Science.gov

Sample records for core neutronic design

  1. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no visible impacts on neutronic characteristics compared with reference full UOX core. The fuel cycle analysis has shown that {sup 233}U mono-recycling with U{sub 3}ThOX fuel could save 13% of natural uranium resource compared with UOX once through fuel cycle, slightly more than that of Plutonium single-recycling with MOX fuel. If {sup 233}U multi-recycling with U{sub 3}ThOX fuel is implemented, more natural uranium resource would be saved. (authors)

  2. A Monte Carlo model system for core analysis and epithermal neutron beam design at the Washington State University Radiation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    The Monte Carlo Model System (MCMS) for the Washington State University (WSU) Radiation Center provides a means through which core criticality and power distributions can be calculated, as well as providing a method for neutron and photon transport necessary for BNCT epithermal neutron beam design. The computational code used in this Model System is MCNP4A. The geometric capability of this Monte Carlo code allows the WSU system to be modeled very accurately. A working knowledge of the MCNP4A neutron transport code increases the flexibility of the Model System and is recommended, however, the eigenvalue/power density problems can be run with little direct knowledge of MCNP4A. Neutron and photon particle transport require more experience with the MCNP4A code. The Model System consists of two coupled subsystems; the Core Analysis and Source Plane Generator Model (CASP), and the BeamPort Shell Particle Transport Model (BSPT). The CASP Model incorporates the S({alpha}, {beta}) thermal treatment, and is run as a criticality problem yielding, the system eigenvalue (k{sub eff}), the core power distribution, and an implicit surface source for subsequent particle transport in the BSPT Model. The BSPT Model uses the source plane generated by a CASP run to transport particles through the thermal column beamport. The user can create filter arrangements in the beamport and then calculate characteristics necessary for assessing the BNCT potential of the given filter want. Examples of the characteristics to be calculated are: neutron fluxes, neutron currents, fast neutron KERMAs and gamma KERMAs. The MCMS is a useful tool for the WSU system. Those unfamiliar with the MCNP4A code can use the MCMS transparently for core analysis, while more experienced users will find the particle transport capabilities very powerful for BNCT filter design.

  3. Neutronics methods, models, and applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the advanced neutron source reactor three-element core design

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, C.A.; Schnitzler, B.G.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    A summary of the methods and models used to perform neutronics analyses on the Advanced Neutron Source reactor three-element core design is presented. The applications of the neutral particle Monte Carlo code MCNP are detailed, as well as the expansion of the static role of MCNP to analysis of fuel cycle depletion calculations. Results to date of these applications are presented also. A summary of the calculations not yet performed is also given to provide a {open_quotes}to-do{close_quotes} list if the project is resurrected.

  4. RELAP5 model for advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic transients, three-element-core design

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1996-02-01

    In order to utilize reduced enrichment fuel, the three-element-core design has been proposed. The proposed core configuration consists of inner, middle, and outer elements, with the middle element offset axially beneath the inner and outer elements, which are axially aligned. The three-element-core RELAP5 model assumes that the reactor hardware is changed only within the core region, so that the loop piping, heat exchangers, and pumps remain as assumed for the two-element-core configuration. However, the total flow rate through the core is greater and the pressure drop across the core is less so that the primary coolant pumps and heat exchangers are operating at a different point in their performance curves. This report describes the new RELAP5 input for the core components.

  5. Core Design Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  6. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  7. Modeling and design of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Dundar

    This study is for modeling and designing a new reactor core-moderator assembly and new neutron beam ports that aimed to expand utilization of a new beam hall of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The PSBR is a part of the Radiation Science and Engineering Facility (RSEC) and is a TRIGA MARK III type research reactor with a movable core placed in a large pool and is capable to produce 1MW output. This reactor is a pool-type reactor with pulsing capability up to 2000 MW for 10-20 msec. There are seven beam ports currently installed to the reactor. The PSBR's existing core design limits the experimental capability of the facility, as only two of the seven available neutron beam ports are usable. The finalized design features an optimized result in light of the data obtained from neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses as well as geometrical constraints. A new core-moderator assembly was introduced to overcome the limitations of the existing PSBR design, specifically maximizing number of available neutron beam ports and mitigating the hydrogen gamma contamination of the neutron beam channeled in the beam ports. A crescent-shaped moderator is favored in the new PSBR design since it enables simultaneous use of five new neutron beam ports in the facility. Furthermore, the crescent shape sanctions a coupling of the core and moderator, which reduces the hydrogen gamma contamination significantly in the new beam ports. A coupled MURE and MCNP5 code optimization analysis was performed to calculate the optimum design parameters for the new PSBR. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of the new design was achieved using ANSYS Fluent CFD code. In the current form, the PSBR is cooled by natural convection of the pool water. The driving force for the natural circulation of the fluid is the heat generation within the fuel rods. The convective heat data was generated at the reactor's different operating powers by using TRIGSIMS, the fuel management code of the PSBR core. In the CFD modeling, the amount of heat generated by the fuel is assumed to be transferred totally into the coolant. Therefore, the surface heat flux is applied to the fuel cladding outer surface by considering the depleted fuel composition of each individual fuel rod under a reference core loading condition defined as; 53H at 1MW full power. In order to model the entire PSBR reactor, fine mesh discretization was achieved with 22 millions structured and unstructured computational meshes. The conductive heat transfer inside the fuel rods was ignored in order to decrease the computational mesh requirement. Since the PSBR core operates in the subcooled nucleate boiling region, the CFD simulation of new PSBR design was completed utilizing an Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase flow formulation and RPI wall boiling model. The simulation results showed that the new moderator tank geometry results in secondary flow entering into the core due to decrease in the cross-flow area. Notably, the radial flow improves the local heat transfer conditions by providing radial-mixing in the core. Bubble nucleation occurs on the heated fuel rods but bubbles are collapsing in the subcooled fluid. Furthermore, the bulk fluid properties are not affected by the bubble formation. Yet, subcooled boiling enhances the heat transfer on the fuel rods. Five neutron beam ports are designed for the new reactor. The geometrical configuration, filter and collimator system designs of each neutron beam ports are selected based on the requirements of the experimental facilities. A cold neutron beam port which utilizes cold neutrons from three curved guide tubes is considered. Therefore, there will be seven neutron beams available in the new facility. The neutronic analyses of the new beam port designs were achieved by using MCNP5 code and Burned Coupled Simulation Tool for the PSBR. The MCNP simulation results showed that thermal neutron flux was increased by a factor of minimum 1.23 times and maximum 2.68 times in the new beam port compared to the existing BP4 design. Besides total gamma dose was decreased by a factor

  8. Pharmacokinetics of core-polymerized, boron-conjugated micelles designed for boron neutron capture therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Sumitani, Shogo; Oishi, Motoi; Yaguchi, Tatsuya; Murotani, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Yanagie, Hironobu; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2012-05-01

    Core-polymerized and boron-conjugated micelles (PM micelles) were prepared by free radical copolymerization of a PEG-b-PLA block copolymer bearing an acetal group and a methacryloyl group (acetal-PEG-b-PLA-MA), with 1-(4-vinylbenzyl)-closo-carborane (VB-carborane), and the utility of these micelles as a tumor-targeted boron delivery system was investigated for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Non-polymerized micelles (NPM micelles) that incorporated VB-carborane physically showed significant leakage of VB-carborane (ca. 50%) after 12 h incubation with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) at 37 °C. On the other hand, no leakage from the PM micelles was observed even after 48 h of incubation. To clarify the pharmacokinetics of the micelles, (125)I (radioisotope)-labeled PM and NPM micelles were administered to colon-26 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. The (125)I-labeled PM micelles showed prolonged blood circulation (area under the concentration curve (AUC): 943.4) than the (125)I-labeled NPM micelles (AUC: 495.1), whereas tumor accumulation was similar for both types of micelles (AUC(PM micelle): 249.6, AUC(NPM micelle): 201.1). In contrast, the tumor accumulation of boron species in the PM micelles (AUC: 268.6) was 7-fold higher than the NPM micelles (AUC: 37.1), determined by ICP-AES. Thermal neutron irradiation yielded tumor growth suppression in the tumor-bearing mice treated with the PM micelles without reduction in body weight. On the basis of these data, the PM micelles represent a promising approach to the creation of boron carrier for BNCT. PMID:22326646

  9. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: The PBMR-400 core design

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, F.; Ivanov, K.; Downar, T.; De Haas, H.; Gougar, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept to be built in South Africa. As part of the verification and validation program the definition and execution of code-to-code benchmark exercises are important. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem in its program. The OECD benchmark defines steady-state and transients cases, including reactivity insertion transients. It makes use of a common set of cross sections (to eliminate uncertainties between different codes) and includes specific simplifications to the design to limit the need for participants to introduce approximations in their models. In this paper the detailed specification is explained, including the test cases to be calculated and the results required from participants. (authors)

  10. FAST FOSSIL ROTATION OF NEUTRON STAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-10

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed {approx}10{sup 3} yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  11. Shear viscosity in neutron star cores

    E-print Network

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2008-08-21

    We calculate the shear viscosity $\\eta = \\eta_{e\\mu}+\\eta_{n}$ in a neutron star core composed of nucleons, electrons and muons ($\\eta_{e\\mu}$ being the electron-muon viscosity, mediated by collisions of electrons and muons with charged particles, and $\\eta_{n}$ the neutron viscosity, mediated by neutron-neutron and neutron-proton collisions). Deriving $\\eta_{e\\mu}$, we take into account the Landau damping in collisions of electrons and muons with charged particles via the exchange of transverse plasmons. It lowers $\\eta_{e\\mu}$ and leads to the non-standard temperature behavior $\\eta_{e\\mu}\\propto T^{-5/3}$. The viscosity $\\eta_{n}$ is calculated taking into account that in-medium effects modify nucleon effective masses in dense matter. Both viscosities, $\\eta_{e\\mu}$ and $\\eta_{n}$, can be important, and both are calculated including the effects of proton superfluidity. They are presented in the form valid for any equation of state of nucleon dense matter. We analyze the density and temperature dependence of $\\eta$ for different equations of state in neutron star cores, and compare $\\eta$ with the bulk viscosity in the core and with the shear viscosity in the crust.

  12. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  13. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  14. Simplifier cut core inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    Advantages of specifying C cores and cut toroids fabricated from grain oriented silicon steels for use in high frequency power converters and pulse width modulated switching regulators are discussed. A method for rating cores assigns to each core a number which is the product of its window and core cross section area, called 'Area Product A sub p.' A correlation between the A sub p numbers and current density for a given temperature rise was developed. Also, straight line relationships were developed for A sub p and volume, A sub p and surface area, and A sub p and weight. These relationships can be used to simplify and standardize the process of inductor design. They also make it possible to design inductors of small bulk and volume or to optimize efficiency.

  15. Simplified cut core inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    Although filter inductor designers have routinely tended to specify molypermalloy powder cores for use in high frequency power converters and pulse-width modulated switching regulators, there are sigificant advantages in specifying C cores and cut toroids fabricated from grain oriented silicon steels which should not be overlooked. Such steel cores can develop flux densities of 1.6 tesla, with useful linearity to 1.2 tesla, whereas molypermalloy cores carrying d.c. current have useful flux density capabilities only to about 0.3 tesla. The use of silicon steel cores thus makes it possible to design more compact cores, and therefore inductors of reduced volume, or conversely to provide greater load capacity in inductors of a given volume. Information is available which makes it possible to obtain quick and close approximations of significant parameters such as size, weight and temperature rise for silicon steel cores for breadboarding. Graphs, nomographs and tables are presented for this purpose, but more complete mathematical derivations of some of the important parameters are also included for a more rigorous treatment.

  16. SmAHTR-CTC Neutronic Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Holcomb, David Eugene; Gehin, Jess C

    2014-01-01

    Building on prior experience for the 2010 initial SmAHTR neutronic design and on 2012 neutronic design for the advanced high temperature reactor (AHTR), this paper presents the main results of the neutronic design effort for the newly re-purposed SmAHTR-CTC reactor concept. The results are obtained based on full-core simulations performed with SCALE6.1. The dimensionality of the SmAHTR design space is reduced by using constraints originating in material fabricability, fuel licensing, molten salt chemistry, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical considerations. The new design represents in many regards a substantial improvement from the neutronic performance standpoint over the 2010 SmAHTR concept. Among other results, it is shown that fuel cycle length of over 2 years or discharged fuel burnup of 40GWd/MTHM are possible with a low, 8% fuel enrichment in a once-through fuel cycle, while 8-year once-through fuel cycle lengths are possible at higher fuel enrichments.

  17. 400 MWth gas cooled ADT core neutronic benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Chabert, C.; Rimpault, G.; Peneliau, Y.; Tommasi, J.; Plisson-Rieunier, D.; da Cruz, D.F.; Malambu, E.; Rineiski, A.

    2007-07-01

    In France, the 'December 1991 act' has generated much R and D on nuclear waste management. One of the main conclusions is that fast reactors offer the best performances to transmute minor actinides. Two types of fast spectrum reactors can be used: critical or sub-critical ones (in this case, Accelerator Driven systems, ADS). Within this scope, a Gas-cooled ADT core neutronic benchmark has been proposed by CEA for an IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste'. This will help clarifying the future issues associated to the improvement of the core designs with more reliable and accurate tools. The benchmark exercise is based on a 400 MWth gas-cooled ADT with fertile-free fuel (Pu, Np, Am, Cm)O{sub 2} within MgO matrix. (authors)

  18. Superfluidity in the Core of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Dany

    2013-04-01

    The year (1958) after the publication of the BCS theory, Bohr, Mottelson & Pines showed that nuclei should also contain superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons. In 1959, A. Migdal proposed that neutron superfluidity should also occur in the interior of neutron stars. Pairing in nuclei forms Cooper pairs with zero spin, but the relevant component of the nuclear interaction becomes repulsive at densities larger than the nuclear matter density. It has been proposed that neutron-neutron interaction in the spin-triplet state, and L=1 orbital angular momentum, that is known to be attractive from laboratory experiments, may result in a new form of neutron superfluidity in the neutron star interior. I will review our present understanding of the structure of neutron stars and describe how superfluidity strongly affects their thermal evolution. I will show how a ``Minimal Model'' that excludes the presence of ``exotic'' matter (Bose condensates, quarks, etc.) is compatible with most observations of the surface temperatures of young isolated neutron stars in the case this neutron superfluid exists. Compared to the case of isotropic spin-zero Cooper pairs, the formation of anisotropic spin-one Cooper pairs results in a strong neutrino emission that leads to an enhanced cooling of neutron stars after the onset of the pairing phase transition and allows the Minimal Cooling scenario to be compatible with most observations. In the case the pairing critical temperature Tc is less than about 6 x10^8 K, the resulting rapid cooling of the neutron star may be observable. It was recently reported that 10 years of Chandra observations of the 333 year young neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant revealed that its temperature has dropped by about 5%. This result indicates that neutrons in this star are presently becoming superfluid and, if confirmed, provides us with the first direct observational evidence for neutron superfluidity at supra-nuclear densities.

  19. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kazeminejad, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  20. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-06

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  1. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CADLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  2. Design configuration of GCFR core assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    LaBar, M.P.; Lee, G.E.; Meyer, R.J.

    1980-05-01

    The current design configurations of the core assemblies for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant reactor core conceptual design are described. Primary emphasis is placed upon the design innovations that have been incorporated in the design of the core assemblies since the establishment of the initial design of an upflow GCFR core. A major feature of the design configurations is that they are prototypical of core assemblies for use in commercial plants; a larger number of the same assemblies would be used in a commercial plant.

  3. Heat transfer and core neutronics considerations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Determan, W. R.; Lewis, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The authors summarize the results of detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic (HPTI) reactor design, identify its key design attributes, and quantify its performance characteristics. The HPTI core uses modular, liquid-metal core heat transfer assemblies to replace the liquid-metal heat transport loop employed by in-core thermionic reactor designs of the past. The nuclear fuel, power conversion, heat transport, and heat rejection functions are all combined into a single modular unit. The reactor/converter assembly uses UN fuel pins to obtain a critical core configuration with in-core safety rods and reflector controls added to complete the subassembly. By thermally bonding the core heat transfer assemblies during the reactor core is coupled neutronically, thermally, and electrically into a modular assembly of individual power sources with cross-tied architecture. A forward-facing heat pipe radiator assembly extends from the reactor head in the shape of a frustum of a cone on the opposite side of the power system from the payload. Important virtues of the concept are the absence of any single-point failures and the ability of the core to effectively transfer the TFE waste heat load laterally to other in-core heat transfer assemblies in the event of multiple failures in either in-core and radiator heat pipes.

  4. Nodal weighting factor method for ex-core fast neutron fluence evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R. T.

    2012-07-01

    The nodal weighting factor method is developed for evaluating ex-core fast neutron flux in a nuclear reactor by utilizing adjoint neutron flux, a fictitious unit detector cross section for neutron energy above 1 or 0.1 MeV, the unit fission source, and relative assembly nodal powers. The method determines each nodal weighting factor for ex-core neutron fast flux evaluation by solving the steady-state adjoint neutron transport equation with a fictitious unit detector cross section for neutron energy above 1 or 0.1 MeV as the adjoint source, by integrating the unit fission source with a typical fission spectrum to the solved adjoint flux over all energies, all angles and given nodal volume, and by dividing it with the sum of all nodal weighting factors, which is a normalization factor. Then, the fast neutron flux can be obtained by summing the various relative nodal powers times the corresponding nodal weighting factors of the adjacent significantly contributed peripheral assembly nodes and times a proper fast neutron attenuation coefficient over an operating period. A generic set of nodal weighting factors can be used to evaluate neutron fluence at the same location for similar core design and fuel cycles, but the set of nodal weighting factors needs to be re-calibrated for a transition-fuel-cycle. This newly developed nodal weighting factor method should be a useful and simplified tool for evaluating fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in ex-core components of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  5. Core-Collapse Supernovae and Neutron Star Kicks

    E-print Network

    Dong Lai

    2002-12-05

    Recent observations have revealed many new puzzles related to core-collapse supernovae, including the formation of magnetars and black holes and their possible GRB connections. We review our current understanding of the origin of pulsar kicks and supernova asymmetry. It is argued that neutron star kicks are intimately connected to the other fundamental parameters of young neutron stars, such as the initial spin and magnetic field strength.

  6. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  7. One pass core design of a super fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qingjie; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-07-01

    One pass core design for Supercritical-pressure light water-cooled fast reactor (Super FR) is proposed. The whole core is cooled with upward flow in one through flow pattern like PWR. Compared with the previous two pass core design; this new flow pattern can significantly simplify the core concept. Upper core structure, coolant flow scheme as well as refueling procedure are as simple as in PWR. In one pass core design, supercritical-pressure water is at approximately 25.0 MPa and enters the core at 280 C. degrees and is heated up in one through flow pattern upwardly to the average outlet temperature of 500 C. degrees. Great density change in vertical direction can cause significant axial power offset during the cycle. Meanwhile, Pu accumulated in the UO{sub 2} fuel blanket assemblies also introduces great power increase during cycle, which requires large amount of flow for heat removal and makes the outlet temperature of blanket low at the beginning of equilibrium cycle (BOEC). To deal with these issues, some MOX fuel is applied in the bottom region of the blanket assembly. This can help to mitigate the power change in blanket due to Pu accumulation and to increase the outlet temperature of the blanket during cycle. Neutron transport and thermohydraulics coupled calculation shows that this design can satisfy the requirement in the Super FR principle for both 500 C. degrees outlet temperature and negative coolant void reactivity. (authors)

  8. AHTR Mechanical, Structural, and Neutronic Preconceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, V.K.; Holcomb, D.E.; Peretz, F.J.; Bradley, E.C.; Ilas, D.; Qualls, A.L.; Zaharia, N.M.

    2012-09-15

    This report provides an overview of the mechanical, structural, and neutronic aspects of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) design concept. The AHTR is a design concept for a large output Fluoride salt cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is being developed to enable evaluation of the technology hurdles remaining to be overcome prior to FHRs becoming an option for commercial reactor deployment. This report documents the incremental AHTR design maturation performed over the past year and is focused on advancing the design concept to a level of a functional, self-consistent system. The reactor concept development remains at a preconceptual level of maturity. While the overall appearance of an AHTR design is anticipated to be similar to the current concept, optimized dimensions will differ from those presented here. The AHTR employs plate type coated particle fuel assemblies with rapid, off-line refueling. Neutronic analysis of the core has confirmed the viability of a 6-month two-batch cycle with 9 wt. % enriched uranium fuel. Refueling is intended to be performed automatically under visual guidance using dedicated robotic manipulators. The report includes a preconceptual design of the manipulators, the fuel transfer system, and the used fuel storage system. The present design intent is for used fuel to be stored inside of containment for at least six months and then transferred to local dry wells for intermediate term, on-site storage. The mechanical and structural concept development effort has included an emphasis on transportation and constructability to minimize construction costs and schedule. The design intent is that all components be factory fabricated into rail transportable modules that are assembled into subsystems at an on-site workshop prior to being lifted into position using a heavy-lift crane in an open-top style construction. While detailed accident identification and response sequence analysis has yet to be performed, the design concept incorporates fully passive responses to all identified design basis or non-very-low frequency beyond design basis accidents as well as multiple levels of radioactive material containment. Key building design elements include (1) below grade siting to minimize vulnerability to aircraft impact, (2) multiple natural circulation decay heat rejection chimneys, (3) seismic base isolation, and (4) decay heat powered back-up electricity generation.

  9. Induced gravitational collapse in FeCO Core-Neutron star binaries and Neutron star-Neutron star binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Aimuratov, Y.; Bianco, C. L.; Enderli, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Moradi, R.; Muccino, M.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.; Wang, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We review the recent progress in understanding the nature of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The occurrence of GRB is explained by the Induced Gravitational Collapse (IGC) in FeCO Core-Neutron star binaries and Neutron star-Neutron star binary mergers, both processes occur within binary system progenitors. Making use of this most unexpected new paradigm, with the fundamental implications by the neutron star (NS) critical mass, we find that different initial configurations of binary systems lead to different GRB families with specific new physical predictions confirmed by observations.

  10. Automated Design and Optimization of Pebble-bed Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2010-07-01

    We present a conceptual design approach for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors using recirculating pebble-bed cores. The design approach employs PEBBED, a reactor physics code specifically designed to solve for and analyze the asymptotic burnup state of pebble-bed reactors, in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain a core that maximizes a fitness value that is a function of user-specified parameters. The uniqueness of the asymptotic core state and the small number of independent parameters that define it suggest that core geometry and fuel cycle can be efficiently optimized toward a specified objective. PEBBED exploits a novel representation of the distribution of pebbles that enables efficient coupling of the burnup and neutron diffusion solvers. With this method, even complex pebble recirculation schemes can be expressed in terms of a few parameters that are amenable to modern optimization techniques. With PEBBED, the user chooses the type and range of core physics parameters that represent the design space. A set of traits, each with acceptable and preferred values expressed by a simple fitness function, is used to evaluate the candidate reactor cores. The stochastic search algorithm automatically drives the generation of core parameters toward the optimal core as defined by the user. The optimized design can then be modeled and analyzed in greater detail using higher resolution and more computationally demanding tools to confirm the desired characteristics. For this study, the design of pebble-bed high temperature reactor concepts subjected to demanding physical constraints demonstrated the efficacy of the PEBBED algorithm.

  11. Hyperons in neutron stars and supernova cores

    E-print Network

    M. Oertel; F. Gulminelli; C. Providencia; A. R. Raduta

    2016-01-04

    The properties of compact stars and their formation processes depend on many physical ingredients. The composition and the thermodynamics of the involved matter is one of them. We will investigate here uniform strongly interacting matter at densities and temperatures, where potentially other components than free nucleons appear such as hyperons, mesons or even quarks. In this paper we will put the emphasis on two aspects of stellar matter with non-nucleonic degrees of freedom. First, we will study the phase diagram of baryonic matter with strangeness, showing that the onset of hyperons, as that of quark matter, could be related to a very rich phase structure with a large density domain covered by phase coexistence. Second, we will investigate thermal effects on the equation of state (EoS), showing that they favor the appearance of non-nucleonic particles. We will finish by reviewing some recent results on the impact of non-nucleonic degrees freedom in compact star mergers and core-collapse events, where thermal effects cannot be neglected.

  12. DANDE: a linked code system for core neutronics/depletion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LaBauve, R.J.; England, T.R.; George, D.C.; MacFarlane, R.E.; Wilson, W.B.

    1985-06-01

    This report describes DANDE - a modular neutronics, depletion code system for reactor analysis. It consists of nuclear data processing, core physics, and fuel depletion modules, and allows one to use diffusion and transport methods interchangeably in core neutronics calculations. This latter capability is especially important in the design of small modular cores. Additional unique features include the capability of updating the nuclear data file during a calculation; a detailed treatment of depletion, burnable poisons as well as fuel; and the ability to make geometric changes such as control rod repositioning and fuel relocation in the course of a calculation. The detailed treatment of reactor fuel burnup, fission-product creation and decay, as well as inventories of higher-order actinides is a necessity when predicting the behavior of reactor fuel under increased burn conditions. The operation of the code system is made clear in this report by following a sample problem.

  13. Core restraint design for inherent safety

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple analytical model is developed of core radial expansion for a fast reactor using a limited-free-bow core restraint design. Essentially elementary beam theory is used to calculate the elastic bow of a driver assembly at the core periphery subject to temperature dependent boundary conditions at the nozzle support, ACLP and TLP and subject to thermal and inelastic bowing deformations. The model is used to show the relative importance of grid plate temperature, core temperature rise, and restraint ring temperature in the inherent response of a limited-free-bow core restraint system to thermal transients. It is also used to explore this inherent core expansion. Limited verification of the model using detailed 3-D core restraint calculations is presented.

  14. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  15. Design of multidirectional neutron beams for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.

    1997-12-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is a potential application of the {sup 10}B(n, a) {sup 7}Li reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The target of therapy is the synovial membrane. Rheumatoid synovium is greatly inflamed and is the source of the discomfort and disability associated with the disease. The BNCS proposes to destroy the synovium by first injecting a boron-labeled compound into the joint space and then irradiating the joint with a neutron beam. This study discusses the design of a multidirectional neutron beam for BNCS.

  16. Designing Professional Development around the Common Core

    E-print Network

    Belding, Juliana

    Designing Professional Development around the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice Preparation of Teachers: The Impact of the Common Core State Standards Initiative January 7, 2012 #12;The It Up Report, 2001 National Math Advisory Panel Report, 2008 #12;What do these Mathematical Practices

  17. High-burnup core design using minor actinide-containing metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Obara, T.

    2013-07-01

    A neutronic design study of metal fuel fast reactor (FR) cores is conducted on the basis of an innovative fuel design concept to achieve an extremely high burnup and realize an efficient fuel cycle system. Since it is expected that the burnup reactivity swing will become extremely large in an unprecedented high burnup core, minor actinides (MAs) from light water reactors (LWRs) are added to fresh fuel to improve the core internal conversion. Core neutronic analysis revealed that high burnups of about 200 MWd/kg for a small-scale core and about 300 MWd/kg for a large-scale core can be attained while suppressing the burnup reactivity swing to almost the same level as that of conventional cores with normal burnup. An actinide burnup analysis has shown that the MA consumption ratio is improved to about 60% and that the accumulated MAs originating from LWRs can be efficiently consumed by the high-burnup metal fuel FR. (authors)

  18. Transport coefficients of nuclear matter in neutron star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shternin, P. S.; Baldo, M.; Haensel, P.

    2013-12-01

    We calculate thermal conductivity and shear viscosity of nucleons in the dense nuclear matter of neutron star cores in the nonrelativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock framework. The nucleon-nucleon interaction is described by the Argonne v18 potential with addition of the Urbana IX effective three-body forces. We find that this three-body force leads to a decrease of the kinetic coefficients with respect to the two-body case. The results of calculations are compared with electron and muon transport coefficients as well as with the results of other authors.

  19. Combined analysis of neutron and photon flux measurements for the Jules Horowitz reactor core mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J. P.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J. Y.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Merroun, O.; Brun, J.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the combined analysis of nuclear measurements to improve the knowledge of the irradiation conditions in the experimental locations of the future Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The goal of the present work is to measure more accurately neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating in the reactor. In a Material Testing Reactor (MTR), nuclear heating is a crucial parameter to design the experimental devices to be irradiated in harsh nuclear conditions. This parameter drives the temperature of the devices and of the samples. The numerical codes can predict this parameter but in-situ measurements are necessary to reach the expected accuracy. For this reason, one objective of the IN-CORE program [1] is to study the combined measurements of neutron and photon flux and their cross advanced interpretation. It should be reminded that both neutron and photon sensors are not totally selective as their signals are due to neutron and photon interactions. We intend to measure the neutron flux by three different kinds of sensors (Uranium Fission chamber, Plutonium Fission chamber and Self Powered Neutron Detector), the photon flux by two different sensors (Ionization chamber and Self Powered Gamma Detector) and the nuclear heating by two different ones (Differential calorimeter and Gamma Thermometer). For the same parameter, we expect that the use of different kinds of sensors will allow a better estimation of the aimed parameter by mixing different spectrum responses and different neutron and gamma contributions. An experimental test called CARMEN-1 is scheduled in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France) at the end of 2011, with the goal to map irradiation locations in the reactor reflector to get a first validation of the analysis model. This article focuses on the sensor selection for CARMEN-1 experiment and to the way to link neutron and photon flux measurements in view to reduce their uncertainties but also to better assess the neutron and photon contributions to nuclear heating. (authors)

  20. Design and Performance of Neutron Detector N*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelczak, Iwona; Toke, Jan; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Udo Schröder, W.

    2008-04-01

    The design of the N* Detector (``Neutron Sandwich Transmuter/Activation-? Radiator'') and its response to neutrons are described. The N* is a high efficiency plastic-scintillation detector with sensitivity to neutrons in a wide energy range and multi-hit information. The device consists of a stack of plastic scintillator slabs (Saint Gobain BC-408) alternating with thin radiator films (PDMS), which are loaded with 0.5% (by weight) of Gd. The stack is coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The scintillator plays the dual role of a neutron moderator and a ?-radiation detector. Scintillation light is produced in response to both, the prompt moderation process and the delayed emission of Gd-capture ?-rays. The design and experimental results with respect to light response, energy and time resolution, and detection efficiency will be discussed, along with comparison to Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Science: Physics Designation Science Core Courses

    E-print Network

    Ottino, Julio M.

    -1 for physic sdept. majors) A 5th 300 level course of your choice in Astronomy: Physics Designation Term Grade Science Core Courses: BIOL SCI 215: Genetics & Molecular in science courses & no course in which a grade lower than a "C" may be counted

  2. MetaCores: Design and Optimization Techniques Seapahn Meguerdichian1

    E-print Network

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    approach for designing hardware and soft- ware IP called MetaCores. The new design approach starts cores are IPs completely implemented using a particular physical design library. Firm cores are also in terms of their flexibility and application range. Initially, hard cores dominated the IP reuse market

  3. Design of a Thermal Neutron Beam for a New Neutron Imaging Facility at Tehran Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastjerdi, Mohammad Hossein Choopan; Khalafi, Hossein

    A new neutron imaging facility will be built around the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). The TRR is an open pool light water moderated5 MW research reactor with six beam tubes. The neutron energy spectrum near the reactor core at the entrance of the beam tube was measured by the foil activation method using the SAND-II code and calculated by the MCNP Monte Carlo code. There was a good similarity between calculated and simulated spectra. The principal component of this facility is its neutron collimator. The collimator is a beam-forming assembly which determines the geometric properties of the beam. In addition, it may contain filters to modify the energy spectrum or to reduce the gamma ray content of the beam. The optimum thickness of filters, the position of the aperture and other details of the neutron collimator were calculated using MCNP Monte Carlo simulations. In this design, the L/D ratio of this facility had the value of 120. The thermal neutron flux at the image plane was about 7.8×106 n/cm2.s and n/? ratio about 106 n/cm2.?Sv.

  4. Neutron stars, remnant cores following supernova explosions, are highly interesting astrophysical

    E-print Network

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    Neutron stars, remnant cores following supernova explosions, are highly interesting astrophysical environments In particular, accreting neutron stars presents a unique environment for nuclear reactions al., Phys. Rev. C 77, 045807 (2008) (4) Haensel et al., Neutron Stars 1, 2007 #12; One potential heat

  5. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Lei; Miller, Don

    2015-01-23

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  6. Stellar encounters involving neutron stars in globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Encounters between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star and a 0.8 solar mass red giant (RG) and between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star (NS) and an 0.8 solar mass main-sequence (MS) star have been successfully simulated. In the case of encounters involving an RG, bound systems are produced when the separation at periastron passage R(MIN) is less than about 2.5 R(RG). At least 70 percent of these bound systems are composed of the RG core and NS forming a binary engulfed in a common envelope of what remains of the former RG envelope. Once the envelope is ejected, a tight white dwarf-NS binary remains. For MS stars, encounters with NSs will produce bound systems when R(MIN) is less than about 3.5 R(MS). Some 50 percent of these systems will be single objects with the NS engulfed in a thick disk of gas almost as massive as the original MS star. The ultimate fate of such systems is unclear.

  7. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MW{sub th}, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS.

  8. Neutronics Analyses of the Minimum Original HEU TREAT Core

    SciTech Connect

    Kontogeorgakos, D.; Connaway, H.; Yesilyurt, G.; Wright, A.

    2014-04-01

    This work was performed to support the feasibility study on the potential conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory from the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by the GTRI Reactor Conversion staff at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of this study was to validate the MCNP model of the TREAT reactor with the well-documented measurements which were taken during the start-up and early operation of TREAT. Furthermore, the effect of carbon graphitization was also addressed. The graphitization level was assumed to be 100% (ANL/GTRI/TM-13/4). For this purpose, a set of experiments was chosen to validate the TREAT MCNP model, involving the approach to criticality procedure, in-core neutron flux measurements with foils, and isothermal temperature coefficient and temperature distribution measurements. The results of this study extended the knowledge base for the TREAT MCNP calculations and established the credibility of the MCNP model to be used in the core conversion feasibility analysis.

  9. Maximum Mass of the Hot Neutron Star with the Quark Core

    E-print Network

    Yazdizadeh, T

    2010-01-01

    We have considered a hot neutron star with a quark core, a mixed phase of quark-hadron matter, and a hadronic matter crust and have determined the equation of state of the hadronic phase and the quark phase, we have then found the equation of state of the mixed phase under the Gibbs conditions. Finally, we have computed the structure of hot neutron star with the quark core and compared our results with those of the neutron star without the quark core. For the quark matter calculations, we have used the MIT bag model in which the total energy of the system is considered as the kinetic energy of the particles plus a bag constant. For the hadronic matter calculations, we have used the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) formalism. Our calculations show that the results for the maximum gravitational mass of the hot neutron star with the quark core are substantially different from those of without the quark core.

  10. Neutron flux measurements in the side-core region of Hunterston B advanced gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.A.; Shaw, S.E.; Huggon, A.P.; Steadman, R.J.; Thornton, D.A.; Whiley, G.S.

    2011-07-01

    The core restraints of advanced gas-cooled reactors are important structural components that are required to maintain the geometric integrity of the cores. A review of neutron dosimetry for the sister stations Hunterston B and Hinkley Point B identified that earlier conservative assessments predicted high thermal neutron dose rates to key components of the restraint structure (the restraint rod welds), with the implication that some of them may be predicted to fail during a seismic event. A revised assessment was therefore undertaken [Thornton, D. A., Allen, D. A., Tyrrell, R. J., Meese, T. C., Huggon, A.P., Whiley, G. S., and Mossop, J. R., 'A Dosimetry Assessment for the Core Restraint of an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor,' Proceedings of the 13. International Symposium on Reactor Dosimetry (ISRD-13, May 2008), World Scientific, River Edge, NJ, 2009, W. Voorbraak, L. Debarberis, and P. D'hondt, Eds., pp. 679-687] using a detailed 3D model and a Monte Carlo radiation transport program, MCBEND. This reassessment resulted in more realistic fast and thermal neutron dose recommendations, the latter in particular being much lower than had been thought previously. It is now desirable to improve confidence in these predictions by providing direct validation of the MCBEND model through the use of neutron flux measurements. This paper describes the programme of work being undertaken to deploy two neutron flux measurement 'stringers' within the side-core region of one of the Hunterston B reactors for the purpose of validating the MCBEND model. The design of the stringers and the determination of the preferred deployment locations have been informed by the use of detailed MCBEND flux calculations. These computational studies represent a rare opportunity to design a flux measurement beforehand, with the clear intention of minimising the anticipated uncertainties and obtaining measurements that are known to be representative of the neutron fields to which the vulnerable steel restraint components are exposed. (authors)

  11. Occurrence of Hyperon Superfluidity in Neutron Star Cores

    E-print Network

    Tatsuyuki Takatsuka; Shigeru Nishizaki; Yasuo Yamamoto; Ryozo Tamagaki

    2006-01-24

    Superfluidity of $\\Lambda$ and $\\Sigma^-$ admixed in neutron star (NS) cores is investigated realistically for hyperon ($Y$)-mixed NS models obtained using a $G$-matrix-based effective interaction approach. Numerical results for the equation of state (EOS) with the mixing ratios of the respective components and the hyperon energy gaps including the temperature dependence are presented. These are meant to serve as physical inputs for $Y$-cooling calculations of NSs. By paying attention to the uncertainties of the EOS and the $YY$ interactions, it is shown that both $\\Lambda$ and $\\Sigma^-$ are superfluid as soon as they appear although the magnitude of the critical temperature and the density region where superfluidity exists depend considerably on the $YY$ pairing potential. Considering momentum triangle condition and the occurrence of superfluidity, it is found that a so-called `` hyperon cooling\\rq\\rq~(neutrino-emission from direct Urca process including $Y$) combined with $Y$-superfluidity may be able to account for observations of the colder class of NSs. It is remarked that $\\Lambda$-hyperons play a decisive role in the hyperon cooling scenario. Some comments are given regarding the consequences of the less attractive $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ interaction recently suggested by the `` NAGARA event\\rq\\rq~$^6_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}$He.

  12. Energy Efficient Engine core design and performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, E. Marshall

    1982-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) is a NASA program to develop fuel saving technology for future large transport aircraft engines. Testing of the General Electric E3 core showed that the core component performance and core system performance necessary to meet the program goals can be achieved. The E3 core design and test results are described.

  13. Bulk viscosity in superfluid neutron star cores. III. Effects of $?^-$ hyperons

    E-print Network

    P. Haensel; K. P. Levenfish; D. G. Yakovlev

    2001-11-15

    Bulk viscosity of neutron star cores containing hyperons is studied taking into account non-equilibrium weak process $n+n \\rightleftharpoons p+\\Sigma^-$. Rapid growth of the bulk viscosity within the neutron star core associated with switching on new reactions (modified Urca process, direct Urca process, hyperon reactions) is analyzed. The suppression of the bulk viscosity by superfluidity of baryons is considered and found out to be very important.

  14. Overview of core designs and requirements/criteria for core restraint systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W.H.

    1984-09-01

    The requirements and lifetime criteria for the design of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Core Restraint System are presented. A discussion of the three types of core restraint systems used in LMFBR core design is given. Details of the core restraint system selected for FFTF are presented and the reasons for this selection given. Structural analysis procedures being used to manage the FFTF assembly irradiations are discussed. Efforts that are ongoing to validate the calculational methods and lifetime criteria are presented.

  15. Conceptual design of a medical reactor for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, W.A.; Jones, J.L. )

    1990-10-01

    A conceptual design of a passively safe reactor facility for boron neutron capture therapy is presented. The facility configuration and its neutronic, thermal hydraulic, and safety issues are addressed in order to demonstrate the deployability of reactor technology for routine patient treatments and advanced research and dosimetry. The reactor has a power level of <10 MW (thermal) and is based on low-enriched UZrH fuel. The reactor facility generates a clean epithermal neutron beam capable of treating deep-seated brain tumors ([approximately] 70 mm) in <10 min. The incident fast neutron and gamma-ray contaminants in the beam are 1.8 and 0.4 Gy, respectively, for a 20-Gy therapeutic dose to a deep-seated tumor. With an expected operation schedule of [approximately]2,000 treatment periods per year, the reactor core lifetime is equal to the 30-yr facility lifetime and no refueling is necessary. Five beam ports are available for simultaneous patient treatments allowing between 2,000 and 10,000 treatments per year with expansion capabilities of at least threefold for 24 h/day operation. The cost per patient treatment is small, about $1,000, making the therapy very affordable. The reactor system design includes several passive safety features that allow the reactor to respond in a safe and benign manner in the event of off-normal transients. The response for various instantaneous reactivity insertions is assessed. Results show the reactor can passively respond to a reactivity insertion of 2 dollars such that the maximum temperature limits of the fuel are not exceeded.

  16. MPACT Fast Neutron Multiplicity System Design Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. T. Kinlaw; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; A. Enqvist; J. T. Johnsom; S. M. Watson

    2012-10-01

    This report documents work performed by Idaho National Laboratory and the University of Michigan in fiscal year (FY) 2012 to examine design parameters related to the use of fast-neutron multiplicity counting for assaying plutonium for materials protection, accountancy, and control purposes. This project seeks to develop a new type of neutron-measurement-based plutonium assay instrument suited for assaying advanced fuel cycle materials. Some current-concept advanced fuels contain high concentrations of plutonium; some of these concept fuels also contain other fissionable actinides besides plutonium. Because of these attributes the neutron emission rates of these new fuels may be much higher, and more difficult to interpret, than measurements made of plutonium-only materials. Fast neutron multiplicity analysis is one approach for assaying these advanced nuclear fuels. Studies have been performed to assess the conceptual performance capabilities of a fast-neutron multiplicity counter for assaying plutonium. Comparisons have been made to evaluate the potential improvements and benefits of fast-neutron multiplicity analyses versus traditional thermal-neutron counting systems. Fast-neutron instrumentation, using for example an array of liquid scintillators such as EJ-309, have the potential to either a) significantly reduce assay measurement times versus traditional approaches, for comparable measurement precision values, b) significantly improve assay precision values, for measurement durations comparable to current-generation technology, or c) moderating improve both measurement precision and measurement durations versus current-generation technology. Using the MCNPX-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation code, studies have been performed to assess the doubles-detection efficiency for a variety of counter layouts of cylindrical liquid scintillator detector cells over one, two, and three rows. Ignoring other considerations, the best detector design is the one with the most detecting volume. However, operational limitations guide a) the maximum acceptable size of each detector cell (due to PSD performance and maximum-acceptable per-channel data throughput rates, limited by pulse pile-up and the processing rate of the electronics components of the system) and b) the affordability of a system due to the number of total channels of data to be collected and processed. As a first estimate, it appears that a system comprised of two rows of detectors 5" Ø ? 3" would yield a working prototype system with excellent performance capabilities for assaying Pu-containing items and capable of handling high signal rates likely when measuring items with Pu and other actinides. However, it is still likely that gamma-ray shielding will be needed to reduce the total signal rate in the detectors. As a first step prior to working with these larger-sized detectors, it may be practical to perform scoping studies using small detectors, such as already-on-hand 3" Ø ? 3" detectors.

  17. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  18. Hydromagnetic and gravitomagnetic crust-core coupling in a precessing neutron star

    E-print Network

    Yuri Levin; Caroline D'Angelo

    2004-02-29

    We consider two types of mechanical coupling between the crust and the core of a precessing neutron star. First, we find that a hydromagnetic (MHD) coupling between the crust and the core strongly modifies the star's precessional modes when $t_a\\le\\sim (T_s\\times T_p)^{1/2}$; here $t_a$ is the Alfven crossing timescale, and $T_s$ and $T_p$ are the star's spin and precession periods, respectively. We argue that in a precessing pulsar PSR B1828-11 the restoring MHD stress prevents a free wobble of the crust relative to the non-precessing core. Instead, the crust and the proton-electron plasma in the core must precess in unison, and their combined ellipticity determines the period of precession. Link has recently shown that the neutron superfluid vortices in the core of PSR B1828-11 cannot be pinned to the plasma; he has also argued that this lack of pinning is expected if the proton Fermi liquid in the core is type-I superconductor. In this case, the neutron superfluid is dynamically decoupled from the precessing motion. The pulsar's precession decays due to the mutual friction between the neutron superfluid and the plasma in the core. The decay is expected to occur over tens to hundreds of precession periods and may be measurable over a human lifetime. Such a measurement would provide information about the strong n-p interaction in the neutron-star core. Second, we consider the effect of gravitomagnetic coupling between the neutron superfluid in the core and the rest of the star and show that this coupling changes the rate of precession by about 10%. The general formalism developed in this paper may be useful for other applications.

  19. Learn from the Core--Design from the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ockerse, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The current objective, object-oriented approach to design is questioned along with design education viewed as a job-oriented endeavor. Instead relational knowledge and experience in a holistic sense, both tacit and explicit, are valued along with an appreciation of the unique character of the student. A new paradigm for design education is…

  20. IP core design of template matching algorithm in image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Quanqing; Zou, Xuecheng; Dong, Zhenzhong; Huang, Feng; Shen, Xubang

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of template matching IP cores for image processing. Enhanced Moment Preserving Pattern Matching (MPPM) algorithm of template matching was adopted for efficient hardware implementation. The cores were coded in Verilog HDL for modularity and portability. The IP cores were validated in a XC4052XL FPGA and XESS XS40 prototyping board.

  1. Core bit design reduces mud invasion, improves ROP

    SciTech Connect

    Clydesdale, G. ); Leseultre, A.; Lamine, E. )

    1994-08-08

    A recently developed core bit reduces fluid invasion in the cut core by minimizing the exposure to the drilling fluid and by increasing the rate of penetration (ROP). A high ROP during coring is one of the major factors in reducing mud filtrate invasion in cores. This new low-invasion polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) core bit was designed to achieve a higher ROP than conventional PDC core bits without detriment to the cutting structure. The paper describes the bit and its operation, results of lab tests, fluid dynamics, and results of field tests.

  2. DIRSIG 5: core design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.

    2012-06-01

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model has been developed at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) for over two decades. The last major update of the model, DIRSIG 4, built on an established, first-principles, multi- and hyper-spectral scene simulation tool. It introduced a modern and flexible software architecture to support new sensor modalities and more complex and dynamic scenes. Since that time, the needs of the user community have grown and diversified in tandem with the computational capabilities of modern hardware. Faced with a desire to model more complex, multi-component systems that are beyond the original intent and capabilities of an aging software design, a new version of DIRSIG, version 5, is being introduced to the community. This paper describes the core of DIRSIG 5 that is responsible for linking the disparate sensor, scene, and environmental models together, spatially, temporally, and parametrically. The spatial relationships are governed by a planet-centric universe model encompassing a whole globe digital elevation and optical property model, the scene model(s), globally varying atmospheric models, and a space model. Temporal relationships are driven by a formal modeling and simulation architecture based on approaches used in engineering and biological sciences to model highly dynamic and interactive systems. Finally, the parametric interfaces are described by a universal data model that facilitates scripting, inter-dependent properties and user interface construction. The design of these components will be presented along with specific module implementation details. These simulation tools will be used to demonstrate some of the new capabilities and applications of DIRSIG 5.

  3. An intrinsically safe facility for forefront research and training on nuclear technologies — Core design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viberti, C. M.; Ricco, G.

    2014-04-01

    The core of a subcritical, low-power research reactor in a lead matrix has been designed using the MCNPX code. The main parameters, like geometry, material composition in the fuel assembly and reflector size, have been optimized for a k eff ˜ 0.95 and a thermal power around 200 Kw. A 70 Mev, 1 mA proton beam incident on a beryllium target has been assumed as neutron source and the corresponding thermal power distribution and neutron fluxes in the reactor have been simulated.

  4. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design.

  5. Neutron Dosimetry on the Full-Core First Generation VVER-440 Aimed at Reactor Support Structure Load Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, P.; Borodkin, G.; Khrennikov, N.; Konheiser, J.; Noack, K.

    2009-08-01

    Reactor support structures (RSS), especially the ferritic steel wall of the water tank, of first-generation VVER-440 are non-restorable reactor equipment, and their lifetime may restrict plant-life. All operated Russian first generation VVER-440 have a reduced core with dummy assemblies except Unit 4 of Novovoronezh nuclear power plant (NPP). In comparison with other reactors, the full-core loading scheme of this reactor provides the highest neutron fluence on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RSS accumulated over design service-life and its prolongation. The radiation load parameters on the RPV and RSS that have resulted from this core loading scheme should be evaluated by means of precise calculations and validated by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry to provide the reliable assessment of embrittlement parameters of these reactor components. The results of different types of calculations and their comparison with measured data have been analyzed in this paper. The calculational analysis of RSS fluence rate variation in dependence on the core loading scheme, including the standard and low leakage core as well as the introduction of dummy assemblies, is presented in this paper.

  6. Design Study of Small Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor Cores Using SiC Cladding and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivai, Abu Khalid; Takahashi, Minoru

    Neutronics of a reactor core with SiC cladding and structure was compared with that with steel cladding and structure analytically for small lead-cooled fast reactors. Uranium nitride fuel was used for this reactor. U235 enrichment was 11% in inner core and 13% in outer core for relatively flat neutron flux distributions and power density distribution. The core design was optimized using natural uranium blanket and nitride fuel for long life-core with reshuffling interval of 15 years. The analytical result indicated that neutron energy spectrum was slightly softer in the core with the SiC cladding and structure than that with steel cladding and structure. The SiC type reactor was designed to have criticality at the beginning of cycle (BOC), although the steel type reactor could not have criticality with the same size and geometry. In other words, the SiC type core can be designed smaller than the steel type core. The peak power densities could remain constant over the reactor operation. The consumption capability of uranium was quite high, i.e. 10% for 125 MWt reactor and 18.4% for 375 MWt reactor at the end of cycle (EOC).

  7. Neutronic optimization of solid breeder blankets for STARFIRE design

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive neutronic tradeoff studies were carried out to define and optimize the neutronic performance of the different solid breeder options for the STARFIRE blanket design. A set of criteria were employed to select the potential blanket materials. The basic criteria include the neutronic performance, tritium-release characteristics, material compatibility, and chemical stability. Three blanket options were analyzed. The first option is based on separate zones for each basic blanket function where the neutron multiplier is kept in a separate zone. The second option is a heterogeneous blanket type with two tritium breeder zones. In the first zone the tritium breeder is assembled in a neutron multiplier matrix behind the first wall while the second zone has a neutron moderator matrix instead of the neutron multiplier. The third blanket option is similar to the second concept except the tritium breeder and the neutron multiplier form a homogeneous mixture.

  8. Observational constraints on neutron star crust-core coupling during glitches

    E-print Network

    William G. Newton; Sabrina Berger; Brynmor Haskell

    2015-06-04

    We demonstrate that observations of glitches in the Vela pulsar can be used to investigate the strength of the crust-core coupling in a neutron star, and suggest that recovery from the glitch is dominated by torque exerted by the re-coupling of superfluid components of the core that were decoupled from the crust during the glitch. Assuming that the recoupling is mediated by mutual friction between the superfluid neutrons and the charged components of the core, we use the observed magnitudes and timescales of the shortest timescale components of the recoveries from two recent glitches in the Vela pulsar to infer the fraction of the core that is coupled to the crust during the glitch, and hence spun up by the glitch event. Within the framework of a two-fluid hydrodynamic model of glitches, we analyze whether crustal neutrons alone are sufficient to drive the glitch activity observed in the Vela pulsar. We use two sets of neutron star equations of state (EOSs), both of which span crust and core consistently and cover a range of the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density $30 70\\%$ of the moment of inertia of the core is coupled to the crust during the glitch, though for softer EOSs $L\\approx 30$MeV as little as $5\\%$ could be coupled. No EOS is able to reproduce the observed glitch activity with crust neutrons alone, but extending the region where superfluid vortices are strongly pinned into the core by densities as little as 0.016fm$^{-3}$ above the crust-core transition density restores agreement with the observed glitch activity.

  9. System Design for a Nuclear Electric Spacecraft Utilizing Out-of-core Thermionic Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, W. C.; Phillips, W. M.; Hsieh, T.

    1976-01-01

    Basic guidelines are presented for a nuclear space power system which utilizes heat pipes to transport thermal power from a fast nuclear reactor to an out of core thermionic converter array. Design parameters are discussed for the nuclear reactor, heat pipes, thermionic converters, shields (neutron and gamma), waste heat rejection systems, and the electrical bus bar-cable system required to transport the high current/low voltage power to the processing equipment. Dimensions are compatible with shuttle payload bay constraints.

  10. The Effects of Binary Evolution on the Dynamics of Core Collapse and Neutron-Star Kicks

    E-print Network

    Ph. Podsiadlowski; N. Langer; A. J. T. Poelarends; S. Rappaport; A. Heger; E. Pfahl

    2004-02-19

    We systematically examine how the presence in a binary affects the final core structure of a massive star and its consequences for the subsequent supernova explosion. Interactions with a companion star may change the final rate of rotation, the size of the helium core, the strength of carbon burning and the final iron core mass. Stars with initial masses larger than \\sim 11\\Ms that experiece core collapse will generally have smaller iron cores at the time of the explosion if they lost their envelopes due to a previous binary interaction. Stars below \\sim 11\\Ms, on the other hand, can end up with larger helium and metal cores if they have a close companion, since the second dredge-up phase which reduces the helium core mass dramatically in single stars does not occur once the hydrogen envelope is lost. We find that the initially more massive stars in binary systems with masses in the range 8 - 11\\Ms are likely to undergo an electron-capture supernova, while single stars in the same mass range would end as ONeMg white dwarfs. We suggest that the core collapse in an electron-capture supernova (and possibly in the case of relatively small iron cores) leads to a prompt explosion rather than a delayed neutrino-driven explosion and that this naturally produces neutron stars with low-velocity kicks. This leads to a dichotomous distribution of neutron star kicks, as inferred previously, where neutron stars in relatively close binaries attain low kick velocities. We illustrate the consequences of such a dichotomous kick scenario using binary population synthesis simulations and discuss its implications. This scenario has also important consequences for the minimum initial mass of a massive star that becomes a neutron star. (Abbreviated.)

  11. Neutronic evaluation of GCFR core diluents and reflectors

    E-print Network

    Yu, Kun, 1974-

    2003-01-01

    Materials are evaluated for use as in-core diluents and as peripheral reflectors for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) service, using coupled Monte Carlo (MCNP) and isotopics (ORIGEN) codes. The principal performance indices ...

  12. Effect of core structure irradiation on the RBMK neutron characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Balygin, A. A. Krayushkin, A. V.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of changes in the graphite density and fuel channel diameters on the RBMK neutron characteristics is estimated. It is shown that uncertainty of those quantities can lead to a noticeable difference between the calculated and experimental values of the steam coefficient of reactivity and the subcriticality of the reactor.

  13. TORT/MCNP coupling method for the calculation of neutron flux around a core of BWR.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    For the analysis of BWR neutronics performance, accurate data are required for neutron flux distribution over the In-Reactor Pressure Vessel equipments taking into account the detailed geometrical arrangement. The TORT code can calculate neutron flux around a core of BWR in a three-dimensional geometry model, but has difficulties in fine geometrical modelling and lacks huge computer resource. On the other hand, the MCNP code enables the calculation of the neutron flux with a detailed geometry model, but requires very long sampling time to give enough number of particles. Therefore, a TORT/MCNP coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this method, the TORT code calculates angular flux distribution on the core surface and the MCNP code calculates neutron spectrum at the points of interest using the flux distribution. The coupling method will be used as the DOT-DOMINO-MORSE code system. This TORT/MCNP coupling method was applied to calculate the neutron flux at points where induced radioactivity data were measured for 54Mn and 60Co and the radioactivity calculations based on the neutron flux obtained from the above method were compared with the measured data. PMID:16604689

  14. Design Analyses and Shielding of HFIR Cold Neutron Scattering Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Selby, D.L.; Winn, B.; Stoica, D.; Jones, A.B.; Crow, L.

    2011-07-01

    Research reactor geometries and special characteristics present unique dosimetry analysis and measurement issues. The introduction of a cold neutron moderator and the production of cold neutron beams at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor have created the need for modified methods and devices for analyzing and measuring low energy neutron fields (0.01 to 100 meV). These methods include modifications to an MCNPX version to provide modeling of neutron mirror reflection capability. This code has been used to analyze the HFIR cold neutron beams and to design new instrument equipment that will use the beams. Calculations have been compared with time-of-flight measurements performed at the start of the neutron guides and at the end of one of the guides. The results indicate that we have a good tool for analyzing the transport of these low energy beams through neutron mirror and guide systems for distance up to 60 meters from the reactor. (authors)

  15. Hans A. Bethe Prize: Neutron Stars and Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James

    2015-04-01

    Core-collapse supernovae lead to the formation of neutron stars, and both are sensitive to the dense matter equation of state. Hans Bethe first recognized that the matter in the collapsing core of a massive star has a relatively low entropy which prevents nuclear dissociation until nuclei merge near the nuclear saturation density. This recognition means that collapse continues until the core exceeds the saturation density. This prediction forms the foundation for modern simulations of supernovae. These supernovae sample matter up to about twice nuclear saturation density, but neutron stars are sensitive to the equation of state both near the saturation density and at several times higher densities. Two important recent developments are the discovery of two-solar mass neutron stars and refined experimental determinations of the behavior of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter near the saturation density. Combined with the assumption of causality, they imply that the radii of observed neutron stars are largely independent of their mass, and that this radius is in the range of 11 to 13 km. These theoretical results are not only consistent with expectations from theoretical studies of pure neutron matter, but also accumulated observations of both bursting and cooling neutron stars. In the near future, new pulsar timing data, which could lead to larger measured masses as well as measurements of moments of inertia, X-ray observations, such as from NICER, of bursting and other sources, and gravitational wave observations of neutron stars in merging compact binaries, will provide important new constraints on neutron stars and the dense matter equation of state. DOE DE-FG02-87ER-40317.

  16. Low-Enriched Fuel Design Concept for the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W

    2007-05-01

    A new non-TRISO fuel and clad design concept is proposed for the prismatic, heliumcooled Very High Temperature Reactor core. The new concept could substantially reduce the current 10-20 wt% TRISO uranium enrichments down to 4-6 wt% for both initial and reload cores. The proposed fuel form would be a high-temperature, high-density uranium ceramic, for example UO2, configured into very small diameter cylindrical rods. The small diameter fuel rods significantly increase core reactivity through improved neutron moderation and fuel lumping. Although a high-temperature clad system for the concept remains to be developed, recent success in tube fabrication and preliminary irradiation testing of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding for light water reactor applications offers good potential for this application, and for future development of other carbide clad designs. A high-temperature ceramic fuel, together with a high-temperature clad material, could also lead to higher thermal safety margins during both normal and transient reactor conditions relative to TRISO fuel. The calculated neutronic results show that the lowenrichment, small diameter fuel rods and low thermal neutron absorbing clad retain the strong negative Doppler fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity that ensures inherent safe operation of the VHTR, and depletion studies demonstrate that an 18-month power cycle can be achieved with the lower enrichment fuel.

  17. Pulsed neutron source cold moderators --- concepts, design and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Guenter S.

    1997-01-01

    Moderator design for pulsed neutron sources is becoming more and more an interface area between source designers and instrument designers. Although there exists a high degree of flexibility, there are also physical and technical limitations. This paper aims at pointing out these limitations and examining ways to extend the current state of moderator technology in order to make the next generation neutron sources even more versatile and flexible tools for science in accordance with the users' requirements. (auth)

  18. Observational constraints on neutron star crust-core coupling during glitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, W. G.; Berger, S.; Haskell, B.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that observations of glitches in the Vela pulsar can be used to investigate the strength of the crust-core coupling in a neutron star and provide a powerful probe of the internal structure of neutron stars. We assume that glitch recovery is dominated by the torque exerted by the mutual friction-mediated recoupling of superfluid components of the core that were decoupled from the crust during the glitch. Then we use the observations of the recoveries from two recent glitches in the Vela pulsar to infer the fraction of the core that is coupled to the crust during the glitch. We then analyse whether crustal neutrons alone are sufficient to drive glitches in the Vela pulsar, taking into account crustal entrainment. We use two sets of neutron star equations of state (EOSs) which span crust and core consistently and cover a conservative range of the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density 30 < L < 120 MeV. The two sets differ in the stiffness of the high density EOS. We find that for medium to stiff EOSs, observations imply >70 per cent of the moment of inertia of the core is coupled to the crust during the glitch, though for softer EOSs L ? 30 MeV as little as 5 per cent could be coupled. We find that only by extending the region where superfluid vortices are strongly pinned into the core by densities at least 0.016 fm-3 above the crust-core transition density does any EOS reproduce the observed glitch activity.

  19. Neutronics Assessment of Molten Salt Breeding Blanket Design

    E-print Network

    1 Neutronics Assessment of Molten Salt Breeding Blanket Design Options Mohamed Sawan Fusion adequate tritium breeding and shielding for VV and magnet Larger margins are considered to account flow channel required to cool it #12;5 Tritium Breeding Potential If neutron coverage for double null

  20. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K{sub Q} due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail.

  1. Progress in the neutronic core conversion (HEU-LEU) analysis of Ghana research reactor-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Anim-Sampong, S.; Maakuu, B. T.; Akaho, E. H. K.; Andam, A.; Liaw, J. J. R.; Matos, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Ghana Atomic Energy Commission; Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology

    2006-01-01

    The Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) and has operated at different power levels since its commissioning in March 1995. As required for all nuclear reactors, neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis are being performed for the HEU-LEU core conversion studies of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) facility, which is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). Stochastic Monte Carlo particle transport methods and tools (MCNP4c/MCNP5) were used to fine-tune a previously developed 3-D MCNP model of the GHARR-1 facility and perform neutronic analysis of the 90.2% HEU reference and candidate LEU (UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, U-9Mo) fresh cores with varying enrichments from 12.6%-19.75%. In this paper, the results of the progress made in the Monte Carlo neutronic analysis of the HEU reference and candidate LEU fuels are presented. In particular, a comparative performance assessment of the LEU with respect to neutron flux variations in the fission chamber and experimental irradiation channels are highlighted.

  2. De novo design of the hydrophobic cores of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed and experimentally tested a novel computational approach for the de novo design of hydrophobic cores. A pair of computer programs has been written, the first of which creates a "custom" rotamer library for potential hydrophobic residues, based on the backbone structure of the protein of interest. The second program uses a genetic algorithm to globally optimize for a low energy core sequence and structure, using the custom rotamer library as input. Success of the programs in predicting the sequences of native proteins indicates that they should be effective tools for protein design. Using these programs, we have designed and engineered several variants of the phage 434 cro protein, containing five, seven, or eight sequence changes in the hydrophobic core. As controls, we have produced a variant consisting of a randomly generated core with six sequence changes but equal volume relative to the native core and a variant with a "minimalist" core containing predominantly leucine residues. Two of the designs, including one with eight core sequence changes, have thermal stabilities comparable to the native protein, whereas the third design and the minimalist protein are significantly destabilized. The randomly designed control is completely unfolded under equivalent conditions. These results suggest that rational de novo design of hydrophobic cores is feasible, and stress the importance of specific packing interactions for the stability of proteins. A surprising aspect of the results is that all of the variants display highly cooperative thermal denaturation curves and reasonably dispersed NMR spectra. This suggests that the non-core residues of a protein play a significant role in determining the uniqueness of the folded structure. PMID:8535237

  3. A demonstration of a whole core neutron transport method in a gas cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper illustrates a capability of the whole core transport method COMET. Building on previous works which demonstrated the accuracy of the method, this work serves to emphasize the robust capability of the method while also accentuating its efficiency. A set of core configurations is presented based on an operating gas-cooled thermal reactor, Japan's HTTR, and COMET determines the eigenvalue and fission density profile throughout each core configuration. Results for core multiplication factors are compared to MCNP for accuracy and also to compare runtimes. In all cases, the values given by COMET differ by those given by MCNP by less than the uncertainty inherent in the stochastic solution procedure, however, COMET requires runtimes shorter on the order of a few hundred. Figures are provided illustrating the whole core fission density profile, with segments of pins explicitly modeled individually, so that pin-level neutron flux behavior can be seen without any approximation due to simplification strategies such as homogenization. (authors)

  4. CORE ANALYSIS, DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF A DEEP-BURN PEBBLE BED REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Achieving a high burnup in the Deep-Burn pebble bed reactor design, while remaining within the limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback, is challenging. The high content of Pu and Minor Actinides in the Deep-Burn fuel significantly impacts the thermal neutron energy spectrum. This can result in power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed core in locally thermalized regions near the graphite reflectors. Furthermore, the interplay of the Pu resonances of the neutron absorption cross sections at low-lying energies can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator at certain operating conditions. To investigate the aforementioned effects a code system using existing codes has been developed for neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and fuel depletion analysis of Deep-Burn pebble bed reactors. A core analysis of a Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (400 MWth) design has been performed for two Deep-Burn fuel types and possible improvements of the design with regard to power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback are identified.

  5. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source -- Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Iverson, Erik B.; Sokol, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  6. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Sokol, P. E.

    2011-08-15

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  7. Design of an integrating type neutron dose monitor.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    2011-07-01

    It is intended that deuterium-deuterium reaction experiments will be performed for the next phase of the large helical device (LHD) at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Japan. To protect workers against radiation, the characteristics of the radiation field at the LHD workplace should be evaluated. The neutron fluence at the workplace was calculated by means of the radiation transportation code. Since the neutron energy distribution at the workplace has a wide energy range, from thermal to fast neutrons, a neutron dose monitor had to be especially designed. The author designed an integrating type neutron dose monitor for this purpose. Since this monitor has good responses for dose evaluation in every energy range, it should be able to evaluate the dose at the LHD workplace accurately. PMID:21515622

  8. Maximum mass of neutron stars with quark matter core

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Masuda, Kota

    2012-11-12

    We propose a new strategy to construct the equation of state (EOS) for neutron stars (NSs) with hadron-quark (H-Q) phase transition, by considering three density-regions. We supplement the EOS at H-Q region, very uncertain due to the confinement-deconfinement problems, by sandwitching in between and matching to the relatively 'well known' EOSs, i.e., the EOS at lower densities (H-phase up to several times nuclear density, calculated from a G-matrix approach) and that at ultra high densities (Q-phase, form a view of asymptotic freedom). Here, as a first step, we try a simple case and discuss the maximum mass of NSs.

  9. Design and Demonstration of a Quasi-monoenergetic Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Sorensen, Peter F.; Foxe, Michael P.; Bench, G.; Bernstein, A.

    2014-03-05

    The design of a neutron source capable of producing 24 and 70 keV neutron beams with narrow energy spread is presented. The source exploits near-threshold kinematics of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction while taking advantage of the interference `notches' found in the scattering cross-sections of iron. The design was implemented and characterized at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Alternative lters such as vanadium and manganese are also explored and the possibility of studying the response of di*erent materials to low-energy nuclear recoils using the resultant neutron beams is discussed.

  10. Cooling neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant: evidence for superfluidity in the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shternin, Peter S.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Patnaude, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    According to recent results of Ho & Heinke, the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant contains a young (?330-yr-old) neutron star (NS) which has carbon atmosphere and shows notable decline of the effective surface temperature. We report a new (2010 November) Chandra observation which confirms the previously reported decline rate. The decline is naturally explained if neutrons have recently become superfluid (in triplet state) in the NS core, producing a splash of neutrino emission due to Cooper pair formation (CPF) process that currently accelerates the cooling. This scenario puts stringent constraints on poorly known properties of NS cores: on density dependence of the temperature Tcn(?) for the onset of neutron superfluidity [Tcn(?) should have a wide peak with maximum ? (7-9) × 108 K]; on the reduction factor q of CPF process by collective effects in superfluid matter (q > 0.4) and on the intensity of neutrino emission before the onset of neutron superfluidity (30-100 times weaker than the standard modified Urca process). This is serious evidence for nucleon superfluidity in NS cores that comes from observations of cooling NSs.

  11. Massive neutron stars with hyperonic core : a case study with the IUFSU model

    E-print Network

    Bipasha Bhowmick; Madhubrata Bhattacharya; Abhijit Bhattacharyya; G. Gangopadhyay

    2015-11-17

    The recent discoveries of massive neutron stars, such as PSR J$0348+0432$ and PSR J$1614-2230$, have raised questions about the existence of exotic matter such as hyperons in the neutron star core. The validity of many established equations of states (EoS's) like the GM1 and FSUGold are also questioned. We investigate the existence of hyperonic matter in the central regions of massive neutron stars using Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) theory with the recently proposed IUFSU model. The IUFSU model is extended by including hyperons to study the neutron star in $\\beta$ equilibrium. The effect of different hyperonic potentials, namely $\\Sigma$ and $\\Xi$ potentials, on the EoS and hence the maximum mass of neutron stars has been studied. We have also considered the effect of stellar rotation since the observed massive stars are pulsars. It has been found that a maximum mass of $1.93M_{\\odot}$, which is within the 3$\\sigma$ limit of the observed mass of PSR J$0348+0432$, can be obtained for rotating stars, with certain choices of the hyperonic potentials. The said star contains a fair amount of hyperons near the core.

  12. Core restraint and seismic analysis of a large heterogeneous free-flowering core design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Madell, J.T.; Moran, T.J.; Ash, J.E.; Fulford, P.J.

    1980-11-01

    The core restraint and seismic performance of a large heterogeneous core was analyzed. A free-flowering core restraint system was selected for this study, as opposed to the limited-free bow system of the FFTF and CRBRP. The key features of the core restraint system, such as stiff reflector assemblies and load pad properties, were specified in this study. Other features - such as the fuel-assembly description, flux and temperature distributions, and clearances between the assembly nozzle and grid plate - were obtained from the other parts of a large, heterogeneous Core Study 11 and 12. Core restraint analysis was performed with NUBOW-3D over the first two cycles of operation. The SCRAP code was used to analyze the time-history seismic response of the core with the effects of fluid, impact, and bowed assemblies modeled in the code. The core restraint system design was assessed in terms of the predicted forces, impacts, displacements, and reactivity effects for different cycle times and power/flow ratios.

  13. Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-17

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. It is based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility with low enriched uranium fuel, using the existing electron accelerators at KIPT of Ukraine [1]. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100-KW electron beam, which has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, with a natural uranium target [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron beam experiments and material studies are also included. Over the past two-three decades, structures with characteristic lengths of 100 {angstrom} and correspondingly smaller vibrational energies have become increasingly important for both science and technology [3]. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructures can be well matched by neutrons with longer vibrational wavelength and lower energy. In the accelerator-driven subcritical facility, most of the neutrons are generated from fission reactions with energy in the MeV range. They are slowed down to the meV energy range through scattering reactions in the moderator and reflector materials. However, the fraction of neutrons with energies less than 5 meV in a normal moderator spectrum is very low because of up-scattering caused by the thermal motion of moderator or reflector molecules. In order to obtain neutrons with energy less than 5 meV, cryogenically cooled moderators 'cold neutron sources' should be used to slow down the neutrons. These cold moderators shift the neutron energy spectrum down because the thermal motion of moderator molecules as well as the up-scattering is very small, which provides large gains in intensity of low energy neutrons, E < 5 meV. The accelerator driven subcritical facility is designed with a provision to add a cryogenically cooled moderator system. This cold neutron source could provide the neutrons beams with lower energy, which could be utilized in scattering experiment and material structures analysis. This study describes the performed physics analyses to define and characterize the cold neutron source of the KIPT neutron source facility. The cold neutron source is designed to optimize the cold neutron brightness to the experimental instruments outside the radial heavy concrete shield of the facility. Liquid hydrogen or solid methane with 20 K temperature is used as a cold moderator. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX [4], with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries, is utilized to calculate the cold neutron source performance and estimate the nuclear heat load to the cold moderator. The surface source generation capability of MCNPX code has been used to provide the possibility of analyzing different design configurations and perform design optimization analyses with reasonable computer resources. Several design configurations were analyzed and their performance were characterized and optimized.

  14. Double-core evolution and the formation of neutron-star binaries with compact companions

    E-print Network

    J. D. M. Dewi; Ph. Podsiadlowski; A. Sena

    2006-02-23

    We present the results of a systematic exploration of an alternative evolutionary scenario to form double neutron-star binaries, first proposed by Brown (1995), which does not involve a neutron star passing through a common envelope. In this scenario, the initial binary components have very similar masses, and both components have left the main sequence before they evolve into contact; preferably the primary has already developed a CO core. We have performed population synthesis simulations to study the formation of double neutron star binaries via this channel and to predict the orbital properties and system velocities of such systems. We obtain a merger rate for DNSs in this channel in the range of 0.1 - 12/Myr. These rates are still subject to substantial uncertainties such as the modelling of the contact phase.

  15. Core-coupled states and split proton-neutron quasiparticle multiplets in 122-126Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalkovski, S.; Bruce, A. M.; Jungclaus, A.; Górska, M.; Pfützner, M.; Cáceres, L.; Naqvi, F.; Pietri, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Simpson, G. S.; Andgren, K.; Bednarczyk, P.; Beck, T.; Benlliure, J.; Benzoni, G.; Casarejos, E.; Cederwall, B.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Cuenca-García, J. J.; Cullen, I. J.; Denis Bacelar, A. M.; Detistov, P.; Doornenbal, P.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Geissel, H.; Gelletly, W.; Gerl, J.; Grebosz, J.; Hadinia, B.; Hellström, M.; Hinke, C.; Hoischen, R.; Ilie, G.; Jaworski, G.; Jolie, J.; Khaplanov, A.; Kisyov, S.; Kmiecik, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Kumar, R.; Kurz, N.; Maj, A.; Mandal, S.; Modamio, V.; Montes, F.; Myalski, S.; Palacz, M.; Prokopowicz, W.; Reiter, P.; Regan, P. H.; Rudolph, D.; Schaffner, H.; Sohler, D.; Steer, S. J.; Tashenov, S.; Walker, J.; Walker, P. M.; Weick, H.; Werner-Malento, E.; Wieland, O.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Zhekova, M.

    2013-03-01

    Neutron-rich silver isotopes were populated in the fragmentation of a 136Xe beam and the relativistic fission of 238U. The fragments were mass analyzed with the GSI Fragment Separator and subsequently implanted into a passive stopper. Isomeric transitions were detected by 105 high-purity germanium detectors. Eight isomeric states were observed in 122-126Ag nuclei. The level schemes of 122,123,125Ag were revised and extended with isomeric transitions being observed for the first time. The excited states in the odd-mass silver isotopes are interpreted as core-coupled states. The isomeric states in the even-mass silver isotopes are discussed in the framework of the proton-neutron split multiplets. The results of shell-model calculations, performed for the most neutron-rich silver nuclei are compared to the experimental data.

  16. Quark deconfinement in neutron star cores and the ground state of neutral matter

    E-print Network

    Chang-Qun Ma; Chun-Yuan Gao

    2007-06-22

    Whether or not deconfined quark phase exists in neutron star cores and represents the ground state of neutral matter at moderate densities are open questions. We use two realistic effective quark models, the three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and the modified quark-meson coupling model, to describe the neutron star matter. After constructing possible hybrid equations of state (EOSes) with unpaired or color superconducting quark phase, we systematically discuss the observational constraints of neutron stars on the EOSes. It is found that the neutron star with pure quark matter core is unstable and the hadronic phase with hyperons is denied, while hybrid EOSes with two-flavor color superconducting phase or unpaired quark matter phase are both allowed by the tight and most reliable constraints from two stars Ter 5 I and EXO 0748-676. And the hybrid EOS with unpaired quark matter phase is allowed even compared with the tightest constraint from the most massive pulsar star PSR J0751+1807. Therefore, we conclude that the ground state of neutral matter at moderate densities is in deconfined quark phase likely.

  17. Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-01-22

    The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

  18. Natural Nuclear Reactor Oklo and Variation of Fundamental Constants Part 1: Computation of Neutronics of Fresh Core

    E-print Network

    Yu. V. Petrov; A. I. Nazarov; M. S. Onegin; V. Yu. Petrov; E. G. Sakhnovsky

    2005-09-15

    Using modern methods of reactor physics we have performed full-scale calculations of the natural reactor Oklo. For reliability we have used recent version of two Monte Carlo codes: Russian code MCU REA and world wide known code MCNP (USA). Both codes produce similar results. We have constructed a computer model of the reactor Oklo zone RZ2 which takes into account all details of design and composition. The calculations were performed for three fresh cores with different uranium contents. Multiplication factors, reactivities and neutron fluxes were calculated. We have estimated also the temperature and void effects for the fresh core. As would be expected, we have found for the fresh core a significant difference between reactor and Maxwell spectra, which was used before for averaging cross sections in the Oklo reactor. The averaged cross section of Sm-149 and its dependence on the shift of resonance position (due to variation of fundamental constants) are significantly different from previous results. Contrary to results of some previous papers we find no evidence for the change of the fine structure constant in the past and obtain new, most accurate limits on its variation with time: -4 10^{-17}year^{-1} < d alpha/dt/alpha < 3 10^{-17} year^{-1} A further improvement in the accuracy of the limits can be achieved by taking account of the core burnup. These calculations are in progress.

  19. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    In light of the scientific evidence for changes in the climate caused by greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities, the world is in ever more desperate need of new, inexhaustible, safe and clean primary energy sources. A viable solution to this problem is the widespread adoption of nuclear breeder reactor technology. Innovative breeder reactor concepts using liquid-metal coolants such as sodium or lead will be able to utilize the waste produced by the current light water reactor fuel cycle to power the entire world for several centuries to come. Breed & burn (B&B) type fast reactor cores can unlock the energy potential of readily available fertile material such as depleted uranium without the need for chemical reprocessing. Using B&B technology, nuclear waste generation, uranium mining needs and proliferation concerns can be greatly reduced, and after a transitional period, enrichment facilities may no longer be needed. In this dissertation, new passively operating safety systems for fast reactors cores are presented. New analysis and optimization methods for B&B core design have been developed, along with a comprehensive computer code that couples neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and structural mechanics and enables a completely automated and optimized fast reactor core design process. In addition, an experiment that expands the knowledge-base of corrosion issues of lead-based coolants in nuclear reactors was designed and built. The motivation behind the work presented in this thesis is to help facilitate the widespread adoption of safe and efficient fast reactor technology.

  20. Core design of the upgraded TREAT reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, D.C.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Lipinski, W.C.; Stone, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The upgrading of the TREAT reactor involves the replacement of the central 11 x 11 subzone of the 19 x 19 fuel assembly array by new, Inconel-clad, high-temperature fuel assemblies, and the additions of a new reactor control system, a safety-grade plant protection system, and an enhanced reactor filtration/coolant system. The final design of these modifications will be completed in early 1983. The TREAT facility is scheduled to be shut down for modification in mid-1984, and should resume the safety test program in mid-1985. The upgrading will provide a capability to conduct fast reactor safety tests on clusters of up to 37 prototypic LMFBR pins.

  1. Conceptual design of a neutron camera for MAST Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weiszflog, M. Sangaroon, S.; Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Klimek, I.; Keeling, D.; Martin, R.; Turnyanskiy, M.

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents two different conceptual designs of neutron cameras for Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) Upgrade. The first one consists of two horizontal cameras, one equatorial and one vertically down-shifted by 65 cm. The second design, viewing the plasma in a poloidal section, also consists of two cameras, one radial and the other one with a diagonal view. Design parameters for the different cameras were selected on the basis of neutron transport calculations and on a set of target measurement requirements taking into account the predicted neutron emissivities in the different MAST Upgrade operating scenarios. Based on a comparison of the cameras’ profile resolving power, the horizontal cameras are suggested as the best option.

  2. Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud

    SciTech Connect

    Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R.

    1996-06-01

    Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder.

  3. Small Angle Neutron-Scattering Studies of the Core Structure of Intact Neurosecretory Vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Susan Takacs

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the state of the dense cores within intact neurosecretory vesicles. These vesicles transport the neurophysin proteins, along with their associated hormones, oxytocin or vasopressin, from the posterior pituitary gland to the bloodstream, where the entire vesicle contents are released. Knowledge of the vesicle core structure is important in developing an understanding of this release mechanism. Since the core constituents exist in a dense state at concentrations which cannot be reproduced (in solution) in the laboratory, a new method was developed to determine the core structure from SANS experiments performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. These studies were complemented by biochemical assays performed to determine the role, if any, played by phospholipids in the interactions between the core constituents. H_2O/D_2 O ratio in the solvent can be adjusted, using the method of contrast variation, such that the scattering due to the vesicle membranes is minimized, thus emphasizing the scattering originating from the cores. The applicability of this method for examining the interior of biological vesicles was tested by performing an initial study on human red blood cells, which are similar in structure to other biological vesicles. Changes in intermolecular hemoglobin interactions, occurring when the ionic strength of the solvent was varied or when the cells were deoxygenated, were examined. The results agreed with those expected for dense protein solutions, indicating that the method developed was suitable for the study of hemoglobin within the cells. Similar SANS studies were then performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. The experimental results were inconsistent with model calculations which assumed that the cores consisted of small, densely-packed particles or large, globular aggregates. Although a unique model could not be determined, the data suggest that the core constituents form long aggregates of varying cross-sectional diameters. The biochemical experiments not only confirmed the ability of the core constituents to form large aggregates but also established that phospholipids do not play a role in this aggregate formation.

  4. Surface tension of the core-crust interface of neutron stars with global charge neutrality

    E-print Network

    Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini; Yuan-Bin Wu; She-Sheng Xue

    2014-03-19

    It has been shown recently that taking into account strong, weak, electromagnetic, and gravitational interactions, and fulfilling the global charge neutrality of the system, a transition layer will happen between the core and crust of neutron stars, at the nuclear saturation density. We use relativistic mean field theory together with the Thomas-Fermi approximation to study the detailed structure of this transition layer and calculate its surface and Coulomb energy. We find that the surface tension is proportional to a power-law function of the baryon number density in the core bulk region. We also analyze the influence of the electron component and the gravitational field on the structure of the transition layer and the value of the surface tension to compare and contrast with known phenomenological results in nuclear physics. Based on the above results we study the instability against Bohr-Wheeler surface deformations in the case of neutron stars obeying global charge neutrality. Assuming the core-crust transition at nuclear density $\\rho_{core}\\approx 2.7 * 10^{14}$ g cm$^{-3}$, we find that the instability sets the upper limit to the crust density, $\\rho_{crust}^{crit}\\approx 1.2 * 10^{14}$ g cm$^{-3}$. This result implies a nonzero lower limit to the maximum electric field of the core-crust transition surface and makes inaccessible a limit of quasilocal charge neutrality in the limit $\\rho_{crust}=\\rho_{core}$. The general framework presented here can be also applied to study the stability of sharp phase transitions in hybrid stars as well as in strange stars, both bare and with outer crust. The results of this work open the way to a more general analysis of the stability of these transition surfaces, accounting for other effects such as gravitational binding, centrifugal repulsion, magnetic field induced by rotating electric field, and therefore magnetic dipole-dipole interactions.

  5. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2011-09-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Previously, the design of the LEU fuel had been determined in order to provide the users of the NBSR with the same cycle length as exists for the current HEU fueled reactor. The fuel composition at different points within an equilibrium fuel cycle had also been determined. In the present study, neutronics parameters have been calculated for these times in the fuel cycle for both the existing HEU and the proposed LEU equilibrium cores. The results showed differences between the HEU and LEU cores that would not lead to any significant changes in the safety analysis for the converted core. In general the changes were reasonable except that the figure-of-merit for neutrons that can be used by experimentalists shows there will be a 10% reduction in performance. The calculations included kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions.

  6. Neutronics analyses in support of the conceptual design of the MAPS NTP reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Raepsaet, X.; Lenain, R.

    1996-03-01

    Within the framework of the French nuclear thermal propulsion program called MAPS (Lenain 1996), several neutronics studies and analyses were performed. The aim was to determine the basic design features of a reactor based on the Pebble Bed Reactor concept (Powell 1985) and needing minimum technological developments. In the concern to further enhance the reactor safety posture and to maintain a minimum engine mass breakdown, a beryllium moderated/reflected reactor using highly enriched UO{sub 2} or UC{sub 2} as fuel has been designed with a mean hydrogen core outlet temperature of 2200 K (theoretical ISP of 859 s). The objective of this paper is to give a detailed neutronics analysis of the MAPS reactor. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Uncertainty reduction requirements in cores designed for passive reactivity shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to describe the changed focus of neutronics accuracy requirements existing in the current US advanced LMR development program where passive shutdown is a major design goal. The second purpose is to provide the background and rationale which supports the selection of a formal data fitting methodology as the means for the application of critical experiment measurements to meet these accuracy needs. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Advanced core design and fuel management for pebble-bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gougar, Hans David

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well-defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat-transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  9. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  10. Novel kind of DSP design method based on IP core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiaoyan; Liu, Peng; Wang, Weidong; Hong, Xiang; Chen, Jicheng; Yuan, Jianzhong; Chen, Keming

    2004-04-01

    With the pressure from the design productivity and various special applications, original design method for DSP can no longer keep up with the required speed. A novel design method is needed urgently. Intellectual Property (IP) reusing is a tendency for DSP design, but simple plug-and-play IP cores approaches almost never work. Therefore, appropriate control strategies are needed to connect all the IP cores used and coordinate the whole DSP. This paper presents a new DSP design procedure, which refers to System-on-a-chip, and later introduces a novel control strategy named DWC to implement the DSP based on IP cores. The most important part of this novel control strategy, pipeline control unit (PCU), is given in detail. Because a great number of data hazards occur in most computation-intensive scientific application, a new effective algorithm of checking data hazards is employed in PCU. Following this strategy, the design of a general or special purposed DSP can be finished in shorter time, and the DSP has a potency to improve performance with little modification on basic function units. This DWC strategy has been implement in a 16-bit fixed-pointed DSP successfully.

  11. Ultracold neutron source at the PULSTAR reactor: Engineering design and cryogenic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkina, E.; Medlin, G.; Wehring, B.; Hawari, A. I.; Huffman, P. R.; Young, A. R.; Beaumont, B.; Palmquist, G.

    2014-12-01

    Construction is completed and commissioning is in progress for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University. The source utilizes two stages of neutron moderation, one in heavy water at room temperature and the other in solid methane at ~ 40 K, followed by a converter stage, solid deuterium at 5 K, that allows a single down scattering of cold neutrons to provide UCN. The UCN source rolls into the thermal column enclosure of the PULSTAR reactor, where neutrons will be delivered from a bare face of the reactor core by streaming through a graphite-lined assembly. The source infrastructure, i.e., graphite-lined assembly, heavy-water system, gas handling system, and helium liquefier cooling system, has been tested and all systems operate as predicted. The research program being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source includes the physics of UCN production, fundamental particle physics, and material surface studies of nanolayers containing hydrogen. In the present paper we report details of the engineering and cryogenic design of the facility as well as results of critical commissioning tests without neutrons.

  12. Circulating pumps of a liquid metal, generally sodium, ensuring the cooling of the core of a fast neutron reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Guidez, J.; Pradel, M.

    1980-08-26

    A circulating pump, particularly for the liquid cooling metal of the core of a fast neutron reactor, comprises a non-removable assembly permanently disposed in the vessel containing the liquid metal, constituted by a suction channel, a diffuser and at least one delivery pipe, wherein the non-removable assembly is suspended on a supporting structure which is immobilized relative to the core.

  13. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of built-up, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components.

  14. Evaluation of Neutron Radiography Reactor LEU-Core Start-Up Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Maddock, Thomas L.; Smolinski, Andrew T.; Marshall, Margaret A.

    2014-11-04

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate the cold-critical start-up measurements performed during the fresh core reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. Experiments include criticality, control-rod worth measurements, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity for four core loadings with 56, 60, 62, and 64 fuel elements. The worth of four graphite reflector block assemblies and an empty dry tube used for experiment irradiations were also measured and evaluated for the 60-fuel-element core configuration. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff come from uncertainties in the manganese content and impurities in the stainless steel fuel cladding as well as the 236U and erbium poison content in the fuel matrix. Calculations with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are approximately 1.4% (9?) greater than the benchmark model eigenvalues, which is commonly seen in Monte Carlo simulations of other TRIGA reactors. Simulations of the worth measurements are within the 2? uncertainty for most of the benchmark experiment worth values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  15. Evaluation of Neutron Radiography Reactor LEU-Core Start-Up Measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bess, John D.; Maddock, Thomas L.; Smolinski, Andrew T.; Marshall, Margaret A.

    2014-11-04

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate the cold-critical start-up measurements performed during the fresh core reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. Experiments include criticality, control-rod worth measurements, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity for four core loadings with 56, 60, 62, and 64 fuel elements. The worth of four graphite reflector block assemblies and an empty dry tube used for experiment irradiations were also measured and evaluated for the 60-fuel-element core configuration. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff come from uncertainties in the manganese content and impurities in the stainless steel fuel cladding asmore »well as the 236U and erbium poison content in the fuel matrix. Calculations with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are approximately 1.4% (9?) greater than the benchmark model eigenvalues, which is commonly seen in Monte Carlo simulations of other TRIGA reactors. Simulations of the worth measurements are within the 2? uncertainty for most of the benchmark experiment worth values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  16. Neutron Star - Core Merger as a Rare R-process Site

    E-print Network

    Papish, Oded

    2013-01-01

    We raise the possibility that strong r-process nucleosynthesis occurs inside jets launched by a neutron star (NS) spiraling-in inside the core of a red supergiant star. The strong r-process is the one where elements with high atomic weight of A>130 are formed. A NS in a common envelope (CE) with a massive red supergiant star is a very rare evolutionary route. This can account for the large variations in r-process elements bundances in the early evolution of the galaxy. We estimate the properties of the jets launched by the NS and their interaction with the giant material by using the jet-feedback mechanism, where energy deposited by the jets drives the ejection of the envelope and core. The jet feedback mechanism implies that Thorne-Zytkow objects cannot be produced via CE evolution. We compare the properties of these CE-NS jets with jets that are launched by a newly formed neutron star in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). We find that the lower neutrino flux and longer duration of the process in the rare cas...

  17. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhonglu

    2006-08-01

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiform (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm{sup 2} treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm {sup 10}B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm{sup 2} fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm{sup 2} tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm {sup 10}B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth in the head phantom for the 5.0-cm thick tungsten filter is (16.6 {+-} 1.8)%, which agrees well with the MCNP simulation of the simplified BNCEFNT assembly, (16.4 {+-} 0.5)%. The error in the calculated dose enhancement only considers the statistical uncertainties. The total dose rate measured at 5.0-cm depth using the non-borated ion chamber is (0.765 {+-} 0.076) Gy/MU, about 61% of the fast neutron standard dose rate (1.255Gy/MU) at 5.0-cm depth for the standard 10x10 cm{sup 2} treatment beam. The increased doses to other organs due to the use of the BNCEFNT assembly were calculated using MCNP5 and a MIRD phantom. The activities of the activation products produced in the BNCEFNT assembly after neutron beam delivery were computed. The photon ambient dose rate due to the radioactive activation products was also estimated.

  18. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhonglu

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm2 treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm2 collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm 10B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm2 fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm2 collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm2 tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm 10B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth in the head phantom for the 5.0-cm thick tungsten filter is (16.6 +/- 1.8)%, which agrees well with the MCNP simulation of the simplified BNCEFNT assembly, (16.4+/- 0.5)%. The error in the calculated dose enhancement only considers the statistical uncertainties. The total dose rate measured at 5.0-cm depth using the non-borated ion chamber is (0.765 +/- 0.076) Gy/MU, about 61% of the fast neutron standard dose rate (1.255Gy/MU) at 5.0-cm depth for the standard 10x10 cm 2 treatment beam. The increased doses to other organs due to the use of the BNCEFNT assembly were calculated using MCNP5 and a MIRD phantom. The activities of the activation products produced in the BNCEFNT assembly after neutron beam delivery were computed. The photon ambient dose rate due to the radioactive activation products was also estimated.

  19. Neutronic assessment of stringer fuel assembly design for liquid-salt-cooledvery high temperature reactor (LS-VHTR).

    SciTech Connect

    Szakaly, F. J.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2006-09-15

    Neutronic studies of 18-pin and 36-pin stringer fuel assemblies have been performed to ascertain that core design requirements for the Liquid-Salt Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR) can be met. Parametric studies were performed to determine core characteristics required to achieve a target core cycle length of 18 months and fuel discharge burnup greater than 100 GWd/t under the constraint that the uranium enrichment be less than 20% in order to support non-proliferation goals. The studies were done using the WIMS9 lattice code and the linear reactivity model to estimate the core reactivity balance, fuel composition, and discharge burnup. The results show that the design goals can be met using a 1-batch fuel management scheme, uranium enrichment of 15% and a fuel packing fraction of 30% or greater for the 36-pin stringer fuel assembly design.

  20. Neutron Imaging of Rapid Water Imbibition in Fractured Sedimentary Rock Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Donnelly, Brendan; Bilheux, Hassina; Tremsin, Anton; McKay, Larry; Distefano, Victoria; Cai, Jianchao; Santodonato, Lou

    2015-03-01

    Advances in nondestructive testing methods, such as neutron, nuclear magnetic resonance, and x-ray imaging, have significantly improved experimental capabilities to visualize fracture flow in various important fossil energy contexts, e.g. enhanced oil recovery and shale gas. We present a theoretical framework for predicting the rapid movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over rough fracture surfaces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Dynamic neutron imaging of water imbibition in unsaturated fractured Berea sandstone cores was employed to evaluate the proposed model. The experiments were conducted at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. Both theory and neutron imaging data indicated that fractures significantly increase imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increased the dispersion of the wetting front.

  1. Coupled 3D-neutronics / thermal-hydraulics analysis of an unprotected loss-of-flow accident for a 3600 MWth SFR core

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.; Chenu, A.; Mikityuk, K.; Krepel, J.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The core behaviour of a large (3600 MWth) sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is investigated in this paper with the use of a coupled TRACE/PARCS model. The SFR neutron spectrum is characterized by several performance advantages, but also leads to one dominating neutronics drawback - a positive sodium void reactivity. This implies a positive reactivity effect when sodium coolant is removed from the core. In order to evaluate such feedback in terms of the dynamics, a representative unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) transient, i.e. flow run-down without SCRAM in which sodium boiling occurs, is analyzed. Although analysis of a single transient cannot allow general conclusions to be drawn, it does allow better understanding of the underlying physics and can lead to proposals for improving the core response during such an accident. The starting point of this study is the reference core design considered in the framework of the Collaborative Project on the European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR). To reduce the void effect, the core has been modified by introducing an upper sodium plenum (along with a boron layer) and by reducing the core height-to-diameter ratio. For the ULOF considered, a sharp increase in core power results in melting of the fuel in the case of the reference core. In the modified core, a large dryout leads to melting of the clad. It seems that, for the hypothetical event considered, fuel failure cannot be avoided with just improvement of the neutronics design; therefore, thermal-hydraulics optimization has been considered. An innovative assembly design is proposed to prevent sodium vapour blocking the fuel channel. This results in preventing a downward propagation of the sodium boiling to the core center, thus limiting it to the upper region. Such a void map introduces a negative coolant density reactivity feedback, which dominates the total reactivity change. As a result, the power level and the fuel temperature are effectively reduced, and a large dryout is prevented. As a next step, the classical sodium plenum is replaced by a fission gas plenum (with lower sodium fraction), thus improving flow stability. Stable boiling at a steady power level is achieved in this final configuration. (authors)

  2. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  3. Electron-muon heat conduction in neutron star cores via the exchange of transverse plasmons

    E-print Network

    Shternin, P S

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons and muons kappa_{e-mu} produced owing to electromagnetic interactions of charged particles in neutron star cores and show that these interactions are dominated by the exchange of transverse plasmons (via the Landau damping of these plasmons in nonsuperconducting matter and via a specific plasma screening in the presence of proton superconductivity). For normal protons, the Landau damping strongly reduces kappa_{e-mu} and makes it temperature independent. Proton superconductivity suppresses the reduction and restores the Fermi-liquid behavior kappa_{e-mu} ~ 1/T. Comparing with the thermal conductivity of neutrons kappa_n, we obtain kappa_{e-mu}> kappa_n for T>2 GK in normal matter and for any T in superconducting matter with proton critical temperatures T_c>3e9 K. The results are described by simple analytic formulae.

  4. Electron-muon heat conduction in neutron star cores via the exchange of transverse plasmons

    E-print Network

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2007-05-14

    We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons and muons kappa_{e-mu} produced owing to electromagnetic interactions of charged particles in neutron star cores and show that these interactions are dominated by the exchange of transverse plasmons (via the Landau damping of these plasmons in nonsuperconducting matter and via a specific plasma screening in the presence of proton superconductivity). For normal protons, the Landau damping strongly reduces kappa_{e-mu} and makes it temperature independent. Proton superconductivity suppresses the reduction and restores the Fermi-liquid behavior kappa_{e-mu} ~ 1/T. Comparing with the thermal conductivity of neutrons kappa_n, we obtain kappa_{e-mu}> kappa_n for T>2 GK in normal matter and for any T in superconducting matter with proton critical temperatures T_c>3e9 K. The results are described by simple analytic formulae.

  5. Core polarization for the electric quadrupole moment of neutron-rich Aluminum isotopes

    E-print Network

    Kenichi Yoshida

    2009-02-18

    The core polarization effect for the electric quadrupole moment of the neutron-rich $^{31}$Al, $^{33}$Al and $^{35}$Al isotopes in the vicinity of the island of inversion are investigated by means of the microscopic particle-vibration coupling model in which the Skyrme Hartee-Fock-Bogoliubov and quasiparticle-random-phase approximation are used to calculate the single-quasiparticle wave functions and the excitation modes. It is found that the polarization charge for the proton $1d_{5/2}$ hole state in $^{33}$Al is quite sensitive to coupling to the neutrons in the $pf$-shell associated with the pairing correlations, and that the polarization charge in $^{35}$Al becomes larger due to the stronger collectivity of the low-lying quadrupole vibrational mode in the neighboring $^{36}$Si nucleus.

  6. Design and analysis of PCRV core cavity closure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.T.; Schwartz, A.A.; Koopman, D.C.A.

    1980-05-01

    Design requirements and considerations for a core cavity closure which led to the choice of a concrete closure with a toggle hold-down as the design for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) plant are discussed. A procedure for preliminary stress analysis of the closure by means of a three-dimensional finite element method is described. A limited parametric study using this procedure indicates the adequacy of the present closure design and the significance of radial compression developed as a result of inclined support reaction.

  7. Pebble-bed core design option for VHTRs - Core configuration flexibility and potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, M. L.; Tsvetkov, P. V.

    2006-07-01

    Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of VHTRs with fuel loadings containing minor actinides. This paper presents the analysis of pebble-bed core configurations. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities become more apparent. Effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, Dancoff factor, and core and reflector configurations are investigated. This effort is anticipated to contribute to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. (authors)

  8. Characterization of core debris/concrete interactions for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, C.R.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1992-02-01

    This report provides the results of a recent study conducted to explore the molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) issue for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The need for such a study arises from the potential threats to reactor system integrity posed by MCCI. These threats include direct attack of the concrete basemat of the containment; generation and release of large quantities of gas that can pressurize the containment; the combustion threat of these gases; and the potential generation, release, and transport of radioactive aerosols to the environment.

  9. Designing an Institutional Web-based Core Facility Management System

    PubMed Central

    Tabarini, D.; Clisham, S.; John, D.; Hagen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors and their four institutions collaborated to (i) identify the key challenges to core facility management; (ii) identify the requirements for an effective core facility management system; (iii) design, test and deploy such a system. Through a series of interviews with all participants in the core work flow (customers, core staff, administrators), the team identified a number of key challenges, including: (i) difficulty for researchers in identifying available services; (ii) inconsistent processes for requesting services; (iii) inadequate controls for approving service requests; (iv) inefficient processes for tracking and communicating about project processes; (v) time-consuming billing practices; (vi) incomplete revenue capture; (vii) manual reporting processes. The team identified the following requirements for a system to address these challenges: (i) ability to support a broad range of core business practices such as complex quote generation and project management; calendaring/equipment reservation management; sample tracking; complex forms; and import of usage data from hardware; (ii) ability to offer services for both internal and external customers, including flexible pricing and off-site access; (iii) ability to interact with institutional financial systems (e.g. SAP, PeopleSoft, Lawson, SunGard Banner) and identify management systems (e.g. Microsoft Active Directory, LDAP, and other SAML 2.0-compliant services). The team developed and deployed this system across the collaborative partners, as well as other major research institutions.

  10. Optimizing the usable bandwidth and loss through core design in realistic hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amezcua-Correa, Rodrigo; Broderick, N. G.; Petrovich, M. N.; Poletti, F.; Richardson, D. J.

    2006-08-01

    The operational bandwidth of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (PBGFs) is drastically affected by interactions between the fundamental core mode and surface modes guided at the core-cladding interface. By systematically studying realistic hollow-core PBGFs we identify a new design regime robust in eliminating the presence of surface modes. We present new fiber designs with a fundamental core mode free of anticrossings with surface modes at all wavelengths within the bandgap, allowing for a low-loss operational bandwidth of ~17% of the central gap wavelength.

  11. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.; Yan, J.

    2012-07-01

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  12. Neutron source design for the Los Alamos APT system

    SciTech Connect

    Cappiello, M.W. )

    1993-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerator production of tritium (APT) design incorporates a high-energy (1-GeV), high-current (200-mA) proton accelerator, a tungsten neutron source, and a moderating blanket that contains [sup 3]He for the production of tritium. To reduce the power density in the neutron source to acceptable levels, the incident proton beam is expanded to a 0.5- x 1.0-m [open quotes]beam spot.[close quotes] The beam passes through a double-wall vacuum interface window that is constructed of Inconel and is cooled with D[sub 2]O. The protons then enter a 1.3-m-diam x 3.5-m-long vessel also made of Inconel that contains [sup 3]He at moderate pressure (0.66 MPa) and 104 tungsten rod bundles that are distributed along the length of the vessel. The protons impinge on the tungsten and produce high-energy neutrons through the process of spallation. Behind the Inconel vessel is a proton backstop made of zirconium and lead that provides an additional source of neutrons and fully stops the proton beam. The Inconel vessel is surrounded by an annulus of aluminum-clad lead that is cooled with D[sub 2]O. Neutron multiplication occurs in the lead through additional spallation and (n,xn) reactions. Surrounding the lead is a thin annulus of [sup 3]He contained in aluminum tubing, a D[sub 2]O moderator, another annulus of [sup 3]He, and a D[sub 2]O reflector. Neutrons are moderated to near thermal energies in the D[sub 2]O. Tritium is produced through neutron capture in [sup 3]He that is circulated and processed continually. Thermal neutrons that are scattered back into the neutron source are preferentially captured in the [sup 3]He, thereby reducing the parasitic capture in the tungsten. The entire assembly of the neutron source vessel and surrounding blanket of lead, [sup 3]He, and D[sub 2]O are contained in a steel vessel.

  13. BEAM DUMP WINDOW DESIGN FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA,D.RANK,J.MURDOCH,G.ET AL.

    2004-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator systems will provide a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. Beam tuning dumps are provided at the end of the linac (the Linac Dump) and in the Ring-to-Target transport line (the Extraction Dump) [1]. Thin windows are required to separate the accelerator vacuum from the poor vacuum upstream of the beam dump. There are several challenging engineering issues that have been addressed in the window design. Namely, handling of the high local power density deposited by the stripped electrons from the H-beam accelerated in the linac, and the need for low-exposure removal and replacement of an activated window. The thermal design of the linac dump window is presented, as is the design of a vacuum clamp and mechanism that allows remote removal and replacement of the window.

  14. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  15. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  16. Rare earth elements in core marine sediments of coastal East Malaysia by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Ahmadreza; Saion, Elias; Gharibshahi, Elham; Mohamed Kamari, Halimah; Chee Kong, Yap; Suhaimi Hamzah, Mohd; Suhaimi Elias, Md

    2016-01-01

    A study was carried out on the concentration of REEs (Dy, Sm, Eu,Yb, Lu, La and Ce) that are present in the core marine sediments of East Malaysia from three locations at South China Sea and one location each at Sulu Sea and Sulawesi Sea. The sediment samples were collected at a depth of between 49 and 109m, dried, and crushed to powdery form. The entire core sediments prepared for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) were weighted approximately 0.0500g to 0.1000g for short irradiation and 0.1500g to 0.2000g for long irradiation. The samples were irradiated with a thermal neutron flux of 4.0×10(12)cm(-2)s(-1) in a TRIGA Mark II research reactor operated at 750kW. Blank samples and standard reference materials SL-1 were also irradiated for calibration and quality control purposes. It was found that the concentration of REEs varies in the range from 0.11 to 36.84mg/kg. The chondrite-normalized REEs for different stations suggest that all the REEs are from similar origins. There was no significant REEs contamination as the enrichment factors normalized for Fe fall in the range of 0.42-2.82. PMID:26405840

  17. Whole-core neutronics modeling of a TRIGA reactor using integral transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1990-01-01

    An innovative analysis approach for performing criticality calculations of various misload configurations for a TRIGA reactor has been employed recently at the Westinghouse Hanford Company. A deterministic transport theory model with sufficient geometric complexity to evaluate asymmetric loading patterns was used. Calculations of this complexity have been performed in the past using Monte Carlo simulation, such as the MCNP code. However, the Monte Carlo calculations are more difficult to prepare and require more computer time. On the Hanford site CRAY XMP-18 computer, the new methods required less than one-third of the central processing unit time per calculation as compared with an MCNP calculation using 100,000 neutron histories. The calculations were validated to actual core measurements, and very good agreement was achieved. Currently, the Hanford site NRF TRIGA reactor is being put into a nonoperational mode. One of the requirements accompanying this decision was to show computationally that the proposed downloaded core configuration should be substantially subcritical. To accomplish this, a series of criticality computations were undertaken using the latest version of the British neutron transport theory code, WIMS.

  18. The determination of neutron energy spectrum in reactor core C1 of reactor VR-1 Sparrow

    SciTech Connect

    Vins, M.

    2008-07-15

    This contribution overviews neutron spectrum measurement, which was done on training reactor VR-1 Sparrow with a new nuclear fuel. Former nuclear fuel IRT-3M was changed for current nuclear fuel IRT-4M with lower enrichment of 235U (enrichment was reduced from former 36% to 20%) in terms of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Neutron spectrum measurement was obtained by irradiation of activation foils at the end of pipe of rabit system and consecutive deconvolution of obtained saturated activities. Deconvolution was performed by computer iterative code SAND-II with 620 groups' structure. All gamma measurements were performed on Canberra HPGe. Activation foils were chosen according physical and nuclear parameters from the set of certificated foils. The Resulting differential flux at the end of pipe of rabit system agreed well with typical spectrum of light water reactor. Measurement of neutron spectrum has brought better knowledge about new reactor core C1 and improved methodology of activation measurement. (author)

  19. THE DOUBLE PULSAR: EVIDENCE FOR NEUTRON STAR FORMATION WITHOUT AN IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Breton, R. P.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Possenti, A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    2013-04-10

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4 hr orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737-3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3. Degree-Sign 2, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relatively symmetric, possibly involving electron capture onto an O-Ne-Mg core.

  20. Preliminary design study of advanced multistage axial flow core compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.; Koch, C. C.; Smith, L. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to identify an advanced core compressor for use in new high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines to be introduced into commercial service in the 1980's. An evaluation of anticipated compressor and related component 1985 state-of-the-art technology was conducted. A parametric screening study covering a large number of compressor designs was conducted to determine the influence of the major compressor design features on efficiency, weight, cost, blade life, aircraft direct operating cost, and fuel usage. The trends observed in the parametric screening study were used to develop three high-efficiency, high-economic-payoff compressor designs. These three compressors were studied in greater detail to better evaluate their aerodynamic and mechanical feasibility.

  1. CORE-BASED DESIGNS pose a significant test challenge. Vendors of intellectual prop-

    E-print Network

    Touba, Nur A.

    for testing embed- ded cores is to use multiplexing to make the core's inputs and outputs accessibleCORE-BASED DESIGNS pose a significant test challenge. Vendors of intellectual prop- erty cores, system designers can- not perform traditional test generation processes such as automatic test pattern

  2. GEANT4 used for neutron beam design of a neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouardi, A.; Machmach, A.; Alami, R.; Bensitel, A.; Hommada, A.

    2011-09-01

    Neutron imaging has a broad scope of applications and has played a pivotal role in visualizing and quantifying hydrogenous masses in metallic matrices. The field continues to expand into new applications with the installation of new neutron imaging facilities. In this scope, a neutron imaging facility for computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography is currently being developed around 2.0MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear Research Center in Morocco (Reuscher et al., 1990 [1]; de Menezes et al., 2003 [2]; Deinert et al., 2005 [3]). The neutron imaging facility consists of neutron collimator, real-time neutron imaging system and imaging process systems. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the tangential channel was selected. For power of 250 kW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux measured at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 3×10 11 ncm 2/s. This facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with two circular diaphragms with diameters of 4 and 2 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio of 165 and 325, respectively. These diaphragms' sizes allow reaching a compromise between good flux and efficient L/D-ratio. Convergent-divergent collimator geometry has been adopted. The beam line consists of a gamma filter, fast neutrons filter, neutron moderator, neutron and gamma shutters, biological shielding around the collimator and several stages of neutron collimator. Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 were used to design the neutron beam line ( http://www.info.cern.ch/asd/geant4/geant4.html[4]). To enhance the neutron thermal beam in terms of quality, several materials, mainly bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) were examined as gamma and neutron filters respectively. The GEANT4 simulations showed that the gamma and epithermal and fast neutron could be filtered using the bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) filters, respectively. To get a good cadmium ratio, GEANT 4 simulations were used to define the design of the moderator in the inlet of the radiation channel. A graphite block of 22 cm thickness seems to be the optimal neutron moderator. The results showed that the combination of 5 cm of bismuth with 5 cm of sapphire permits the filtration of gamma-rays, epithermal neutrons as well as fast neutrons in a considerable way without affecting the neutron thermal flux.

  3. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean; Vierow, Karen

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  4. Shielding Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    1998-09-17

    The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements, calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented.

  5. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) conceptual design shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Odano, N.; Lillie, R.A.

    1998-03-01

    The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented.

  6. Initial global 2-D shielding analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source core and reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    This document describes the initial global 2-D shielding analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, the D{sub 2}O reflector, the reflector vessel, and the first 200 mm of light water beyond the reflector vessel. Flux files generated here will later serve as source terms in subsequent shielding analyses. In addition to reporting fluxes and other data at key points of interest, a major objective of this report was to document how these analyses were performed, the phenomena that were included, and checks that were made to verify that these phenomena were properly modeled. In these shielding analyses, the fixed neutron source distribution in the core was based on the `lifetime-averaged` spatial power distribution. Secondary gamma production cross sections in the fuel were modified so as to account intrinsically for delayed fission gammas in the fuel as well as prompt fission gammas. In and near the fuel, this increased the low-energy gamma fluxes by 50 to 250%, but out near the reflector vessel, these same fluxes changed by only a few percent. Sensitivity studies with respect to mesh size were performed, and a new 2-D mesh distribution developed after some problems were discovered with respect to the use of numerous elongated mesh cells in the reflector. All of the shielding analyses were performed sing the ANSL-V 39n/44g coupled library with 25 thermal neutron groups in order to obtain a rigorous representation of the thermal neutron spectrum throughout the reflector. Because of upscatter in the heavy water, convergence was very slow. Ultimately, the fission cross section in the various materials had to be artificially modified in order to solve this fixed source problem as an eigenvalue problem and invoke the Vondy error-mode extrapolation technique which greatly accelerated convergence in the large 2-D RZ DORT analyses. While this was quite effective, 150 outer iterations (over energy) were still required.

  7. Design of MR brake featuring tapered inner magnetic core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Oh, Jong-Soek; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    In this work, a new type of MR brake featuring tapered inner magnetic core is proposed and its braking performance is numerically evaluated. In order to achieve high braking torque with restricted size and weight of MR brake system, tapered inner magnetic core is designed and expands the area that the magnetic flux is passing by MR fluid-filled gap. The mathematical braking torque model of the proposed MR brake is derived based on the field-dependent Bingham rheological model of MR fluid. Finite element analysis is carried out to identify electromagnetic characteristics of the conventional and the proposed MR brake configuration. To demonstrate the superiority of the proposed MR brake, the braking torque of the proposed MR brake is numerically evaluated and compared with that of conventional MR brake model.

  8. Development of a neutronics calculation method for designing commercial type Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Shimazu, Y.; Hibi, K.; Fujimura, K.

    2012-07-01

    Under the R and D project to improve the modeling accuracy for the design of fast breeder reactors the authors are developing a neutronics calculation method for designing a large commercial type sodium- cooled fast reactor. The calculation method is established by taking into account the special features of the reactor such as the use of annular fuel pellet, inner duct tube in large fuel assemblies, large core. The Verification and Validation, and Uncertainty Qualification (V and V and UQ) of the calculation method is being performed by using measured data from the prototype FBR Monju. The results of this project will be used in the design and analysis of the commercial type demonstration FBR, known as the Japanese Sodium fast Reactor (JSFR). (authors)

  9. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, J.L.

    1993-11-30

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values. 28 figures.

  10. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, Jasmina L. (Lisle, IL)

    1993-01-01

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values.

  11. Effect of irradiation induced structural material deformations on core restraint design

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinowski, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the major considerations in the design of LMFBR core restraint systems is presented. A discussion of these considerations is given using the design features and environment of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant core restraint system design. A comparison of core restraint performance with an alternate concept is provided. Conclusions are drawn on the direction of current and future core restraint system designs.

  12. A New Equation of State for Neutron Star Matter with Nuclei in the Crust and Hyperons in the Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatsu, Tsuyoshi; Yamamuro, Sachiko; Nakazato, Ken'ichiro

    2013-11-01

    The equation of state for neutron stars in a wide-density range at zero temperature is constructed. The chiral quark-meson coupling model within relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation is adopted for uniform nuclear matter. The coupling constants are determined so as to reproduce the experimental data of atomic nuclei and hypernuclei. In the crust region, nuclei are taken into account within the Thomas-Fermi calculation. All octet baryons are considered in the core region, while only ?- appears in neutron stars. The resultant maximum mass of neutron stars is 1.95 M ?, which is consistent with the constraint from the recently observed massive pulsar, PSR J1614-2230.

  13. Impact of the symmetry energy on nuclear pasta phases and crust-core transition in neutron stars

    E-print Network

    S. S. Bao; H. Shen

    2015-01-14

    We study the impact of the symmetry energy on properties of nuclear pasta phases and crust-core transition in neutron stars. We perform a self-consistent Thomas--Fermi calculation employing the relativistic mean-field model. The properties of pasta phases presented in the inner crust of neutron stars are investigated and the crust-core transition is examined. It is found that the slope of the symmetry energy plays an important role in determining the pasta phase structure and the crust-core transition. The correlation between the symmetry energy slope and the crust-core transition density obtained in the Thomas--Fermi approximation is consistent with that predicted by the liquid-drop model.

  14. A neutronic feasibility study of the AP1000 design loaded with fully ceramic micro-encapsulated fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.; Ji, W.

    2013-07-01

    A neutronic feasibility study is performed to evaluate the utilization of fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel in the AP1000 reactor design. The widely used Monte Carlo code MCNP is employed to perform the full core analysis at the beginning of cycle (BOC). Both the original AP1000 design and the modified design with the replacement of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with FCM fuel compacts are modeled and simulated for comparison. To retain the original excess reactivity, ranges of fuel particle packing fraction and fuel enrichment in the FCM fuel design are first determined. Within the determined ranges, the reactor control mechanism employed by the original design is directly used in the modified design and the utilization feasibility is evaluated. The worth of control of each type of fuel burnable absorber (discrete/integral fuel burnable absorbers and soluble boron in primary coolant) is calculated for each design and significant differences between the two designs are observed. Those differences are interpreted by the fundamental difference of the fuel form used in each design. Due to the usage of silicon carbide as the matrix material and the fuel particles fuel form in FCM fuel design, neutron slowing down capability is increased in the new design, leading to a much higher thermal spectrum than the original design. This results in different reactivity and fission power density distributions in each design. We conclude that a direct replacement of fuel pellets by the FCM fuel in the AP1000 cannot retain the original optimum reactor core performance. Necessary modifications of the core design should be done and the original control mechanism needs to be re-designed. (authors)

  15. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING-DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    2005-05-16

    After six years, the delivery of components for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring (AR) and the transport lines was completed in Spring 2005. Designed to deliver 1.5 MW beam power (1.5 x 10{sup 14} protons of 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz), stringent measures were implemented in the fabrication, test, and assembly to ensure the quality of the accelerator systems. This paper summarizes the design, R&D, and construction of the ring and transport systems.

  16. DESIGN OPTIMIZATION AND THE PATH TOWARDS A 2 MW SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CATALAN-LASHERAS,N.; DAVINO,D.; FEDOTOV,A.; LEE,Y.Y.; MALITSKY,N.; ET AL

    2001-06-18

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to ultimately reach an average proton beam power of 2 MW for pulsed neutron production. The SNS physics groups analyze the machine performance within the hardware constraints, optimize the accelerator design, and establish the best path towards a 2 MW and higher spallation neutron source.

  17. Modeling & analysis of core debris recriticality during hypothetical severe accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Georgevich, V.; Simpson, D.B.; Slater, C.O.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1992-10-01

    This paper discusses salient aspects of severe-accident-related recriticality modeling and analysis in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. The development of an analytical capability using the KEN05A-SCALE system is described including evaluation of suitable nuclear cross-section sets to account for the effects of system geometry, mixture temperature, material dispersion and other thermal-hydraulic conditions. Benchmarking and validation efforts conducted with KEN05-SCALE and other neutronic codes against critical experiment data are described. Potential deviations and biases resulting from use of the 16-group Hansen-Roach library are shown. A comprehensive test matrix of calculations to evaluate the threat of a criticality event in the ANS is described. Strong dependencies on geometry, material constituents, and thermal-hydraulic conditions are described. The introduction of designed mitigative features are described.

  18. Energy efficient engine core design and performance report. Report, January 1978-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, E.M.

    1982-12-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) is a NASA program to develop fuel saving technology for future large transport aircraft engines. Testing of the General Electric E3 core showed that the core component performance and core system performance necessary to meet the program goals can be achieved. The E3 core design and test results are described.

  19. On the Charge to Mass Ratio of Neutron Cores and Heavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricelli, B.; Rotondo, M.; Ruffini, R.

    2008-01-01

    We determine theoretically the relation between the total number of protons Np and the mass number A (the charge to mass ratio) of nuclei and neutron cores with the model recently proposed by Ruffini et al. (2007) and we compare it with other Np versus A relations: the empirical one, related to the Periodic Table, and the semi-empirical relation, obtained by minimizing the Weizsäcker mass formula. We find that there is a very good agreement between all the relations for values of A typical of nuclei, with differences of the order of per cent. Our relation and the semi-empirical one are in agreement up to A~104 for higher values, we find that the two relations differ. We interprete the different behaviour of our theoretical relation as a result of the penetration of electrons (initially confined in an external shell) inside the core, that becomes more and more important by increasing A; these effects are not taken into account in the semi-empirical mass-formula.

  20. Determination of neutron flux density distribution in the core with LEU fuel IRT-4M at the training reactor VR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Huml, O.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this work was to determine the neutron flux density distribution in various places of the training reactor VR-1 Sparrow. This experiment was performed on the new core design C1, composed of the new low-enriched uranium fuel cells IRT-4M (19.7 %). This fuel replaced the old high-enriched uranium fuel IRT-3M (36 %) within the framework of the RERTR Program in September 2005. The measurement used the neutron activation analysis method with gold wires. The principle of this method consists in neutron capture in a nucleus of the material forming the activation detector. This capture can change the nucleus in a radioisotope, whose activity can be measured. The absorption cross-section values were evaluated by MCNP computer code. The gold wires were irradiated in seven different positions in the core C1. All irradiations were performed at reactor power level 1E8 (1 kW{sub therm}). The activity of segments of irradiated wires was measured by special automatic device called 'Drat' (Wire in English). (author)

  1. STEP: A Unified Design Methodology for Secure Test and IP Core Protection

    E-print Network

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    STEP: A Unified Design Methodology for Secure Test and IP Core Protection Pranav Yeolekar1 , Rishad@cs.bris.ac.uk4 , saraju.mohanty@unt.edu5 ABSTRACT Intellectual property (IP) core based embedded systems de- sign. Protecting the design information in these IP cores and secur- ing test from various attacks are two emerging

  2. Quadrupole transition strength in the (74)Ni nucleus and core polarization effects in the neutron-rich Ni isotopes.

    PubMed

    Marchi, T; de Angelis, G; Valiente-Dobón, J J; Bader, V M; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Berryman, J; Bonaccorso, A; Clark, R; Coraggio, L; Crawford, H L; Doncel, M; Farnea, E; Gade, A; Gadea, A; Gargano, A; Glasmacher, T; Gottardo, A; Gramegna, F; Itaco, N; John, P R; Kumar, R; Lenzi, S M; Lunardi, S; McDaniel, S; Michelagnoli, C; Mengoni, D; Modamio, V; Napoli, D R; Quintana, B; Ratkiewicz, A; Recchia, F; Sahin, E; Stroberg, R; Weisshaar, D; Wimmer, K; Winkler, R

    2014-10-31

    The reduced transition probability B(E2;0(+)?2(+)) has been measured for the neutron-rich nucleus (74)Ni in an intermediate energy Coulomb excitation experiment performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The obtained B(E2;0(+)?2(+))=642(-226)(+216)??e(2)?fm(4) value defines a trend which is unexpectedly small if referred to (70)Ni and to a previous indirect determination of the transition strength in (74)Ni. This indicates a reduced polarization of the Z=28 core by the valence neutrons. Calculations in the pfgd model space reproduce well the experimental result indicating that the B(E2) strength predominantly corresponds to neutron excitations. The ratio of the neutron and proton multipole matrix elements supports such an interpretation. PMID:25396363

  3. Core design of long life-cycle fast reactors operating without reactivity margin

    SciTech Connect

    Aristova, E. N.; Baydin, D. F.; Gol'din, V. Y.; Pestryakova, G. A.; Stoynov, M. I.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we consider a possibility of designing a fast reactor core that operates without reactivity margin for a long time. This study is based on the physical principle of fast reactor operating in a self-adjustable neutron-nuclear regime (SANNR-1) introduced by L.P. Feoktistov (1988-1993) and improved by V. Ya. Gol'din SANNR-2 (1995). The mathematical modeling of active zones of fast reactors in SANNR modes is held by authors since 1992. The numerical simulation is based on solving the neutron transport equation coupled with quasi-diffusion equations. The calculations have been performed using standard 26 energy groups. We use a hierarchy of spatial models of 1D, 1.5D, 2D, and 3D geometries. The spatial models of higher dimensionality are used for verification of results. The calculations showed that operation of the reactor in this mode increases its efficiency, safety and simplifies management. It is possible to achieve continuous work of the reactor in SANNR-2 during 7-10 years without fuel overloads by means of further optimization of the mode. Small reactivity margin is used only for the reactor start up. After first 10-15 days the reactor in SANNR-2 operates without reactivity margin. (authors)

  4. THERMAL: A routine designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1995-02-24

    THERMAL is designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering that is isotropic in the center of mass system. At low energy thermal motion will be included. At high energies the target nuclei are assumed to be stationary. The point of transition between low and high energies has been defined to insure a smooth transition. It is assumed that at low energy the elastic cross section is constant in the center of mass system. At high energy the cross section can be of any form. You can use this routine for all energies where the elastic scattering is isotropic in the center of mass system. In most materials this will be a fairly high energy.

  5. New parallel programming language design: a bridge between brain models and multi-core/many-core computers?

    E-print Network

    Stefanescu, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    The recurrent theme of this paper is that sequences of long temporal patterns as opposed to sequences of simple statements are to be fed into computation devices, being them (new proposed) models for brain activity or multi-core/many-core computers. In such models, parts of these long temporal patterns are already committed while other are predicted. This combination of matching patterns and making predictions appears as a key element in producing intelligent processing in brain models and getting efficient speculative execution on multi-core/many-core computers. A bridge between these far-apart models of computation could be provided by appropriate design of massively parallel, interactive programming languages. Agapia is a recently proposed language of this kind, where user controlled long high-level temporal structures occur at the interaction interfaces of processes. In this paper Agapia is used to link HTMs brain models with TRIPS multi-core/many-core architectures.

  6. Design Core Commonalities: A Study of the College of Design at Iowa State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venes, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive study asks what a group of rather diverse disciplines have in common. It involves a cross-disciplinary examination of an entire college, the College of Design at Iowa State University. This research was intended to provide a sense of direction in developing and assessing possible core content. The reasoning was that material…

  7. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.; Filliatre, P.; Lopez, A. Legrand; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Bréaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 1020 n/cm2. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  8. Neutronics assessment of stringer fuel assembly designs for the liquid-salt-cooled very high temperature reactor (LS-VHTR).

    SciTech Connect

    Szakaly, F. J.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-01-01

    Neutronic studies of 18-pin and 36-pin stringer fuel assemblies have been performed to ascertain that core design requirements for the Liquid-Salt Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR) can be met. Parametric studies were performed to determine core characteristics required to achieve a target core cycle length of 18 months and fuel discharge burnup greater than 100 GWd/t under the constraint that the uranium enrichment be less than 20% in order to support non-proliferation goals. The studies were done using the WIMS9 lattice code and the linear reactivity model to estimate the core reactivity balance, fuel composition, and discharge burnup. The results show that the design goals can be met using a 1-batch fuel management scheme, uranium enrichment of 15% and a fuel packing fraction of 30% or greater for the 36-pin stringer fuel assembly design.Evaluations of a liquid-salt- (molten-salt-) cooled version of the prismatic-block type VHTR, the LS-VHTR, are ongoing at U.S. national laboratories, universities, and industry. These evaluations have included core and passive safety studies and balance of plant conceptual designs.

  9. Facing Challenges for Monte Carlo Analysis of Full PWR Cores : Towards Optimal Detail Level for Coupled Neutronics and Proper Diffusion Data for Nodal Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttin, A.; Capellan, N.; David, S.; Doligez, X.; El Mhari, C.; Méplan, O.

    2014-06-01

    Safety analysis of innovative reactor designs requires three dimensional modeling to ensure a sufficiently realistic description, starting from steady state. Actual Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport codes are suitable candidates to simulate large complex geometries, with eventual innovative fuel. But if local values such as power densities over small regions are needed, reliable results get more difficult to obtain within an acceptable computation time. In this scope, NEA has proposed a performance test of full PWR core calculations based on Monte Carlo neutron transport, which we have used to define an optimal detail level for convergence of steady state coupled neutronics. Coupling between MCNP for neutronics and the subchannel code COBRA for thermal-hydraulics has been performed using the C++ tool MURE, developed for about ten years at LPSC and IPNO. In parallel with this study and within the same MURE framework, a simplified code of nodal kinetics based on two-group and few-point diffusion equations has been developed and validated on a typical CANDU LOCA. Methods for the computation of necessary diffusion data have been defined and applied to NU (Nat. U) and Th fuel CANDU after assembly evolutions by MURE. Simplicity of CANDU LOCA model has made possible a comparison of these two fuel behaviours during such a transient.

  10. The design of reload cores using optimal control theory

    SciTech Connect

    Terney, W.B.; Williamson, E.A.

    1982-11-01

    A formal approach for the optimization of the final design of reload cores has been devised and verified. The method is based on applying the calculus of variations (Pontryagin's principle) to the normal flux and depletion system equations. The resulting set of coupled system, Euler-Lagrange (E-L), and optimality equations are solved iteratively. This is done by assuming a loading pattern for the old fuel, first solving the system equations, and then the E-L equations. The pattern is then modified by using the optimality (or Pontryagin) condition, and the process is repeated until no further improvements can be made. A computer program, OPMUV, implementing these procedures has been written and verified. The code can handle two-dimensional, quarter-core symmetric configurations with up to 241 assemblies and 4 nodes per assembly with modified one-group theory. It also has the capability of optimizing over the entire depletion cycle as well as just at the beginning of cycle (BOC). The results show that the procedure does work. In all cases tried, the method led to a reduction in nodal peaks of 1 to 3% over the final designer-obtained loading pattern within a couple of iterations. These savings carry over to comparable reductions in pin peaks when the optimized patterns are used in four-group, fine-mesh calculations. Since the changes on each iteration are limited to ensure convergence, the method is thus well suited for the final fine tuning of the normally obtained patterns to gain an extra few percent in power flattening.

  11. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  12. A feasibility design study on a neutron spectrometer for BNCT with liquid moderator.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, S; Sato, F; Murata, I

    2015-12-01

    Neutrons generated by accelerators have various energy spectra. However, only limited methods are available to measure the whole neutron energy spectrum, especially when including the epithermal region that is normally used in BNCT. In the present study, we carried out the design study on a new neutron spectrometer that can measure such a neutron spectrum more accurately, precisely and with higher energy resolution, using an unfolding technique and a liquid moderator. PMID:26297075

  13. Media digital signal processor core design for multimedia application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Yu, Guo-jun; Cai, Wei-guang; Yao, Qing-dong

    2006-02-01

    An embedded single media processor named MediaDSP3200 core fabricated in a six-layer metal 0.18um CMOS process which implemented the RISC instruction set, DSP data processing instruction set and single-instruction-multiple-data (SIMD) multimedia-enhanced instruction set is described. MediaDSP3200 fuses RISC architecture and DSP computation capability thoroughly, which achieves RISC fundamental, DSP extended and single instruction multiple data (SIMD) instruction set with various addressing modes in a unified pipeline stage architecture. These characteristics enhance system digital signal processing performance greatly. The test processor can achieve 32x32-bit multiply-accumulate (MAC) of 320 MOPS, with 16x16-bit MAC of 1280MOPS. The test processor dissipates 600mW at 1.8v, 320MHz. Also, the implementation was primarily standard cell logic design style. MediaDSP3200 targets diverse embedded application systems, which need both powerful processing/control capability and low-cost budget, e.g. set-top-boxes, video conferencing, DTV, etc. MediaDSP3200 instruction set architecture, addressing mode, pipeline design, SIMD feature, split-ALU and MAC are described in this paper. Finally, the performance benchmark based on H.264 and MPEG decoder algorithm are given in this paper.

  14. Design study for an advanced liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core with a high burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, T.; Kuga, H. ); Suzuki, M.; Yokoyama, T. ); Yamaoka, M. . Nuclear Research Lab.); Kaneto, K.; Ohashi, M. . Hitachi Works); Kurihara, K. . Energy Research Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    Design studies are performed for a commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core that can achieve a burnup of 200 GWd/t. A plutonium-type asymmetric parfait core with two different plutonium-enriched zones in the axial direction as well as in the radial direction is studied. This core concept solves core design problems related to high burnup, and it is possible to achieve a burnup of 200 GWd/t with this concept. A core with ductless fuel assemblies suitable for high burnup is also studied. An axially heterogeneous core was selected from among various concepts. It is possible to realize a core with a burnup of 200 GWd/t, a compact size, and a lower core pressure drop than the demonstration reactor design.

  15. A new paradigm for local-global coupling in whole-core neutron transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.; Smith, M.; Palmiotti, G,; Nuclear Engineering Division; Northwestern Univ.; INL

    2009-01-01

    A new paradigm that increases the efficiency of whole-core neutron transport calculations without lattice homogenization is introduced. Quasi-reflected interface conditions are formulated to partially decouple periodic lattice effects from global flux gradients. The starting point is the finite subelement form of the variational nodal code VARIANT that eliminates fuel-coolant homogenization through the use of heterogeneous nodes. The interface spherical harmonics expansions that couple pin-cell-sized nodes are divided into low-order and high-order terms, and reflected interface conditions are applied to the high-order terms. Combined with an integral transport method within the node, the new approach dramatically reduces both the formation time and the dimensions of the nodal response matrices and leads to sharply reduced memory requirements and computational time. The method is applied to the two-dimensional C5G7 problem, an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency pressurized water reactor benchmark containing mixed oxide (MOX) and UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies, as well as to a three-dimensional MOX fuel assembly. Results indicate the new approach results in very little loss of accuracy relative to the corresponding full spherical harmonics expansions while reducing computational times by well over an order of magnitude.

  16. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2011-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  17. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  18. Verification of the CENTRM Module for Adaptation of the SCALE Code to NGNP Prismatic and PBR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, Barry; Maldonado, Ivan

    2014-01-23

    The generation of multigroup cross sections lies at the heart of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) core design, whether the prismatic (block) or pebble-bed type. The design process, generally performed in three steps, is quite involved and its execution is crucial to proper reactor physics analyses. The primary purpose of this project is to develop the CENTRM cross-section processing module of the SCALE code package for application to prismatic or pebble-bed core designs. The team will include a detailed outline of the entire processing procedure for application of CENTRM in a final report complete with demonstration. In addition, they will conduct a thorough verification of the CENTRM code, which has yet to be performed. The tasks for this project are to: Thoroughly test the panel algorithm for neutron slowing down; Develop the panel algorithm for multi-materials; Establish a multigroup convergence 1D transport acceleration algorithm in the panel formalism; Verify CENTRM in 1D plane geometry; Create and test the corresponding transport/panel algorithm in spherical and cylindrical geometries; and, Apply the verified CENTRM code to current VHTR core design configurations for an infinite lattice, including assessing effectiveness of Dancoff corrections to simulate TRISO particle heterogeneity.

  19. Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-11-29

    This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the code’s versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research project’s primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

  20. A new equation of state for neutron star matter with nuclei in the crust and hyperons in the core

    E-print Network

    Miyatsu, Tsuyoshi; Nakazato, Ken'ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The equation of state for neutron stars in a wide-density range at zero temperature is constructed. The chiral quark-meson coupling model within relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation is adopted for uniform nuclear matter. The coupling constants are determined so as to reproduce the experimental data of atomic nuclei and hypernuclei. In the crust region, nuclei are taken into account within the Thomas-Fermi calculation. All octet baryons are considered in the core region, while only $\\Xi^{-}$ appears in neutron stars. The resultant maximum mass of neutron stars is $1.95M_\\odot$, which is consistent with the constraint from the recently observed massive pulsar, PSR J1614-2230.

  1. IB: a Monte Carlo Simulation Tool for Neutron Scattering Instrument Design under Parallel Virtual Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui

    2011-01-01

    IB is a Monte Carlo simulation tool for aiding neutron scattering instrument designs. It is written in C++ and implemented under Parallel Virtual Machine. The program has a few basic components, or modules, that can be used to build a virtual neutron scattering instrument. More complex components, such as neutron guides and multichannel beam benders, can be constructed using the grouping technique unique to IB. Users can specify a collection of modules as a group. For example, a neutron guide can be constructed by grouping four neutron mirrors together that make up the four sides of the guide. IB s simulation engine ensures that neutrons entering a group will be properly operated upon by all members of the group. For simulations that require higher computer speed, the program can be run in parallel mode under the PVM architecture. Initially, the program was written for designing instruments on pulsed neutron sources, it has since been used to simulate reactor based instruments as well.

  2. Results of a Neutronic Simulation of HTR-Proteus Core 4.2 using PEBBED and other INL Reactor Physics Tools: FY-09 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar

    2009-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory’s deterministic neutronics analysis codes and methods were applied to the computation of the core multiplication factor of the HTR-Proteus pebble bed reactor critical facility. A combination of unit cell calculations (COMBINE-PEBDAN), 1-D discrete ordinates transport (SCAMP), and nodal diffusion calculations (PEBBED) were employed to yield keff and flux profiles. Preliminary results indicate that these tools, as currently configured and used, do not yield satisfactory estimates of keff. If control rods are not modeled, these methods can deliver much better agreement with experimental core eigenvalues which suggests that development efforts should focus on modeling control rod and other absorber regions. Under some assumptions and in 1D subcore analyses, diffusion theory agrees well with transport. This suggests that developments in specific areas can produce a viable core simulation approach. Some corrections have been identified and can be further developed, specifically: treatment of the upper void region, treatment of inter-pebble streaming, and explicit (multiscale) transport modeling of TRISO fuel particles as a first step in cross section generation. Until corrections are made that yield better agreement with experiment, conclusions from core design and burnup analyses should be regarded as qualitative and not benchmark quality.

  3. Spallation neutron source cryomodule heat loads and thermal design

    SciTech Connect

    E. F. Daly; V. Ganni; C. H. Rode; W. J. Schneider; K. M. Wilson; M. A. Wiseman

    2002-05-10

    When complete, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide a 1 GeV, 2 MW beam for experiments. One portion of the machine's linac consists of over 80 Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) 805 MHz cavities housed in a minimum of 23 cryomodules operating at a saturation temperature of 2.1 K. Minimization of the total heat load is critical to machine performance and for efficient operation of the system. The total heat load of the cryomodules consists of the fixed static load and the dynamic load, which is proportional to the cavity performance. The helium refrigerator supports mainly the cryomodule loads and to a lesser extent the distribution system loads. The estimated heat loads and calculated thermal performance are discussed along with two unique features of this design: the helium heat exchanger housed in the cryomodule return end can and the helium gas cooled fundamental power coupler.

  4. Design and Simulation of a Boron-loaded Neutron Spectrometer 

    E-print Network

    Martin, Thomas

    2012-10-19

    The measurement of the distribution of kinetic energy carried by neutron particles is of interest to the health physics and radiation protection industry. Neutron particle spectral fluence is essential to the calculation of absorbed dose, equivalent...

  5. Core design for use with precision composite reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Christopher C. (inventor); Jacoy, Paul J. (inventor); Schmitigal, Wesley P. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A uniformly flexible core, and method for manufacturing the same, is disclosed for use between the face plates of a sandwich structure. The core is made of a plurality of thin corrugated strips, the corrugations being defined by a plurality of peaks and valleys connected to one another by a plurality of diagonal risers. The corrugated strips are orthogonally criss-crossed to form the core. The core is particularly suitable for use with high accuracy spherically curved sandwich structures because undesirable stresses in the curved face plates are minimized due to the uniform flexibility characteristics of the core in both the X and Y directions. The core is self venting because of the open geometry of the corrugations. The core can be made from any suitable composite, metal, or polymer. Thermal expansion problems in sandwich structures may be minimized by making the core from the same composite materials that are selected in the manufacture of the curved face plates because of their low coefficients of thermal expansion. Where the strips are made of a composite material, the core may be constructed by first cutting an already cured corrugated sheet into a plurality of corrugated strips and then secondarily bonding the strips to one another or, alternatively, by lying a plurality of uncured strips orthogonally over one another in a suitable jig and then curing and bonding the entire plurality of strips to one another in a single operation.

  6. Development of Optimized Core Design and Analysis Methods for High Power Density BWRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvan, Koroush

    Increasing the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy is vital to its future. Improving the economics of BWRs is the main goal of this work, focusing on designing cores with higher power density, to reduce the BWR capital cost. Generally, the core power density in BWRs is limited by the thermal Critical Power of its assemblies, below which heat removal can be accomplished with low fuel and cladding temperatures. The present study investigates both increases in the heat transfer area between ~he fuel and coolant and changes in operating parameters to achieve higher power levels while meeting the appropriate thermal as well as materials and neutronic constraints. A scoping study is conducted under the constraints of using fuel with cylindrical geometry, traditional materials and enrichments below 5% to enhance its licensability. The reactor vessel diameter is limited to the largest proposed thus far. The BWR with High power Density (BWR-HD) is found to have a power level of 5000 MWth, equivalent to 26% uprated ABWR, resulting into 20% cheaper O&M and Capital costs. This is achieved by utilizing the same number of assemblies, but with wider 16x16 assemblies and 50% shorter active fuel than that of the ABWR. The fuel rod diameter and pitch are reduced to just over 45% of the ABWR values. Traditional cruciform form control rods are used, which restricts the assembly span to less than 1.2 times the current GE14 design due to limitation on shutdown margin. Thus, it is possible to increase the power density and specific power by 65%, while maintaining the nominal ABWR Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR) margin. The plant systems outside the vessel are assumed to be the same as the ABWR-Il design, utilizing a combination of active and passive safety systems. Safety analyses applied a void reactivity coefficient calculated by SIMULA TE-3 for an equilibrium cycle core that showed a 15% less negative coefficient for the BWR-HD compared to the ABWR. The feedwater temperature was kept the same for the BWR-HD and ABWR which resulted in 4 °K cooler core inlet temperature for the BWR-HD given that its feedwater makes up a larger fraction of total core flow. The stability analysis using the STAB and S3K codes showed satisfactory results for the hot channel, coupled regional out-of-phase and coupled core-wide in-phase modes. A RELAPS model of the ABWR system was constructed and applied to six transients for the BWR-HD and ABWR. The 6MCPRs during all the transients were found to be equal or less for the new design and the core remained covered for both. The lower void coefficient along with smaller core volume proved to be advantages for the simulated transients. Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods were proposed in prior MIT studies to enhance the fuel surface to volume ratio. In this work, higher fidelity models (e.g. CFD instead of subchannel methods for the hydraulic behaviour) are used to investigate the resolution needed for accurate assessment of the HCF design. For neutronics, conserving the fuel area of cylindrical rods results in a different reactivity level with a lower void coefficient for the HCF design. In single-phase flow, for which experimental results existed, the friction factor is found to be sensitive to HCF geometry and cannot be calculated using current empirical models. A new approach for analysis of flow crisis conditions for HCF rods in the context of Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) and dryout using the two phase interface tracking method was proposed and initial results are presented. It is shown that the twist of the HCF rods promotes detachment of a vapour bubble along the elbows which indicates no possibility for an early DNB for the HCF rods and in fact a potential for a higher DNB heat flux. Under annular flow conditions, it was found that the twist suppressed the liquid film thickness on the HCF rods, at the locations of the highest heat flux, which increases the possibility of reaching early dryout. It was also shown that modeling the 3D heat and stress distribution in the HCF rods is necessary

  7. General Behavioral Thermal Modeling and Characterization for Multi-core Microprocessor Design

    E-print Network

    Tan, Sheldon X.-D.

    General Behavioral Thermal Modeling and Characterization for Multi-core Microprocessor Design Thom-performance multi-core microprocessor design. The new approach builds the thermal behavioral models from. Such an approach can make the modeling process much easier and less restrictive than before, and more amenable

  8. Suspended core subwavelength fibers: towards practical designs for low-loss terahertz guidance

    E-print Network

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    . Additionally, the air-tight porous cladding serves as a natural enclosure for the fiber core, thus avoidingSuspended core subwavelength fibers: towards practical designs for low-loss terahertz guidance.skorobogatiy@polymtl.ca Abstract: In this work we report two designs of subwavelength fibers packaged for practical terahertz wave

  9. Apparatus for the purification of a liquid metal for cooling in the core of a fast neutron reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, R.; Delisle, J.; Elie, X.; Peyrelongue, J.; Salon, G.

    1981-07-14

    Apparatus is described for the purification of the liquid metal for cooling the core of a fast neutron reactor comprising a heat insulating envelope immersed in the reactor core and suspended from the protective slab surmounting the latter, a removable plug disposed in said slab and giving access to the upper part of the inside of the envelope and, within the latter, a cooling coil for cooling a liquid metal flow taken from the reactor core to a temperature which ensures the solidification of impurities, a filter cartridge for filtering the cooled liquid metal, a heat exchanger for the at least partial heating of the purified metal prior to its return to the reactor core and a valve for regulating the purified metal flow returned to the core, wherein it comprises a passage for returning to the upper part of the envelope purified metal from the filter cartridge, the purified metal being returned to the reactor core with the purified metal in heat exchange with the metal to be purified in a regulated flow, the regulating valve of said flow being disposed in the upper part of the envelope.

  10. CHARGED-PARTICLE AND NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESSES IN THE HIGH-ENTROPY WIND OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Truran, J. W.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. E-mail: truran@nova.uchicago.ed E-mail: k-l.Kratz@mpic.d E-mail: F-K.Thielemann@unibas.c

    2010-04-01

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e} , and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e} , beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a beta-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from beta-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and beta-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low metallicity stars.

  11. Parallel Computational Modelling of Inelastic Neutron Scattering in Multi-node and Multi-core Architectures 

    E-print Network

    Garba, M.T.; Gonzales-Velez, H.; Roach, D.L.

    2010-11-26

    This paper examines the initial parallel implementation of SCATTER, a computationally intensive inelastic neutron scattering routine with polycrystalline averaging capability, for the General Utility Lattice Program (GULP). ...

  12. Designing a minimum-functionality neutron and gamma measurement instrument with a focus on authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Karpius, Peter J; Williams, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    During the design and construction of the Next-Generation Attribute-Measurement System, which included a largely commercial off-the-shelf (COTS), nondestructive assay (NDA) system, we realized that commercial NDA equipment tends to include numerous features that are not required for an attribute-measurement system. Authentication of the hardware, firmware, and software in these instruments is still required, even for those features not used in this application. However, such a process adds to the complexity, cost, and time required for authentication. To avoid these added authenticat ion difficulties, we began to design NDA systems capable of performing neutron multiplicity and gamma-ray spectrometry measurements by using simplified hardware and software that avoids unused features and complexity. This paper discusses one possible approach to this design: A hardware-centric system that attempts to perform signal analysis as much as possible in the hardware. Simpler processors and minimal firmware are used because computational requirements are kept to a bare minimum. By hard-coding the majority of the device's operational parameters, we could cull large sections of flexible, configurable hardware and software found in COTS instruments, thus yielding a functional core that is more straightforward to authenticate.

  13. Neutron micro-beam design simulation by Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Taheri, Ali

    2007-09-01

    Over the last two decades neutron micro-beam has increasingly been developing in view of various applications in molecular activation analysis, micro-radiography in space and aviation and in radiation induced bystander effects in bio-cells. In this paper the structure and simulation of a neutron micro-beam is presented. The collimator for micro-beam is made of a polyethylene cylinder with a small hole along the centerline of the cylinder. The hole is filled with very thin needles in triangular or rectangular arrangement. The neutron source was reactor neutrons or a spontaneous Cf-252 neutron source falling on the top side of the collimator. The outgoing thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes were calculated.

  14. Double core evolution. 7: The infall of a neutron star through the envelope of its massive star companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terman, James L.; Taam, Ronald E.; Hernquist, Lars

    1995-01-01

    Binary systems with properties similar to those of high-mass X-ray binaries are evolved through the common envelope phase. Three-dimensional simulations show that the timescale of the infall phase of the neutron star depends upon the evolutionary state of its massive companion. We find that tidal torques more effectively accelerate common envelope evolution for companions in their late core helium-burning stage and that the infall phase is rapid (approximately several initial orbital periods). For less evolved companions the decay of the orbit is longer; however, once the neutron star is deeply embedded within the companion's envelope the timescale for orbital decay decreases rapidly. As the neutron star encounters the high-density region surrounding the helium core of its massive companion, the rate of energy loss from the orbit increases dramatically leading to either partial or nearly total envelope ejection. The outcome of the common envelope phase depends upon the structure of the evolved companion. In particular, it is found that the entire common envelope can be ejected by the interaction of the neutron star with a red supergiant companion in binaries with orbital periods similar to those of long-period Be X-ray binaries. For orbital periods greater than or approximately equal to 0.8-2 yr (for companions of mass 12-24 solar mass) it is likely that a binary will survive the common envelope phase. For these systems, the structure of the progenitor star is characterized by a steep density gradient above the helium core, and the common envelope phase ends with a spin up of the envelope to within 50%-60% of corotation and with a slow mass outflow. The efficiency of mass ejection is found to be approximately 30%-40%. For less evolved companions, there is insufficient energy in the orbit to unbind the common envelope and only a fraction of it is ejected. Since the timescale for orbital decay is always shorter than the mass-loss timescale from the common envelope, the two cores will likely merge to form a Thorne-Zytkow object. Implications for the origin of Cyg X-3, an X-ray source consisting of a Wolf-Rayet star and a compact companion, and for the fate of the remnant binary consisting of a helium star and a neutron star are briefly discussed.

  15. Analyzing the effect of geometric factors on designing neutron radiography system.

    PubMed

    Amini, Moharam; Fadaei, Amir Hosein; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Neutron radiography is one of the main applications of research reactors. It is a powerful tool to conduct nondestructive testing of materials. The parameters that affect the quality of a radiographic image must be considered during the design of a neutron radiography system. Hence, this study aims to investigate the effect of geometric factors on the quality of the neutron radiography system. The results show that the performance of the mentioned system can be increased by regulating the geometric factors. PMID:26343340

  16. Near-Core and In-Core Neutron Radiation Monitors for Real Time Neutron Flux Monitoring and Reactor Power Level Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas S. McGregor; Marvin L. Adams; Igor Carron; Paul Nelson

    2006-06-12

    MPFDs are a new class of detectors that utilize properties from existing radiation detector designs. A majority of these characteristics come from fission chamber designs. These include radiation hardness, gamma-ray background insensitivity, and large signal output.

  17. ATR LEU Monothlic and Dispersed with 10B Loading Minimization DesignNeutronics Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2001-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), currently operating in the United States, is used for material testing at very high neutron fluxes. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting HEU driven reactor cores to low-enriched uranium (LEU) cores. The present work investigates the optimized LEU Monolithic and Dispersed fuel with 10B loading minimization design and evaluates the subsequent neutronics operating effects of these optimized fuel designs. The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was used to optimize the 235U and minimize the 10B loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profiles between the HEU and LEU cores were minimized. The fuel depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K eff versus effective full power days (EFPD) in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the optimized LEU Monolithic and Dispersed fuel cases demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPD plot is similar to the ATR reference HEU case study. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, the proposed LEU Monolithic (U-10Mo) core conversion case with nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and 235U enrichment of 19.7 wt% is used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness. The proposed LEU fuel meat varies from 0.203 mm (8.0 mil) to 0.254 mm (10.0 mil) at the inner four fuel plates (1-4) and outer four fuel plates (16-19). In addition, an optimized LEU dispersed (U7Mo) case with all the fuel meat thickness of 0.635 mm (25 mil) was also proposed. Then, for both Monolithic and dispersed cases, a burnable absorber – 10B, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the higher to average ratio of the inner/outer heat flux more effectively. The final minimized 10B loading for LEU case studies will have 0.635 g in the LEU fuel meat at the inner 2 fuel plates (1-2) and outer 2 fuel plates (18-19), which can achieve peak to average ratios similar to those for the ATR reference HEU case study. The investigation of this paper shows the optimized LEU Monolithic (U-10Mo) and Dispersed (U7Mo) cases can all meet the LEU conversion objectives.

  18. Design and Characterization of a Hydride-based Hydrogen Storage Container for Neutron Imaging Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruj, A.; Ardito, M.; Marín, J.; Sánchez, F.; Borzone, E. M.; Meyer, G.

    We have designed, constructed and tested a prototype hydride-based container to in-situ observe the hydride decomposition process using a neutron imaging facility. This work describes the container design parameters and the experimental setup used for the studies. The results open new possibilities for the application of the neutron imaging technique to visualize the internal state of massive hydride-based hydrogen containers, thus aiding in the design of efficient hydrogen storage tanks.

  19. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV, and D-T wi...

  20. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: Effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation (PGNA) analysis is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV and D-T with...

  1. The 'virtual density' principle of neutronics: Toward rapid computation of reactivity effects in practical core distortion scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.; Smith, K.; Forget, B.

    2013-07-01

    Fast reactor core reactivities are sensitive to geometric distortions arising from three distinct phenomena: (1) irradiation swelling of fuel throughout core lifetime, (2) thermal expansion of fuel during transients, and (3) mechanical oscillations during seismic events. Performing comprehensive reactivity analysis of these distortions requires methods for rapidly computing a multitude of minute reactivity changes. Thus, we introduce the 'virtual density' principle of neutronics as a new perturbation technique to achieve this rapid computation. This new method obviates many of the most challenging aspects of conventional geometric perturbation theory. Essentially, this 'virtual density' principle converts geometric perturbations into equivalent material density perturbations (either isotropic or anisotropic), which are highly accurate and comparatively simple to evaluate. While traditional boundary perturbation theory employs surface integrals, the 'virtual density' principle employs equivalent volume integrals. We introduce and validate this method in three subsequent stages: (1) isotropic 'virtual density', (2) anisotropic 'virtual density' for whole cores, and (3) anisotropic 'virtual density' for interior zones within cores. We numerically demonstrate its accuracy for 2-D core flowering scenarios. (authors)

  2. Finite element solution of the multi-group neutron diffusion equation applied to the hypothetical core disruptive accident

    SciTech Connect

    Baldasaro, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    A two-dimensional (r,z), space-time-energy dependent calculational method has been developed for use in LMFBR hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) analyses which utilizes the Finite Element Method (subsequently referred to as FEM) for the necessary diffusion theory neutronics calculations.The hydrodynamic portion of the calculation is performed with a modified form of the VENUS-I computer program which does a thermodynamic energy balance and uses an energy-density-dependent equation-of-state to calculate the pressures which cause reactor disassembly. The reactivity feedback which results from material motion is based on a Hermite Finite Element neutronics method in (r,z) geometry. The FEM neutronic calculations are done using an Eulerian coordinate system while the VENUS calculations employ a Lagrangian coordinate system. A unique feature of the FEM calculations is that the use of Hermite finite elements allows the analytic construction of iteration matrices. The numerical solution of the resulting system of equations utilizes direct matrix inversion which helps to minimize computing time. The major disadvantage of this method, relative to the standard finite differencing method (FDM), is the additional computational logic which is required. This application of the FEM demonstrates the potential which the method has for providing fast, accurate, and reliable solutions to the multi-group neutron diffusion problem where the effects of local heterogeneities are minimal.

  3. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  4. Coded aperture Fast Neutron Analysis: Latest design advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, Roberto; Lanza, Richard C.

    2001-07-01

    Past studies have showed that materials of concern like explosives or narcotics can be identified in bulk from their atomic composition. Fast Neutron Analysis (FNA) is a nuclear method capable of providing this information even when considerable penetration is needed. Unfortunately, the cross sections of the nuclear phenomena and the solid angles involved are typically small, so that it is difficult to obtain high signal-to-noise ratios in short inspection times. CAFNAaims at combining the compound specificity of FNA with the potentially high SNR of Coded Apertures, an imaging method successfully used in far-field 2D applications. The transition to a near-field, 3D and high-energy problem prevents a straightforward application of Coded Apertures and demands a thorough optimization of the system. In this paper, the considerations involved in the design of a practical CAFNA system for contraband inspection, its conclusions, and an estimate of the performance of such a system are presented as the evolution of the ideas presented in previous expositions of the CAFNA concept.

  5. Current directions in core-shell nanoparticle design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schärtl, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Ten years ago I wrote a review about the important field of core-shell nanoparticles, focussing mainly on our own work about tracer systems, and briefly addressing polymer-coated nanoparticles as fillers for homogeneous polymer-colloid composites. Since then, the potential use of core-shell nanoparticles as multifunctional sensors or potential smart drug-delivery vehicles in biology and medicine has gained more and more importance, affording special types of multi-functionalized and bio-compatible nanoparticles. In this new review article, I try to address the most important developments during the last ten years. This overview is mainly based on frequently cited and more specialized recent review articles from leaders in their respective field. We will consider a variety of nanoscopic core-shell architectures from highly fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), protected magnetic NPs, multifunctional NPs, thermoresponsive NPs and biocompatible systems to, finally, smart drug-delivery systems.Ten years ago I wrote a review about the important field of core-shell nanoparticles, focussing mainly on our own work about tracer systems, and briefly addressing polymer-coated nanoparticles as fillers for homogeneous polymer-colloid composites. Since then, the potential use of core-shell nanoparticles as multifunctional sensors or potential smart drug-delivery vehicles in biology and medicine has gained more and more importance, affording special types of multi-functionalized and bio-compatible nanoparticles. In this new review article, I try to address the most important developments during the last ten years. This overview is mainly based on frequently cited and more specialized recent review articles from leaders in their respective field. We will consider a variety of nanoscopic core-shell architectures from highly fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), protected magnetic NPs, multifunctional NPs, thermoresponsive NPs and biocompatible systems to, finally, smart drug-delivery systems. Dedicated to Professor Manfred Schmidt on the occasion of his 60th birthday

  6. High accuracy modeling for advanced nuclear reactor core designs using Monte Carlo based coupled calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espel, Federico Puente

    The main objective of this PhD research is to develop a high accuracy modeling tool using a Monte Carlo based coupled system. The presented research comprises the development of models to include the thermal-hydraulic feedback to the Monte Carlo method and speed-up mechanisms to accelerate the Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Presently, deterministic codes based on the diffusion approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation, coupled with channel-based (or sub-channel based) thermal-hydraulic codes, carry out the three-dimensional (3-D) reactor core calculations of the Light Water Reactors (LWRs). These deterministic codes utilize nuclear homogenized data (normally over large spatial zones, consisting of fuel assembly or parts of fuel assembly, and in the best case, over small spatial zones, consisting of pin cell), which is functionalized in terms of thermal-hydraulic feedback parameters (in the form of off-line pre-generated cross-section libraries). High accuracy modeling is required for advanced nuclear reactor core designs that present increased geometry complexity and material heterogeneity. Such high-fidelity methods take advantage of the recent progress in computation technology and coupled neutron transport solutions with thermal-hydraulic feedback models on pin or even on sub-pin level (in terms of spatial scale). The continuous energy Monte Carlo method is well suited for solving such core environments with the detailed representation of the complicated 3-D problem. The major advantages of the Monte Carlo method over the deterministic methods are the continuous energy treatment and the exact 3-D geometry modeling. However, the Monte Carlo method involves vast computational time. The interest in Monte Carlo methods has increased thanks to the improvements of the capabilities of high performance computers. Coupled Monte-Carlo calculations can serve as reference solutions for verifying high-fidelity coupled deterministic neutron transport methods with detailed and accurate thermal-hydraulic models. The development of such reference high-fidelity coupled multi-physics scheme is described in this dissertation on the basis of MCNP5, NEM, NJOY and COBRA-TF (CTF) computer codes. This work presents results from studies performed and implemented at the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) on both accelerating Monte Carlo criticality calculations by using hybrid nodal diffusion Monte Carlo schemes and thermal-hydraulic feedback modeling in Monte Carlo core calculations. The hybrid MCNP5/CTF/NEM/NJOY coupled code system is proposed and developed in this dissertation work. The hybrid coupled code system contains a special interface developed to update the required MCNP5 input changes to account for dimension and density changes provided by the thermal-hydraulics feedback module. The interface has also been developed to extract the flux and reaction rates calculated by MCNP5 to later transform the data into the power feedback needed by CTF (axial and radial peaking factors). The interface is contained in a master program that controls the flow of the calculations. Both feedback modules (thermal-hydraulic and power subroutines) use a common internal interface to further accelerate the data exchange. One of the most important steps to correctly include the thermal hydraulic feedback into MCNP5 calculations begins with temperature dependent cross section libraries. If the cross sections used for the calculations are not at the correct temperature, the temperature feedback cannot be included into MCNP5 (referred to the effect of temperature on cross sections: Doppler boarding of resolve and unresolved resonances, thermal scattering and elastic scattering). The only method of considering the temperature effects on cross sections is through the generation (or as introduced in this dissertation through a novel interpolation mechanism) of continuous energy temperature-dependent cross section libraries. An automated methodology for generation of continuous energy temperature-dependent cross section libraries has been developed

  7. 1.1 Abstract In this thesis, we have designed a core model of microprocessor that can be used for

    E-print Network

    of intellectual Property (IP) cores. With increasing number of IP cores, it is important to connect IP cores. At the early phase of the design, which is likely to undergo lot of changes1 CHAPTER 1.1 Abstract In this thesis, we have designed a core model of microprocessor that can

  8. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Visscher, Theodore; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Donahue, Jr., Cornelius; Riedel, Richard A.

    2015-05-21

    We describe the design and performance of a 157mm x 157mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of 3) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low Rw(F) values

  9. Magnetic heating properties and neutron activation of tungsten-oxide coated biocompatible FePt core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Seemann, K M; Luysberg, M; Révay, Z; Kudejova, P; Sanz, B; Cassinelli, N; Loidl, A; Ilicic, K; Multhoff, G; Schmid, T E

    2015-01-10

    Magnetic nanoparticles are highly desirable for biomedical research and treatment of cancer especially when combined with hyperthermia. The efficacy of nanoparticle-based therapies could be improved by generating radioactive nanoparticles with a convenient decay time and which simultaneously have the capability to be used for locally confined heating. The core-shell morphology of such novel nanoparticles presented in this work involves a polysilico-tungstate molecule of the polyoxometalate family as a precursor coating material, which transforms into an amorphous tungsten oxide coating upon annealing of the FePt core-shell nanoparticles. The content of tungsten atoms in the nanoparticle shell is neutron activated using cold neutrons at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRMII) neutron facility and thereby transformed into the radioisotope W-187. The sizeable natural abundance of 28% for the W-186 precursor isotope, a radiopharmaceutically advantageous gamma-beta ratio of ???30% and a range of approximately 1mm in biological tissue for the 1.3MeV ?-radiation are promising features of the nanoparticles' potential for cancer therapy. Moreover, a high temperature annealing treatment enhances the magnetic moment of nanoparticles in such a way that a magnetic heating effect of several degrees Celsius in liquid suspension - a prerequisite for hyperthermia treatment of cancer - was observed. A rise in temperature of approximately 3°C in aqueous suspension is shown for a moderate nanoparticle concentration of 0.5mg/ml after 15min in an 831kHz high-frequency alternating magnetic field of 250Gauss field strength (25mT). The biocompatibility based on a low cytotoxicity in the non-neutron-activated state in combination with the hydrophilic nature of the tungsten oxide shell makes the coated magnetic FePt nanoparticles ideal candidates for advanced radiopharmaceutical applications. PMID:25445697

  10. Preliminary Neutronics Design and Analysis of D2O Cooled High Conversion PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled PWRs loaded with MOX fuel and focuses essentially on the Pu breeding potential of such reactors as well as on an important safety parameter, the void coefficient, which has to be negative. It is well known that fast reactors have a better neutron economy and are better suited than thermal reactors to breed fissile material from neutron capture in fertile material. Such fast reactors (e.g. sodium-cooled reactors) usually rely on technologies that are very different from those of existing water-cooled reactors and are probably more expensive. This report investigates another possibility to obtain a fast neutron reactor while still relying mostly on a PWR technology by: (1) Tightening the lattice pitch to reduce the water-to-fuel volume ratio compared to that of a standard PWR. Water-to-fuel volume ratios of between 0.45 and 1 have been considered in this study while a value of about 2 is typical of standard PWRs, (2) Using D2O instead of H2O as a coolant. Indeed, because of its different neutron physics properties, the use of D2O hardens the neutron spectrum to an extent impossible with H2O when used in a tight-pitch lattice. The neutron spectra thus obtained are not as fast as those in sodium-cooled reactor but they can still be characterized as fast compared to that of standard PWR neutron spectra. In the phase space investigated in this study we did not find any configurations that would have, at the same time, a positive Pu mass balance (more Pu at the end than at the beginning of the irradiation) and a negative void coefficient. At this stage, the use of radial blankets has only been briefly addressed whereas the impact of axial blankets has been well defined. For example, with a D2O-to-fuel volume ratio of 0.45 and a core driver height of about 60 cm, the fissile Pu mass balance between the fresh fuel and the irradiated fuel (50 GWd/t) would be about -7.5% (i.e. there are 7.5% fewer fissile Pu isotopes at the end than at the beginning of the irradiation) and the void coefficient would be negative. The addition of 1 cm of U-238 blanket at the top and bottom of the fuel would bring the fissile Pu mass balance from -7.5% to -6.5% but would also impact the void coefficient in the wrong way. In fact, it turns out that the void coefficient is so sensitive to the presence of axial blanket that it limits its size to only a few cm for driver fuel height of about 50-60 cm. For reference, the fissile Pu mass balance is about -35% in a standard PWR MOX fuel such as those used in France. In order to reduce the fissile Pu deficit and potentially reach a true breeding regime (i.e. a positive Pu mass balance), it would be necessary to make extensive use of radial blankets, both internal and external. Even though this was not addressed in detail here, it is reasonable to believe that at least as much U-238 blanket subassemblies as MOX driver fuel subassemblies would be necessary to breed enough Pu to compensate for the Pu deficit in the driver fuel. Hence, whereas a relatively simple D2O-cooled PWR core design makes it possible to obtain a near-breeder core, it may be necessary to more than double the mass of heavy metal in the core as well as the mass of heavy metal to reprocess per unit of energy produced in order to breed the few percents of Pu missing to reach a true breeding regime. It may be interesting to quantify these aspects further in the future.

  11. Characterization of core debris/concrete interactions for the Advanced Neutron Source. ANS Severe Accident Analysis Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, C.R.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1992-02-01

    This report provides the results of a recent study conducted to explore the molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) issue for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The need for such a study arises from the potential threats to reactor system integrity posed by MCCI. These threats include direct attack of the concrete basemat of the containment; generation and release of large quantities of gas that can pressurize the containment; the combustion threat of these gases; and the potential generation, release, and transport of radioactive aerosols to the environment.

  12. Teaching to the Common Core by Design, Not Accident

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Vicki; Wong, Carina

    2012-01-01

    The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has created tools and supports intended to help teachers adapt to the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and mathematics. The tools seek to find the right balance between encouraging teachers' creativity and giving them enough guidance to ensure quality. They are the product of two years of…

  13. A compact neutron beam generator system designed for prompt gamma nuclear activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D

    2011-08-01

    In this work a compact system was designed for bulk sample analysis using the technique of PGNAA. The system consists of (252)Cf fission neutron source, a moderator/reflector/filter assembly, and a suitable enclosure to delimit the resulting neutron beam. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement has been optimised to maximise the thermal neutron component useful for samples analysis with a suitably low level of beam contamination. The neutron beam delivered by this compact system is used to irradiate the sample and the prompt gamma rays produced by neutron reactions within the sample elements are detected by appropriate gamma rays detector. Neutron and gamma rays transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP5). PMID:21129990

  14. The evolution of core and surface magnetic eld in isolated neutron stars

    E-print Network

    .Petersburg, Russia e-mail: dyk@astro.io e.rssi.ru 2) Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam An der Sternwarte 16 D (2000), both to neutron star models based on di erent equations of state and to di erent initial

  15. Rapid cooling of neutron star in Cassiopeia A and $r$-mode damping in the core

    E-print Network

    Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    An alternative explanation to the rapid cooling of neutron star in Cas A is proposed, which suggests that the star is experiencing the recovery period following the \\textit{r}-mode heating process, assuming the star is differentially rotating. Like the neutron-superfluidity-triggering model, we predicted the rapid cooling will continue for several decades. But the behavior of the two models has slight differences, and they may be distinguished by observations in the near future.

  16. An Effective Instructional Design at Iowa Lakes Community College to Make Hard Core Unemployed People Employable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorzmann, Eugene F.

    In order to meet the educational needs of the hard-core unemployed, an instructional program known as the "Alternative Career Center" was designed at Iowa Lakes Community College to prepare those identified by the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act for employment. After reviewing the literature on educational programs for the hard-core

  17. Low Power Monolithic 3D IC Design of Asynchronous AES Core

    E-print Network

    Lim, Sung Kyu

    Low Power Monolithic 3D IC Design of Asynchronous AES Core Neela Lohith Penmetsa1, Christos--In this paper, we demonstrate, for the first time, that a monolithic 3D implementation of an asynchronous AES that the asynchronous implementation of the encryption core is more tolerant to monolithic 3D tier-tier variation

  18. Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector

    E-print Network

    Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

  19. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

  20. IB: A Monte Carlo simulation tool for neutron scattering instrument design under PVM and MPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui

    2011-12-01

    Design of modern neutron scattering instruments relies heavily on Monte Carlo simulation tools for optimization. IB is one such tool written in C++ and implemented under Parallel Virtual Machine and the Message Passing Interface. The program was initially written for the design and optimization of the EQ-SANS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source. One of its features is the ability to group simple instrument components into more complex ones at the user input level, e.g. grouping neutron mirrors into neutron guides and curved benders. The simulation engine manages the grouped components such that neutrons entering a group are properly operated upon by all components, multiple times if needed, before exiting the group. Thus, only a few basic optical modules are needed at the programming level. For simulations that require higher computer speeds, the program can be compiled and run in parallel modes using either the PVM or the MPI architectures.

  1. Overview of the Conceptual Design of the Future VENUS Neutron Imaging Beam Line at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilheux, Hassina; Herwig, Ken; Keener, Scott; Davis, Larry

    VENUS (Versatile Neutron Imaging Beam line at the Spallation Neutron Source) will be a world-class neutron-imaging instrument that will uniquely utilize the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) time-of-flight (TOF) capabilities to measure and characterize objects across several length scales (mm to ?m). When completed, VENUS will provide academia, industry and government laboratories with the opportunity to advance scientific research in areas such as energy, materials, additive manufacturing, geosciences, transportation, engineering, plant physiology, biology, etc. It is anticipated that a good portion of the VENUS user community will have a strong engineering/industrial research focus. Installed at Beam line 10 (BL10), VENUS will be a 25-m neutron imaging facility with the capability to fully illuminate (i.e., umbra illumination) a 20 cm x 20 cm detector area. The design allows for a 28 cm x 28 cm field of view when using the penumbra to 80% of the full illumination flux. A sample position at 20 m will be implemented for magnification measurements. The optical components are comprised of a series of selected apertures, T0 and bandwidth choppers, beam scrapers, a fast shutter to limit sample activation, and flight tubes filled with Helium. Techniques such as energy selective, Bragg edge and epithermal imaging will be available at VENUS.

  2. 76 FR 14825 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated Contact Markets

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...3038-AD09 Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated Contact Markets AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION...site at http://www.cftc.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nancy Markowitz, Assistant Deputy Director,...

  3. Development of optimized core design and analysis methods for high power density BWRs

    E-print Network

    Shirvan, Koroush

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy is vital to its future. Improving the economics of BWRs is the main goal of this work, focusing on designing cores with higher power density, to reduce the BWR ...

  4. Fusion Engineering and Design 80 (2006) 7998 Advanced power core system for the

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    the number of cooling systems. However, Pb-17Li provides marginal heat transfer performance in particularFusion Engineering and Design 80 (2006) 79­98 Advanced power core system for the ARIES-AT power in the presence of MHD effects and the divertor design had to be adapted to accommodate the peak design heat flux

  5. Fusion Engineering and Design 82 (2007) 217236 Advanced power core system for the

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    heat transfer performance in particular in the presence of MHD effects and the divertor design hadFusion Engineering and Design 82 (2007) 217­236 Advanced power core system for the ARIES-AT power to be adapted to accommodate the peak design heat flux of 5 MW/m2 . The blanket flow scheme enables operating Pb

  6. Legal Protection on IP Cores for System-on-Chip Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Takahiko

    The current semiconductor industry has shifted from vertical integrated model to horizontal specialization model in term of integrated circuit manufacturing. In this circumstance, IP cores as solutions for System-on-Chip (SoC) have become increasingly important for semiconductor business. This paper examines to what extent IP cores of SoC effectively can be protected by current intellectual property system including integrated circuit layout design law, patent law, design law, copyright law and unfair competition prevention act.

  7. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Stillman, J.; Feldman, E.; Foyto, L; Kutikkad, K; McKibben, J C; Peters, N.; Stevens, J.

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  8. Neutron capture on Pt isotopes in iron meteorites and the Hf-W chronology of core formation in planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijer, Thomas S.; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Kleine, Thorsten; Sprung, Peter; Leya, Ingo; Wieler, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The short-lived 182Hf-182W isotope system can provide powerful constraints on the timescales of planetary core formation, but its application to iron meteorites is hampered by neutron capture reactions on W isotopes resulting from exposure to galactic cosmic rays. Here we show that Pt isotopes in magmatic iron meteorites are also affected by capture of (epi)thermal neutrons and that the Pt isotope variations are correlated with variations in 182W/184W. This makes Pt isotopes a sensitive neutron dosimeter for correcting cosmic ray-induced W isotope shifts. The pre-exposure 182W/184W derived from the Pt-W isotope correlations of the IID, IVA and IVB iron meteorites are higher than most previous estimates and are more radiogenic than the initial 182W/184W of Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI). The Hf-W model ages for core formation range from +1.6±1.0 million years (Ma; for the IVA irons) to +2.7±1.3 Ma after CAI formation (for the IID irons), indicating that there was a time gap of at least ˜1 Ma between CAI formation and metal segregation in the parent bodies of some iron meteorites. From the Hf-W ages a time limit of <1.5-2 Ma after CAI formation can be inferred for the accretion of the IID, IVA and IVB iron meteorite parent bodies, consistent with earlier conclusions that the accretion of differentiated planetesimals predated that of most chondrite parent bodies.

  9. Multipurpose Advanced 'inherently' Safe Reactor (MARS): Core design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Golfier, H.; Poinot, C.; Delpech, M.; Mignot, G.

    2006-07-01

    In the year 2005, in collaboration with CEA, the University of Rome 'La Sapienza' investigated a new core model with the aim at increasing the performances of the reference one, by extending the burn-up to 60 GWD/t in the case of multi-loading strategy and investigating the characteristics and limitations of a 'once-through' option, in order to enhance the proliferation resistance. In the first part of this paper, the objectives of this study and the methods of calculation are briefly described, while in the second part the calculation results are presented. (authors)

  10. Design and experimental tests of a novel neutron spin analyzer for wide angle spin echo spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Fouquet, Peter; Farago, Bela; Andersen, Ken H.; Bentley, Phillip M.; Pastrello, Gilles; Sutton, Iain; Thaveron, Eric; Thomas, Frederic; Moskvin, Evgeny; Pappas, Catherine

    2009-09-15

    This paper describes the design and experimental tests of a novel neutron spin analyzer optimized for wide angle spin echo spectrometers. The new design is based on nonremanent magnetic supermirrors, which are magnetized by vertical magnetic fields created by NdFeB high field permanent magnets. The solution presented here gives stable performance at moderate costs in contrast to designs invoking remanent supermirrors. In the experimental part of this paper we demonstrate that the new design performs well in terms of polarization, transmission, and that high quality neutron spin echo spectra can be measured.

  11. Drive turbine system for 20-inch turbofan simulators. 2: Core turbine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Drive-turbines for a given set of 20-inch turbo-fan simulators are described. The simulators had both single-stage and two-stage fans that had design pressure ratios as low as 1.25 and as high as 3.0. The desired objective of the study was to be able to drive all of the single-stage fans with one core turbine and to drive all of the two-stage fans with this same core turbine in combination with a duct turbine. The core turbine is described. Included are the design operating conditions, design velocity diagram and a power-speed envelope determined by an off-design performance procedure. Also discussed is the adaption and scaling of an existing turbine design to this particular application.

  12. Neutronics analysis of an open-cycle high-impulse gas core reactor concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A procedure was developed to calculate the critical fuel mass, including the effects of propellant pressure, for coaxial-flow gas-core reactors operating at 196,600 newtons thrust and 4400 seconds specific impulse. Data were generated for a range of cavity diameter, reflector-moderator thickness, and quantity of structural material. Also presented are such core characteristics as upper limits on cavity pressure, spectral hardening in very-high-temperature hydrogen, and reactivity coefficients.

  13. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modeling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    SciTech Connect

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; de Caro, M S; Caro, A

    2009-03-16

    Concept designs for the laser-initiated fusion/fission engine (LIFE) include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a safe and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermomechanical behavior under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence/fast flux on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling, which we estimate to be at least 16 months if uncoated and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed.

  14. Modified Y-TZP Core Design Improves All-ceramic Crown Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Silva, N.R.F.A.; Bonfante, E.A.; Rafferty, B.T.; Zavanelli, R.A.; Rekow, E.D.; Thompson, V.P.; Coelho, P.G.

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that all-ceramic core-veneer system crown reliability is improved by modification of the core design. We modeled a tooth preparation by reducing the height of proximal walls by 1.5 mm and the occlusal surface by 2.0 mm. The CAD-based tooth preparation was replicated and positioned in a dental articulator for core and veneer fabrication. Standard (0.5 mm uniform thickness) and modified (2.5 mm height lingual and proximal cervical areas) core designs were produced, followed by the application of veneer porcelain for a total thickness of 1.5 mm. The crowns were cemented to 30-day-aged composite dies and were either single-load-to-failure or step-stress-accelerated fatigue-tested. Use of level probability plots showed significantly higher reliability for the modified core design group. The fatigue fracture modes were veneer chipping not exposing the core for the standard group, and exposing the veneer core interface for the modified group. PMID:21057036

  15. Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

    1999-11-14

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

  16. ETHERNES: A new design of radionuclide source-based thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, R; Sacco, D; Gómez-Ros, J M; Lorenzoli, M; Gentile, A; Buonomo, B; Pola, A; Introini, M V; Bortot, D; Domingo, C

    2016-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility based on an (241)Am-Be source embedded in a polyethylene moderator has been designed, and is called ETHERNES (Extended THERmal NEutron Source). The facility shows a large irradiation cavity (45cm×45cm square section, 63cm in height), which is separated from the source by means of a polyethylene sphere acting as shadowing object. Taking advantage of multiple scattering of neutrons with the walls of this cavity, the moderation process is especially effective and allows obtaining useful thermal fluence rates from 550 to 800cm(-2)s(-1) with a source having nominal emission rate 5.7×10(6)s(-1). Irradiation planes parallel to the cavity bottom have been identified. The fluence rate across a given plane is as uniform as 3% (or better) in a disk with 30cm (or higher) diameter. In practice, the value of thermal fluence rate simply depends on the height from the cavity bottom. The thermal neutron spectral fraction ranges from 77% up to 89%, depending on the irradiation plane. The angular distribution of thermal neutrons is roughly isotropic, with a slight prevalence of directions from bottom to top of the cavity. The mentioned characteristics are expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing. PMID:26516990

  17. Energy efficient engine. Core engine bearings, drives and configuration: Detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broman, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The detailed design of the forward and aft sumps, the accessory drive system, the lubrication system, and the piping/manifold configuration to be employed in the core engine test of the Energy Efficient Engine is addressed. The design goals for the above components were established based on the requirements of the test cell engine.

  18. IEEE P1500-Compliant Test Wrapper Design for Hierarchical Cores Anuja Sehgal

    E-print Network

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    modules are tested as stand-alone units [2]. For embed- ded non-logic components, such as memoriesIEEE P1500-Compliant Test Wrapper Design for Hierarchical Cores Anuja Sehgal ¡ Sandeep Kumar Goel Research Department of Digital Design & Test Prof. Holstlaan 4 ­ WAY-41 5656 AA Eindhoven, The Netherlands

  19. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  20. A high power density radial-in-flow reactor split core design for space power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomes, Edmund P.

    Application of the Rankine cycle to space power systems is difficult because of the problems and complexities associated with two phase flow systems in microgravity. A direct cycle system which could provide super heated vapor to the turbine inlet would greatly enhance the development of Rankine cycle power systems for space applications. The split core radial-in-flow reactor design provides a safe reliable core design for space power systems. It makes direct Rankine cycle power systems a very competitive design, eliminating the boiler and additional pumps of an indirect cycle along with the liquid vapor separator. A continuous power Rankine cycle system using this core design would produce the least weight system of any having the same power output.

  1. Design and simulation of an optimized e-linac based neutron source for BNCT research.

    PubMed

    Durisi, E; Alikaniotis, K; Borla, O; Bragato, F; Costa, M; Giannini, G; Monti, V; Visca, L; Vivaldo, G; Zanini, A

    2015-12-01

    The paper is focused on the study of a novel photo-neutron source for BNCT preclinical research based on medical electron Linacs. Previous studies by the authors already demonstrated the possibility to obtain a mixed thermal and epithermal neutron flux of the order of 10(7)cm(-2)s(-1). This paper investigates possible Linac's modifications and a new photo-converter design to rise the neutron flux above 5 10(7)cm(-2)s(-1), also reducing the gamma contamination. PMID:26315098

  2. The design of a portable cosmic ray three-band neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Monk, S D; Joyce, M J

    2007-01-01

    The design of a portable three-band cosmic-ray neutron detector is reported in this article. This instrument has been designed to characterise cosmic ray neutron fields in the upper atmosphere and in cosmic reference field facilities. The design utilises a spherical moderator with a layer of spallation material covering a central (3)He proportional counter. The instrument incorporates twelve lithium-coated diodes, six on the outside of the polyethylene layer and six placed within the structure. The dimensions, materials and arrangement of these in the instrument have been optimised with MCNPX to provide a compromise between the requirements of portability and spectral response. PMID:16829509

  3. Neutrino emissivity of 3P2-3F2 superfluid cores in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinson, L. B.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of the admixture of the 3F2 state onto collective spin oscillations and neutrino emission processes in the triplet superfluid neutron liquid is studied in the BCS approximation. The eigenmode of spin oscillations with ??58/35? is predicted to exist in the triplet superfluid neutron condensate besides the already known mode ???/5. Excitation of the high-frequency spin oscillations in the condensate occurs through the tensor interactions between quasiparticles. Neutrino energy losses through neutral weak currents are found to consist of three separate contributions caused by a recombination of broken Cooper pairs and by weak decays of the collective modes of spin oscillations. Neutrino decays of the low-frequency spin waves can play an important role in the cooling scenario of neutron stars. Weak decays of the high-frequency oscillations that occur only if the tensor forces are taken into account in the pairing interactions does not modify substantially the total energy losses. Simple expressions are suggested for the total neutrino emissivity.

  4. Dynamical analysis of innovative core designs facing unprotected transients with the MAT5 DYN code

    SciTech Connect

    Darmet, G.; Massara, S.

    2012-07-01

    Since 2007, advanced Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) are investigated by CEA, AREVA and EDF in the framework of a joint French collaboration. A prototype called ASTRID, sets out to demonstrate progress made in SFR technology, is due to operate in the years 2020's. The modeling of unprotected transients by computer codes is one of the key safety issues in the design approach to such SFR systems. For that purpose, the activity on CATHARE, which is the reference code for the transient analysis of ASTRID, has been strengthened during last years by CEA. In the meantime, EDF has developed a simplified and multi-channel code, named MAT5 DYN, to analyze and validate innovative core designs facing protected and unprotected transients. First, the paper consists in a description of MAT5 DYN: a code based on the existing code MAT4 DYN including major improvements on geometry description and physical modeling. Second, two core designs based on the CFV core design developed at CEA are presented. Then, the dynamic response of those heterogeneous cores is analyzed during unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) transient and unprotected transient of power (UTOP). The results highlight the importance of the low void core effect specific to the CFV design. Such an effect, when combined with a sufficient primary pump halving time and an optimized cooling group scheme, allows to delay (or, possibly, avoid) the sodium boiling onset during ULOF accidents. (authors)

  5. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Kingston, TN)

    1987-01-01

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  6. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  7. Sanitation and design of lettuce coring knives for minimizing Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Luo, Yaguang; Millner, Patricia; Feng, Hao

    2012-03-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of ultrasound in combination with chlorine on the reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations on lettuce coring knives. Two new coring devices designed to mitigate pathogen attachment were fabricated and evaluated. The coring rings of the knives were dip inoculated with soil slurry containing 10? E. coli cells and treated with chlorinated water with and without ultrasonication for 30, 60, and 120 s. The rough welding joints on currently used in-field lettuce coring knives provided a site conducive to bacterial attachment and resistant to cell removal during sanitation treatment. The two modified coring knives harbored significantly fewer E. coli cells than did the currently used commercial model, and the efficacy of the disinfection treatment was high (P < 0.05). Ultrasound treatment reduced the E. coli O157:H7 counts to below the detection limit of 1.10 log CFU/cm² at both the coring ring blade and welding joint within 30 s in 1 ppm of chlorinated water. The redesigned coring knives and an ultrasound plus chlorine combination treatment may provide practical options for minimizing the microbial safety hazards of lettuce processed by core-in-field operations. PMID:22410232

  8. Design of the 50 kW neutron converter for SPIRAL2 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilov, M. S.; Tecchio, L. B.; Titov, A. T.; Tsybulya, V. S.; Zhmurikov, E. I.

    2010-06-01

    SPIRAL2 is a facility for the study of fundamental nuclear physics and multidisciplinary research. SPIRAL2 represents a major advance for research on exotic nuclei. The radioactive ion beam (RIB) production system is comprised of a neutron converter, a target and an ion source. This paper is dedicated to the designing of the 50 kW neutron converter for the SPIRAL2 facility. Among the different variants of the neutron converter, the one based on a rotating solid disk seems quite attractive due to its safety, ease in production and relatively low cost. Dense graphite used as the converter's material allows the production of high-intensity neutron flux and, at the same time, the heat removal from the converter by means of radiation cooling. Thermo-mechanical simulations performed in order to determine the basic geometry and physical characteristics of the neutron production target for SPIRAL2 facility, to define the appropriate beam power distribution, and to predict the target behaviour under the deuteron beam of nominal parameters (40 MeV, 1.2 mA, 50 kW) are presented. To study the main physical and mechanical properties and serviceability under operating conditions, several kinds of graphite have been analyzed and tested. The paper reports the results of such measurements. Radiation damage is the most important issue for the application of graphite as neutron converter. It is well known that the thermal conductivity of the neutron-irradiated graphite is reduced by a factor of 10 from the initial value after irradiation. Difference in volume expansions between the matrix and the fiber results in serious damage of neutron-irradiated C/C composites. Calculations showed that at high temperature the effect of neutron radiation is not so critical and that the change in thermal conductivity does not prevent the use of graphite as neutron converter.

  9. Design and pilot evaluation of the RAH-66 Comanche Core AFCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogler, Donald L., Jr.; Keller, James F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the design and pilot evaluation of the Core Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) for the Reconnaissance/Attack Helicopter (RAH-66) Comanche. During the period from November 1991 through February 1992, the RAH-66 Comanche control laws were evaluated through a structured pilot acceptance test using a motion base simulator. Design requirements, descriptions of the control law design, and handling qualities data collected from ADS-33 maneuvers are presented.

  10. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. The present study investigates the use of a sandwich foam fan blade mae up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The resulting structures possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and a detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of kin thickness and core volume are presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  11. Thermally activated post-glitch response of the neutron star inner crust and core. I. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Bennett

    2014-07-10

    Pinning of superfluid vortices is predicted to prevail throughout much of a neutron star. Based on the idea of Alpar et al., I develop a description of the coupling between the solid and liquid components of a neutron star through thermally activated vortex slippage, and calculate the response to a spin glitch. The treatment begins with a derivation of the vortex velocity from the vorticity equations of motion. The activation energy for vortex slippage is obtained from a detailed study of the mechanics and energetics of vortex motion. I show that the 'linear creep' regime introduced by Alpar et al. and invoked in fits to post-glitch response is not realized for physically reasonable parameters, a conclusion that strongly constrains the physics of a post-glitch response through thermal activation. Moreover, a regime of 'superweak pinning', crucial to the theory of Alpar et al. and its extensions, is probably precluded by thermal fluctuations. The theory given here has a robust conclusion that can be tested by observations: for a glitch in the spin rate of magnitude ??, pinning introduces a delay in the post-glitch response time. The delay time is t{sub d} = 7(t{sub sd}/10{sup 4} yr)((??/?)/10{sup –6}) d, where t{sub sd} is the spin-down age; t{sub d} is typically weeks for the Vela pulsar and months in older pulsars, and is independent of the details of vortex pinning. Post-glitch response through thermal activation cannot occur more quickly than this timescale. Quicker components of post-glitch response, as have been observed in some pulsars, notably, the Vela pulsar, cannot be due to thermally activated vortex motion but must represent a different process, such as drag on vortices in regions where there is no pinning. I also derive the mutual friction force for a pinned superfluid at finite temperature for use in other studies of neutron star hydrodynamics.

  12. Core Noise: Implications of Emerging N+3 Designs and Acoustic Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a summary of the core-noise implications of NASA's primary N+3 aircraft concepts. These concepts are the MIT/P&W D8.5 Double Bubble design, the Boeing/GE SUGAR Volt hybrid gas-turbine/electric engine concept, the NASA N3-X Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion aircraft, and the NASA TBW-XN Truss-Braced Wing concept. The first two are future concepts for the Boeing 737/Airbus A320 US transcontinental mission of 180 passengers and a maximum range of 3000 nm. The last two are future concepts for the Boeing 777 transpacific mission of 350 passengers and a 7500 nm range. Sections of the presentation cover: turbofan design trends on the N+1.5 time frame and the already emerging importance of core noise; the NASA N+3 concepts and associated core-noise challenges; the historical trends for the engine bypass ratio (BPR), overall pressure ratio (OPR), and combustor exit temperature; and brief discussion of a noise research roadmap being developed to address the core-noise challenges identified for the N+3 concepts. The N+3 conceptual aircraft have (i) ultra-high bypass ratios, in the rage of 18 - 30, accomplished by either having a small-size, high-power-density core, an hybrid design which allows for an increased fan size, or by utilizing a turboelectric distributed propulsion design; and (ii) very high OPR in the 50 - 70 range. These trends will elevate the overall importance of turbomachinery core noise. The N+3 conceptual designs specify the need for the development and application of advanced liners and passive and active control strategies to reduce the core noise. Current engineering prediction of core noise uses semi-empirical methods based on older turbofan engines, with (at best) updates for more recent designs. The models have not seen the same level of development and maturity as those for fan and jet noise and are grossly inadequate for the designs considered for the N+3 time frame. An aggressive program for the development of updated noise prediction tools for integrated core assemblies as well as and strategies for noise reduction and control is needed in order to meet the NASA N+3 noise goals. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic.

  13. Neutron angular distributions from the core break-up reactions of the {sup 11}Be and {sup 11}Li halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grevy, S.; Axelsson, L.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Smedberg, M.; Angelique, J. C.; Orr, N.; Anne, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Mueller, A. C.; Pougheon, F.; Sorlin, O.; Hansen, P. G.; Hornshoj, P.; Riisager, K.

    1998-12-21

    The halo nuclei {sup 11}Be and {sup 11}Li have been studied through core break-up reactions, where the halo neutrons are detected in anti-coincidence with the core of the halo nucleus. In this particular channel, the halo neutrons are not expected to participate in the reaction and should therefore show the same properties as when situated inside the halo nucleus. The widths of the halo neutron momentum distributions have been extracted in coincidence with He fragments, {gamma}=32{+-}4 MeV/c, and Li fragments, {gamma}=42{+-}4 MeV/c for {sup 11}Be and with He fragments, {gamma}=42{+-}6 MeV/c for {sup 11}Li. An experimental value of the shadow effect for {sup 11}Be when breaking up to Li and He fragments has been obtained to be 0.63. A simple theoretical calculation to reproduce this value is given.

  14. Baseline Design Compliance Matrix for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System

    SciTech Connect

    LECHELT, J.A.

    2000-10-17

    The purpose of the design compliance matrix (DCM) is to provide a single-source document of all design requirements associated with the fifteen subsystems that make up the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) system. It is intended to be the baseline requirement document for the RMCS system and to be used in governing all future design and design verification activities associated with it. This document is the DCM for the RMCS system used on Hanford single-shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This includes the Exhauster System, Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks, Universal Sampling System, Diesel Generator System, Distribution Trailer, X-Ray Cart System, Breathing Air Compressor, Nitrogen Supply Trailer, Casks and Cask Truck, Service Trailer, Core Sampling Riser Equipment, Core Sampling Support Trucks, Foot Clamp, Ramps and Platforms and Purged Camera System. Excluded items are tools such as light plants and light stands. Other items such as the breather inlet filter are covered by a different design baseline. In this case, the inlet breather filter is covered by the Tank Farms Design Compliance Matrix.

  15. Designing the Molybdopterin Core through Regioselective Coupling of Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Pimkov, Igor V; Serli-Mitasev, Barbara; Peterson, Antoinette A; Ratvasky, Stephen C; Hammann, Bernd; Basu, Partha

    2015-11-16

    Molybdopterin is an essential cofactor for all forms of life. The cofactor is composed of a pterin moiety appended to a dithiolene-functionalized pyran ring, and through the dithiolene moiety it binds metal ions. Different synthetic strategies for dithiolene-functionalized pyran precursors that have been designed and synthesized are discussed. These precursors also harbor 1,2-diketone or osone functionality that has been condensed with 1,2-diaminobenzene or other heterocycles resulting in several quinoxaline or pterin derivatives. Use of additives improves the regioselectivity of the complexes. The molecules have been characterized by (1) H and (13) C?NMR and IR spectroscopies, as well as by mass spectrometry. In addition, several compounds have been crystallographically characterized. The geometries of the synthesized molecules are more planar than the geometry of the cofactor found in proteins. PMID:26541355

  16. The advanced neutron source--designing to meet the needs of the user community

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is to be a multi-purpose neutron research center, constructed around a high-flux reactor now being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its primary purpose is to place the United States in the forefront of neutron scattering in the twenty-first century. Other research programs include nuclear and fundamental physics, isotopes production, materials irradiation, and analytical chemistry. The Advanced Neutron Source will be a unique and invaluable research tool because of the unprecedented neutron flux available from the high intensity research reactor. But that reactor would be ineffective without world-class research facilities that allow the fullest utilization of the available neutrons. And, in turn, those research facilities will not produce new and exciting science without a broad population of users coming from all parts of the nation, and the world, placed in a simulating environment in which experiments can be effectively conducted, and in which scientific exchange is encouraged. This paper discusses the measures being taken to ensure that the design of the ANS focuses not only on the reactor, but on providing the experiment and user support facilities needed to allow its effective use. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Coupled Neutronics Thermal-Hydraulic Solution of a Full-Core PWR Using VERA-CS

    SciTech Connect

    Clarno, Kevin T; Palmtag, Scott; Davidson, Gregory G; Salko, Robert K; Evans, Thomas M; Turner, John A; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell; Schmidt, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing a core simulator called VERA-CS to model operating PWR reactors with high resolution. This paper describes how the development of VERA-CS is being driven by a set of progression benchmark problems that specify the delivery of useful capability in discrete steps. As part of this development, this paper will describe the current capability of VERA-CS to perform a multiphysics simulation of an operating PWR at Hot Full Power (HFP) conditions using a set of existing computer codes coupled together in a novel method. Results for several single-assembly cases are shown that demonstrate coupling for different boron concentrations and power levels. Finally, high-resolution results are shown for a full-core PWR reactor modeled in quarter-symmetry.

  18. Target station design for a 1 MW pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Baker, G.D.; Brewton, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Target stations are vital components of the 1 MW, next generation spallation neutron source proposed for LANSCE. By and large, target stations design determines the overall performance of the facility. Many traditional concepts will probably have to be rethought, and many new concepts will have to be put forward to meet the 1 MW challenge. This article gives a brief overview of the proposed neutron spallation source from the target station viewpoint, as well as the general philosophy adopted for the design of the LANSCE-II target stations. Some of the saliant concepts and features envisioned for LANSCE-II are briefly described.

  19. The design and performance of IceCube DeepCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; De Clercq, C.; Degner, T.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Stüer, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.

    2012-05-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory in operation at the South Pole, Antarctica, comprises three distinct components: a large buried array for ultrahigh energy neutrino detection, a surface air shower array, and a new buried component called DeepCore. DeepCore was designed to lower the IceCube neutrino energy threshold by over an order of magnitude, to energies as low as about 10 GeV. DeepCore is situated primarily 2100 m below the surface of the icecap at the South Pole, at the bottom center of the existing IceCube array, and began taking physics data in May 2010. Its location takes advantage of the exceptionally clear ice at those depths and allows it to use the surrounding IceCube detector as a highly efficient active veto against the principal background of downward-going muons produced in cosmic-ray air showers. DeepCore has a module density roughly five times higher than that of the standard IceCube array, and uses photomultiplier tubes with a new photocathode featuring a quantum efficiency about 35% higher than standard IceCube PMTs. Taken together, these features of DeepCore will increase IceCube's sensitivity to neutrinos from WIMP dark matter annihilations, atmospheric neutrino oscillations, galactic supernova neutrinos, and point sources of neutrinos in the northern and southern skies. In this paper we describe the design and initial performance of DeepCore.

  20. Design and Performance of South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant Mixed Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullayev, A. M.; Baydulin, V.; Zhukov, A. I.; Latorre, Richard

    2011-09-24

    In 2010, 42 Westinghouse fuel assemblies (WFAs) were loaded into the core of South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant (SUNPP) Unit 3 after four successful cycles with 6 Westinghouse Lead Test Assemblies. The scope of safety substantiating documents required for the regulatory approval of this mixed core was extended considerably, particularly with development and implementation of new methodologies and 3-D kinetic codes. Additional verification for all employed codes was also performed. Despite the inherent hydraulic non-uniformity of a mixed core, it was possible to demonstrate that all design and operating restrictions for three different types of fuel (TVS-M, TVSA and WFA) loaded in the core were conservatively met. This paper provides the main results from the first year of operation of the core loaded with 42 WFAs, the predicted parameters for the transition and equilibrium cycles with WFAs, comparisons of predicted versus measured core parameters, as well as the acceptable margin evaluation results for reactivity accidents using the 3-D kinetic codes. To date WFA design parameters have been confirmed by operation experience.

  1. The Design and Performance of IceCube DeepCore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatikos, M.

    2012-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory in operation at the South Pole, Antarctica, comprises three distinct components: a large buried array for ultrahigh energy neutrino detection, a surface air shower array, and a new buried component called DeepCore. DeepCore was designed to lower the IceCube neutrino energy threshold by over an order of magnitude, to energies as low as about 10 GeV. DeepCore is situated primarily 2100 m below the surface of the icecap at the South Pole, at the bottom center of the existing IceCube array, and began taking pbysics data in May 2010. Its location takes advantage of the exceptionally clear ice at those depths and allows it to use the surrounding IceCube detector as a highly efficient active veto against the principal background of downward-going muons produced in cosmic-ray air showers. DeepCore has a module density roughly five times higher than that of the standard IceCube array, and uses photomultiplier tubes with a new photocathode featuring a quantum efficiency about 35% higher than standard IceCube PMTs. Taken together, these features of DeepCore will increase IceCube's sensitivity to neutrinos from WIMP dark matter annihilations, atmospheric neutrino oscillations, galactic supernova neutrinos, and point sources of neutrinos in the northern and southern skies. In this paper we describe the design and initial performance of DeepCore.

  2. Modeling and design of a reload PWR core for a 48-month fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, M.V.; Driscoll, M.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this research was to use state-of-the-art nuclear and fuel performance packages to evaluate the feasibility and costs of a 48 calendar month core in existing pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, considering the full range of practical design and economic considerations. The driving force behind this research is the desire to make nuclear power more economically competitive with fossil fuel options by expanding the scope for achievement of higher capacity factors. Using CASMO/SIMULATE, a core design with fuel enriched to 7{sup w}/{sub o} U{sup 235} for a single batch loaded, 48-month fuel cycle has been developed. This core achieves an ultra-long cycle length without exceeding current fuel burnup limits. The design uses two different types of burnable poisons. Gadolinium in the form of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) mixed with the UO{sub 2} of selected pins is sued to hold down initial reactivity and to control flux peaking throughout the life of the core. A zirconium di-boride (ZrB{sub 2}) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) coating on the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-UO{sub 2} fuel pellets is added to reduce the critical soluble boron concentration in the reactor coolant to within acceptable limits. Fuel performance issues of concern to this design are also outlined and areas which will require further research are highlighted.

  3. A multi-group Monte Carlo core analysis method and its application in SCWR design

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Wang, K.; Yu, G.

    2012-07-01

    Complex geometry and spectrum have been the characteristics of many newly developed nuclear energy systems, so the suitability and precision of the traditional deterministic codes are doubtable while being applied to simulate these systems. On the contrary, the Monte Carlo method has the inherent advantages of dealing with complex geometry and spectrum. The main disadvantage of Monte Carlo method is that it takes long time to get reliable results, so the efficiency is too low for the ordinary core designs. A new Monte Carlo core analysis scheme is developed, aimed to increase the calculation efficiency. It is finished in two steps: Firstly, the assembly level simulation is performed by continuous energy Monte Carlo method, which is suitable for any geometry and spectrum configuration, and the assembly multi-group constants are tallied at the same time; Secondly, the core level calculation is performed by multi-group Monte Carlo method, using the assembly group constants generated in the first step. Compared with the heterogeneous Monte Carlo calculations of the whole core, this two-step scheme is more efficient, and the precision is acceptable for the preliminary analysis of novel nuclear systems. Using this core analysis scheme, a SCWR core was designed based on a new SCWR assembly design. The core output is about 1,100 MWe, and a cycle length of about 550 EFPDs can be achieved with 3-batch refueling pattern. The average and maximum discharge burn-up are about 53.5 and 60.9 MWD/kgU respectively. (authors)

  4. Neutronics and thermal design analyses of US solid breeder blanket for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Billone, M.; Attaya, H. ); Sawan, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The US Solid Breeder Blanket is designed to produce the necessary tritium required for the ITER operation and to operate at power reactor conditions as much as possible. Safety, low tritium inventory, reliability, flexibility cost, and minimum R D requirements are the other design criteria. To satisfy these criteria, the produced tritium is recovered continuously during operation and the blanket coolant operates at low pressure. Beryllium multiplier material is used to control the solid-breeder temperature. Neutronics and thermal design analyses were performed in an integrated manner to define the blanket configuration. The reference parameters of ITER including the operating scenarios, the neutron wall loading distribution and the copper stabilizer are included in the design analyses. Several analyses were performed to study the impact of the reactor parameters, blanket dimensions, material characteristics, and heat transfer coefficient at the material interfaces on the blanket performance. The design analyses and the results from the different studies are summarized. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E

    2006-04-30

    The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the discharged hydride fuel is more proliferation resistant. Preliminary feasibility assessment indicates that by replacing some of the ZrH1.6 by ThH2 it will be possible to further improve the plutonium incineration capability of PWR’s. Other possibly promising applications of hydride fuel were identified but not evaluated in this work. A number of promising oxide fueled PWR core designs were also found as spin-offs of this study: (1) The optimal oxide fueled PWR core design features smaller fuel rod diameter of D=6.5 mm and a larger pitch-to-diameter ratio of P/D=1.39 than presently practiced by industry – 9.5mm and 1.326. This optimal design can provide a 30% increase in the power density and a 24% reduction in the cost of electricity (COE) provided the PWR could be designed to have the coolant pressure drop across the core increased from the reference 29 psia to 60 psia. (2) Using wire wrapped oxide fuel rods in hexagonal fuel assemblies it is possible to design PWR cores to operate at 54% higher power density than the reference PWR design that uses grid spacers and a square lattice, provided 60 psia coolant pressure drop across the core could be accommodated. Uprating existing PWR’s to use such cores could result in 40% reduction in the COE. The optimal lattice geometry is D = 8.08 mm and P/D = 1.41. The most notable advantages of wire wraps over grid spacers are their significant lower pressure drop, higher critical heat flux and improved vibrations characteristics.

  6. Designing a recombinant Bacmid construct of HCV core+1 in Baculovirus expression system

    PubMed Central

    Safarnezhad Tameshkel, Fahimeh; Rahimi, Pooneh; Khataminejad, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronically infects around 200 million people worldwide and frequently causes liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Rapid detection of this virus results in decreasing the distance between infection and initiation the anti-viral treatment, and may prevent most of the undesirable consequences. The new detected HCV protein “Core+1” made from the ribosomal frame shift in Core region is an important candidate for diagnostic tools. This study was conducted to design a recombinant Bacmid plasmid expressing the HCV 1a Core+1 sequence in the Baculovirus expression system for further diagnostic applications. Materials and Methods: The HCV Core +1 gene was amplified by PCR using the pcDNA-HAF recombinant vector that contained the Core+1 sequence from HCV genotype 1a as a template, and the specific primers with 2 restriction sites for Nco I and Xba I restriction enzymes. The PCR product was cloned in XbaI/NcoI restriction sites of the linearized pFastBac-HTB vector and evaluated by using those restriction enzymes and sequencing. Then the recombinant pFastBac-HTB vector was transformed in DH10Bac and the result was screened and confirmed by X-Gal discrimination and PCR. Results: The HCV 1a Core+1 was successfully amplified and the PCR product was confirmed by using the related restriction enzymes and sequencing. Cloning of pFastBac vector with the purified PCR product of HCV Core+1 was confirmed. Finally, the recombinant Bacmid was successfully transformed in DH10Bac. Conclusion: The recombinant Bac-Core+1 expression vector is considered as an important tool to transfect the sf9 cell line and expression the Core+1 protein.

  7. The SNL100-02 blade : advanced core material design studies for the Sandia 100-meter blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A series of design studies are performed to investigate the effects of advanced core materials and a new core material strategy on blade weight and performance for large blades using the Sandia 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. The initial core material design studies were based on the SNL100-01 100- meter carbon spar design. Advanced core material with improved performance to weight was investigated with the goal to reduce core material content in the design and reduce blade weight. A secondary element of the core study was to evaluate the suitability of core materials from natural, regrowable sources such as balsa and recyclable foam materials. The new core strategy for the SNL100-02 design resulted in a design mass of 59 tons, which is a 20% reduction from the most recent SNL100-01 carbon spar design and over 48% reduction from the initial SNL100-00 all-glass baseline blade. This document provides a description of the final SNL100-02 design, includes a description of the major design modifications, and summarizes the pertinent blade design information. This document is also intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-02 that are made publicly available.

  8. HARDWARE/SOFTWARE CO-DESIGN OF H.264/AVC ENCODERS FOR MULTI-CORE EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Sousa, Leonel

    processing cores. Experimental re- sults obtained with the implementation in a Virtex4 FPGA of an H.264/AVC encoder using an ASIP IP core as a ME hard- ware accelerator have proven the advantages of this methodolHARDWARE/SOFTWARE CO-DESIGN OF H.264/AVC ENCODERS FOR MULTI-CORE EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Tiago Dias, Nuno

  9. Verifying IP-Core based System-On-Chip Designs Pankaj Chauhan, Edmund M. Clarke, Yuan Lu and Dong Wang

    E-print Network

    Clarke, Edmund M.

    Verifying IP-Core based System-On-Chip Designs Pankaj Chauhan, Edmund M. Clarke, Yuan Lu and Dong and for all, the standard bus interconnecting IP Cores in the system . The next task is to verify the glue logic, which connects the IP Cores to the buses. Finally, using the verified bus protocols and the IP

  10. Spring design for use in the core of a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Willard, Jr., H. James (Bethel Park, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A spring design particularly suitable for use in the core of a nuclear reactor includes one surface having a first material oriented in a longitudinal direction, and another surface having a second material oriented in a transverse direction. The respective surfaces exhibit different amounts of irraditation induced strain.

  11. Design And Operation Of A Wireline Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Design And Operation Of A Wireline Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Technical Note 17 T. L. Pettigrew Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive. & Drilling Operations Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director August 1992 #12;Material in this publication may

  12. Post-silicon Debugging for Multi-core Designs Valeria Bertacco

    E-print Network

    Bertacco, Valeria

    Post-silicon Debugging for Multi-core Designs Valeria Bertacco Dept. of Electrical Engineering in released silicon are growing in number due to the increasing complexity of modern processor de- signs. This deteriorating situation is causing a growing portion of the validation effort to shift to post-silicon, when

  13. Fusion-power-core design of a compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR)

    SciTech Connect

    Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Mynard, R.C.; Cappiello, C.; Lujan, R.E.; Davidson, J.W.; Chaffee, A.D.; Battat, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual design of a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils) based on a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) has been completed. After a brief statement of rationale and description of the reactor configuration, the FPC integration is described in terms of power balance, thermal-hydraulics, and mechanical design. The engineering versatility, promise, and problems of this high-power-density approach to fusion are addressed.

  14. Fusion-power-core design of a compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR)

    SciTech Connect

    Copenhaver, C.; Battak, M.E.; Cappiello, C.; Chaffee, A.D.; Davidson, J.W.; Hayenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Lujan, R.E.; Mynard, R.C.; Schnurr, N.M.

    1985-07-01

    A conceptual design of a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils) based on a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) has been completed. After a brief statement of rationale and description of the reactor configuration, the FPC integration is described in terms of power balance, thermal-hydraulics, and mechanical design. The engineering versatility, promise, and problems of this high-power-density approach to fusion are addressed.

  15. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.; Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  16. Design and verification of the shielding around the new Neutron Standards Laboratory (LPN) at CIEMAT.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Villafañe, R; Guerrero, J E; Embid, M; Fernández, R; Grandio, R; Pérez-Cejuela, P; Márquez, J L; Alvarez, F; Ortego, P

    2014-10-01

    The construction of the new Neutron Standards Laboratory at CIEMAT (Laboratorio de Patrones Neutrónicos) has been finalised and is ready to provide service. The facility is an ?8 m×8 m×8 m irradiation vault, following the International Organization for Standardization 8529 recommendations. It relies on several neutron sources: a 5-GBq (5.8× 10(8) s(-1)) (252)Cf source and two (241)Am-Be neutron sources (185 and 11.1 GBq). The irradiation point is located 4 m over the ground level and in the geometrical centre of the room. Each neutron source can be moved remotely from its storage position inside a water pool to the irradiation point. Prior to this, an important task to design the neutron shielding and to choose the most appropriate materials has been developed by the Radiological Security Unit and the Ionizing Radiations Metrology Laboratory. MCNPX was chosen to simulate the irradiation facility. With this information the walls were built with a thickness of 125 cm. Special attention was put on the weak points (main door, air conditioning system, etc.) so that the ambient dose outside the facility was below the regulatory limits. Finally, the Radiation Protection Unit carried out a set of measurements in specific points around the installation with an LB6411 neutron monitor and a Reuter-Stokes high-pressure ion chamber to verify experimentally the results of the simulation. PMID:24478306

  17. DESIGNING ARIES-CS COMPACT RADIAL BUILD AND NUCLEAR SYSTEM: NEUTRONICS,

    E-print Network

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    DESIGNING ARIES-CS COMPACT RADIAL BUILD AND NUCLEAR SYSTEM: NEUTRONICS, SHIELDING, AND ACTIVATION L top-level re- quirements, the carefully selected nuclear and engineer- ing parameters to produce for the three-dimensional nuclear assessment, and the overarching safety and environmen- tal constraints

  18. Challenges in the development of high-fidelity LWR core neutronics tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Forget, B.

    2013-07-01

    Modern computing has made possible the solution of extremely large-scale reactor simulations, and the literature has numerous examples of high-resolution methods (often Monte Carlo) applied to full-core reactor problems. However, there are currently no examples in the literature of application of such 'High-Fidelity' or 'First Principles' methods to operating Light Water Reactor (LWR) analysis. This paper seeks to remind code developers, project managers, and analysts of the many important aspects of LWR simulation that must be incorporated to produce truly high-fidelity analysis tools. The authors offer a monetary prize to the first person (or group) that successfully solves a new two-cycle operational PWR depletion benchmark problem using high-fidelity tools and demonstrates acceptable accuracy by comparison with measured operational plant data (open source) provided to the reactor analysis community. (authors)

  19. A neutron pinhole camera for PF-24 source: Conceptual design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielecki, J.; Wójcik-Gargula, A.; Wiacek, U.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wo?nicka, U.

    2015-07-01

    A fast-neutron pinhole camera based on small-area (5mm × 5 mm) BCF-12 scintillation detectors with nanosecond time resolution has been designed. The pinhole camera is dedicated to the investigation of the spatial and temporal distributions of DD neutrons from the Plasma Focus (PF-24) source. The geometrical parameters of the camera have been optimized in terms of maximum neutron flux at the imaging plane by means of MCNP calculations. The detection system consists of four closely packed scintillation detectors coupled via long optical fibres to Hamamatsu H3164-10 photomultiplier tubes. The pinhole consists of specially designed 420 mm long copper collimator with an effective aperture of 1.7 mm mounted inside a cylindrical polyethylene tube. The performance of the presented detection system in the mixed (hard X-ray and neutron) radiation field of the PF-24 plasma focus device has been tested. The results of the tests showed that the small-area BCF-12 scintillation detectors can be successfully applied as the detection system of the neutron pinhole camera for the PF-24 device.

  20. Fast Neutron Spectrum Potassium Worth for Space Power Reactor Design Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Marshall, Margaret A.; Briggs, J. Blair; Tsiboulia, Anatoli; Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-03-01

    A variety of critical experiments were constructed of enriched uranium metal (oralloy ) during the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. The purposes of these experiments included the evaluation of storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant and providing data for verification of calculation methods and cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included solid cylinders of various diameters, annuli of various inner and outer diameters, two and three interacting cylinders of various diameters, and graphite and polyethylene reflected cylinders and annuli. Of the hundreds of delayed critical experiments, one was performed that consisted of uranium metal annuli surrounding a potassium-filled, stainless steel can. The outer diameter of the annuli was approximately 13 inches (33.02 cm) with an inner diameter of 7 inches (17.78 cm). The diameter of the stainless steel can was 7 inches (17.78 cm). The critical height of the configurations was approximately 5.6 inches (14.224 cm). The uranium annulus consisted of multiple stacked rings, each with radial thicknesses of 1 inch (2.54 cm) and varying heights. A companion measurement was performed using empty stainless steel cans; the primary purpose of these experiments was to test the fast neutron cross sections of potassium as it was a candidate for coolant in some early space power reactor designs.The experimental measurements were performed on July 11, 1963, by J. T. Mihalczo and M. S. Wyatt (Ref. 1) with additional information in its corresponding logbook. Unreflected and unmoderated experiments with the same set of highly enriched uranium metal parts were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in the 1960s and are evaluated in the International Handbook for Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) with the identifier HEU MET FAST 051. Thin graphite reflected (2 inches or less) experiments also using the same set of highly enriched uranium metal parts are evaluated in HEU MET FAST 071. Polyethylene-reflected configurations are evaluated in HEU-MET-FAST-076. A stack of highly enriched metal discs with a thick beryllium top reflector is evaluated in HEU-MET-FAST-069, and two additional highly enriched uranium annuli with beryllium cores are evaluated in HEU-MET-FAST-059. Both detailed and simplified model specifications are provided in this evaluation. Both of these fast neutron spectra assemblies were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. The calculated eigenvalues for both the detailed and the simple benchmark models are within ~0.26 % of the benchmark values for Configuration 1 (calculations performed using MCNP6 with ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron cross section data), but under-calculate the benchmark values by ~7s because the uncertainty in the benchmark is very small: ~0.0004 (1s); for Configuration 2, the under-calculation is ~0.31 % and ~8s. Comparison of detailed and simple model calculations for the potassium worth measurement and potassium mass coefficient yield results approximately 70 – 80 % lower (~6s to 10s) than the benchmark values for the various nuclear data libraries utilized. Both the potassium worth and mass coefficient are also deemed to be acceptable benchmark experiment measurements.

  1. High-Order Homogenization Method in Diffusion Theory for Reactor Core Simulation and Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Farzad Rahnema

    2003-09-30

    Most modern nodal methods in use by the reactor vendors and utilities are based on the generalized equivalence theory (GET) that uses homogenized cross sections and flux discontinuity factors. These homogenized parameters, referred to as infinite medium parameters, are precomputed by performing single bundle fine-mesh calculations with zero current boundary conditions. It is known that for configurations in which the node-to-node leakage (e.g., surface current-to-flux ratio) is large the use of the infinite medium parameters could lead to large errors in the nodal solution. This would be the case for highly heterogeneous core configurations, typical of modern reactor core designs.

  2. Design of the radiation shielding for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Du, T. F.; Chen, Z. J.; Peng, X. Y.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, X.; Hu, Z. M.; Cui, Z. Q.; Xie, X. F.; Ge, L. J.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-11-15

    A radiation shielding has been designed to reduce scattered neutrons and background gamma-rays for the new double-ring Time Of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics (TOFED). The shielding was designed based on simulation with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. Dedicated model of the EAST tokamak has been developed together with the emission neutron source profile and spectrum; the latter were simulated with the Nubeam and GENESIS codes. Significant reduction of background radiation at the detector can be achieved and this satisfies the requirement of TOFED. The intensities of the scattered and direct neutrons in the line of sight of the TOFED neutron spectrometer at EAST are studied for future data interpretation.

  3. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, R. A.; Donahue, C.; Visscher, T.; Montcalm, C.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and performance of a 157 mm×157 mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of <1.2 mm with distortion <0.5 mm on over 50 installed Anger Cameras. The performance of the detector is limited by the light yield of the scintillator, and it is estimated that the resolution of the current detector could be doubled with a brighter scintillator. Data collected from small (<1 mm3) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low values of the refinement parameter Rw(F).

  4. Effective Domain Partitioning for Multi-Clock Domain IP Core Wrapper Design under Power Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Thomas Edison; Yoneda, Tomokazu; Zhao, Danella; Fujiwara, Hideo

    The rapid advancement of VLSI technology has made it possible for chip designers and manufacturers to embed the components of a whole system onto a single chip, called System-on-Chip or SoC. SoCs make use of pre-designed modules, called IP-cores, which provide faster design time and quicker time-to-market. Furthermore, SoCs that operate at multiple clock domains and very low power requirements are being utilized in the latest communications, networking and signal processing devices. As a result, the testing of SoCs and multi-clock domain embedded cores under power constraints has been rapidly gaining importance. In this research, a novel method for designing power-aware test wrappers for embedded cores with multiple clock domains is presented. By effectively partitioning the various clock domains, we are able to increase the solution space of possible test schedules for the core. Since previous methods were limited to concurrently testing all the clock domains, we effectively remove this limitation by making use of bandwidth conversion, multiple shift frequencies and properly gating the clock signals to control the shift activity of various core logic elements. The combination of the above techniques gains us greater flexibility when determining an optimal test schedule under very tight power constraints. Furthermore, since it is computationally intensive to search the entire expanded solution space for the possible test schedules, we propose a heuristic 3-D bin packing algorithm to determine the optimal wrapper architecture and test schedule while minimizing the test time under power and bandwidth constraints.

  5. Core-crust transition in neutron stars: Predictivity of density developments

    SciTech Connect

    Ducoin, Camille; Providencia, Constanca; Vidana, Isaac; Margueron, Jerome

    2011-04-15

    The possibility to draw links between the isospin properties of nuclei and the structure of compact stars is a stimulating perspective. In order to pursue this objective on a sound basis, the correlations from which such links can be deduced have to be carefully checked against model dependence. Using a variety of nuclear effective models and a microscopic approach, we study the relation between the predictions of a given model and those of a Taylor density development of the corresponding equation of state: this establishes to what extent a limited set of phenomenological constraints can determine the core-crust transition properties. From a correlation analysis, we show that (a) the transition density {rho}{sub t} is mainly correlated with the symmetry energy slope L, (b) the proton fraction Y{sub p,t} with the symmetry energy and symmetry energy slope (J,L) defined at saturation density, or, even better, with the same quantities defined at {rho}=0.1 fm{sup -3}, and (c) the transition pressure P{sub t} with the symmetry energy slope and curvature (L,K{sub sym}) defined at {rho}=0.1 fm{sup -3}.

  6. A new design of fission detector for prompt fission neutron investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O.; Nazarenko, M. A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2012-10-01

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy spectroscopy. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of the fission axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electronic circuitry and special multi-channel pulse processing apparatus. Mathematical algorithms were provided along with formulae derived for fission axis angles determination. It was shown how the point of fission fragments origin on the target plane may be determined using the same measured data. The last feature made the TIC a rather powerful tool for prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission investigation in event by event analysis of individual fission reactions from non point fissile source. Position sensitive neutron induced fission detector for neutron imaging applications with both thermal and low energy neutrons was found as another possible implementation of the designed TIC.

  7. The design of a multisource americium-beryllium (Am-Be) neutron irradiation facility using MCNP for the neutronic performance calculation.

    PubMed

    Sogbadji, R B M; Abrefah, R G; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Odoi, H C; Attakorah-Birinkorang, S

    2014-08-01

    The americium-beryllium neutron irradiation facility at the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI), Ghana, was re-designed with four 20 Ci sources using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code to investigate the maximum amount of flux that is produced by the combined sources. The results were compared with a single source Am-Be irradiation facility. The main objective was to enable us to harness the maximum amount of flux for the optimization of neutron activation analysis and to enable smaller sample sized samples to be irradiated. Using MCNP for the design construction and neutronic performance calculation, it was realized that the single-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (1.8±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s and the four-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (5.4±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s which is a factor of 3.5 fold increase compared to the single-source Am-Be design. The criticality effective, k(eff), of the single-source and the four-source Am-Be designs were found to be 0.00115±0.0008 and 0.00143±0.0008, respectively. PMID:24792123

  8. Design of the neutron imaging pinhole for use at the national ignition facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fatherley, Valerie E; Day, Robert D; Garcia, Felix P; Grim, Gary P; Oertel, John A; Wilde, Carl H; Wilke, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic is designed to be used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This instrument will be used to image both primary (14MeV neutrons) and down scattered (6-8MeV neutrons). The pinhole body sits 225mm from the target, while the scintillator and recording systems are located 28m from the target. The diagnostic uses port 90, 315 and the recording system is located in a specifically built room located outside of switchyard I. The location of the pinhole and the recording system combine to give a magnification of 104. The recording of both the primary and downscattered image is done by recording the image from both the front and back side of the scintillator.

  9. Insert Design and Manufacturing for Foam-Core Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lares, Alan

    Sandwich structures have been used in the aerospace industry for many years. The high strength to weight ratios that are possible with sandwich constructions makes them desirable for airframe applications. While sandwich structures are effective at handling distributed loads such as aerodynamic forces, they are prone to damage from concentrated loads at joints or due to impact. This is due to the relatively thin face-sheets and soft core materials typically found in sandwich structures. Carleton University's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Project Team has designed and manufactured a UAV (GeoSury II Prototype) which features an all composite sandwich structure fuselage structure. The purpose of the aircraft is to conduct geomagnetic surveys. The GeoSury II Prototype serves as the test bed for many areas of research in advancing UAV technologies. Those areas of research include: low cost composite materials manufacturing, geomagnetic data acquisition, obstacle detection, autonomous operations and magnetic signature control. In this thesis work a methodology for designing and manufacturing inserts for foam-core sandwich structures was developed. The results of this research work enables a designer wishing to design a foam-core sandwich airframe structure, a means of quickly manufacturing optimized inserts for the safe introduction of discrete loads into the airframe. The previous GeoSury II Prototype insert designs (v.1 & v.2) were performance tested to establish a benchmark with which to compare future insert designs. Several designs and materials were considered for the new v.3 inserts. A plug and sleeve design was selected, due to its ability to effectively transfer the required loads to the sandwich structure. The insert material was chosen to be epoxy, reinforced with chopped carbon fibre. This material was chosen for its combination of strength, low mass and also compatibility with the face-sheet material. The v.3 insert assembly is 60% lighter than the previous insert designs. A casting process for manufacturing the v.3 inserts was developed. The developed casting process, when producing more than 13 inserts, becomes more economical than machining. An exploratory study was conducted looking at the effects of dynamic loading on the v.3 insert performance. The results of this study highlighted areas for improving dynamic testing of foam-core sandwich structure inserts. Correlations were developed relating design variables such as face-sheet thickness and insert diameter to a failure load for different load cases. This was done through simulations using Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) software, and experimental testing. The resulting correlations were integrated into a computer program which outputs the required insert dimensions given a set of design parameters, and load values.

  10. Conceptual design of thorium-fuelled Mitrailleuse accelerator-driven subcritical reactor using D-Be neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Y.; Kamei, T.

    2012-07-01

    A distributed accelerator is a charged-particle accelerator that uses a new acceleration method based on repeated electrostatic acceleration. This method offers outstanding benefits not possible with the conventional radio-frequency acceleration method, including: (1) high acceleration efficiency, (2) large acceleration current, and (3) lower failure rate made possible by a fully solid-state acceleration field generation circuit. A 'Mitrailleuse Accelerator' is a product we have conceived to optimize this distributed accelerator technology for use with a high-strength neutron source. We have completed the conceptual design of a Mitrailleuse Accelerator and of a thorium-fuelled subcritical reactor driven by a Mitrailleuse Accelerator. This paper presents the conceptual design details and approach to implementing the subcritical reactor core. We will spend the next year or so on detailed design work, and then will start work on developing a prototype for demonstration. If there are no obstacles in setting up a development organization, we expect to finish verifying the prototype's performance by the third quarter of 2015. (authors)

  11. The design of the inelastic neutron scattering mode for the Extreme Environment Diffractometer with the 26 T High Field Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowiak, Maciej; Stüßer, Norbert; Prokhnenko, Oleksandr

    2015-10-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer is a neutron time-of-flight instrument, designed to work with a constant-field hybrid magnet capable of reaching fields over 26 T, unprecedented in neutron science; however, the presence of the magnet imposes both spatial and technical limitations on the surrounding instrument components. In addition to the existing diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering modes, the instrument will operate also in an inelastic scattering mode, as a direct time-of-flight spectrometer. In this paper we present the Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations, the results of which illustrate the performance of the instrument in the inelastic-scattering mode. We describe the focussing neutron guide and the chopper system of the existing instrument and the planned design for the instrument upgrade. The neutron flux, neutron spatial distribution, divergence distribution and energy resolution are calculated for standard instrument configurations.

  12. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9)cm(-2)s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5MeV protons in a beam current of 2mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed. PMID:26235186

  13. Design and analysis of large-core multitrench channel waveguide for high-power applications.

    PubMed

    Saini, Than Singh; Kumar, Ajeet; Sinha, Ravindra Kumar

    2015-07-01

    We present a multitrench leaky channel waveguide design that supports effective single-mode operation even with large-core size. The proposed waveguide structure has a uniform rectangular core and a geometrically shaped trench-assisted cladding in such a way that all the confined modes become leaky. The effective single-mode operation is achieved by choosing the appropriate geometrical parameters that introduce very large leakage losses for higher-order modes with very low leakage losses for fundamental mode. A power law profile for cladding geometry is considered to explore the effect of trenches on the effective single-mode operation. The finite element method is used to calculate the leakage losses of the modes. Our numerical results show that the waveguide ensures extended single-mode operation in the wavelength range of 1.25-2.0 ?m with the rectangular core area as large as 100???m2. Such a large-core-area waveguide structure efficiently suppresses unwanted nonlinear optical effects. A proposed channel waveguide structure with a large core size is suitable for high-power delivery devices such as high-power waveguide lasers and amplifiers. PMID:26193164

  14. PGNAA system preliminary design and measurement of In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator for boron concentration measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zizhu; Chong, Yizheng; Chen, Xinru; Jin, Congjun; Yang, Lijun; Liu, Tong

    2015-12-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system has been recently developed at the 30-kW research reactor In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator (IHNI) in Beijing. Neutrons from the specially designed thermal neutron beam were used. The thermal flux of this beam is 3.08×10(6)cm(-2)s(-1) at a full reactor power of 30kW. The PGNAA system consists of an n-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of 40% efficiency, a digital spectrometer, and a shielding part. For both the detector shielding part and the neutron beam shielding part, the inner layer is composed of (6)Li2CO3 powder and the outer layer lead. The boron-10 sensitivity of the PGNAA system is approximately 2.5cps/ppm. Two calibration curves were produced for the 1-10ppm and 10-50 ppm samples. The measurement results of the control samples were in accordance with the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) results. PMID:26242556

  15. Design of a prototype microchannel plate detector with cooled amorphous silicon array readout for neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Fraser, G. W.; Street, R. A.; Watterson, J. I. W.; Lanza, R. C.; Dowson, J.; Abbey, A. F.; Feller, B.; Downing, G.; White, P.; Stevenson, T.

    2005-04-01

    High-performance large-area imaging detectors for fast neutrons in the 5-14 MeV energy range do not exist at present. The aim of this project is to combine microchannel plates or MCPs (or similar electron multiplication structures) traditionally used in image intensifiers and X-ray detectors with amorphous silicon pixel arrays to produce a composite converter and intensifier position-sensitive imaging system. This detector will provide an order of magnitude improvement in image resolution when compared with current millimetre resolution limits obtained using phosphor- or scintillator-based hydrogen-rich converters. In this study the detection of fast neutrons is based on neutron capture in silicon rather than proton recoil in hydrogen-rich converters. This will reduce the effect that light spreading has on image resolution when using conventional phosphor-based converters. The threshold in the silicon capture cross-section will reduce the effect of neutron scatter on the detectability of small features in fast neutron radiographs. In this study we highlight the prototype detector design, present its main advantages and the current status of the detector build phase.

  16. Nuclear safety analyses and core design calculations to convert the Texas A & M University Nuclear Science Center reactor to low enrichment uranium fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, T.A.

    1995-03-02

    This project involved performing the nuclear design and safety analyses needed to modify the license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to allow operation of the Texas A& M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) with a core containing low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. The specific type of LEU fuel to be considered was the TRIGA 20-20 fuel produced by General Atomic. Computer codes for the neutronic analyses were provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the assistance of William Woodruff of ANL in helping the NSCR staff to learn the proper use of the codes is gratefully acknowledged. The codes applied in the LEU analyses were WIMSd4/m, DIF3D, NCTRIGA and PARET. These codes allowed full three dimensional, temperature and burnup dependent calculations modelling the NSCR core to be performed for the first time. In addition, temperature coefficients of reactivity and pulsing calculations were carried out in-house, whereas in the past this modelling had been performed at General Atomic. In order to benchmark the newly acquired codes, modelling of the current NSCR core with highly enriched uranium fuel was also carried out. Calculated results were compared to both earlier licensing calculations and experimental data and the new methods were found to achieve excellent agreement with both. Therefore, even if an LEU core is never loaded at the NSCR, this project has resulted in a significant improvement in the nuclear safety analysis capabilities established and maintained at the NSCR.

  17. Design and operation of a passive neutron monitor for assaying the TRU content of solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Brown, D.P.; Rieck, H.G. Jr.; Rogers, L.A.

    1984-02-01

    A passive neutron monitor has been designed and built for determining the residual transuranic (TRU) and plutonium content of chopped leached fuel hulls and other solid wastes from spent Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel. The system was designed to measure as little as 8 g of plutonium or 88 mg of TRU in a waste package as large as a 208-l drum which could be emitting up to 220,000 R/hr of gamma radiation. For practical purposes, maximum assay times were chosen to be 10,000 sec. The monitor consists of 96 /sup 10/BF/sub 3/ neutron sensitive proportional counting tubes each 5.08 cm in diameter and 183 cm in active length. Tables of neutron emission rates from both spontaneous fission and (..cap alpha..,n) reactions on oxygen are given for all contributing isotopes expected to be present in spent FFTF fuel. Tables of neutron yeilds from isotopic compositions predicted for various exposures and cooling times are also given. Methods of data reduction and sources, magnitude, and control of errors are discussed. Backgrounds and efficiencies have been measured and are reported. A section describing step-by-step operational procedures is included. Guidelines and procedures for quality control and troubleshooting are also given. 13 references, 15 figures, 4 tables.

  18. A Los Alamos design study for a high-power spallation-neutron-source driver

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Macek, R.W.; Schriber, S.O.; Thiessen, H.A.; Woods, R.

    1993-06-01

    A design study for an accelerator-driven spallation-neutron source is underway at Los Alamos. The driver, based on the LAMPF facility, produces a 1-MW proton beam and is upgradable to 5 MW. After linear acceleration to full energy, an H-beam is accumulated for approximately I ms in a compressor ring and then extracted to produce an intense proton burst, less than 1 {mu}s long, onto a spallation target system with a 60-Hz cycle rate. The design uses existing infrastructure insofar as possible while maintaining project goals. This paper summarizes the system specifications and design status.

  19. Preliminary design report for SCDAP/RELAP5 lower core plate model

    SciTech Connect

    Coryell, E.W.; Griffin, F.P.

    1998-07-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. Under primary sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is responsible for overall maintenance of this code and for improvements for pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Since 1991, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been improving SCDAP/RELAP5 for boiling water reactor (BWR) applications. The RELAP5 portion of the code performs the thermal-hydraulic calculations for both normal and severe accident conditions. The structures within the reactor vessel and coolant system can be represented with either RELAP5 heat structures or SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident structures. The RELAP5 heat structures are limited to normal operating conditions (i.e., no structural oxidation, melting, or relocation), while the SCDAP portion of the code is capable of representing structural degradation and core damage progression that can occur under severe accident conditions. DCDAP/RELAP5 currently assumes that molten material which leaves the core region falls into the lower vessel head without interaction with structural materials. The objective of this design report is to describe the modifications required for SCDAP/RELAP5 to treat the thermal response of the structures in the core plate region as molten material relocates downward from the core, through the core plate region, and into the lower plenum. This has been a joint task between INEEL and ORNL, with INEEL focusing on PWR-specific design, and ORNL focusing upon the BWR-specific aspects. Chapter 2 describes the structures in the core plate region that must be represented by the proposed model. Chapter 3 presents the available information about the damage progression that is anticipated to occur in the core plate region during a severe accident, including typical SCDAP/RELAP5 simulation results. Chapter 4 provides a description of the implementation of the recommended model and Chapter 5 discusses the testing which could be done to verify the design and implementation of the model.

  20. Design, synthesis and photochemical properties of the first examples of iminosugar clusters based on fluorescent cores

    PubMed Central

    Lepage, Mathieu L; Mirloup, Antoine; Ripoll, Manon; Stauffert, Fabien; Bodlenner, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Summary The synthesis and photophysical properties of the first examples of iminosugar clusters based on a BODIPY or a pyrene core are reported. The tri- and tetravalent systems designed as molecular probes and synthesized by way of Cu(I)-catalysed azide–alkyne cycloadditions are fluorescent analogues of potent pharmacological chaperones/correctors recently reported in the field of Gaucher disease and cystic fibrosis, two rare genetic diseases caused by protein misfolding. PMID:26124868

  1. Energy Efficient Engine integrated core/low spool design and performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, E. Marshall

    1985-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) is a NASA program to create fuel saving technology for future transport aircraft engines. The E3 technology advancements were demonstrated to operate reliably and achieve goal performance in tests of the Integrated Core/Low Spool vehicle. The first build of this undeveloped technology research engine set a record for low fuel consumption. Its design and detailed test results are herein presented.

  2. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-29

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  3. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  4. Lunar in-core thermionic nuclear reactor power system conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Gallup, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a lunar in-core thermionic reactor power system. The concept consists of a thermionic reactor located in a lunar excavation with surface mounted waste heat radiators. The system was integrated with a proposed lunar base concept representative of recent NASA Space Exploration Initiative studies. The reference mission is a permanently-inhabited lunar base requiring a 550 kWe, 7 year life central power station. Performance parameters and assumptions were based on the Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification Program. Five design cases were analyzed ranging from conservative to advanced. The cases were selected to provide sensitivity effects on the achievement of TFE program goals.

  5. Multi-group helium and hydrogen production cross section libraries for fusion neutronics design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Seiji; Zimin, S.; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    1993-09-01

    The helium and hydrogen production cross section libraries based on the JENDL-3 data file were compiled for use in neutronics and shielding design calculation of a fusion reactor. These libraries have the same group structures as the transport cross section sets, FUSION-J3 and FUSION-40, which are often used in fusion neutronics design and can be used as the response function libraries for the reaction rate calculation code, APPLE-3. These libraries were processed from the JENDL gas production cross section file which is one of the JENDL special purpose files. Some sample calculations using the discrete ordinate code, ANISN, with these libraries were performed and the results were compared with the existing results. Consequently it was found that the appropriate results can be obtained with these libraries. The generated multi-group cross sections for helium and hydrogen production are presented in graphs and tables.

  6. Validation of the MCNPX-PoliMi Code to Design a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Dolan; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester

    2012-07-01

    Many safeguards measurement systems used at nuclear facilities, both domestically and internationally, rely on He-3 detectors and well established mathematical equations to interpret coincidence and multiplicity-type measurements for verifying quantities of special nuclear material. Due to resource shortages alternatives to these existing He-3 based systems are being sought. Work is also underway to broaden the capabilities of these types of measurement systems in order to improve current multiplicity analysis techniques. As a part of a Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technology (MPACT) project within the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technology Program we are designing a fast-neutron multiplicity counter with organic liquid scintillators to quantify important quantities such as plutonium mass. We are also examining the potential benefits of using fast-neutron detectors for multiplicity analysis of advanced fuels in comparison with He-3 detectors and testing the performance of such designs. The designs are being developed and optimized using the MCNPX-PoliMi transport code to study detector response. In the full paper, we will discuss validation measurements used to justify the use of the MCNPX-PoliMi code paired with the MPPost multiplicity routine to design a fast neutron multiplicity counter with liquid scintillators. This multiplicity counter will be designed with the end goal of safeguarding advanced nuclear fuels. With improved timing qualities associated with liquid scintillation detectors, we can design a system that is less limited by nuclear materials of high activities. Initial testing of the designed system with nuclear fuels will take place at Idaho National Laboratory in a later stage of this collaboration.

  7. CHINA SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT: DESIGN ITERATIONS AND R AND D STATUS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    2006-09-21

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator based high power project currently under preparation in China. The accelerator complex is based on an H{sup -} linear accelerator and a rapid cycling proton synchrotron. During the past year, the design of most accelerator systems went through major iterations, and initial research and developments were started on the prototyping of several key components. This paper summarizes major activities of the past year.

  8. Shielding analysis and design of the KIPT experimental neutron source facility of Ukraine.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Naberezhnev, D.; Duo, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility [1]. The facility uses the existing electron accelerators of KIPT in Ukraine. The neutron source of the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Reactor physics experiments and material performance characterization will also be carried out. The subcritical assembly is driven by neutrons generated by the electron beam interactions with the target material. A fraction of these neutrons has an energy above 50 MeV generated through the photo nuclear interactions. This neutron fraction is very small and it has an insignificant contribution to the subcritical assembly performance. However, these high energy neutrons are difficult to shield and they can be slowed down only through the inelastic scattering with heavy isotopes. Therefore the shielding design of this facility is more challenging relative to fission reactors. To attenuate these high energy neutrons, heavy metals (tungsten, iron, etc.) should be used. To reduce the construction cost, heavy concrete with 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} density is selected as a shielding material. The iron weight fraction in this concrete is about 0.6. The shape and thickness of the heavy concrete shield are defined to reduce the biological dose equivalent outside the shield to an acceptable level during operation. At the same time, special attention was give to reduce the total shield mass to reduce the construction cost. The shield design is configured to maintain the biological dose equivalent during operation {le} 0.5 mrem/h inside the subcritical hall, which is five times less than the allowable dose for working forty hours per week for 50 weeks per year. This study analyzed and designed the thickness and the shape of the radial and top shields of the neutron source based on the biological dose equivalent requirements inside the subcritical hall during operation. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX is selected because of its capabilities for transporting electrons, photons, and neutrons. Mesh based weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized to estimate the biological dose outside the shield with good statistics. A significant effort dedicated to the accurate prediction of the biological dose equivalent outside the shield boundary as a function of the shield thickness without geometrical approximations or material homogenization. The building wall was designed with ordinary concrete to reduce the biological dose equivalent to the public with a safety factor in the range of 5 to 20.

  9. Design of an RFQ-Based Neutron Source for Cargo ContainerInterrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, John W.; Hoff, M.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Li, D.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Ratti, A.; Virostek, S.P.; Wells, R.P.

    2006-08-01

    An RFQ-based neutron generator system is described that produces pulsed neutrons for the active screening of sea-land cargo containers for the detection of shielded special nuclear materials (SNM).A microwave-driven deuteron source is coupled to an electrostatic LEBT that injects a 40 mA D+ beam into a 6 MeV, 5.1 meter-long 200 MHz RFQ.The RFQ has a unique beam dynamics design and is capable of operating at duty factors of 5 to 10 percent accelerating a D+ time-averaged current of up to 1.5 mA at 5 percent duty factor, including species and transmission loss. The beam is transported through a specially-designed thin window into a 2.5-atmosphere deuterium gas target. A high-frequency dipole magnet is used to scan the beam over the long dimension of the 5by 35 cm target window. The source will deliver a neutron flux of 1 cdot107 n/(cm2s) to the center of an empty cargo container. Details of the ion source, LEBT, RFQ beam dynamics and gas target design are presented.

  10. Design of a backscatter 14-MeV neutron time-of-flight spectrometer for experiments at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Dzysiuk, N.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Skiba, M.

    2014-08-21

    Neutron energy spectrometry diagnostics play an important role in present-day experiments related to fusion energy research. Measurements and thorough analysis of the neutron emission from the fusion plasma give information on a number of basic fusion performance quantities, on the condition of the neutron source and plasma behavior. Here we discuss the backscatter Time-of-Flight (bTOF) spectrometer concept as a possible instrument for performing high resolution measurements of 14 MeV neutrons. The instrument is based on two sets of scintillators, a first scatterer exposed to a collimated neutron beam and a second detector set placed in the backward direction. The scintillators of the first set are enriched in deuterium to achieve neutron backscattering. The energy resolution and efficiency of a bTOF instrument have been determined for various geometrical configurations. A preliminary design of optimal geometry for the two scintillator sets has been obtained by Monte Carlo simulations based on the MCNPX code.

  11. Investigation on the reflector/moderator geometry and its effect on the neutron beam design in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Y; Rahmani, F; Khalafi, H

    2015-12-01

    In order to provide an appropriate neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), a special Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) must be designed based on the neutron source specifications. A typical BSA includes moderator, reflector, collimator, thermal neutron filter, and gamma filter. In common BSA, the reflector is considered as a layer which covers the sides of the moderator materials. In this paper, new reflector/moderator geometries including multi-layer and hexagonal lattice have been suggested and the effect of them has been investigated by MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. It was found that the proposed configurations have a significant effect to improve the thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio which is an important neutron beam parameter. PMID:26298435

  12. Design and performance of horizontal-type neutron reflectometer SOFIA at J-PARC/MLF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, N. L.; Torikai, N.; Mitamura, K.; Sagehashi, H.; Sato, S.; Seto, H.; Sugita, T.; Goko, S.; Furusaka, M.; Oda, T.; Hino, M.; Fujiwara, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahara, A.

    2011-11-01

    Neutron reflectometry is a powerful method for investigating the surface and interfacial structures of materials in the spatial range from nanometers to sub-micrometers. At the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), a high-intensity pulsed neutron beam is produced with a proton accelerator at 220kW, which will be upgraded to 1MW in future. Beamline 16 (BL16) at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) in J-PARC is dedicated to a horizontal-type reflectometer, and in this beamline, neutrons are transported downward at two different angles, 2.2° and 5.7° , relative to the horizontal. In December 2008, we started to accept the neutron beam at BL16 with the old ARISA reflectometer relocated from the KENS facility, KEK, Japan; and we have now replaced it with the brand-new reflectometer SOFIA (SOFt Interface Analyzer). With a high-flux beam and instrumental upgrade, the observable reflectivity of SOFIA reaches around 10-7 within a few hours for specimens on 3" substrates. In this paper, we will present the design and performance of the SOFIA reflectometer, and discuss some preliminary results on the device development for further upgrade.

  13. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are similar to those obtained with the traditional UO2 nuclear fuel.

  14. Enhancement of REBUS-3/DIF3D for whole-core neutronic analysis of prismatic very high temperature reactor (VHTR).

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C. H.; Zhong, Z.; Taiwo, T.A.; Yang, W.S.; Khalil, H.S.; Smith, M.A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-10-13

    Enhancements have been made to the REBUS-3/DIF3D code suite to facilitate its use for the design and analysis of prismatic Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs). A new cross section structure, using table-lookup, has been incorporated to account for cross section changes with burnup and fuel and moderator temperatures. For representing these cross section dependencies, three new modules have been developed using FORTRAN 90/95 object-oriented data structures and implemented within the REBUS-3 code system. These modules provide a cross section storage procedure, construct microscopic cross section data for all isotopes, and contain a single block of banded scattering data for efficient data management. Fission products other than I, Xe, Pm, and Sm, can be merged into a single lumped fission product to save storage space, memory, and computing time without sacrificing the REBUS-3 solution accuracy. A simple thermal-hydraulic (thermal-fluid) feedback model has been developed for prismatic VHTR cores and implemented in REBUS-3 for temperature feedback calculations. Axial conduction was neglected in the formulation because of its small magnitude compared to radial (planar) conduction. With the simple model, the average fuel and graphite temperatures are accurately estimated compared to reference STAR-CD results. The feedback module is currently operational for the non-equilibrium fuel cycle analysis option of REBUS-3. Future work should include the extension of this capability to the equilibrium cycle option of the code and additional verification of the feedback module. For the simulation of control rods in VHTR cores, macroscopic cross section deviations (deltas) have been defined to account for the effect of control rod insertion. The REBUS-3 code has been modified to use the appropriately revised cross sections when control rods are inserted in a calculation node. In order to represent asymmetric core blocks (e.g., fuel blocks or reflector blocks containing asymmetric absorber rods), surface-dependent discontinuity factors based on nodal equivalence theory have been introduced into the nodal diffusion theory option of the DIF3D code (DIF3D-nodal) to improve modeling accuracy. Additionally, the discontinuity factors based on the Simplified Equivalence Theory (SET) have been incorporated as an alternative and may be employed for both the DIF3D-nodal and DIF3D-VARIANT (nodal transport) solution options. Two- and three-dimensional core calculations have been performed using the routines developed and modified in this work, along with cross sections generated from single fuel block and one-dimensional or two-dimensional fuel-reflector model. Generally, REBUS-3/DIF3D results for the core multiplication factor and power distribution are found to be in good agreement with reference results (generated with MCNP continuous energy calculations) particularly when discontinuity factors are applied. The DIF3D-VARIANT option was found to provide a more accurate solution in its diffusion approximation than the DIF3D-nodal option. Control rod worths can be estimated with acceptably small errors compared to MCNP results. However, estimation of the core power tilt needs to be improved by introducing the surface-dependent discontinuity factor capability in DIF3D-VARIANT.

  15. The new vertical neutron beam line at the CERN n_TOF facility design and outlook on the performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, C.; Chiaveri, E.; Girod, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Aberle, O.; Barros, S.; Bergström, I.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Guerrero, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Tsinganis, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Beinrucker, C.; Belloni, F.; Be?vá?, F.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cerutti, F.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L.; Deo, K.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Dressler, R.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frost, R.; Furman, V.; Ganesan, S.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Göbel, K.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krti?ka, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui, J.; Licata, M.; Lo Meo, S.; López, D.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Palomo Pinto, R.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M. S.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Steinegger, P.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2015-11-01

    At the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN a new vertical beam line was constructed in 2014, in order to extend the experimental possibilities at this facility to an even wider range of challenging cross-section measurements of interest in astrophysics, nuclear technology and medical physics. The design of the beam line and the experimental hall was based on FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, aiming at maximizing the neutron flux, reducing the beam halo and minimizing the background from neutrons interacting with the collimator or back-scattered in the beam dump. The present paper gives an overview on the design of the beam line and the relevant elements and provides an outlook on the expected performance regarding the neutron beam intensity, shape and energy resolution, as well as the neutron and photon backgrounds.

  16. A new designed dual-guided ring-core fiber for OAM mode transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Wenbo; Xi, Lixia; Tang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2015-10-01

    We propose and analyze a design of multi-OAM-modes ring-core fiber with two guided modes regions which possess relatively large effective index separations required for the vector modes transmission. The proposed fiber can support up to 28 information states bearing OAM spanning 8 OAM orders in the ring region, and two degenerate fundamental polarization modes in the core region across the whole C bands. Fiber features such as dispersion, differential mode delay, effective mode area, power isolation between two guided regions and modal birefringence have been analyzed in this paper. For the reason that the proposed fiber possess the relatively good features, it has potential applications in the next generation fiber communication systems either in the quantum domain or in the classical domain.

  17. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 1: Blading design. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    A baseline compressor test stage was designed as well as a candidate rotor and two candidate stators that have the potential of reducing endwall losses relative to the baseline stage. These test stages are typical of those required in the rear stages of advanced, highly-loaded core compressors. The baseline Stage A is a low-speed model of Stage 7 of the 10 stage AMAC compressor. Candidate Rotor B uses a type of meanline in the tip region that unloads the leading edge and loads the trailing edge relative to the baseline Rotor A design. Candidate Stator B embodies twist gradients in the endwall region. Candidate Stator C embodies airfoil sections near the endwalls that have reduced trailing edge loading relative to Stator A. Tests will be conducted using four identical stages of blading so that the designs described will operate in a true multistage environment.

  18. Design and implementation of a multiaxial loading capability during heating on an engineering neutron diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Benafan, O.; Padula, S. A.; Skorpenske, H. D.; An, K.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2014-10-01

    A gripping capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during multiaxial loading and heating on the VULCAN engineering materials diffractometer at the spallation neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed capability allowed for the acquisition of neutron spectra during tension, compression, torsion, and/or complex loading paths at elevated temperatures. The design consisted of age-hardened, Inconel{sup ®} 718 grips with direct attachment to the existing MTS load frame having axial and torsional capacities of 100 kN and 400 N·m, respectively. Internal cooling passages were incorporated into the gripping system for fast cooling rates during high temperature experiments up to ~1000 K. The specimen mounting couplers combined a threaded and hexed end-connection for ease of sample installation/removal without introducing any unwanted loads. Instrumentation of this capability is documented in this work along with various performance parameters. The gripping system was utilized to investigate deformation in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes (e.g., isothermal, isobaric, and cyclic), and preliminary results are presented. The measurements facilitated the quantification of the texture, internal strain, and phase fraction evolution in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes.

  19. Polar-Drive Designs for Optimizing Neutron Yields on the National Ignition Faciltiy

    SciTech Connect

    Cok, A.M.; Craxton, R.S.; McKenty, P.W.

    2008-09-10

    Polar-drive designs are proposed for producing symmetric implosions of thin-shell, DT gas-filled targets leading to high fusion-neutron yields for neutron-diagnostic development. The designs can be implemented as soon as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, B39 (1999)] is operational as they use indirect-drive phase plates. Two-dimensional simulations using the hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton and R. L. McCrory, J. Appl. Phys. 56, 108 (1984)] have shown that good low-mode uniformity can be obtained by choosing combinations of pointing and defocusing of the beams, including pointing offsets of individual beams within some of the NIF laser-beam quads. The optimizations have been carried out for total laser energies ranging from 350 kJ to 1.5 MJ, enabling the optimum pointing and defocusing parameters to be determined through interpolation for any given laser energy in this range. Neutron yields in the range of 10^15–10^16 are expected.

  20. Polar-drive designs for optimizing neutron yields on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cok, A. M.; Craxton, R. S.; McKenty, P. W.

    2008-08-15

    Polar-drive designs are proposed for producing symmetric implosions of thin-shell, DT gas-filled targets leading to high fusion-neutron yields for neutron-diagnostic development. The designs can be implemented as soon as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, B39 (1999)] is operational as they use indirect-drive phase plates. Two-dimensional simulations using the hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton and R. L. McCrory, J. Appl. Phys. 56, 108 (1984)] have shown that good low-mode uniformity can be obtained by choosing combinations of pointing and defocusing of the beams, including pointing offsets of individual beams within some of the NIF laser-beam quads. The optimizations have been carried out for total laser energies ranging from 350 kJ to 1.5 MJ, enabling the optimum pointing and defocusing parameters to be determined through interpolation for any given laser energy in this range. Neutron yields in the range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} are expected.

  1. Design and implementation of a multiaxial loading capability during heating on an engineering neutron diffractometer.

    PubMed

    Benafan, O; Padula, S A; Skorpenske, H D; An, K; Vaidyanathan, R

    2014-10-01

    A gripping capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during multiaxial loading and heating on the VULCAN engineering materials diffractometer at the spallation neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed capability allowed for the acquisition of neutron spectra during tension, compression, torsion, and/or complex loading paths at elevated temperatures. The design consisted of age-hardened, Inconel(®) 718 grips with direct attachment to the existing MTS load frame having axial and torsional capacities of 100 kN and 400 N·m, respectively. Internal cooling passages were incorporated into the gripping system for fast cooling rates during high temperature experiments up to ?1000 K. The specimen mounting couplers combined a threaded and hexed end-connection for ease of sample installation/removal without introducing any unwanted loads. Instrumentation of this capability is documented in this work along with various performance parameters. The gripping system was utilized to investigate deformation in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes (e.g., isothermal, isobaric, and cyclic), and preliminary results are presented. The measurements facilitated the quantification of the texture, internal strain, and phase fraction evolution in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes. PMID:25362410

  2. Design study of superconducting sextupole magnet using HTS coated conductor for neutron-focusing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosaka, T.; Koyanagi, K.; Ono, M.; Kuriyama, T.; Watanabe, I.; Tsuchiya, K.; Suzuki, J.; Adachi, T.; Shimizu, H. M.

    2006-10-01

    We performed a design study of sextupole magnet using high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires. The sextupole magnet is used as a focusing lens for neutron-focusing devices. A neutron-focusing device is desired to have a large aperture and a high magnetic field gradient of G, where G = 2B/r2, B is the magnetic field and r is a distance from the sextupole magnet axis. Superconducting magnets offer promising prospects to meet the demands of a neutron-focusing device. Recently NbTi coils of low temperature superconducting (LTS) have been developed for a sextupole magnet with a 46.8 mm aperture. The maximum magnetic field gradient G of this magnet is 9480 T/m2 at 4.2 K and 12,800 T/m2at 1.8 K. On the other hand, rapid progress on second generation HTS wire has been made in increasing the performance of critical current and in demonstrating a long length. The second generation HTS wire is referred to as coated conductor. It consists of tape-shaped base upon which a thin coating of superconductor, usually YBCO, is deposited or grown. This paper describes a design study of sextupole magnet using coated conductors.

  3. Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-05-05

    A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance trends such as conversion ratio and mass flow parameters are less sensitive to these parameters and the current results should provide a good basis for static and dynamic system analysis. The conversion ratio is fundamentally a ratio of the macroscopic cross section of U-238 capture to that of TRU fission. Since the microscopic cross sections only change moderately with fuel design and isotopic concentration for the fast reactor, a specific conversion ratio requires a specific enrichment. The approximate average charge enrichment (TRU/HM) is 14%, 21%, 33%, 56%, and 100% for conversion ratios of 1.0, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, and 0.0 for the metal-fueled cores. The approximate average charge enrichment is 17%, 25%, 38%, 60%, and 100% for conversion ratios of 1.0, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, and 0.0 for the oxide-fueled core. For the split batch cores, the maximum enrichment will be somewhat higher. For both the metal and oxide-fueled cores, the reactivity feedback coefficients and kinetics parameters seem reasonable. The maximum single control assembly reactivity faults may be too large for the low conversion ratio designs. The average reactivity of the primary control assemblies was increased, which may cause the maximum reactivity of the central control assembly to be excessive. The values of the reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters show that some values appear to improve significantly at lower conversion ratios while others appear far less favorable. Detailed safety analysis is required to determine if these designs have adequate safety margins or if appropriate design modifications are required. Detailed system analysis data has been generated for both metal and oxide-fueled core designs over the entire range of potential burner reactors. Additional data has been calculated for a few alternative fuel cycles. The systems data has been summarized in this report and the detailed data will be provided to the systems analysis team so that static and dynamic system analyses can be performed.

  4. Exploration of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing Through Neutron Activator Design for Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Formation in (99)Mo Production and BNCT Applications.

    PubMed

    Khorshidi, Abdollah

    2015-10-01

    A feasibility study was performed to design thermal and epithermal neutron sources for radioisotope production and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by moderating fast neutrons. The neutrons were emitted from the reaction between (9)Be, (181)Ta, and (184)W targets and 30 MeV protons accelerated by a small cyclotron at 300??A. In this study, the adiabatic resonance crossing (ARC) method was investigated by means of (207)Pb and (208)Pb moderators, graphite reflector, and boron absorber around the moderator region. Thermal/epithermal flux, energy, and cross section of accumulated neutrons in the activator were examined through diverse thicknesses of the specified regions. Simulation results revealed that the (181)Ta target had the highest neutron yield, and also tungsten was found to have the highest values in both surface and volumetric flux ratio. Transmutation in the (98)Mo sample through radiative capture was investigated for the natural lead moderator. When the sample radial distance from the target was increased inside the graphite region, the production yield had the greatest value of activity. The potential of the ARC method is a replacement or complements the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes. PMID:26397967

  5. Preliminary Neutronics Design Studies for a Molten Salt Blanket LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J

    2008-10-23

    The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Program being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) aims to design a hybrid fission-fusion subcritical nuclear engine that uses a laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) system to drive a subcritical fission blanket. This combined fusion-fission hybrid system could be used for generating electricity, material transmutation or incineration, or other applications. LIFE does not require enriched fuel since it is a sub-critical system and LIFE can sustain power operation beyond the burnup levels at which typical fission reactors need to be refueled. In light of these factors, numerous options have been suggested and are being investigated. Options being investigated include fueling LIFE engines with spent nuclear fuel to aid in disposal/incineration of commercial spent nuclear fuel or using depleted uranium or thorium fueled options to enhance proliferation resistance and utilize non-fissile materials [1]. LIFE engine blanket designs using a molten salt fuel system represent one area of investigation. Possible applications of a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket include uses as a spent nuclear fuel burner, fissile fuel breeding platform, and providing a backup alternative to other LIFE engine blanket designs using TRISO fuel particles in case the TRISO particles are found to be unable to withstand the irradiation they will be subjected to. These molten salts consist of a mixture of LiF with UF{sub 4} or ThF{sub 4} or some combination thereof. Future systems could look at using PuF{sub 3} or PuF{sub 4} as well, though no work on such system with initial plutonium loadings has been performed for studies documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to document preliminary neutronics design studies performed to support the development of a molten salt blanket LIFE engine option, as part of the LIFE Program being performed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory. Preliminary design studies looking at fast ignition and hot spot ignition fusion options are documented, along with limited scoping studies performed to investigate other options of interest that surfaced during the main design effort. Lastly, side studies that were not part of the main design effort but may alter future work performed on LIFE engine designs are shown. The majority of all work reported in this document was performed during the Molten Salt Fast Ignition Moderator Study (MSFIMS) which sought to optimize the amount of moderator mixed into the molten salt region in order to produce the most compelling design. The studies in this report are of a limited scope and are intended to provide a preliminary neutronics analysis of the design concepts described herein to help guide decision processes and explore various options that a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket might enable. None of the designs shown in this report, even reference cases selected for detailed description and analysis, have been fully optimized. The analyses were performed primarily as a neutronics study, though some consultation was made regarding thermal-hydraulic and structural concerns during both scoping out an initial model and subsequent to identifying a neutronics-based reference case to ensure that the design work contained no glaring mechanical or thermal issues that would preclude its feasibility. Any analyses and recommendations made in this report are either primarily or solely from the point of view of LIFE neutronics and ignore other fundamental issues related to molten salt fuel blankets such as chemical processing feasibility and political feasibility of a molten salt system.

  6. Efficient Design and Analysis of Lightweight Reinforced Core Sandwich and PRSEUS Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Lucking, Ryan C.; Collier, Craig S.; Ainsworth, James J.; Toubia, Elias A.

    2012-01-01

    Design, analysis, and sizing methods for two novel structural panel concepts have been developed and incorporated into the HyperSizer Structural Sizing Software. Reinforced Core Sandwich (RCS) panels consist of a foam core with reinforcing composite webs connecting composite facesheets. Boeing s Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) panels use a pultruded unidirectional composite rod to provide axial stiffness along with integrated transverse frames and stitching. Both of these structural concepts are ovencured and have shown great promise applications in lightweight structures, but have suffered from the lack of efficient sizing capabilities similar to those that exist for honeycomb sandwich, foam sandwich, hat stiffened, and other, more traditional concepts. Now, with accurate design methods for RCS and PRSEUS panels available in HyperSizer, these concepts can be traded and used in designs as is done with the more traditional structural concepts. The methods developed to enable sizing of RCS and PRSEUS are outlined, as are results showing the validity and utility of the methods. Applications include several large NASA heavy lift launch vehicle structures.

  7. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  8. Design and construction of a thermal neutron beam for BNCT at Tehran Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Yaser; Khalafi, Hossein; Rahmani, Faezeh; Ezzati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Hossnirokh, Ashkan; Shamami, Mehrdad Azizi; Amini, Sepideh

    2014-12-01

    An irradiation facility has been designed and constructed at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) for the treatment of shallow tumors using Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). TRR has a thermal column which is about 3m in length with a wide square cross section of 1.2×1.2m(2). This facility is filled with removable graphite blocks. The aim of this work is to perform the necessary modifications in the thermal column structure to meet thermal BNCT beam criteria recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency. The main modifications consist of rearranging graphite blocks and reducing the gamma dose rate at the beam exit. Activation foils and TLD700 dosimeter have been used to measure in-air characteristics of the neutron beam. According to the measurements, a thermal flux is 5.6×10(8) (ncm(-2)s(-1)), a cadmium ratio is 186 for gold foils and a gamma dose rate is 0.57Gy h(-1). PMID:25195172

  9. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, Theodore; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Donahue, Jr., Cornelius; Riedel, Richard A.

    2015-05-21

    We describe the design and performance of a 157mm x 157mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of < 1.2mm with distortion < 0.5mm on over 50 installed Anger Cameras. The performance of the detector is limited by the light yield of the scintillator, and it is estimated that the resolution of the current detector could be doubled with a brighter scintillator. Data collected from small (<1mm3) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low Rw(F) values

  10. Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation Studies for Designer Materials, Sustainable Energy and Healthy Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-05-01

    Probably the most prolific use of large accelerators today is in the creation of bright beams of x-ray photons or neutrons. The number of scientific users of such sources in the US alone is approaching 10,000. I will describe the some of the major applications of synchrotron and neutron radiation and their impact on society. If you have AIDS, need a better IPOD or a more efficient car, or want to clean up a superfund site, you are benefitting from these accelerators. The design of new materials is becoming more and more dependent on structural information from these sources. I will identify the trends in applications which are demanding new sources with greater capabilities.

  11. Design and analysis of rectangular core photonic crystal fiber for supercontinuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Than Singh; Kumar, Ajeet; Cherif, Rim; Sinha, R. K.; Zghal, Mourad

    2015-08-01

    A rectangular core photonic crystal fiber design in As2Se3 chalcogenide glass has been reported for mid-infrared supercontinuum generation. The structural parameters have been tailored for all normal dispersion profile. The proposed structure possesses nonlinearity (?) as large as 20956 W-1 km-1 at 2800 nm wavelength with very low and flat dispersion of -2.38 ps/(nm×km). We have generated supercontinuum spectra spanning 1480 - 9990 nm using only 4 mm length of proposed photonic crystal fiber pumped with femtosecond optical pulses of peak power of 500 W at 2800 nm.

  12. Comparative sodium void effects for different advanced liquid metal reactor fuel and core designs

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbin, K.D.; Kessler, S.F.; Nelson, J.V.; Gedeon, S.R.; Omberg, R.P.

    1991-07-01

    An analysis of metal-, oxide, and nitride-fueled advanced liquid metal reactor cores was performed to investigate the calculated differences in sodium void reactivity, and to determine the relationship between sodium void reactivity and burnup reactivity swing using the three fuel types. The results of this analysis indicate that nitride fuel has the least positive sodium void reactivity for any given burnup reactivity swing. Thus, it appears that a good design compromise between transient overpower and loss of flow response is obtained using nitride fuel. Additional studies were made to understand these and other nitride advantages. 8 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Benzotriazonine as a new core structure for the design of CCK-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Escherich, A; Escrieut, C; Fourmy, D; Moroder, L

    1999-03-01

    The search for heterocyclic scaffolds for the design of non-peptidic and highly selective agonists or antagonists of peptide hormone receptors led to 4-N-benzyl-2,3,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-1H-1,4,7-benzotriazonin-2, 6-dione with a 9-membered core structure as a new low mass lead compound that exhibits submicromolar antagonistic activity at the CCK-A receptor with a 54-fold selectivity over the CCK-B/gastrin receptor. PMID:10323559

  14. Thermal-hydraulic criteria for the APT tungsten neutron source design

    SciTech Connect

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    1998-03-01

    This report presents the thermal-hydraulic design criteria (THDC) developed for the tungsten neutron source (TNS). The THDC are developed for the normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis accidents. The requirements of the safety analyses are incorporated into the design criteria, consistent with the integrated safety management and the safety-by-design philosophy implemented throughout the APT design process. The phenomenology limiting the thermal-hydraulic design and the confidence level requirements for each limit are discussed. The overall philosophy of the uncertainty analyses and the confidence level requirements also are presented. Different sets of criteria are developed for normal operations, operational transients, anticipated accidents, unlikely accidents, extremely unlikely accidents, and accidents during TNS replacement. In general, the philosophy is to use the strictest criteria for the high-frequency events. The criteria is relaxed as the event frequencies become smaller. The THDC must be considered as a guide for the design philosophy and not as a hard limit. When achievable, design margins greater than those required by the THDC must be used. However, if a specific event sequence cannot meet the THDC, expensive design changes are not necessary if the single event sequence results in sufficient margin to safety criteria and does not challenge the plant availability or investment protection considerations.

  15. Fluence-limited burnup as a function of fast reactor core parameters

    E-print Network

    Kersting, Alyssa (Alyssa Rae)

    2011-01-01

    The limiting factor in current designs for fast reactors is not only the reactivity, but also the maximum permissible fast-neutron fluence in the cladding, especially for reduced uranium enrichment cores using high-albedo ...

  16. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace several obsolete components of the current analytical tool set used for ATR neutronics support. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). It will also greatly facilitate the LEU conversion effort, since the upgraded computational capabilities are now at a stage where they can be, and in fact have been, used for the required physics analysis from the beginning. In this context, extensive scoping neutronics analyses were completed for six preconceptual candidate LEU fuel element designs for the ATR (and for its companion critical facility, ATRC). Of these, four exhibited neutronics performance in what is believed to be an acceptable range. However, there are currently some concerns with regard to fabricability and mechanical performance that have emerged for one of the four latter concepts. Thus three concepts have been selected for more comprehensive conceptual design analysis during the upcoming fiscal year.

  17. Core physics analysis of 100% MOX Core in IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Franceschini, F.; Petrovic, B.

    2006-07-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) is an advanced small-to-medium-size (1000 MWt) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), targeting deployment around 2015. Its reference core design is based on the current Westinghouse UO{sub 2} fuel with less than 5% {sup 235}U, and the analysis has been previously completed confirming good performance. The full MOX fuel core is currently under evaluation as one of the alternatives for the second wave of IRIS reactors. A full 3-D neutronic analysis has been performed to examine main core performance parameters, such as critical boron concentration, peaking factors, discharge burnup, etc. The enhanced moderation of the IRIS fuel lattice facilitates MOX core design, and all the obtained results are within the requirements, confirming viability of this option from the reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

  18. Klystron Modulator Design for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A.; Baca, David M.; Partridge, Edward R.; Rees, Daniel E.

    2012-06-22

    This paper will describe the design of the 44 modulator systems that will be installed to upgrade the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator RF system. The klystrons can operate up to 86 kV with a nominal 32 Amp beam current with a 120 Hz repetition rate and 15% duty cycle. The klystrons are a mod-anode design. The modulator is designed with analog feedback control to ensure the klystron beam current is flat-top regulated. To achieve fast switching while maintaining linear feedback control, a grid-clamp, totem-pole modulator configuration is used with an 'on' deck and an 'off' deck. The on and off deck modulators are of identical design and utilize a cascode connected planar triode, cathode driven with a high speed MOSFET. The derived feedback is connected to the planar triode grid to enable the flat-top control. Although modern design approaches suggest solid state designs may be considered, the planar triode (Eimac Y-847B) is very cost effective, is easy to integrate with the existing hardware, and provides a simplified linear feedback control mechanism. The design is very compact and fault tolerant. This paper will review the complete electrical design, operational performance, and system characterization as applied to the LANSCE installation.

  19. Small Launch Vehicle Design Approaches: Clustered Cores Compared with Multi-Stage Inline Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Eric D.; Beers, Benjamin; Esther, Elizabeth; Philips, Alan; Threet, Grady E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to better define small launch vehicle design options two approaches were investigated from the small launch vehicle trade space. The primary focus was to evaluate a clustered common core design against a purpose built inline vehicle. Both designs focused on liquid oxygen (LOX) and rocket propellant grade kerosene (RP-1) stages with the terminal stage later evaluated as a LOX/methane (CH4) stage. A series of performance optimization runs were done in order to minimize gross liftoff weight (GLOW) including alternative thrust levels, delivery altitude for payload, vehicle length to diameter ratio, alternative engine feed systems, re-evaluation of mass growth allowances, passive versus active guidance systems, and rail and tower launch methods. Additionally manufacturability, cost, and operations also play a large role in the benefits and detriments for each design. Presented here is the Advanced Concepts Office's Earth to Orbit Launch Team methodology and high level discussion of the performance trades and trends of both small launch vehicle solutions along with design philosophies that shaped both concepts. Without putting forth a decree stating one approach is better than the other; this discussion is meant to educate the community at large and let the reader determine which architecture is truly the most economical; since each path has such a unique set of limitations and potential payoffs.

  20. Design Fundamentals for Cost-Optimized Neutron Detectors Based on an Array of Helium-3 Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaulding, Randy; Morris, Chris; Greene, Steve; Makela, Mark; Forest, Tony

    2009-10-01

    Increasing competition over the world's finite helium-3 reserves has recently created an urgent need to utilize our existing supplies of the gas in the most efficient manner possible. A new design for helium-3-based neutron detectors has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory which maximizes utilization of helium-3 on the basis of cost efficiency. This design employs atmospheric-pressure tubes that contain less than one bar partial pressure of helium-3 nestled inside a lattice of thin HDPE sheets. This results in a net gain of 200-300% in efficiency per gram helium-3 compared to traditional high-pressure tubes. The cost efficiency is independent of surface area, making the design concept appropriate for a wide range of applications involving detector surface areas from <100 cm2 to >100 m2. A prototype detector with surface area 1.01 m2 was built at LANL and the results of benchmarking experiments are presented.

  1. Methodology for worker neutron exposure evaluation in the PDCF facility design.

    PubMed

    Scherpelz, R I; Traub, R J; Pryor, K H

    2004-01-01

    A project headed by Washington Group International is meant to design the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) to convert the plutonium pits from excessed nuclear weapons into plutonium oxide for ultimate disposition. Battelle staff are performing the shielding calculations that will determine appropriate shielding so that the facility workers will not exceed target exposure levels. The target exposure levels for workers in the facility are 5 mSv y(-1) for the whole body and 100 mSv y(-1) for the extremity, which presents a significant challenge to the designers of a facility that will process tons of radioactive material. The design effort depended on shielding calculations to determine appropriate thickness and composition for glove box walls, and concrete wall thicknesses for storage vaults. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff used ORIGEN-S and SOURCES to generate gamma and neutron source terms, and Monte Carlo (computer code for) neutron photon (transport) (MCNP-4C) to calculate the radiation transport in the facility. The shielding calculations were performed by a team of four scientists, so it was necessary to develop a consistent methodology. There was also a requirement for the study to be cost-effective, so efficient methods of evaluation were required. The calculations were subject to rigorous scrutiny by internal and external reviewers, so acceptability was a major feature of the methodology. Some of the issues addressed in the development of the methodology included selecting appropriate dose factors, developing a method for handling extremity doses, adopting an efficient method for evaluating effective dose equivalent in a non-uniform radiation field, modelling the reinforcing steel in concrete, and modularising the geometry descriptions for efficiency. The relative importance of the neutron dose equivalent compared with the gamma dose equivalent varied substantially depending on the specific shielding conditions and lessons were learned from this effect. This paper addresses these issues and the resulting methodology. PMID:15353738

  2. Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D.; Eberle, C.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world`s best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world`s best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using {sup 64}Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet.

  3. METHODOLOGY FOR WORKER NEUTRON EXPOSURE EVALUATION IN THE PDCF FACILITY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, Robert I.; Traub, Richard J.; Pryor, Kathryn H.

    2004-08-01

    A project headed by Washington Group International is meant to design the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) to convert the plutonium pits from excessed nuclear weapons into plutonium oxide for ultimate disposition. Battelle staff are performing the shielding calculations that will determine appropriate shielding so that the facility workers will not exceed target exposure levels. The target exposure levels for workers in the facility are 5 mSv y?1 for the whole body and 100 mSv y?1 for the extremity, which presents a significant challenge to the designers of a facility that will process tons of radioactive material. The design effort depended on shielding calculations to determine appropriate thickness and composition for glove box walls, and concrete wall thicknesses for storage vaults. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff used ORIGEN-S and SOURCES to generate gamma and neutron source terms, and Monte Carlo (computer code for) neutron photon (transport) (MCNP-4C) to calculate the radiation transport in the facility. The shielding calculations were performed by a team of four scientists, so it was necessary to develop a consistent methodology. There was also a requirement for the study to be cost-effective, so efficient methods of evaluation were required. The calculations were subject to rigorous scrutiny by internal and external reviewers, so acceptability was a major feature of the methodology. Some of the issues addressed in the development of the methodology included selecting appropriate dose factors, developing a method for handling extremity doses, adopting an efficient method for evaluating effective dose equivalent in a non-uniform radiation field, modeling the reinforcing steel in concrete, and modularizing the geometry descriptions for efficiency. The relative importance of the neutron dose equivalent compared with the gamma dose equivalent varied substantially depending on the specific shielding conditions and lessons were learned from this effect. This paper addresses these issues and the resulting methodology.

  4. Neutronic analysis of graphite-moderated solid breeder design for INTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J.; Abdou, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of the INTOR tritium-production-blanket design is presented. A ternary system of solid silicate breeder, lead neutron multiplier, and graphite moderator is explored primary from safety and blanket tritium-inventory considerations. Lithium-silicate (Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/) breeder systems are studied along with water (H/sub 2/O/D/sub 2/O) and Type 316 stainless steel as coolant and structural material, respectively. The analysis examines the neutronics effects on tritium-production regarding: (1) coolant choice; (2) moderator choice; (3) moderator location; (4) multiplier thickness; (5) /sup 6/Li enrichment; and (6) /sup 6/Li burnup. The tritium-breeding-blanket modules are located at the top, outboard, and bottom (outer) parts of the torus, resulting in a breeding coverage of approx. 60% at the first-wall surface. It is found that the reference INTOR design yields, based on a three-dimensional analysis, a net tritium breeding ratio (BR) of approx. 0.65 at the beginning of reactor operation, satisfying the design criterion of BR > 0.6.

  5. Preliminary probabilistic design accident evaluation of the cold source facilities of the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.M.; Ramsey, C.T.

    1995-08-01

    Consistent with established Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project policy for the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in design, a task has been established to use PRA techniques to help guide the design and safety analysis of the ANS cold sources. The work discussed in this report is the first formal output of the cold source PRA task. The major output at this stage is a list of design basis accidents, categorized into approximate frequency categories. This output is expected to focus attention on continued design work to define and optimize the design such that design basis accidents are better defined and have acceptable outcomes. Categorizing the design basis events (DBEs) into frequency categories should prove helpful because it will allow appropriate acceptance criteria to be applied. Because the design of the cold source is still proceeding, it is beyond the scope of this task to produce detailed event probability calculations or even, in some cases, detailed event sequence definitions. That work would take place as a logically planned follow-on task, to be completed as the design matures. Figure 1.1 illustrates the steps that would typically be followed in selecting design basis accidents with the help of PRA. Only those steps located above the dashed line on Fig. 1.1 are included in the scope of the present task. (Only an informal top-level failure modes and effects analysis was done.) With ANS project closeout expected in the near future, the scope of this task has been abbreviated somewhat beyond the state of available design information on the ANS cold sources, or what could be achieved in a reasonable time. This change was necessary to ensure completion before the closeout and because the in-depth analytical support necessary to define fully some of the accidents has already been curtailed.

  6. Optimal design at inner core of the shaped pyramidal truss structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol

    2013-12-16

    Sandwich material is a type of composite material with lightweight, high strength, good dynamic properties and high bending stiffness-to-weight ratio. This can be found well such structures in the nature (for example, internal structure of bones, plants, etc.). New trend which prefers eco-friendly products and energy efficiency is emerging in industries recently. Demand for materials with high strength and light weight is also increasing. In line with these trends, researches about manufacturing methods of sandwich material have been actively conducted. In this study, a sandwich structure named as “Shaped Pyramidal Truss Structure” is proposed to improve mechanical strength and to apply a manufacturing process suitable for massive production. The new sandwich structure was designed to enhance compressive strength by changing the cross-sectional shape at the central portion of the core. As the next step, optimization of the shape was required. Optimization technique used here was the SZGA(Successive Zooming Genetic Algorithm), which is one of GA(Genetic Algorithm) methods gradually reducing the area of design variable. The objective function was defined as moment of inertia of the cross-sectional shape of the strut. The control points of cubic Bezier curve, which was assumed to be the shape of the cross section, were used as design variables. By using FEM simulation, it was found that the structure exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to the simple design of the prior art.

  7. Optimal design at inner core of the shaped pyramidal truss structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol

    2013-12-01

    Sandwich material is a type of composite material with lightweight, high strength, good dynamic properties and high bending stiffness-to-weight ratio. This can be found well such structures in the nature (for example, internal structure of bones, plants, etc.). New trend which prefers eco-friendly products and energy efficiency is emerging in industries recently. Demand for materials with high strength and light weight is also increasing. In line with these trends, researches about manufacturing methods of sandwich material have been actively conducted. In this study, a sandwich structure named as "Shaped Pyramidal Truss Structure" is proposed to improve mechanical strength and to apply a manufacturing process suitable for massive production. The new sandwich structure was designed to enhance compressive strength by changing the cross-sectional shape at the central portion of the core. As the next step, optimization of the shape was required. Optimization technique used here was the SZGA(Successive Zooming Genetic Algorithm), which is one of GA(Genetic Algorithm) methods gradually reducing the area of design variable. The objective function was defined as moment of inertia of the cross-sectional shape of the strut. The control points of cubic Bezier curve, which was assumed to be the shape of the cross section, were used as design variables. By using FEM simulation, it was found that the structure exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to the simple design of the prior art.

  8. America's Next Great Ship: Space Launch System Core Stage Transitioning from Design to Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkenstock, Benjamin; Kauer, Roy

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Program is essential to achieving the Nation's and NASA's goal of human exploration and scientific investigation of the solar system. As a multi-element program with emphasis on safety, affordability, and sustainability, SLS is becoming America's next great ship of exploration. The SLS Core Stage includes avionics, main propulsion system, pressure vessels, thrust vector control, and structures. Boeing manufactures and assembles the SLS core stage at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, LA, a historical production center for Saturn V and Space Shuttle programs. As the transition from design to manufacturing progresses, the importance of a well-executed manufacturing, assembly, and operation (MA&O) plan is crucial to meeting performance objectives. Boeing employs classic techniques such as critical path analysis and facility requirements definition as well as innovative approaches such as Constraint Based Scheduling (CBS) and Cirtical Chain Project Management (CCPM) theory to provide a comprehensive suite of project management tools to manage the health of the baseline plan on both a macro (overall project) and micro level (factory areas). These tools coordinate data from multiple business systems and provide a robust network to support Material & Capacity Requirements Planning (MRP/CRP) and priorities. Coupled with these tools and a highly skilled workforce, Boeing is orchestrating the parallel buildup of five major sub assemblies throughout the factory. Boeing and NASA are transforming MAF to host state of the art processes, equipment and tooling, the most prominent of which is the Vertical Assembly Center (VAC), the largest weld tool in the world. In concert, a global supply chain is delivering a range of structural elements and component parts necessary to enable an on-time delivery of the integrated Core Stage. SLS is on plan to launch humanity into the next phase of space exploration.

  9. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted of: (1) comparison to an analytical solution for the dam break problem, (2) water spreading tests in a 1/10 linear scale model of the Mark I containment by Theofanous et al., and (3) steel spreading tests by Suzuki et al. that were also conducted in a geometry similar to the Mark I. The objective of this work was to utilize the MELTSPREAD code to check the assumption of uniform melt spreading in the EPR core catcher design. As a starting point for the project, the code was validated against the worldwide melt spreading database that emerged after the code was originally written in the very early 1990's. As part of this exercise, the code was extensively modified and upgraded to incorporate findings from these various analytical and experiment programs. In terms of expanding the ability of the code to analyze various melt simulant experiments, the options to input user-specified melt and/or substrate material properties was added. The ability to perform invisicid and/or adiabatic spreading analysis was also added so that comparisons with analytical solutions and isothermal spreading tests could be carried out. In terms of refining the capability to carry out reactor material melt spreading analyses, the code was upgraded with a new melt viscosity model; the capability was added to treat situations in which solid fraction buildup between the liquidus-solidus is non-linear; and finally, the ability to treat an interfacial heat transfer resistance between the melt and substrate was incorporated. This last set of changes substantially improved the predictive capability of the code in terms of addressing reactor material melt spreading tests. Aside from improvements and upgrades, a method was developed to fit the model to the various melt spreading tests in a manner that allowed uncertainties in the model predictions to be statistically characterized. With these results, a sensitivity study was performed to investigate the assumption of uniform spreading in the EPR core catcher that addressed parametric variations in: (1) melt pour mass, (2) melt composition, (3) me

  10. Homogeneous immunoconjugates for boron neutron-capture therapy: Design, synthesis, and preliminary characterization

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Lufeng; Wims, Letitia A.; Kane, Robert R.; Smuckler, Mark B.; Morrison, Sherie L.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    1998-01-01

    The application of immunoprotein-based targeting strategies to the boron neutron-capture therapy of cancer poses an exceptional challenge, because viable boron neutron-capture therapy by this method will require the efficient delivery of 103 boron-10 atoms by each antigen-binding protein. Our recent investigations in this area have been focused on the development of efficient methods for the assembly of homogeneous immunoprotein conjugates containing the requisite boron load. In this regard, engineered immunoproteins fitted with unique, exposed cysteine residues provide attractive vehicles for site-specific modification. Additionally, homogeneous oligomeric boron-rich phosphodiesters (oligophosphates) have been identified as promising conjugation reagents. The coupling of two such boron-rich oligophosphates to sulfhydryls introduced to the CH2 domain of a chimeric IgG3 has been demonstrated. The resulting boron-rich immunoconjugates are formed efficiently, are readily purified, and have promising in vitro and in vivo characteristics. Encouragingly, these studies showed subtle differences in the properties of the conjugates derived from the two oligophosphate molecules studied, providing a basis for the application of rational design to future work. Such subtle details would not have been as readily discernible in heterogeneous conjugates, thus validating the rigorous experimental design employed here. PMID:9789066

  11. Homogeneous immunoconjugates for boron neutron-capture therapy: design, synthesis, and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Guan, L; Wims, L A; Kane, R R; Smuckler, M B; Morrison, S L; Hawthorne, M F

    1998-10-27

    The application of immunoprotein-based targeting strategies to the boron neutron-capture therapy of cancer poses an exceptional challenge, because viable boron neutron-capture therapy by this method will require the efficient delivery of 10(3) boron-10 atoms by each antigen-binding protein. Our recent investigations in this area have been focused on the development of efficient methods for the assembly of homogeneous immunoprotein conjugates containing the requisite boron load. In this regard, engineered immunoproteins fitted with unique, exposed cysteine residues provide attractive vehicles for site-specific modification. Additionally, homogeneous oligomeric boron-rich phosphodiesters (oligophosphates) have been identified as promising conjugation reagents. The coupling of two such boron-rich oligophosphates to sulfhydryls introduced to the CH2 domain of a chimeric IgG3 has been demonstrated. The resulting boron-rich immunoconjugates are formed efficiently, are readily purified, and have promising in vitro and in vivo characteristics. Encouragingly, these studies showed subtle differences in the properties of the conjugates derived from the two oligophosphate molecules studied, providing a basis for the application of rational design to future work. Such subtle details would not have been as readily discernible in heterogeneous conjugates, thus validating the rigorous experimental design employed here. PMID:9789066

  12. Design of a new lithium ion battery test cell for in-situ neutron diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Matthew; Biendicho, Jordi Jacas; Hull, Stephen; Beran, Premysl; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Svensson, Gunnar; Edström, Kristina

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces a new cell design for the construction of lithium ion batteries with conventional electrochemical performance whilst allowing in situ neutron diffraction measurement. A cell comprising of a wound cathode, electrolyte and anode stack has been prepared. The conventional hydrogen-containing components of the cell have been replaced by hydrogen-free equivalents. The electrodes are fabricated using a PTFE binder, the electrolyte consists of deuterated solvents which are supported in a quartz glass fibre separator. Typical battery performance is reported using the hydrogen-free components with a specific capacity of 140 mA h g-1 being observed for LiFePO4 at a rate of 0.2 C. Neutron diffraction patterns of full cells were recorded with phase change reactions monitored. When aluminium packaging was used a better signal to noise ratio was obtained. The obtained atomic positions and lattice parameters for all cells investigated were found to be consistent with parameters refined from the diffraction pattern of a powder of the pure electrode material. This paper highlights the pertinent points in designing cells for these measurements and addresses some of the problems.

  13. Novel design of dual-core microstructured fiber with enhanced longitudinal strain sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Tenderenda, T.; Napierala, M.; Szyma?ski, M.; Murawski, M.; Mergo, P.; Lesiak, P.; Marc, P.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Nasilowski, T.

    2014-05-01

    Constantly refined technology of manufacturing increasingly complex photonic crystal fibers (PCF) leads to new optical fiber sensor concepts. The ways of enhancing the influence of external factors (such as hydrostatic pressure, temperature, acceleration) on the fiber propagating conditions are commonly investigated in literature. On the other hand longitudinal strain analysis, due to the calculation difficulties caused by the three dimensional computation, are somehow neglected. In this paper we show results of such a 3D numerical simulation and report methods of tuning the fiber strain sensitivity by changing the fiber microstructure and core doping level. Furthermore our approach allows to control whether the modes' effective refractive index is increasing or decreasing with strain, with the possibility of achieving zero strain sensitivity with specific fiber geometries. The presented numerical analysis is compared with experimental results of the fabricated fibers characterization. Basing on the aforementioned methodology we propose a novel dual-core fiber design with significantly increased sensitivity to longitudinal strain for optical fiber sensor applications. Furthermore the reported fiber satisfies all conditions necessary for commercial applications like good mode matching with standard single-mode fiber, low confinement loss and ease of manufacturing with the stack-and-draw technique. Such fiber may serve as an integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer when highly coherent source is used. With the optimization of single mode transmission to 850 nm, we propose a VCSEL source to be used in order to achieve a low-cost, reliable and compact strain sensing transducer.

  14. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Goulding, R H; Kang, Y W; Shin, K; Welton, R F

    2010-02-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H(-) ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as sigma. Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion. PMID:20192395

  15. Design and fabrication of an asymmetric twin-core fiber directional coupler for gain-flattened EDFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraju, B.; Ude, M.; Trzésien, S.; Dussardier, B.; Varshney, R. K.; Monnom, G.; Blanc, W.; Pal, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    Fiber directional couplers made of highly asymmetric twin-cores (ATC), one of which is doped with erbium, are designed to achieve an inherently gain flattened erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). The refractive index profiles of the fibers as well as the spacing between the two cores were carefully designed to achieve a targeted gain with low gain excursions across the C-band. One of the designs yielded a theoretical median gain ~ 38 dB with an excursion within +/-1 dB. In order to suite fabrication of such an inherently gain flattened EDFA by the MCVD fiber preform fabrication process, the design had to be modified and a more modest target of about 20 dB was set with excursion below +/- 1.5 dB for metro-centric applications. It involved preparation of two independent preforms, which required selective polishing of the cladding from one side by a certain amount to meet the required nominal separation between the two cores set at the design stage of the fiber. Several intricate operations were required to implement the fiber drawing step from the two assembled preforms. Preliminary characterization of the fabricated fiber shows filtering of ASE peak through selective wavelength coupling from Er-doped core to un-doped core.

  16. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. ); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. )

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

  17. Soft error rate simulation and initial design considerations of neutron intercepting silicon chip (NISC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Cihangir

    Advances in microelectronics result in sub-micrometer electronic technologies as predicted by Moore's Law, 1965, which states the number of transistors in a given space would double every two years. The most available memory architectures today have submicrometer transistor dimensions. The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), a continuation of Moore's Law, predicts that Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) will have an average half pitch size of 50 nm and Microprocessor Units (MPU) will have an average gate length of 30 nm over the period of 2008-2012. Decreases in the dimensions satisfy the producer and consumer requirements of low power consumption, more data storage for a given space, faster clock speed, and portability of integrated circuits (IC), particularly memories. On the other hand, these properties also lead to a higher susceptibility of IC designs to temperature, magnetic interference, power supply, and environmental noise, and radiation. Radiation can directly or indirectly affect device operation. When a single energetic particle strikes a sensitive node in the micro-electronic device, it can cause a permanent or transient malfunction in the device. This behavior is called a Single Event Effect (SEE). SEEs are mostly transient errors that generate an electric pulse which alters the state of a logic node in the memory device without having a permanent effect on the functionality of the device. This is called a Single Event Upset (SEU) or Soft Error . Contrary to SEU, Single Event Latchup (SEL), Single Event Gate Rapture (SEGR), or Single Event Burnout (SEB) they have permanent effects on the device operation and a system reset or recovery is needed to return to proper operations. The rate at which a device or system encounters soft errors is defined as Soft Error Rate (SER). The semiconductor industry has been struggling with SEEs and is taking necessary measures in order to continue to improve system designs in nano-scale technologies. Prevention of SEEs has been studied and applied in the semiconductor industry by including radiation protection precautions in the system architecture or by using corrective algorithms in the system operation. Decreasing 10B content (20%of natural boron) in the natural boron of Borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) layers that are conventionally used in the fabrication of semiconductor devices was one of the major radiation protection approaches for the system architecture. Neutron interaction in the BPSG layer was the origin of the SEEs because of the 10B (n,alpha) 7Li reaction products. Both of the particles produced have the capability of ionization in the silicon substrate region, whose thickness is comparable to the ranges of these particles. Using the soft error phenomenon in exactly the opposite manner of the semiconductor industry can provide a new neutron detection system based on the SERs in the semiconductor memories. By investigating the soft error mechanisms in the available semiconductor memories and enhancing the soft error occurrences in these devices, one can convert all memory using intelligent systems into portable, power efficient, directiondependent neutron detectors. The Neutron Intercepting Silicon Chip (NISC) project aims to achieve this goal by introducing 10B-enriched BPSG layers to the semiconductor memory architectures. This research addresses the development of a simulation tool, the NISC Soft Error Analysis Tool (NISCSAT), for soft error modeling and analysis in the semiconductor memories to provide basic design considerations for the NISC. NISCSAT performs particle transport and calculates the soft error probabilities, or SER, depending on energy depositions of the particles in a given memory node model of the NISC. Soft error measurements were performed with commercially available, off-the-shelf semiconductor memories and microprocessors to observe soft error variations with the neutron flux and memory supply voltage. Measurement results show that soft errors in the memories increase proportionally with the neutron flux, wherea

  18. SAHA-based novel HDAC inhibitor design by core hopping method.

    PubMed

    Zang, Lan-Lan; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Li, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Shu-Qing; Xu, Wei-Ren; Xie, Xian-Bin; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Ma, Huan; Wang, Run-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic activity of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) is directly relevant to the pathogenesis of cancer, and HDAC inhibitors represented a promising strategy for cancer therapy. SAHA (suberoanilide hydroxamic acid), an effective HDAC inhibitor, is an anti-cancer agent against T-cell lymphoma. However, SAHA has adverse effects such as poor pharmacokinetic properties and severe toxicities in clinical use. In order to identify better HDAC inhibitors, a compound database was established by core hopping of SAHA, which was then docked into HDAC-8 (PDB ID: 1T69) active site to select a number of candidates with higher docking score and better interaction with catalytic zinc ion. Further ADMET prediction was done to give ten compounds. Molecular dynamics simulation of the representative compound 101 was performed to study the stability of HDAC8-inhibitor system. This work provided an approach to design novel high-efficiency HDAC inhibitors with better ADMET properties. PMID:25241128

  19. Evaluating secondary neutron doses of a refined shielded design for a medical cyclotron using the TLD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jye-Bin; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Wen-Shan; Lin, Ding-Bang; Hsieh, Teng-San; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2013-11-01

    An increasing number of cyclotrons at medical centers in Taiwan have been installed to generate radiopharmaceutical products. An operating cyclotron generates immense amounts of secondary neutrons from reactions such the 18O(p, n)18F, used in the production of FDG. This intense radiation can be hazardous to public health, particularly to medical personnel. To increase the yield of 18F-FDG from 4200 GBq in 2005 to 48,600 GBq in 2011, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital (CSMUH) has prolonged irradiation time without changing the target or target current to meet requirements regarding the production 18F. The CSMUH has redesigned the CTI Radioisotope Delivery System shield. The lack of data for a possible secondary neutron doses has increased due to newly designed cyclotron rooms. This work aims to evaluate secondary neutron doses at a CTI cyclotron center using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-600). Two-dimensional neutron doses were mapped and indicated that neutron doses were high as neutrons leaked through self-shielded blocks and through the L-shaped concrete shield in vault rooms. These neutron doses varied markedly among locations close to the H218O target. The Monte Carlo simulation and minimum detectable dose are also discussed and demonstrated the reliability of using the TLD-600 approach. Findings can be adopted by medical centers to identify radioactive hot spots and develop radiation protection.

  20. Parameter Design and Optimal Control of an Open Core Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, D.; Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    In low earth orbit (LEO) satellite applications spacecraft power is provided by photovoltaic cells and batteries. To overcome battery shortcomings the University of Maryland, working in cooperation with NASA/GSFC and NASA/LeRC, has developed a magnetically suspended flywheel for energy storage applications. The system is referred to as an Open Core Composite Flywheel (OCCF) energy storage system. Successful application of flywheel energy storage requires integration of several technologies, viz. bearings, rotor design, motor/generator, power conditioning, and system control. In this paper we present a parameter design method which has been developed for analyzing the linear SISO model of the magnetic bearing controller for the OCCF. The objective of this continued research is to principally analyze the magnetic bearing system for nonlinear effects in order to increase the region of stability, as determined by high speed and large air gap control. This is achieved by four tasks: (1) physical modeling, design, prototyping, and testing of an improved magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system, (2) identification of problems that limit performance and their corresponding solutions, (3) development of a design methodology for magnetic bearings, and (4) design of an optimal controller for future high speed applications. Both nonlinear SISO and MIMO models of the magnetic system were built to study limit cycle oscillations and power amplifier saturation phenomenon observed in experiments. The nonlinear models include the inductance of EM coils, the power amplifier saturation, and the physical limitation of the flywheel movement as discussed earlier. The control program EASY5 is used to study the nonlinear SISO and MIMO models. Our results have shown that the characteristics and frequency responses of the magnetic bearing system obtained from modeling are comparable to those obtained experimentally. Although magnetic saturation is shown in the bearings, there are good correlations between the theoretical model and experimental data. Both simulation and experiment confirm large variations of the magnetic bearing characteristics due to air gap growth. Therefore, the gap growth effect should be considered in the magnetic bearing system design. Additionally, the magnetic bearing control system will be compared to other design methods using not only parameter design but H-infinity optimal control and mu synthesis.

  1. Design, construction, and characterization of a facility for neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252

    SciTech Connect

    Layfield, J.R.

    1980-03-01

    A study of neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252 as a neutron source is reported. Both internal and external target geometries are investigated. The facility designed for and used in this study is described. The external target geometry is found to be inappropriate because of the low thermal neutron flux at the sample location, which must be outside the biological shielding. The internal target geometry is found to have a sufficient thermal neutron flux, but an excessive gamma ray background. A water filled plastic facility, rather than the paraffin filled steel one used in this study, is suggested as a means of increasing flexibility and decreasing the beackground in the internal target geometry.

  2. Design and development of an in-line sputtering system and process development of thin film multilayer neutron supermirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, A.; Sampathkumar, R.; Kumar, Ajaya; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.; Lagoo, K. D.; Veerapur, R. D.; Padmanabhan, M.; Puri, R. K.; Bhattacharya, Debarati; Singh, Surendra; Basu, S.

    2014-12-15

    Neutron supermirrors and supermirror polarizers are thin film multilayer based devices which are used for reflecting and polarizing neutrons in various neutron based experiments. In the present communication, the in-house development of a 9 m long in-line dc sputtering system has been described which is suitable for deposition of neutron supermirrors on large size (1500 mm × 150 mm) substrates and in large numbers. The optimisation process of deposition of Co and Ti thin film, Co/Ti periodic multilayers, and a-periodic supermirrors have also been described. The system has been used to deposit thin film multilayer supermirror polarizers which show high reflectivity up to a reasonably large critical wavevector transfer of ?0.06 Å{sup ?1} (corresponding to m = 2.5, i.e., 2.5 times critical wavevector transfer of natural Ni). The computer code for designing these supermirrors has also been developed in-house.

  3. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, R. T.; Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T.; Williams, K. A.; Moses, D. L.

    2006-11-01

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, “continuously graded” fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 ?m is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457?m. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

  4. MIC-SVM: Designing A Highly Efficient Support Vector Machine For Advanced Modern Multi-Core and Many-Core Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yang; Song, Shuaiwen; Fu, Haohuan; Marquez, Andres; Mehri Dehanavi, Maryam; Barker, Kevin J.; Cameron, Kirk; Randles, Amanda; Yang, Guangwen

    2014-08-16

    Support Vector Machine (SVM) has been widely used in data-mining and Big Data applications as modern commercial databases start to attach an increasing importance to the analytic capabilities. In recent years, SVM was adapted to the ?eld of High Performance Computing for power/performance prediction, auto-tuning, and runtime scheduling. However, even at the risk of losing prediction accuracy due to insuf?cient runtime information, researchers can only afford to apply of?ine model training to avoid signi?cant runtime training overhead. To address the challenges above, we designed and implemented MICSVM, a highly efficient parallel SVM for x86 based multi-core and many core architectures, such as the Intel Ivy Bridge CPUs and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor (MIC).

  5. Laser Intertial Fusion Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, K

    2010-04-08

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 {micro}m of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The {sub 17}Pb{sub 83} flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}, separated from the Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF{sub 2}), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles having a packing fraction of 20% in 2 cm diameter fuel pebbles. The fission blanket is cooled by the same radial flibe flow that travels through perforated ODS walls to the reflector blanket. This reflector blanket is 75 cm thick comprised of 2 cm diameter graphite pebbles cooled by flibe. The flibe extraction plenum surrounds the reflector bed. Detailed neutronics designs studies are performed to arrive at the described design. The LFFH engine thermal power is controlled using a technique of adjusting the {sup 6}Li/{sup 7}Li enrichment in the primary and secondary coolants. The enrichment adjusts system thermal power in the design by increasing tritium production while reducing fission. To perform the simulations and design of the LFFH engine, a new software program named LFFH Nuclear Control (LNC) was developed in C++ to extend the functionality of existing neutron transport and depletion software programs. Neutron transport calculations are performed with MCNP5. Depletion calculations are performed using Monteburns 2.0, which utilizes ORIGEN 2.0 and MCNP5 to perform a burnup calculation. LNC supports many design parameters and is capable of performing a full 3D system simulation from initial startup to full burnup. It is able to iteratively search for coolant {sup 6}Li enrichments and resulting material compositions that meet user defined performance criteria. LNC is utilized throughout this study for time dependent simulation of the LFFH engine. Two additional methods were developed to improve the computation efficiency of LNC calculations. These methods, termed adaptive time stepping and adaptive mesh refinement were incorporated into a separate stand alone C++ library name the Adaptive Burnup Library (ABL). The ABL allows for other client codes to call and utilize its functionality. Adaptive time stepping is useful for automatically maximizing the size of the depletion time step while maintaining a desired level of accuracy. Adaptive meshing allows for analysis of fixed fuel configurations that would normally require a computationally burdensome number of depletion zones. Alternatively, Adaptive M

  6. Neutron imaging of radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, F.; Karimzadeh, S.; Zawisky, M.

    2008-08-01

    Isotopic neutron sources have been available for more than six decades. At the Atomic Institute in Vienna, operating a 250 kW TRIGA reactor, different neutron sources are in use for instrument calibration and fast neutron applications but we have only little information about their construction and densities. The knowledge of source design is essential for a complete MCNP5 modeling of the experiments. Neutron radiography (NR) and neutron tomography (NT) are the best choices for the non-destructive inspection of the source geometry and homogeneity. From the transmission analysis we gain information about the shielding components and the densities of the radio-isotopes in the cores. Three neutron sources, based on (alpha, n) reaction, have been investigated, two 239PuBe sources and one 241AmBe source. In the NR images the internal structure was clearly revealed using high-resolving scintillation and imaging plate detectors. In one source tablet a crack was detected which causes asymmetric neutron emission. The tomography inspection of strong absorbing materials is more challenging due to the low beam intensity of 1.3x105 n/cm2s at our NT instrument, and due to the beam hardening effect which requires an extension of reconstruction software. The tomographic inspection of a PuBe neutron source and appropriate measures for background and beam hardening correction are presented.

  7. Enhancing the Practicum Experience for Pre-service Chemistry Teachers Through Collaborative CoRe Design with Mentor Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ongoing study exploring how the Content Representation (CoRe) design can be used as a tool to help chemistry student teachers begin acquiring the professional knowledge required to become expert chemistry teachers. Phase 2 of the study, reported in this paper, investigated how collaboration with school-based mentors (associate teachers) on teaching practice (practicum) might impact on this process and student teachers' development of their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The collaboration involved identifying and discussing pedagogical issues related to a practicum-teaching topic using a student teacher's draft CoRe as a starting point and ongoing focus for the professional dialogue. Practicum offered an opportunity for aspects of student teachers' PCK, as embodied in their draft CoRes, to be explored and expanded upon in classroom programmes with the support and input of associate teachers. The findings were influenced by different contextual factors; however, the student teachers found their CoRes to be very useful frameworks for engaging in focussed professional dialogue with their teaching mentors. They valued the expertise, currency of knowledge and mentoring of their associates and reported positively about the contribution this support made to their PCK development via the CoRe design process and the transformation of the CoRe into classroom teaching.

  8. Mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, C.W.; Verghese, K.; Huo, Y.G.

    1997-12-01

    The North Carolina State University PULSTAR Reactor license was renewed for an additional 20 years of operation on April 30, 1997. The relicensing period added additional years to the facility operating time through the end of the second license period, increasing the excess reactivity needs as projected in 1988. In 1995, the Nuclear Reactor Program developed a strategic plan that addressed the future maintenance, development, and utilization of the facility. Goals resulting from this plan included increased academic utilization of the facility in accordance with its role as a university research facility, and increased industrial service use in accordance with the mission of a land grant university. The strategic plan was accepted, and it is the intent of the College of Engineering to operate the PULSTAR Reactor as a going concern through at least the end of the current license period. In order to reach the next relicensing review without prejudice due to low excess reactivity, it is desired to maintain sufficient excess reactivity so that, if relicensed again, the facility could continue to operate without affecting users until new fuel assistance was provided. During the NC State University license renewal, the operation of the PULSTAR Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo) was terminated. At that time, the SUNY Buffalo facility had about 240 unused PULSTAR Reactor fuel pins with 6% enrichment. The objective of the work reported here was to develop a mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR reactor which would: (1) demonstrate that 6% enriched SUNY buffalo fuel could be used in the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor within the existing technical specification safety limits for core physics parameters; (2) show that use of this fuel could permit operating the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor to 2017 with increased utilization; and (3) assure that the decision whether or not to relicense the facility would not be prejudiced by reduced operations due to low excess reactivity.

  9. The design and implementation of the parallel out-of-core ScaLAPACK LU, QR and Cholesky factorization routines

    SciTech Connect

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Dongarra, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of three core factorization routines--LU, QR and Cholesky--included in the out-of-core extension of ScaLAPACK. These routines allow the factorization and solution of a dense system that is too large to fit entirely in physical memory. An image of the full matrix is maintained on disk and the factorization routines transfer sub-matrices into memory. The left-looking column-oriented variant of the factorization algorithm is implemented to reduce the disk I/O traffic. The routines are implemented using a portable I/O interface and utilize high performance ScaLAPACK factorization routines as in-core computational kernels. The authors present the details of the implementation for the out-of-core ScaLAPACK factorization routines, as well as performance and scalability results on the Intel Paragon.

  10. Conceptual design of a high-frame-rate fast neutron radiography detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fa-qiang; Li, Zheng-hong; Yang, Jian-lun; Guo, Cun; Yang, Hong-qiong; Ye, Fan; Wang, Zhen; Ying, Chun-tong; Liu, Guang-jun

    2007-01-01

    Fast neutron radiography offers means to inspect thick hydrogenous materials because of high penetration depth of fast neutrons. Further more, quasi monoenergetic neutrons is relatively easy to obtain by neutron generators and it is helpful for density inversion of targets, which has many difficulties in flash radiography. In order to investigate dynamic processes, an intense repetitive pulsed neutron source will be used. Efficient detection of fast neutrons is one of the hardest problems for fast neutron imaging detectors. In the system, a scintillating fiber array is employed to obtain a detection efficiency of about 20% for DT neutrons. High-performance ICCDs and large aperture lens are taken into account to increase the conversion efficiency and the collective efficiency. The properties of the detector are charaterized in this paper.

  11. Solves the Multigroup Neutron Diffusion Equation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-06-23

    GNOMER is a program which solves the multigroup neutron diffusion equation in 1D, 2D and 3D cartesian geometry. The program is designed to calculate the global core power distributions (with thermohydraulic feedbacks), as well as power distribution and homogenized cross sections over a fuel assembly.

  12. Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) Design: Safety, Neutronics, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Mechanics, Fuel, Core, and Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C

    2010-02-22

    The idea of developing fast spectrum reactors with molten lead (or lead alloy) as a coolant is not a new one. Although initially considered in the West in the 1950s, such technology was not pursued to completion because of anticipated difficulties associated with the corrosive nature of these coolant materials. However, in the Soviet Union, such technology was actively pursued during the same time frame (1950s through the 1980s) for the specialized role of submarine propulsion. More recently, there has been a renewal of interest in the West for such technology, both for critical systems as well as for Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) systems. Meanwhile, interest in the former Soviet Union, primarily Russia, has remained strong and has expanded well beyond the original limited mission of submarine propulsion. This section reviews the past and current status of LFR development.

  13. Neutronic benchmark on the 2400 MW gas-cooled fast reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Da Cruz, D. F.; Hogenbirk, A.; Bosq, J. C.; Rimpault, G.; Prulhiere, G.; Pelloni, S.

    2006-07-01

    The 2400 MWth Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR), with plate-type carbide/SiC CERCER fuel, is an innovative design exhibiting many attractive features among which sustainability achieved with an internal breeding gain close to zero and feedback coefficients enabling an excellent behavior under some safety transients. This paper summarizes the analytical results of an international benchmark exercise being set up within the European Union to verify the neutronic tools and associated nuclear data libraries currently used for helping in finalizing the design of the GCFR within the European Union. A rather simple homogenized 2D model has been specified for the first phase of this benchmark. The computational tools being used in the analysis include both a stochastic and a deterministic code, MCNP and ERANOS, respectively, with nuclear data essentially based on the JEF-2.2 data library. The overall results indicate that the agreement of the solutions provided by the different participants is satisfactory. The most significant discrepancy, which can be partly attributed to different ERANOS options, is observed in the case of the end of life reactivity and amounts to a few dollars. The rather positive outcome of this initial phase of the benchmark has allowed identifying deficiencies in the analytical tools and serves as a basis for the definition of subsequent phases. It might also help to identify potential ways to improve the design. (authors)

  14. Radiation transport analyses in support of the SNS Target Station Neutron Beam Line Shutters Title I Design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.M.; Pevey, R.E.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed radiation transport analysis of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) shutters is important for the construction of the SNS because of its impact on conventional facility design, normal operation of the facility, and maintenance operations. Thus far the analysis of the SNS shutter travel gaps has been completed. This analysis was performed using coupled Monte Carlo and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations.

  15. A prismatic-core design for a milling machine component A. Srikantha Phani, S.P. Mai, N.A. Fleck, J. Woodhouse

    E-print Network

    Fleck, Norman A.

    in the machine tool industry- current designs are based on welded steel monolithic tubular construction with internal stiffeners. A steel sandwich structure with a corrugated core is proposed as an alternative multi cooling down the channels of the corrugated core, and additional damping when the core is filled

  16. Enhancing the Practicum Experience for Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers through Collaborative CoRe Design with Mentor Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ongoing study exploring how the Content Representation (CoRe) design can be used as a tool to help chemistry student teachers begin acquiring the professional knowledge required to become expert chemistry teachers. Phase 2 of the study, reported in this paper, investigated how collaboration with school-based…

  17. LS101US-Ways of Knowing Courses with University Seminar (US) core designation are primarily intended for first-

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    LS101US- Ways of Knowing Courses with University Seminar (US) core designation and creative thinking in written communication LS101US-Ways of Knowing is open to all students; however, it cannot be repeated. Liberal Studies does not use a common syllabus for LS101US

  18. Modular Approach to Launch Vehicle Design Based on a Common Core Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Dennis M.; Threet, Grady E., Jr.; Philips, Alan D.; Waters, Eric D.; Baysinger, Mike

    2010-01-01

    With a heavy lift launch vehicle as the centerpiece of our nation's next exploration architecture's infrastructure, the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center initiated a study to examine the utilization of elements derived from a heavy lift launch vehicle for other potential launch vehicle applications. The premise of this study is to take a vehicle concept, which has been optimized for Lunar Exploration, and utilize the core stage with other existing or near existing stages and boosters to determine lift capabilities for alternative missions. This approach not only yields a vehicle matrix with a wide array of capabilities, but also produces an evolutionary pathway to a vehicle family based on a minimum development and production cost approach to a launch vehicle system architecture, instead of a purely performance driven approach. The upper stages and solid rocket booster selected for this study were chosen to reflect a cross-section of: modified existing assets in the form of a modified Delta IV upper stage and Castor-type boosters; potential near term launch vehicle component designs including an Ares I upper stage and 5-segment boosters; and longer lead vehicle components such as a Shuttle External Tank diameter upper stage. The results of this approach to a modular launch system are given in this paper.

  19. Measurements of the impedance matrix of a thermoacoustic core: applications to the design of thermoacoustic engines.

    PubMed

    Bannwart, Flávio C; Penelet, Guillaume; Lotton, Pierrick; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The successful design of a thermoacoustic engine depends on the appropriate description of the processes involved inside the thermoacoustic core (TAC). This is a difficult task when considering the complexity of both the heat transfer phenomena and the geometry of the porous material wherein the thermoacoustic amplification process occurs. An attempt to getting round this difficulty consists in measuring the TAC transfer matrix under various heating conditions, the measured transfer matrices being exploited afterward into analytical models describing the complete apparatus. In this paper, a method based on impedance measurements is put forward, which allows the accurate measurement of the TAC transfer matrix, contrarily to the classical two-load method. Four different materials are tested, each one playing as the porous element allotted inside the TAC, which is submitted to different temperature gradients to promote thermoacoustic amplification. The experimental results are applied to the modeling of basic standing-wave and traveling-wave engines, allowing the prediction of the engine operating frequency and thermoacoustic amplification gain, as well as the optimum choice of the components surrounding the TAC. PMID:23654373

  20. DYNAMICO-1.0, an icosahedral hydrostatic dynamical core designed for consistency and versatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubos, T.; Dubey, S.; Tort, M.; Mittal, R.; Meurdesoif, Y.; Hourdin, F.

    2015-10-01

    The design of the icosahedral dynamical core DYNAMICO is presented. DYNAMICO solves the multi-layer rotating shallow-water equations, a compressible variant of the same equivalent to a discretization of the hydrostatic primitive equations in a Lagrangian vertical coordinate, and the primitive equations in a hybrid mass-based vertical coordinate. The common Hamiltonian structure of these sets of equations is exploited to formulate energy-conserving spatial discretizations in a unified way. The horizontal mesh is a quasi-uniform icosahedral C-grid obtained by subdivision of a regular icosahedron. Control volumes for mass, tracers and entropy/potential temperature are the hexagonal cells of the Voronoi mesh to avoid the fast numerical modes of the triangular C-grid. The horizontal discretization is that of Ringler et al. (2010), whose discrete quasi-Hamiltonian structure is identified. The prognostic variables are arranged vertically on a Lorenz grid with all thermodynamical variables collocated with mass. The vertical discretization is obtained from the three-dimensional Hamiltonian formulation. Tracers are transported using a second-order finite-volume scheme with slope limiting for positivity. Explicit Runge-Kutta time integration is used for dynamics, and forward-in-time integration with horizontal/vertical splitting is used for tracers. Most of the model code is common to the three sets of equations solved, making it easier to develop and validate each piece of the model separately. Representative three-dimensional test cases are run and analyzed, showing correctness of the model. The design permits to consider several extensions in the near future, from higher-order transport to more general dynamics, especially deep-atmosphere and non-hydrostatic equations.

  1. Design and development of a 3He replacement safeguards neutron counter based on 10B-lined proportional detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Henzlova, Daniela; Evans, Louise; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Rael, Carlos D.; Martinez, Isaac P.; Marlow, Johnna B.

    2012-07-16

    This presentation represents an overview of the experimental evaluation of a boron-lined proportional technology performed within an NA-241 sponsored project on testing of boron-lined proportional counters for the purpose of replacement of {sup 3}He technologies. The presented boron-lined technology will be utilized in a design of a full scale safeguards neutron coincidence counter. The design considerations and the Monte Carlo performance predictions for the counter are also presented.

  2. Neutron Repulsion

    E-print Network

    Oliver K. Manuel

    2011-02-08

    Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch that locked together these puzzling space-age observations: 1.) Excess 136Xe accompanied primordial helium in the stellar debris that formed the solar system (Fig. 1); 2.) The Sun formed on the supernova core (Fig. 2); 3.) Waste products from the core pass through an iron-rich mantle, selectively carrying lighter elements and lighter isotopes of each element into the photosphere (Figs. 3-4); and 4.) Neutron repulsion powers the Sun and sustains life (Figs. 5-7). Together these findings offer a framework for understanding how: a.) The Sun generates and releases neutrinos, energy and solar-wind hydrogen and helium; b.) An inhabitable planet formed and life evolved around an ordinary-looking star; c.) Continuous climate change - induced by cyclic changes in gravitational interactions of the Sun's energetic core with planets - has favored survival by adaptation.

  3. Thermal-Hydraulic Design of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Tungsten Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal O.; Willcutt, Gordon J. Jr.; Elson, Jay S.; Siebe, Donald A.

    2000-10-15

    The thermal-hydraulic design of the accelerator production of tritium (APT) tungsten neutron source is presented. A carefully engineered thermal-hydraulic design is required to remove the deposited power effectively during normal operations and remove the decay power during plant shutdown and postulated accidents. For steady-state operations and operational and anticipated transients, the design criterion is to maintain single-phase flow conditions with a margin to onset of nucleate boiling. The margin is determined based on phenomenological and geometric uncertainties associated with the design. A large margin to thermal excursion limits, such as critical heat flux and onset of flow instability, also is maintained during normal operations. In general, a very robust thermal-hydraulic design can be accomplished using the traditional models and correlations available in the engineering literature. However, two issues require further attention: maintaining adequate flows in a parallel network of flow channels and minimizing the volume fraction of heavy water to maximize tritium production.The design uses ladderlike structures that contain clad tungsten cylinders in the rungs that have coolant supplied and removed by the vertical ladder rails. Because the power density drops in the beam direction, the thickness of the tungsten cylinders is increased with increasing beam penetration length. The cooling requirement is determined using a conservative criterion where the minimum wall subcooling inside the rungs is at least 40 deg. C and the minimum Reynolds number is 6000. Initial flow distribution tests were conducted with a full-scale model of an APT ladder assembly based on a preliminary design. Flow distributions can be made more even by using a larger riser than downcomer and also by increasing the flow resistance across each rung. The calculations discussed assume nominal dimensions, even though the power deposition and removal use a conservative approach. The effect of manufacturing tolerances will be investigated in future research. Also, the applicability of the critical heat flux and onset of flow instability models to small coolant channels is being verified experimentally. Further design optimization will be possible when these studies are completed.

  4. An overview of the planned advanced neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), now in the conceptual design stage, will be a new user facility for neutron research, including neutron beam experiments, materials irradiation testing and materials analysis capabilities, and production facilities for transuranic and lighter isotopes. The neutron source is to be the world's highest flux beam reactor and is based on existing reactor technology to minimize safety issues. The preferred fuel, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, has been tested in operating reactors in the United States, Japan, and Europe. The core is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water, common practice for research reactors. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. PHISICS multi-group transport neutronic capabilities for RELAP5

    SciTech Connect

    Epiney, A.; Rabiti, C.; Alfonsi, A.; Wang, Y.; Cogliati, J.; Strydom, G.

    2012-07-01

    PHISICS is a neutronic code system currently under development at INL. Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. This paper reports on the effort of coupling this package to the thermal hydraulic system code RELAP5. This will enable full prismatic core and system modeling and the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5 (NESTLE). The paper describes the capabilities of the coupling and illustrates them with a set of sample problems. (authors)

  6. Design and Performance Improvements of the Prototype Open Core Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, D.; Anand, D. K. (Editor); Kirk, J. A. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    A prototype magnetically suspended composite flywheel energy storage (FES) system is operating at the University of Maryland. This system, designed for spacecraft applications, incorporates recent advances in the technologies of composite materials, magnetic suspension, and permanent magnet brushless motor/generator. The current system is referred to as an Open Core Composite Flywheel (OCCF) energy storage system. This paper will present design improvements for enhanced and robust performance. Initially, when the OCCF prototype was spun above its first critical frequency of 4,500 RPM, the rotor movement would exceed the space available in the magnetic suspension gap and touchdown on the backup mechanical bearings would occur. On some occasions it was observed that, after touchdown, the rotor was unable to re-suspend as the speed decreased. Additionally, it was observed that the rotor would exhibit unstable oscillations when the control system was initially turned on. Our analysis suggested that the following problems existed: (1) The linear operating range of the magnetic bearings was limited due to electrical and magnetic saturation; (2) The inductance of the magnetic bearings was affecting the transient response of the system; (3) The flywheel was confined to a small movement because mechanical components could not be held to a tight tolerance; and (4) The location of the touchdown bearing magnifies the motion at the pole faces of the magnetic bearings when the linear range is crucial. In order to correct these problems an improved design of the flywheel energy storage system was undertaken. The magnetic bearings were re-designed to achieve a large linear operating range and to withstand load disturbances of at least 1 g. The external position transducers were replaced by a unique design which were resistant to magnetic field noise and allowed cancellation of the radial growth of the flywheel at high speeds. A central rod was utilized to ensure the concentricity of the magnetic bearings, the motor/generator, and the mechanical touchdown bearings. In addition, the mechanical touchdown bearings were placed at two ends of the magnetic bearing stack to restrict the motion at pole faces. A composite flywheel was made using a multi-ring interference assembled design for a high specific energy density. To achieve a higher speed and better efficiency, a permanent magnet DC brushless motor was specially designed and fabricated. A vacuum enclosure was constructed to eliminate windage losses for testing at high speeds. With the new improvements the OCCF system was tested to 20,000 RPM with a total stored energy of 15.9 WH and an angular momentum of 54.8 N-m-s (40.4 lb-ft-s). Motor current limitation, caused by power loss in the magnetic bearings, was identified as causing the limit in upper operating speed.

  7. LOW LOSS DESIGN OF THE LINAC AND ACCUMULATOR RING FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA,D.

    2003-02-03

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a second generation pulsed neutron source and is presently in the fourth year of a seven-year construction cycle at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A collaboration of six national laboratories (ANL, BNL, LANL, LBNL, ORNL, TJNAF) is responsible for the design and construction of the various subsystems. The operation of the facility will begin in 2006 and deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam with pulse length of 650 nanosecond at a repetition rate of 60 Hz, on a liquid mercury target. It consists of an RF volume H{sup -} source of 50 mA peak current at 6% duty; an all electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) which also serves as a first stage beam chopper with {+-} 25 ns rise/fall time; a 402.5 MHz, 4-vane Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for acceleration up to 2.5 MeV; a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) housing a second stage chopper (<{+-} 10ns rise/fall), an adjustable beam halo scraper, and diagnostics devices; a 6-tank Drift Tube Linac (DTL) with permanent magnet quadrupoles up to 87 MeV; an 805 MHz, 4-module, Side Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) up to 186 MeV; an 805 MHz, superconducting RF (SRF) linac with eleven medium beta ({beta} = 0.61) cryo-modules and twelve high beta ({beta} = 0.81) cryo-modules accelerating the beam to the full energy; a High Energy Beam transport (HEBT) for diagnostics, transverse and longitudinal collimation, energy correction, painting and matching; an accumulator ring compressing the 1 GeV, 1 ms pulse to 650 ns for delivery onto the target through a Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) with transverse collimators.

  8. Design study of an air pump and integral lift engine ALF-504 using the Lycoming 502 core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, D.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies were conducted for an integral lift fan engine utilizing the Lycoming 502 fan core with the final MQT power turbine. The fan is designed for a 12.5 bypass ratio and 1.25:1 pressure ratio, and provides supercharging for the core. Maximum sea level static thrust is 8370 pounds with a specific fuel consumption of 0.302 lb/hr-lb. The dry engine weight without starter is 1419 pounds including full-length duct and sound-attenuating rings. The engine envelope including duct treatment but not localized accessory protrusion is 53.25 inches in diameter and 59.2 inches long from exhaust nozzle exit to fan inlet flange. Detailed analyses include fan aerodynamics, fan and reduction gear mechanical design, fan dynamic analysis, engine noise analysis, engine performance, and weight analysis.

  9. The Practical Turn in Teacher Education: Designing a Preparation Sequence for Core Practice Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Fred; Westbroek, Hanna; Doyle, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Amid calls for more practice-based teacher education, this article presents a concrete illustration of a practice-based bridging strategy for preparing high school biology teachers to enact open-inquiry labs. Open-inquiry labs were considered a core practice frame that served as a context for identifying core practices and for giving coherence to…

  10. Neutronic design studies of a conceptual DCLL fusion reactor for a DEMO and a commercial power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, I.; Veredas, G.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Ibarra, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutronic analyses or, more widely, nuclear analyses have been performed for the development of a dual-coolant He/LiPb (DCLL) conceptual design reactor. A detailed three-dimensional (3D) model has been examined and optimized. The design is based on the plasma parameters and functional materials of the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) model C. The initial radial-build for the detailed model has been determined according to the dimensions established in a previous work on an equivalent simplified homogenized reactor model. For optimization purposes, the initial specifications established over the simplified model have been refined on the detailed 3D design, modifying material and dimension of breeding blanket, shield and vacuum vessel in order to fulfil the priority requirements of a fusion reactor in terms of the fundamental neutronic responses. Tritium breeding ratio, energy multiplication factor, radiation limits in the TF coils, helium production and displacements per atom (dpa) have been calculated in order to demonstrate the functionality and viability of the reactor design in guaranteeing tritium self-sufficiency, power efficiency, plasma confinement, and re-weldability and structural integrity of the components. The paper describes the neutronic design improvements of the DCLL reactor, obtaining results for both DEMO and power plant operational scenarios.

  11. Design of metallic textile core sandwich panels F.W. Zok *, H.J. Rathbun, Z. Wei, A.G. Evans

    E-print Network

    Zok, Frank

    Design of metallic textile core sandwich panels F.W. Zok *, H.J. Rathbun, Z. Wei, A.G. Evans-5050, USA Received 3 March 2003 Abstract Metallic sandwich panels with textile cores have been analyzed. All rights reserved. Keywords: Sandwich panels; Lightweight structures; Textiles; Optimal design 1

  12. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, D. I.; Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Golikov, A. V.; Andreev, D. A.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 107–1012 n/pulse with resources on the order of 103–104 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30–700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator.

  13. Modeling of the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling Reposnse to Beyond Design Basis Operations - Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wilson, Chisom Shawn; Morrow, Charles; Osborn, Douglas; Gauntt, Randall O.

    2015-12-01

    Efforts are being pursued to develop and qualify a system-level model of a reactor core isolation (RCIC) steam-turbine-driven pump. The model is being developed with the intent of employing it to inform the design of experimental configurations for full-scale RCIC testing. The model is expected to be especially valuable in sizing equipment needed in the testing. An additional intent is to use the model in understanding more fully how RCIC apparently managed to operate far removed from its design envelope in the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2 accident. RCIC modeling is proceeding along two avenues that are expected to complement each other well. The first avenue is the continued development of the system-level RCIC model that will serve in simulating a full reactor system or full experimental configuration of which a RCIC system is part. The model reasonably represents a RCIC system today, especially given design operating conditions, but lacks specifics that are likely important in representing the off-design conditions a RCIC system might experience in an emergency situation such as a loss of all electrical power. A known specific lacking in the system model, for example, is the efficiency at which a flashing slug of water (as opposed to a concentrated jet of steam) could propel the rotating drive wheel of a RCIC turbine. To address this specific, the second avenue is being pursued wherein computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of such a jet are being carried out. The results of the CFD analyses will thus complement and inform the system modeling. The system modeling will, in turn, complement the CFD analysis by providing the system information needed to impose appropriate boundary conditions on the CFD simulations. The system model will be used to inform the selection of configurations and equipment best suitable of supporting planned RCIC experimental testing. Preliminary investigations with the RCIC model indicate that liquid water ingestion by the turbine decreases the developed turbine torque; the RCIC speed then slows, and thus the pump flow rate to the RPV decreases. Subsequently, RPV water level decreases due to continued boiling and the liquid fraction flowing to the RCIC decreases, thereby accelerating the RCIC and refilling the RPV. The feedback cycle then repeats itself and/or reaches a quasi-steady equilibrium condition. In other words, the water carry-over is limited by cyclic RCIC performance degradation, and hence the system becomes self-regulating. The indications achieved to date with the system model are more qualitative than quantitative. The avenues being pursued to increase the fidelity of the model are expected to add quantitative realism. The end product will be generic in the sense that the RCIC model will be incorporable within the larger reactor coolant system model of any nuclear power plant or experimental configuration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work is funded through the U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Nuclear Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Clinton Smith of Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies (PADT) is acknowledged for providing assistance on the FLUENT efforts in this report, as well as modifying the geometry model of the Terry turbine to make it more amenable for FLUENT analysis with rotating reference frames.

  14. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K. D. Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Leeper, R. J.

    2014-04-15

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r{sup 2} decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm{sup 2} and is ? 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  15. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: design, analysis, and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, K D; Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Fehl, D L; Chandler, G A; Knapp, P F; Leeper, R J; Nelson, A J; Smelser, R M; Torres, J A

    2014-04-01

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r(2) decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm(2) and is ? 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects. PMID:24784607

  16. Thermal Hydraulics Design and Analysis Methodology for a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Chen, Yen-Sen; Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions. This chapter describes a thermal hydraulics design and analysis methodology developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in support of the nuclear thermal propulsion development effort. The objective of this campaign is to bridge the design methods in the Rover/NERVA era, with a modern computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer methodology, to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments of a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine the Small Engine, designed in the 1960s. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer platform, while formulations of flow and heat transfer through porous and solid media were implemented to describe those of hydrogen flow channels inside the solid24 core. Design analyses of a single flow element and the entire solid-core thrust chamber of the Small Engine were performed and the results are presented herein

  17. Biomechanical evaluation of bending strength of spinal pedicle screws, including cylindrical, conical, dual core and double dual core designs using numerical simulations and mechanical tests.

    PubMed

    Amaritsakul, Yongyut; Chao, Ching-Kong; Lin, Jinn

    2014-09-01

    Pedicle screws are used for treating several types of spinal injuries. Although several commercial versions are presently available, they are mostly either fully cylindrical or fully conical. In this study, the bending strengths of seven types of commercial pedicle screws and a newly designed double dual core screw were evaluated by finite element analyses and biomechanical tests. All the screws had an outer diameter of 7 mm, and the biomechanical test consisted of a cantilever bending test in which a vertical point load was applied using a level arm of 45 mm. The boundary and loading conditions of the biomechanical tests were applied to the model used for the finite element analyses. The results showed that only the conical screws with fixed outer diameter and the new double dual core screw could withstand 1,000,000 cycles of a 50-500 N cyclic load. The new screw, however, exhibited lower stiffness than the conical screw, indicating that it could afford patients more flexible movements. Moreover, the new screw produced a level of stability comparable to that of the conical screw, and it was also significantly stronger than the other screws. The finite element analysis further revealed that the point of maximum tensile stress in the screw model was comparable to the point at which fracture occurred during the fatigue test. PMID:25060212

  18. Epitaxial Growth of ZSM-5@Silicalite-1: A Core-Shell Zeolite Designed with Passivated Surface Acidity.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanpour, Arian; Gumidyala, Abhishek; Grabow, Lars C; Crossley, Steven P; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-04-28

    The design of materials with spatially controlled chemical composition has potential advantages for wide-reaching applications that span energy to medicine. Here, we present a method for preparing a core-shell aluminosilicate zeolite with continuous translational symmetry of nanopores and an epitaxial shell of tunable thickness that passivates Brønsted acid sites associated with framework Al on exterior surfaces. For this study, we selected the commercially relevant MFI framework type and prepared core-shell particles consisting of an aluminosilicate core (ZSM-5) and a siliceous shell (silicalite-1). Transmission electron microscopy and gas adsorption studies confirmed that silicalite-1 forms an epitaxial layer on ZSM-5 crystals without blocking pore openings. Scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering were used in combination to confirm that the shell thickness can be tailored with nanometer resolution (e.g., 5-20 nm). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption measurements revealed the presence of a siliceous shell, while probe reactions using molecules that were either too large or adequately sized to access MFI pores confirmed the uniform shell coverage. The synthesis of ZSM-5@silicalite-1 offers a pathway for tailoring the physicochemical properties of MFI-type materials, notably in the area of catalysis, where surface passivation can enhance product selectivity without sacrificing catalyst activity. The method described herein may prove to be a general platform for zeolite core-shell design with potentially broader applicability to other porous materials. PMID:25824422

  19. Neutronics and Thermal Hydraulics Study for Using a Low-Enriched Uranium Core in the Advanced Test Reactor -- 2008 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. A. Lillo; R. G. Ambrosek

    2008-06-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis was performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff versus effective full power days (EFPDs) between the HEU and the LEU cores. The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was used to optimize the U 235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profiles between the HEU and LEU cores were minimized. The depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar to the ATR reference HEU case study. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, the proposed LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt% is used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness from 0.191 mm (7.0 mil) to 0.330 mm (13.0 mil) at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19). A 0.8g of Boron-10, a burnable absorber, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the peak to average ratio of the inner/outer heat flux more effectively. Because the B-10 (n,a) reaction will produce Helium-4 (He-4), which might degrade the LEU foil type fuel performance, an alternative absorber option is proposed. The proposed LEU case study will have 6.918 g of Cadmium (Cd) mixed with the LEU at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19) as a burnable absorber to achieve peak to average ratios similar to those for the ATR reference HEU case study.

  20. Relative performance properties of the ORNL Advanced Neutron Source Reactor with reduced enrichment fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.; Deen, J.R.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Pond, R.B.; Travelli, A.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    Three cores for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor, differing in size, enrichment, and uranium density in the fuel meat, have been analyzed. Performance properties of the reduced enrichment cores are compared with those of the HEU reference configuration. Core lifetime estimates suggest that none of these configurations will operate for the design goal of 17 days at 330 MW. With modes increases in fuel density and/or enrichment, however, the operating lifetimes of the HEU and MEU designs can be extended to the desired length. Achieving this lifetime with LEU fuel in any of the three studies cores, however, will require the successful development of denser fuels and/or structural materials with thermal neutron absorption cross sections substantially less than that of Al-6061. Relative to the HEU reference case, the peak thermal neutron flux in cores with reduced enrichment will be diminished by about 25--30%.

  1. Oyster Creek fuel thermal margin during core thermal-hydraulic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Dougher, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oyster Creek nuclear facility, a boiling water reactor (BWR)-2 plant type, has never experienced core thermal-hydraulic instability. Power oscillations, however, have been observed in other BWR cores both domestically and internationally. Two modes of oscillations have been observed, core wide and regional half-core. During core wide oscillations, the neutron flux in the core oscillates in the radial fundamental mode. During regional half-core oscillations, higher order harmonics in the radial plane result in out-of-phase oscillations with the neutron flux in one half of the core oscillating 180 deg out-of-phase with the neutron flux in the other half of the core. General Design Criteria 12 requires either prevention or detection and suppression of power oscillations which could result in violations of fuel design limits. Analyses performed by General Electric have demonstrated that for large-magnitude oscillations the potential exists for violation of the safety limit minimum critical power ratio (MCPR). However, for plants with a flow-biased neutron flux scram automatic mitigation of oscillations may be provided at an oscillation magnitude below that at which the safety limit is challenged. Plant-specific analysis for Oyster Creek demonstrates that the existing average power range monitor (APRM) system will sense and suppress power oscillations prior to violation of any safety limits.

  2. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Bent-Core Mesogen-Jacketed Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    E-print Network

    Wan, Xin-hua

    by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique,4,5 strong interaction between the polymer backbone reported.12-14 Phase behavior of MJLCPs depends on polymer molecular weight (MW), which was demonstrated- troxide-mediated radical polymerization7,15 and atom-transfer radical polymerization have been employed.16

  3. The Landscape of the Neutrino Mechanism of Core-collapse Supernovae: Neutron Star and Black Hole Mass Functions, Explosion Energies, and Nickel Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ond?ej; Thompson, Todd A.

    2015-03-01

    If the neutrino luminosity from the proto-neutron star formed during a massive star core collapse exceeds a critical threshold, a supernova (SN) results. Using spherical quasi-static evolutionary sequences for hundreds of progenitors over a range of metallicities, we study how the explosion threshold maps onto observables, including the fraction of successful explosions, the neutron star (NS) and black hole (BH) mass functions, the explosion energies (E SN) and nickel yields (M Ni), and their mutual correlations. Successful explosions are intertwined with failures in a complex pattern that is not simply related to initial progenitor mass or compactness. We predict that progenitors with initial masses of 15 ± 1, 19 ± 1, and ~21-26 M ? are most likely to form BHs, that the BH formation probability is non-zero at solar-metallicity and increases significantly at low metallicity, and that low luminosity, low Ni-yield SNe come from progenitors close to success/failure interfaces. We qualitatively reproduce the observed E SN-M Ni correlation, we predict a correlation between the mean and width of the NS mass and E SN distributions, and that the means of the NS and BH mass distributions are correlated. We show that the observed mean NS mass of ~= 1.33 M ? implies that the successful explosion fraction is higher than 0.35. Overall, we show that the neutrino mechanism can in principle explain the observed properties of SNe and their compact objects. We argue that the rugged landscape of progenitors and outcomes mandates that SN theory should focus on reproducing the wide ranging distributions of observed SN properties.

  4. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux beam reactor (HFBR).

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R. B.

    1998-01-16

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm{sup 3} in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept.

  5. THERMAL: A routine designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1995-09-19

    THERMAL is designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering that is elastic and isotropic in the center of mass system. At low energy thermal motion will be included. At high energies the target nuclei are assumed to be stationary. The point of transition between low and high energies has been defined to insure a smooth transition. It is assumed that at low energy the elastic cross section is constant in the relative system. At high energy the cross section can be of any form. You can use this routine for all energies where the elastic scattering is isotropic in the center of mass system. In most materials this will be a fairly high energy, e.g., the keV energy range. The THERMAL method is simple, clean, easy to understand, and most important very efficient; on a SUN SPARC-10 workstation, at low energies with thermal scattering it can do almost 6 million scatters a minute and at high energy over 13 million. Warning: This version of THERMAL completely supersedes the original version described in the same report number, dated February 24, 1995. The method used in the original code is incorrect, as explained in this report.

  6. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

    2010-09-01

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

  7. Design of short polarization splitter based on dual-core photonic crystal fiber with ultra-high extinction ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Ling, Weiwei; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2015-11-01

    A novel (to our knowledge) type of dual-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based polarization splitter is proposed. The effects of the geometrical parameters on the performances of the polarization splitter are studied numerically based on full vector finite element method (FEM). Finally, an optimal design based on the proposed dual-core PCF with a length of 0.401 mm is achieved, the extinction ratio (ER) of the splitter can reach 110.1 dB at the wavelength of 1.55 ?m, and the bandwidth of ER over 20 dB and 10 dB can be as wide as 140 nm and 200 nm, respectively. This polarization splitter proposed in this paper provides a new structure for designing a splitter with short length, high ER and wide bandwidth simultaneously.

  8. Binary pulsar J0737-3039 - evidence for a new core collapse and neutron star formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Piran, Tsvi; Shaviv, Nir

    2014-02-01

    The binary pulsar J0737-3039 is the only known system having two observable pulsars, thus offering a unique laboratory to test general relativity and explore pulsar physics. Based on the low eccentricity and the position within the galactic plane, two of us have argued that pulsar B had a non-standard formation scenario with little or no mass ejection and predicted that the system would have a very slow proper motion. Pulsar timing measurements confirmed this prediction. The recent observations of the alignment between the spin of pulsar A and the binary orbit is also in agreement with this scenario. Detailed simulations of the formation process of pulsar B show that its progenitor, just before the collapse, was a massive O-Ne-Mg white dwarf surrounded by a tenuous, 0.1-0.16 M?, envelope. This envelope was ejected when the white dwarf collapsed to form a neutron star. Pulsar B was born as a slow rotator (spin period ˜1 s) and a kick received when the pulsar formed changed its spin direction to the current one. This realization sheds light on the angular momentum evolution of the progenitor star, a process which is strongly affected by interaction with the binary companion. The slow proper motion of the system also implies that the system must have undergone a phase of mass transfer in which star A shed a significant fraction of its mass on to B.

  9. Design and characterization of an SRAM-based neutron detector for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ytre-Hauge, Kristian S.; Velure, Arild; Larsen, Eivind F.; Stokkevåg, Camilla H.; Röhrich, Dieter; Brekke, Njål; Odland, Odd Harald

    2015-12-01

    A neutron detector based on registration of radiation effects in Static Random Access Memories (SRAMs) has been developed at the University of Bergen for applications in particle therapy. Nine different SRAMs were tested and a 16 Mibit SRAM from Cypress was chosen for the final detector. The SRAMs were irradiated in beam lines at PTB Braunschweig, the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory, The Svedberg Laboratory, The Institute for Energy Technology (IFE, Kjeller) and the CERN-EU high-energy reference field. The results from the measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using the selected SRAMs for neutron detection. The results indicate low or no sensitivity to thermal neutrons while the cross section for fast neutrons increases with neutron energy before reaching a more stable level at energies of several tenths of MeV.

  10. Design and initial 1D radiography tests of the FANTOM mobile fast-neutron radiography and tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, P.; Valldor-Blücher, J.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Sjöstrand, H.; Jacobsson-Svärd, S.

    2014-08-01

    The FANTOM system is a tabletop sized fast-neutron radiography and tomography system newly developed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Division of Uppsala University. The main purpose of the system is to provide time-averaged steam-and-water distribution measurement capability inside the metallic structures of two-phase test loops for light water reactor thermal-hydraulic studies using a portable fusion neutron generator. The FANTOM system provides a set of 1D neutron transmission data, which may be inserted into tomographic reconstruction algorithms to achieve a 2D mapping of the steam-and-water distribution. In this paper, the selected design of FANTOM is described and motivated. The detector concept is based on plastic scintillator elements, separated for spatial resolution. Analysis of pulse heights on an event-to-event basis is used for energy discrimination. Although the concept allows for close stacking of a large number of detector elements, this demonstrator is equipped with only three elements in the detector and one additional element for monitoring the yield from the neutron generator. The first measured projections on test objects of known configurations are presented. These were collected using a Sodern Genie 16 neutron generator with an isotropic yield of about 1E8 neutrons per second, and allowed for characterization of the instrument's capabilities. At an energy threshold of 10 MeV, the detector offered a count rate of about 500 cps per detector element. The performance in terms of spatial resolution was validated by fitting a Gaussian Line Spread Function to the experimental data, a procedure that revealed a spatial unsharpness in good agreement with the predicted FWHM of 0.5 mm.

  11. Vacuum seals design and testing for a linear accelerator of the National Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Chen; C. Gautier; F. Hemez; N. K. Bultman

    2000-02-01

    Vacuum seals are very important to ensure that the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac has an optimum vacuum system. The vacuum joints between flanges must have reliable seals to minimize the leak rate and meet vacuum and electrical requirements. In addition, it is desirable to simplify the installation and thereby also simplify the maintenance required. This report summarizes an investigation of the metal vacuum seals that include the metal C-seal, Energized Spring seal, Helcoflex Copper Delta seal, Aluminum Delta seal, delta seal with limiting ring, and the prototype of the copper diamond seals. The report also contains the material certifications, design, finite element analysis, and testing for all of these seals. It is a valuable reference for any vacuum system design. To evaluate the suitability of several types of metal seals for use in the SNS Linac and to determine the torque applied on the bolts, a series of vacuum leak rate tests on the metal seals have been completed at Los Alamos Laboratory. A copper plated flange, using the same type of delta seal that was used for testing with the stainless steel flange, has also been studied and tested. A vacuum seal is desired that requires significantly less loading than a standard ConFlat flange with a copper gasket for the coupling cavity assembly. To save the intersegment space the authors use thinner flanges in the design. The leak rate of the thin ConFlat flange with a copper gasket is a baseline for the vacuum test on all seals and thin flanges. A finite element analysis of a long coupling cavity flange with a copper delta seal has been performed in order to confirm the design of the long coupling cavity flange and the welded area of a cavity body with the flange. This analysis is also necessary to predict a potential deformation of the cavity under the combined force of atmospheric pressure and the seating load of the seal. Modeling of this assembly has been achieved using both HKS/Abaqus and COSMOS/M, which are finite element packages for analysis of coupled, nonlinear problems. From these studies, the appropriate seals that are reliable for SNS long coupling cavities and beamline joints were determined.

  12. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi} and 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi}, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  13. Design of a Modular E-Core Flux Concentrating Axial Flux Machine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Tausif; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-08-24

    In this paper a novel E-Core axial flux machine is proposed. The machine has a double-stator, single-rotor configuration with flux-concentrating ferrite magnets and pole windings across each leg of an E-Core stator. E-Core stators with the proposed flux-concentrating rotor arrangement result in better magnet utilization and higher torque density. The machine also has a modular structure facilitating simpler construction. This paper presents a single-phase and a three-phase version of the E-Core machine. Case studies for a 1.1-kW, 400-rpm machine for both the single-phase and three-phase axial flux machines are presented. The results are verified through 3D finite element analysis. facilitating simpler construction. This paper presents a single-phase and a three-phase version of the E-Core machine. Case studies for a 1.1-kW, 400-rpm machine for both the single-phase and three-phase axial flux machines are presented. The results are verified through 3D finite element analysis.

  14. MCNP-REN - A Monte Carlo Tool for Neutron Detector Design Without Using the Point Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, M.E.; Baker, M.C.

    1999-07-25

    The development of neutron detectors makes extensive use of the predictions of detector response through the use of Monte Carlo techniques in conjunction with the point reactor model. Unfortunately, the point reactor model fails to accurately predict detector response in common applications. For this reason, the general Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) was modified to simulate the pulse streams that would be generated by a neutron detector and normally analyzed by a shift register. This modified code, MCNP - Random Exponentially Distributed Neutron Source (MCNP-REN), along with the Time Analysis Program (TAP) predict neutron detector response without using the point reactor model, making it unnecessary for the user to decide whether or not the assumptions of the point model are met for their application. MCNP-REN is capable of simulating standard neutron coincidence counting as well as neutron multiplicity counting. Measurements of MOX fresh fuel made using the Underwater Coincidence Counter (UWCC) as well as measurements of HEU reactor fuel using the active neutron Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC) are compared with calculations. The method used in MCNP-REN is demonstrated to be fundamentally sound and shown to eliminate the need to use the point model for detector performance predictions.

  15. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  16. Possible Methods to Estimate Core Location in a Beyond-Design-Basis Accident at a GE BWR with a Mark I Containment Stucture

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S; Rowland, M; Campbell, K

    2011-07-27

    It is difficult to track to the location of a melted core in a GE BWR with Mark I containment during a beyond-design-basis accident. The Cooper Nuclear Station provided a baseline of normal material distributions and shielding configurations for the GE BWR with Mark I containment. Starting with source terms for a design-basis accident, methods and remote observation points were investigated to allow tracking of a melted core during a beyond-design-basis accident. The design of the GE BWR with Mark-I containment highlights an amazing poverty of expectations regarding a common mode failure of all reactor core cooling systems resulting in a beyond-design-basis accident from the simple loss of electric power. This design is shown in Figure 1. The station blackout accident scenario has been consistently identified as the leading contributor to calculated probabilities for core damage. While NRC-approved models and calculations provide guidance for indirect methods to assess core damage during a beyond-design-basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), there appears to be no established method to track the location of the core directly should the LOCA include a degree of fuel melt. We came to the conclusion that - starting with detailed calculations which estimate the release and movement of gaseous and soluble fission products from the fuel - selected dose readings in specific rooms of the reactor building should allow the location of the core to be verified.

  17. Replacing a 252Cf source with a neutron generator in a shuffler - a conceptual design performed with MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Schear, Melissa A; Tobin, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    The {sup 252}Cf shuffler has been widely used in nuclear safeguards and radioactive waste management to assay fissile isotopes, such as {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu, present in a variety of samples, ranging from small cans of uranium waste to metal samples weighing several kilograms. Like other non-destructive assay instruments, the shuffler uses an interrogating neutron source to induce fissions in the sample. Although shufflers with {sup 252}Cf sources have been reliably used for several decades, replacing this isotopic source with a neutron generator presents some distinct advantages. Neutron generators can be run in a continuous or pulsed mode, and may be turned off, eliminating the need for shielding and a shuffling mechanism in the shuffler. There is also essentially no dose to personnel during installation, and no reliance on the availability of {sup 252}Cf. Despite these advantages, the more energetic neutrons emitted from the neutron generator (141 MeV for D-T generators) present some challenges for certain material types. For example when the enrichment of a uranium sample is unknown, the fission of {sup 238}U is generally undesirable. Since measuring uranium is one of the main uses of a shuffler, reducing the delayed neutron contribution from {sup 238}U is desirable. Hence, the shuffler hardware must be modified to accommodate a moderator configuration near the source to tailor the interrogating spectrum in a manner which promotes sub-threshold fissions (below 1 MeV) but avoids the over-moderation of the interrogating neutrons so as to avoid self-shielding. In this study, where there are many material and geometry combinations, the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to model, design, and optimize the moderator configuration within the shuffler geometry. The code is then used to evaluate and compare the assay performances of both the modified shuffler and the current {sup 252}Cf shuffler designs for different test samples. The matrix effect and the non-uniformity of the interrogating flux are investigated and quantified in each case. The modified geometry proposed by this study can serve s a guide in retrofitting shufflers that are already in use.

  18. Design and fabrication of a metal core PVDF fiber for an air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Huang, Xiaomei; Hong, Jin; Huang, Huiyu; Hui, Shen

    2015-10-01

    To track prey or avoid predators, many arthropods can detect variations in airflow and pressure gradients using an array of very thin and sensitive filiform hairs. In this study, metal core piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers were prepared to mimic such hair sensors. The flexibility of the fibers was very good, which was helpful for overcoming the typical brittleness of piezoelectric ceramic fibers. At the same time, the diameter of the fibers was very small (down to 50 ?m in diameter). In order to mimic the insects’ hairs to the maximum extent, which was expected to greatly improve the sensitivity of such PVDF fiber-based sensors, a feasible process to prepare and extract electrodes on the surface of the fibers had to be developed. Compared with stainless steel filament-core fibers, the molybdenum filament-core PVDF fibers were easy to stretch. The molybdenum filament was then covered by a cylindrical PVDF layer with a diameter of 400 ?m. One half of the longitudinal surface of the fibers was spray-coated with a conductive silver adhesive. The metal core was then used as one electrode, and the conductive silver adhesive was used as the other electrode. After polarization, a single metal-core PVDF fiber could be used as an airflow sensor. The surface structure and the sections of the PVDF fiber were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results of the mechanical stretching tests showed that the metal core greatly enhanced the mechanical properties of the PVDF fibers. X-ray diffraction revealed that the greater the stretching ratio, the higher the ?-to-?-phase conversion rate during the preparation of the PVDF fibers. A single metal-core PVDF fiber was used as a bionic airflow sensor, and a mechanical model of this sensor was derived. The airflow sensing capability of the PVDF fiber was experimentally confirmed in a miniature wind tunnel. The results showed that a cantilevered metal-core PVDF fiber is capable of detecting the range and direction of the surrounding airflow variations. The experimental results also verified the theoretical model.

  19. Mechanical Design and Analysis of a 200 MHz, Bolt-together RFQ forthe Accelerator Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, Steve; Hoff, Matt; Li, Derun; Staples, John; Wells,Russell

    2007-06-20

    A high-yield neutron source to screen sea-land cargocontainers for shielded Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) has been designedat LBNL [1,2]. The Accelerator-Driven Neutron Source (ADNS) uses theD(d,n)3He reaction to create a forward directed neutron beam. Keycomponents are a high-current radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ)accelerator and a high-power target capable of producing a neutron fluxof>107 n/(cm2 cdot s) at a distance of 2.5 m. The mechanical designand analysis of the four-module, bolt-together RFQ will be presentedhere. Operating at 200 MHz, the 5.1 m long RFQ will accelerate a 40 mAdeuteron beam to 6 MeV. At a 5 percent duty factor, the time-average d+beam current on target is 1.5 mA. Each of the 1.27 m long RFQ moduleswill consist of four solid OFHC copper vanes. A specially designed 3-DO-ring will provide vacuum sealing between both the vanes and themodules. RF connections are made with canted coil spring contacts. Aseries of 60 water-cooled pi-mode rods provides quadrupole modestabilization. A set of 80 evenly spaced fixed slug tuners is used forfinal frequency adjustment and local field perturbationcorrection.

  20. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Lafleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Seya, Michio; Bolind, Alan M.

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  1. Effective Web Design and Core Communication Issues: The Missing Components in Web-Based Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Randall O.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of Web-based distance education focuses on communication issues. Highlights include Internet communications; components of a Web site, including site architecture, user interface, information delivery method, and mode of feedback; elements of Web design, including conceptual design, sensory design, and reactive design; and a Web…

  2. Design of a magnetic shielding system for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Z. Q.; Chen, Z. J.; Xie, X. F.; Peng, X. Y.; Hu, Z. M.; Du, T. F.; Ge, L. J.; Zhang, X.; Yuan, X.; Fan, T. S.; Chen, J. X.; Li, X. Q. E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn; Zhang, G. H. E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn; Xia, Z. W.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-11-15

    The novel neutron spectrometer TOFED (Time of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics), comprising 90 individual photomultiplier tubes coupled with 85 plastic scintillation detectors through light guides, has been constructed and installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A dedicated magnetic shielding system has been constructed for TOFED, and is designed to guarantee the normal operation of photomultiplier tubes in the stray magnetic field leaking from the tokamak device. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations carried out employing the finite element method are combined to optimize the design of the magnetic shielding system. The system allows detectors to work properly in an external magnetic field of 200 G.

  3. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  4. Final Stage in the Design of a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility at CEADEN, Cuba

    SciTech Connect

    Cabal, F. Padilla; Martin, G.

    2008-08-11

    A neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Two figures-of-merit, the therapeutic gain and the neutron fluence are utilized as beam assessment parameters. An irradiation cavity is used instead of a parallel beam port for the therapy. Calculations are performed using the MCNP5 code. After the optimization of our beam-shaper a study of the dose distribution in the head, neck, tyroids, lungs and upper and middle spine had been made. The therapeutic gain is increased while the current required for one hour treatment is decreased in comparison with the trading prototypes of NG used for BNCT.

  5. Conceptual design of spectrum changeable neutron calibration fields in JAERI/FRS.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, J; Tanimura, Y; Yoshizawa, M; Yoshida, M

    2004-01-01

    Spectrum changeable neutron calibration fields are planned to be established with an accelerator installed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/Facility of Radiation Standards. The neutron fields are provided by bombarding a target surrounded by a moderator, with charged particles from the accelerator. In the fields, a wide variety of neutron spectra is provided with sufficient fluence rate for the calibration of dosemeters. In this study, necessity of the field was first discussed in view of relationship between readings of existing dosemeters and true dose equivalents where the dosemeters were used. Second, test simulation of neutron spectra was carried out with the Monte Carlo technique for some arrangements with a LiF target and quasi-cylindrical moderators with different materials. The simulated spectra were summarised in terms of fluence-average energy, fluence rate and calibration factor for the dosemeters. PMID:15353628

  6. Design and optimization of 6li neutron-capture pulse mode ion chamber 

    E-print Network

    Chung, Kiwhan

    2009-05-15

    of neutron moderator, the high-density polyethylene body, are optimized through analytical and MCNPX calculations. Also, a methodology of obtaining the suitable combination of electric field strength, electron drift velocity, and fill-gas mixtures has been...

  7. NEUTRONIC AND THERMAL HYDRAULIC DESIGNS OF ANNULAR FUEL FOR HIGH POWER DENSITY BWRS

    E-print Network

    Morra, P.

    As a promising new fuel for high power density light water reactors, the feasibility of using annular fuel for BWR services is explored from both thermal hydraulic and neutronic points of view. Keeping the bundle size ...

  8. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  9. Designing a Core IT Course for Executive MBA Programs: Objectives, Structure, Delivery, and Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newson, E. F. Peter; Parent, Michael; Schneberger, Scott

    This paper discusses the unique challenges posed by executives in MBA (Masters of Business Administration) programs and how these challenges can be met insofar as the core information technology (IT) course is concerned, drawing on the experience of the teachers' across four programs, live and on video, over two years, involving more than 250…

  10. Can Cognitive Writing Models Inform the Design of the Common Core State Standards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, John R.; Olinghouse, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we compare the Common Core State Standards in Writing to the Hayes cognitive model of writing, adapted to describe the performance of young and developing writers. Based on the comparison, we propose the inclusion of standards for motivation, goal setting, writing strategies, and attention by writers to the text they have just…

  11. Fifth-Grade Students' Digital Retellings and the Common Core: Modal Use and Design Intentionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Bridget; Robinson, Kristin H.; Lovvorn, Jason F.; Smith, Blaine E.; Alvey, Tara; Mo, Elaine; Uccelli, Paola; Proctor, C. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal composing is part of the Common Core vision of the twenty-first-century student. Two descriptive studies were conducted of fifth-grade students' digital folktale retellings. Study 1 analyzed 83 retellings in relation to the types and frequencies of modal use, such as image, sound, movement, and written text, as well as their retelling…

  12. Nuclear data uncertainty propagation for neutronic key parameters of CEA's SFR V2B and CFV sodium fast reactor designs

    SciTech Connect

    Archier, P.; Buiron, L.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dos Santos, N.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a nuclear data uncertainty propagation analysis for two CEA's Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor designs: the SFR V2B and CFV cores. The nuclear data covariance matrices are provided by the DER/SPRC/LEPh's nuclear data team (see companion paper) for several major isotopes. From the current status of this analysis, improvements on certain nuclear data reactions are highlighted as well as the need for new specific integral experiments in order to meet the technological breakthroughs proposed by the CFV core. (authors)

  13. Journal of NUCLEAR SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY, Vol. 39, No. 11, p. 11691181 (November 2002) Conceptual Design of a Modular Island Core Fast Breeder Reactor "RAPID-M"

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Journal of NUCLEAR SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY, Vol. 39, No. 11, p. 1169­1181 (November 2002) Conceptual Design of a Modular Island Core Fast Breeder Reactor "RAPID-M" Mitsuru KAMBE Central Research Institute and accepted September 10, 2002) A metal fueled modular island core sodium cooled fast breeder reactor concept

  14. Test-Wrapper Designs for the Detection of Signal-Integrity Faults on Core-External Interconnects of SoCs

    E-print Network

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    - sistors, and they can operate at Gigahertz frequencies. How- ever, test problems are greatly exacerbatedTest-Wrapper Designs for the Detection of Signal-Integrity Faults on Core-External Interconnects-based system-on-a-chip (SoC) integrated circuits. To ef- fectively test SI faults on core

  15. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Floral Designer. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Daniel R.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the floral designer is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential for…

  16. Design of Super-Paramagnetic Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Enhanced Performance of Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Johny; Boudouris, Bryan W; Barrero, César A; Jaramillo, Franklin

    2015-11-18

    Controlling the nature and transfer of excited states in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices is of critical concern due to the fact that exciton transport and separation can dictate the final performance of the system. One effective method to accomplish improved charge separation in organic electronic materials is to control the spin state of the photogenerated charge-carrying species. To this end, nanoparticles with unique iron oxide (Fe3O4) cores and zinc oxide (ZnO) shells were synthesized in a controlled manner. Then, the structural and magnetic properties of these core-shell nanoparticles (Fe3O4@ZnO) were tuned to ensure superior performance when they were incorporated into the active layers of OPV devices. Specifically, small loadings of the core-shell nanoparticles were blended with the previously well-characterized OPV active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Upon addition of the core-shell nanoparticles, the performance of the OPV devices was increased up to 25% relative to P3HT-PCBM active layer devices that contained no nanoparticles; this increase was a direct result of an increase in the short-circuit current densities of the devices. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the increase in photocurrent was not due to enhanced absorption of the active layer due to the presence of the Fe3O4@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. In fact, this increase in device performance occurred because of the presence of the superparamagnetic Fe3O4 in the core of the nanoparticles as incorporation of ZnO only nanoparticles did not alter the device performance. Importantly, however, the ZnO shell of the nanoparticles mitigated the negative optical effect of Fe3O4, which have been observed previously. This allowed the core-shell nanoparticles to outperform bare Fe3O4 nanoparticles when the single-layer nanoparticles were incorporated into the active layer of OPV devices. As such, the new materials described here present a tangible pathway toward the development of enhanced design schemes for inorganic nanoparticles such that magnetic and energy control pathways can be tailored for flexible electronic applications. PMID:26506008

  17. Laser inertial fusion-based energy: Neutronic design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Kevin James

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 mum of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li17Pb83 eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The Li17Pb 83 flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li17Pb83, separated from the Li17Pb83 by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF2), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles having a packing fraction of 20% in 2 cm diameter fuel pebbles. The fission blanket is cooled by the same radial flibe flow that travels through perforated ODS walls to the reflector blanket. This reflector blanket is 75 cm thick comprised of 2 cm diameter graphite pebbles cooled by flibe. The flibe extraction plenum surrounds the reflector bed. Detailed neutronics designs studies are performed to arrive at the described design. The LFFH engine thermal power is controlled using a technique of adjusting the 6Li/7Li enrichment in the primary and secondary coolants. The enrichment adjusts system thermal power in the design by increasing tritium production while reducing fission. To perform the simulations and design of the LFFH engine, a new software program named LFFH Nuclear Control (LNC) was developed in C++ to extend the functionality of existing neutron transport and depletion software programs. Neutron transport calculations are performed with MCNP5. Depletion calculations are performed using Monteburns 2.0, which utilizes ORIGEN 2.0 and MCNP5 to perform a burnup calculation. LNC supports many design parameters and is capable of performing a full 3D system simulation from initial startup to full burnup. It is able to iteratively search for coolant 6Li enrichments and resulting material compositions that meet user defined performance criteria. LNC is utilized throughout this study for time dependent simulation of the LFFH engine. Two additional methods were developed to improve the computation efficiency of LNC calculations. These methods, termed adaptive time stepping and adaptive mesh refinement were incorporated into a separate stand alone C++ library name the Adaptive Burnup Library (ABL). The ABL allows for other client codes to call and utilize its functionality. Adaptive time stepping is useful for automatically maximizing the size of the depletion time step while maintaining a desired level of accuracy. Adaptive meshing allows for analysis of fixed fuel configurations that would normally require a computationally burdensome number of depletion zones. Alternatively, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) adjusts the depletion zone size according to the vari

  18. Design and performance of high-pressure PLANET beamline at pulsed neutron source at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, T.; Sano-Furukawa, A.; Arima, H.; Komatsu, K.; Yamada, A.; Inamura, Y.; Nakatani, T.; Seto, Y.; Nagai, T.; Utsumi, W.; Iitaka, T.; Kagi, H.; Katayama, Y.; Inoue, T.; Otomo, T.; Suzuya, K.; Kamiyama, T.; Arai, M.; Yagi, T.

    2015-04-01

    PLANET is a time-of-flight (ToF) neutron beamline dedicated to high-pressure and high-temperature experiments. The large six-axis multi-anvil high-pressure press designed for ToF neutron diffraction experiments enables routine data collection at high pressures and high temperatures up to 10 GPa and 2000 K, respectively. To obtain clean data, the beamline is equipped with the incident slits and receiving collimators to eliminate parasitic scattering from the high-pressure cell assembly. The high performance of the diffractometer for the resolution (?d/d~0.6%) and the accessible d-spacing range (0.2-8.4 Å) together with low-parasitic scattering characteristics enables precise structure determination of crystals and liquids under high pressure and temperature conditions.

  19. Space Station Furnace Facility Core. Requirements definition and conceptual design study. Volume 2: Technical report. Appendix 6: Technical summary reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is a modular facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The SSFF is designed for crystal growth and solidification research in the fields of electronic and photonic materials, metals and alloys, and glasses and ceramics and will allow for experimental determination of the role of gravitational forces in the solidification process. The facility will provide a capability for basic scientific research and will evaluate the commercial viability of low-gravity processing of selected technologically important materials. The facility is designed to support a complement of furnace modules as outlined in the Science Capabilities Requirements Document (SCRD). The SSFF is a three rack facility that provides the functions, interfaces, and equipment necessary for the processing of the furnaces and consists of two main parts: the SSFF Core Rack and the two Experiment Racks. The facility is designed to accommodate two experimenter-provided furnace modules housed within the two experiment racks, and is designed to operate these two furnace modules simultaneously. The SCRD specifies a wide range of furnace requirements and serves as the basis for the SSFF conceptual design. SSFF will support automated processing during the man-tended operations and is also designed for crew interface during the permanently manned configuration. The facility is modular in design and facilitates changes as required, so the SSFF is adept to modifications, maintenance, reconfiguration, and technology evolution.

  20. ABWR-II Core Design with Spectral Shift Rods for Operation with All Control Rods Withdrawn

    SciTech Connect

    Masanao Moriwaki; Motoo Aoyama; Takafumi Anegawa; Hiroyuki Okada; Koichi Sakurada; Akira Tanabe

    2002-07-01

    An innovative reactor core concept applying spectral shift rods (SSRs) is proposed to improve the plant economy and the operability of the 1700 MWe ABWR-II reactor. The SSR is a new type of water rod, in which a water level is naturally developed during operation and changed according to the coolant flow rate through the channel. By taking advantage of the largeness of the ABWR-II bundle, the enhanced spectral shift operation by eight SSRs allows operation of the ABWR-II with all control rods withdrawn. In addition, the uranium saving factor of 6-7% against the reference ABWR-II core with conventional water rods can be expected owing to the higher spectral shift effect. The combination of these advantages means the ABWR-II with SSRs should be an attractive alternative for the next generation nuclear reactor. (authors)

  1. ABWR-II Core Design with Spectral Shift Rods for Operation with All Control Rods Withdrawn

    SciTech Connect

    Moriwaki, Masanao; Aoyama, Motoo; Anegawa, Takafumi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Sakurada, Koichi; Tanabe, Akira

    2004-03-15

    An innovative reactor core concept applying spectral shift rods (SSRs) is proposed to improve the plant economy and the operability of the 1700-MW(electric) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor II (ABWR-II). The SSR is a new type of water rod in which a water level is naturally developed during operation and changed according to the coolant flow rate through the channel. By taking advantage of the large size of the ABWR-II bundle, the enhanced spectral shift operation by eight SSRs allows operation of the ABWR-II with all control rods withdrawn. In addition, the uranium-saving factor of 6 to 7% relative to the reference ABWR-II core with conventional water rods can be expected due to the greater effect of spectral shift. The combination of these advantages means the ABWR-II with SSRs should be an attractive alternative for the next-generation nuclear reactor.

  2. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful operating range. Operating a blade at or near the resonance frequencies leads to high-cycle fatigue, which ultimately limits the blade's durability and life. So the aim of this study is to determine the variation of the resonance frequencies for an idealized sandwich blade as a function of its face-sheet thickness, core thickness, and foam density. The finite element method is used to determine the natural frequencies for an idealized rectangular sandwich blade. The proven Lanczos method (ref. 7) is used in the study to extract the natural frequency.

  3. Thermal hydraulic method for whole core design analysis of an HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Huning, A. J.; Garimella, S.

    2013-07-01

    A new thermal hydraulic method and initial results are presented for core-wide steady state analysis of prismatic High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The method allows for the complete solution of temperature and coolant mass flow distribution by solving quasi-steady energy balances for the discretized core. Assembly blocks are discretized into unit cells for which the average temperature of each unit cell is determined. Convective heat removal is coupled to the unit cell energy balances by a 1-D axial flow model. The flow model uses established correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number. Bypass flow is explicitly calculated by using an initial guess for mass flow distribution and determining the exit pressure of each flow channel. The mass flow distribution is updated until a uniform core exit pressure condition is reached. Results are obtained for the MHTGR-350 with emphasis on the change in thermal hydraulic parameters due to various steady state power profiles and bypass gap widths. Steady state temperature distribution and its variations are discussed. (authors)

  4. Upgrading the Neutron Radiography Facility in South Africa (SANRAD): Concrete Shielding Design Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beer, F. C.; Radebe, M. J.; Schillinger, B.; Nshimirimana, R.; Ramushu, M. A.; Modise, T.

    A common denominator of all neutron radiography (NRAD) facilities worldwide is that the perimeter of the experimental chamber of the facility is a radiation shielding structure which,in some cases, also includes flight tube and filter chamber structures. These chambers are normally both located on the beam port floor outside the biological shielding of the neutron source. The main function of the NRAD-shielding structure isto maintain a radiological safe working environment in the entire beam hall according to standards set by individual national radiological safety regulations. In addition, the shielding's integrity and capability should not allow, during NRAD operations, an increase in radiation levels in the beam port hall and thus negatively affectadjacent scientific facilities (e.g. neutron diffraction facilities).As a bonus, the shielding for the NRAD facility should also prevent radiation scattering towards the detector plane and doing so, thus increase thecapability of obtaining better quantitative results. This paper addresses Monte Carlo neutron-particletransport simulations to theoretically optimize the shielding capabilities of the biological barrierfor the SANRAD facility at the SAFARI-1 nuclear research reactor in South Africa. The experimental process to develop the shielding, based on the principles of the ANTARES facility, is described. After casting, the homogeneity distribution of these concrete mix materials is found to be near perfect and first order experimental radiation shielding characteristicsthrough film badge (TLD) exposure show acceptable values and trends in neutron- and gamma-ray attenuation.

  5. Experimental subcritical facility driven by D-D/D-T neutron generator at BARC, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Amar; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Bajpai, Shefali; Sarkar, P. S.; Bishnoi, Saroj

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents design of an experimental subcritical assembly driven by D-D/D-T neutron and preliminary experimental measurements. The system has been developed for investigating the static and dynamic neutronic properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems. This system is modular in design and it is first in the series of subcritical assemblies being designed. The subcritical core consists of natural uranium fuel with high density polyethylene as moderator and beryllium oxide as reflector. The fuel is embedded in high density polyethylene moderator matrix. Estimated keff of the system is ?0.89. One of the unique features of subcritical core is the use of Beryllium oxide (BeO) as reflector and HDPE as moderator making the assembly a compact modular system. The subcritical core is coupled to Purnima Neutron Generator which works in D-D and D-T mode with both DC and pulsed operation. It has facility for online source strength monitoring using neutron tagging and programmable source modulation. Preliminary experiments have been carried out for spatial flux measurement and reactivity estimation using pulsed neutron source (PNS) techniques with D-D neutrons. Further experiments are being planned to measure the reactivity and other kinetic parameters using noise methods. This facility would also be used for carrying out studies on effect of source importance and measurement of source multiplication factor ks and external neutron source efficiency ?? in great details. Experiments with D-T neutrons are also underway.

  6. Establishment of a simple neutron calibration field from a moderated 252Cf source . Part I. Design and calculation of the simple neutron calibration field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, A.; Iwai, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1987-02-01

    This paper describes the development and standardization of simple neutron reference calibration fields. These fields have been arranged for calibration of neutron detectors particularly used for radiation control and environmental measurements, having four different neutron spectra formed by a 252Cf source with or without moderators of iron, carbon or polyethylene. These calibration fields are independent of room-scattered neutrons, since they use only direct neutron components which are obtained by subtracting the results with shadow blocks from the results without those. The absolute energy spectra and dose equivalents of direct neutrons and room-scattered neutrons, and the effect of a shadow shield have been calculated by the one-dimensional ANISN-W, two-dimensional DOT-3.5 discrete ordinates codes and the three-dimensional MORSE-CG Monte Carlo code, for these four fields.

  7. GPU Based General-Purpose Parallel computing to Solve Nuclear Reactor In-Core fuel Management Design and Operation Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayudhatama, D.; Waris, A.; Kurniasih, N.; Kurniadi, R.

    2010-06-01

    In-core fuel management study is a crucial activity in nuclear power plant design and operation. Its common problem is to find an optimum arrangement of fuel assemblies inside the reactor core. Main objective for this activity is to reduce the cost of generating electricity, which can be done by altering several physical properties of the nuclear reactor without violating any of the constraints imposed by operational and safety considerations. This research try to address the problem of nuclear fuel arrangement problem, which is, leads to the multi-objective optimization problem. However, the calculation of the reactor core physical properties itself is a heavy computation, which became obstacle in solving the optimization problem by using genetic algorithm optimization. This research tends to address that problem by using the emerging General Purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) techniques implemented by C language for CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) parallel programming. By using this parallel programming technique, we develop parallelized nuclear reactor fitness calculation, which is involving numerical finite difference computation. This paper describes current prototype of the parallel algorithm code we have developed on CUDA, that performs one hundreds finite difference calculation for nuclear reactor fitness evaluation in parallel by using GPU G9 Hardware Series developed by NVIDIA.

  8. Designed fabrication and characterization of three-dimensionally ordered arrays of core-shell magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kaiping; Che, Renchao; Cao, Qi; Sun, Zhenkun; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui

    2015-03-11

    A confined interface coassembly coating strategy based on three-dimensional (3-D) ordered macroporous silica as the nanoreactor was demonstrated for the designed fabrication of novel 3-D ordered arrays of core-shell microspheres consisting of Fe3O4 cores and ordered mesoporous carbon shells. The obtained 3-D ordered arrays of Fe3O4@mesoporous carbon materials possess two sets of periodic structures at both mesoscale and submicrometer scale, high surface area of 326 m(2)/g, and large mesopore size of 19 nm. Microwave absorption test reveals that the obtained materials have excellent microwave absorption performances with maximum reflection loss of up to -57 dB at 8 GHz, and large absorption bandwidth (7.3-13.7 GHz, < -10 dB), due to the combination of the large magnetic loss from iron oxides, the strong dielectric loss from carbonaceous shell, and the strong reflection and scattering of electromagnetic waves of the ordered structures of the mesopores and 3-D arrays of core-shell microspheres. PMID:25647306

  9. GPU Based General-Purpose Parallel computing to Solve Nuclear Reactor In-Core fuel Management Design and Operation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Prayudhatama, D.; Waris, A.; Kurniasih, N.; Kurniadi, R.

    2010-06-22

    In-core fuel management study is a crucial activity in nuclear power plant design and operation. Its common problem is to find an optimum arrangement of fuel assemblies inside the reactor core. Main objective for this activity is to reduce the cost of generating electricity, which can be done by altering several physical properties of the nuclear reactor without violating any of the constraints imposed by operational and safety considerations. This research try to address the problem of nuclear fuel arrangement problem, which is, leads to the multi-objective optimization problem. However, the calculation of the reactor core physical properties itself is a heavy computation, which became obstacle in solving the optimization problem by using genetic algorithm optimization.This research tends to address that problem by using the emerging General Purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) techniques implemented by C language for CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) parallel programming. By using this parallel programming technique, we develop parallelized nuclear reactor fitness calculation, which is involving numerical finite difference computation. This paper describes current prototype of the parallel algorithm code we have developed on CUDA, that performs one hundreds finite difference calculation for nuclear reactor fitness evaluation in parallel by using GPU G9 Hardware Series developed by NVIDIA.

  10. A comparative study of the neutron flux spectra in the MNSR irradiation sites for the HEU and LEU cores using the MCNP4C code.

    PubMed

    Dawahra, S; Khattab, K; Saba, G

    2015-10-01

    A comparative study for fuel conversion from the HEU to LEU in the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) has been performed in this paper using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy and lethargy flux spectra in the first inner and outer irradiation sites of the MNSR reactor for the existing HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched) and the potential LEU fuels (U3Si2-Al, U3Si-Al, U9Mo-Al, 19.75% enriched and UO2, 12.6% enriched) were investigated using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy flux spectra for each group was calculated by dividing the neutron flux by the width of each energy group. The neutron flux spectra per unit lethargy was calculated by multiplying the neutron energy flux spectra for each energy group by the average energy of each group. The thermal neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.0 to 0.625 eV, the fast neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV for the existing HEU and potential LEU fuels. Good agreements have been noticed between the flux spectra for the potential LEU fuels and the existing HEU fuels with maximum relative differences less than 10% and 8% in the inner and outer irradiation sites. PMID:26142805

  11. Neutron chopper development at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, M.; Lewis, L.; Tepper, S.; Silver, R.N.; Heffner, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on neutron chopper systems for the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center pulsed spallation neutron source. This includes the development of 600+ Hz active magnetic bearing neutron chopper and a high speed control system designed to operate with the Proton Storage Ring to phase the chopper to the neutron source. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  12. 76 FR 14825 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated Contact Markets

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets'', 75 FR 80572 (Dec. 22, 2010). The comment period is... Requirements for Designated Contract Markets, 75 FR 80572, 80588-89, Dec. 22, 2010. Since the close of the... Contact Markets AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  13. 78 FR 32988 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... and Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets (77 FR 36612, June 19, 2012). The final rule... Markets; Correction AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY... Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets by inserting a missing instruction to add Appendix...

  14. Staying True to the Core: Designing the Future Academic Library Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the practice of user experience design in academic libraries continues to evolve. It is typically applied in the context of interactions with digital interfaces. Some academic librarians are applying user experience approaches more broadly to design both environments and services with human-centered strategies. As the competition for the…

  15. Calculation verification of the utilization of LR-0 for reference neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ján, Mil?ák; Michal, Koš?ál; Marie, Švadlenková; Michal, Koleška; Vojt?ch, Rypar

    2014-11-01

    Well-defined neutron spectrum is crucial for calibration and testing of detectors for spectrometry and dosimetry purposes. As a possible source of neutrons nuclear reactors can be utilized. In reactor core most of the neutrons are originated from fission and neutron spectra is usually some form of moderated spectra of fast neutrons. The reactor LR-0 is an experimental light-water zero-power pool-type reactor originally designed for research of the VVER type reactor cores, spent-fuel storage lattices and benchmark experiments. The main reactor feature that influences the performance of experiments is the flexible arrangement of the core. Special types of the possible core arrangements on the reactor LR-0 can provide different neutron spectra in special experimental channels. These neutron spectra are modified by inserting different materials around the channel and whole core is driven by standard fuel assemblies. Fast, epithermal or thermal spectra can be simulated using graphite, H2O, D2O insertions, air, Cd foils or fuel with different enrichment.

  16. Principle and Uncertainty Quantification of an Experiment Designed to Infer Actinide Neutron Capture Cross-Sections

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatorre; G. Imel; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Paul

    2010-01-01

    An integral reactor physics experiment devoted to infer higher actinide (Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) neutron cross sections will take place in the US. This report presents the principle of the planned experiment as well as a first exercise aiming at quantifying the uncertainties related to the inferred quantities. It has been funded in part by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act and has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation. The principle is to irradiate different pure actinide samples in a test reactor like INL’s Advanced Test Reactor, and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation allows the energy integrated neutron cross-sections to be inferred since the relation between the two are the well-known neutron-induced transmutation equations. This approach has been used in the past and the principal novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined with the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) facility located at ANL. While AMS facilities traditionally have been limited to the assay of low-to-medium atomic mass materials, i.e., A < 100, there has been recent progress in extending AMS to heavier isotopes – even to A > 200. The detection limit of AMS being orders of magnitude lower than that of standard mass spectroscopy techniques, more transmutation products could be measured and, potentially, more cross-sections could be inferred from the irradiation of a single sample. Furthermore, measurements will be carried out at the INL using more standard methods in order to have another set of totally uncorrelated information.

  17. Analytic methods for design of wave cycles for wave rotor core engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resler, Edwin L., Jr.; Mocsari, Jeffrey C.; Nalim, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure to design a preliminary wave rotor cycle for any application is presented. To complete a cycle with heat addition there are two separate but related design steps that must be followed. The 'wave' boundary conditions determine the allowable amount of heat added in any case and the ensuing wave pattern requires certain pressure discharge conditions to allow the process to be made cyclic. This procedure, when applied, gives a first estimate of the cycle performance and the necessary information for the next step in the design process, namely the application of a characteristic based or other appropriate detailed one dimensional wave calculation that locates the proper porting around the periphery of the wave rotor. Four examples of the design procedure are given to demonstrate its utility and generality. These examples also illustrate the large gains in performance that could be realized with the use of wave rotor enhanced propulsion cycles.

  18. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-03-15

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10{sup 13} emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  19. A Freon-Filled Bubble Chamber for Neutron Detection in Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilea, M.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.

    2011-03-24

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron–Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 1013 emitted from deuterium–tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  20. Design tunable materials: Ferroelectric-antiferroelectric composite with core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curecheriu, Lavinia-Petronela; Buscaglia, Maria Teresa; Maglia, Filippo; Anselmi-Tamburini, Umberto; Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Mitoseriu, Liliana

    2014-12-01

    Permittivity, tunability, and ferroelectric properties can be tailored to meet specific requirements for applications by combining ferroelectric (BaTiO3-BT) and antiferroelectric (La0.04Pb0.96Ti0.1Zr0.9O3-PLZT) and by exploiting interdiffusion and grain size effects at nanoscale. The dielectric properties, dc-tunability, and P(E) loops of ferroelectric-antiferroelectric nanostructured composites produced from mechanically mixed powders (PLZT-BT) and from core-shell particles (PLZT@BT) were comparatively analyzed. Interdiffusion accompanied by local composition gradients occurred during sintering of PLZT@BT composites and caused a thermally stable permittivity. Permittivity was reduced below 1000 in both cases (900 for PLZT-BT and 290 for PLZT@BT), while preserving tunability to 1.2-1.4 (E = 40 kV/cm), with a linear field dependence.

  1. RosettaHoles: rapid assessment of protein core packing for structure prediction, refinement, design, and validation.

    PubMed

    Sheffler, Will; Baker, David

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel method called RosettaHoles for visual and quantitative assessment of underpacking in the protein core. RosettaHoles generates a set of spherical cavity balls that fill the empty volume between atoms in the protein interior. For visualization, the cavity balls are aggregated into contiguous overlapping clusters and small cavities are discarded, leaving an uncluttered representation of the unfilled regions of space in a structure. For quantitative analysis, the cavity ball data are used to estimate the probability of observing a given cavity in a high-resolution crystal structure. RosettaHoles provides excellent discrimination between real and computationally generated structures, is predictive of incorrect regions in models, identifies problematic structures in the Protein Data Bank, and promises to be a useful validation tool for newly solved experimental structures. PMID:19177366

  2. Genomic Design of Strong Direct-Gap Optical Transition in Si/Ge Core/Multishell Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; d'Avezac, M.; Luo, J. W.; Zunger, A.

    2012-02-08

    Finding a Si-based material with strong optical activity at the band-edge remains a challenge despite decades of research. The interest lies in combining optical and electronic functions on the same wafer, while retaining the extraordinary know-how developed for Si. However, Si is an indirect-gap material. The conservation of crystal momentum mandates that optical activity at the band-edge includes a phonon, on top of an electron-hole pair, and hence photon absorption and emission remain fairly unlikely events requiring optically rather thick samples. A promising avenue to convert Si-based materials to a strong light-absorber/emitter is to combine the effects on the band-structure of both nanostructuring and alloying. The number of possible configurations, however, shows a combinatorial explosion. Furthermore, whereas it is possible to readily identify the configurations that are formally direct in the momentum space (due to band-folding) yet do not have a dipole-allowed transition at threshold, the problem becomes not just calculation of band structure but also calculation of absorption strength. Using a combination of a genetic algorithm and a semiempirical pseudopotential Hamiltonian for describing the electronic structures, we have explored hundreds of thousands of possible coaxial core/multishell Si/Ge nanowires with the orientation of [001], [110], and [111], discovering some 'magic sequences' of core followed by specific Si/Ge multishells, which can offer both a direct bandgap and a strong oscillator strength. The search has revealed a few simple design principles: (i) the Ge core is superior to the Si core in producing strong bandgap transition; (ii) [001] and [110] orientations have direct bandgap, whereas the [111] orientation does not; (iii) multishell nanowires can allow for greater optical activity by as much as an order of magnitude over plain nanowires; (iv) the main motif of the winning configurations giving direct allowed transitions involves rather thin Si shell embedded within wide Ge shells. We discuss the physical origin of the enhanced optical activity, as well as the effect of possible experimental structural imperfections on optical activity in our candidate core/multishell nanowires.

  3. Conceptual design and optimization of a plastic scintillator array for 2D tomography using a compact D-D fast neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert; Zboray, Robert; Cortesi, Marco; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-04-01

    A conceptual design optimization of a fast neutron tomography system was performed. The system is based on a compact deuterium-deuterium fast neutron generator and an arc-shaped array of individual neutron detectors. The array functions as a position sensitive one-dimensional detector allowing tomographic reconstruction of a two-dimensional cross section of an object up to 10 cm across. Each individual detector is to be optically isolated and consists of a plastic scintillator and a Silicon Photomultiplier for measuring light produced by recoil protons. A deterministic geometry-based model and a series of Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the design geometry parameters affecting the reconstructed image resolution. From this, it is expected that with an array of 100 detectors a reconstructed image resolution of ~1.5mm can be obtained. Other simulations were performed in order to optimize the scintillator depth (length along the neutron path) such that the best ratio of direct to scattered neutron counts is achieved. This resulted in a depth of 6-8 cm and an expected detection efficiency of 33-37%. Based on current operational capabilities of a prototype neutron generator being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, planned implementation of this detector array design should allow reconstructed tomograms to be obtained with exposure times on the order of a few hours. PMID:24495568

  4. Design of the Core Stage Inter-Tank Umbilical {CSITU) Compliance Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kurt R.

    2013-01-01

    Project Goals: a) Design the compliance mechanism for the CSITU system to a 30% level -3D models completed in Pro/Engineer -Relevant design analysis b) Must meet all system requirements and establish basis for proceeding with detailed design. Tasks to be completed: A design that meets requirements for the 30% design review, 01/16/2013. Umbilical arms provide commodities to the launch vehicle prior to T-0. Commodities can range anywhere from hydraulics, pneumatics, cryogenic, electrical, ECS, etc ... Umbilicals commonly employ truss structures to deliver commodities to vehicle. Common configurations include: -Tilt-up -Swing Arm -Hose Drape -Drop Arm Umbilical arms will be mounted to Mobile Launch Platform. SLS currently has 9 T-0 umbilical arms. The compliance refers to the ability of the umbilical to adjust to minor changes in vehicle location. The compliance mechanism refers to the mechanism on the ground support equipment {GSE) that compensates for these changes. For the CSITU, these minor changes, or vehicle excursions, can be up to +4 in. Excursions refer to movements of the vehicle caused by wind loads and thermal expansion. It is ideal to have significant vertical compliance so a passive secondary release mechanism may be implemented.

  5. Novel design of honeycombs using a seamless combination of auxetic and conventional cores toward phononic band gap engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushovan; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2015-04-01

    A novel design for the geometric configuration of honeycombs using a seamless combination of auxetic and conventional cores-elements with negative and positive Possion ratios respectively, has been presented. The proposed design has been shown to generate a superior band gap property while retaining all major advantages of a purely conventional or purely auxetic honeycomb structure. Seamless combination ensures that joint cardinality is also retained. Several configurations involving different degree of auxeticity and different proportions auxetic and conventional elements have been analyzed. It has been shown that the preferred configurations open up wide and clean band gap at a significantly lower frequency ranges compared to their pure counterparts. In view of existence of band gaps being desired feature for the phononic applications, reported results might be appealing. Use of such design may enable superior vibration control as well. Proposed configurations can be made isovolumic and iso-weight giving designers a fairer ground of applying such configurations without significantly changing size and weight criteria.

  6. Conceptual Design for Replacement of the DTL and CCL with Superconducting RF Cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Mark S; Doleans, Marc; Kim, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source Linac utilizes normal conducting RF cavities in the low energy section from 2.5 MeV to 186 MeV. Six Drift Tube Linac (DTL) structures accelerate the beam to 87 MeV, and four Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures provide further acceleration to 186 MeV. The remainder of the Linac is comprised of 81 superconducting cavities packaged in 23 cryomodules to provide final beam energy of approximately 1 GeV. The superconducting Linac has proven to be substantially more reliable than the normal conducting Linac despite the greater number of stations and the complexity associated with the cryogenic plant and distribution. A conceptual design has been initiated on a replacement of the DTL and CCL with superconducting RF cavities. The motivation, constraints, and conceptual design are presented.

  7. Design Development of a Combined Deployment and Pointing System for the International Space Station Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, Jason; Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Baker, Charles; Berning, Robert; Colangelo, Todd; Holzinger, John; Lewis, Jesse; Liu, Alice; Mitchell, Alissa; Monroe, Chuck; Pugh, Richard; Willey, Roger

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a unique suite of mechanisms which make up the Deployment and Pointing System (DAPS) for the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER/SEXTANT) instrument, an X-Ray telescope, which will be mounted on the International Space Station (ISS). The DAPS system uses 4 stepper motor actuators to deploy the telescope box, latch it in the deployed position, and allow it to track sky targets. The DAPS gimbal architecture provides full-hemisphere coverage, and is fully re-stowable. The compact design of the mechanism allowed the majority of total instrument volume to be used for science. Override features allow DAPS to be stowed by ISS robotics.

  8. Core design and reactor physics of a breed and burn gas-cooled fast reactor

    E-print Network

    Yarsky, Peter

    2005-01-01

    In order to fulfill the goals set forth by the Generation IV International Forum, the current NERI funded research has focused on the design of a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) operating in a Breed and Burnm (B&B) fuel cycle ...

  9. 77 FR 36611 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... contract markets.\\9\\ \\8\\ See 76 FR 14825, Mar. 18, 2011; see also 76 FR 25274, May 4, 2011. \\9\\ The... Securities Association; American Gas Association; Argus Media, Inc. (``Argus''); Better Markets, Inc... and Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol....

  10. A survey of alternative once-through fast reactor core designs

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, T.; Richard, J. G.; Kersting, A. R.; Don, S. M.; Oi, C.; Driscoll, M. J.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-07-01

    Reprocessing of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel to recover plutonium or transuranics for use in Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) is a distant prospect in the U.S.A. This has motivated our evaluation of potentially cost-effective operation of uranium startup fast reactors (USFRs) in a once-through mode. This review goes beyond findings reported earlier based on a UC fueled MgO reflected SFR to describe a broader parametric study of options. Cores were evaluated for a variety of fuel/coolant/reflector combinations: UC/UZr/UO{sub 2}/UN;Na/Pb; MgO/SS/Zr. The challenge is achieving high burnup while minimizing enrichment and respecting both cladding fluence/dpa and reactivity lifetime limits. These parametric studies show that while UC fuel is still the leading contender, UO{sub 2} fuel and ZrH 1.7 moderated metallic fuel are also attractive if UC proves to be otherwise inadequate. Overall, these findings support the conclusion that a competitive fuel cycle cost and uranium utilization compared to LWRs is possible for SFRs operated on a once-through uranium fueled fuel cycle. In addition, eventual transition to TRU recycle mode is studied, as is a small test reactor to demonstrate key features. (authors)

  11. Design, synthesis and characterisation of mannosylated ovalbumin lipid core peptide self-adjuvanting vaccine delivery system.

    PubMed

    Simerska, Pavla; Ziora, Zyta Maria; Fagan, Vincent; Goodwin, Daryn; Edrous, Farrah; Toth, Istvan

    2014-06-01

    Peptide-based vaccine delivery can be hampered by rapid peptidase activity and poor inherent immunogenicity. The self-adjuvanting lipid core peptide system (LCP) has been shown to confer improved stability and immunogenicity on peptide epitopes of group A Streptococcus, Chlamydia, hookworm, and malaria pathogens. However, various diseases, including cancer, still require targeted delivery of their vaccine candidates. For this reason, we have selected two model peptides (ovalbumin CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cell epitopes), and incorporated two or four copies of either epitope into our LCP vaccine. Optimised glycosylation of ovalbumin peptides yielded 46 % when microwave-assisted double coupling with 2 eq of carbohydrate derivative, activated by N,N-diisopropylethylamine and (O-benzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate, was performed. All ovalbumin peptides were successfully synthesised and purified in 11-55 % yields by Fmoc- or Boc-chemistry using solid-phase peptide synthesis. The mannosylated ovalbumin peptides were nontoxic to human erythrocytes in haemolytic assay (<2 % haemolysis) and showed increased (up to 20-fold) stability in plasma. PMID:25786879

  12. Design and characterization of antimicrobial usnic acid loaded-core/shell magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Taresco, Vincenzo; Francolini, Iolanda; Padella, Franco; Bellusci, Mariangela; Boni, Adriano; Innocenti, Claudia; Martinelli, Andrea; D'Ilario, Lucio; Piozzi, Antonella

    2015-07-01

    The application of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in medicine is considered much promising especially because they can be handled and directed to specific body sites by external magnetic fields. MNPs have been investigated in magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia and drug targeting. In this study, properly functionalized core/shell MNPs with antimicrobial properties were developed to be used for the prevention and treatment of medical device-related infections. Particularly, surface-engineered manganese iron oxide MNPs, produced by a micro-emulsion method, were coated with two different polymers and loaded with usnic acid (UA), a dibenzofuran natural extract possessing antimicrobial activity. Between the two polymer coatings, the one based on an intrinsically antimicrobial cationic polyacrylamide (pAcDED) resulted to be able to provide MNPs with proper magnetic properties and basic groups for UA loading. Thanks to the establishment of acid-base interactions, pAcDED-coated MNPs were able to load and release significant drug amounts resulting in good antimicrobial properties versus Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 0.1 mg/mL). The use of pAcDED having intrinsic antimicrobial activity as MNP coating in combination with UA likely contributed to obtain an enhanced antimicrobial effect. The developed drug-loaded MNPs could be injected in the patient soon after device implantation to prevent biofilm formation, or, later, in presence of signs of infection to treat the biofilm grown on the device surfaces. PMID:25953542

  13. The 6,6-dicyanopentafulvene core: a template for the design of electron-acceptor compounds.

    PubMed

    Finke, Aaron D; Jahn, Burkhard O; Saithalavi, Anas; Dahlstrand, Christian; Nauroozi, Djawed; Haberland, Sophie; Gisselbrecht, Jean-Paul; Boudon, Corinne; Mijangos, Edgar; Schweizer, W Bernd; Ott, Sascha; Ottosson, Henrik; Diederich, François

    2015-05-26

    The electron-accepting ability of 6,6-dicyanopentafulvenes (DCFs) can be varied extensively through substitution on the five-membered ring. The reduction potentials for a set of 2,3,4,5-tetraphenyl-substituted DCFs, with varying substituents at the para-position of the phenyl rings, strongly correlate with their Hammett ?p-parameters. By combining cyclic voltammetry with DFT calculations ((U)B3LYP/6-311+G(d)), using the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) for implicit solvation, the absolute reduction potentials of a set of twenty DCFs were reproduced with a mean absolute deviation of 0.10?eV and a maximum deviation of 0.19?eV. Our experimentally investigated DCFs have reduction potentials within 3.67-4.41?eV, however, the computations reveal that DCFs with experimental reduction potentials as high as 5.3?eV could be achieved, higher than that of F4-TCNQ (5.02?eV). Thus, the DCF core is a template that allows variation in the reduction potentials by about 1.6?eV. PMID:25917111

  14. VENUS-F: A fast lead critical core for benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Kochetkov, A.; Wagemans, J.; Vittiglio, G.

    2011-07-01

    The zero-power thermal neutron water-moderated facility VENUS at SCK-CEN has been extensively used for benchmarking in the past. In accordance with GEN-IV design tasks (fast reactor systems and accelerator driven systems), the VENUS facility was modified in 2007-2010 into the fast neutron facility VENUS-F with solid core components. This paper introduces the projects GUINEVERE and FREYA, which are being conducted at the VENUS-F facility, and it presents the measurement results obtained at the first critical core. Throughout the projects other fast lead benchmarks also will be investigated. The measurement results of the different configurations can all be used as fast neutron benchmarks. (authors)

  15. Safety aspects of LMR (liquid metal-cooled reactor) core design

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Features contributing to increased safety margins in liquid metal-cooled reactor (LMR) design are identified. The technical basis is presented for the performance of a pool-type reactor system with an advanced metallic alloy fuel in unprotected accidents. Results are presented from analyses of anticipated transients without scram, including loss-of-flow (LOF), transient overpower (TOP), and loss-of-heat-sink (LOHS) accidents.

  16. Core Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Curriculum Research and Development Group.

    This document focuses on Core Algebra, a course offered in the Hawaii State Department of Education's "Mathematics Program Guide." This algebra option is designed to be less theoretical and more application-oriented than Algebra IA and IB. The text opens with a list of twenty minimum learner objectives of the course. The next section presents an…

  17. An Innovative Three-Dimensional Heterogeneous Coarse-Mesh Transport Method for Advanced and Generation IV Reactor Core Analysis and Design

    SciTech Connect

    Farzad Rahnema

    2009-11-12

    This project has resulted in a highly efficient method that has been shown to provide accurate solutions to a variety of 2D and 3D reactor problems. The goal of this project was to develop (1) an accurate and efficient three-dimensional whole-core neutronics method with the following features: based sollely on transport theory, does not require the use of cross-section homogenization, contains a highly accurate and self-consistent global flux reconstruction procedure, and is applicable to large, heterogeneous reactor models, and to (2) create new numerical benchmark problems for code cross-comparison.

  18. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

  19. Computer-optimized design of polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He counters for fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Byrd

    2000-05-01

    Because polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He counters are rugged and reliable, they are generally the instruments of choice for field detection of fast neutrons in gamma-ray backgrounds. Their main drawback is the bulky, massive moderator needed to reduce the incident neutron energies to the sensitive range of the {sup 3}He+n capture reaction. This report discusses an optimization approach that provides a detector with uniform angular response and the maximum detection efficiency per unit mass. The key assumption is that each parameter has a geometrical interpretation and its effect on the response can be evaluated independently from that of the others. Specifically, the detection efficiency can be written as a product of separate functions for the moderator mass, gas pressure, tube position, etc., and the uniformity of the angular response is determined by the symmetry of the moderator dimensions. This analytical model was tested by compiling a comprehensive database of detector efficiencies as functions of the different parameters, including one- versus two-tube detectors, moderator masses from 1 to 6 kg, gas pressures from 1 to 20 atm, etc. In general, the model reproduced both the magnitude and angular dependence of the efficiency to within about 10%. To a high degree, the most important parameters are polyethylene mass and the quantity of {sup 3}He gas; because of neutron diffusion out of the moderator, the optimum tube positions are near the center of the detector. The highest value of the efficiency per unit mass occurs near 3 kg, a result that requires the most compact detectors to use more than a single {sup 3}He tube. In this case, the optimum detector has two tubes and a total mass of 3.0 kg. Although they could use 4-atm tubes with 2.54-cm diameters, increasing the gas volume could easily provide a 20% increase in efficiency with no changes in other parameters.

  20. Design, Assembly, and Testing of the Neutron Imaging Lens for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R. M., Kaufman, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world’s largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density science. Neutron imaging of ICF targets provides a powerful tool for understanding the implosion conditions of deuterium and tritium (DT) filled targets. The primary purpose of imaging ICF targets at NIF is to determine the symmetry of the fuel in an imploded ICF target. The image data are then combined with other nuclear information to gain insight into the drive laser and radiation conditions required to drive the targets to ignition.

  1. ITER Core Imaging X-Ray Spectrometer Conceptual Design and Performance Assessment - Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Wen, J; Dunn, J; Morris, K

    2011-01-02

    During Phase 2 of our study of the CIXS conceptual design we have tackled additional important issues that are unique to the ITER environment. These include the thermal control of the crystal and detector enclosures located in an environment with a 100-250 C ambient temperature, tritium containment, and the range of crystal and detector movement based on the need for spectral adjustments and the desire to make measurements of colder plasmas. In addressing these issues we have selected a ''Dewar''-type enclosure for the crystals and detectors. Applying realistic view factors for radiant heat and making allowance for conduction we have made engineering studies of this enclosure and showed that the cooling requirements can be solved and the temperature can be kept sufficiently constant without compromising the specification parameters of the CIXS. We have chosen a minimum 3 mm combined thickness of the six beryllium windows needed in a Dewar-type enclosure and showed that a single window of 0.5 mm thickness satisfies tritium containment requirements. For measuring the temperature in cooler ITER plasmas, we have chosen to use the K-shell lines of Fe24+. Iron is the preferred choice because its radiation can be analyzed with the identical CIXS settings used for analyzing the tungsten radiation, i.e., essentially no adjustments besides a simple crystal rotation need to be made. We have, however, included an xy{theta}-drive motor arrangement in our design for fine adjustments and full rotation of the crystal mounts.

  2. High Level Analysis, Design and Validation of Distributed Mobile Systems with CoreASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbod, R.; Glässer, U.; Jackson, P. J.; Vajihollahi, M.

    System design is a creative activity calling for abstract models that facilitate reasoning about the key system attributes (desired requirements and resulting properties) so as to ensure these attributes are properly established prior to actually building a system. We explore here the practical side of using the abstract state machine (ASM) formalism in combination with the CoreASM open source tool environment for high-level design and experimental validation of complex distributed systems. Emphasizing the early phases of the design process, a guiding principle is to support freedom of experimentation by minimizing the need for encoding. CoreASM has been developed and tested building on a broad scope of applications, spanning computational criminology, maritime surveillance and situation analysis. We critically reexamine here the CoreASM project in light of three different application scenarios.

  3. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

    2012-08-01

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  4. Design of an ultra low power CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Husson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Despite a continuously increasing demand, neutron electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are still far from being completely established because their development is a very difficult task. A low-noise, ultra low power consumption CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter has been implemented in a 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology. The prototype is composed of a pixel array for detection of charged particles, and the readout electronics is integrated on the same substrate for signal processing. The excess electrons generated by an impinging particle are collected by the pixel array. The charge collection time and the efficiency are the crucial points of a CMOS detector. The 3-D device simulations using the commercially available Synopsys-SENTAURUS package address the detailed charge collection process. Within a time of 1.9 {mu}s, about 59% electrons created by the impact particle are collected in a cluster of 4 x 4 pixels with the pixel pitch of 80 {mu}m. A charge sensitive preamplifier (CSA) and a shaper are employed in the frond-end readout. The tests with electrical signals indicate that our prototype with a total active area of 2.56 x 2.56 mm{sup 2} performs an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of less than 400 e - and 314 {mu}W power consumption, leading to a promising prototype. (authors)

  5. Spallation Neutron Source high-power Rf transmitter design for high availablility, ease of installation and cost containment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J. T. , III; Rees, D. E.; Hardek, T. W.; Lynch, M. T.; Roybal, W. T.; Tallerico, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The availability goals and installation schedule for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have driven the availability and installation of the SNS linac's high-power RF systems. This paper discusses how the high-power RF systems' availability and installation goals have been addressed in the RF transmitter design and procurement. Design features that allow R1; component failures to be quickly diagnosed and repaired are also presented. Special attention has been given lo interlocks, PLC fault logging and real-time interfaces to thc accelerator's Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) archive system. The availability and cost motivations for the use of different RF transmitter designs in the normalconducting and super-conducting sections of the linac are reviewed. Factory iicceptance tests used to insure fully functional equipment and thereby reduce the time spent on installation and cotnmissioning of the RF transmitters are discussed. Transmitter installation experience and klystron conditioning experience is used to show how these design features have helped and will continue to help the SNS linac to meet its availability and schedule goals.

  6. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be covered, particularly as a compendium of papers on spectrometry for radiation protection has

  7. Development of a multicell methodology to account for heterogeneous core effects in the core-analysis diffusion code

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.

    2006-07-01

    In CANDU R reactor calculations, the lattice-cell cross sections are calculated with WIMS-AECL, and the three-dimensional core neutron-flux and power distributions are calculated with RFSP-IST. The lattice-cell cross sections employed in RFSP-IST and in many other commercial core-analysis diffusion codes are usually based on the use of single-lattice-cell calculations, without considering the effects of the environment. This approximation is not sufficiently accurate for heterogeneous core configurations in the ACR-1000{sup TM}. A multicell correction method is therefore developed in RFSP-IST to account for heterogeneous core effects in the design and analysis of ACR-1000. The calculation results show that the multicell methodology developed in RFSP-IST is effective, generic, and it works well for ACR core analysis. (authors)

  8. Optical designs of reflection and refraction collection optics for a JT-60SA core Thomson scattering system

    SciTech Connect

    Tojo, H.; Hatae, T.; Hamano, T.; Sakuma, T.; Itami, K.

    2013-09-15

    Collection optics for core measurements in a JT-60SA Thomson scattering system were designed. The collection optics will be installed in a limited space and have a wide field of view and wide wavelength range. Two types of the optics are therefore suggested: refraction and reflection types. The reflection system, with a large primary mirror, avoids large chromatic aberrations. Because the size limit of the primary mirror and vignetting due to the secondary mirror affect the total collection throughput, conditions that provide the high throughput are found through an optimization. A refraction system with four lenses forming an Ernostar system is also employed. The use of high-refractive-index glass materials enhances the freedom of the lens curvatures, resulting in suppression of the spherical and coma aberration. Moreover, sufficient throughput can be achieved, even with smaller lenses than that of a previous design given in [H. Tojo, T. Hatae, T. Sakuma, T. Hamano, K. Itami, Y. Aida, S. Suitoh, and D. Fujie, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10D539 (2010)]. The optical resolutions of the reflection and refraction systems are both sufficient for understanding the spatial structures in plasma. In particular, the spot sizes at the image of the optics are evaluated as ?0.3?mm and ?0.4?mm, respectively. The throughput for the two systems, including the pupil size and transmissivity, are also compared. The results show that good measurement accuracy (<10%) even at high electron temperatures (<30?keV) can be expected in the refraction system.

  9. Design and Characterization of a Neutron Calibration Facility for the Study of sub-keV Nuclear Recoils

    E-print Network

    P. S. Barbeau; J. I. Collar; P. M. Whaley

    2007-01-06

    As part of an experimental effort to demonstrate sensitivity in a large-mass detector to the ultra-low energy recoils expected from coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering, we have designed and built a highly monochromatic 24 keV neutron beam at the Kansas State University Triga Mark-II reactor. The beam characteristics were chosen so as to mimic the soft recoil energies expected from reactor antineutrinos in a variety of targets, allowing to understand the response of dedicated detector technologies in this yet unexplored sub-keV recoil range. A full characterization of the beam properties (intensity, monochromaticity, contaminations, beam profile) is presented, together with first tests of the calibration setup using proton recoils in organic scintillator.

  10. THERMAL HYDRAULICS KEYWORDS: neutron activation,

    E-print Network

    Pázsit, Imre

    THERMAL HYDRAULICS KEYWORDS: neutron activation, flow measurements, evaluation methods FLOWACT, FLOW RATE MEASUREMENTS IN PIPES WITH THE PULSED-NEUTRON ACTIVATION METHOD PER LINDÉN,* GUDMAR GROSSHÖG- neutron activation (PNA) in a specially designed test loop. A stationary neutron generator was used

  11. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  12. The use of WIMS-ANL lumped fission product cross sections for burned core analysis with the MCNP Monte Carlo code.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-10-14

    Most Monte Carlo neutronics analyses are performed for fresh cores. To model snapshots of the cores at different stages during burnup using MCNP, a method is presented that uses lumped fission product (LFP) cross sections generated by the WIMS-ANL code and processed for use in MCNP. Results of analyses for four very different reactor cores using MTR-type and Russian-designed fuel assemblies, with LEU and HEU fuels, are provided to demonstrate the use of this method.

  13. The Effectiveness of Professional Development Using a Checklist of Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice for Designing and Delivering Instruction on Algebra I Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peretin, Janeen

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether or not the use of focused professional development using a checklist based on the Common Core State Standards Mathematical Practices impacted students' math scores as measured by an assessment that requires the use of the practices. Additionally, the researcher sought to determine whether or not the use…

  14. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Under-The-Wing (UTW) boiler plate nacelle and core exhaust nozzle design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical design of the boiler plate nacelle and core exhaust nozzle for the QCSEE under the wing engine is presented. The nacelle, which features interchangeable hard-wall and acoustic panels, is to be utilized in the initial engine testing to establish acoustic requirements for the subsequent composite nacelle as well as in the QCSEE over the wing engine configuration.

  15. LS 101US Ways of Knowing Courses with University Seminar (US) core designation are primarily intended for first-year students

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    LS 101US ­ Ways of Knowing Courses with University Seminar (US) core designation are primarily presentation · Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in written communication LS 101US ­ Ways of Knowing for LS 101US; instead, instructors select their own course themes and develop their own curricula. LS 101

  16. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  17. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  18. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  19. Design and Development of a Run-Time Monitor for Multi-Core Architectures in Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mikyung; Kang, Dong-In; Crago, Stephen P.; Park, Gyung-Leen; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new information technology trend that moves computing and data away from desktops and portable PCs into large data centers. The basic principle of cloud computing is to deliver applications as services over the Internet as well as infrastructure. A cloud is a type of parallel and distributed system consisting of a collection of inter-connected and virtualized computers that are dynamically provisioned and presented as one or more unified computing resources. The large-scale distributed applications on a cloud require adaptive service-based software, which has the capability of monitoring system status changes, analyzing the monitored information, and adapting its service configuration while considering tradeoffs among multiple QoS features simultaneously. In this paper, we design and develop a Run-Time Monitor (RTM) which is a system software to monitor the application behavior at run-time, analyze the collected information, and optimize cloud computing resources for multi-core architectures. RTM monitors application software through library instrumentation as well as underlying hardware through a performance counter optimizing its computing configuration based on the analyzed data. PMID:22163811

  20. TRAC analyses for CCTF and SCTF tests and UPTF design/operation. [Cylindrical Core Test Facility; Slab Core Test Facility; Upper Plenum Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spore, J.W.; Cappiello, M.W.; Dotson, P.J.; Gilbert, J.S; Martinez, V.; Stumpf, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical support in 1985 for Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF), and Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) tests involves the posttest analysis of 16 tests that have already been run in the CCTF and the SCTF and the pretest analysis of 3 tests to be performed in the UPTF. Posttest analysis is used to provide insight into the detailed thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring during the refill and reflood tests performed in CCTF and SCTF. Pretest analysis is used to ensure that the test facility is operated in a manner consistent with the expected behavior of an operating full-scale plant during an accident. To obtain expected behavior of a plant during an accident, two plant loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) calculations were performed: a 200% cold-leg-break LOCA calculation for a 2772 MW(t) Babcock and Wilcox plant and a 200% cold-leg-break LOCA calculation for a 3315 MW(t) Westinghouse plant. Detailed results are presented for several CCTF UPI tests and the Westinghouse plant analysis.