Science.gov

Sample records for core limiting conditions

  1. 20 CFR 661.310 - Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services, intensive services, or training services, or act as a One-Stop Operator? 661.310 Section 661.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING...

  2. 20 CFR 661.310 - Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Board directly be a provider of core services, intensive services, or training services, or act as a One... Board directly be a provider of core services, intensive services, or training services, or act as a One-Stop Operator? (a) A Local Board may not directly provide core services, or intensive services, or...

  3. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  4. Limits on the Core Mass of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The core is here defined as the central concentration of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium (it need not be solid and it need not be purely heavy elements and it will not have a sharp boundary). Its determination is a major goal of the Juno mission (2016-17) and it will be difficult to determine because it is expected to be only a few percent of the total mass. It has long been known that there is no prospect of determining the nature of this core (e.g., its density) from gravity measurements, even though the mass can be estimated. By consideration of simple models that are nonetheless faithful to the essential physics, it is further shown that should the core be contaminated with light elements (hydrogen and helium) then the gravity data can tell us the core mass as defined (with some caveats about the fuzziness of its boundary) but not the total mass within some small radius (which could include any light elements mixed in). This is both good and bad news: Good in that the core is thought to be diagnostic of the conditions under which the planet formed but bad in that the admixture also tells us more about both formation process and core erosion. Further, a linear perturbation theory has been developed that provides an easy approximate way of determining how errors in the equation of state (EOS) propagate into errors in the estimated core mass or envelope enrichment in heavies in models that nonetheless satisfy all observables. This theory does not require detailed models of the planet but provides an integral mapping from changes in the EOS into approximate changes in radius at fixed mass, and low degree gravity (or moment of inertia, MOI). This procedure also shows that there exist perturbations that leave the radius, mass and MOI unchanged but cause a change in J2, though in practice the non-uniqueness of structure by this consideration (~0.2% or less in MOI for example) is less than the non-uniqueness arising from likely EOS uncertainties (~1% in total

  5. Fault current limiter with shield and adjacent cores

    SciTech Connect

    Darmann, Francis Anthony; Moriconi, Franco; Hodge, Eoin Patrick

    2013-10-22

    In a fault current limiter (FCL) of a saturated core type having at least one coil wound around a high permeability material, a method of suppressing the time derivative of the fault current at the zero current point includes the following step: utilizing an electromagnetic screen or shield around the AC coil to suppress the time derivative current levels during zero current conditions.

  6. RIA Limits Based On Commercial PWR Core Response To RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Charles L.; Mitchell, David B.; Slagle, William H.

    2006-07-01

    Reactivity insertion accident (RIA) limits have been under intense review by regulators since 1993 with respect to what should be the proper limit as a function of burnup. Some national regulators have imposed new lower limits while in the United States the limits are still under review. The data being evaluated with respect to RIA limits come from specialized test reactors. However, the use of test reactor data needs to be balanced against the response of a commercial PWR core in setting reasonable limits to insure the health and safety of the public without unnecessary restrictions on core design and operation. The energy deposition limits for a RIA were set in the 1970's based on testing in CDC (SPERT), TREAT, PBF and NSRR test reactors. The US limits given in radially averaged enthalpy are 170 cal/gm for fuel cladding failure and 280 cal/gm for coolability. Testing conducted in the 1990's in the CABRI, NSRR and IGR test reactors have demonstrated that the cladding failure threshold is reduced with burnup, with the primary impact due to hydrogen pickup for in-reactor corrosion. Based on a review of this data very low enthalpy limits have been proposed. In reviewing proposed limits from RIL-0401(1) it was observed that much of the data used to anchor the low allowable energy deposition levels was from recent NSRR tests which do not represent commercial PWR reactor conditions. The particular characteristics of the NSRR test compared to commercial PWR reactor characteristics are: - Short pulse width: 4.5 ms vs > 8 ms; - Low temperature conditions: < 100 deg. F vs 532 deg. F. - Low pressure environment: atmospheric vs {approx} 2200 psi. A review of the historical RIA database indicates that some of the key NSRR data used to support the RIL was atypical compared to the overall RIA database. Based on this detailed review of the RIA database and the response of commercial PWR core, the following view points are proposed. - The Failure limit should reflect local fuel

  7. Critical conditions for core-collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Keshet, Uri; Balberg, Shmuel

    2012-06-22

    The explosion of a core-collapse supernova can be approximated by the breakdown of steady-state solutions for accretion onto a proto-neutron star (PNS). We analytically show that as the neutrino luminosity exceeds a critical value L(c), the neutrinosphere pressure exceeds the hydrostatic limit even for an optimal shock radius R. This yields L(c) [proportionally] M(2)T(2) (with logarithmic corrections) and R [proportionally] M/T, in agreement with numerical results, where M and T are the PNS mass and neutrino temperature, respectively. The near-critical flow can be approximated as a ballistic shell on top of an isothermal layer. PMID:23004581

  8. Bounds on metal-silicate equilibration conditions during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguen, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    Much of the Earth was built by high-energy impacts of planetesimals and embryos, many of these impactors already differentiated, with metallic cores of their own. Geochemical data provide critical information on the timing of accretion and the prevailing physical conditions. The comparison between the inferred core/mantle partitioning with the experimentally determined partitioning behavior of a number of siderophile elements can be used to place constraints on the conditions (pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity) under which the metal and silicates equilibrated before separating to form the core and mantle. The main limitation of this approach is that the interpretation of the geochemical data in terms of equilibration conditions is non-unique. This is an ill-posed inverse problem, and the inversion is usually carried out by making a number of assumptions to close the problem and make it (artificially) well-posed. Here, we take another approach and derive exact bounds on the distribution of conditions of equilibration during Earth's formation and core mantle differentiation.

  9. Double storey three phase saturated cores fault current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfus, Y.; Nikulshin, Y.; Friedman, A.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A novel saturated-cores Fault-Current-Limiter (FCL) configuration is described. This FCL is based on two parallel planes of iron rectangular cores, on which three-phase coils are mounted and connected in series to the grid. Two DC coils are mounted in between the planes on perpendicular core limbs connecting the two AC planes. The DC coils are set to magnetically saturate the AC cores. The transition to three-dimensional, double-storey design enables handling three-phase symmetrical faults while offering better decoupling between the AC and DC circuits. At the same time, it shortens the AC limb lengths and enables deeper magnetic saturation levels in comparison to other saturated cores FCL designs. Hence, this FCL configuration exhibits lower insertion impedance and higher ratio of fault to nominal state impedance in comparison with other designs.

  10. 42 CFR 418.64 - Condition of participation: Core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Core services. 418.64 Section 418.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care Core Services § 418.64 Condition of participation:...

  11. Limited Conditions of Operations Tracking Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-12-17

    The Lco tracking program is a computer based solution for tracking time limited action items for Limited Conditions of Operation (LCO) for nuclear and industrial processes. This use is not limited to any process except those not requiring specific action steps and times. The visual and audible assistance the LCO Tracking Program provides significantly reduces the chance of missing crucial actions required for safe operation of any facility in time of limited operations. The LCOmore » Tracking Program maintains all applicable action steps and times for each limited condition for the facility in its data base. The LCO Tracking Program is used to enter that condition by number, and the data base provides the applicble action steps and starts tracking their times based on the time the LCO was entered. The LCO display graphically displays, by colored bar charts, the time expired/time remaining of each specific action item. At 60% time expired, the bar chart turns yellow to caution personnel and then turns red at 90% time expired. Then an audible alarm is sounded at 95% as a warning, to finish or accomplish the required actions to satisfy the requirements. These warning and alarm limits are modifiable by the user and can be set at different values for each action. The display file is dynamic in function, checking every minute, and responds in real time to changes to the LCO Tracking Form file, providing the visual and audible warnings as to the status of the action steps chosen for display. The LCO Tracking Program efficiently tracks action times in minutes or days, up to 2 years. All current LCO''s are easily documentated using the LCO Tracking Form file with ease of printing and disposition. The Lco Tracking Program is designed as a user friendly program with navigational buttons to simplify use.« less

  12. Petrophysical core characterization at supercritical geothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Juliane; Raab, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing scientific interest in the exploitation of supercritical geothermal reservoirs to increase the efficiency of geothermal power plants. The utilisation of geothermal energy requires in any case the detailed knowledge of the reservoir. In reservoir engineering, the characterisation of the geothermal system by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a common geophysical exploration and monitoring strategy. For a realistic interpretation of the field measurements it is necessary to know both, the physical properties of the rock and those of the interacting fluid at defined temperature and pressure conditions. While there have been made great effort in determine the physical and chemical properties of water above its critical point (Tcritical = 374.21° C and pcritical = 221.2 bar), the influence of fluid-rock interactions on petrophysical properties in supercritical aqueous systems is nearly unknown. At supercritical conditions the viscosity of the fluid is low, which enhances the mass transfer and diffusion-controlled chemical reactions. This may have considerable effects on the porosity and hydraulic properties of a rock. To investigate high-enthalpy fluid-rock systems, in the framework of the EU-funded project IMAGE we have built a new percolation set-up, which allows for the measurement of electrical resistivity and permeability of rock samples at controlled supercritical conditions of aqueous fluids (pore pressure = 400 bar and a temperature = 400° C). First results will be presented.

  13. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-05-17

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core. PMID:22495307

  14. Core stability training: applications to sports conditioning programs.

    PubMed

    Willardson, Jeffrey M

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, fitness practitioners have increasingly recommended core stability exercises in sports conditioning programs. Greater core stability may benefit sports performance by providing a foundation for greater force production in the upper and lower extremities. Traditional resistance exercises have been modified to emphasize core stability. Such modifications have included performing exercises on unstable rather than stable surfaces, performing exercises while standing rather than seated, performing exercises with free weights rather than machines, and performing exercises unilaterally rather than bilaterally. Despite the popularity of core stability training, relatively little scientific research has been conducted to demonstrate the benefits for healthy athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to critically examine core stability training and other issues related to this topic to determine useful applications for sports conditioning programs. Based on the current literature, prescription of core stability exercises should vary based on the phase of training and the health status of the athlete. During preseason and in-season mesocycles, free weight exercises performed while standing on a stable surface are recommended for increases in core strength and power. Free weight exercises performed in this manner are specific to the core stability requirements of sports-related skills due to moderate levels of instability and high levels of force production. Conversely, during postseason and off-season mesocycles, Swiss ball exercises involving isometric muscle actions, small loads, and long tension times are recommended for increases in core endurance. Furthermore, balance board and stability disc exercises, performed in conjunction with plyometric exercises, are recommended to improve proprioceptive and reactive capabilities, which may reduce the likelihood of lower extremity injuries. PMID:17685697

  15. 42 CFR 418.64 - Condition of participation: Core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Core services. 418.64 Section 418.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... must be available to the patient and family to assist the patient and family in minimizing the...

  16. 42 CFR 418.64 - Condition of participation: Core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Core services. 418.64 Section 418.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... must be available to the patient and family to assist the patient and family in minimizing the...

  17. 42 CFR 418.64 - Condition of participation: Core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Core services. 418.64 Section 418.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... must be available to the patient and family to assist the patient and family in minimizing the...

  18. 42 CFR 418.64 - Condition of participation: Core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Core services. 418.64 Section 418.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... must be available to the patient and family to assist the patient and family in minimizing the...

  19. Performance analysis of saturated iron core superconducting fault current limiter using Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, D.; Roy, D.; Choudhury, A. B.; Yamada, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper study of the Saturated Iron Core Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SISFCL) has been carried out. Since in an SISFCL, the iron core plays a key role in distributing the magnetic flux, the hysteresis property of the core material has been introduced in a mathematical model to get a more accurate result. In this paper the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model has been used for modeling the core. The equations are solved through numerical method and performances of SISFCL are analyzed for both normal and fault conditions. On further analysis it is observed that for suppression of higher value of fault current a high voltage develops across the DC source. Hence there is a chance of the DC source being damaged by the rise in voltage under fault condition. In order to protect the DC source, a shorted ring is introduced in the SISFCL circuit and its effects have been analyzed. It is noticed that the shorted ring has successfully reduced the voltage across the DC coil during fault condition while the performance of the limiter remains the same.

  20. Condition for Convective Cores in Main Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.

    1990-09-01

    The aim of this work is to find the condition for the existence of convective cores in homogenous main sequence stars where the opacity per unit mass is $k=k_0ρα T-β and the energy generation rate per unit mass is ɛ=ɛ0ρ Tη (ρ and T being the density and the temperature, respectively). Numerical models of stars with different values of α, β and η are constructed and the condition for the existence of a convective core in terms of the relation between α, β and η determined. Forty points η=η(α,β) are determined for αin[0,2] and βin[0,4] and the condition is found to be η = - 3.3294; α + 2.0243; β + 1.8393

  1. Amyloid Fibrillation of Insulin under Water-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Su; Lee, Jong Wha; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Kim, Hugh I.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrillation in water-organic mixtures has been widely studied to understand the effect of protein-solvent interactions on the fibrillation process. In this study, we monitored insulin fibrillation in formamide and its methyl derivatives (formamide, N-methyl formamide, N,N-dimethyl formamide) in the presence and absence of water. These model solvent systems mimic the cellular environment by providing denaturing conditions and a hydrophobic environment with limited water content. Thioflavin T (ThT) assay revealed that binary mixtures of water with formamide and its methyl derivatives enhanced fibrillation rates and β-sheet abundance, whereas organic solvents suppressed insulin fibrillation. We utilized solution small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the correlation between protein-solvent interactions and insulin fibrillation. SAXS experiments combined with simulated annealing of the protein indicated that the degree of denaturation of the hydrophobic core region at residues B11–B17 determines the fibrillation rate. In addition, DSC experiments suggested a crucial role of hydrophobic interactions in the fibrillation process. These results imply that an environment with limited water, which imitates a lipid membrane system, accelerates protein denaturation and the formation of intermolecular hydrophobic interactions during amyloid fibrillation. PMID:25418175

  2. Equilibrium iron isotope fractionation at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2009-02-13

    The equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between lower mantle minerals and metallic iron at core-mantle boundary conditions can be evaluated from the high-pressure 57Fe partial vibrational density of states determined by synchrotron inelastic nuclear resonant x-ray scattering spectroscopy using a diamond anvil. Ferropericlase [(Mg,Fe)O] and (Fe,Mg)SiO3- post-perovskite are enriched in heavy iron isotopes relative to metallic iron at ultrahigh pressures, as opposed to the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between these compounds at low pressure. The enrichment of Earth and Moon basalts in heavy iron isotopes relative to those from Mars and asteroid Vesta can be explained by the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation during the segregation of Earth's core and the assumption that Earth was already differentiated before the Moon-forming "giant impact." PMID:19213913

  3. Spectroscopic modeling and analysis of plasma conditions in implosion cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor E.

    implosions are extracted. We show that opacity effects must be taken into account in order to interpret the spectra and extract accurate plasma conditions. Finally, we determine the dynamic plasma gradients on ICF implosion cores driven by the GECCO XII laser system. The determination of the dynamics gradients in the imploding plasma core found here can serve as a critical test of the current model of the hydrodynamic behavior of high energy density implosions.

  4. Comparison of core sampling and visual inspection for assessment of concrete sewer pipe condition.

    PubMed

    Stanić, N; de Haan, C; Tirion, M; Langeveld, J G; Clemens, F H L R

    2013-01-01

    Sewer systems are costly to construct and even more costly to replace, requiring proper asset management. Sewer asset management relies to a large extent on available information. In sewer systems where pipe corrosion is the dominant failure mechanism, visual inspection by closed circuit television (CCTV) and core sampling are among the methods mostly applied to assess sewer pipe condition. This paper compares visual inspection and drill core analysis in order to enhance further understanding of the limitations and potentials of both methods. Both methods have been applied on a selected sewer reach in the city of The Hague, which was reportedly subject to pipe corrosion. Results show that both methods, visual inspection and core sampling, are associated with large uncertainties and that there is no obvious correlation between results of visual inspection and results of drill core analysis. PMID:23752377

  5. An Integral Condition for Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremiah Wayne; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    We derive an integral condition for core-collapse supernova explosions and use it to construct a new diagnostic of explodability. The fundamental challenge in core-collapse supernova theory is to explain how a stalled accretion shock revives to explode a star. In this manuscript, we assume that shock revival is initiated by the delayed-neutrino mechanism and derive an integral condition for shock expansion, vs > 0. Assuming that vs > 0 corresponds to explosion, we recast this integral condition as a dimensionless condition for explosion, Ψ > 0. Using 1D simulations, we confirm that Ψ = 0 during the stalled phase and Ψ > 0 during explosion. Having validated the integral condition, we use it to derive a useful explosion diagnostic. First, for a given set of parameters, we find the family of solutions to the steady-state equations, parameterized by shock radius Rs, yielding Ψ(Rs). For any particular solution, Ψ(Rs) may be negative, zero, or positive, and, since Ψ ∝ vs, this corresponds to a solution with a receding, stationary, or expanding shock, respectively. Within this family, there is always a solution with a minimum Ψ, Ψmin. When Ψmin < 0, there always exists a stalled accretion shock solution, but when Ψmin > 0, all solutions have vs > 0. Therefore, Ψmin = 0 defines a critical hypersurface for explosion, and we show that the critical neutrino luminosity curve proposed by Burrows & Goshy 1993 is a projection of this more general critical condition. Finally, we propose and verify with 1D simulations that Ψmin is a reliable and accurate explosion diagnostic.

  6. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Brygoo, S.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Mazevet, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Boehly, T.; and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  7. Conductivity and Correlations in Fe at Earth Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. E.; Zhang, Peng; Haule, Kristjan

    We have computed electrical conductivity in iron at Earth core conditions self-consistently within many-body theory using DFT/DMFT. We find that electron correlations are important even in the generation of Earth's magnetic field. Earth's magnetic field was believed to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in Earth's outer core, but density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, so that new geodynamo models were being developed. The DFT computations for resistivity were based on the scattering of electrons off of atomic vibrations, or electron-phonon (e-p) scattering. We applied self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT+DMFT) to iron and found that at high temperatures electron-electron (e-e) scattering is comparable to the e-p scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core, consistent with the conventional thermal geodynamo [Peng, Cohen, and Haule, Nature 517, 605, 2015]. How electron correlations change with pressure, and how this affects material properties, will be discussed. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation and the ERC Advanced grant ToMCaT.

  8. Limitations in Life Participation and Independence Due to Secondary Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The effects of secondary conditions across adults with autism, Down syndrome, and cerebral palsy were explored in terms of overall limitation in life participation and independence, changes over time, and the degree and nature of limitation in specific secondary conditions. Information was obtained for 35 adults with autism, 49 with Down syndrome,…

  9. Partitioning of Sulfur and Platinum at Core Formation Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suer, T. A.; Siebert, J.; Fiquet, G.; Remusat, L.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the partitioning behavior of highly siderophile elements (HSE) at high pressures and temperatures is important for understanding the mantle's elemental reservoir and the core mantle differentiation process. Low solubility of HSEs in silicate melts and the small size of samples obtained from diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments have prevented the experimental study of the partitioning of these elements at realistic deep magma ocean conditions. In this study, we present results for metal-silicate partitioning experiments of sulfur and platinum conducted at pressures between 45 and 80 GPa and at temperatures from 3500 to 4200 K. With the nanoSIMS as our main tool for measuring trace element concentrations, we have developed a protocol for studying the partitioning behavior of these elements from samples that underwent equilibration at high pressure and temperatures in a Laser-Heated DAC. The nanoSIMS has the spatial resolution and the required sensitivity to measure the low concentration of some HSEs in the quenched silicate glass. The results of this study will help to refine current core-mantle differentiation models. Furthermore they add constraints to the contribution of the late veneer to the mantle's elemental abundances.

  10. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  11. Limited dissemination of the wastewater treatment plant core resistome

    PubMed Central

    Munck, Christian; Albertsen, Mads; Telke, Amar; Ellabaan, Mostafa; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial genomes and can facilitate the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental reservoirs and potential pathogens. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are believed to play a central role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. However, the contribution of the dominant members of the WWTP resistome to resistance in human pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we use a combination of metagenomic functional selections and comprehensive metagenomic sequencing to uncover the dominant genes of the WWTP resistome. We find that this core resistome is unique to the WWTP environment, with <10% of the resistance genes found outside the WWTP environment. Our data highlight that, despite an abundance of functional resistance genes within WWTPs, only few genes are found in other environments, suggesting that the overall dissemination of the WWTP resistome is comparable to that of the soil resistome. PMID:26419330

  12. Limited dissemination of the wastewater treatment plant core resistome.

    PubMed

    Munck, Christian; Albertsen, Mads; Telke, Amar; Ellabaan, Mostafa; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Sommer, Morten O A

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial genomes and can facilitate the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental reservoirs and potential pathogens. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are believed to play a central role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. However, the contribution of the dominant members of the WWTP resistome to resistance in human pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we use a combination of metagenomic functional selections and comprehensive metagenomic sequencing to uncover the dominant genes of the WWTP resistome. We find that this core resistome is unique to the WWTP environment, with <10% of the resistance genes found outside the WWTP environment. Our data highlight that, despite an abundance of functional resistance genes within WWTPs, only few genes are found in other environments, suggesting that the overall dissemination of the WWTP resistome is comparable to that of the soil resistome. PMID:26419330

  13. Saturation of electrical resistivity of solid iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of solid iron at high pressure, up to and including conditions likely to be found at the centre of the Earth. We have extended some of the calculations of the resistivities of pure solid iron we recently performed at Earth's core conditions (Pozzo et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014) to lower temperature. We show that at low temperature the resistivity increases linearly with temperature, and saturates at high temperature. This saturation effect is well known as the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit in metals, but has been largely ignored to estimate the resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions. Recent experiments (Gomi et al. in Phys Earth Planet Int 224:88-103, 2013) coupled new high pressure data and saturation to predict the resitivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions, and reported values up to three times lower than previous estimates, confirming recent first principles calculations (de Koker et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:4070-4073, 2012; Pozzo et al. in Nature 485:355-358, 2012, Phys Rev B 87:014110-10, 2013, Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014; Davies et al. in Nat Geosci 8:678-685, 2015). The present results support the saturation effect idea. PMID:27026948

  14. Fluorescent-Core Microcapillaries: Detection Limits for Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Shalon A.

    This work develops a refractive-index sensor based on whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in glass microcapillaries. The capillary channel is coated with a layer of fluorescent silicon quantum dots (QDs), which provides a fluorescence source that also supports the WGMs. When different fluids are pumped into the channel, the fluorescence spectrum responds as the resonances shift to different frequencies. A study of the WGM spectral shift analysis techniques improved the detection limits to ˜10-4 refractive index units, and permitted the development of sensorgram-type analyses in which the channel fluid is probed continuously in time. The feasibility of the device as a microfluidic biosensor was demonstrated by first functionalizing the silica surface and then detecting the binding of biotin and streptavidin to the capillary channel. These structures could be attractive as microfluidic biological sensors, since they are easy to fabricate, mechanically robust, and relatively inexpensive compared to other technologies.

  15. Determination of core design thermal safety limits for a two-loop pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadinov, V.

    1996-04-01

    Results are given of independent research of core thermal design limits for the Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) nuclear power plant; procedures for two-loop pressurized water reactor plant core design safety limit calculation are used. Emphasis is placed on researching the vessel exit boiling and the hot-channel exit quality limits and their impact on the maximum available design safety operating range and thermal operating margin of the NEK reactor core. For this purpose, the LIMITS computer code is developed. Based on the modified, well-tried COBRA-IV-I computer code, the departure of nuclear boiling ratio core safety limits are calculated. The original results complement well those of the NEK Final Safety Analysis Report. The procedures and the methods for determining the reactor core design thermal limits are successfully proven despite the unavailability of proprietary data, different models, and computer codes. In addition to the acquired capability of in-house independent checking of the vendor`s results, the bases are set for further independent analyses of the limiting safety system settings for the NEK core.

  16. Core knowledge and its limits: The domain of food

    PubMed Central

    Shutts, Kristin; Condry, Kirsten F.; Santos, Laurie R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Adults, preschool children, and nonhuman primates detect and categorize food objects according to substance information, conveyed primarily by color and texture. In contrast, they perceive and categorize artifacts primarily by shape and rigidity. The present experiments investigated the origins of this distinction. Using a looking time procedure, Experiment 1 extended previous findings that rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) generalize learning about novel food objects by color over changes in shape. Six additional experiments then investigated whether human infants show the same signature patterns of perception and generalization. Nine-month-old infants failed to detect food objects in accord with their intrinsic properties, in contrast to rhesus monkeys tested in previous research with identical displays. Eight-month-old infants did not privilege substance information over other features when categorizing foods, even though they detected and remembered this information. Moreover, infants showed the same property generalization patterns when presented with foods and tools. The category-specific patterns of perception and categorization shown by human adults, children, and adult monkeys therefore were not found in human infants, providing evidence for limits to infants’ domains of knowledge. PMID:19409538

  17. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The main focus was the study of star-forming regions through high spectral- and spatial resolution observations of mm-wavelength lines, and through models of the observations. The main accomplishments were a) demonstration that more than 15 starless cores show substantial evidence of extended inward motion at about half the sound speed; b) observations of infall asymmetry in several cores, in lines of N2H(+) and DCO(+), low- depletion tracers of the "inner core"; c) observation of "infall asymmetry" of spectral lines over approx. 0.5 pc in the NGC1333 cluster-forming region; d) observations indicating that cores are nearly at rest with respect to their envelopes; and e) development of analytic, power-series solutions to the equations of motions for condensing 1-D systems (layers, cylinders and spheres).

  18. Is iron at the Earth's core conditions hcp-structured?

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Prakapenka, V

    2012-02-07

    Iron is the main component of the Earth's core and its structure and properties are important for interpretation of geophysical observations and modeling dynamics of the core. We argue that the diffraction lines in the high temperature high pressure X-ray diffraction pattern, presented by Tateno et al., 2010 and interpreted as those of solely hot hcp-Fe, correspond indeed to the insufficiently heated part of the sample. We show that observed diffraction spots are either due to bcc-Fe or carbides.

  19. Trends in activity-limiting chronic conditions among children.

    PubMed Central

    Newacheck, P W; Budetti, P P; Halfon, N

    1986-01-01

    Data from the National Health Interview Survey indicate that the prevalence of activity-limiting chronic conditions among children under age 17 years doubled between 1960 and 1981, from 1.8 to 3.8 per cent. Approximately 40 per cent of the overall rise in prevalence occurred before 1970. Most of the increase in prevalence during this early period can be attributed to changes in questionnaire design and aging of the child population following the "baby boom" years. The factors responsible for increases in reported cases of activity limitation following 1970 are more difficult to specify and evaluate. During this later period, the increase in prevalence was restricted to less severe levels of limitations. While prevalence levels rose for a variety of conditions during this period, respiratory conditions and mental and nervous system disorders demonstrated the largest changes. It appears that much of the increase in reported cases of activity limitations during the 1970s can be attributed to shifting perceptions on the part of parents, educators, and physicians. PMID:2936257

  20. Flammability Limits of Gases Under Low Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehlow, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this combustion science investigation is to determine the effect of zero, fractional, and super gravity on the flammability limits of a premixed methane air flame in a standard 51 mm diameter flammability tube and to determine, if possible, the fluid flow associated with flame passage under zero-g conditions and the density (and hence, temperature) profiles associated with the flame under conditions of incipient extinction. This is accomplished by constructing an appropriate apparatus for placement in NASA's Lewis Research Center Lear Jet facility and flying the prescribed g-trajectories while the experiment is being performed. Data is recorded photographically using the visible light of the flame. The data acquired is: (1) the shape and propagation velocity of the flame under various g-conditions for methane compositions that are inside the flammable limits, and (2) the effect of gravity on the limits. Real time accelerometer readings for the three orthogonal directions are displayed in full view of the cameras and the framing rate of the cameras is used to measure velocities.

  1. 42 CFR 418.70 - Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care Non-Core Services § 418.70 Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services. A hospice... hospice or under arrangements made by the hospice as specified in § 418.100. These services must...

  2. Core-halo limit and internal dynamics of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, P. A. P.; Valette, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pichoff, N.; Uriot, D.

    2015-08-15

    The dynamics of high-intensity beams largely depends on their internal space charge forces. These forces are responsible of non-linear coupling, emittance growth, and halo generation. They contribute to shape the beam density profile. As a consequence, an analysis of this profile can be a precious indicator capable of revealing the internal dynamics of the beam. This paper recalls the precise core-halo limit determination proposed earlier, then studies its behavior through a wide range of beam profiles, and finally shows its relevance as an indicator of the limit separating the two space charge field regimes of the core and the halo.

  3. Geomagnetic polarity reversals, Earth's core evolution, and conditions for dynamo action in the cores of terrestrial exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Peter E.

    Planetary dynamos are responsible for the generation of large-scale magnetic fields and are ubiquitous in the solar system. Magnetic fields generated by dynamo action in a planetary core offer unique insight into the internal structure, composition, and energetics of the planet. This dissertation consists of two main parts, the first focuses on long period fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field and the second explores conditions for dynamo action in the cores of terrestrial exoplanets. The first part consists of three projects using first-principle numerical magnetohydrodynamic models of the geodynamo to investigate the relationship between two fundamental, but poorly understood, aspects of the geomagnetic field: magnetic polarity reversals and the influence of core evolution. The first project explores the dependence of various dynamo properties on the relative strengths of buoyancy and rotation, and identifies several dynamical regimes whose magnetic field fluctuations over time are consistent with the paleomagnetic field. We find that normal evolution of buoyancy production in the core and planetary rotation rate over 100 Myr produce a negligible change in dynamo polarity reversal rate and field intensity, implying that the observed fluctuations in the geomagnetic reversal rate requires either anomalous core evolution or a rough dynamo regime boundary. The second project models the long time-scale evolution of the Earth's core using time-dependent control parameters, which are constrained by the secular cooling of the core and tidal deceleration. We find that fluctuations in the geodynamo are closely coupled to the evolution of the core, which implies a connection between the long time-scale trends in the seafloor geomagnetic polarity reversal rate and the rate of core evolution over the last 100 Myr. In the third project we investigate the hypothesis that the long period (˜200 Myr) oscillation in paleomagnetic reversal frequency is controlled by the heat flow

  4. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Limiting conditions/scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H(sub 2) from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: 1. Culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; 2. Mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; 3. Bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; 4. Evaluation of biological synthetic gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; 5. Process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and 6. Economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses.

  5. Relationship of core exit-temperature noise to thermal-hydraulic conditions in PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Core exit thermocouple temperature noise and neutron detector noise measurements were performed at the Loss of Fluid Test Facility (LOFT) reactor and a Westinghouse, 1148 MW(e) PWR to relate temperature noise to core thermal-hydraulic conditions. The noise analysis results show that the RMS of the temperature noise increases linearly with increasing core ..delta..T at LOFT and the commercial PWR. Out-of-core test loop temperature noise has shown similar behavior. The phase angle between core exit temperature noise and in-core or ex-core neutron noise is directly related to the core coolant flow velocity. However, if the thermocouple response time is slow, compared to the coolant transit time between the sensors, velocities inferred from the phase angle are lower than measured coolant flow velocities.

  6. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy (≲0.4 kB nucleon-1) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy (≳6 kB nucleon-1) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy (˜4 × 1050 erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.

  7. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein (1990) to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy ($\\lesssim 0.4\\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy ($\\gtrsim 6\\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy ($\\sim 4\\times 10^{50}$ erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.

  8. Computational Study on the Steady-state Impedance of Saturated-core Superconducting Fault Current Limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Tang, Y.; Liang, S.; Ren, L.; Wang, Z.; Xu, Y.

    This paper presents the electromagnetic analysis of a high voltage saturated-core superconducting fault current limiter (SCSFCL). The numerical analyses of a three-dimensional (3D) model is shown, and the specific parameters are given. The model focus on the steady-state impedance of the limiter when connected to the power grid. It analyzed the dependence of steady-state impedance on the AC coil current, and the relationship between oil gap and coil inductance. The results suggest that, adding oil gap between slice of silicon steel can reduce the core cross-section, restrain the ultraharmonic and decrease the steady-state impedance. As the core cross-section of AC limb decreased from 4344 cm2 to 3983 cm2, the total harmonic distortion for voltage decreased from 2.4% to 1.8%, and the impedance decreased from 1.082 Ω to 1.069 Ω(Idc=400A,Iac=1296A).

  9. Hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1995-01-01

    The main results of the grant were (1) finishing the manuscript of a proof of completeness of the Poincare modes in an incompressible nonviscous fluid corotating with a rigid ellipsoidal boundary, (2) partial completion of a manuscript describing a definition of helicity that resolved questions in the literature about calculating the helicities of vector fields with complicated topologies, and (3) the beginning of a reexamination of the inverse problem of inferring properties of the geomagnetic field B just outside the core-mantle boundary (CMB) from measurements of elements of B at and above the earth's surface. This last work has led to a simple general formalism for linear and nonlinear inverse problems that appears to include all the inversion schemes so far considered for the uniqueness problem in geomagnetic inversion. The technique suggests some new methods for error estimation that form part of this report.

  10. Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Finkel, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Many environments on Earth experience nutrient limitation and as a result have nongrowing or very slowly growing bacterial populations. To better understand bacterial respiration under environmentally relevant conditions, the effect of nutrient limitation on respiration rates of heterotrophic bacteria was measured. The oxygen consumption and population density of batch cultures of Escherichia coli K-12, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 were tracked for up to 200 days. The oxygen consumption per CFU (QO2) declined by more than 2 orders of magnitude for all three strains as they transitioned from nutrient-abundant log-phase growth to the nutrient-limited early stationary phase. The large reduction in QO2 from growth to stationary phase suggests that nutrient availability is an important factor in considering environmental respiration rates. Following the death phase, during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP), QO2 values of the surviving population increased with time and more cells were respiring than formed colonies. Within the respiring population, a subpopulation of highly respiring cells increased in abundance with time. Apparently, as cells enter LTSP, there is a viable but not culturable population whose bulk community and per cell respiration rates are dynamic. This result has a bearing on how minimal energy requirements are met, especially in nutrient-limited environments. The minimal QO2 rates support the extension of Kleiber's law to the mass of a bacterium (100-fg range). PMID:23770901

  11. Feasibility and benefits of methanogenesis under oxygen-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zitomer, D.H.; Shrout, J.D.

    1998-12-31

    Methanogenic and aerobic (or microaerophilic) biological processes are often considered mutually exclusive and separated as biological wastewater treatment options. However, under oxygen-limited conditions, both aerobic respiration and methanogenesis can be practically accomplished by a single mixed culture. This paper describes sustained batch culture, oxygen-limited methanogenic serum bottle and bench-scale systems. Serum bottle cultures exhibited methanogenic activity similar to or greater than that of a strictly anaerobic culture maintained in parallel. The COD removal efficiencies of anaerobic, oxygen-limited, and aerobic bench-scale reactors receiving 30,000 mg/l of sucrose were all greater than 93%, a system receiving 1 g O{sub 2}/L{sub R}-day achieved a lower final effluent COD than the strictly anaerobic reactor. After a shock-load of sucrose, the pH recovered in low-aeration batch reactors in 28--34 days, whereas anaerobic pH did not recover after 52 days of observation. In the future, methanogenesis under limited-aeration may be employed as an energy efficient treatment option to achieve low final COD concentrations, minimal biosolids generation, and mineralization of a broad range of specific organic chemicals.

  12. USE OF SEDIMENT CORES TO ESTABLISH REFERENCE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess the degree to which integrity of waterbodies have been degraded, comparisons are made to "reference" conditions. Finding systems with similar ecological components, but absent the specific stressors of concern, may often be difficult or even impossible. An alt...

  13. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. An analysis of the proposed MITR-III core to establish thermal-hydraulic limits at 10 MW. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.; Meyer, J.E.; Henry, A.F.

    1997-06-01

    The 5 MW Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II) is expected to operate under a new license beginning in 1999. Among the options being considered is an upgrade in the heat removal system to allow operation at 10 MW. The purpose of this study is to predict the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits for the upgraded reactor (MITR-III). The MITR Multi-Channel Analysis Code was written to analyze the response of the MITR system to a series of anticipated transients in order to determine the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits under various operating conditions. The MIT Multi-Channel Analysis Code models the primary and secondary systems, with special emphasis placed on analyzing the thermal-hydraulic conditions in the core. The code models each MITR fuel element explicitly in order to predict the behavior of the system during flow instabilities. The results of the code are compared to experimental data from MITR-II and other sources. New definitions are suggested for the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits. MITR Limit Diagrams are included for three different heat removal system configurations. It is concluded that safe, year-round operating at 10 MW is possible, given that the primary and secondary flow rates are both increased by approximately 40%.

  15. The Structure of Gas-accreting Protoplanets and the Condition of the Critical Core Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2013-03-01

    In the core accretion model for the formation of gas giant planets, runaway gas accretion onto a core is the primary requisite, triggered when the core mass reaches a critical value. The recently revealed wide diversity of the extrasolar giant planets suggests the necessity to further the understanding of the conditions resulting in the critical core mass that initiates runaway accretion. We study the internal structure of protoplanets under hydrostatic and thermal equilibria represented in terms of a polytropic equation of state to investigate what factors determine and affect the critical core mass. We find that the protoplanets, embedded in protoplanetary disks, have the same configuration as red giants, characterized by the envelope of the centrally condensed type solution. Applying the theory of stellar structure with homology invariants, we demonstrate that there are three types of criteria for the critical core mass depending on the stiffness of polytrope and the nature of outer boundary condition. For the stiff polytropes of index N <= 3 with the Bondi radius as the outer boundary, the criterion governing the critical core mass occurs at the surface. For stiff polytropes with the Hill outer boundary and for soft polytropes of N > 3, this criterion acts at the bottom of gaseous envelope. Further, we elucidate the roles and effects of coexistent radiative and convective zones in the envelope of critical core mass. Based on the results, we discuss the relevance of Bondi and Hill surface conditions and explore the parameter dependences of critical core mass.

  16. THE STRUCTURE OF GAS-ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS AND THE CONDITION OF THE CRITICAL CORE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2013-03-01

    In the core accretion model for the formation of gas giant planets, runaway gas accretion onto a core is the primary requisite, triggered when the core mass reaches a critical value. The recently revealed wide diversity of the extrasolar giant planets suggests the necessity to further the understanding of the conditions resulting in the critical core mass that initiates runaway accretion. We study the internal structure of protoplanets under hydrostatic and thermal equilibria represented in terms of a polytropic equation of state to investigate what factors determine and affect the critical core mass. We find that the protoplanets, embedded in protoplanetary disks, have the same configuration as red giants, characterized by the envelope of the centrally condensed type solution. Applying the theory of stellar structure with homology invariants, we demonstrate that there are three types of criteria for the critical core mass depending on the stiffness of polytrope and the nature of outer boundary condition. For the stiff polytropes of index N {<=} 3 with the Bondi radius as the outer boundary, the criterion governing the critical core mass occurs at the surface. For stiff polytropes with the Hill outer boundary and for soft polytropes of N > 3, this criterion acts at the bottom of gaseous envelope. Further, we elucidate the roles and effects of coexistent radiative and convective zones in the envelope of critical core mass. Based on the results, we discuss the relevance of Bondi and Hill surface conditions and explore the parameter dependences of critical core mass.

  17. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant in the past year we have pursued spectral-line observations of star-forming regions over size scales from 0.01 pc to 0.5 pc. Our main goal has been to measure the systematic and turbulent motions of condensing and collapsing gas. In this area, our results include (1) in 67 starless dense cores, some 19 show clear evidence of spatially extended inward motions, with typical line-of-sight inward speed 0.05-0.09 km s(sup -1) and with typical plane-of-the-sky extent 0.1-0.3 pc, (2) In some 40 nearby regions with embedded groups and clusters, we see extended infall asymmetry in lines of CS and HCO(+) clearly in 4 regions and less clearly in 4 others, (3) Using finer resolution (15 arcsec or 0.01-0.02 pc) and lines tracing higher density, we see spatial concentration of infall asymmetry near the protostars in NGC 1333 IRS 4A and B, L483, and L1251B, and with still finer resolution (2 arcsec or 0.003 pc or 600 AU) we detect inverse P Cyg profiles, indicating absorption of continuum emission from the protostellar envelope by infalling gas in NGC 1333 IRS 4A and 4B. Further, at high resolution we identify regions of stellar mass and low turbulence ("kernels") which are good candidates to become the next generation of stars in embedded clusters. In addition we have completed a survey for the OH Zeeman effect in absorption against nearby H II regions, indicating that the large-scale magnetic field may be nearly critical if it typically threads a flattened structure. We have also developed a model of spatially extended infall motions based on dissipation of turbulence in a magnetized, selfgravitating layer. In the following we describe some of these results in more detail.

  18. Social Interest and the Core Conditions: Could It Be that Adler Influenced Rogers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Richard E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents primary source documentation highlighting the similarities between Alfred Adler's social interest construct and the counselor-oriented core conditions of Carl Rogers. Implications of the similarities are discussed. (Author)

  19. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth’s core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth’s core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth’s core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch–Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron–phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth’s core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  20. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core. PMID:27251282

  1. First-wall and limiter conditioning in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Krawchuk, R.B.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Sesnic, S.; Tenney, F.H.

    1984-10-01

    A progress report on the experimental studies of vacuum vessel conditioning during the first year of TFTR operation is presented. A previous paper described the efforts expended to condition the TFTR vessel prior to and during the initial plasma start-up experiments. During the start-up phase, discharge cleaning was performed with the vessel at room temperature. For the second phase of TFTR operations, which was directed towards the optimization of ohmically heated plasmas, the vacuum vessel could be heated to 150/sup 0/C. The internal configuration of the TFTR vessel was more complex during the second phase with the addition of a TiC/C moveable limiter array, Inconel bellows cover plates, and ZrAl getter pumps. A quantitative comparison is given on the effectiveness of vessel bakeout, glow discharge cleaning, and pulse discharge cleaning in terms of the total quantity of removed carbon and oxygen, residual gas base pressures and the resulting plasma impurity levels as measured by visible, uv, and soft x-ray spectroscopy. The initial experience with hydrogen isotope changeover in TFTR is presented including the results of the attempt to hasten the changeover time by using a glow discharge to precondition the vessel with the new isotope.

  2. Sound velocities of iron carbides (Fe3C and Fe7C3) under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Zhang, D.; Liu, J.; Bi, W.; Zhao, J.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    For a carbon-rich core, iron carbides might be the major phase crystallizing to form the Earth's solid inner core. On basis of high-pressure experiments and theoretical calculations, Fe3C, Fe7C3 and more recently Fe2C have been considered as the most stable carbide phase under the inner core conditions. The identity of the stable carbide phase in a carbon-containing inner core is still a topic under active debate. It is crucial to determine the elastic and acoustic properties of the relevant carbide phases to core conditions, in order to test the carbon-rich core composition model. In this study, we have performed nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) measurements of both Fe7C3 and Fe3C up to core pressures at 300 K and determined their shear-wave (VS) and compressional-wave (VP) velocities for comparison with seismic observations of the inner core. The high-pressure magnetic properties of both phases have also been investigated by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and Synchrotron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (SMS). Our results show that the magnetic transitions from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic and then to nonmagnetic in Fe7C3 and Fe3C significantly affects their VS and VP at high pressures. Extrapolating the sound velocities of the nonmagnetic phases to the inner core conditions, we found that sound velocities, particularly VS, of the iron carbides are markedly low comparing with iron and other iron-rich alloys, making them compelling candidates to explain the seismic observations of the inner core. Our hypothesis of a carbon-rich core may also be consistent with geochemical and petrological evidence on deep carbon inventory in Earth's interior.

  3. Current limiting behavior in three-phase transformer-type SFCLs using an iron core according to variety of fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong-Sun; Jung, Byung-Ik; Ha, Kyoung-Hun; Choi, Soo-Geun; Park, Hyoung-Min; Choi, Hyo-Sang

    To apply the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to the power system, the reliability of the fault-current-limiting operation must be ensured in diverse fault conditions. The SFCL must also be linked to the operation of the high-speed recloser in the power system. In this study, a three-phase transformer-type SFCL, which has a neutral line to improve the simultaneous quench characteristics of superconducting elements, was manufactured to analyze the fault-current-limiting characteristic according to the single, double, and triple line-to-ground faults. The transformer-type SFCL, wherein three-phase windings are connected to one iron core, reduced the burden on the superconducting element as the superconducting element on the sound phase was also quenched in the case of the single line-to-ground fault. In the case of double or triple line-to-ground faults, the flux from the faulted phase winding was interlinked with other faulted or sound phase windings, and the fault-current-limiting rate decreased because the windings of three phases were inductively connected by one iron core.

  4. A distance-limited sample of massive star-forming cores from the RMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Moore, T. J. T.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cicchini, A.

    2015-09-01

    We analyse C18O (J = 3-2) data from a sample of 99 infrared (IR)-bright massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact H II regions that were identified as potential molecular-outflow sources in the Red MSX Source survey. We extract a distance-limited (D < 6 kpc) sample shown to be representative of star formation covering the transition between the source types. At the spatial resolution probed, Larson-like relationships are found for these cores, though the alternative explanation, that Larson's relations arise where surface-density-limited samples are considered, is also consistent with our data. There are no significant differences found between source properties for the MYSOs and H II regions, suggesting that the core properties are established prior to the formation of massive stars, which subsequently have little impact at the later evolutionary stages investigated. There is a strong correlation between dust-continuum and C18O-gas masses, supporting the interpretation that both trace the same material in these IR-bright sources. A clear linear relationship is seen between the independently established core masses and luminosities. The position of MYSOs and compact H II regions in the mass-luminosity plane is consistent with the luminosity expected from the most massive protostar in the cluster when using an ˜40 per cent star formation efficiency and indicates that they are at a similar evolutionary stage, near the end of the accretion phase.

  5. The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) postulated limiting event initial and building source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, L F

    1992-08-01

    As part of the update of the Safety analysis Report (SAR) for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), operational limiting events under the category of inadvertent withdrawal of an experiment while at power or during a power pulse were determined to be the most limiting event(s) for this reactor. This report provides a summary of the assumptions, modeling, and results in evaluation of: Reactivity and thermal hydraulics analysis to determine the amount of fuel melt or fuel damage ratios; The reactor inventories following the limiting event; A literature review of post NUREG-0772 release fraction experiment results on severe fuel damages; Decontamination factors due to in-pool transport; and In-building transport modeling and building source term analysis.

  6. Mode-converters for rectangular-core fiber amplifiers to achieve diffraction-limited power scaling.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R; Armstrong, J Paul; Dawson, Jay W

    2012-12-17

    A rectangular-core (ribbon) fiber that guides and amplifies a single higher-order-mode (HOM) can potentially scale to much higher average powers than what is possible in traditional circular-core large-mode-area fibers. Such an amplifier would require mode-conversion at the input to enable interfacing with seed sources that typically output TEM(00) mode radiation and at the output to generate diffraction-limited radiation for end-user applications. We present the first simulation and experimental results of a mode conversion technique that uses two diffractive-optic-elements in conjugate Fourier planes to convert a diffraction limited TEM(00) mode to the HOM of a ribbon fiber. Mode-conversion-efficiency is approximately 84% and can theoretically approach 100%. We also demonstrate a mode-converter system that converts a single HOM of a ribbon fiber back to a diffraction-limited TEM(00) mode. Conversion efficiency is a record 80.5%. PMID:23263119

  7. Accessing High Pressure States Relevant to Core Conditions in the Giant Planets

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Cavallo, R M; Edwards, M J; Ho, D D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H E; Lasinski, B F; McNaney, J M; Pollaine, S M; Smith, R F

    2004-04-15

    We have designed an experimental technique to use on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to achieve very high pressure (P{sub max} > 10 Mbar = 1000 GPa), dense states of matter at moderate temperatures (kT < 0.5 eV = 6000 K), relevant to the core conditions of the giant planets. A discussion of the conditions in the interiors of the giant planets is given, and an experimental design that can approach those conditions is described.

  8. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Anta, Juan A.; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-07

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO{sub 2} show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of

  9. Body core temperature of rats subjected to daily exercise limited to a fixed time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shido, O.; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Sakurada, Sotaro; Kaneko, Yoshiko; Nagasaka, Tetsuo

    Several timed daily environmental cues alter the pattern of nycthemeral variations in body core temperature in rodents. The present study investigated the effect of timed exercise on variations of daily body core temperature. Male rats were housed in cages with a running wheel at an ambient temperature of 24° C with a 12:12 h light/dark cycle. Timed daily exercise rats (TEX) were allowed access to the wheel for 6 h in the last half of the dark phase, freely exercising rats (FEX) could run at any time, and sedentary rats (NEX) were not allowed to run. After a 3-week exercise period, all animals were denied access to the wheel. The intraabdominal temperatures (Tab) and spontaneous activities of rats were measured for 6 days after the exercise period. The Tab values of the TEX rats were significantly higher than those of the other two groups only in the last half of the dark phase, while Tab in the FEX and NEX rats showed no significant difference. The specific Tab changes in the TEX rats lasted for 2 days after the exercise period. Spontaneous activity levels were higher in the TEX rats than the FEX and NEX rats in the last half of the dark phase for 1 day after the exercise period. The results suggest that daily exercise limited to a fixed time per day modifies nycthemeral variations of body core temperature in rats so that the temperature increases during the period when the animals had previously exercised. Such a rise in body core temperature is partly attributed to an increase in the spontaneous activity level.

  10. Excitation energy transfer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii deficient in the PSI core or the PSII core under conditions mimicking state transitions.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Lucyna M; Dinc, Emine; Croce, Roberta; Dekker, Jan P

    2016-06-01

    The efficient use of excitation energy in photosynthetic membranes is achieved by a dense network of pigment-protein complexes. These complexes fulfill specific functions and interact dynamically with each other in response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Here, we studied how in the intact cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C.r.) the lack of the photosystem I (PSI) core or the photosystem II (PSII) core affects these interactions. To that end the mutants F15 and M18 (both PSI-deficient) and FUD7 (PSII-deficient) were incubated under conditions known to promote state transitions in wild-type. The intact cells were then instantly frozen to 77K and the full-spectrum time-resolved fluorescence emission of the cells was measured by means of streak camera. In the PSI-deficient mutants excitation energy transfer (EET) towards light-harvesting complexes of PSI (Lhca) occurs in less than 0.5 ns, and fluorescence from Lhca decays in 3.1 ns. Decreased trapping by PSII and increased fluorescence of Lhca upon state 1 (S1)→state 2 (S2) transition appears in the F15 and less in the M18 mutant. In the PSII-deficient mutant FUD7, quenched (0.5 ns) and unquenched (2 ns) light-harvesting complexes of PSII (LHCII) are present in both states, with the quenched form more abundant in S2 than in S1. Moreover, EET of 0.4 ns from the remaining LHCII to PSI increases upon S1→S2 transition. We relate the excitation energy kinetics observed in F15, M18 and FUD7 to the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus in these mutants under S1 and S2 conditions. PMID:26946087

  11. Liquid Iron Alloys with Hydrogen at Outer Core Conditions by First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Hirose, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the density of the outer core deduced from seismic data is about 10% lower than that of pure iron at core pressures and temperatures (P-T), it is widely believed that the outer core includes one or more light elements. Although intensive experimental and theoretical studies have been performed so far, the light element in the core has not yet been identified. Comparison of the density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys with observations, such as the PREM, is a promising way to determine the species and quantity of light alloying component(s) in the outer core. Here we report the results of a first-principles molecular dynamics study on liquid iron alloyed with hydrogen, one of candidates of the light elements. Hydrogen had been much less studied than other candidates. However, hydrogen has been known to reduce the melting temperature of Fe-H solid [1]. Furthermore, very recently, Nomura et al. argued that the outer core may include 24 at.% H in order to be molten under relatively low temperature (< 3600 K) [2]. Since then hydrogen has attracted strong interests. We clarify the effects of hydrogen on density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys under outer core P-T conditions. It is shown that ~1 wt% hydrogen can reproduce PREM density and sound velocity simultaneously very well. In addition, we show the presence of hydrogen rather reduces Gruneisen parameters. It indicates that, if hydrogen exists in the outer core, temperature profile of the outer core could be changed considerably from one estimated so far. [1] Sakamaki, K., E. Takahashi, Y. Nakajima, Y. Nishihara, K. Funakoshi, T. Suzuki, and Y. Fukai, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 174, 192-201 (2009). [2] Nomura, R., K. Hirose, K. Uesugi, Y. Ohishi, A. Tsuchiyama, A. Miyake, and Y. Ueno, Science 31, 522-525 (2014).

  12. Biological effects of extreme environmental conditions. [considering limits of biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imshenetskiy, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Actions of extreme physical and chemical space factors on microorganisms and plants are elaborated in order to establish limits for the biosphere. Considered are effects of low and high temperatures; ionizing and ultraviolet radiation; various gases; and effects of vibration, desiccation and acceleration.

  13. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks if authorized by the FAA. (b) No certificate holder... such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  14. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks if authorized by the FAA. (b) No certificate holder... such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  15. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks if authorized by the FAA. (b) No certificate holder... such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  16. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks if authorized by the FAA. (b) No certificate holder... such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  17. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    PubMed

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo. PMID:27251283

  18. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth’s core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth’s magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth’s core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth’s core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18–44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth’s geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth’s history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  19. Thermopyhsical conditions for the onset of a core dynamo in Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, Michelangelo; Federico, Costanzo; De Angelis, Simone; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Magni, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a study on the magnetization of the eucrite meteorite Allan Hills A81001 [1] has suggested the possibility that, in its primordial history, Vesta had an active core dynamo. The magnetic field associated could have preserved Vesta from the space-weathering. In this work, using a parametrized thermal convection method, we verified the thermophysical conditions for the onset of a core dynamo. The starting point is a post-differentiated structure [2,3,4], made of a metallic core, silicate mantle and rocky crust. We explored four different fully differentiated configurations of Vesta [5], characterized by different chondritic composition, with the constraints on the core size and density provided by [6]. We also explored three different scaling laws for the core velocity (mixing-length theory, MAC and an intermediate case). Core and mantle have both a temperature-dependent viscosity, which is the parameter that largely influences the magnetic Reynolds number and the dynamo duration. Our results suggest that Vesta had an active dynamo, whose duration lies in the range 150-500 Myr and the more appropriate scaling law for the core velocity is that given by the mixing-length theory. The maximum strength of the primordial core magnetic field is compatible with the estimations provided by [1]. [1] Fu, R. et al, 2012, Science 338, 238 [2] Ghosh, A. and McSween, H.Y., 1998, Icarus, 134, 187 [3] Formisano, M. et al., 2013, Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 48, 2316 [4] Neumann, W., et al., 2014, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 395, 267 [5] Toplis, M.J., et al., 2013, Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 48, 2300 [6] Ermakov, A.I., et al.2014, Icarus, 240, 146

  20. 33 CFR 330.4 - Conditions, limitations, and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... comply with the provisions of 33 CFR 325.4. In the latter case, the conditioned 401 water quality... event shall the period exceed one (1) year (see 33 CFR 325.2(b)(1)(ii)). Upon receipt of an individual... provisions of 33 CFR 325.4 or believes for some other specific reason it would be inappropriate to...

  1. 33 CFR 330.4 - Conditions, limitations, and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... comply with the provisions of 33 CFR 325.4. In the latter case, the conditioned 401 water quality... event shall the period exceed one (1) year (see 33 CFR 325.2(b)(1)(ii)). Upon receipt of an individual... provisions of 33 CFR 325.4 or believes for some other specific reason it would be inappropriate to...

  2. The Limits of Knowledge Management in Contemporary Corporate Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on Jean-François Lyotard's (1984) seminal study "The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge" to reflect on two macro-level catastrophes: the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2009 (and its continuing effects throughout the Eurozone and elsewhere) and Fukushima. These two case studies probe aspects of these grand…

  3. 33 CFR 330.4 - Conditions, limitations, and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply with the provisions of 33 CFR 325.4. In the latter case, the conditioned 401 water quality... event shall the period exceed one (1) year (see 33 CFR 325.2(b)(1)(ii)). Upon receipt of an individual... provisions of 33 CFR 325.4 or believes for some other specific reason it would be inappropriate to...

  4. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airplane that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any propeller, windshield, stabilizing or control surface... system, or wing, except that takeoffs may be made with frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably...

  5. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airplane that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any propeller, windshield, stabilizing or control surface... system, or wing, except that takeoffs may be made with frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably...

  6. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 74 FR 62696, Dec. 1, 2009. (a) No pilot may take off an airplane that has frost, ice, or snow... follow conditions: (1) Takeoffs may be made with frost adhering to the wings, or stabilizing or control surfaces, if the frost has been polished to make it smooth. (2) Takeoffs may be made with frost under...

  7. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airplane that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any propeller, windshield, stabilizing or control surface... system, or wing, except that takeoffs may be made with frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably...

  8. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airplane that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any propeller, windshield, stabilizing or control surface... system, or wing, except that takeoffs may be made with frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably...

  9. Dendritic carbon architectures formed by nanotube core-directed diffusion-limited aggregation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Kong, Xiaohui

    2010-08-28

    A regular array of fractal patterns with macroscopic dendritic carbon architecture was prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The dendritic carbon architectures have micrometre-sized stems and hyperbranches evolved by lateral growth, and they are formed by diffusion-limited aggregation of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticle building blocks generated from catalytic pyrolysis of toluene, which is directed by carbon nanotube cores, and followed by subsequent restructuring from surface to bulk. Incorporation of such proposed processes in Monte Carlo simulations generates dendritic architectures similar to the morphologies observed from the experiments. The findings provide direct information to the time resolved evolution of the morphology and microstructure of the dendritic carbon architecture, which mimic the nature behavior as snowflake attaching on the tree branches. Those will be important to understand the growth of vapor grown carbon fibers and carbon filamentous structures, and further possibility to control branching out of vapor grown carbon fibers. PMID:20607160

  10. Operating condition limitations of high density QCW arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Jeremy; Levy, Joseph; Feeler, Ryan

    2012-03-01

    Northrop Grumman Cutting Edge Optronics (NGCEO) has developed a laser diode array package with minimal bar-tobar spacing. These High Density Stack (HDS) packages allow for a power density increase on the order of ~ 2.5x when compared to industry-standard arrays. Power densities as high as 15 kW/cm2 can be achieved when operated at 200 W/bar. This work provides a detailed description of the duty factor, pulse width and power limitations of high density arrays. The absence of the interposing heatsinks requires that all of the heat generated by the interior bars must travel through the adjacent bars to the electrical contacts. This results in limitations to the allowable operating envelope of the HDS arrays. Thermal effects such as wavelength shifts across large HDS arrays are discussed. An overview of recent HDS design and manufacturing improvements is also presented. These improvements result in reliable operation at higher power densities and increased duty factors. A comparison of the effect of bar geometry on HDS performance is provided. Test data from arrays featuring these improvements based on both full 1 cm wide diode bars as well as 3 mm wide mini-bars is also presented.

  11. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; et al

    2016-07-07

    Here, it is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.more » 117, 025001 (2016)] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.« less

  12. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  13. Massive Infrared-Quiet Dense Cores: Unveiling the Initial Conditions of High-Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, F.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Schilke, P.; Menten, K. M.

    2008-05-01

    As Th. Henning said at the conference, cold precursors of high-mass stars are now ``hot topics''. We here propose some observational criteria to identify massive infrared-quiet dense cores which can host the high-mass analogs of Class~0 protostars and pre-stellar condensations. We also show how far-infrared to millimeter imaging surveys of entire complexes forming OB stars are starting to unveil the initial conditions of high-mass star formation.

  14. Laboratory Equipment for Investigation of Coring Under Mars-like Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K.; Cooper, G.

    2004-12-01

    To develop a suitable drill bit and set of operating conditions for Mars sample coring applications, it is essential to make tests under conditions that match those of the mission. The goal of the laboratory test program was to determine the drilling performance of diamond-impregnated bits under simulated Martian conditions, particularly those of low pressure and low temperature in a carbon dioxide atmosphere. For this purpose, drilling tests were performed in a vacuum chamber kept at a pressure of 5 torr. Prior to drilling, a rock, soil or a clay sample was cooled down to minus 80 degrees Celsius (Zacny et al, 2004). Thus, all Martian conditions, except the low gravity were simulated in the controlled environment. Input drilling parameters of interest included the weight on bit and rotational speed. These two independent variables were controlled from a PC station. The dependent variables included the bit reaction torque, the depth of the bit inside the drilled hole and the temperatures at various positions inside the drilled sample, in the center of the core as it was being cut and at the bit itself. These were acquired every second by a data acquisition system. Additional information such as the rate of penetration and the drill power were calculated after the test was completed. The weight of the rock and the bit prior to and after the test were measured to aid in evaluating the bit performance. In addition, the water saturation of the rock was measured prior to the test. Finally, the bit was viewed under the Scanning Electron Microscope and the Stereo Optical Microscope. The extent of the bit wear and its salient features were captured photographically. The results revealed that drilling or coring under Martian conditions in a water saturated rock is different in many respects from drilling on Earth. This is mainly because the Martian atmospheric pressure is in the vicinity of the pressure at the triple point of water. Thus ice, heated by contact with the

  15. Siderophile Element Constraints on the Conditions of Core Formation in Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Humayun, M.

    2012-01-01

    Siderophile element concentrations in planetary basalts and mantle samples have been used to estimate conditions of core formation for many years and have included applications to Earth, Moon, Mars and asteroid 4 Vesta [1]. For Earth, we have samples of mantle and a diverse collection of mantle melts which have provided a mature understanding of the how to reconstruct the concentration of siderophile elements in mantle materials, from only concentrations in surficial basalt (e.g., [2]). This approach has led to the consensus views that Earth underwent an early magma ocean stage to pressures of 40-50 GPa (e.g., [3,4]), Moon melted extensively and formed a small (approx. 2 mass %) metallic core [5], and 4 Vesta contains a metallic core that is approximately 18 mass % [6,7]. Based on new data from newly found meteorites, robotic spacecraft, and experimental partitioning studies, [8] showed that eight siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, Ga, P, V and Cr) are consistent with equilibration of a 20 mass% S-rich metallic core with the mantle at pressures of 14 +/- 3 GPa. We aim to test this rather simple scenario with additional analyses of meteorites for a wide range of siderophile elements, and application of new experimental data for the volatile siderophile and highly siderophile elements.

  16. Melting of iron at the physical conditions of the Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey H; Holmes, Neil C

    2004-01-22

    Seismological data can yield physical properties of the Earth's core, such as its size and seismic anisotropy. A well-constrained iron phase diagram, however, is essential to determine the temperatures at core boundaries and the crystal structure of the solid inner core. To date, the iron phase diagram at high pressure has been investigated experimentally through both laser-heated diamond-anvil cell and shock-compression techniques, as well as through theoretical calculations. Despite these contributions, a consensus on the melt line or the high-pressure, high-temperature phase of iron is lacking. Here we report new and re-analysed sound velocity measurements of shock-compressed iron at Earth-core conditions. We show that melting starts at 225 +/- 3 GPa (5,100 +/- 500 K) and is complete at 260 +/- 3 GPa (6,100 +/- 500 K), both on the Hugoniot curve-the locus of shock-compressed states. This new melting pressure is lower than previously reported, and we find no evidence for a previously reported solid-solid phase transition on the Hugoniot curve near 200 GPa (ref. 16). PMID:14737164

  17. Transport properties for liquid silicon-oxygen-iron mixtures at Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2013-01-01

    We report on the thermal and electrical conductivities of two liquid silicon-oxygen-iron mixtures (Fe0.82Si0.10O0.08 and Fe0.79Si0.08O0.13), representative of the composition of the Earth's outer core at the relevant pressure-temperature conditions, obtained from density functional theory calculations with the Kubo-Greenwood formulation. We find thermal conductivities k=100(160) W m-1 K-1, and electrical conductivities σ=1.1(1.3)×106Ω-1 m-1 at the top (bottom) of the outer core. These values are between two and three times higher than previous estimates, and have important implications for our understanding of the Earth's thermal history and the functioning of the Earth's magnetic field, including rapid cooling rate for the whole core or high level of radiogenic elements in the core. We also show results for a number of structural and dynamic properties of the mixtures, including the partial radial distribution functions, mean square displacements, viscosities, and speeds of sound.

  18. Liquid iron-hydrogen alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei

    2015-09-01

    We examined the density, bulk sound (compressional) velocity, and Grüneisen parameter of liquid pure Fe, Fe100H28 (0.50 wt % H), Fe88H40 (0.81 wt % H), and Fe76H52 (1.22 wt % H) at Earth's outer core pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions (~100 to 350 GPa, 4000 to 7000 K) based on first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. The results demonstrate that the thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of liquid iron alloy decreases with increasing pressure, temperature, and hydrogen concentration, indicating a relatively small temperature gradient in the outer core when hydrogen is present. Along such temperature profile, both the density and compressional velocity of liquid iron containing ~1 wt % hydrogen match seismological observations. It suggests that hydrogen could be a primary light element in the core, although the shear velocity of the inner core is not reconciled with solid Fe-H alloy and thus requires another impurity element.

  19. Transition from the adiabatic to the sudden limit in core-electron photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Lars; Michiels, John; Inglesfield, John

    1998-12-01

    Experimental results for core-electron photoemission Jk(ω) are often compared with the one-electron spectral function Ac(ɛk-ω), where ω is the photon energy, ɛk is the photoelectron energy, and the optical transition matrix elements are taken as constant. Since Jk(ω) is nonzero only for ɛk>0, we must actually compare it with Ac(ɛk-ω)θ(ɛk). For metals Ac(ω) is known to have a quasiparticle (QP) peak with an asymmetric power-law [theories of Mahan, Nozières, de Dominicis, Langreth, and others (MND)] singularity due to low-energy particle-hole excitations. The QP peak starts at the core-electron energy ɛc, and is followed by an extended satellite (shakeup) structure at smaller ω. For photon energies ω just above threshold, ωth=-ɛc, Ac(ɛk-ω)θ(ɛk) as a function of ɛk (ω constant) is cut just behind the quasiparticle peak, and neither the tail of the MND line nor the plasmon satellites are present. The sudden (high-energy) limit is given by a convolution of Ac(ω) and a loss function, i.e., by the Berglund-Spicer two-step expression. Thus Ac(ω) alone does not give the correct photoelectron spectrum, neither at low nor at high energies. We present an extension of the quantum-mechanical (QM) models developed earlier by Inglesfield, and by Bardyszewski and Hedin to calculate Jk(ω). It includes recoil and damping, as well as shakeup effects and extrinsic losses, is exact in the high-energy limit, and allows calculations of Jk(ω) including the MND line and multiple plasmon losses. The model, which involves electrons coupled to quasibosons, is motivated by detailed arguments. As an illustration we have made quantitative calculations for a semi-infinite jellium with the density of aluminum metal and an embedded atom. The coupling functions (fluctuation potentials) between the electron and the quasibosons are related to the random-phase-approximation dielectric function, and different levels of approximations are evaluated numerically. The differences

  20. Initial condition for efficient mapping of level set algorithms on many-core architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornai, Gábor János; Cserey, György

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of adding more small curves to the initial condition which determines the required number of iterations of a fast level set (LS) evolution. As a result, we discovered two new theorems and developed a proof on the worst case of the required number of iterations. Furthermore, we found that these kinds of initial conditions fit well to many-core architectures. To show this, we have included two case studies which are presented on different platforms. One runs on a graphical processing unit (GPU) and the other is executed on a cellular nonlinear network universal machine (CNN-UM). With the new initial conditions, the steady-state solutions of the LS are reached in less than eight iterations depending on the granularity of the initial condition. These dense iterations can be calculated very quickly on many-core platforms according to the two case studies. In the case of the proposed dense initial condition on GPU, there is a significant speedup compared to the sparse initial condition in all cases since our dense initial condition together with the algorithm utilizes the properties of the underlying architecture. Therefore, greater performance gain can be achieved (up to 18 times speedup compared to the sparse initial condition on GPU). Additionally, we have validated our concept against numerically approximated LS evolution of standard flows (mean curvature, Chan-Vese, geodesic active regions). The dice indexes between the fast LS evolutions and the evolutions of the numerically approximated partial differential equations are in the range of 0.99±0.003.

  1. Mercury's core fraction and ancient crustal composition: Predictions from planetary formation under extremely reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. M.; Elkins-Tanton, L.

    2007-12-01

    Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the paradox of Mercury's large core, which is on the order of sixty percent of the mass of the planet and recently demonstrated to be at least partially molten. Here we suggest that extremely reducing conditions in the earliest stages of planetary accretion nearest to the Sun may have produced the unusual metallic iron fraction by reducing iron otherwise bound into silicates. We demonstrate the formation conditions necessary for various meteoritic bulk compositions to produce the core/mantle ratio of Mercury. During this hypothetical core formation, we assume the remaining silicate fraction of Mercury (now largely lacking iron) has been heated to produce a magma ocean. The resulting cumulate mantle composition is calculated in a Matlab simulation of magma ocean solidification using a CMAS system adapted for Mercury. Plagioclase flotation, frequently cited as the necessary signature of a magma ocean, is highly dependent upon initial bulk composition. We demonstrate the initial silicate iron content of the magma ocean necessary to make plagioclase buoyant and thus produce a plagioclase flotation crust as seen on the Moon. In addition, over a range of bulk compositions the solidified mantle cumulates are unstable to gravitational overturn. During overturn hot cumulates rise from depth and may cross their solidi and melt, producing an earliest planetary crust. This crust may still exist on Mercury. With the first flyby results of the MESSENGER mission coming this winter, predictions from these models can be compared with initial ground measurements.

  2. Liquid iron-sulfur alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei; Imada, Saori; Nakajima, Yoichi; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2014-10-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate liquid iron-sulfur alloys (Fe, Fe56S8, Fe52S12, and Fe48S16) under high-pressure and high-temperature (150-300 GPa and 4000-6000 K) conditions corresponding to the Earth's outer core. Considering only the density profile, the best match with the preliminary reference Earth model is by liquid Fe-14 wt % S (Fe50S14), assuming sulfur is the only light element. However, its bulk sound velocity is too high, in particular in the deep outer core, suggesting that another light component such as oxygen is required. An experimental check using inelastic X-ray scattering shows good agreement with the calculations. In addition, a present study demonstrates that the Birch's law does not hold for liquid iron-sulfur alloy, consistent with a previous report on pure liquid iron.

  3. Genomic regions associated with the nitrogen limitation response revealed in a global wheat core collection.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Jacques; Ravel, C; Jaubertie, J P; Duperrier, B; Gardet, O; Heumez, E; Pissavy, A L; Charmet, G; Le Gouis, J; Balfourier, F

    2013-03-01

    Modern wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties in Western Europe have mainly been bred, and selected in conditions where high levels of nitrogen-rich fertilizer are applied. However, high input crop management has greatly increased the risk of nitrates leaching into groundwater with negative impacts on the environment. To investigate wheat nitrogen tolerance characteristics that could be adapted to low input crop management, we supplied 196 accessions of a wheat core collection of old and modern cultivars with high or moderate amounts of nitrogen fertilizer in an experimental network consisting of three sites and 2 years. The main breeding traits were assessed including grain yield and grain protein content. The response to nitrogen level was estimated for grain yield and grain number per m(2) using both the difference and the ratio between performance at the two input levels and the slope of joint regression. A large variability was observed for all the traits studied and the response to nitrogen level. Whole genome association mapping was carried out using 899 molecular markers taking into account the five ancestral group structure of the collection. We identified 54 main regions involving almost all chromosomes that influence yield and its components, plant height, heading date and grain protein concentration. Twenty-three regions, including several genes, spread over 16 chromosomes were involved in the response to nitrogen level. These chromosomal regions may be good candidates to be used in breeding programs to improve the performance of wheat varieties at moderate nitrogen input levels. PMID:23192671

  4. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  7. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart T of Part 1910 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving...

  8. THE INITIAL CONDITIONS OF CLUSTERED STAR FORMATION. III. THE DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION OF THE OPHIUCHUS B2 CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R. K.; Di Francesco, J.; Myers, P. C.; Bourke, T. L.; Belloche, A.; Shirley, Y. L.; Andre, P.

    2010-08-01

    We present N{sub 2}D{sup +} 3-2 (IRAM), and H{sub 2}D{sup +} 1{sub 11}-1{sub 10} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 4-3 (JCMT) maps of the small cluster-forming Ophiuchus B2 core in the nearby Ophiuchus molecular cloud. In conjunction with previously published N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1-0 observations, the N{sub 2}D{sup +} data reveal the deuterium fractionation in the high-density gas across Oph B2. The average deuterium fractionation R{sub D} = N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) {approx} 0.03 over Oph B2, with several small scale R{sub D} peaks and a maximum R{sub D} = 0.1. The mean R{sub D} is consistent with previous results in isolated starless and protostellar cores. The column density distributions of both H{sub 2}D{sup +} and N{sub 2}D{sup +} show no correlation with total H{sub 2} column density. We find, however, an anticorrelation in deuterium fractionation with proximity to the embedded protostars in Oph B2 to distances {approx}>0.04 pc. Destruction mechanisms for deuterated molecules require gas temperatures greater than those previously determined through NH{sub 3} observations of Oph B2 to proceed. We present temperatures calculated for the dense core gas through the equating of non-thermal line widths for molecules (i.e., N{sub 2}D{sup +} and H{sub 2}D{sup +}) expected to trace the same core regions, but the observed complex line structures in B2 preclude finding a reasonable result in many locations. This method may, however, work well in isolated cores with less complicated velocity structures. Finally, we use R{sub D} and the H{sub 2}D{sup +} column density across Oph B2 to set a lower limit on the ionization fraction across the core, finding a mean x{sub e,lim} {approx}> few x 10{sup -8}. Our results show that care must be taken when using deuterated species as a probe of the physical conditions of dense gas in star-forming regions.

  9. Sediment Core Sectioning and Extraction of Pore Waters under Anoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Keimowitz, Alison R; Zheng, Yan; Lee, Ming-Kuo; Natter, Michael; Keevan, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for sectioning sediment cores and extracting pore waters while maintaining oxygen-free conditions. A simple, inexpensive system is built and can be transported to a temporary work space close to field sampling site(s) to facilitate rapid analysis. Cores are extruded into a portable glove bag, where they are sectioned and each 1-3 cm thick section (depending on core diameter) is sealed into 50 ml centrifuge tubes. Pore waters are separated with centrifugation outside of the glove bag and then returned to the glove bag for separation from the sediment. These extracted pore water samples can be analyzed immediately. Immediate analyses of redox sensitive species, such as sulfide, iron speciation, and arsenic speciation indicate that oxidation of pore waters is minimal; some samples show approximately 100% of the reduced species, e.g. 100% Fe(II) with no detectable Fe(III). Both sediment and pore water samples can be preserved to maintain chemical species for further analysis upon return to the laboratory. PMID:27023267

  10. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period. 54.9801-3 Section 54.9801-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.9801-3 Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period....

  11. 77 FR 69785 - Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... Part 1002 Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions AGENCY: The Presidio... a public use limit on persons who are walking four or more dogs at one time in Area B of the Presidio of San Francisco (Presidio) for consideration (Commercial Dog Walkers). The limit will require...

  12. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Bose, A; Woo, K M; Betti, R; Campbell, E M; Mangino, D; Christopherson, A R; McCrory, R L; Nora, R; Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Sangster, T C; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Knauer, J P; Marshall, F J; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions. PMID:27575069

  13. First-principles calculations of properties of orthorhombic iron carbide Fe7C3 at the Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Zamaan; Shulumba, Nina; Caffrey, Nuala M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-06-01

    A recently discovered phase of orthorhombic iron carbide o-Fe7C3 [Prescher et al., Nat. Geosci. 8, 220 (2015), 10.1038/ngeo2370] is assessed as a potentially important phase for interpretation of the properties of the Earth's core. In this paper, we carry out first-principles calculations on o-Fe7C3 , finding properties to be in broad agreement with recent experiments, including a high Poisson's ratio (0.38). Our enthalpy calculations suggest that o-Fe7C3 is more stable than Eckstrom-Adcock hexagonal iron carbide (h-Fe7C3 ) below approximately 100 GPa. However, at 150 GPa, the two phases are essentially degenerate in terms of Gibbs free energy, and further increasing the pressure towards Earth's core conditions stabilizes h-Fe7C3 with respect to the orthorhombic phase. Increasing the temperature tends to stabilize the hexagonal phase at 360 GPa, but this trend may change beyond the limit of the quasiharmonic approximation.

  14. Extinction and Reinstatement of Phasic Dopamine Signals in the Nucleus Accumbens Core during Pavlovian Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Sunsay, Ceyhun; Rebec, George V.

    2014-01-01

    The prediction-error model of dopamine (DA) signaling has largely been confirmed with various appetitive Pavlovian conditioning procedures and has been supported in tests of Pavlovian extinction. Studies have repeatedly shown, however, that extinction does not erase the original memory of conditioning as the prediction-error model presumes, putting the model at odds with contemporary views that treat extinction as an episode of learning rather than unlearning of conditioning. Here, we combined fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) with appetitive Pavlovian conditioning to assess DA release directly during extinction and reinstatement. DA was monitored in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc), which plays a key role in reward processing. Following at least 4 daily sessions of 16 tone-food pairings, FSCV was performed while rats received additional tone-food pairings followed by tone alone presentations (i.e., extinction). Acquisition memory was reinstated with non-contingent presentations of reward and then tested with cue presentation. Tone-food pairings produced transient (1–3 s) DA release in response to tone. During extinction, the amplitude of the DA response decreased significantly. Following presentation of two non-contingent food pellets, subsequent tone presentation reinstated the DA signal. Our results support the prediction-error model for appetitive Pavlovian extinction but not for reinstatement. PMID:25111335

  15. Global shielding analysis for the three-element core advanced neutron source reactor under normal operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.; Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations were performed for a model of the three-element core Advanced Neutron Source reactor design under normal operating conditions. The core consists of two concentric upper elements and a lower element radially centered in the annulus between the upper elements. The initial radiation transport calculations were performed with the DORT two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code using the 39-neutron-group/44-gamma-ray-group ANSL-V cross-section library, an S{sub 6} quadrature, and a P{sub 1} Legendre polynomial expansion of the cross sections to determine the fission neutron source distribution in the core fuel elements. These calculations were limited to neutron groups only. The final radiation transport calculations, also performed with DORT using the 39-neutron-group/44-gamma-ray-group ANSL-V cross-section library, an S{sub l0} quadrature, and a P{sub 3} Legendre polynomial expansion of the cross sections, produced neutron and gamma-ray fluxes over the full extent of the geometry model. Responses (or activities) at various locations in the model were then obtained by folding the appropriate response functions with the fluxes at those locations. Some comparisons were made with VENTURE-calculated (diffusion theory) 20-group neutron fluxes that were summed into four broad groups. Tne results were in reasonably good agreement when the effects of photoneutrons were not included, thus verifying the physics model upon which the shielding model was based. Photoneutrons increased the fast-neutron flux levels deep within the D{sub 2}0 several orders of magnitude. Results are presented as tables of activity values for selected radial and axial traverses, plots of the radial and axial traverse data, and activity contours superimposed on the calculational geometry model.

  16. Preliminary scoping safety analyses of the limiting design basis protected accidents for the Fast Flux Test Facility tritium production core

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, F.J.

    1997-11-19

    The SAS4A/SASSYS-l computer code is used to perform a series of analyses for the limiting protected design basis transient events given a representative tritium and medical isotope production core design proposed for the Fast Flux Test Facility. The FFTF tritium and isotope production mission will require a different core loading which features higher enrichment fuel, tritium targets, and medical isotope production assemblies. Changes in several key core parameters, such as the Doppler coefficient and delayed neutron fraction will affect the transient response of the reactor. Both reactivity insertion and reduction of heat removal events were analyzed. The analysis methods and modeling assumptions are described. Results of the analyses and comparison against fuel pin performance criteria are presented to provide quantification that the plant protection system is adequate to maintain the necessary safety margins and assure cladding integrity.

  17. VLBI limits on the proper motion of the 'core' of the superluminal quasar 3C345

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartel, N.; Herring, T. A.; Ratner, M. I.; Shapiro, I. I.; Corey, B. E.

    1986-01-01

    VLBI (very-long-baseline interferometry) observations between 1971 and 1983 have been used to determine the positions of the 'core' of the quasar 3C345 relative to the more distant compact quasar NRAO512 with a fractional uncertainty as small as two parts in a hundred million. The core of 3C345 appears stationary in right ascension to within 20 arc microsec/yr, a subluminal bound corresponding to 0.7c. The apparent velocities of the jets are superluminal, up to 14c in magnitude.

  18. Partitioning of Phosphorus and Molybdenum between the Earth's Mantle and Core and the Conditions of Core Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuff, K. M.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Lee, C. T.

    2008-01-01

    There are several hypotheses on the specific processes that might have occurred during the formation of the Earth. One hypothesis that has been proposed is that early in the Earth's formation, there was a magma ocean present, and within this body, siderophile elements separated out of the silicate liquid to form the metal core. This study addresses this hypothesis. P and Mo are moderately siderophile elements that are present in both the mantle and the core. The concentrations of P and Mo in silicate vs. metal can be measured and in turn used to determine the temperatures, pressures, oxygen fugacity and melt composition required to achieve the same concentrations as observed in the mantle. The data here include eight experiments examining the partitioning of P and Mo between metallic liquid and silicate liquid. The purpose of the experiments has been to gain a greater understanding of core-mantle separation during the Earth formation process and examines temperature effect on P and Mo, which has not been systematically studied before.

  19. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin Zhang, Xiangyi; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ∼1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  20. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a

  1. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect. PMID:26933678

  2. Chronologies of marine sediment cores during the Last Interglacial: strengths and limitations of commonly used climato-stratigraphic alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govin, Aline; Capron, Emilie

    2015-04-01

    The Last Interglacial (LIG, ~129-116 thousand of years, ka) is relatively well documented in marine sediment cores retrieved across the globe. However, these records exhibit very few absolute age markers such as magnetic events and dated tephra layers, which limits the definition of independent and precise LIG age models. As a result, age models of marine sediments are defined using various methods based on the (i) synchronisation or (ii) climato-stratigraphic alignment of marine records to dated "reference" records, assuming simultaneous regional changes for a given climate variable (e.g. foraminiferal δ18O, temperature). The use of different "reference" chronologies (e.g. LR04, speleothem or ice core chronologies) also limits a precise investigation of climatic sequences across the LIG. Here, we evaluate the underlying hypotheses, strengths and limitations, and age uncertainties of methods commonly used in marine sediments during the LIG: i.e. benthic δ18O alignment to the LR04 benthic δ18O stack, temperature alignment to ice core or to speleothem records. We compare the resulting age models using examples from the North Atlantic core MD95-2042 and the Southern Ocean core MD02-2488. We show a lack of remarkable tie-points within the LIG, which limits the study of the sub-millennial-scale climate variability. We also report age offsets up to 4 ka when different reference chronologies (e.g. ice cores vs. speleothems) or different types of aligned records (e.g. SST vs. planktonic δ18O) are used. These results highlight the need for careful estimates of age uncertainties when defining age models in marine sediments. They also emphasize the fact that LIG chronologies should be considered with care. A clear statement on the reference chronology, the method of alignment and the type of tracers that are used should be given when investigating the LIG sequence of climatic events from various sediment cores or when comparing LIG marine records and climate model

  3. Elevated-Temperature Tests Under Static and Aerodynamic Conditions on Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Joseph M.; Johnson, Aldie E., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Stainless-steel honeycomb-core sandwich panels which differed primarily in skin thicknesses were tested at elevated temperatures under static and aerodynamic conditions. The results of these tests were evaluated to determine the insulating effectiveness and structural integrity of the panels. The static radiant-heating tests were performed in front of a quartz-tube radiant heater at panel skin temperatures up to 1,5000 F. The aerodynamic tests were made in a Mach 1.4 heated blowdown wind tunnel. The tunnel temperature was augmented by additional heat supplied by a radiant heater which raised the panel surface temperature above 8000 F during air flow. Static radiant-heating tests of 2 minutes duration showed that all the panels protected the load-carrying structure about equally well. Thin-skin panels showed an advantage for this short-time test over thick-skin panels from a standpoint of weight against insulation. Permanent inelastic strains in the form of local buckles over each cell of the honeycomb core caused an increase in surface roughness. During the aero- dynamic tests all of the panels survived with little or no damage, and panel flutter did not occur.

  4. Dynamical stability of body center cubic iron at the Earth’s core conditions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Johansson, Börje; Eriksson, Olle; Arapan, Sergiu; Souvatzis, Petros; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Here, using self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamical calculations that go beyond the quasiharmonic approximation, we show that the high-pressure high-temperature bcc-Fe phase is dynamically stable. In this treatment the temperature-dependent phonon spectra are derived by exciting all the lattice vibrations, in which the phonon–phonon interactions are considered. The high-pressure and high-temperature bcc-Fe phase shows standard bcc-type phonon dispersion curves except for the transverse branch, which is overdamped along the high symmetry direction Γ-N, at temperatures below 4,500 K. When lowering the temperature down to a critical value TC, the lattice instability of the bcc structure is reached. The pressure dependence of this critical temperature is studied at conditions relevant for the Earth’s core. PMID:20479276

  5. Real-Time Dopamine Efflux in the Nucleus Accumbens Core During Pavlovian Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Sunsay, Ceyhun; Rebec, George V.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the role of dopamine input to the nucleus accumbens core in anticipatory learning, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was combined with appetitive Pavlovian conditioning. One group of rats (Paired) received 16 tone-food pairings for at least four daily sessions while the control group (Unpaired) received the same number of unpaired tone and food presentations. Both groups showed transient dopamine responses during food presentation throughout training, confirming dopamine involvement in reward processing. Only the Paired Group, however, showed consistently timed dopamine transients during the 10-s tone presentation. Transients first appeared near the end of the tone period as each animal acquired the tone-food association and then occurred progressively sooner on subsequent sessions. Later sessions also revealed a consistently timed dopamine response soon after food delivery in Paired animals. Collectively, these results implicate phasic dopamine release in the acquisition of Pavlovian learning and also suggest an early dopamine response to the unconditioned stimulus as training continues. PMID:18410174

  6. On the body centered structure of iron at Earth Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Stixrude, L.; Verma, A.; Modak, P.; Godwal, B.

    2007-12-01

    The stability of the body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of iron is considered at Earth-core conditions (V = 7.2 Å3, T = 5500 K) by way of ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations and electronic-structure calculations using the density-functional approach. Tetragonal strain splits a peak in the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, lowering the energy of the structure with distortion and therefore documenting the metastability of the bcc structure. As temperature is increased from zero to 5500 K, the bcc structure satisfies the condition of hydrostaticity, with vanishing of stress anisotropy, but it remains energetically unstable with respect to the tetragonal distortion; an increase in elastic anisotropy is documented with increasing tetragonal strain. An energy minimum is observed around c/a = 0.9 in a Bain-path plot, and has previously been interpreted as evidence of an elastically-stable body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure. However, we find from static total-energy calculations as a function of b/a and c/a that this is a local minimum in energy corresponding to a metastable structure. Analysis of the structure with tetragonal strain reveals the presence of anomalous shear stresses that, coupled with phonon instability, suggest a tendency toward formation of a hexagonal closed-packed (hcp) structure. Overall, these results argue against bcc or even bct structures of Fe being present in Earth's core, and instead highlight the importance of the known hcp (ɛ) high-pressure phase of iron.

  7. Investigation of fatty acid accumulation in the engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae under nitrogen limited culture condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoling; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type strain and engineered strain with an overexpressed heterologous ATP-citrate lyase (acl) were cultured in medium with different carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and their fatty acid production levels were investigated. The results showed that when the S. cerevisiae engineered strain was cultivated under nitrogen limited culture condition, the yield of mono-unsaturated fatty acids showed higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition; with the carbon concentration increased, the accumulation become more apparent, whereas in the wild type strain, no such correlation was found. Besides, the citrate level in the S. cerevisiae under nitrogen limited condition was found to be much higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition, which indicated a relationship between the diminution of nitrogen and accumulation of citrate in the S. cerevisiae. The accumulated citrate could be further cleaved by acl to provide substrate for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24755317

  8. Effectiveness and limitations of core needle biopsy in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules: review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young; Moon, Hee Jung

    2015-05-01

    Fine needle aspiration (FNA) is currently accepted as an easy, safe, and reliable tool for the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. Nonetheless, a proportion of FNA samples are categorized into non-diagnostic or indeterminate cytology, which frustrates both the clinician and patient. To overcome this limitation of FNA, core needle biopsy (CNB) of the thyroid has been proposed as an additional diagnostic method for more accurate and decisive diagnosis for thyroid nodules of concern. In this review, we focus on the effectiveness and limitations of CNB, and what factors should be considered when CNB is utilized in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. PMID:26018514

  9. 76 FR 25648 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    .... These proposed special conditions pertain to their effects on the structural performance of the airplane... load imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are... structures be able to support limit loads without detrimental permanent deformation, meaning that...

  10. 78 FR 6273 - Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... proposed rule published November 21, 2012 (77 FR 69785-69788) is extended. Comments are due February 25... Part 1002 Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions AGENCY: The Presidio... requesting public comment on a proposed public use limit on persons who are walking four or more dogs at...

  11. Design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system to ensure limitation of core damage. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, N.A.; Atcheson, D.B.

    1981-09-01

    Safety-based functional requirements and design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) are derived in accordance with LOA-2 success criteria and reliability goals. The design basis transients have been defined and evaluated for the CDS Phase II design, which is a 2550 MWt mixed oxide heterogeneous core reactor. A partial set of reactor responses for selected transients is provided as a function of SASS characteristics such as reactivity worth, trip points, and insertion times.

  12. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology position stand: The use of instability to train the core in athletic and nonathletic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Behm, David G; Drinkwater, Eric J; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Cowley, Patrick M

    2010-02-01

    The use of instability devices and exercises to train the core musculature is an essential feature of many training centres and programs. It was the intent of this position stand to provide recommendations regarding the role of instability in resistance training programs designed to train the core musculature. The core is defined as the axial skeleton and all soft tissues with a proximal attachment originating on the axial skeleton, regardless of whether the soft tissue terminates on the axial or appendicular skeleton. Core stability can be achieved with a combination of muscle activation and intra-abdominal pressure. Abdominal bracing has been shown to be more effective than abdominal hollowing in optimizing spinal stability. When similar exercises are performed, core and limb muscle activation are reported to be higher under unstable conditions than under stable conditions. However, core muscle activation that is similar to or higher than that achieved in unstable conditions can also be achieved with ground-based free-weight exercises, such as Olympic lifts, squats, and dead lifts. Since the addition of unstable bases to resistance exercises can decrease force, power, velocity, and range of motion, they are not recommended as the primary training mode for athletic conditioning. However, the high muscle activation with the use of lower loads associated with instability resistance training suggests they can play an important role within a periodized training schedule, in rehabilitation programs, and for nonathletic individuals who prefer not to use ground-based free weights to achieve musculoskeletal health benefits. PMID:20130673

  13. 42 CFR 410.23 - Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.23 Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on... mellitus. (ii) Individual with a family history of glaucoma. (iii) African-Americans age 50 and over....

  14. 42 CFR 410.23 - Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.23 Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on... mellitus. (ii) Individual with a family history of glaucoma. (iii) African-Americans age 50 and over....

  15. 42 CFR 410.23 - Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.23 Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on... mellitus. (ii) Individual with a family history of glaucoma. (iii) African-Americans age 50 and over....

  16. 42 CFR 410.23 - Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.23 Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on... mellitus. (ii) Individual with a family history of glaucoma. (iii) African-Americans age 50 and over....

  17. 42 CFR 410.23 - Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.23 Screening for glaucoma: Conditions for and limitations on...) Hispanic-Americans age 65 and over. (3) Screening for glaucoma means the following procedures furnished...

  18. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  19. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  20. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  1. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  2. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  3. Conditional cooling limit for a quantum channel going through an incoherent environment

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Ivo; Miková, Martina; Mičuda, Michal; Dušek, Miloslav; Ježek, Miroslav; Filip, Radim

    2015-01-01

    We propose and experimentally verify a cooling limit for a quantum channel going through an incoherent environment. The environment consists of a large number of independent non-interacting and non-interfering elementary quantum systems – qubits. The qubits travelling through the channel can only be randomly replaced by environmental qubits. We investigate a conditional cooling limit that exploits an additional probing output. The limit specifies when the single-qubit channel is quantum, i.e. it preserves entanglement. It is a fundamental condition for entanglement-based quantum technology. PMID:26568362

  4. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  5. Measurement of a tree growth condition by the hetero-core optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Hoshito; Akita, Shohei; Nishiyama, Michiko; Kumekawa, Norikazu; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-04-01

    Condition and growth of trees are considered to be important in monitoring global circulation with heat and water, additionally growth of trees are affected by CO2 and air pollutants. On the other hand, since growth of plants is affected by surrounding climates, it is expected that real-time monitoring of crop plants growing makes possible quantitative agricultural management. This study proposed methods in measuring tree growth using hetero-core optical fiber sensors which are suitable for long-term, remote and real-time monitoring in wide area due to their features such as independence from temperature fluctuation and weather condition in addition to advantages of an optical fiber. Two types of sensors were used for that purpose. One of them was a dendrometer which measured radial changes of a tree stem and the other was elastic sensor which was to measure growth of smaller tree such as crop plant. In our experiment, it was demonstrated that the dendrometer was capable of measuring the differences of tree growing trend in period of different seasons such as growing rates 2.08 mm between spring and summer and 0.21 mm between autumn and winter, respectively. Additionally, this study had proposed the method of measuring crop plant growing by the elastic sensor because of its compact and light design and monotonious changes in optical loss to the amount of expansion and contraction.

  6. Atmospheric synoptic conditions of snow precipitation in East Antarctica using ice core and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarchilli, Claudio; Ciardini, Virginia; Bonazza, Mattia; Frezzotti, Massimo; Stenni, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the International Partnerships in Ice Core Sciences (IPCS) initiatives the GV7 site (70°41' S - 158°51' E) in East Antarctica was chosen as the new drilling site for the Italian contribution to the understanding of the climatic variability in the last 2000 years (IPICS 2k Array). Water stable isotopes and snow accumulation (SMB) values from a shallow firn core, obtained at GV7 during the 2001-2002 International Trans-Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE) traverse, are analyzed and compared with different meteorological model output in order to characterize the atmospheric synoptic conditions driving precipitation events at the site. On annual basis, ECMWF +24h forecasted snowfalls (SF) seem to well reproduce GV7 SMB values trend for the period from 1980 to 2005. Calculated air mass back-trajectories show that Eastern Indian - Western Pacific oceans represent the main moisture path toward the site during autumn - winter season. Analysis of the ECMWF 500 hPa Geopotential height field (GP500) anomalies shows that atmospheric blocking events developing between 130° E and 150° W at high latitudes drive the GV7 SMB by blocking zonal flow and conveying warm and moist deep air masses from ocean into the continental interior. On inter-annual basis, The SF variability over GV7 region follows the temporal oscillation of the third CEOF mode (CEOF3 10% of the total explained variance) of a combined complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) performed over GP500 and SF field. The CEOF3 highlights an oscillating feature, with wavenumber 2, in GP500 field over the Western Pacific-Eastern Indian Oceans and propagating westward. The pattern is deeply correlated with the Indian Dipole Oscillation and ENSO and their associated quasi-stationary Rossby waves propagating from the lower toward the higher latitudes.

  7. Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

  8. Optical harmonic generation in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres: analysis of optical losses and phase-matching conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, A N; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2002-02-28

    We consider hollow-core fibres with a microstructure photonic-crystal cladding, which open a unique opportunity of implementing nonlinear-optical interactions of waveguide modes with transverse sizes on the order of several microns in the gas phase. Phase-matching conditions for optical harmonic generation can be improved in higher waveguide modes of hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres by optimising parameters of the gas medium filling the fibre and characteristics of the fibre. (optical fibres)

  9. Reducing Conservatism in Aircraft Engine Response Using Conditionally Active Min-Max Limit Regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Current aircraft engine control logic uses a Min-Max control selection structure to prevent the engine from exceeding any safety or operational limits during transients due to throttle commands. This structure is inherently conservative and produces transient responses that are slower than necessary. In order to utilize the existing safety margins more effectively, a modification to this architecture is proposed, referred to as a Conditionally Active (CA) limit regulator. This concept uses the existing Min-Max architecture with the modification that limit regulators are active only when the operating point is close to a particular limit. This paper explores the use of CA limit regulators using a publicly available commercial aircraft engine simulation. The improvement in thrust response while maintaining all necessary safety limits is demonstrated in a number of cases.

  10. Sulfur Saturation Limits in Silicate Melts and their Implications for Core Formation Scenarios for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzheid, Astrid; Grove, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the controls of temperature, pressure, and silicate melt composition on S solubility in silicate liquids. The solubility of S in FeO-containing silicate melts in equilibrium with metal sulfide increases significantly with increasing temperature but decreases with increasing pressure. The silicate melt structure also exercises a control on S solubility. Increasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure lowers the S solubility in the silicate liquid. The new set of experimental data is used to expand the model of Mavrogenes and O'Neill(1999) for S solubility in silicate liquids by incorporating the influence of the silicate melt structure. The expected S solubility in the ascending magma is calculated using the expanded model. Because the negative pressure dependence of S solubility is more influential than the positive temperature dependence, decompression and adiabatic ascent of a formerly S-saturated silicate magma will lead to S undersaturation. A primitive magma that is S-saturated in its source region will, therefore, become S-undersaturated as it ascends to shallower depth. In order to precipitate magmatic sulfides, the magma must first cool and undergo fractional crystallization to reach S saturation. The S content in a metallic liquid that is in equilibrium with a magma ocean that contains approx. 200 ppm S (i.e., Earth's bulk mantle S content) ranges from 5.5 to 12 wt% S. This range of S values encompasses the amount of S (9 to 12 wt%) that would be present in the outer core if S is the light element. Thus, the Earth's proto-mantle could be in equilibrium (in terms of the preserved S abundance) with a core-forming metallic phase.

  11. Fate of MgSiO3 melts at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Malfait, Wim J; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Kupenko, Ilya; Hennet, Louis; Harries, Dennis; Dane, Thomas; Burghammer, Manfred; Rubie, Dave C

    2015-11-17

    One key for understanding the stratification in the deep mantle lies in the determination of the density and structure of matter at high pressures, as well as the density contrast between solid and liquid silicate phases. Indeed, the density contrast is the main control on the entrainment or settlement of matter and is of fundamental importance for understanding the past and present dynamic behavior of the deepest part of the Earth's mantle. Here, we adapted the X-ray absorption method to the small dimensions of the diamond anvil cell, enabling density measurements of amorphous materials to unprecedented conditions of pressure. Our density data for MgSiO3 glass up to 127 GPa are considerably higher than those previously derived from Brillouin spectroscopy but validate recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. A fourth-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reproduces our experimental data over the entire pressure regime of the mantle. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, the density of MgSiO3 glass is 5.48 ± 0.18 g/cm(3), which is only 1.6% lower than that of MgSiO3 bridgmanite at 5.57 g/cm(3), i.e., they are the same within the uncertainty. Taking into account the partitioning of iron into the melt, we conclude that melts are denser than the surrounding solid phases in the lowermost mantle and that melts will be trapped above the CMB. PMID:26578761

  12. Dependence of polarization mode dispersion of slotted core NZDF ribbon on cable design and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlik, Sait Eser; Yilmaz, Gunes

    2006-09-01

    Non-zero dispersion fiber (NZDF) ribbon cable has recently become a considerable alternative in long-haul high-speed network construction. Since long-distance high-bit rate transmission requires low polarization mode dispersion (PMD), it is very important to know the PMD performance of this type of optical fiber cables. In this paper, we report experimental analysis of effects of the cable design and environmental parameters, in particular ribbon thickness, positions of fibers in the ribbon, flexing and vibration, on PMD performances of several slotted-core fiber ribbon cables. Results show that ribbon thickness and positions of fibers in the ribbon alter the PMD values of NZDF ribbon cables. Also, 23% and 11% PMD variations have been determined in flexing and vibration experiments, respectively. Moreover, it has been observed that vibration amplitude has significant effects and vibration frequency has little effects (14% and 6% variations, respectively) on fiber PMD. Results are important for understanding effects of installation conditions and wind, especially for aerial fibers, on PMD values of cables.

  13. Microstructure evolution in proton-irradiated austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys under LWR core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian

    1999-11-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructure of austenitic stainless steel was investigated using proton irradiation. High-purity alloys of Fe-20Cr-9Ni (UHP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons at a dose rate of 7 × 10-6 dpa/s between 300°C and 600°C. The irradiation produced a microstructure consisting of dislocation loops and voids. The dose and temperature dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were investigated. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier hardening model. The dose and temperature dependence of microstructure and hardness change for proton irradiation follows the same trend as that for neutron irradiation at comparable irradiation conditions. Commercial purity alloys of CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 3.0 dpa. The irradiated microstructure consists of dislocation loops. No voids were detected at doses up to 3.0 dpa. Loop size distributions are in close agreement with that in the same alloys neutron-irradiated in a LWR core. The loop density also agrees with neutron irradiation data. The yield strength as a function of dose in proton irradiated commercial purity alloys is consistent with the neutron- data trend. A fast-reactor microstructure model was adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275°C, 7 × 10 -8 dpa/s) and then applied to proton irradiation under conditions (360°C, 7 × 10-6 dpa/s) relevant to LWRs. The original model was modified by including in-cascade interstitial clustering and the loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by cluster diffusion. It was demonstrated that loop nucleation for both LWR irradiation condition and proton irradiation are driven by in-cascade interstitial clustering. One important result from this modeling work is that the difference in displacement cascade between

  14. Electronic correlations in Fe at Earth's inner core conditions: Effects of alloying with Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilova, O. Yu.; Pourovskii, L. V.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Simak, S. I.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phases of Fe alloyed with 25 at.% of Ni at Earth's core conditions using an ab initio local density approximation + dynamical mean-field theory approach. The alloys have been modeled by ordered crystal structures based on the bcc, fcc, and hcp unit cells with the minimum possible cell size allowing for the proper composition. Our calculations demonstrate that the strength of electronic correlations on the Fe 3 d shell is highly sensitive to the phase and local environment. In the bcc phase, the 3 d electrons at the Fe site with Fe only nearest neighbors remain rather strongly correlated, even at extreme pressure-temperature conditions, with the local and uniform magnetic susceptibility exhibiting a Curie-Weiss-like temperature evolution and the quasiparticle lifetime Γ featuring a non-Fermi-liquid temperature dependence. In contrast, for the corresponding Fe site in the hcp phase, we predict a weakly correlated Fermi-liquid state with a temperature-independent local susceptibility and a quadratic temperature dependence of Γ. The iron sites with nickel atoms in the local environment exhibit behavior in the range between those two extreme cases, with the strength of correlations gradually increasing along the hcp-fcc-bcc sequence. Further, the intersite magnetic interactions in the bcc and hcp phases are also strongly affected by the presence of Ni nearest neighbors. The sensitivity to the local environment is related to modifications of the Fe partial density of states due to mixing with Ni 3 d states.

  15. A new 10Be record recovered from an Antarctic ice core: validity and limitations to record the solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Mélanie; Bard, Edouard; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides provide the only possibility to document solar activity over millennia. Carbon-14 (14C) and beryllium-10 (10Be) records are retrieved from tree rings and ice cores, respectively. Recently, 14C records have also proven to be reliable to detect two large Solar Proton Events (SPE) (Miyake et al., Nature, 2012, Miyake et al., Nat. Commun., 2013) that occurred in 774-775 A.D. and in 993-994 A.D.. The origin of these events is still under debate but it opens new perspectives for the interpretation of 10Be ice core records. We present a new 10Be record from an ice core from Dome C (Antarctica) covering the last millennium. The chronology of this new ice core has been established by matching volcanic events on the WAIS Divide ice core (WDC06A) that is the best dated record in Antarctica over the Holocene (Sigl et al., JGR, 2013, Sigl et al., Nat. Clim. Change, 2014). The five minima of solar activity (Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton) are detected and characterized by a 10Be concentration increase of ca. 20% above average in agreement with previous studies of ice cores drilled at South Pole and Dome Fuji in Antarctica (Bard et al., EPSL, 1997; Horiuchi et al., Quat. Geochrono., 2008) and at NGRIP and Dye3 in Greenland (Berggren et al., GRL, 2009). The high resolution, on the order of a year, allows the detection of the 11-year solar cycle. Sulfate concentration, a proxy for volcanic eruptions, has also been measured in the very same samples, allowing a precise comparison of both 10Be and sulfate profiles. We confirm the systematic relationship between stratospheric eruptions and 10Be concentration increases, first evidenced by observations of the stratospheric volcanic eruptions of Agung in 1963 and Pinatubo in 1991 (Baroni et al., GCA, 2011). This relationship is due to an increase in 10Be deposition linked to the role played by the sedimentation of volcanic aerosols. In the light of these new elements, we will discuss the limitations and

  16. Modelling reference conditions for the upper limit of Posidonia oceanica meadows: a morphodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, Matteo; Misson, Gloria; Montefalcone, Monica; Archetti, Renata; Nike Bianchi, Carlo; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The upper portion of the meadows of the protected Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica occurs in the region of the seafloor mostly affected by surf-related effects. Evaluation of its status is part of monitoring programs, but proper conclusions are difficult to draw due to the lack of definite reference conditions. Comparing the position of the meadow upper limit with the beach morphodynamics (i.e. the distinctive type of beach produced by topography and wave climate) provided evidence that the natural landwards extension of meadows can be predicted. Here we present an innovative predictive cartographic approach able to identify the seafloor portion where the meadow upper limit should naturally lies (i.e. its reference conditions). The conceptual framework of this model is based on 3 essential components: i) Definition of the breaking depth geometry: the breaking limit represents the major constrain for the landward meadow development. We modelled the breaking limit (1 year return time) using the software Mike 21 sw. ii) Definition of the morphodynamic domain of the beach using the surf scaling index ɛ; iii) Definition of the P. oceanica upper limit geometry. We coupled detailed aerial photo with thematic bionomic cartography. In GIS environment, we modelled the seafloor extent where the meadow should naturally lies according to the breaking limit position and the morphodynamic domain of the beach. Then, we added the GIS layer with the meadow upper limit geometry. Therefore, the final output shows, on the same map, both the reference condition and the actual location of the upper limit. It make possible to assess the status of the landward extent of a given P. oceanica meadow and quantify any suspected or observed regression caused by anthropic factors. The model was elaborated and validated along the Ligurian coastline (NW Mediteraanean) and was positively tested in other Mediterranean areas.

  17. 34 CFR 675.20 - Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Federal Work-Study Program § 675.20 Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment... used or to be used for religious worship or sectarian instruction; or (v) Include employment for the...

  18. 34 CFR 675.20 - Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Federal Work-Study Program § 675.20 Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment... used or to be used for religious worship or sectarian instruction; or (v) Include employment for the...

  19. 34 CFR 675.20 - Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Federal Work-Study Program § 675.20 Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment... used or to be used for religious worship or sectarian instruction; or (v) Include employment for the...

  20. 34 CFR 675.20 - Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Federal Work-Study Program § 675.20 Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment... used or to be used for religious worship or sectarian instruction; or (v) Include employment for the...

  1. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... FR 25648). One supportive comment was received and the special conditions are adopted as proposed... structural performance of the airplane. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or... imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are expected...

  2. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION...

  3. 34 CFR 675.20 - Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment. 675.20 Section 675.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Federal Work-Study Program § 675.20...

  4. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  5. Penman-Monteith Evapotranspiration under Soil Moisture Limiting Conditions across California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, A. J.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions soil moisture often limits the flux of water to meet the atmospheric evapotranspiration (ET) demand. Potentially drier conditions and more variable precipitation and snow in California create a need to better understand how this reservoir limits ET across the state. The upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission's surface and root zone soil moisture data will provide additional information to force observation based ET models at spatial scales ranging from 3-36 km2. To support application of SMAP data to ET modeling we investigate the role of soil moisture within the Penman-Monteith representation at FLUXNET and agricultural sites across California. We present findings on actual ET under soil moisture limiting conditions that do not violate assumptions within this modeling framework.

  6. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ofenheimer, Aldo; Buchmayr, Bruno; Kolleck, Ralf

    2005-08-05

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  7. Microhabitat Conditions in Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Effects on Nest Site Selection and Success.

    PubMed

    Dinkins, Jonathan B; Smith, Kurt T; Beck, Jeffrey L; Kirol, Christopher P; Pratt, Aaron C; Conover, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify microhabitat characteristics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nest site selection and survival to determine the quality of sage-grouse habitat in 5 regions of central and southwest Wyoming associated with Wyoming's Core Area Policy. Wyoming's Core Area Policy was enacted in 2008 to reduce human disturbance near the greatest densities of sage-grouse. Our analyses aimed to assess sage-grouse nest selection and success at multiple micro-spatial scales. We obtained microhabitat data from 928 sage-grouse nest locations and 819 random microhabitat locations from 2008-2014. Nest success was estimated from 924 nests with survival data. Sage-grouse selected nests with greater sagebrush cover and height, visual obstruction, and number of small gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥0.5 m and <1.0 m), while selecting for less bare ground and rock. With the exception of more small gaps between shrubs, we did not find any differences in availability of these microhabitat characteristics between locations within and outside of Core Areas. In addition, we found little supporting evidence that sage-grouse were selecting different nest sites in Core Areas relative to areas outside of Core. The Kaplan-Meier nest success estimate for a 27-day incubation period was 42.0% (95% CI: 38.4-45.9%). Risk of nest failure was negatively associated with greater rock and more medium-sized gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥2.0 m and <3.0 m). Within our study areas, Wyoming's Core Areas did not have differing microhabitat quality compared to outside of Core Areas. The close proximity of our locations within and outside of Core Areas likely explained our lack of finding differences in microhabitat quality among locations within these landscapes. However, the Core Area Policy is most likely to conserve high quality habitat at larger spatial scales, which over decades may have cascading effects on microhabitat quality available between areas within

  8. Computing cellular automata spectra under fixed boundary conditions via limit graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruivo, Eurico L. P.; de Oliveira, Pedro P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata are fully discrete complex systems with parallel and homogeneous behavior studied both from the theoretical and modeling viewpoints. The limit behaviors of such systems are of particular interest, as they give insight into their emerging properties. One possible approach to investigate such limit behaviors is the analysis of the growth of graphs describing the finite time behavior of a rule in order to infer its limit behavior. Another possibility is to study the Fourier spectrum describing the average limit configurations obtained by a rule. While the former approach gives the characterization of the limit configurations of a rule, the latter yields a qualitative and quantitative characterisation of how often particular blocks of states are present in these limit configurations. Since both approaches are closely related, it is tempting to use one to obtain information about the other. Here, limit graphs are automatically adjusted by configurations directly generated by their respective rules, and use the graphs to compute the spectra of their rules. We rely on a set of elementary cellular automata rules, on lattices with fixed boundary condition, and show that our approach is a more reliable alternative to a previously described method from the literature.

  9. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  10. An adaptive confidence limit for periodic non-steady conditions fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianzhen; Wu, Hao; Ni, Mengqi; Zhang, Milu; Dong, Jingjing; Benbouzid, Mohamed El Hachemi; Hu, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    System monitoring has become a major concern in batch process due to the fact that failure rate in non-steady conditions is much higher than in steady ones. A series of approaches based on PCA have already solved problems such as data dimensionality reduction, multivariable decorrelation, and processing non-changing signal. However, if the data follows non-Gaussian distribution or the variables contain some signal changes, the above approaches are not applicable. To deal with these concerns and to enhance performance in multiperiod data processing, this paper proposes a fault detection method using adaptive confidence limit (ACL) in periodic non-steady conditions. The proposed ACL method achieves four main enhancements: Longitudinal-Standardization could convert non-Gaussian sampling data to Gaussian ones; the multiperiod PCA algorithm could reduce dimensionality, remove correlation, and improve the monitoring accuracy; the adaptive confidence limit could detect faults under non-steady conditions; the fault sections determination procedure could select the appropriate parameter of the adaptive confidence limit. The achieved result analysis clearly shows that the proposed ACL method is superior to other fault detection approaches under periodic non-steady conditions.

  11. Strong premelting effect in the elastic properties of hcp-Fe under inner-core conditions.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Benjamí; Vocadlo, Lidunka; Brodholt, John; Wood, Ian G

    2013-10-25

    The observed shear-wave velocity VS in Earth's core is much lower than expected from mineralogical models derived from both calculations and experiments. A number of explanations have been proposed, but none sufficiently explain the seismological observations. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we obtained the elastic properties of hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) at 360 gigapascals up to its melting temperature Tm. We found that Fe shows a strong nonlinear shear weakening just before melting (when T/Tm > 0.96), with a corresponding reduction in VS. Because temperatures range from T/Tm = 1 at the inner-outer core boundary to T/Tm ≈ 0.99 at the center, this strong nonlinear effect on VS should occur in the inner core, providing a compelling explanation for the low VS observed. PMID:24114785

  12. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  13. A water use and growth model for Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, I.R.

    1992-12-31

    To investigate the environmental impact of plantation forestry using fast-growing tree species in southern India, a program of field studies was initiated in 1987 specifically to measure the water use, nutrient uptake and growth rates of the plantations. A water use and growth (WAG) model is proposed for calculating transpiration and growth of Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions. The model is based on the measured relationships between transpiration rate and basal cross-sectional area and soil moisture availability. The volume growth rate (in water-limited conditions) is assumed to be proportional to the volume of water transpired. The model is calibrated using (deuterium tracing) measurements of transpiration and measurements of growth recorded at the Puradal experimental plantation, Karnataka, southern India.

  14. Role of microRNAs involved in plant response to nitrogen and phosphorous limiting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Giao N.; Rothstein, Steven J.; Spangenberg, German; Kant, Surya

    2015-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs which target and regulate the expression of genes involved in several growth, development, and metabolism processes. Recent researches have shown involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of uptake and utilization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and more importantly for plant adaptation to N and P limitation conditions by modifications in plant growth, phenology, and architecture and production of secondary metabolites. Developing strategies that allow for the higher efficiency of using both N and P fertilizers in crop production is important for economic and environmental benefits. Improved crop varieties with better adaptation to N and P limiting conditions could be a key approach to achieve this effectively. Furthermore, understanding on the interactions between N and P uptake and use and their regulation is important for the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in plants. This review describes the possible functions of different miRNAs and their cross-talk relevant to the plant adaptive responses to N and P limiting conditions. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of these processes at molecular level and importance of biological adaptation for improved N and P use efficiency is discussed. PMID:26322069

  15. Resonant condition for storage ring short wavelength FEL with power exceeding Renieri limit

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Wu, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of operating a storage ring FEL with resonant conditions providing for preservation of electron beam structure on an optical wave scale. We suggest tuning the storage ring betatron and synchrotron tunes on one of the high (N-th) order resonances to compensate dynamic diffusion of optical phase. This mode of operation does not require isochronicity of the ring lattice. In these conditions optical phase will be restored after N turns around the ring and stochastic conditions used in the derivation of Renieri limit are no longer applicable. We discuss the influence of high order terms in electron motion, RF frequency stability, and synchrotron radiation effects on preservation of optical phase.

  16. Direct laser-driven ramp compression studies of iron: A first step toward the reproduction of planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Guyot, F.; Mazevet, S.; Morard, G.; de Resseguier, T.; Vinci, T.; Myanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Boehly, T.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Koenig, M.

    2013-06-01

    The study of iron under quasi-isentropic compression using high energy lasers, might allow to understand its thermodynamical properties, in particular its melting line in conditions of pressure and temperature relevant to Earth-like planetary cores (330-1500 GPa, 5000-8000 K). However, the iron alpha-epsilon solid-solid phase transition at 13 GPa favors shock formation during the quasi-isentropic compression process which can depart from the appropriate thermodynamical path. Understanding this shock formation mechanism is a key issue for being able to reproduce Earth-like planetary core conditions in the laboratory by ramp compression. In this article, we will present recent results of direct laser-driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments on iron samples obtained on the LULI 2000 and LIL laser facilities.

  17. Prevalence of 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' type II under phosphate limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Welles, L; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Hooijmans, C M; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Brdjanovic, D

    2016-12-01

    P-limitation in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems fed with acetate, has generally been considered as a condition leading to enrichment of organisms of the genotype' Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis' expressing the glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO) phenotype. Recent studies have demonstrated in short-term experiments that organisms of the genotype 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' clade I and II, known to express the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) phenotype can switch to the GAO phenotype when poly-P is absent, but are performing the HAc-uptake at lower kinetic rates, where clade I showed the lowest rates. The objective of this study was to verify whether organisms of the genotype 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' can also be enriched under P-limiting conditions while expressing a GAO phenotype and more specifically to see which specific clade prevails. A sequencing batch reactor was inoculated with activated sludge to enrich an EBPR culture for a cultivation period of 128 days (16 times the solids retention time) under P-limiting conditions. A mixed culture was obtained comprising of 49 % 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' clade II and 46 % 'Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis'. The culture performed a full GAO metabolism for anaerobic HAc-uptake, but was still able to switch to a PAO metabolism, taking up excessive amounts of phosphate during the aerobic phase when it became available in the influent. These findings show that P-limitation, often used as strategy for enrichment of 'Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis', does not always lead to enrichment of only 'Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis'. Furthermore, it demonstrates that 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' are able to proliferate in activated sludge systems for periods of up to 128 days or longer when the influent phosphate concentrations are just enough for assimilation purposes and no poly-P is formed. The 'Candidatus Accumulibacter

  18. Analysis and Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter in Ice Cores as Indicators of Past Environmental Conditions Using High Resolution FTICR-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Grannas, A. M.; Willoughby, A. S.; Catanzano, V.; Hatcher, P.

    2015-12-01

    With rapid changes in global temperatures, research aimed at better understanding past climatic events in order to predict future trends is an area of growing importance. Carbonaceous gases stored in ice cores are known to correlate with temperature change and provide evidence of such events. However, more complex forms of carbon preserved in ice cores such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) can provide additional information relating to changes in environmental conditions over time. The examination of ice core samples presents unique challenges including detection of ultra-low concentrations of organic material and extremely limited sample amounts. In this study, solid phase extraction techniques combined with ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FTICR-MS) were utilized to successfully extract, concentrate and analyze the low concentrations of DOM in only 100 mL of ice core samples originating from various regions of Antarctica and Greenland. We characterize the DOM composition in each sample by evaluating elemental ratios, molecular formula distribution (CHO, CHON, CHOS and CHNOS) and compound class composition (lignin, tannin, lipid, condensed aromatic, protein and unsaturated hydrocarbon content). Upon characterization, we identified molecular trends in ice core DOM chemistry that correlated with past climatic events in addition to observing possible photochemical and microbial influences affecting DOM chemistry. Considering these samples range in age from 350-1175 years old, thus being formed during the Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age, we observed that DOM properties reflected anticipated changes in composition as influenced by warming and cooling events occurring during that time period.

  19. The reef-building coral Acropora conditionally hybridize under sperm limitation.

    PubMed

    Kitanobo, Seiya; Isomura, Naoko; Fukami, Hironobu; Iwao, Kenji; Morita, Masaya

    2016-08-01

    Multi-specific synchronous spawning risks both sperm limitation, which reduces fertilization success, and hybridization with other species. If available sperm of conspecifics are limited, hybridization with heterospecific sperm could be an alternative. Some species of the reef-building coral Acropora produce hybrid offspring in vitro, and therefore hybridization between such species does sometimes occur in nature. Here, we report that the interbreeding species Acropora florida and A. intermedia preferentially bred with conspecifics at optimal gamete concentrations (10(6) cells ml(-1)), but when sperm concentration was low (10(4) cells ml(-1)), A florida eggs displayed an increased incidence of fertilization by sperm of A intermedia However, A intermedia eggs never crossed with heterospecific sperm, regardless of gamete concentrations. It appears that A florida eggs conditionally hybridize with heterospecific sperm; in nature, this would allow A florida to cross with later-spawning species such as A intermedia These results indicate that hybridization between some Acropora species could occur in nature according to the number of available sperm, and the choice of heterospecific sperm for fertilization could be one of the fertilization strategies in the sperm-limited condition. PMID:27555653

  20. Carbon Solution in Core-Forming Magma Ocean Conditions: Implications for the Origin and Distribution of Terrestrial Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Chi, H.; Walker, D.; Shimizu, N.; Buono, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    The origin of bulk silicate Earth carbon inventory is poorly known and the fate of the element during the early Earth differentiation and core formation is a missing link in the evolution of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here we present high pressure-temperature experiments that simulate metal-silicate equilibria in a shallow magma ocean. Experiments were performed at 1-5 GPa, 1600-2100 °C on mixtures of synthetic or natural silicates (tholeiitic basalt/ alkali basalt/ komatiite/ fertile peridotite) and Fe-Ni-C±Co±S contained in graphite or MgO capsules. All the experiments produced immiscible Fe-rich metallic and silicate melts at oxygen fugacity (fO2) between ~IW-1.5 and IW-1.9. Carbon and hydrogen concentrations of basaltic glasses and non-glassy quenched silicate melts were determined using secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) and speciation of dissolved C-O-H volatiles in silicate glasses was constrained using Raman spectroscopy. Carbon contents of metallic melts were determined using both electron microprobe and SIMS. Our experiments indicate that at core-forming, reduced conditions, carbon in mafic-ultramafic magmas dissolves primarily as various hydrogenated species and the total carbon storage capacity, although is significantly higher than solubility of CO2 under similar conditions, remains low (<500 ppm). The total carbon content in our reduced melts at graphite saturation increases with increasing melt depolymerization (NBO/T), consistent with recent spectroscopic studies [1], and modestly with increasing hydration. Carbon behaves as a metal loving element during core-mantle separation and metal/silicate carbon partition coefficient, DC varies between ~3500 and ≥150 and increases with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature and melt NBO/T. Extrapolation of our data to the plausible conditions of core-mantle equilibration suggest that if only a trace amount of carbon (~730 ppm C; [2]) was available during early Earth

  1. Exploring the limits and utility of operant conditioning in the treatment of drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a research program to develop an operant treatment for cocaine addiction in low-income, treatment-resistant methadone patients. The treatment's central feature is an abstinence reinforcement contingency in which patients earn monetary reinforcement for providing cocaine-free urine samples. Success and failure of this contingency appear to be an orderly function of familiar parameters of operant conditioning. Increasing reinforcement magnitude and duration can increase effectiveness, and sustaining the contingency can prevent relapse. Initial development of a potentially practical application of this technology suggests that it may be possible to integrate abstinence reinforcement into employment settings using salary for work to reinforce drug abstinence. This research illustrates the potential utility and current limitations of an operant approach to the treatment of drug addiction. Similar research programs are needed to explore the limits of the operant approach and to develop practical applications that can be used widely in society for the treatment of drug addiction. PMID:22478430

  2. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  3. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey I; Voll, Lars B; Psakhie, Sergey G; Popov, Valentin L

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting ("periodic rolling"). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  4. The Agony of Choice: How Plants Balance Growth and Survival under Water-Limiting Conditions1

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Hannes; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    When confronted with water limitation, plants actively reprogram their metabolism and growth. Recently, it has become clear that growing tissues show specific and highly dynamic responses to drought, which differ from the well-studied responses in mature tissues. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in understanding shoot growth regulation in water-limiting conditions. Of special interest is the balance between maintained growth and competitiveness on the one hand and ensured survival on the other hand. A number of master regulators controlling this balance have been identified, such as DELLAs and APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR-type transcription factors. The possibilities of engineering or breeding crops that maintain growth in periods of mild drought, while still being able to activate protective tolerance mechanisms, are discussed. PMID:23766368

  5. Calcification and photosynthesis of the coral acropora cervicornis under calcium limited conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathfon, Megan; Brewer, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    Differing hypothesis about the function of calcification are based on an interesting dilemma. Is the purpose of calcification mainly a structural and protective one or does calcification serve other functions? Does photosynthesis increase carbonate ion activity and cause calcification or does calcification increase CO2 levels and stimulate photsynthesis? It is proposed that calcification in corals is not dependent upon photosynthesis but upon calcium levels in the water. Under normal ocean conditions, corals convert a certain percentage of energy to photosynthesis and respiration and another percentage to calcification. As corals become nutrient stressed, particularly calcium limited, the ratio of photosynthesis to calcification shifts towards calcification in order to generate protons. The protons generated during calcification may stimulate photosynthesis and aid in the uptake of nutrients and biocarbonates. The results of the calcification experiment show a trend towards increased calcification and decreased photosynthesis when the coral Acropora cervicornis is calcium limited, but the data are inconclusive and further research is needed.

  6. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-03-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear.

  7. A necessary condition for applying MUSIC algorithm in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taehoon; Park, Won-Kwang

    2015-09-01

    Throughout various results of numerical simulations, it is well-known that MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm can be applied in the limited-view inverse scattering problems. However, the application is somehow heuristic. In this contribution, we identify a necessary condition of MUSIC for imaging of collection of small, perfectly conducting cracks. This is based on the fact that MUSIC imaging functional can be represented as an infinite series of Bessel function of integer order of the first kind. Numerical experiments from noisy synthetic data supports our investigation.

  8. Pedestrian evacuation in view and hearing limited condition: The impact of communication and memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuqi; Jia, Bin; Jiang, Rui; Shan, Jingjing

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies pedestrian evacuation in view and hearing limited condition based on the social force approach. It is assumed that there are two types of pedestrians: Informed individuals know the exit location whereas uninformed individuals do not. The uninformed individuals can communicate with the informed ones within their perceptual fields, thus learning to know and memorize the exit location. We consider cases with and without communication/memory. The simulations show communication and memory are able to enhance the evacuation efficiency. We also investigate the impact of communication on the efficiency of an emergency exit.

  9. Surface potential and permeability of rock cores under asphaltenic oil flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkafeef, S.F.; Gochin, R.J.; Smith, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    The surface properties, wetting behaviour and permeability of rock samples are central to understanding recovery behaviour in oil reservoirs. This paper will present a method new to petroleum engineering to show how area/length ratios for porous systems can be obtained by combining streaming potential and streaming current measurements on rock cores. This has allows streaming current measurements (independent of surface conductivity errors) to be made on rock samples using hydrocarbon solvents with increasing concentrations of asphaltene. Negative surface potentials for the rock became steadily more positive as asphaltene coated the pore surfaces, with permeability reduction agreeing well with petrographic analysis.

  10. A vegetation sensitivity approximation for gross primary production in water limited conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claesson, Jonas; Nycander, Jonas

    2013-04-01

    The most severe impact of climate change on vegetation growth and agriculture is likely to occur under water-limited conditions. Under such conditions the plants optimize the inward flux of CO2 and the outward flux of water vapor (the transpiration) by regulating the size of the stomata openings. Higher temperature increases water loss through transpiration, forcing the plants to diminish the stomata openings, which decreases photosynthesis. This is counteracted by higher CO2 concentration, which allows plants to maintain the inward flux of CO2 through the smaller openings. These two counteracting effects, combined with the change in precipitation, determine the net change of biological productivity in a changed climate. Here, a vegetation sensitivity approximation (VSA) is introduced, in order to understand and estimate the combined effect of changed temperature, CO2-concentration and precipitation on gross primary production (GPP) to first order. According to the VSA, we have: ( ) ?CO2atm ν GP P = ?0 P Here ?CO2atm is the atmospheric CO2 concentration, ?0 is the baseline for atmospheric CO2 concentration, P is precipitation and ν is defined by: -s- ν = 1 - 11°C where s is the climate sensitivity i.e. the increase in temperature when atmospheric CO2 is doubled. The VSA is based on the physical laws of gas flux through the stomata openings, and is only valid under water-limited conditions. It assumes that the temperature depends logarithmically on the CO2 concentration with a given climate sensitivity. Transpiration is assumed to be a constant fraction of precipitation, which is reasonable under water-limited conditions. The VSA is compared to simulations with the dynamic vegetation model LPJ. The agreement is reasonable, and the deviations can be understood by comparison with Köppen's definition of arid climate: in an arid climate growth increases more according to LPJ than according to the VSA, and in non-arid conditions the reverse is true. Both the VSA and

  11. The Extracellular Matrix Protein Brevican Limits Time-Dependent Enhancement of Cocaine Conditioned Place Preference.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, Bart R; Matos, Mariana R; Horn, Annemarie; Visser, Esther; Van der Loo, Rolinka C; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; Meerhoff, Gideon F; Frischknecht, Renato; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Smit, August B; Spijker, Sabine; van den Oever, Michel C

    2016-06-01

    Cocaine-associated environmental cues sustain relapse vulnerability by reactivating long-lasting memories of cocaine reward. During periods of abstinence, responding to cocaine cues can time-dependently intensify a phenomenon referred to as 'incubation of cocaine craving'. Here, we investigated the role of the extracellular matrix protein brevican in recent (1 day after training) and remote (3 weeks after training) expression of cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP). Wild-type and Brevican heterozygous knock-out mice, which express brevican at ~50% of wild-type levels, received three cocaine-context pairings using a relatively low dose of cocaine (5 mg/kg). In a drug-free CPP test, heterozygous mice showed enhanced preference for the cocaine-associated context at the remote time point compared with the recent time point. This progressive increase was not observed in wild-type mice and it did not generalize to contextual-fear memory. Virally mediated overexpression of brevican levels in the hippocampus, but not medial prefrontal cortex, of heterozygous mice prevented the progressive increase in cocaine CPP, but only when overexpression was induced before conditioning. Post-conditioning overexpression of brevican did not affect remote cocaine CPP, suggesting that brevican limited the increase in remote CPP by altering neuro-adaptive mechanisms during cocaine conditioning. We provide causal evidence that hippocampal brevican levels control time-dependent enhancement of cocaine CPP during abstinence, pointing to a novel substrate that regulates incubation of responding to cocaine-associated cues. PMID:26711251

  12. Prospects and limitations of digital Shearography and Active Thermography in finding and rating flaws in CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, J.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2012-05-01

    This work shows the prospects and limitations of the non-destructive testing methods Digital Shearography and Active Thermography when applied to CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb cores. Two specimens with different core materials (aluminum, NOMEX) and artificial flaws such as delaminations, disbonds and inclusions of foreign material, are tested with Digital Shearography and Pulse Thermography including Pulse Phase Thermography. Both methods provide a good ability for finding and rating the flaws.

  13. Contributions from geomagnetic inverse theory to the study of hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1991-01-01

    The Final Report on contributions from geomagnetic inverse theory to the study of hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is presented. The original proposal was to study five questions concerning what the surface and satellite magnetic data imply about hydromagnetic and electromagnetic conditions near the CMB. The five questions are: (1) what do the surface and satellite data imply about the geomagnetic field B near the surface of the earth; (2) how does one extrapolate B down through the conducting mantle to the CMB; (3) if B on the CMB is visible, how accurately does it satisfy the frozen-flux approximation; (4) if frozen flux is a good approximation on the CMB, what can be inferred about the fluid velocity v in the upper core; and (5) if v at the CMB is visible, does it suggest any dynamical properties of the core, such as vertical advection, Alfven-inertial waves, link instabilities, or mantle effects. A summary of the research is provided.

  14. Characterization of direct-drive-implosion core conditions on OMEGA with time-resolved Ar K-shell spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Haynes, D. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; Hooper, C. F.

    2002-04-01

    Direct-drive-implosion core conditions have been characterized on the 60-beam OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser system with time-resolved Ar K-shell spectroscopy. Plastic shells with an Ar-doped deuterium fill gas were driven with a 23 kJ, 1 ns square laser pulse smoothed with 1 THz smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) using birefringent wedges. The targets are predicted to have a convergence ratio of ˜15. The emissivity-averaged core electron temperature (Te) and density (ne) were inferred from the measured time-dependent Ar K-shell spectral line shapes. As the imploding shell decelerates the observed Te and ne increase to 2.0 (±0.2) keV and 2.5 (±0.5)×1024cm-3 at peak neutron production, which is assumed to occur at the time of the peak emissivity-averaged Te. At peak compression the ne increases to 3.1 (±0.6)×1024cm-3 and the Te decreases to 1.7 (±0.17) keV. The observed core conditions are close to those predicted by a one-dimensional hydrodynamics code.

  15. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important. PMID:25631449

  16. In-situ Density and Thermal Expansion Measurements of Fe and Fe-S Alloying Liquids Under Planetary Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Chantel, J.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid iron is likely the dominant constituent in the cores of terrestrial planets and icy satellites such as Earth, Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Ganymede, and Io. Suggested by geophysical and geochemical observations, light elements such as S, C, Si, etc., are likely present in planetary cores. These light elements can significantly reduce the density and melting temperature of the Fe cores, and hence their abundances are crucial to our understanding of the structure and thermal history of planetary cores, as well as the generation of intrinsic magnetic fields. Knowledge on the density of Fe-light element alloying liquids at high pressures is critical to place constraints on the composition of planetary cores. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited in pressure and composition and are sometimes controversial. In this study, we extend the density dataset for Fe-rich liquids by measuring the density of Fe, Fe-10wt%S, Fe-20wt%S, Fe-27wt%S, and FeS liquids using the X-ray absorption technique in a DIA-type multianvil apparatus up to 7 GPa and 2173 K. An ion chamber (1D-detector) and a CCD camera (2D-detector) were used to measure intensities of transmitted monochromatic X-rays through molten samples, with the photon energy optimized at 40 keV. The densities were then determined from the Beer-Lambert law using the mass absorption coefficients, calibrated by solid standards using X-ray diffraction. At each pressure, density measurements were conducted at a range of temperatures above the liquidus of the samples, enabling the determination of thermal expansion. Combined with our previous results on the sound velocity of Fe and Fe-S liquids at high pressures (Jing et al., 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 396, 78-87), these data provide tight constraints on the equation of state and thermodynamic properties such as the adiabatic temperature gradient for Fe-S liquids. We will discuss these results with implications to planetary

  17. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties. PMID:25560266

  18. Conditions for shock revival by neutrino heating in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H.-Th.

    2001-03-01

    Energy deposition by neutrinos can rejuvenate the stalled bounce shock and can provide the energy for the supernova explosion of a massive star. This neutrino-heating mechanism, though investigated by numerical simulations and analytic studies, is not finally accepted or proven as the trigger of the explosion. Part of the problem is that different groups have obtained seemingly discrepant results, and the complexity of the hydrodynamic models often hampers a clear and simple interpretation of the results. This demands a deeper theoretical understanding of the requirements of a successful shock revival. A toy model is developed here for discussing the neutrino heating phase analytically. The neutron star atmosphere between the neutrinosphere and the supernova shock can well be considered to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a layer of net neutrino cooling below the gain radius and a layer of net neutrino heating above. Since the mass infall rate to the shock is in general different from the rate at which gas is advected into the neutron star, the mass in the gain layer varies with time. Moreover, the gain layer receives additional energy input by neutrinos emitted from the neutrinosphere and the cooling layer. Therefore the determination of the shock evolution requires a time-dependent treatment. To this end the hydrodynamical equations of continuity and energy are integrated over the volume of the gain layer to obtain conservation laws for the total mass and energy in this layer. The radius and velocity of the supernova shock can then be calculated from global properties of the gain layer as solutions of an initial value problem, which expresses the fact that the behavior of the shock is controlled by the cumulative effects of neutrino heating and mass accumulation in the gain layer. The described toy model produces steady-state accretion and mass outflow from the nascent neutron star as special cases. The approach is useful to illuminate the conditions that can

  19. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  20. Physiological characterization of xylose metabolism in Aspergillus niger under oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Meijer, S; Panagiotou, G; Olsson, L; Nielsen, J

    2007-10-01

    The physiology of Aspergillus niger was studied under different aeration conditions. Five different aeration rates were investigated in batch cultivations of A. niger grown on xylose. Biomass, intra- and extra-cellular metabolites profiles were determined and ten different enzyme activities in the central carbon metabolism were assessed. The focus was on organic acid production with a special interest in succinate production. The fermentations revealed that oxygen limitation significantly changes the physiology of the micro-organism. Changes in extra cellular metabolite profiles were observed, that is, there was a drastic increase in polyol production (erythritol, xylitol, glycerol, arabitol, and mannitol) and to a lesser extent in the production of reduced acids (malate and succinate). The intracellular metabolite profiles indicated changes in fluxes, since several primary metabolites, like the intermediates of the TCA cycle accumulated during oxygen limitation (on average three fold increase). Also the enzyme activities showed changes between the exponential growth phase and the oxygen limitation phase. In general, the oxygen availability has a significant impact on the physiology of this fungus causing dramatic alterations in the central carbon metabolism that should be taken into account in the design of A. niger as a succinate cell factory. PMID:17335061

  1. Deconvolution and IVIVC: Exploring the Role of Rate-Limiting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Margolskee, Alison; Darwich, Adam S; Galetin, Aleksandra; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Aarons, Leon

    2016-03-01

    In vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVCs) play an important role in formulation development and drug approval. At the heart of IVIVC is deconvolution, the method of deriving an in vivo "dissolution profile" for comparison with in vitro dissolution data. IVIVCs are generally believed to be possible for highly permeable and highly soluble compounds with release/dissolution as the rate-limiting step. In this manuscript, we apply the traditional deconvolution methods, Wagner-Nelson and numerical deconvolution, to profiles simulated using a simplified small intestine absorption and transit model. Small intestinal transit, dissolution, and absorption rate constants are varied across a range of values approximately covering those observed in the literature. IVIVC plots and their corresponding correlation coefficients are analyzed for each combination of parameters to determine the applicability of the deconvolution methods under a range of rate-limiting conditions. For highly absorbed formulations, the correlation coefficients obtained during IVIVC are comparable for both methods and steadily decline with decreasing dissolution rate and increasing transit rate. The applicability of numerical deconvolution to IVIVC is not greatly affected by absorption rate, whereas the applicability of Wagner-Nelson falls when dissolution rate overcomes absorption rate and absorption becomes the rate-limiting step. The discrepancy between the expected and deconvolved input arises from the violation of a key assumption of deconvolution that the unknown input and unit impulse enter the system in the same location. PMID:26667356

  2. Oceanographic Conditions Limit the Spread of a Marine Invader along Southern African Shores

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Katy R.; Zardi, Gerardo I.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Serrão, Ester A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species can affect the function and structure of natural ecological communities, hence understanding and predicting their potential for spreading is a major ecological challenge. Once established in a new region, the spread of invasive species is largely controlled by their dispersal capacity, local environmental conditions and species interactions. The mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is native to the Mediterranean and is the most successful marine invader in southern Africa. Its distribution there has expanded rapidly and extensively since the 1970s, however, over the last decade its spread has ceased. In this study, we coupled broad scale field surveys, Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) and Lagrangian Particle Simulations (LPS) to assess the current invaded distribution of M. galloprovincialis in southern Africa and to evaluate what prevents further spread of this species. Results showed that all environmentally suitable habitats in southern Africa have been occupied by the species. This includes rocky shores between Rocky Point in Namibia and East London in South Africa (approx. 2800 km) and these limits coincide with the steep transitions between cool-temperate and subtropical-warmer climates, on both west and southeast African coasts. On the west coast, simulations of drifting larvae almost entirely followed the northward and offshore direction of the Benguela current, creating a clear dispersal barrier by advecting larvae away from the coast. On the southeast coast, nearshore currents give larvae the potential to move eastwards, against the prevalent Agulhas current and beyond the present distributional limit, however environmental conditions prevent the establishment of the species. The transition between the cooler and warmer water regimes is therefore the main factor limiting the northern spread on the southeast coast; however, biotic interactions with native fauna may also play an important role. PMID:26114766

  3. Oceanographic Conditions Limit the Spread of a Marine Invader along Southern African Shores.

    PubMed

    Assis, Jorge; Zupan, Mirta; Nicastro, Katy R; Zardi, Gerardo I; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serrão, Ester A

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species can affect the function and structure of natural ecological communities, hence understanding and predicting their potential for spreading is a major ecological challenge. Once established in a new region, the spread of invasive species is largely controlled by their dispersal capacity, local environmental conditions and species interactions. The mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is native to the Mediterranean and is the most successful marine invader in southern Africa. Its distribution there has expanded rapidly and extensively since the 1970s, however, over the last decade its spread has ceased. In this study, we coupled broad scale field surveys, Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) and Lagrangian Particle Simulations (LPS) to assess the current invaded distribution of M. galloprovincialis in southern Africa and to evaluate what prevents further spread of this species. Results showed that all environmentally suitable habitats in southern Africa have been occupied by the species. This includes rocky shores between Rocky Point in Namibia and East London in South Africa (approx. 2800 km) and these limits coincide with the steep transitions between cool-temperate and subtropical-warmer climates, on both west and southeast African coasts. On the west coast, simulations of drifting larvae almost entirely followed the northward and offshore direction of the Benguela current, creating a clear dispersal barrier by advecting larvae away from the coast. On the southeast coast, nearshore currents give larvae the potential to move eastwards, against the prevalent Agulhas current and beyond the present distributional limit, however environmental conditions prevent the establishment of the species. The transition between the cooler and warmer water regimes is therefore the main factor limiting the northern spread on the southeast coast; however, biotic interactions with native fauna may also play an important role. PMID:26114766

  4. Floral resource limitation severely reduces butterfly survival, condition and flight activity in simplified agricultural landscapes.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Julie; Wesselingh, Renate A; Van Dyck, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Agricultural intensification has a strong negative impact on farmland biodiversity (including flower-visiting insects), but understanding the mechanisms involved in this requires experimental work. We document the impact of nectar limitation on the performance of a flower-visiting insect, the meadow brown butterfly Maniola jurtina. We conducted two types of experiments: a field experiment in agricultural landscapes with grasslands of different management intensity and an experiment in outdoor flight cages in which the nectar supply was simulated. For the field experiment, we introduced an array of nectar resources in intensively managed, nectar-poor meadows and in extensively managed, flower-rich grasslands and counted flower visitors. Despite higher butterfly abundance in the extensive meadows, our introduced nectar sources were more frequently visited in intensive meadows, indicating the lack of floral resources. The 48-h confinement under nectar-poor conditions in the flight cages had a strong negative effect on body condition, flight activity and lifetime survival compared to butterflies under nectar-rich conditions. Female lifespan was reduced by 22% and male lifespan even by 43%. Agricultural landscapes that provide limited amounts of floral nectar, and no high-quality, preferred nectar sources relative to the needs of the flower-visiting species, may create ecological sinks. Regards an insect's performance, the simple presence of nectar is not necessarily functionally adequate. The effectiveness of agri-environmental schemes for flower-visiting insects (e.g. flower strips) could be improved based on ecological and evolutionary insights on the effects of specific nectar quantities and qualities. PMID:26541442

  5. Optimization of plant mineral nutrition under growth-limiting conditions in a lunar greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaets, I.; Voznyuk, T.; Kovalchuk, M.; Rogutskyy, I.; Lukashov, D.; Mytrokhyn, O.; Mashkovska, S.; Foing, B.; Kozyrovska, N.

    It may be assumed that the first plants in a lunar base will play a main role in forming a protosoil of acceptable fertility needed for purposively growing second generation plants like wheat, rice, tulips, etc. The residues of the first-generation plants could be composted and transformed by microorganisms into a soil-like substrate within a loop of regenerative life support system. The lunar regolith may be used as a substrate for plant growth at the very beginning of a mission to reduce its cost. The use of microbial communities for priming plants will allow one to facilitate adaption to stressful conditions and to support the plant development under growth limiting conditions. Well-defined plant-associated bacteria were used for growing three cultivars to colonize French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) in anorthosite, a substrate of low bioavailability, analogous to a lunar rock. The consortium was composed of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and the bacterium Paenibacillus sp. IMBG156 which stimulated seed germination, better plant development, and finally, the flowering of inoculated tagetes. In contrast, control plants grew poorly in the anorthosite and practically did not survive until flowering. Analysis of bacterial community composition showed that all species colonized plant roots, however, the rate of colonization depended on the allelopatic characteristics of marigold varieties. Bacteria of consortium were able to liberate some elements (Ca, Fe, Mn, Si, Ni, Cu, Zn) from substrate anorthosite. Plant colonization by mixed culture of bacterial strains resulted in the increase of accumulation of K, Mg, Mn by the plant and in the lowering of the level of toxic metal accumulation. It was assumed that a rationally assembled consortium of bacterial strains promoted germination of marygold seeds and supported the plant development under growth limiting conditions by means of bioleaching plant essential nutritional elements and by protecting the plant against

  6. MYB10 and MYB72 are required for growth under iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine M; Hindt, Maria N; Schmidt, Holger; Clemens, Stephan; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2013-11-01

    Iron is essential for photosynthesis and is often a limiting nutrient for plant productivity. Plants respond to conditions of iron deficiency by increasing transcript abundance of key genes involved in iron homeostasis, but only a few regulators of these genes have been identified. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we searched for transcription factors that are induced within 24 hours after transferring plants to iron-deficient growth conditions. Out of nearly 100 transcription factors shown to be up-regulated, we identified MYB10 and MYB72 as the most highly induced transcription factors. Here, we show that MYB10 and MYB72 are functionally redundant and are required for plant survival in alkaline soil where iron availability is greatly restricted. myb10myb72 double mutants fail to induce transcript accumulation of the nicotianamine synthase gene NAS4. Both myb10myb72 mutants and nas4-1 mutants have reduced iron concentrations, chlorophyll levels, and shoot mass under iron-limiting conditions, indicating that these genes are essential for proper plant growth. The double myb10myb72 mutant also showed nickel and zinc sensitivity, similar to the nas4 mutant. Ectopic expression of NAS4 rescues myb10myb72 plants, suggesting that loss of NAS4 is the primary defect in these plants and emphasizes the importance of nicotianamine, an iron chelator, in iron homeostasis. Overall, our results provide evidence that MYB10 and MYB72 act early in the iron-deficiency regulatory cascade to drive gene expression of NAS4 and are essential for plant survival under iron deficiency. PMID:24278034

  7. Genomic sweep and potential genetic rescue during limiting environmental conditions in an isolated wolf population

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jennifer R.; Vucetich, Leah M.; Hedrick, Philip W.; Peterson, Rolf O.; Vucetich, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic rescue, in which the introduction of one or more unrelated individuals into an inbred population results in the reduction of detrimental genetic effects and an increase in one or more vital rates, is a potentially important management tool for mitigating adverse effects of inbreeding. We used molecular techniques to document the consequences of a male wolf (Canis lupus) that immigrated, on its own, across Lake Superior ice to the small, inbred wolf population in Isle Royale National Park. The immigrant's fitness so exceeded that of native wolves that within 2.5 generations, he was related to every individual in the population and his ancestry constituted 56 per cent of the population, resulting in a selective sweep of the total genome. In other words, all the male ancestry (50% of the total ancestry) descended from this immigrant, plus 6 per cent owing to the success of some of his inbred offspring. The immigration event occurred in an environment where space was limiting (i.e. packs occupied all available territories) and during a time when environmental conditions had deteriorated (i.e. wolves' prey declined). These conditions probably explain why the immigration event did not obviously improve the population's demography (e.g. increased population numbers or growth rate). Our results show that the beneficial effects of gene flow may be substantial and quickly manifest, short-lived under some circumstances, and how the demographic benefits of genetic rescue might be masked by environmental conditions. PMID:21450731

  8. Genomic sweep and potential genetic rescue during limiting environmental conditions in an isolated wolf population.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jennifer R; Vucetich, Leah M; Hedrick, Philip W; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2011-11-22

    Genetic rescue, in which the introduction of one or more unrelated individuals into an inbred population results in the reduction of detrimental genetic effects and an increase in one or more vital rates, is a potentially important management tool for mitigating adverse effects of inbreeding. We used molecular techniques to document the consequences of a male wolf (Canis lupus) that immigrated, on its own, across Lake Superior ice to the small, inbred wolf population in Isle Royale National Park. The immigrant's fitness so exceeded that of native wolves that within 2.5 generations, he was related to every individual in the population and his ancestry constituted 56 per cent of the population, resulting in a selective sweep of the total genome. In other words, all the male ancestry (50% of the total ancestry) descended from this immigrant, plus 6 per cent owing to the success of some of his inbred offspring. The immigration event occurred in an environment where space was limiting (i.e. packs occupied all available territories) and during a time when environmental conditions had deteriorated (i.e. wolves' prey declined). These conditions probably explain why the immigration event did not obviously improve the population's demography (e.g. increased population numbers or growth rate). Our results show that the beneficial effects of gene flow may be substantial and quickly manifest, short-lived under some circumstances, and how the demographic benefits of genetic rescue might be masked by environmental conditions. PMID:21450731

  9. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues. PMID:26954265

  10. Understanding the Disability Dynamics of Youth: Health Condition and Limitation Changes for Youth and Their Influence on Longitudinal Survey Attrition.

    PubMed

    Mann, David R; Honeycutt, Todd

    2016-06-01

    Disability status-experiencing a functional limitation caused by a health condition-is dynamic throughout the life cycle, even during adolescence and young adulthood. We use data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to better understand these dynamics, examining how health condition and limitation statuses evolve during adolescence and young adulthood as well as how changes in these characteristics are related to survey nonresponse and attrition. Health condition and limitation dynamics are evident in our data: the proportion of sample members who reported having a limitation in their activities for any interview increased from approximately 12 % during the initial interview (when sample members were 12 to 17 years old) to almost 25 % 13 years later. Multivariate analyses revealed that women are more likely than men to report changes in health condition or limitation status. Those with mild limitations were relatively less likely than those without limitations or with severe limitations to experience changes in limitation status. Somewhat surprisingly, a survival analysis of survey participation outcomes found limited correlation among health conditions, limitations, and either missing a survey interview for the first time or permanently leaving the survey sample. PMID:27083196

  11. The role of psychosocial working conditions on burnout and its core component emotional exhaustion – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aims To analyze the association between psychosocial working conditions and burnout and its core component emotional exhaustion, a systematic literature review was undertaken including cohort studies, case–control studies, and randomized controlled trials. Methods The literature search in Medline and PsycInfo was based on a defined search string and strict exclusion and inclusion criteria. Evaluation of the 5,599 initially identified search hits by two independent reviewers and a detailed quality assessment resulted in six methodologically adequate cohort studies considering the relationship between psychosocial working conditions and burnout (one study) as well as the burnout core component emotional exhaustion (five studies). Results The results of our systematic review point to a relationship between psychosocial working conditions and the development of emotional exhaustion/burnout. Particularly high job demands seem to play a role in the development of emotional exhaustion. However, strong intercorrelations between workplace factors, as a matter of principle, make the identification of a single psychosocial workplace factor (being associated with an especially high or low risk of burnout) difficult. Conclusions Multidimensional approaches including reduction of work demands, enhancement of decision latitude and improving the social climate might be promising for preventing burnout and emotional exhaustion. However, methodologically adequate intervention studies are urgently needed to prove the effectiveness of workplace interventions. PMID:24628839

  12. Melting curves and entropy of melting of iron under Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Jin; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Zhong-Li; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-07-01

    The melting curves of iron are determined up to 365 GPa via molecular dynamic (MD) simulations combining with the embedded atom model (EAM) potential developed by Ackland et al. We simulated the melting with three approaches, the hysteresis, two-phase and recently modified Z methods. All three techniques can produce satisfying results, consistent well with most of static compression measurements and shock experiments. Hence, we recommend that these three techniques and this EAM potential are reliable techniques and potential for simulating melting properties of iron. Fitting the well-known Simon equation to our two-phase data we yield the analytical melting curve for iron: 1825(1 + P/57.723)0.654, which gives a melting point at the inner core boundary of 6345 K, very close to the recent diamond anvil cell (DAC) extrapolated value and other ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the analyses of our entropy of melting and solid-liquid interfacial energy γsl indicate that at high pressure, the entropy of fusion shows weak pressure effect. The γsl increases monotonically with pressure, and can be described as a second-order polynomial relation.

  13. Structural response of reactor-core hexcan subassemblies subjected to dynamic overpressurization under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structural analysis for the evaluation of a single core subassembly due to internal overpressure associated with possible failure of fuel pins having high fission gas plenum pressure. Structural models are developed for the subassemblies and their surroundings with emphasis on the critical physical aspects of the problem. With these models the strains, deformations and the extent of permanent damage (plastic strain) to the subassemblies can be assessed. The nonlinear structural analyses was performed with a finite element program called STRAW (Structural Transient Response of Assembly Wrappers). This finite element program is applicable to nonlinear large displacement problems. The results of this study indicate that the permanent deformation (damage) is strongly influenced by the rise time (time to reach peak pressure) of the pressure pulse and the pressure in the fuel pin. The rise time is influenced by the opening time of the flow path for release of gas from the fuel pin plenum. Several examples are illustrated with various rise times and pressure magnitudes and the resulting permanent deformation of the hexcan wall.

  14. Structural response of reactor-core hexcan subassemblies subjected to dynamic overpressurization under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structural analysis for the evaluation of a single core subassembly due to internal overpressure associated with possible failure of fuel pins having high fission gas plenum pressure. Structural models are developed for the subassemblies and their surroundings with emphasis on the critical physical aspects of the problem. With these models the strains, deformations and the extent of permanent damage (plastic strain) to the subassemblies can be assessed. The nonlinear structural analyses was performed with a finite element program called STRAW (Structural Transient Response of Assembly Wrappers). This finite element program is applicable to nonlinear large displacement problems. The results of this study indicate that the permanent deformation (damage) is strongly influenced by the rise time (time to reach peak pressure) of the pressure pulse and the pressure in the fuel pin. The rise time is influenced by the opening time of the flow path for release of gas from the fuel pin plenum. Several examples are illustrated with various rise times and pressure magnitudes and the resulting permanent deformation of the hexcan wall.

  15. Diffusion modeling of fission product release during depressurized core conduction cooldown conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A simple model for diffusion through the silicon carbide layer of TRISO particles is applied to the data for accident condition testing of fuel spheres for the High-Temperature Reactor program of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Categorization of sphere release of {sup 137}Cs based on fast neutron fluence permits predictions of release with an accuracy comparable to that of the US/FRG accident condition fuel performance model. Calculations are also performed for {sup 85}Kr, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 110m}Ag. Diffusion of cesium through SiC suggests that models of fuel failure should consider fuel performance during repeated accident condition thermal cycling. Microstructural considerations in models in fission product release are discussed. The neutron-induced segregation of silicon within the SiC structure is postulated as a mechanism for enhanced fission product release during accident conditions. An oxygen-enhanced SiC decomposition mechanism is also discussed. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    clay content and with study site as a random effect. (III) Threshold values of texture and climatc effects were identified using a regression tree. Three mean annual temperature classes for texture dependent BSC growth limitation were identified: (1) <9 °C with a threshold value of 25% silt and clay (limited growth on coarser soils), (2) 9-19 °C, where texture did have no influence on relative crust biomass, and (3) >19 °C at soils with <4 or >17% silt and clay. Because biocrust development is limited under certain climatic and soil texture conditions, it is suggested to consider soil texture for biocrust rehabilitation purposes and in biogeochemical modeling of cryptogamic ground covers. References Belnap, J. & Eldridge, D. 2001. Disturbance and Recovery of Biological Soil Crusts. In: Belnap, J. & Lange, O. (eds.) Biological Soil Crusts: Structure, Function, and Management, Springer, Berlin. Belnap, J. 2001. Biological Soil Crusts and Wind Erosion. In: Belnap, J. & Lange, O. (eds.) Fischer, T., Subbotina, M. 2014. Climatic and soil texture threshold values for cryptogamic cover development: a meta analysis. Biologia 69/11:1520-1530,

  17. Language and Traits of Autism Spectrum Conditions: Evidence of Limited Phenotypic and Etiological Overlap

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark J.; Charman, Tony; Robinson, Elise B.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Happé, Francesca; Dale, Philip S.; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Language difficulties have historically been viewed as integral to autism spectrum conditions (ASC), leading molecular genetic studies to consider whether ASC and language difficulties have overlapping genetic bases. The extent of genetic, and also environmental, overlap between ASC and language is, however, unclear. We hence conducted a twin study of the concurrent association between autistic traits and receptive language abilities. Internet-based language tests were completed by ~3,000 pairs of twins, while autistic traits were assessed via parent ratings. Twin model fitting explored the association between these measures in the full sample, while DeFries-Fulker analysis tested these associations at the extremes of the sample. Phenotypic associations between language ability and autistic traits were modest and negative. The degree of genetic overlap was also negative, indicating that genetic influences on autistic traits lowered language scores in the full sample (mean genetic correlation = −0.13). Genetic overlap was also low at the extremes of the sample (mean genetic correlation = 0.14), indicating that genetic influences on quantitatively defined language difficulties were largely distinct from those on extreme autistic traits. Variation in language ability and autistic traits were also associated with largely different nonshared environmental influences. Language and autistic traits are influenced by largely distinct etiological factors. This has implications for molecular genetic studies of ASC and understanding the etiology of ASC. Additionally, these findings lend support to forthcoming DSM-5 changes to ASC diagnostic criteria that will see language difficulties separated from the core ASC communication symptoms, and instead listed as a clinical specifier. PMID:25088445

  18. Language and traits of autism spectrum conditions: evidence of limited phenotypic and etiological overlap.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark J; Charman, Tony; Robinson, Elise B; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E; Happé, Francesca; Dale, Philip S; Ronald, Angelica

    2014-10-01

    Language difficulties have historically been viewed as integral to autism spectrum conditions (ASC), leading molecular genetic studies to consider whether ASC and language difficulties have overlapping genetic bases. The extent of genetic, and also environmental, overlap between ASC and language is, however, unclear. We hence conducted a twin study of the concurrent association between autistic traits and receptive language abilities. Internet-based language tests were completed by ~3,000 pairs of twins, while autistic traits were assessed via parent ratings. Twin model fitting explored the association between these measures in the full sample, while DeFries-Fulker analysis tested these associations at the extremes of the sample. Phenotypic associations between language ability and autistic traits were modest and negative. The degree of genetic overlap was also negative, indicating that genetic influences on autistic traits lowered language scores in the full sample (mean genetic correlation = -0.13). Genetic overlap was also low at the extremes of the sample (mean genetic correlation = 0.14), indicating that genetic influences on quantitatively defined language difficulties were largely distinct from those on extreme autistic traits. Variation in language ability and autistic traits were also associated with largely different nonshared environmental influences. Language and autistic traits are influenced by largely distinct etiological factors. This has implications for molecular genetic studies of ASC and understanding the etiology of ASC. Additionally, these findings lend support to forthcoming DSM-5 changes to ASC diagnostic criteria that will see language difficulties separated from the core ASC communication symptoms, and instead listed as a clinical specifier. PMID:25088445

  19. Changes in exercise and post-exercise core temperature under different clothing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Glen P.; Reardon, Francis D.; Thoden, Jim S.; Giesbrecht, Gordon G.; Kenny, G.

    This study evaluates the effect of different levels of insulation on esophageal (Tes) and rectal (Tre) temperature responses during and following moderate exercise. Seven subjects completed three 18-min bouts of treadmill exercise (75% VO2max, 22°C ambient temperature) followed by 30 min of recovery wearing either: (1) jogging shoes, T-shirt and shorts (athletic clothing); (2) single-knit commercial coveralls worn over the athletic clothing (coveralls); or (3) a Canadian Armed Forces nuclear, bacteriological and chemical warfare protective overgarment with hood, worn over the athletic clothing (NBCW overgarment). Tes was similar at the start of exercise for each condition and baseline Tre was 0.4°C higher than Tes. The hourly equivalent rate of increase in Tes during the final 5 min of exercise was 1.8°C, 3.0°C and 4.2°C for athletic clothing, coveralls and NBCW overgarment respectively (P<0.05). End-exercise Tes was significantly different between conditions [37.7°C (SEM 0.1°C), 38.2°C (SEM 0.2°C and 38.5°C (SEM 0.2°C) for athletic clothing, coveralls and NBCW overgarment respectively)] (P<0.05). No comparable difference in the rate of temperature increase for Tre was demonstrated, except that end-exercise Tre for the NBCW overgarment condition was significantly greater (0.5°C) than that for the athletic clothing condition. There was a drop in Tes during the initial minutes of recovery to sustained plateaus which were significantly (P<0.05) elevated above pre-exercise resting values by 0.6°C, 0.8°C and 1.0°C, for athletic clothing, coveralls, and NBCW overgarment, respectively. Post-exercise Tre decreased very gradually from end-exercise values during the 30-min recovery. Only the NBCW overgarment condition Tre was significantly elevated (0.3°C) above the athletic clothing condition (P<0.05). In conclusion, Tes is far more sensitive in reflecting the heat stress of different levels of insulation during exercise and post-exercise than Tre

  20. Haze, clouds and limited sky visibility: polarotactic orientation of crickets under difficult stimulus conditions.

    PubMed

    Henze, Miriam J; Labhart, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Field crickets (Gryllus campestris L.) are able to detect the orientation of the electric vector (e-vector) of linearly polarized light. They presumably use this sense to exploit the celestial polarization pattern for course control or navigation. Polarization vision in crickets can be tested by eliciting a spontaneous polarotactic response. Previously, wide and 100% polarized stimuli were employed to induce this behavior. However, field crickets live on meadows where the observation of the sky is strongly limited by surrounding vegetation. Moreover, degrees of polarization (d) in the natural sky are much lower than 100%. We have therefore investigated thresholds for the behavioral response to polarized light under conditions mimicking those experienced by the insects in the field. We show that crickets are able to rely on polarized stimuli of just 1 degrees diameter. We also provide evidence that they exploit polarization down to an (average) polarization level of less than 7%, irrespective of whether the stimulus is homogeneous, such as under haze, or patched, such as a sky spotted by clouds. Our data demonstrate that crickets can rely on skylight polarization even under unfavorable celestial conditions, emphasizing the significance of polarized skylight orientation for insects. PMID:17766304

  1. Core functional traits of bacterial communities in the Upper Mississippi River show limited variation in response to land cover

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J.; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of environmental microbial communities via high-throughput DNA sequencing has revealed that patterns in microbial biogeography affect community structure. However, shifts in functional diversity related to variation in taxonomic composition are poorly understood. To overcome limitations due to the prohibitive cost of high-depth metagenomic sequencing, tools to infer functional diversity based on phylogenetic distributions of functional traits have been developed. In this study we characterized functional microbial diversity at 11 sites along the Mississippi River in Minnesota using both metagenomic sequencing and functional-inference-based (PICRUSt) approaches. This allowed us to determine how distance and variation in land cover throughout the river influenced the distribution of functional traits, as well as to validate PICRUSt inferences. The distribution and abundance of functional traits, by metagenomic analysis, were similar among sites, with a median standard deviation of 0.0002% among tier 3 functions in KEGG. Overall inferred functional variation was significantly different (P ≤ 0.035) between two water basins surrounded by agricultural vs. developed land cover, and abundances of bacterial orders that correlated with functional traits by metagenomic analysis were greater where abundances of the trait were inferred to be higher. PICRUSt inferences were significantly correlated (r = 0.147, P = 1.80 × 10−30) with metagenomic annotations. Discrepancies between metagenomic and PICRUSt taxonomic-functional relationships, however, suggested potential functional redundancy among abundant and rare taxa that impeded the ability to accurately assess unique functional traits among rare taxa at this sequencing depth. Results of this study suggest that a suite of “core functional traits” is conserved throughout the river and distributions of functional traits, rather than specific taxa, may shift in response to environmental

  2. Upper limit for the D2H+ ortho-to-para ratio in the prestellar core 16293E (CHESS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastel, C.; Caselli, P.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bacmann, A.; Lis, D. C.; Caux, E.; Codella, C.; Beckwith, J. A.; Ridley, T.

    2012-11-01

    The H_3^+ ion plays a key role in the chemistry of dense interstellar gas clouds where stars and planets are forming. The low temperatures and high extinctions of such clouds make direct observations of H_3^+ impossible, but lead to large abundances of H2D+ and D2H+, which are very useful probes of the early stages of star and planet formation. The ground-state rotational ortho-D2H+ 11,1-00,0 transition at 1476.6 GHz in the prestellar core 16293E has been searched for with the Herschel HIFI instrument, within the CHESS (Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions) Key Program. The line has not been detected at the 21 mK km s-1 level (3σ integrated line intensity). We used the ortho-H2D+ 11,0-11,1 transition and para-D2H+ 11,0-10,1 transition detected in this source to determine an upper limit on the ortho-to-para D2H+ ratio as well as the para-D2H+/ortho-H2D+ ratio from a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis. The comparison between our chemical modeling and the observations suggests that the CO depletion must be high (larger than 100), with a density between 5 × 105 and 106 cm-3. Also the upper limit on the ortho-D2H+ line is consistent with a low gas temperature (~11 K) with a ortho-to-para ratio of 6 to 9, i.e. 2 to 3 times higher than the value estimated from the chemical modeling, making it impossible to detect this high frequency transition with the present state of the art receivers. The chemical network is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/547/A33Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  3. Cultivar Mixture Cropping Increased Water Use Efficiency in Winter Wheat under Limited Irrigation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunqi; Zhang, Yinghua; Ji, Wei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Bin; Li, Jinpeng; Han, Meikun; Xu, Xuexin; Wang, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of cultivar mixture cropping on yield, biomass, and water use efficiency (WUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were investigated under non-irrigation (W0, no irrigation during growth stage), one time irrigation (W1, irrigation applied at stem elongation) and two times irrigation (W2, irrigation applied at stem elongation and anthesis) conditions. Nearly 90% of cultivar mixture cropping treatments experienced an increase in grain yield as compared with the mean of the pure stands under W0, those for W1 and W2 were 80% and 85%, respectively. Over 75% of cultivar mixture cropping treatments got greater biomass than the mean of the pure stands under the three irrigation conditions. Cultivar mixture cropping cost more water than pure stands under W0 and W1, whereas the water consumption under W2 decreased by 5.9%–6.8% as compared with pure stands. Approximately 90% of cultivar mixtures showed an increase of 5.4%–34.5% in WUE as compared with the mean of the pure stands, and about 75% of cultivar mixtures had 0.8%–28.5% higher WUE than the better pure stands under W0. Similarly, there were a majority of mixture cropping treatments with higher WUE than the mean and the better one of the pure stands under W1 and W2. On the whole, proper cultivar mixture cropping could increase yield and WUE, and a higher increase in WUE occurred under limited irrigation condition. PMID:27362563

  4. Kinetics of benzene biotransformation under microaerophilic and oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Yerushalmi, Laleh; Lascourreges, Jean-Francois; Guiot, Serge R

    2002-08-01

    A special microbial consortium adapted to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons at limited availability of oxygen, transformed benzene, a highly toxic and carcinogenic contaminant of groundwater and soil, at low initial dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations of 0.05-2 mg/L. The employed initial concentrations of dissolved oxygen were considerably lower than the previously reported values. Under these conditions, the overall transformation of benzene ranged from 34% +/- 1.7% to 100%, considerably higher than the theoretical predictions for complete mineralization of benzene based on the requirement of 3.08 mg oxygen/mg benzene. Unlike biotransformation that proceeded at the lowest examined DO concentration of 0.05 mg/L, the mineralization of benzene, defined by its conversion to CO(2) and water, required a minimum DO concentration of 0.2 mg/L. The mineralization of benzene under microaerophilic conditions (DO < 2 mg/L), ranged from 0.83% +/- 0.06% to 89% +/- 1.3%, which was less than the theoretical predictions at any given initial DO concentration. The regulatory effects of dissolved oxygen concentration or its partial pressure on the activities of enzymes catalyzing the biotransformation of aromatic hydrocarbons was postulated to account for the reduced mineralization of benzene. The ratio between the transformed benzene and the consumed oxygen increased with the decrease of initial DO concentration, reaching a value of 2.8, considerably higher than the theoretical value of 0.33 obtained for a complete aerobic oxidation of benzene. Phenol was the major and the most stable intermediate metabolite during the biotransformation of benzene at low concentrations of DO. While benzene transformation stopped after the depletion of oxygen in the experimental system, phenol continued to accumulate under strictly anaerobic conditions, indicating its formation from an alternative carbon source, possibly biomass. PMID:12115423

  5. Electromagnetic characterization of current transformer with toroidal core under sinusoidal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprivica, Branko; Milovanovic, Alenka

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new procedure for the electromagnetic analysis of a measuring current transformer under sinusoidal conditions in its electrical and magnetic circuit. The influence of the magnetic hysteresis has been taken into account using the measured inverse magnetization curve and phase lag between the time waveforms of the magnetic field and the magnetic induction. Using the proposed analysis, ratio and phase errors of the current transformer have been calculated. The results of the calculation have been compared with experimental results and a good agreement has been found.

  6. Permeability Changes of Coal Cores and Briquettes under Tri-Axial Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicki, Mirosław; Konečný, Pavel; Kožušníková, Alena

    2014-12-01

    The paper is dealing with the permeability of coal in triaxial state of stress. The permeability of coal, besides coal's methane capacity, is the main parameter determining the quantity of methane inflow into underground excavations. The stress in a coal seam is one of the most important factors influencing coal permeability therefore the permeability measurements were performed in tri-axial state of stress. The hydrostatic three-axial state of stress was gradually increased from 5 MPa with steps of 5 MPa up to a maximum of 30 MPa. Nitrogen was applied as a gas medium in all experiments. The results of the permeability measurements of coal cores from the "Zofiówka" mine, Poland, and three mines from the Czech Republic are presented in this paper. As a "reference", permeability measurements were also taken for coal briquettes prepared from coal dust with defined porosity. It was confirmed that the decreasing porosity of coal briquettes affects the decreasing permeability. The advantage of experimentation on coal briquettes is its good repeatability. From the experimental results, an empirical relation between gas permeability and confining pressure has also been identified. The empirical relation for coal briquettes is in good correspondence with published results. However, for coal cores, the character of change differs. The influence of confining pressure has a different character and the decrease in permeability is stronger due to the increasing confining pressure Przepuszczalność węgla, oprócz pojemności sorpcyjnej względem metanu jest głównym parametrem określającym dopływ metanu do podziemnych wyrobiskach górniczych. W warunkach naturalnych wartość przepuszczalności jest ściśle związana ze stanem naprężenia w pokładzie węgla. W pracy przedstawiono wyniki pomiarów przepuszczalności wykonanych w trójosiowym stanie naprężenia. Hydrostatyczny trójosiowy stan naprężenia stopniowo zwiększano od 5 MPa do maksymalnie 30 MPa z krokiem

  7. Spatial heterogeneity of dechlorinating bacteria and limiting factors for in situ trichloroethene dechlorination revealed by analyses of sediment cores from a polluted field site.

    PubMed

    Dowideit, Kerstin; Scholz-Muramatsu, Heidrun; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Vigelahn, Lothar; Freygang, Martina; Dohrmann, Anja B; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2010-03-01

    Microbiological analyses of sediment samples were conducted to explore potentials and limitations for bioremediation of field sites polluted with chlorinated ethenes. Intact sediment cores, collected by direct push probing from a 35-ha contaminated area, were analyzed in horizontal layers. Cultivation-independent PCR revealed Dehalococcoides to be the most abundant 16S rRNA gene phylotype with a suspected potential for reductive dechlorination of the major contaminant trichloroethene (TCE). In declining abundances, Desulfitobacterium, Desulfuromonas and Dehalobacter were also detected. In TCE-amended sediment slurry incubations, 66% of 121 sediment samples were dechlorinating, among them one-third completely and the rest incompletely (end product cis-1,2-dichloroethene; cDCE). Both PCR and slurry analyses revealed highly heterogeneous horizontal and vertical distributions of the dechlorination potentials in the sediments. Complete reductive TCE dechlorination correlated with the presence of Dehalococcoides, accompanied by Acetobacterium and a relative of Trichococcus pasteurii. Sediment incubations under close to in situ conditions showed that a low TCE dechlorination activity could be stimulated by 7 mg L(-1) dissolved carbon for cDCE formation and by an additional 36 mg carbon (lactate) L(-1) for further dechlorination. The study demonstrates that the highly heterogeneous distribution of TCE degraders and their specific requirements for carbon and electrons are key issues for TCE degradation in contaminated sites. PMID:20041951

  8. Intracellular release of doxorubicin from core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles triggered by both pH and reduction conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liangliang; Zou, Yan; Deng, Chao; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-07-01

    Reduction and pH dual-sensitive reversibly core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles were developed from lipoic acid (LA) and cis-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid (CCA) decorated poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-P(LL-CCA/LA)) block copolymers for active loading and triggered intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX). PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) and PEG-P(LL18-CCA8/LA10) (M(n PEG) = 5.0 kg/mol) formed nano-sized micelles that were readily crosslinked in the presence of a catalytic amount of dithiothreitol (DTT) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4, 10 mM). PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles displayed an elevated DOX loading over PEG-P(LL14-LA14) controls likely due to presence of ionic interactions between DOX and CCA. These core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles while exhibiting high stability against extensive dilution and high salt concentration were quickly dissociated into unimers in the presence of 10 mM DTT. The in vitro release studies showed that DOX release from PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles at pH 7.4 and 37 °C was significantly inhibited by crosslinking (i.e. less than 20% release in 24 h). The release of DOX was, however, doubled under endosomal pH of 5.0, possibly triggered by cleavage of the acid-labile amide bonds of CCA. In particular, rapid DOX release was observed under a reductive condition containing 10 mm glutathione (GSH), in which 86.0% and 96.7% of DOX were released in 24 h at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, under otherwise the same conditions. MTT assays demonstrated that these core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles were practically non-toxic up to a tested concentration of 1.0 mg/mL, while DOX-loaded micelles caused pronounced cytotoxic effects to HeLa and HepG2 tumor cells with IC50 (inhibitory concentration to produce 50% cell death) of ca. 12.5 μg DOX equiv/mL following 48 h incubation. Confocal microscopy observations revealed that DOX-loaded crosslinked PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles more efficiently delivered and released DOX into the nuclei of

  9. Synthesis of Xenon and Iron/Nickel Intermetallic Compounds Under the Thermodynamic Conditions of the Earth's Core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, E.; Zaug, J. M.; Crowhurst, J.; Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Prakapenka, V.; Prescher, C.; Yao, Y.; Liu, H.; Dai, Z.; Oleynik, I.; Steele, B.; Cong, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The lower Xe abundance in Earth's atmosphere, in comparison to other noble gases like Ar and Kr, is one of the most challenging open questions in geosciences [1]. The origin of the so-called "missing Xe paradox" is usually attributed to the inclusion of Xe in the interior of Earth[2]. Although Xe is known to form compounds (e.g. with hydrogen, oxygen), none of them can be related with Earth's interior. Indeed, only a very low amount of Xe can be incorporated in silica at <1 GPa and 500K [3]. On the other hand, experimental attempts have failed to trace possible formation of Fe-Xe compounds up to 155 GPa and bellow 2500K [4]. A very recent theoretical study, suggests that Xe-Ni and Xe-Fe compounds can form at thermodynamic conditions representative of Earth's outer core [5]. Here we explored the possible formation of stable compounds in the Xe-Fe/Ni system at thermodynamic conditions representative of Earth's outer core starting from the following mixtures: a) Xe-Fe, b) Xe-Ni and c) Xe and an Fe/Ni alloy representative of Earth's core (ca 6% Ni). Using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy we report the formation of: a) a XeNi3 compound, in the form of a CrNi3-type FCC solid solution, above 150 GPa and 1500K, b) a Xe(Fe/Ni)3 compound, tentatively characterized as an orthorhombic NbPd3-type solid solution, above 190 GPa and 2000K and c) a still not completely characterized XeFexcompound above 180 GPa and 2000K. This work provides a plausible explanation of the "missing Xe paradox", and underscores the importance of understanding the novel rules of high-pressure chemistry for an improved understanding of the structure and chemistry of the Earth's core. [1] E. Anders, E. and T. Owen, Science 198, 453 (1977). [2] Caldwell, W. A. et al.,Science 277, 930 (1997). [3] C. Sanloup et al.,Science 310, 1174(2005). [4] D. Nishio-Hamane et al.,Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L04302 (2010). [5] L. Zhu et al., Nature chemistry 6, 664 (2014).

  10. Parameter identification of the SWAT model on the BANI catchment (West Africa) under limited data condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaibou Begou, Jamilatou; Jomaa, Seifeddine; Benabdallah, Sihem; Rode, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Due to the climate change, drier conditions have prevailed in West Africa, since the seventies, and the consequences are important on water resources. In order to identify and implement management strategies of adaptation to climate change in the sector of water, it is crucial to improve our physical understanding of water resources evolution in the region. To this end, hydrologic modelling is an appropriate tool for flow predictions under changing climate and land use conditions. In this study, the applicability and performance of the recent version of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT2012) model were tested on the Bani catchment in West Africa under limited data condition. Model parameters identification was also tested using one site and multisite calibration approaches. The Bani is located in the upper part of the Niger River and drains an area of about 101, 000 km2 at the outlet of Douna. The climate is tropical, humid to semi-arid from the South to the North with an average annual rainfall of 1050 mm (period 1981-2000). Global datasets were used for the model setup such as: USGS hydrosheds DEM, USGS LCI GlobCov2009 and the FAO Digital Soil Map of the World. Daily measured rainfall from nine rain gauges and maximum and minimum temperature from five weather stations covering the period 1981-1997 were used for model setup. Sensitivity analysis, calibration and validation are performed within SWATCUP using GLUE procedure at Douna station first (one site calibration), then at three additional internal stations, Bougouni, Pankourou and Kouoro1 (multi-site calibration). Model parameters were calibrated at daily time step for the period 1983-1992, then validated for the period 1993-1997. A period of two years (1981-1982) was used for model warming up. Results of one-site calibration showed that the model performance is evaluated by 0.76 and 0.79 for Nash-Sutcliffe (NS) and correlation coefficient (R2), respectively. While for the validation period the performance

  11. Performance of Airborne Precision Spacing Under Realistic Wind Conditions and Limited Surveillance Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Frederick; Santos, Michel; Krueger, William; Houston, Vincent E.

    2011-01-01

    With the expected worldwide increase of air traffic during the coming decade, both the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), as well as Eurocontrol's Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program have, as part of their plans, air traffic management (ATM) solutions that can increase performance without requiring time-consuming and expensive infrastructure changes. One such solution involves the ability of both controllers and flight crews to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater accuracy than they can today. Previous research has shown that time-based spacing techniques, wherein the controller assigns a time spacing to each pair of arriving aircraft, can achieve this goal by providing greater runway delivery accuracy and producing a concomitant increase in system-wide performance. The research described herein focuses on one specific application of time-based spacing, called Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), which has evolved over the past ten years. This research furthers APS understanding by studying its performance with realistic wind conditions obtained from atmospheric sounding data and with realistic wind forecasts obtained from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) short-range weather forecast. In addition, this study investigates APS performance with limited surveillance range, as provided by the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system, and with an algorithm designed to improve APS performance when ADS-B surveillance data is unavailable. The results presented herein quantify the runway threshold delivery accuracy of APS under these conditions, and also quantify resulting workload metrics such as the number of speed changes required to maintain spacing.

  12. First-principles Exploration of Crystal Structures of Pure Iron at Earth’s Inner Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Tsuchiya, T.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2009-12-01

    Determining the structure of Earth’s inner core has been a long standing challenge for geoscience. Iron has been considered as a main composition of the inner core and expected to exist as an iron-nickel-light elements alloy there. In order to get some information about the structure of the inner core, pure iron has been also investigated by many experimental and ab-initio studies. Pure iron has been expected to take the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure at the inner core conditions (Jephcoat and Olson, Nature 325, 332-335, 1987.; Mao et al., Nature 396, 741-743, 1998.; Fiquet et al., Science 291, 468-471, 2001.; Uchida et al., J. Geophys. Res. 106, 21799-21810, 2001.). On the other hand, the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure (Mikhaylushkin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 165505-165508, 2007.) and the body-centered cubic structure (Vocadlo et al., Phys. Earth Planet In. 170, 52-59, 2008.) have been also considered as the candidate structures. In this study, first we explored the crystal structures of pure iron at 400 GPa by our originally developing algorithm for the structure exploration, Free Energy Surface Trekking (FEST). In FEST, using a minus sign of driving force acting on a simulation cell, we force a system to climb up to a ridge of a free energy surface (ascent-run). Then, flipping the negative driving force to an original one, we make the system go down to a neighboring potential well (descent-run). The more different directions we examine in the ascent-run, the more accurate topography we capture of free energy surface. For the exploration of the ultrahigh-pressure structures of pure iron, we used 16 atoms supercell and explored 64 pathways around the initial local minimum corresponding to hcp. As the result, 30 pathways lead to a complex hcp (chcp) structure, which has ABCACABCBCAB stacking with 12 layers. Other 33 pathways lead to hcp and 1 pathway fcc. The enthalpy of chcp was found higher than that of hcp but only by 4 mRy/atom and lower than

  13. Conditions of Core Formation in the Early Earth: Single Stage or Heterogeneous Accretion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Since approx.1990 high pressure and temperature (PT) experiments on metal-silicate systems have showed that partition coefficients [D(met/sil)] for siderophile (iron-loving) elements are much different than those measured at low PT conditions [1,2]. The high PT data have been used to argue for a magma ocean during growth of the early Earth [3,4]. In the ensuing decades there have been hundreds of new experiments carried out and published on a wide range of siderophile elements (> 80 experiments published for Ni, Co, Mo, W, P, Mn, V, Cr, Ga, Cu and Pd). At the same time several different models have been advanced to explain the siderophile elements in Earth's mantle: a) shallow depth magma ocean 25-30 GPa [3,5]; b) deep magma ocean; up to 50 GPa [6,7], and c) early reduced and later oxidized magma ocean [8,9]. Some studies have drawn conclusions based on a small subset of siderophile elements, or a set of elements that provides little leverage on the big picture (like slightly siderophile elements), and no single study has attempted to quantitatively explain more than 5 elements at a time. The purpose of this abstract is to identify issues that have lead to a difference in interpretation, and to present updated predictive expressions based on new experimental data. The resulting expressions will be applied to the siderophile element depletions in Earth's upper mantle.

  14. Do water-limiting conditions predispose Norway spruce to bark beetle attack?

    PubMed

    Netherer, Sigrid; Matthews, Bradley; Katzensteiner, Klaus; Blackwell, Emma; Henschke, Patrick; Hietz, Peter; Pennerstorfer, Josef; Rosner, Sabine; Kikuta, Silvia; Schume, Helmut; Schopf, Axel

    2015-02-01

    Drought is considered to enhance susceptibility of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to infestations by the Eurasian spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Curculionidae), although empirical evidence is scarce. We studied the impact of experimentally induced drought on tree water status and constitutive resin flow, and how physiological stress affects host acceptance and resistance. We established rain-out shelters to induce both severe (two full-cover plots) and moderate (two semi-cover plots) drought stress. In total, 18 sample trees, which were divided equally between the above treatment plots and two control plots, were investigated. Infestation was controlled experimentally using a novel 'attack box' method. Treatments influenced the ratios of successful and defended attacks, but predisposition of trees to infestation appeared to be mainly driven by variations in stress status of the individual trees over time. With increasingly negative twig water potentials and decreasing resin exudation, the defence capability of the spruce trees decreased. We provide empirical evidence that water-limiting conditions impair Norway spruce resistance to bark beetle attack. Yet, at the same time our data point to reduced host acceptance by I. typographus with more extreme drought stress, indicated by strongly negative pre-dawn twig water potentials. PMID:25417785

  15. Do water-limiting conditions predispose Norway spruce to bark beetle attack?

    PubMed Central

    Netherer, Sigrid; Matthews, Bradley; Katzensteiner, Klaus; Blackwell, Emma; Henschke, Patrick; Hietz, Peter; Pennerstorfer, Josef; Rosner, Sabine; Kikuta, Silvia; Schume, Helmut; Schopf, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Drought is considered to enhance susceptibility of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to infestations by the Eurasian spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Curculionidae), although empirical evidence is scarce. We studied the impact of experimentally induced drought on tree water status and constitutive resin flow, and how physiological stress affects host acceptance and resistance. We established rain-out shelters to induce both severe (two full-cover plots) and moderate (two semi-cover plots) drought stress. In total, 18 sample trees, which were divided equally between the above treatment plots and two control plots, were investigated. Infestation was controlled experimentally using a novel ‘attack box’ method. Treatments influenced the ratios of successful and defended attacks, but predisposition of trees to infestation appeared to be mainly driven by variations in stress status of the individual trees over time. With increasingly negative twig water potentials and decreasing resin exudation, the defence capability of the spruce trees decreased. We provide empirical evidence that water-limiting conditions impair Norway spruce resistance to bark beetle attack. Yet, at the same time our data point to reduced host acceptance byI. typographus with more extreme drought stress, indicated by strongly negative pre-dawn twig water potentials. PMID:25417785

  16. Biocorrosion and biofilm formation in a nutrient limited heating system subjected to alternating microaerophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kjellerup, B V; Kjeldsen, K U; Lopes, F; Abildgaard, L; Ingvorsen, K; Frølund, B; Sowers, K R; Nielsen, P H

    2009-11-01

    Severe biofilm formation and biocorrosion have been observed in heating systems even when the water quality complied with existing standards. The coupling between water chemistry, biofilm formation, species composition, and biocorrosion in a heating system was investigated by adding low concentrations of nutrients and oxygen under continuous and alternating dosing regimes. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments demonstrated that the amendments did not cause changes in the overall bacterial community composition. The combined alternating dosing of nutrients and oxygen caused increased rates of pitting (bio-) corrosion. Detection of bacteria involved in sulfide production and oxidation by retrieval of the functional dsrAB and apsA genes revealed the presence of Gram-positive sulfate- and sulfite-reducers and an unknown sulfur-oxidizer. Therefore, to control biocorrosion, sources of oxygen and nutrients must be limited, since the effect of the alternating operational conditions apparently is more important than the presence of potentially corrosive biofilm bacteria. PMID:20183131

  17. Conditioned Medium From Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Limits Infarct Size and Enhances Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Cervio, Elisabetta; Calvillo, Laura; Copes, Francesco; Pisano, Federica; Mura, Manuela; Kleijn, Lennaert; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Viarengo, Gianluca; Rosti, Vittorio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Roccio, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    The paracrine properties of human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMCs) have not been fully elucidated. The goal of the present study was to elucidate whether hAMCs can exert beneficial paracrine effects on infarcted rat hearts, in particular through cardioprotection and angiogenesis. Moreover, we aimed to identify the putative active paracrine mediators. hAMCs were isolated, expanded, and characterized. In vitro, conditioned medium from hAMC (hAMC-CM) exhibited cytoprotective and proangiogenic properties. In vivo, injection of hAMC-CM into infarcted rat hearts limited the infarct size, reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and ventricular remodeling, and strongly promoted capillary formation at the infarct border zone. Gene array analysis led to the identification of 32 genes encoding for the secreted factors overexpressed by hAMCs. Among these, midkine and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine were also upregulated at the protein level. Furthermore, high amounts of several proangiogenic factors were detected in hAMC-CM by cytokine array. Our results strongly support the concept that the administration of hAMC-CM favors the repair process after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:25824141

  18. Conditioned medium from human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells limits infarct size and enhances angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Cervio, Elisabetta; Calvillo, Laura; Copes, Francesco; Pisano, Federica; Mura, Manuela; Kleijn, Lennaert; de Boer, Rudolf A; Viarengo, Gianluca; Rosti, Vittorio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Roccio, Marianna; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-05-01

    The paracrine properties of human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMCs) have not been fully elucidated. The goal of the present study was to elucidate whether hAMCs can exert beneficial paracrine effects on infarcted rat hearts, in particular through cardioprotection and angiogenesis. Moreover, we aimed to identify the putative active paracrine mediators. hAMCs were isolated, expanded, and characterized. In vitro, conditioned medium from hAMC (hAMC-CM) exhibited cytoprotective and proangiogenic properties. In vivo, injection of hAMC-CM into infarcted rat hearts limited the infarct size, reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and ventricular remodeling, and strongly promoted capillary formation at the infarct border zone. Gene array analysis led to the identification of 32 genes encoding for the secreted factors overexpressed by hAMCs. Among these, midkine and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine were also upregulated at the protein level. Furthermore, high amounts of several proangiogenic factors were detected in hAMC-CM by cytokine array. Our results strongly support the concept that the administration of hAMC-CM favors the repair process after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:25824141

  19. Kinetically limited weathering at low denudation rates in semiarid climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jérôme; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Christl, Marcus

    2016-02-01

    Biogeochemical cycling within the Critical Zone depends on the interactions between minerals and fluids controlling chemical weathering and physical erosion rates. In this study, we explore the role of water availability in controlling soil chemical weathering in semiarid climatic conditions. Weathering rates and intensities were evaluated for nine soil profiles located on convex ridge crests of three mountain ranges in the Spanish Betic Cordillera. We combine a geochemical mass balance with 10Be cosmogenic nuclides to constrain chemical weathering intensities and long-term denudation rates. As such, this study presents new data on chemical weathering and 10Be-derived denudation for understudied semiarid climate systems. In the Betic Cordillera, chemical weathering intensities are relatively low (~5 to 30% of the total denudation of the soil) and negatively correlated with the magnitude of the water deficit in soils. Chemical mass losses are inversely related to denudation rates (14-109 mm/kyr) and positively to soil thickness (14-58 cm); these results are consistent with kinetic limitation of chemical weathering rates. A worldwide compilation of chemical weathering data suggests that soil water balance may regulate the coupling between chemical weathering and physical erosion by modulating soil solute fluxes. Therefore, future landscape evolution models that seek to link chemical weathering and physical erosion should include soil water flux as an essential driver of weathering.

  20. Measurements of core and compressed-shell temperature and density conditions in thick-wall target implosions at the OMEGA laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Tommasini, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Yaakobi, B.

    2011-06-15

    A spectroscopic method is discussed to measure core and compressed-shell conditions in thick-wall plastic-shell implosions filled with deuterium and a tracer amount of argon. Simultaneous observation over a broad photon energy range of the argon line emission and the attenuation and self-emission effects of the compressed shell confining the core yields enough information to extract average temperature and density conditions in both core and compressed shell. The spectroscopic analysis also provides an estimate of the target areal density which is an important characteristic of inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  1. Constraints on Earth’s inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth’s inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density–sound velocity data of Earth’s core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (VP) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch’s law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the VP of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth’s inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller VP than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth’s core are required to explain Earth’s core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth’s core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect. PMID:26933678

  2. Little Ice Age climate and oceanic conditions of the Ross Sea, Antarctica from a coastal ice core record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, R. H.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Baker, J. A.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Sneed, S. B.; Morgenstern, U.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2012-07-01

    Increasing paleoclimatic evidence suggests that the Little Ice Age (LIA) was a global climate change event. Understanding the forcings and associated climate system feedbacks of the LIA is made difficult by the scarcity of Southern Hemisphere paleoclimate records. We use a new glaciochemical record of a coastal ice core from Mt. Erebus Saddle, Antarctica, to reconstruct atmospheric and oceanic conditions in the Ross Sea sector of Antarctica over the past five centuries. The LIA is identified in stable isotope (δD) and lithophile element records, which respectively demonstrate that the region experienced 1.6 ± 1.4 °C cooler average temperatures prior to 1850 AD than during the last 150 yr and strong (>57 m s-1) prevailing katabatic winds between 1500 and 1800 AD. Al and Ti concentration increases of an order of magnitude (>120 ppb Al) are linked to enhanced aeolian transport of complex silicate minerals and represent the strongest katabatic wind events of the LIA. These events are associated with three 12-30 yr intervals of cooler temperatures at ca. 1690 AD, 1770 AD and 1840 AD. Furthermore, ice core concentrations of the biogenic sulphur species MS- suggest that biological productivity in the Ross Sea polynya was ~80% higher prior to 1875 AD than at any subsequent time. We propose that cooler Antarctic temperatures promoted stronger katabatic winds across the Ross Ice Shelf, resulting in an enlarged Ross Sea polynya during the LIA.

  3. Limited Expansion of the New Self-Expandable Transcathether Aortic Valve Prosthesis (CoreValve Evolut R).

    PubMed

    Serio, Daniela; Doss, Mirko; Kim, Won-Keun; Möllmann, Helge; Walther, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been established as a therapeutic option in patients with a high procedural risk presenting with severe aortic stenosis. Recent improvements of TAVI technology made it possible to treat degenerated bioprosthesis using the valve-in-valve implantation concept. The self-expanding CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) prosthesis has recently been redesigned and was introduced into clinical practice. We report a case of a not fully expanded Medtronic CoreValve Evolut R after deploying a 26 mm prosthesis into a degenerated 25 mm Carpentier-Edwards Perimount prosthesis. PMID:27106459

  4. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.; Sabir, Jamal S.; Alfassi, Fahad A.; Hajarah, Nahid H.; Kabli, Saleh A.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Ashworth, Matt P.; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K.; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock. PMID:26440112

  5. Valence and metal/silicate partitioning of Mo: Implications for conditions of Earth accretion and core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Pando, K. M.; Shofner, G. A.; Sutton, S. R.; Newville, M.; Lee, C.-T.

    2016-03-01

    To better understand and predict the partition coefficient of Mo at the conditions of the deep interior of Earth and other terrestrial planets or bodies, we have undertaken new measurements of the valence and partitioning of Mo. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) K-edge spectra for Mo have been measured in a series of Fe-bearing glasses produced at 1 bar and higher PT conditions. High pressure experiments have been carried out up to 19 GPa in order to better understand the effect of pressure on Mo partitioning. And, finally, a series of experiments at very low fO2 conditions and high Si content metallic liquids has been carried out to constrain the effect of Si on the partitioning of Mo between metallic liquids and silicate melt. The valence measurements demonstrate that Mo undergoes a transition from 4+ to 6+ near IW-1, in general agreement with previous 1 bar studies on FeO-free silicate melts. High pressure experiments demonstrate a modest pressure dependence of D (Mo) metal/silicate and, combined with previous results, show a significant decrease with pressure that must be quantified in any predictive expression. Finally, the effect of dissolved Si in Fe-rich metallic liquid is to decrease D (Mo) significantly, as suggested by previous work in metallurgical systems. The effect of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, metallic liquid composition, and silicate melt composition can be quantified by using multiple linear regression of available experimental data for Mo. Our XANES results show that Mo will be 4+ at conditions of core formation, so only experiments carried out at fO2 of IW-1 and lower were used in the regressions. Application of predictive expressions to Earth accretion shows that D (Mo) decreases to values consistent with an equilibrium scenario for early Earth core-mantle. The Mo content of the primitive upper mantle (PUM) can be attained by metal-silicate equilibrium involving S-, C-, and Si-bearing metallic liquid, and peridotite

  6. Bottom-up design and synthesis of limit size lipid nanoparticle systems with aqueous and triglyceride cores using millisecond microfluidic mixing.

    PubMed

    Zhigaltsev, Igor V; Belliveau, Nathan; Hafez, Ismail; Leung, Alex K K; Huft, Jens; Hansen, Carl; Cullis, Pieter R

    2012-02-21

    Limit size systems are defined as the smallest achievable aggregates compatible with the packing of the molecular constituents in a defined and energetically stable structure. Here we report the use of rapid microfluidic mixing for the controlled synthesis of two types of limit size lipid nanoparticle (LNP) systems, having either polar or nonpolar cores. Specifically, limit size LNP consisting of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC), cholesterol and the triglyceride triolein were synthesized by mixing a stream of ethanol containing dissolved lipid with an aqueous stream, employing a staggered herringbone micromixer. Millisecond mixing of aqueous and ethanol streams at high flow rate ratios (FRR) was used to rapidly increase the polarity of the medium, driving bottom-up synthesis of limit size LNP systems by spontaneous assembly. For POPC/triolein systems the limit size structures consisted of a hydrophobic core of triolein surrounded by a monolayer of POPC where the diameter could be rationally engineered over the range 20-80 nm by varying the POPC/triolein ratio. In the case of POPC and POPC/cholesterol (55/45; mol/mol) the limit size systems achieved were bilayer vesicles of approximately 20 and 40 nm diameter, respectively. We further show that doxorubicin, a representative weak base drug, can be efficiently loaded and retained in limit size POPC LNP, establishing potential utility as drug delivery systems. To our knowledge this is the first report of stable triglyceride emulsions in the 20-50 nm size range, and the first time vesicular systems in the 20-50 nm size range have been generated by a scalable manufacturing method. These results establish microfluidic mixing as a powerful and general approach to access novel LNP systems, with both polar or nonpolar core structures, in the sub-100 nm size range. PMID:22268499

  7. 76 FR 10489 - Special Conditions: Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited Model 407 Helicopter, Installation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    .../Stabilization Augmentation System (AP/SAS) that has potential failure conditions with more severe adverse... conditions contain the added safety standards the Administrator considers necessary to ensure the failures... independent of this system. However, the possible failure conditions for this system, and their effect...

  8. Capillary ion chromatography with on-column focusing for ultra-trace analysis of methanesulfonate and inorganic anions in limited volume Antarctic ice core samples.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Estrella Sanz; Poynter, Sam; Curran, Mark; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2015-08-28

    Preservation of ionic species within Antarctic ice yields a unique proxy record of the Earth's climate history. Studies have been focused until now on two proxies: the ionic components of sea salt aerosol and methanesulfonic acid. Measurement of the all of the major ionic species in ice core samples is typically carried out by ion chromatography. Former methods, whilst providing suitable detection limits, have been based upon off-column preconcentration techniques, requiring larger sample volumes, with potential for sample contamination and/or carryover. Here, a new capillary ion chromatography based analytical method has been developed for quantitative analysis of limited volume Antarctic ice core samples. The developed analytical protocol applies capillary ion chromatography (with suppressed conductivity detection) and direct on-column sample injection and focusing, thus eliminating the requirement for off-column sample preconcentration. This limits the total sample volume needed to 300μL per analysis, allowing for triplicate sample analysis with <1mL of sample. This new approach provides a reliable and robust analytical method for the simultaneous determination of organic and inorganic anions, including fluoride, methanesulfonate, chloride, sulfate and nitrate anions. Application to composite ice-core samples is demonstrated, with coupling of the capillary ion chromatograph to high resolution mass spectrometry used to confirm the presence and purity of the observed methanesulfonate peak. PMID:26206628

  9. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  10. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.