Nerijus; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Mockus, Jonas; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.

    2012-01-01

    Gap-junction (GJ) channels formed of connexin (Cx) proteins provide a direct pathway for electrical and metabolic cell-cell interaction. Each hemichannel in the GJ channel contains fast and slow gates that are sensitive to transjunctional voltage (Vj). We developed a stochastic 16-state model (S16SM) that details the operation of two fast and two slow gates in series to describe the gating properties of homotypic and heterotypic GJ channels. The operation of each gate depends on the fraction of Vj that falls across the gate (VG), which varies depending on the states of three other gates in series, as well as on parameters of the fast and slow gates characterizing 1), the steepness of each gate's open probability on VG; 2), the voltage at which the open probability of each gate equals 0.5; 3), the gating polarity; and 4), the unitary conductances of the gates and their rectification depending on VG. S16SM allows for the simulation of junctional current dynamics and the dependence of steady-state junctional conductance (gj,ss) on Vj. We combined global coordinate optimization algorithms with S16SM to evaluate the gating parameters of fast and slow gates from experimentally measured gj,ss-Vj dependencies in cells expressing different Cx isoforms and forming homotypic and/or heterotypic GJ channels. PMID:22713562

  20. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robida, François; Wächter, Joachim; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Lorenz, Henning; Carter, Mary; Cipolloni, Carlo; Morel, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Geological data and models are important assets for the EPOS community. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS is being designed and will be implemented in an efficient and sustainable access system for geological multi-scale data assets for EPOS through the integration of distributed infrastructure components (nodes) of geological surveys, research institutes and the international drilling community (ICDP/IODP). The TCS will develop and take benefit of the synergy between the existing data infrastructures of the Geological Surveys of Europe (EuroGeoSurveys / OneGeology-Europe / EGDI) and of the large amount of information produced by the research organisations. These nodes will offer a broad range of resources including: geological maps, borehole data, geophysical data (seismic data, borehole log data), archived information on physical material (samples, cores), geochemical and other analyses of rocks, soils and minerals, and Geological models (3D, 4D). The services will be implemented on international standards (such as INSPIRE, IUGS/CGI, OGC, W3C, ISO) in order to guarantee their interoperability with other EPOS TCS as well as their compliance with INSPIRE European Directive or international initiatives (such as OneGeology). This will provide future virtual research environments with means to facilitate the use of existing information for future applications. In addition, workflows will be established that allow the integration of other existing and new data and applications. Processing and the use of simulation and visualization tools will subsequently support the integrated analysis and characterization of complex subsurface structures and their inherent dynamic processes. This will in turn aid in the overall understanding of complex multi-scale geo-scientific questions. This TCS will work alongside other EPOS TCSs to create an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth Sciences in Europe.

  1. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robida, François; Wächter, Joachim; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Lorenz, Henning; Carter, Mary; Cipolloni, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Geological data and models are important assets for the EPOS community. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS will be designed and implemented in an efficient and sustainable access system for geological multi-scale data assets for EPOS through the integration of distributed infrastructure components (nodes) of geological surveys, research institutes and the international drilling community (ICDP) . The TCS will develop and take benefit of the synergy between the existing data infrastructures of the Geological Surveys of Europe (EuroGeoSurveys / OneGeology-Europe / EGDI) and on the large amount of information produced by the research organisations. These nodes will offer a broad range of resources including: digitised geological maps, borehole data, geophysical data (seismic data, borehole log data), archived information on physical material (samples, cores), geochemical and other analyses of rocks, soils and minerals, and Geological models (3D, 4D). The services will be implemented on international standards (such as INSPIRE, IUGS/CGI, OGC, W3C, ISO) in order to guarantee their interoperability with other EPOS TCS as well as their compliance with INSPIRE European Directive or international initiatives (such as OneGeology). This will provide future virtual research environments with means to facilitate the use of existing information for future applications. In addition, workflows will be established that allow the integration of other existing and new data and applications. Processing and the use of simulation and visualization tools will subsequently support the integrated analysis and characterization of complex subsurface structures and their inherent dynamic processes. This will in turn aid in the overall understanding of complex multi-scale geo-scientific questions. This TCS will work alongside other EPOS TCSs to create an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth Sciences in Europe.

  2. An analytical model of eddy current ferrite-core probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Bowler, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    An analytical model of an axisymmetric eddy current probe with a cylindrical ferrite core above a layered conductive half-space is developed. Initially we consider the magnetic vector potential of a circular filament coaxial with a ferrite core over a layered conducting half-space. The principle of superposition is then used to derive close-form expressions for both the electromagnetic field and the impedance of a coil from the filament field. Rather than locating the probe in infinite space, it is confined coaxially within a circularly cylindrical boundary on which the vector potential field is zero. The radius of this artificial boundary is large in order to ensure that does not interfere substantially with the field near the probe. By using a truncated region in this way, the vector potential in the probe region can be expanded as a series rather than an integral form. Thus the solution of the problem amounts to finding the expansion coeefficients in the series. The numerical predictions of probe impedance have been compared with experimental data showing good agreement.

  3. Hydrodynamic models of AGN feedback in cooling core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleo, John C.

    X-ray observations show that the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) in many galaxy clusters is cooling at a rapid rate, often to the point that it should have radiated away all of its energy in less than the age of the cluster. There is however a very clear lack of enough cool end products of this gas in the centers of the clusters. Energetic arguments indicate that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) should be capable of heating the inner regions of clusters enough to offset the radiative cooling; truncating massive galaxy formation and solving the cooling flow problem. We present three sets of high resolution, ideal hydrodynamic simulations with the ZEUS code to test this AGN heating paradigm. For the first set of simulations, we study the dependence of the interaction between the AGN jets and the ICM on the parameters of the jets themselves. We present a parameter survey of two-dimensional (axisymmetric) models of back-to-back jets injected into a cluster atmosphere. We follow the passive evolution of the resulting structures. These simulations fall into roughly two classes, cocoon-bounded and non-cocoon bounded. We find that the cocoon-bounded sources inject significantly more entropy into the core regions of the ICM atmosphere, even though the efficiency with which the energy is thermalized is independent of the morphological class. In all cases, a large fraction of the energy injected by the jet ends up as gravitational potential energy due to the expansion of the atmosphere. For the second set, we present three-dimensional simulations of jetted AGN that act in response to cooling-mediated accretion of an ICM atmosphere. We find that our models are incapable of producing a long term balance of heating and cooling; catastrophic cooling can be delayed by the jet action but inevitably takes hold. At the heart of the failure of these models is the formation of a low density channel through which the jet can freely flow, carrying its energy out of the cooling core. Finally, we

  4. A Transient Diffusion Model Yields Unitary Gap Junctional Permeabilities from Images of Cell-to-Cell Fluorescent Dye Transfer Between Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nitsche, Johannes M.; Chang, Hou-Chien; Weber, Paul A.; Nicholson, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    As ubiquitous conduits for intercellular transport and communication, gap junctional pores have been the subject of numerous investigations aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying permeability and selectivity. Dye transfer studies provide a broadly useful means of detecting coupling and assessing these properties. However, given evidence for selective permeability of gap junctions and some anomalous correlations between junctional electrical conductance and dye permeability by passive diffusion, the need exists to give such studies a more quantitative basis. This article develops a detailed diffusion model describing experiments (reported separately) involving transport of fluorescent dye from a “donor” region to an “acceptor” region within a pair of Xenopus oocytes coupled by gap junctions. Analysis of transport within a single oocyte is used to determine the diffusion and binding characteristics of the cellular cytoplasm. Subsequent double-cell calculations then yield the intercellular junction permeability, which is translated into a single-channel permeability using concomitant measurements of intercellular conductance, and known single-channel conductances of gap junctions made up of specific connexins, to count channels. The preceding strategy, combined with use of a graded size series of Alexa dyes, permits a determination of absolute values of gap junctional permeability as a function of dye size and connexin type. Interpretation of the results in terms of pore theory suggests significant levels of dye-pore affinity consistent with the expected order of magnitude of typical (e.g., van der Waals) intermolecular attractions. PMID:15041648

  5. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, make possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented. Specifically shown here are the inner-plasmasphere RIMS measurements, radial fits to densities and temperatures for H(+), He(+), He(++), O(+), and O(+) and the error associated with these initial simple fits. Also shown are more subtle dependencies on the f10.7 P-value (see Richards et al. [1994]).

  6. Phase diagram of the Gaussian-core model.

    PubMed

    Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Giaquinta, Paolo V

    2005-05-01

    We trace with high numerical accuracy the phase diagram of the Gaussian-core model, a classical system of point particles interacting via a Gaussian-shaped, purely repulsive potential. This model, which provides a reliable qualitative description of the thermal behavior of interpenetrable globular polymers, is known to exhibit a polymorphic fcc-bcc transition at low densities and reentrant melting at high densities. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations, carried out in conjunction with accurate calculations of the solid free energies, lead to a thermodynamic scenario that is partially modified with respect to previous knowledge. In particular, we find that: (i) the fluid-bcc-fcc triple-point temperature is about one third of the maximum freezing temperature; (ii) upon isothermal compression, the model exhibits a fluid-bcc-fcc-bcc-fluid sequence of phases in a narrow range of temperatures just above the triple point. We discuss these results in relation to the behavior of star-polymer solutions and of other softly repulsive systems. PMID:16089510

  7. PACS model based on digital watermarking and its core algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Que, Dashun; Wen, Xianlin; Chen, Bi

    2009-10-01

    PACS model based on digital watermarking is proposed by analyzing medical image features and PACS requirements from the point of view of information security, its core being digital watermarking server and the corresponding processing module. Two kinds of digital watermarking algorithm are studied; one is non-region of interest (NROI) digital watermarking algorithm based on wavelet domain and block-mean, the other is reversible watermarking algorithm on extended difference and pseudo-random matrix. The former belongs to robust lossy watermarking, which embedded in NROI by wavelet provides a good way for protecting the focus area (ROI) of images, and introduction of block-mean approach a good scheme to enhance the anti-attack capability; the latter belongs to fragile lossless watermarking, which has the performance of simple implementation and can realize tamper localization effectively, and the pseudo-random matrix enhances the correlation and security between pixels. Plenty of experimental research has been completed in this paper, including the realization of digital watermarking PACS model, the watermarking processing module and its anti-attack experiments, the digital watermarking server and the network transmission simulating experiments of medical images. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the designed PACS model can effectively ensure confidentiality, authenticity, integrity and security of medical image information.

  8. Epithelial Junction Opener Improves Oncolytic Adenovirus Therapy in Mouse Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Yumul, Roma; Richter, Maximilian; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-04-01

    A central resistance mechanism in solid tumors is the maintenance of epithelial junctions between malignant cells that prevent drug penetration into the tumor. Human adenoviruses (Ads) have evolved mechanisms to breach epithelial barriers. For example, during Ad serotype 3 (Ad3) infection of epithelial tumor cells, massive amounts of subviral penton-dodecahedral particles (PtDd) are produced and released from infected cells to trigger the transient opening of epithelial junctions, thus facilitating lateral virus spread. We show here that an Ad3 mutant that is disabled for PtDd production is significantly less effective in killing of epithelial human xenograft tumors than the wild-type Ad3 virus. Intratumoral spread and therapeutic effect of the Ad3 mutant was enhanced by co-administration of a small recombinant protein (JO; produced in Escherichia coli) that incorporated the minimal junction opening domains of PtDd. We then demonstrated that co-administration of JO with replication-competent Ads that do not produce PtDd (Ad5, Ad35) resulted in greater attenuation of tumor growth than virus injection alone. Furthermore, we genetically modified a conditionally replicating Ad5-based oncolytic Ad (Ad5Δ24) to express a secreted form of JO upon replication in tumor cells. The JO-expressing virus had a significantly greater antitumor effect than the unmodified AdΔ24 version. Our findings indicate that epithelial junctions limit the efficacy of oncolytic Ads and that this problem can be address by co-injection or expression of JO. JO has also the potential for improving cancer therapy with other types of oncolytic viruses. PMID:26993072

  9. Numerical Results of Earth's Core Accumulation 3-D Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod

    2013-04-01

    For a long time as a most convenient had been the model of mega impact in which the early forming of the Earth's core and mantle had been the consequence of formed protoplanet collision with the body of Mercurial mass. But all dynamical models of the Earth's accumulation and the estimations after the Pb-Pb system, lead to the conclusion that the duration of the planet accumulation was about 1 milliard years. But isotopic results after the W-Hf system testify about a very early (5-10) million years, dividing of the geochemical reservoirs of the core and mantle. In [1,3] it is shown, that the account of energy dissipating by the decay of short living radioactive elements and first of all Al,it is sufficient for heating even small bodies with dimensions about (50-100) km up to the iron melting temperature and can be realized a principal new differentiation mechanism. The inner parts of the melted preplanets can join and they are mainly of iron content, but the cold silicate fragments return to the supply zone. Only after the increasing of the gravitational radius, the growing area of the future core can save also the silicate envelope fragments. All existing dynamical accumulation models are constructed by using a spherical-symmetrical model. Hence for understanding the further planet evolution it is significant to trace the origin and evolution of heterogeneities, which occur on the planet accumulation stage. In that paper we are modeling distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity of matter flowing in a block of 3D- spherical body with a growing radius. The boundary problem is solved by the finite-difference method for the system of equations, which include equations which describe the process of accumulation, the Safronov equation, the equation of impulse balance, equation Navier-Stocks, equation for above litho static pressure and heat conductivity in velocity-pressure variables using the Businesque approach. The numerical algorithm of the problem solution in

  10. Numerical modelling of Triple Junction Tectonics at Karlıova, Eastern Turkey: implications for the mechanism of magma transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoǧlu, Özgür; Browning, John; Bazargan, Mohsen; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    Few places on Earth are as tectonically active as the Karlıova region of eastern Turkey. In this region, complex interactions between the Arabian, Eurasian and Anatolian plates occur at the Karlıova Triple Junction (KTJ). Suitably stressed crustal materials of the extruded block on the Karlıova-type triple junctions are potential regions for magma ascent. The relationship between tectonics and magma propagation in triple junction tectonic settings is, however, poorly understood. This study discusses the mechanism of magma propagation in the Karlıova Triple Junction (KTJ) tectonic regime. We aim to demonstrate how the geometry and mechanical properties of faults and rock units affect magma propagation under a variety of tectonic boundary loads. We discuss the geologic setting of the KTJ and the manifestations of shallow and deeper magma chambers within the crustal segment. Our numerical modelling study aims to quantify the crustal response of various tectonic regimes in Eastern Turkey. The region is characterised by lithological heterogeneity which is considered in our models. We present a series of two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical models to help constrain evolving ideas regarding inversion and transtensional tectonics in an east-west direction along the KTJ. We also consider a north to south striking profile which is subjected to regional compression and local extensional tectonic phases which likely operated in the region ~3 My. A three-dimensional model is presented to investigate the effect of regional differential stresses. Our numerical models demonstrate that the regional tectonic stresses that are capable of encouraging magma-chamber failure and dyke propagation. Turnadaǧ volcanism at the western part of this triple junction has been fed by a shallow magma chamber located at 8-10 km depth during E-W extension. The Varto caldera is also fed by a shallow magma chamber at 8-10 km depth. Numerical results show that if the region were to be

  11. Morse potential-based model for contacting composite rough surfaces: Application to self-assembled monolayer junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra-Suarez, Jonatan A.; Majumdar, Shubhaditya; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Malen, Jonathan A.; Higgs, C. Fred

    2016-04-01

    This work formulates a rough surface contact model that accounts for adhesion through a Morse potential and plasticity through the Kogut-Etsion finite element-based approximation. Compared to the commonly used Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, the Morse potential provides a more accurate and generalized description for modeling covalent materials and surface interactions. An extension of this contact model to describe composite layered surfaces is presented and implemented to study a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) grown on a gold substrate placed in contact with a second gold substrate. Based on a comparison with prior experimental measurements of the thermal conductance of this SAM junction [Majumdar et al., Nano Lett. 15, 2985-2991 (2015)], the more general Morse potential-based contact model provides a better prediction of the percentage contact area than an equivalent LJ potential-based model.

  12. Integration of geometric consistency contributory factors in three-leg junctions collision prediction models of Portuguese two-lane national highways.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Jocilene Otilia; Jacques, Maria Alice Prudêncio; Soares, Francisco Emanuel Cunha; Freitas, Elisabete Fraga

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at developing a collision prediction model for three-leg junctions located in national roads (NR) in Northern Portugal. The focus is to identify factors that contribute for collision type crashes in those locations, mainly factors related to road geometric consistency, since literature is scarce on those, and to research the impact of three modeling methods: generalized estimating equations, random-effects negative binomial models and random-parameters negative binomial models, on the factors of those models. The database used included data published between 2008 and 2010 of 177 three-leg junctions. It was split in three groups of contributing factors which were tested sequentially for each of the adopted models: at first only traffic, then, traffic and the geometric characteristics of the junctions within their area of influence; and, lastly, factors which show the difference between the geometric characteristics of the segments boarding the junctions' area of influence and the segment included in that area were added. The choice of the best modeling technique was supported by the result of a cross validation made to ascertain the best model for the three sets of researched contributing factors. The models fitted with random-parameters negative binomial models had the best performance in the process. In the best models obtained for every modeling technique, the characteristics of the road environment, including proxy measures for the geometric consistency, along with traffic volume, contribute significantly to the number of collisions. Both the variables concerning junctions and the various national highway segments in their area of influence, as well as variations from those characteristics concerning roadway segments which border the already mentioned area of influence have proven their relevance and, therefore, there is a rightful need to incorporate the effect of geometric consistency in the three-leg junctions safety studies. PMID:26513337

  13. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Dan; Segall, Ken

    2010-07-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These “Josephson junction neurons” reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, large interconnected networks of Josephson junction neurons would operate fully in parallel. They would be orders of magnitude faster than both traditional computer simulations and biological neural networks. Josephson junction neurons provide a new tool for exploring long-term large-scale dynamics for networks of neurons.

  14. A Single-Level Tunnel Model to Account for Electrical Transport through Single Molecule- and Self-Assembled Monolayer-based Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Yuan, Li; Wang, Lejia; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Thompon, Damien; Del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical analysis aimed at understanding electrical conduction in molecular tunnel junctions. We focus on discussing the validity of coherent versus incoherent theoretical formulations for single-level tunneling to explain experimental results obtained under a wide range of experimental conditions, including measurements in individual molecules connecting the leads of electromigrated single-electron transistors and junctions of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of molecules sandwiched between two macroscopic contacts. We show that the restriction of transport through a single level in solid state junctions (no solvent) makes coherent and incoherent tunneling formalisms indistinguishable when only one level participates in transport. Similar to Marcus relaxation processes in wet electrochemistry, the thermal broadening of the Fermi distribution describing the electronic occupation energies in the electrodes accounts for the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on temperature. We demonstrate that a single-level tunnel model satisfactorily explains experimental results obtained in three different molecular junctions (both single-molecule and SAM-based) formed by ferrocene-based molecules. Among other things, we use the model to map the electrostatic potential profile in EGaIn-based SAM junctions in which the ferrocene unit is placed at different positions within the molecule, and we find that electrical screening gives rise to a strongly non-linear profile across the junction.

  15. A Single-Level Tunnel Model to Account for Electrical Transport through Single Molecule- and Self-Assembled Monolayer-based Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Yuan, Li; Wang, Lejia; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Thompon, Damien; del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis aimed at understanding electrical conduction in molecular tunnel junctions. We focus on discussing the validity of coherent versus incoherent theoretical formulations for single-level tunneling to explain experimental results obtained under a wide range of experimental conditions, including measurements in individual molecules connecting the leads of electromigrated single-electron transistors and junctions of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of molecules sandwiched between two macroscopic contacts. We show that the restriction of transport through a single level in solid state junctions (no solvent) makes coherent and incoherent tunneling formalisms indistinguishable when only one level participates in transport. Similar to Marcus relaxation processes in wet electrochemistry, the thermal broadening of the Fermi distribution describing the electronic occupation energies in the electrodes accounts for the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on temperature. We demonstrate that a single-level tunnel model satisfactorily explains experimental results obtained in three different molecular junctions (both single-molecule and SAM-based) formed by ferrocene-based molecules. Among other things, we use the model to map the electrostatic potential profile in EGaIn-based SAM junctions in which the ferrocene unit is placed at different positions within the molecule, and we find that electrical screening gives rise to a strongly non-linear profile across the junction. PMID:27216489

  16. A Single-Level Tunnel Model to Account for Electrical Transport through Single Molecule- and Self-Assembled Monolayer-based Junctions.

    PubMed

    Garrigues, Alvar R; Yuan, Li; Wang, Lejia; Mucciolo, Eduardo R; Thompon, Damien; Del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis aimed at understanding electrical conduction in molecular tunnel junctions. We focus on discussing the validity of coherent versus incoherent theoretical formulations for single-level tunneling to explain experimental results obtained under a wide range of experimental conditions, including measurements in individual molecules connecting the leads of electromigrated single-electron transistors and junctions of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of molecules sandwiched between two macroscopic contacts. We show that the restriction of transport through a single level in solid state junctions (no solvent) makes coherent and incoherent tunneling formalisms indistinguishable when only one level participates in transport. Similar to Marcus relaxation processes in wet electrochemistry, the thermal broadening of the Fermi distribution describing the electronic occupation energies in the electrodes accounts for the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on temperature. We demonstrate that a single-level tunnel model satisfactorily explains experimental results obtained in three different molecular junctions (both single-molecule and SAM-based) formed by ferrocene-based molecules. Among other things, we use the model to map the electrostatic potential profile in EGaIn-based SAM junctions in which the ferrocene unit is placed at different positions within the molecule, and we find that electrical screening gives rise to a strongly non-linear profile across the junction. PMID:27216489

  17. Analytical model and new structure of the enhancement-mode polarization-junction HEMT with vertical conduction channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Xiong, Jiayun; Wei, Jie; Wu, Junfeng; Peng, Fu; Deng, Siyu; Zhang, Bo; Luo, Xiaorong

    2016-04-01

    A novel enhancement-mode (E-mode) polarization-junction HEMT with vertical conduction channel (PVC-HEMT) is proposed, and its analytical model for threshold voltage (Vth) is presented. It has two features: one is GaN/AlGaN/GaN double hetero-structure, the other is that source and drain locate at the same side of trench-type MOS gate (T-gate), and the source contacts with the T-gate, which forms vertical conduction channel (VC). The 2-D hole gas (2-DHG) and 2-D electron gas (2-DEG) are formed at the GaN-top/AlGaN and AlGaN/GaN-buffer interface, respectively, forming the polarization-junction. First, the E-mode operation is realized because 2-DHG under the source prevents the electrons injecting from source to 2-DEG, breaking through the conventional E-mode method by depleting 2-DEG under the gate. Second, a uniform electric field (E-field) distribution is achieved due to the assisted depletion effect by polarization-junction. Third, the source reduces the E-field peak at the T-gate side and modulates the E-field distribution. The breakdown voltage (BV) of PVC-HEMT is 705 V and specific ON-resistance (RON,sp) is 1.18 mΩ cm2. Compared with conventional HEMT (C-HEMT), PVC-HEMT has a smaller size due to the special location of the source and T-gate. An analytic threshold voltage model is presented and the analytical results agree well with the simulated results.

  18. Technical bases of the second generation SARIS core model (Task Number: 90-008-0)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, M.V.

    1991-11-01

    A methodology has been developed to rigorously derive the constants in the Savannah River Simulator (SARIS) core model from detailed, charge-design, diffusion theory solutions. This methodology is intended to replace the ill-defined, ad hoc iterative process used in the past to generate these constants. Along the development path, three shortcomings of the current core model were identified and corrected. The updated core model with revised constants is termed the second generation core model. In addition, changes in the decay heat and delayed neutron precursor models are also recommended, all in the interest of improving simulator neutronics fidelity.

  19. Conductance Measurements of Magnesium Diboride-based Josephson Junctions Below 1 Kelvin: Beyond the 2-Gap Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabello, Steven; Lambert, Joseph; Mlack, Jerome; Dai, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Chen, Ke; Cunnane, Daniel; Zhuang, C. G.; Xi, X. X.; Ramos, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have probed the nature of magnesium diboride's two superconducting energy gaps Δπ and Δσ. Several theoretical analyses have predicted fine structures within each energy gap, with recent experiments revealing similar structures. We have performed high-resolution tunneling measurements of low-transparency Josephson junctions using ``terraced,'' ``columnar,'' and c-axis MgB2 films separated by its native oxide from either lead (Pb) or tin (Sn) counter-electrodes. Using high-resolution I-V data at T as low as 23mK, we observe sub-structures within both energy gaps. We also observe sharp peaks in the subgap that identify, to high precision, the energy gap values of the junction counter-electrodes (Pb and Sn). These lead us to conclude that the substructures seen in the gaps are due to MgB2. We then fit the data using simplified two-gap and four-gap models with variable weights and broadening factors. By demonstrating the inadequacy of a simple two-gap model in fitting the data, we illustrate that some distinctions between theoretical models of energy gap substructures are experimentally observable. R.C.R. acknowledges partial support from National Science Foundation Grant # DMR-1206561.

  20. The composition of Earth's core from equations of state, metal-silicate partitioning, and core formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rebecca; Campbell, Andrew; Ciesla, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The Earth accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, the metallic core segregated from the silicate mantle, acquiring its modern composition through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and metal-silicate partitioning experiments, constrained by density measurements of Fe-rich alloys. Previously, the equations of state of FeO, Fe-9Si, Fe-16Si, and FeSi were measured to megabar pressures and several thousand K using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. With these equations of state, we determined that the core's density can be reproduced through the addition of 11.3 +/- 0.6 wt% silicon or 8.1 +/- 1.1 wt% oxygen to an Fe-Ni alloy (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O have been performed in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5700 K, allowing the effects of P, T, and composition on the partitioning behaviors of these elements to be parameterized (Fischer et al., 2015; Siebert et al., 2012). Here we apply those experimental results to model Earth's core formation, using N-body simulations to describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). For partial equilibration of the mantle at 55% of the evolving core-mantle boundary pressure and the liquidus temperature, we find that the core contains 5.4 wt% Si and 1.9 wt% O. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to our equations of state, and indicate that the core cannot contain more than ~2 wt% S or C. Earth analogues experience 1.2 +/- 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion, due to both the effects of high P

  1. Application of stochastic automata networks for creation of continuous time Markov chain models of voltage gating of gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Snipas, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Paulauskas, Nerijus; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC) of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ) channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs), which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ~20 times. PMID:25705700

  2. Preschool Literacy and the Common Core: A Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Donna G.; Benson, Tammy Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    Many states have adopted the Common Core Standards for literacy and math and have begun enacting these standards in school curriculum. In states where these standards have been adopted, professional educators working in K-12 contexts have been working to create transition plans from existing state-based standards to the Common Core standards. A…

  3. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FIELD MODELS FOR REVERSE BIASED P-N JUNCTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    UBALDI,F.; POZZI, G.; FAZZINI, P.F.; BELEGGIA, M.

    2007-04-02

    In order to obtain reliable quantitative information on the electrostatic field associated with reverse-biased p-n junctions and on the distribution of dopants, the physics of the so-called ''dead layer'' and the influence of charged oxide layers are of paramount importance. To this purpose, experimental observations near the edge of a TEM sample can be useful. In these conditions, however, phase computations required to interpret the experimental results are very challenging as the problem is intrinsically three-dimensional. In order to cope with this problem, a mixed analytical-numerical approach is presented and discussed.

  4. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  5. Magnetically nonlinear and anisotropic iron core model of synchronous reluctance motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štumberger, G.; Štumberger, B.; Dolinar, D.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetically nonlinear and anisotropic iron core model of a synchronous reluctance motor (SRM) is presented. The iron core model is given by the current-dependent flux linkages and their partial derivatives. It is included in a dynamic SRM model and confirmed through the comparison of measured and calculated results in the case of current-controlled linear synchronous reluctance servomotor.

  6. Stem Cell Modeling of Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mosna, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Even though clonally originated from a single cell, acute leukemia loses its homogeneity soon and presents at clinical diagnosis as a hierarchy of cells endowed with different functions, of which only a minority possesses the ability to recapitulate the disease. Due to their analogy to hematopoietic stem cells, these cells have been named “leukemia stem cells,” and are thought to be chiefly responsible for disease relapse and ultimate survival after chemotherapy. Core Binding Factor (CBF) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is cytogenetically characterized by either the t(8;21) or the inv(16)/t(16;16) chromosomal abnormalities, which, although being pathognomonic, are not sufficient per se to induce overt leukemia but rather determine a preclinical phase of disease when preleukemic subclones compete until the acquisition of clonal dominance by one of them. In this review we summarize the concepts regarding the application of the “leukemia stem cell” theory to the development of CBF AML; we will analyze the studies investigating the leukemogenetic role of t(8;21) and inv(16)/t(16;16), the proposed theories of its clonal evolution, and the role played by the hematopoietic niches in preserving the disease. Finally, we will discuss the clinical implications of stem cell modeling of CBF AML for the therapy of the disease. PMID:26880987

  7. Evolution of resistive switching and its ionic models in Pt/Nb-doped SrTiO3 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Ma, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Xi, He; Lv, Ling; Zhang, Peng; Xie, Yong; Gao, Haixia; Cao, Yanrong; Li, Shuwei; Hao, Yue

    2016-07-01

    Charge-trapping or ionic mechanisms of the resistive switching (RS) at metal/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (NSTO) interfaces are still unclear. Here, the electrical properties and RS evolution at Pt/NSTO interfaces are investigated. A volatile RS in the fresh junctions complies with Schottky theory involving an interfacial layer and electrically dependent permittivity. The RS is interpreted by a redox-reaction modulated barrier model. A nonvolatile RS emerges and evolves with increasing the forward voltage. I–V and C–V characteristics imply different conductive filament (CF) configurations in high and low resistance states. An in-barrier ionic CF model is established for the nonvolatile RS. The coherent ionic models are beneficial for understanding the interfacial role in RS and for regulating RS characteristics or realizing high quality metal/oxide diodes.

  8. Carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhen; Postma, Henk W. Ch.; Balents, Leon; Dekker, Cees

    1999-11-01

    The ultimate device miniaturization would be to use individual molecules as functional devices. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising candidates for achieving this: depending on their diameter and chirality, they are either one-dimensional metals or semiconductors. Single-electron transistors employing metallic nanotubes and field-effect transistors employing semiconducting nanotubes have been demonstrated. Intramolecular devices have also been proposed which should display a range of other device functions. For example, by introducing a pentagon and a heptagon into the hexagonal carbon lattice, two tube segments with different atomic and electronic structures can be seamlessly fused together to create intramolecular metal-metal, metal-semiconductor, or semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. Here we report electrical transport measurements on SWNTs with intramolecular junctions. We find that a metal-semiconductor junction behaves like a rectifying diode with nonlinear transport characteristics that are strongly asymmetric with respect to bias polarity. In the case of a metal-metal junction, the conductance appears to be strongly suppressed and it displays a power-law dependence on temperatures and applied voltage, consistent with tunnelling between the ends of two Luttinger liquids. Our results emphasize the need to consider screening and electron interactions when designing and modelling molecular devices. Realization of carbon-based molecular electronics will require future efforts in the controlled production of these intramolecular nanotube junctions.

  9. Spinal astrocyte gap junction and glutamate transporter expression contributes to a rat model of bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Caleb R.; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence implicating astrocytes in multiple forms of chronic pain, as well as in the specific context of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). However, it is still unclear what the exact role of astrocytes may be in the context of CIPN. Findings in oxaliplatin and paclitaxel models have displayed altered expression of astrocytic gap junctions and glutamate transporters as means by which astrocytes may contribute to observed behavioral changes. The current study investigated whether these changes were also generalizable to the bortezomib CIPN. Changes in mechanical sensitivity were verified in bortezomib-treated animals, and these changes were prevented by co-treatment with a glial activation inhibitor (minocycline), a gap junction decoupler (carbenoxolone), and by a glutamate transporter upregulator (ceftriaxone). Immunohistochemistry data at day 30 in bortezomib-treated animals showed increases in expression of GFAP and connexin 43 but decrease in GLAST expression. These changes were prevented by co-treatment with minocycline. Follow-up Western blotting data showed a shift in connexin 43 from a non-phosphorylated state to a phosphorylated state, indicating increased trafficking of expressed connexin 43 to the cell membrane. These data suggest that increases in behavioral sensitivity to cutaneous stimuli may be tied to persistent synaptic glutamate resulting from increased calcium flow between spinal astrocytes. PMID:25446343

  10. Ab initio no-core shell model with continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Petr

    2008-04-01

    The ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) is a many-body approach to nuclear structure of light nuclei. The NCSM adopts an effective interaction theory to transform fundamental inter-nucleon interactions into effective interactions for a specified nucleus in a selected harmonic oscillator basis space [1]. The method is capable of predicting nuclear structure from inter-nucleon forces derived from quantum chromodynamics by means of chiral effective field theory [2]. NCSM extensions to the microscopic description of nuclear reactions are now under development. In my talk, I will first discuss our recent calculations of the ^4He total photo-absorption cross section using two- and three-nucleon interactions from chiral effective field theory [3]. I will then outline our effort to augment the NCSM by the resonating group method (RGM) technique to develop a new method capable of describing simultaneously both bound states and nuclear reactions on light nuclei [4]. This approach, which preserves translational symmetry and the Pauli principle, will allow us to calculate cross sections of reactions important for astrophysics and describe weakly-bound systems from first principles. I will present our first phase shift results for neutron scattering off ^3H, ^4He and ^7Li and proton scattering off ^3He, ^4He and ^7Be using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials. 3mm [1] P. Navr'atil, J. P. Vary and B. R. Barrett, Phys. Rev. C 62, 054311 (2000). [2] P. Navr'atil and V. G. Gueorguiev and J. P. Vary, W. E. Ormand and A. Nogga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 042501 (2007). [3] S. Quaglioni and P. Navr'atil, Phys. Lett. B 652, 370 (2007). [4] S. Quaglioni and P. Navr'atil, arXiv:0712.0855.

  11. Computer modeling of a two-junction, monolithic cascade solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamorte, M. F.; Abbott, D.

    1979-01-01

    The theory and design criteria for monolithic, two-junction cascade solar cells are described. The departure from the conventional solar cell analytical method and the reasons for using the integral form of the continuity equations are briefly discussed. The results of design optimization are presented. The energy conversion efficiency that is predicted for the optimized structure is greater than 30% at 300 K, AMO and one sun. The analytical method predicts device performance characteristics as a function of temperature. The range is restricted to 300 to 600 K. While the analysis is capable of determining most of the physical processes occurring in each of the individual layers, only the more significant device performance characteristics are presented.

  12. Preliminary Results from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 324: Coring Shatsky Rise to Test Models of Oceanic Plateau Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, W. W.; Sano, T.; Geldmacher, J.

    2009-12-01

    Located ~1500 km east of Japan, Shatsky Rise is a large oceanic plateau with an area roughly equivalent to Japan or California. The plateau formed at a rapidly-spreading triple junction during the late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Some evidence, such as the inferred duration of initial eruptions, the “capture” of the triple junction, and the transition from massive initial eruptions to a smaller trail of volcanism have been taken to support the idea that Shatsky Rise was emplaced by the head of a starting mantle plume. In contrast, other evidence, such as MORB-like geochemistry of existing samples, favor a plate boundary formation. With characteristics that could fit either type of model, Shatsky Rise is an ideal place to learn what makes an oceanic plateau. A major roadblock to understanding Shatsky Rise has been the paucity of suitable samples. The few dredge samples available from the plateau are highly altered, giving little insight into primary geochemistry and no usable radiometric dates. Only one Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) hole has penetrated into the igneous complex (Site 1213), yielding intriguing data, but raising as many questions as answers. During September-November 2009, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 324 will core at 5 locations along Shatsky Rise with the primary goal of recovering igneous rocks for study. Three of the five are sites situated on the largest volcanic edifice, TAMU Massif, the massive volcano that represents initial eruptions. In addition, one site will be drilled on both ORI and Shirshov Massifs, which are smaller, younger volcanoes in central and northern Shatsky Rise. In all, expedition plans call for coring ~800 m of igneous basement rock for various studies, including geochronology to examine the timing of eruptions, isotope and geochemical studies to investigate source type and depth, physical volcanology to learn about plateau eruptions, and paleomagnetism to determine paleolatitude and subsequent

  13. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  14. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores.

    PubMed

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core. PMID:27587138

  15. An analytical model for the evolution of starless cores - I. The constant-mass case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, K.

    2016-07-01

    We propose an analytical model for the quasi-static evolution of starless cores confined by a constant external pressure, assuming that cores are isothermal and obey a spherically symmetric density distribution. We model core evolution for Plummer-like and Gaussian density distributions in the adiabatic and isothermal limits, assuming Larson-like dissipation of turbulence. We model the variation in the terms in the virial equation as a function of core characteristic radius, and determine whether cores are evolving towards virial equilibrium or gravitational collapse. We ignore accretion on to cores in the current study. We discuss the different behaviours predicted by the isothermal and adiabatic cases, and by our choice of index for the size-linewidth relation, and suggest a means of parametrizing the magnetic energy term in the virial equation. We model the evolution of the set of cores observed by Pattle et al. in the L1688 region of Ophiuchus in the `virial plane'. We find that not all virially bound and pressure-confined cores will evolve to become gravitationally bound, with many instead contracting to virial equilibrium with their surroundings, and find an absence of gravitationally dominated and virially unbound cores. We hypothesize a `starless core desert' in this quadrant of the virial plane, which may result from cores initially forming as pressure-confined objects. We conclude that a virially bound and pressure-confined core will not necessarily evolve to become gravitationally bound, and thus cannot be considered pre-stellar. A core can only be definitively considered pre-stellar (collapsing to form an individual stellar system) if it is gravitationally unstable.

  16. The Unified Core: A "Major" Learning Community Model in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Johnson, Corey W.; James, J. Joy; Dunlap, Rudy

    2011-01-01

    The Unified Core is an innovative approach to higher education that blends content through linked courses within a major to create a community of learners. This article offers the theoretical background for the approach, describes the implementation, and offers suggestions to educators who would like to design their own version of this innovative…

  17. A Core Journal Decision Model Based on Weighted Page Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hei-Chia; Chou, Ya-lin; Guo, Jiunn-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper's aim is to propose a core journal decision method, called the local impact factor (LIF), which can evaluate the requirements of the local user community by combining both the access rate and the weighted impact factor, and by tracking citation information on the local users' articles. Design/methodology/approach: Many…

  18. Competing Models of Librarianship: Do Core Values Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissinger, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Librarianship's worldview or philosophy preconditions understanding of ideas such as core value, diversity, and equity. Adherents to the orthodox version of this worldview restrict minority interests while aspiring to become a scientific profession. Those in favor of a modified version of the worldview support cultural diversity and non-positivist…

  19. Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid: Models & Tools (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    This brochure describes Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE), a trademarked process NREL employs to produce conceptual microgrid designs. This systems-based process enables designs to be optimized for economic value, energy surety, and sustainability. Capabilities NREL offers in support of microgrid design are explained.

  20. Alterations in gap junction connexin43/connexin45 ratio mediate a transition from quiescence to excitation in a mathematical model of the myometrium

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Rachel E.; Mashayamombe, Chipo; Shi, Shao-Qing; Garfield, Robert E.; Shmygol, Anatoly; Blanks, Andrew M.; van den Berg, Hugo A.

    2014-01-01

    The smooth muscle cells of the uterus contract in unison during delivery. These cells achieve coordinated activity via electrical connections called gap junctions which consist of aggregated connexin proteins such as connexin43 and connexin45. The density of gap junctions governs the excitability of the myometrium (among other factors). An increase in gap junction density occurs immediately prior to parturition. We extend a mathematical model of the myometrium by incorporating the voltage-dependence of gap junctions that has been demonstrated in the experimental literature. Two functional subtypes exist, corresponding to systems with predominantly connexin43 and predominantly connexin45, respectively. Our simulation results indicate that the gap junction protein connexin45 acts as a negative modulator of uterine excitability, and hence, activity. A network with a higher proportion of connexin45 relative to connexin43 is unable to excite every cell. Connexin45 has much more rapid gating kinetics than connexin43 which we show limits the maximum duration of a local burst of activity. We propose that this effect regulates the degree of synchronous excitation attained during a contraction. Our results support the hypothesis that as labour approaches, connexin45 is downregulated to allow action potentials to spread more readily through the myometrium. PMID:25401181

  1. Simulating and modeling the breakdown voltage in a semi-insulating GaAs P+N junction diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resfa, A.; Menezla, Brahimi. R.; Benchhima, M.

    2014-08-01

    This work aims to determine the characteristic I (breakdown voltage) of the inverse current in a GaAs PN junction diode, subject to a reverse polarization, while specifying the parameters that influence the breakdown voltage of the diode. In this work, we simulated the behavior of the ionization phenomenon by impact breakdown by avalanche of the PN junctions, subject to an inverse polarization. We will take into account both the trapping model in a stationary regime in the P+N structure using like material of basis the III-V compounds and mainly the GaAs semi-insulating in which the deep centers have in important densities. We are talking about the model of trapping in the space charge region (SCR) and that is the trap density donor and acceptor states. The carrier crossing the space charge region (SCR) of W thickness creates N electron—hole pairs: for every created pair, the electron and the hole are swept quickly by the electric field, each in an opposite direction, which comes back, according to an already accepted reasoning, to the crossing of the space charge region (SCR) by an electron or a hole. So the even N pair created by the initial particle provoke N2 ionizations and so forth. The study of the physical and electrical behaviour of semiconductors is based on the influence of the presence of deep centers on the characteristic I(V) current-tension, which requires the calculation of the electrostatic potential, the electric field, the integral of ionization, the density of the states traps, the diffusion current of minority in the regions (1) and (3), the current thermal generation in the region (2), the leakage current in the surface, and the breakdown voltage.

  2. Multiscale model of global inner-core anisotropy induced by hcp alloy plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincot, A.; Cardin, Ph.; Deguen, R.; Merkel, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's solid inner core exhibits a global seismic anisotropy of several percents. It results from a coherent alignment of anisotropic Fe alloy crystals through the inner-core history that can be sampled by present-day seismic observations. By combining self-consistent polycrystal plasticity, inner-core formation models, Monte-Carlo search for elastic moduli, and simulations of seismic measurements, we introduce a multiscale model that can reproduce a global seismic anisotropy of several percents aligned with the Earth's rotation axis. Conditions for a successful model are an hexagonal close packed structure for the inner-core Fe alloy, plastic deformation by pyramidal slip, and large-scale flow induced by a low-degree inner-core formation model. For global anisotropies ranging between 1 and 3%, the elastic anisotropy in the single crystal ranges from 5 to 20% with larger velocities along the c axis.

  3. High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Analysis-Challenges and Recent Enhancements in Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Germina

    2016-01-01

    A concerted effort over the past few years has focused on enhancing the core depletion models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as part of a comprehensive study for designing a HFIR core that would use low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. A HFIR core depletion model that is based on current state-of-the-art methods and nuclear data was needed for use as a reference for the design of an LEU fuel for HFIR and to improve the basis for analyses that support HFIR s current operation with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. This paper summarizes the recent improvements in modeling and simulation for HFIR core analyses, with a focus on core depletion models.

  4. Inherited junctional epidermolysis bullosa in the German Pointer: establishment of a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Capt, Annabelle; Spirito, Flavia; Guaguere, Eric; Spadafora, Anne; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Meneguzzi, Guerrino

    2005-03-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a genodermatosis suitable for gene therapy because conventional treatments are ineffective. Here, we elucidate the genetic basis of mild JEB in a breed of dogs that display all the clinical traits observed in JEB patients. The condition is associated with reduced expression of laminin 5 caused by a homozygous insertion (4818+207ins6.5 kb) of repetitive satellite DNA within intron 35 of the gene (lama3) for the laminin alpha3 chain. The intronic mutation interferes with maturation of the alpha3 pre-messenger RNA resulting in the coexpression of a transcript with a 227 nucleotide insertion and a wild-type mRNA that encodes scant amounts of the alpha3 polypeptide. Our results show that the amino acid sequence and structure of the canine and human alpha3 chain are highly conserved and that the reduced expression of laminin 5 affects the adhesion and clonogenic potential of the JEB keratinocytes. These JEB dogs provide the opportunity to perform gene delivery in a naturally occurring genodermatosis and to evaluate host tolerance to recombinant laminin 5. PMID:15737193

  5. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  6. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  7. A novel nanopin model based on a Y-junction carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhong-Qiang; Zhong, Jun; Ye, Hong-Fei; Liu, Zhen; Cheng, Guang-Gui; Ding, Jian-Ning

    2016-08-01

    A prototype of nanopin based on a Y-junction carbon nanotube (CNT) is first proposed. The loading and unloading processes are investigated by using classical molecular dynamics, considering the influences of the fit dimension, positioning error, thermal effect, and the loading/unloading velocity on the performance of the proposed nanopin. The optimum size of the gap between the nanopin and the through hole in a silicon component is obtained, which is responsible for a desired fixity with the acceptable install resistance. It is found that a proper positioning error in a certain direction associated with the branched structure of the nanopin will facilitate the installation process. The performance of the proposed nanopin is not sensitive to thermal and normal axial velocity of the nanopin, while the unloading direction affects appreciably on the service performance of the nanopin attributed to the orientation of the branched CNT. Particularly, the service performance of the proposed nanopin considerably depends on several special deforming configurations in the loading and unloading processes.

  8. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  9. Effects of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on New Trabecular Bone during Bone–Tendon Junction Healing in a Rabbit Model: A Synchrotron Radiation Micro-CT Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongbin; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Zhanwen; Chen, Can; Chen, Huabin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone–tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone–tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone–tendon junction injury model at the patella–patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week) and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point). The patella–patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone–tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promot bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone–tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate the

  10. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbin; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Zhanwen; Chen, Can; Chen, Huabin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week) and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point). The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate the