Science.gov

Sample records for core potential studies

  1. Different Timing Features in Brain Processing of Core and Moral Disgust Pictures: An Event-Related Potentials Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youxue; Lou, Liandi; Ding, Daoqun

    2015-01-01

    Disgust, an emotion motivating withdrawal from offensive stimuli, protects us from the risk of biological pathogens and sociomoral violations. Homogeneity of its two types, namely, core and moral disgust has been under intensive debate. To examine the dynamic relationship between them, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) for core disgust, moral disgust and neutral pictures while participants performed a modified oddball task. ERP analysis revealed that N1 and P2 amplitudes were largest for the core disgust pictures, indicating automatic processing of the core disgust-evoking pictures. N2 amplitudes were higher for pictures evoking moral disgust relative to core disgust and neutral pictures, reflecting a violation of social norms. The core disgust pictures elicited larger P3 and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes in comparison with the moral disgust pictures which, in turn, elicited larger P3 and LPP amplitudes when compared to the neutral pictures. Taken together, these findings indicated that core and moral disgust pictures elicited different neural activities at various stages of information processing, which provided supporting evidence for the heterogeneity of disgust. PMID:26011635

  2. Analytical second derivatives for effective core potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidung, Jürgen; Thiel, Walter; Komornicki, Andrew

    1988-12-01

    Analytical first and second derivatives for effective core potentials are reported. The computational implementation of the derivative formulas makes use of new integral routines which take advantage of the shell concept. Test calculations for H 3SnBr and F 3AsS demonstrate the efficiency of the analytical determination of harmonic force fields using effective core potentials. The spectroscopic constants of the unknown molecule F 3AsS are predicted.

  3. Multireference study of spin-orbit coupling in the hydrides of the 6p-block elements using the model core potential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Tao; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Klobukowski, Mariusz

    2010-02-01

    Careful spin-orbit multireference studies were carried out for the late p-block elements Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, and Rn and their hydrides using the model core potentials developed in the present work. The model core potentials were designed to treat the scalar-relativistic and spin-orbit coupling effects at the Douglas-Kroll level. The variational stability of the spin-orbit coupling operator was discussed in terms of the relativistic kinematic operators and depicted graphically. A detailed analysis of the spin-orbit multireference dissociation curves of the 6p element hydrides as well as of their atomic spectra allowed to establish the accuracy of the model core potentials with respect to all-electron calculations to be within several mÅ for re, meV (ceV) for De at the correlation level of configuration interaction (multireference perturbation theory), 30 cm-1 for ωe, and about 350 cm-1 for the low-lying atomic and molecular term and level energies. These values are expected to be the maximum error limits for the model core potentials of all the np-block elements (n =2-6). Furthermore, a good agreement with experiment requires that many terms be coupled in the spin-orbit coupling calculations. A timing study of Tl and TlH computations indicates that the model core potentials lead to 20-fold (6-fold) speedup at the level of configuration interaction (multireference perturbation theory) calculations.

  4. The USDA barley core collection: genetic diversity, population structure, and potential for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Cuesta-Marcos, Alfonso; Endelman, Jeffrey B; Comadran, Jordi; Bonman, John M; Bockelman, Harold E; Chao, Shiaoman; Russell, Joanne; Waugh, Robbie; Hayes, Patrick M; Muehlbauer, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    New sources of genetic diversity must be incorporated into plant breeding programs if they are to continue increasing grain yield and quality, and tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Germplasm collections provide a source of genetic and phenotypic diversity, but characterization of these resources is required to increase their utility for breeding programs. We used a barley SNP iSelect platform with 7,842 SNPs to genotype 2,417 barley accessions sampled from the USDA National Small Grains Collection of 33,176 accessions. Most of the accessions in this core collection are categorized as landraces or cultivars/breeding lines and were obtained from more than 100 countries. Both STRUCTURE and principal component analysis identified five major subpopulations within the core collection, mainly differentiated by geographical origin and spike row number (an inflorescence architecture trait). Different patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) were found across the barley genome and many regions of high LD contained traits involved in domestication and breeding selection. The genotype data were used to define 'mini-core' sets of accessions capturing the majority of the allelic diversity present in the core collection. These 'mini-core' sets can be used for evaluating traits that are difficult or expensive to score. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of 'hull cover', 'spike row number', and 'heading date' demonstrate the utility of the core collection for locating genetic factors determining important phenotypes. The GWAS results were referenced to a new barley consensus map containing 5,665 SNPs. Our results demonstrate that GWAS and high-density SNP genotyping are effective tools for plant breeders interested in accessing genetic diversity in large germplasm collections. PMID:24732668

  5. Model core potentials for studies of scalar-relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling at Douglas-Kroll level. I. Theory and applications to Pb and Bi.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Klobukowski, Mariusz

    2009-09-28

    A theory of model core potentials that can treat spin-orbit-coupling (SOC) effects at the level of Douglas-Kroll formalism has been developed. By storing the damping effect of kinematic operator in the Douglas-Kroll spin-orbit operator into an additional set of basis set contraction coefficients, the Breit-Pauli spin-orbit code in the GAMESS-US program was successfully used to perform Douglas-Kroll spin-orbit calculations. It was found that minute errors in the radial functions of valence orbitals lead to large errors in the spin-orbit energy levels and thus fitting the radial part of the spin-orbit matrix elements is necessary in model core potential parametrization. The first model core potentials that include the new formalism were developed for two 6p-block elements, Pb and Bi. The valence space of the 5p, 5d, 6s, and 6p orbitals was used because of the large SOC between the 5p and 6p orbitals. The model core potentials were validated in the calculations of atomic properties as well as spectroscopic constants of diatomic metal hydrides. The agreement between results of the model core potential and all-electron calculations was excellent, with energy errors of hundreds of cm(-1) and hundredths of eV, r(e) errors of thousandths of A, and omega(e) errors under 20 cm(-1). Two kinds of interplay between SOC effect and bonding process (antibonding and bonding SOC) were demonstrated using spin-free term potential curves of PbH and BiH. The present study is the first extension of the model core potential method beyond Breit-Pauli to Douglas-Kroll SOC calculations. PMID:19791854

  6. The USDA Barley Core Collection: Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Potential for Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Endelman, Jeffrey B.; Comadran, Jordi; Bonman, John M.; Bockelman, Harold E.; Chao, Shiaoman; Russell, Joanne; Waugh, Robbie; Hayes, Patrick M.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    New sources of genetic diversity must be incorporated into plant breeding programs if they are to continue increasing grain yield and quality, and tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Germplasm collections provide a source of genetic and phenotypic diversity, but characterization of these resources is required to increase their utility for breeding programs. We used a barley SNP iSelect platform with 7,842 SNPs to genotype 2,417 barley accessions sampled from the USDA National Small Grains Collection of 33,176 accessions. Most of the accessions in this core collection are categorized as landraces or cultivars/breeding lines and were obtained from more than 100 countries. Both STRUCTURE and principal component analysis identified five major subpopulations within the core collection, mainly differentiated by geographical origin and spike row number (an inflorescence architecture trait). Different patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) were found across the barley genome and many regions of high LD contained traits involved in domestication and breeding selection. The genotype data were used to define ‘mini-core’ sets of accessions capturing the majority of the allelic diversity present in the core collection. These ‘mini-core’ sets can be used for evaluating traits that are difficult or expensive to score. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of ‘hull cover’, ‘spike row number’, and ‘heading date’ demonstrate the utility of the core collection for locating genetic factors determining important phenotypes. The GWAS results were referenced to a new barley consensus map containing 5,665 SNPs. Our results demonstrate that GWAS and high-density SNP genotyping are effective tools for plant breeders interested in accessing genetic diversity in large germplasm collections. PMID:24732668

  7. Precursors to potential severe core damage applications, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Minarick, J.W.; Dolan, B.W. ); Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A. )

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 x 10-6 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1991 are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1990 events. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to mnk precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  8. [Towards computer-aided catalyst design: Three effective core potential studies of C-H activation]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    Research in the initial grant period focused on computational studies relevant to the selective activation of methane, the prime component of natural gas. Reaction coordinates for methane activation by experimental models were delineated, as well as the bonding and structure of complexes that effect this important reaction. This research, highlighted in the following sections, also provided the impetus for further development, and application of methods for modeling metal-containing catalysts. Sections of the report describe the following: methane activation by multiple-bonded transition metal complexes; computational lanthanide chemistry; and methane activation by non-imido, multiple-bonded ligands.

  9. The Nonconservation of Potential Vorticity by a Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffin, Leo; Methven, John; Gray, Sue

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models of the atmosphere combine a dynamical core, which approximates solutions to the adiabatic, frictionless governing equations for fluid dynamics, with tendencies arising from the parametrization of other physical processes. Since potential vorticity (PV) is conserved following fluid flow in adiabatic, frictionless circumstances, it is possible to isolate the effects of non-conservative processes by accumulating PV changes in an air-mass relative framework. This ``PV tracer technique'' is used to accumulate separately the effects on PV of each of the different non-conservative processes represented in a numerical model of the atmosphere. Dynamical cores are not exactly conservative because they introduce, explicitly or implicitly, some level of dissipation and adjustment of prognostic model variables which acts to modify PV. Here, the PV tracers technique is extended to diagnose the cumulative effect of the non-conservation of PV by a dynamical core and its characteristics relative to the PV modification by parametrized physical processes. Quantification using the Met Office Unified Model reveals that the magnitude of the non-conservation of PV by the dynamical core is comparable to those from physical processes. Moreover, the residual of the PV budget, when tracing the effects of the dynamical core and physical processes, is at least an order of magnitude smaller than the PV tracers associated with the most active physical processes. The implication of this work is that the non-conservation of PV by a dynamical core can be assessed in case studies with a full suite of physics parametrizations and directly compared with the PV modification by parametrized physical processes.

  10. Electronic Charges and Electric Potential at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces Studied by Core-Level Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Harold

    2011-08-19

    We studied LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces for varying LaAlO{sub 3} thickness by core-level photoemission spectroscopy. In Ti 2p spectra for conducting 'n-type' interfaces, Ti{sup 3+} signals appeared, which were absent for insulating 'p-type' interfaces. The Ti{sup 3+} signals increased with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness, but started well below the critical thickness of 4 unit cells for metallic transport. Core-level shifts with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness were much smaller than predicted by the polar catastrophe model. We attribute these observations to surface defects/adsorbates providing charges to the interface even below the critical thickness.

  11. On orthogonality constrained multiple core-hole states and optimized effective potential method.

    PubMed

    Glushkov, V N; Assfeld, X

    2012-10-01

    An attempt to construct a multiple core-hole state within the optimized effective potential (OEP) methodology is presented. In contrast to the conventional Δ-self-consistent field method for hole states, the effects of removing an electron is achieved using some orthogonality constraints imposed on the orbitals so that a Slater determinant describing a hole state is constrained to be orthogonal to that of a neutral system. It is shown that single, double, and multiple core-hole states can be treated within a unified framework and can be easily implemented for atoms and molecules. For this purpose, a constrained OEP method proposed earlier for excited states (Glushkov and Levy, J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 174106) is further developed to calculate single and double core ionization energies using a local effective potential expressed as a direct mapping of the external potential. The corresponding equations, determining core-hole orbitals from a one-particle Schrödinger equation with a local potential as well as correlation corrections derived from the second-order many-body perturbation theory are given. One of the advantages of the present direct mapping formulation is that the effective potential, which plays the role of the Kohn-Sham potential, has the symmetry of the external potential. Single and double core ionization potentials computed with the presented scheme were found to be in agreement with data available from experiment and other calculations. We also discuss core-hole state local potentials for the systems studied. PMID:22696265

  12. The Core Journal Concept in Black Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissinger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Black Studies scholars have shown interest in the core journal concept. Indeed, the idea of core journals for the study of the Black experience has changed several times since 1940. While Black Studies scholars are citing Black Studies journals with frequency, they also cite traditional disciplinary journals a great deal of the time. However,…

  13. Antigenic potential of a highly conserved Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide inner core structure defined by chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Anika; Yang, You; Claus, Heike; Pereira, Claney L; Cox, Andrew D; Vogel, Ulrich; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H

    2015-01-22

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide. We studied the potential of synthetic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core structures as broadly protective antigens against N. meningitidis. Based on the specific reactivity of human serum antibodies to synthetic LPS cores, we selected a highly conserved LPS core tetrasaccharide as a promising antigen. This LPS inner core tetrasaccharide induced a robust IgG response in mice when formulated as an immunogenic glycoconjugate. Binding of raised mouse serum to a broad collection of N. meningitidis strains demonstrated the accessibility of the LPS core on viable bacteria. The distal trisaccharide was identified as the crucial epitope, whereas the proximal Kdo moiety was immunodominant and induced mainly nonprotective antibodies that are responsible for lack of functional protection in polyclonal serum. Our results identified key antigenic determinants of LPS core glycan and, hence, may aid the design of a broadly protective immunization against N. meningitidis. PMID:25601073

  14. Infrared and Submilllimeter Studies of Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Tyler L.

    2014-07-01

    Dense Cores are the birthplace of stars, and so understanding their structure and evolution is key to understanding star formation. Information on the density, temperature, and motions within cores are needed to describe these properties, and are obtained through continuum and line observations at far infrared and submm/mm wavelengths. Recent observations of dust emission with Herschel and molecular line observations with single-dish telescopes and interferometers provide the wavelength coverage and resolution to finally map core properties without appealing to spherical simplifications. Although large scale Herschel observations reveal numerous filaments in molecular clouds which are well described by cylindrical geometries, cores are still modeled as spherical entities. A few examples of other core geometries exist in the literature, and the wealth of new data on cloud filaments demand that non-spherical models receive more attention in future studies. This talk will examine the evidence for non-spherical cores and their connection to the filaments from which they form.

  15. Atomic orbital basis sets for use with effective core potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaudeau, J.P.; Brozell, S.R.; Matsika, S.; Zhang, Z.; Pitzer, R.M.

    2000-03-15

    Basis sets developed for use with effective core potentials describe pseudo-orbitals rather than orbitals. The primitive Gaussian functions and the contraction coefficients in the basis set must therefore both describe the valence region effectively and allow the pseudo-orbital to be small in the core region. The latter is particularly difficult using 1s primitive functions, which have their maxima at the nucleus. Several methods of choosing contraction coefficients are tried, and it is found that natural orbitals give the best results. The number and optimization of primitive functions are done following Dunning's correlation-consistent procedure. Optimization of orbital exponents for larger atoms frequently results in coalescence of adjacent exponents; use of orbitals with higher principal quantum number is one alternative. Actinide atoms or ions provide the most difficult cases in that basis sets must be optimized for valence shells of different radial size simultaneously considering correlation energy and spin-orbit energy.

  16. Nijmegen soft-core potential including two-meson exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Stoks, V.G.J.; Rijken, T.A.

    1995-05-10

    We report on the progress of the construction of the extended soft-core (ESC) Nijmegen potential. Next to the standard one-boson-exchange parts, the model includes the pion-meson-exchange potentials due to the parallel and crossed-box diagrams, as well as the one-pair and two-pair diagrams, vertices for which can be identified with similar interactions appearing in chiral-symmetric Lagrangians. Although the ESC potential is still under construction, it already gives an excellent description of all {ital NN} scattering data below 350 MeV with {chi}{sup 2}/datum=1.3. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. Discrete perturbation theory for continuous soft-core potential fluids.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, L A; Jaime-Muñoz, G; Benavides, A L; Torres-Arenas, J; Sastre, F

    2015-03-21

    In this work, we present an equation of state for an interesting soft-core continuous potential [G. Franzese, J. Mol. Liq. 136, 267 (2007)] which has been successfully used to model the behavior of single component fluids that show some water-type anomalies. This equation has been obtained using discrete perturbation theory. It is an analytical expression given in terms of density, temperature, and the set of parameters that characterize the intermolecular interaction. Theoretical results for the vapor-liquid phase diagram and for supercritical pressures are compared with previous and new simulation data and a good agreement is found. This work also clarifies discrepancies between previous Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation results for this potential. PMID:25796255

  18. A logistics and potential hazard study of propellant systems for a Saturn 5 derived heavy lift (three-stage core) launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, E. Dow

    1992-09-01

    The Bush Administration has directed NASA to prepare for a return to the Moon and on to Mars - the Space Exploration Initiative. To meet this directive, powerful rocket boosters will be required in order to lift payloads that may reach the half-million pound range into low earth orbit. In this report an analysis is presented on logistics and potential hazards of the propellant systems envisioned for future Saturn 5 derived heavy lift launch vehicles. In discussing propellant logistics, particular attention has been given to possible problems associated with procurement, transportation, and storage of RP-1, HL2, and LOX, the heavy lift launch vehicle propellants. Current LOX producing facilities will need to be expanded and propellant storage and some support facilities will require relocation if current Launch Pads 39A and/or 39B are to be used for future heavy noise-abatement measures. Included in the report is a discussion of suggested additional studies, primarily economic and environmental, which should be undertaken in support of the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative.

  19. A logistics and potential hazard study of propellant systems for a Saturn 5 derived heavy lift (three-stage core) launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, E. Dow

    1992-01-01

    The Bush Administration has directed NASA to prepare for a return to the Moon and on to Mars - the Space Exploration Initiative. To meet this directive, powerful rocket boosters will be required in order to lift payloads that may reach the half-million pound range into low earth orbit. In this report an analysis is presented on logistics and potential hazards of the propellant systems envisioned for future Saturn 5 derived heavy lift launch vehicles. In discussing propellant logistics, particular attention has been given to possible problems associated with procurement, transportation, and storage of RP-1, HL2, and LOX, the heavy lift launch vehicle propellants. Current LOX producing facilities will need to be expanded and propellant storage and some support facilities will require relocation if current Launch Pads 39A and/or 39B are to be used for future heavy noise-abatement measures. Included in the report is a discussion of suggested additional studies, primarily economic and environmental, which should be undertaken in support of the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative.

  20. The 3-dimensional cored and logarithm potentials: Periodic orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Maité; Llibre, Jaume

    2014-11-15

    We study analytically families of periodic orbits for the cored and logarithmic Hamiltonians with 3 degrees of freedom, which are relevant in the analysis of the galactic dynamics. First, after introducing a scale transformation in the coordinates and momenta with a parameter ε, we show that both systems give essentially the same set of equations of motion up to first order in ε. Then the conditions for finding families of periodic orbits, using the averaging theory up to first order in ε, apply equally to both systems in every energy level H = h > 0 showing the existence of at least 3 periodic orbits, for ε small enough, and also provides an analytic approximation for the initial conditions of these periodic orbits. We prove that at every positive energy level the cored and logarithmic Hamiltonians with 3 degrees of freedom have at least three periodic solutions. The technique used for proving such a result can be applied to other Hamiltonian systems.

  1. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  2. The cored and logarithm galactic potentials: Periodic orbits and integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Lara, Lidia; Llibre, Jaume

    2012-04-01

    We apply the averaging theory of first order to study analytically families of periodic orbits for the cored and logarithmic Hamiltonians HC=12px2+py2+1+x2+y2q2-1, and HL=12px2+py2+12log1+x2+y2q2, which are relevant in the study of the galactic dynamic. We first show, after introducing a scale transformation in the coordinates and momenta with a parameter ɛ, that both systems give essentially the same set of equations of motion up to first order in ɛ. Then the conditions for finding families of periodic orbits, using the averaging theory up to first order in ɛ, apply equally for both systems in every energy level H = h > 0 with H either HC or HL. We prove the existence of two periodic orbits if q is irrational, for ɛ small enough, and we give an analytic approximation for the initial conditions of these periodic orbits. Finally, the previous periodic orbits provide information about the non-integrability of the cored and the logarithmic Hamiltonian systems.

  3. Pre-conceptual design study of ASTRID core

    SciTech Connect

    Varaine, F.; Marsault, P.; Chenaud, M. S.; Bernardin, B.; Conti, A.; Sciora, P.; Venard, C.; Fontaine, B.; Devictor, N.; Martin, L.; Scholer, A. C.; Verrier, D.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project at CEA, core design studies are performed at CEA with the AREVA and EDF support. At the stage of the project, pre-conceptual design studies are conducted in accordance with GEN IV reactors criteria, in particularly for safety improvements. An improved safety for a sodium cooled reactor requires revisiting many aspects of the design and is a rather lengthy process in current design approach. Two types of cores are under evaluation, one classical derived from the SFR V2B and one more challenging called CFV (low void effect core) with a large gain on the sodium void effect. The SFR V2b core have the following specifications: a very low burn-up reactivity swing (due to a small cycle reactivity loss) and a reduced sodium void effect with regard to past designs such as the EFR (around 2$ minus). Its performances are an average burn-up of 100 GWd/t, and an internal conversion ratio equal to one given a very good behavior of this core during a control rod withdrawal transient). The CFV with its specific design offers a negative sodium void worth while maintaining core performances. In accordance of ASTRID needs for demonstration those cores are 1500 MWth power (600 MWe). This paper will focus on the CFV pre-conceptual design of the core and S/A, and the performances in terms of safety will be evaluated on different transient scenario like ULOF, in order to assess its intrinsic behavior compared to a more classical design like V2B core. The gap in term of margin to a severe accident due to a loss of flow initiator underlines the potential capability of this type of core to enhance prevention of severe accident in accordance to safety demonstration. (authors)

  4. Piezoelectric constants for ZnO calculated using classical polarizable core-shell potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shuangxing; Dunn, Martin L.; Park, Harold S.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using classical atomistic simulations, i.e. molecular dynamics and molecular statics, to study the piezoelectric properties of ZnO using core-shell interatomic potentials. We accomplish this by reporting the piezoelectric constants for ZnO as calculated using two different classical interatomic core-shell potentials: that originally proposed by Binks and Grimes (1994 Solid State Commun. 89 921-4), and that proposed by Nyberg et al (1996 J. Phys. Chem. 100 9054-63). We demonstrate that the classical core-shell potentials are able to qualitatively reproduce the piezoelectric constants as compared to benchmark ab initio calculations. We further demonstrate that while the presence of the shell is required to capture the electron polarization effects that control the clamped ion part of the piezoelectric constant, the major shortcoming of the classical potentials is a significant underprediction of the clamped ion term as compared to previous ab initio results. However, the present results suggest that overall, these classical core-shell potentials are sufficiently accurate to be utilized for large scale atomistic simulations of the piezoelectric response of ZnO nanostructures.

  5. Inverting Asymmetric Confinement Potentials in Core/Thick-Shell Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Paulite, Melissa; Acharya, Krishna P; Nguyen, Hue Minh; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Htoon, Han

    2015-02-19

    We investigate CdSe/ZnSe core/thick-shell nanocrystals (a.k.a. giant-nanocrystal quantum dots [g-NQDs]) that have an asymmetric electron/hole confinement potential opposite to nonblinking CdSe/CdS g-NQDs. We deconstruct the photon streams into five different photoluminescence (PL) intensity levels and analyze second-order photon correlation (g((2))) traces of each PL intensity level. This analysis allows us to decouple the contribution of exciton charging from the g((2)) experiment and determine the quantum yield of neutral biexciton states to be in the range of ∼20-50%, a value comparable to that of CdSe/CdS g-NQDs. We also show that the Auger recombination rate of positive trion states is suppressed compared to that of negative trions. This suppression, however, is shown not to be strong enough to yield complete suppression of PL fluctuations due to the heavy effective mass of holes. Strong intensity fluctuations also result from the fact that hole charging occurs more readily in CdSe/ZnSe g-NQDs than electron charging in CdSe/CdS g-NQDs. PMID:26262490

  6. Precursors to potential severe core damage applications, 1991. A status report, main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Minarick, J.W.; Dolan, B.W.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 x 10-6 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1991 are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1990 events. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to mnk precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  7. Molecular electrostatic potential at the atomic sites in the effective core potential approximation.

    PubMed

    Lesiuk, Michał; Zachara, Janusz

    2013-02-21

    Considering calculations of the molecular electrostatic potential at the atomic sites (MEP@AS) in the presence of effective core potentials (ECP), we found that the consequent use of the definition of MEP@AS based on the energy derivative with respect to nuclear charge leads to a formula that differs by one term from the result of simple application of Coulomb's law. We have developed a general method to analytically treat derivatives of ECP with respect to nuclear charge. Benchmarking calculations performed on a set of simple molecules show that our formula leads to a systematic decrease in the error connected with the introduction of ECP when compared to all-electron results. Because of a straightforward implementation and relatively low costs of the developed procedure we suggest to use it by default. PMID:23444997

  8. Molecular electrostatic potential at the atomic sites in the effective core potential approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesiuk, Michał; Zachara, Janusz

    2013-02-01

    Considering calculations of the molecular electrostatic potential at the atomic sites (MEP@AS) in the presence of effective core potentials (ECP), we found that the consequent use of the definition of MEP@AS based on the energy derivative with respect to nuclear charge leads to a formula that differs by one term from the result of simple application of Coulomb's law. We have developed a general method to analytically treat derivatives of ECP with respect to nuclear charge. Benchmarking calculations performed on a set of simple molecules show that our formula leads to a systematic decrease in the error connected with the introduction of ECP when compared to all-electron results. Because of a straightforward implementation and relatively low costs of the developed procedure we suggest to use it by default.

  9. Motion sickness potentiates core cooling during immersion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Tipton, Michael J; Gennser, Mikael; Eiken, Ola

    2001-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that motion sickness affects thermoregulatory responses to cooling in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers underwent three separate head-out immersions in 28 °C water after different preparatory procedures. In the ‘control’ procedure immersion was preceded by a rest period. In the ‘motion sickness’ procedure immersion was preceded by provocation of motion sickness in a human centrifuge. This comprised rapid and repeated alterations of the gravitational (G-) stress in the head-to-foot direction, plus a standardized regimen of head movements at increased G-stress. In the ‘G-control’ procedure, the subjects were exposed to similar G-stress, but without the motion sickness provocation. During immersion mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, the difference in temperature between the forearm and 3rd digit of the right hand (ΔTforearm-fingertip), oxygen uptake and heart rate were recorded. Subjects provided ratings of temperature perception, thermal comfort and level of motion sickness discomfort at regular intervals. No differences were observed in any of the variables between control and G-control procedures. In the motion sickness procedure, the ΔTforearm-fingertip response was significantly attenuated, indicating a blunted vasoconstrictor response, and rectal temperature decreased at a faster rate. No other differences were observed. Motion sickness attenuates the vasoconstrictor response to skin and core cooling, thereby enhancing heat loss and the magnitude of the fall in deep body temperature. Motion sickness may predispose individuals to hypothermia, and have significant implications for survival time in maritime accidents. PMID:11533150

  10. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  11. A core-top study of dissolution effect on B/Ca in Globigerinoides sacculifer from the tropical Atlantic: Potential bias for paleo-reconstruction of seawater carbonate chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coadic, R.; Bassinot, F.; Dissard, D.; Douville, E.; Greaves, M.; Michel, E.

    2013-04-01

    has been recently shown that B/Ca in planktonic foraminiferal calcite can be used as a proxy for seawater pH. Based on the study of surface sediments (multi-cores) retrieved along a depth transect on the Sierra Leone Rise (Eastern Equatorial Atlantic), we document the decrease of B/Ca and Mg/Ca of Globigerinoides sacculifer shells with increasing water depth and dissolution. This effect of dissolution on B/Ca may potentially represent a severe bias for paleo-pH reconstructions using this species. Samples of G. sacculifer were analyzed independently at two laboratories for B/Ca and Mg/Ca. Both sets of results show a systematic decrease of B/Ca and Mg/Ca along the depth transect, with an overall loss of ~14 µmol/mol (~15%) for B/Ca and of ~0.7 mmol/mol (~21%) for Mg/Ca between the shallowest (2640 m) and the deepest (4950 m) sites. Because of this dissolution effect, surface water pH reconstructed from B/Ca of G. sacculifer decreases by ~0.11 units between the shallowest site and the deepest site, a magnitude similar to the expected glacial/interglacial surface water pH changes.

  12. A Numerical Study on Possible Driving Mechanisms of Core Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, M.; Harder, H.; Hansen, U.

    2005-12-01

    We present a numerical study on core convection based on a model of a rotating spherical shell where different driving mechanisms are investigated. Two different sources are potentially available to act as driving forces. The first is based on the super adiabatic temperature gradient in the outer core. The second is of chemical nature and is derived from light elements which emerge at the boundary between the inner and the outer core as a result of the freezing process of the outer core. So far it is uncertain if the convective flow in the outer core is dominated by thermal or by chemical buoyancy. Dynamically, both components differ mainly in terms of their diffusional time scales, whereas the chemical component diffuses much faster than the thermal one. To investigate the influence of the driving mechanisms on the convective flow pattern we considered different scenarios including the two extreme cases of purely thermal and purely chemical driven convection and the more likely situation of a joint action of both sources. We focused on the question how the driving mechanisms affects the differential rotation and the spatial distribution of helicity which are particularly important for the dynamo process.

  13. The Potential of Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Relevant to the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Amy C.; Colwell, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Digital tools have the potential to transform instruction and promote literacies outlined in the Common Core State Standards. Empirical research is examined to illustrate this potential in grades 6-12 instruction.

  14. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  15. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1995 A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    Ten operational events that affected 10 commercial light-water reactors during 1995 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1995 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  16. Teleseismic Array Studies of Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    The core mantle boundary (CMB) is an inaccessible and complex region, knowledge of which is vital to our understanding of many Earth processes. Above it is the heterogeneous lower-mantle. Below the boundary is the outer-core, composed of liquid iron, and/or nickel and some lighter elements. Elucidation of how these two distinct layers interact may enable researchers to better understand the geodynamo, global tectonics, and overall Earth history. One parameter that can be used to study structure and limit potential chemical compositions is seismic-wave velocity. Current global-velocity models have significant uncertainties in the 200 km above and below the CMB. In this thesis, these regions are studied using three methods. The upper outer core is studied using two seismic array methods. First, a modified vespa, or slant-stack method is applied to seismic observations at broadband seismic arrays, and at large, dense groups of broadband seismic stations dubbed 'virtual' arrays. Observations of core-refracted teleseismic waves, such as SmKS, are used to extract relative arrivaltimes. As with previous studies, lower -mantle heterogeneities influence the extracted arrivaltimes, giving significant scatter. To remove raypath effects, a new method was developed, called Empirical Transfer Functions (ETFs). When applied to SmKS waves, this method effectively isolates arrivaltime perturbations caused by outer core velocities. By removing raypath effects, the signals can be stacked further reducing scatter. The results of this work were published as a new 1D outer-core model, called AE09. This model describes a well-mixed outer core. Two array methods are used to detect lower mantle heterogeneities, in particular Ultra-Low Velocity Zones (ULVZs). The ETF method and beam forming are used to isolate a weak P-wave that diffracts along the CMB. While neither the ETF method nor beam forming could adequately image the low-amplitude phase, beam forms of two events indicate precursors

  17. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report. Volume 17, Main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W.; Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D.

    1993-12-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 {times} 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  18. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1997 -- A status report. Volume 26

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Muhlheim, M.D.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W.

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the five operational events in 1997 that affected five commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1997 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those events that could be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1996 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  19. Magnetic core studies at LBNL and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Faltens, A.; Reginato, L.; Blaszkiewicz, M.; Smith, C.; Wood, R.

    1997-09-20

    The objective of this work is to minimize the cost of the materials and maximize the performance of magnetic cores, a major cost component of a Heavy-Ion-Fusion, HIF, induction accelerator driver. This includes selection of the alloy for cost and performance, and maximizing the performance of each alloy evaluated. The two major performance parameters are the magnetic flux swing and the energy loss. The volt seconds of the cores, obtained from the flux swing with Faraday's Law, determines the beam energy and duration. Core losses from forming domains and moving their boundaries are a major factor in determining the efficiency of an induction accelerator.

  20. Preserving Social Studies as Core Curricula in an Era of Common Core Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, David W.; Sink, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Education reform over the last two decades has changed perceptions of core curricula. Although social studies has traditionally been part of the core, emphasis on standards-based teaching and learning, along with elaborate accountability schemes, is causing unbalanced treatment of subjects. While the research literature indicates teachers are…

  1. Generally Contracted Valence-Core/Valence Basis Sets for Use with Relativistic Effective Core Potentials and Spin-Orbit Coupling Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Ermler, Walter V.; Tilson, Jeffrey L.

    2012-12-15

    A procedure for structuring generally contracted valence-core/valence basis sets of Gaussian-type functions for use with relativistic effective core potentials (gcv-c/v-RECP basis sets) is presented. Large valence basis sets are enhanced using a compact basis set derived for outer core electrons in the presence of small-core RECPs. When core electrons are represented by relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs), and appropriate levels of theory, these basis sets are shown to provide accurate representations of atomic and molecular valence and outer-core electrons. Core/valence polarization and correlation effects can be calculated using these basis sets through standard methods for treating electron correlation. Calculations of energies and spectra for Ru, Os, Ir, In and Cs are reported. Spectroscopic constants for RuO2+, OsO2+, Cs2 and InH are calculated and compared with experiment.

  2. Core history from paleomagnetic data: Potential changes in stratification but no evidence for a Mesoproterozoic inner core age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Aleksey; Tarduno, John; Kulakov, Evgeniy; McEnroe, Suzanne; Bono, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Data on the long-term evolution of Earth's magnetic field intensity are crucial for understanding the mechanisms of the geodynamo and planetary evolution. However, the paleointensity record in rocks may be adversely affected by a plethora of physical processes which must be taken into account when analyzing the paleointensity database. Recently, a statistical analysis of the Precambrian paleointensity database was used to claim that the solid inner core formed in the Mesoproterozoic, and that this onset time constrains the thermal conductivity in the core to "moderate" values. Here, we demonstrate that the data selection criteria used in this analysis failed to filter out data that significantly overestimate the true paleofield strength due to the presence of non-ideal carriers of paleointensity signals and/or viscous re-magnetizations. Moreover, the use of site-mean data led to an additional statistical bias by giving equal weight to time-averaged and non-time-averaged data. When the paleointensity overestimates are removed, and the study-mean data are used instead of site-mean data, the Precambrian database does not indicate a robust change in geomagnetic field intensity during the Mesoproterozoic. Our analyses indicate that the presently available paleointensity data of Mesoproterozoic age are insufficient in number and quality to constrain the timing of solid inner core formation, or the outstanding problem of core thermal conductivity. More promising available data sets that reflect long-term core structure are geomagnetic reversal rate and field morphology. The latter suggests changes that may reflect differences in Archean to Proterozoic core stratification, whereas the former suggest an interval of geodynamo hyperactivity at ca 550 Ma.

  3. Idaho NTE Core Battery Validation: Study Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zetler, Alan G.

    The content validity of the National Teacher Examinations (NTE) Core Battery tests of communications skills, general knowledge, and professional knowledge was examined to determine whether this commercially available test was suitable for initial teacher certification in Idaho. Focus was on recommending adoption scores (cut scores) to the State…

  4. Marketing Competencies: A Core Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicchetti, Elric A.

    The document provides a systematic analysis of curriculum in marketing, focusing on the design and evaluation of a vocational course in the distributive education curriculum. The core course, entitled basic marketing, was selected because marketing competencies are essential to every distributive education student. The following areas are…

  5. Mercury's Core Molten, Radar Study Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    Scientists using a high-precision planetary radar technique for the first time have discovered that the innermost planet Mercury probably has a molten core, resolving a mystery of more than three decades. The discovery, which used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia and Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, and NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory antennas in California, is an important step toward a better understanding of how planets form and evolve. Planetary Radar High-precision planetary radar technique sent signal to Mercury, received reflection. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (447 KB) "For a long time it was thought we'd have to land spacecraft on Mercury to learn if its core is solid or molten. Now we've answered that question using ground-based telescopes," said Jean-Luc Margot, of Cornell University, leader of the research team, which published its results in the May 4 issue of the journal Science. Mercury is one of the least-understood of the planets in our Solar System. Its distance from the Sun is just over one-third that of the Earth, and it contains a mass just 5½ percent that of Earth. Only about half of Mercury's surface has been photographed by a spacecraft, Mariner 10, back in 1974. Mariner 10 also discovered that Mercury has a weak magnetic field, about one percent as strong as Earth's. That discovery spurred a scientific debate about the planet's core. Scientists normally expect a rocky planet's magnetic field to be caused by an electromagnetic dynamo in a molten core. However, Mercury is so small that most scientists expected its core to have cooled and solidified long ago. Those scientists speculated that the magnetic field seen today may have been "frozen" into the planet when the core cooled. "Whether the core is molten or solid today depends greatly on the chemical composition of the core. That chemical composition can provide important clues about the

  6. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential.

    PubMed

    Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2013-12-28

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case. PMID:24387380

  7. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu E-mail: niharc2002@yahoo.com

    2013-12-28

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case.

  8. Potential of electrospun core-shell structured gelatin-chitosan nanofibers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Jalaja, K; Naskar, Deboki; Kundu, Subhas C; James, Nirmala R

    2016-01-20

    Coaxial electrospinning is an upcoming technology that has emerged from the conventional electrospinning process in order to realize the production of nanofibers of less spinnable materials with potential applications. The present work focuses on the production of chitosan nanofibers in a benign route, using natural polymer as core template, mild solvent system and naturally derived cross-linkers. Nanofibers with chitosan as shell are fabricated by coaxial electrospinning with highly spinnable gelatin as core using aqueous acetic acid as solvent. For maintaining the biocompatibility and structural integrity of the core-shell nanofibers, cross-linking is carried out using naturally derived cross-linking agents, dextran aldehyde and sucrose aldehyde. The biological evaluation of gelatin/chitosan mat is carried out using human osteoblast like cells. The results show that the cross-linked core-shell nanofibers are excellent matrices for cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:26572452

  9. Probing the Anharmonicity of the Potential Well for a Magnetic Vortex Core in a Nanodot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhostavets, O. V.; Pigeau, B.; Sangiao, S.; de Loubens, G.; Naletov, V. V.; Klein, O.; Mitsuzuka, K.; Andrieu, S.; Montaigne, F.; Guslienko, K. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The anharmonicity of the potential well confining a magnetic vortex core in a nanodot is measured dynamically with a magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM). The stray field of the MRFM tip is used to displace the equilibrium core position away from the nanodot center. The anharmonicity is then inferred from the relative frequency shift induced on the eigenfrequency of the vortex core translational mode. An analytical framework is proposed to extract the anharmonic coefficient from this variational approach. Traces of these shifts are recorded while scanning the tip above an isolated nanodot, patterned out of a single crystal FeV film. We observe a +10% increase of the eigenfrequency when the equilibrium position of the vortex core is displaced to about one-third of its radius. This calibrates the tunability of the gyrotropic mode by external magnetic fields.

  10. Performance potential of gas-core and fusion rockets - A mission applications survey.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.; Willis, E. A., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    This paper reports an evaluation of the performance potential of five nuclear rocket engines for four mission classes. These engines are: the regeneratively cooled gas-core nuclear rocket; the light bulb gas-core nuclear rocket; the space-radiator cooled gas-core nuclear rocket; the fusion rocket; and an advanced solid-core nuclear rocket which is included for comparison. The missions considered are: earth-to-orbit launch; near-earth space missions; close interplanetary missions; and distant interplanetary missions. For each of these missions, the capabilities of each rocket engine type are compared in terms of payload ratio for the earth launch mission or by the initial vehicle mass in earth orbit for space missions (a measure of initial cost). Other factors which might determine the engine choice are discussed. It is shown that a 60 day manned round trip to Mars is conceivable.-

  11. Graduate Study in Advertising and the Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Edd

    1995-01-01

    Discusses business school guidelines and journalism school guidelines for graduate education. Discusses graduate study in advertising and the advertising core. Outlines suggested changes to the advertising core to make it more attractive to advertising agency executives and to meet the challenges of the future. (SR)

  12. Use of Relativistic Effective Core Potentials in the Calculation of Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Kim, Yong-Ki

    1999-01-01

    Based on the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, the advantage of using relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) in the calculation of total ionization cross sections of heavy atoms or molecules containing heavy atoms is discussed. Numerical examples for Ar, Kr, Xe, and WF6 are presented.

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance studies of lunar core stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Cirlin, E. H.; Goldberg, I. B.; Crowe, H.

    1976-01-01

    We first review the evidence which links the characteristic ferromagnetic resonance observed in lunar fines samples with agglutinatic glass produced primarily by micrometeorite impacts and present new results on Apollo 15, 16, and 17 breccias which support this link by showing that only regolith breccias contribute significantly to the characteristic FMR intensity. We then provide a calibration of the amount of Fe metal in the form of uniformly magnetized spheres required to give our observed FMR intensities and discuss the theoretical magnetic behavior to be expected of Fe spheres as a function of size. Finally, we present FMR results on samples from every 5 mm interval in the core segments 60003, 60009, and 70009. These results lead us to suggest: (1) that secondary mixing may generally be extensive during regolith deposition so that buried regolith surfaces are hard to recognize or define; and (2) that local grinding of rocks and pebbles during deposition may lead to short scale fluctuations in grain size, composition, and apparent exposure age of samples.

  14. Core compressor exit stage study, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behlke, R. F.; Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Korn, N. D.

    1979-01-01

    A total of two three-stage compressors were designed and tested to determine the effects of aspect ratio on compressor performance. The first compressor was designed with an aspect ratio of 0.81; the other, with an aspect ratio of 1.22. Both compressors had a hub-tip ratio of 0.915, representative of the rear stages of a core compressor, and both were designed to achieve a 15.0% surge margin at design pressure ratios of 1.357 and 1.324, respectively, at a mean wheel speed of 167 m/sec. At design speed the 0.81 aspect ratio compressor achieved a pressure ratio of 1.346 at a corrected flow of 4.28 kg/sec and an adiabatic efficiency of 86.1%. The 1.22 aspect ratio design achieved a pressure ratio of 1.314 at 4.35 kg/sec flow and 87.0% adiabatic efficiency. Surge margin to peak efficiency was 24.0% with the lower aspect ratio blading, compared with 12.4% with the higher aspect ratio blading.

  15. Feasibility Studies of Teacher Core Job Characteristics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, W. W., Jr.; And Others

    Work redesign for improving satisfaction or productivity depends partially on employee attributes because employees respond differently to work conditions. The Hackman-Oldham theory distinguishes "job" from employee responses to job. A job's motivating potential is thus linked to five core characteristics that affect three psychological states…

  16. A mean spherical model for soft potentials: The hard core revealed as a perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Y.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1978-01-01

    The mean spherical approximation for fluids is extended to treat the case of dense systems interacting via soft-potentials. The extension takes the form of a generalized statement concerning the behavior of the direct correlation function c(r) and radial distribution g(r). From a detailed analysis that views the hard core portion of a potential as a perturbation on the whole, a specific model is proposed which possesses analytic solutions for both Coulomb and Yukawa potentials, in addition to certain other remarkable properties. A variational principle for the model leads to a relatively simple method for obtaining numerical solutions.

  17. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic studies on molten core-concrete interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report discusses studies carried out in connection with light water power reactor accidents. Recent assessments have indicated that the consequences of molten-core concrete interactions dominate the considerations of severe accidents. The two areas of interest that have been investigated are interlayer heat and mass transfer and liquid-liquid boiling. Interlayer heat and mass transfer refers to processes that occur within a core melt between the stratified, immiscible phases of core oxides and metals. Liquid-liquid boiling refers to processes that occur at the melt-concrete on melt-coolant interface. (JDH)

  19. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M.

    2015-12-01

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O-Si-O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O-O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O-O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies.

  20. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Izvekov, Sergei Rice, Betsy M.

    2015-12-28

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O–Si–O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O–O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O–O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies.

  1. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies.

    PubMed

    Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M

    2015-12-28

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O-Si-O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O-O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O-O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies. PMID:26723691

  2. Genomic and Proteomic Studies on Plesiomonas shigelloides Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We report here the identification of waa clusters with the genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two Plesiomonas shigelloides strains. Both P. shigelloides waa clusters shared all of the genes besides the ones flanking waaL. In both strains, all of the genes were found in the waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wapG) was found in a different chromosome location outside the cluster. Since P. shigelloides and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up at least to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. shigelloides genes were elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined K. pneumoniae mutants. The function of strain-specific inner- or outer-core genes was identified by using as a surrogate acceptor LPS from three well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. Using this strategy, we were able to assign a proteomic function to all of the P. shigelloides waa genes identified in the two strains encoding six new glycosyltransferases (WapA, -B, -C, -D, -F, and -G). P. shigelloides demonstrated an important variety of core LPS structures, despite being a single species of the genus, as well as high homologous recombination in housekeeping genes. PMID:24244003

  3. Energies and wave functions for a soft-core Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Richard L.; Saad, Nasser; Sen, K. D.; Ciftci, Hakan

    2009-09-01

    For the family of model soft-core Coulomb potentials represented by V(r)=-[Z/(rq+βq)1/q] , with the parameters Z>0,β>0,q≥1 , it is shown analytically that the potentials and eigenvalues, Eνℓ , are monotonic in each parameter. The potential envelope method is applied to obtain approximate analytic estimates in terms of the known exact spectra for pure power potentials. For the case q=1 , the asymptotic iteration method is used to find exact analytic results for the eigenvalues Eνℓ and corresponding wave functions, expressed in terms of Z and β . A proof is presented establishing the general concavity of the scaled electron density near the nucleus resulting from the truncated potentials for all q . Based on an analysis of extensive numerical calculations, it is conjectured that the crossing between the pair of states [(ν,ℓ),(ν',ℓ')] is given by the conditions ν'≥(ν+1) and ℓ'≥(ℓ+3) . The significance of these results for the interaction of intense laser field with an atom is pointed out. Differences in the observed level-crossing effects between the soft-core potentials and the hydrogen atom confined inside an impenetrable sphere are discussed.

  4. Surface potential and permeability of rock cores under asphaltenic oil flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkafeef, S.F.; Gochin, R.J.; Smith, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    The surface properties, wetting behaviour and permeability of rock samples are central to understanding recovery behaviour in oil reservoirs. This paper will present a method new to petroleum engineering to show how area/length ratios for porous systems can be obtained by combining streaming potential and streaming current measurements on rock cores. This has allows streaming current measurements (independent of surface conductivity errors) to be made on rock samples using hydrocarbon solvents with increasing concentrations of asphaltene. Negative surface potentials for the rock became steadily more positive as asphaltene coated the pore surfaces, with permeability reduction agreeing well with petrographic analysis.

  5. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimassi, M. A.; Brauner, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence.

  6. Dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules improve the photostability and reduce the in vitro irritation potential of this drug.

    PubMed

    Savian, Ana L; Rodrigues, Daiane; Weber, Julia; Ribeiro, Roseane F; Motta, Mariana H; Schaffazick, Scheila R; Adams, Andréa I H; de Andrade, Diego F; Beck, Ruy C R; da Silva, Cristiane B

    2015-01-01

    Dithranol is a very effective drug for the topical treatment of psoriasis. However, it has some adverse effects such as irritation and stain in the skin that make its application and patient adherence to treatment difficult. The aims of this work were to prepare and characterize dithranol-loaded nanocapsules as well as to evaluate the photostability and the irritation potential of these nanocarriers. Lipid-core nanocapsules containing dithranol (0.5 mg/mL) were prepared by interfacial deposition of preformed polymer. EDTA (0.05%) or ascorbic acid (0.02%) was used as antioxidants. After preparation, dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules showed satisfactory characteristics: drug content close to the theoretical concentration, encapsulation efficiency of about 100%, nanometric mean size (230-250 nm), polydispersity index below 0.25, negative zeta potential, and pH values from 4.3 to 5.6. In the photodegradation study against UVA light, we observed a higher stability of the dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules comparing to the solution containing the free drug (half-life times around 4 and 1h for the dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules and free drug solution containing EDTA, respectively; half-life times around 17 and 7h for the dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules and free drug solution containing ascorbic acid, respectively). Irritation test by HET-CAM method was conducted to evaluate the safety of the formulations. From the results it was found that the nanoencapsulation of the drug decreased its toxicity compared to the effects observed for the free drug. PMID:25491961

  7. Bond Functions and Core Correlation Energy Contributions To HeBe Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabi, A. S.; Nour, E. M.; Abdel Halim, W. S.

    An empirical scheme for implementation of bond functions in heteronuclear diatomics is suggested and applied to HeBe using universal even-tempered functions. The effects of bond functions and core-correlation energy on the interaction potential of HeBe calculated at the uncorrelated (SCF) and correlated (MBPT and CC) levels are examined. The results confirm that an accuracy of sub μ Hartree level can be obtained using even-tempered functions with s-, p-, and d- symmetry and that bond functions of size {4s2p} for He and {6s3p} for Be recovers 100% of energy lowering obtained from the addition of 10d atom-centered functions to He and 13d atom centred functions to Be. The various treatments of the electron correlation, conclude that the system is interacting weakly with a well depth from 14.5-24.7 μEh at a separation near 9.1a0 compared with 20.7-25.5 μEh previously reported with a rather limited basis set. The most reliable well depth corrected for BSSE (19.0 μEh) was obtained at the CC-SD(T)level at separation of 8.71a0 taking into account the effects of bond functions and core correlation energy. Potential energy curves at the CC-SD(T) valence and CC-SD(T) valence + core correlation levels are analyzed in analytical forms in terms of exchange repulsion, induction and dispersion components.

  8. Implications of Common Core State Standards on the Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Russell, William B., III.

    2014-01-01

    Social studies teachers have often been on the outside looking in during much of the era billed as the standards-based educational reform (SBER), but with the adoption and implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), social studies teachers seem to have been invited back inside. Yet, how will the standards impact social studies…

  9. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  10. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C

    SciTech Connect

    Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

  11. Core design studies for advanced burner test reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W. S.; Kim, T. K.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. government announced in February 2006 the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) based on a fast spectrum is one of the three major technologies to be demonstrated in GNEP. In FY06, a pre-conceptual design study was performed to develop an advanced burner test reactor (ABTR) that supports development of a prototype full-scale ABR, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR were (1) to demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics (TRU) as part of an advanced fuel cycle, (2) to qualify the TRU-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR, (3) to support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Based on these objectives, core design and fuel cycle studies were performed to develop ABTR core designs, which can accommodate the expected changes of the TRU feed and the conversion ratio. Various option and trade-off studies were performed to determine the appropriate power level and conversion ratio. Both ternary metal alloy (U-TRU-10Zr) and mixed oxide (UO{sub 2}-TRUO{sub 2}) fuel forms have been considered with TRU feeds from weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) and TRU recovered from light water reactor spent fuel (LWR-SF). Reactor performances were evaluated in detail including equilibrium cycle core parameters, mass flow, power distribution, kinetic parameters, reactivity feedback coefficient, reactivity control requirements and shutdown margins, and spent fuel characteristics. Trade-off studies on power level suggested that about 250 MWt is a reasonable compromise to allow a low project cost, at the same time providing a reasonable prototypic irradiation environment for demonstrating

  12. Core Outcomes for Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Consensus Study

    PubMed Central

    Whistance, Robert N.; Forsythe, Rachael O.; Macefield, Rhiannon; Pullyblank, Anne M.; Avery, Kerry N. L.; Brookes, Sara T.; Thomas, Michael G.; Sylvester, Paul A.; Russell, Ann; Oliver, Alfred; Morton, Dion; Kennedy, Robin; Jayne, David G.; Huxtable, Richard; Hackett, Roland; Card, Mia; Brown, Julia; Blazeby, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is common, and there is a great need to improve the delivery of such care. The gold standard for evaluating surgery is within well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, the impact of RCTs is diminished by a lack of coordinated outcome measurement and reporting. A solution to these issues is to develop an agreed standard “core” set of outcomes to be measured in all trials to facilitate cross-study comparisons, meta-analysis, and minimize outcome reporting bias. This study defines a core outcome set for CRC surgery. Methods and Findings The scope of this COS includes clinical effectiveness trials of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer. Excluded were nonsurgical oncological interventions. Potential outcomes of importance to patients and professionals were identified through systematic literature reviews and patient interviews. All outcomes were transcribed verbatim and categorized into domains by two independent researchers. This informed a questionnaire survey that asked stakeholders (patients and professionals) from United Kingdom CRC centers to rate the importance of each domain. Respondents were resurveyed following group feedback (Delphi methods). Outcomes rated as less important were discarded after each survey round according to predefined criteria, and remaining outcomes were considered at three consensus meetings; two involving international professionals and a separate one with patients. A modified nominal group technique was used to gain the final consensus. Data sources identified 1,216 outcomes of CRC surgery that informed a 91 domain questionnaire. First round questionnaires were returned from 63 out of 81 (78%) centers, including 90 professionals, and 97 out of 267 (35%) patients. Second round response rates were high for all stakeholders (>80%). Analysis of responses lead to 45 and 23 outcome domains being retained

  13. The paleoclimatic and geochronologic utility of coring red beds and evaporites: a case study from the RKB core (Permian, Kansas, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Benison, Kathleen C.; Foster, Tyler M.; Zambito, Jay; Soreghan, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Drill core is critical for robust and high-resolution reconstructions of Earth's climate record, as well demonstrated from both marine successions and modern long-lived lake systems. Deep-time climate reconstructions increasingly require core-based data, but some facies, notably red beds and evaporites, have garnered less attention for both paleoclimatic and geochronologic analyses. Here, we highlight studies from the Rebecca K. Bounds (RKB) core, a nearly continuous, >1.6 km drill core extending from the Cretaceous to the Mississippian, recovered from the US Midcontinent by Amoco Production Company in 1988, and serendipitously made available for academic research. Recent research conducted on this core illustrates the potential to recover high-resolution data for geochronologic and climatic reconstructions from both the fine-grained red bed strata, which largely represent paleo-loess deposits, and associated evaporite strata. In this case, availability of core was instrumental for (1) accessing a continuous vertical section that establishes unambiguous superposition key to both magnetostratigraphic and paleoclimatic analyses, and (2) providing pristine sample material from friable, soluble, and/or lithofacies and mineralogical species otherwise poorly preserved in surface exposures. The potential for high-resolution paleoclimatic reconstruction from coring of deep-time loess strata in particular remains severely underutilized.

  14. Flexoelectric polarization studies in bent-core nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Sreenilayam, S P; Panarin, Yu P; Vij, J K; Torgova, S I; Lehmann, A; Tschierske, C

    2015-08-01

    The flexoelectric polarization (Pf) of four bent-core nematic liquid crystals (LCs) has been measured using the pyroelectric effect. Hybrid aligned nematic cells are fabricated for measuring the pyroelectric response over the entire range of the nematic phase. It is found that the magnitude of flexoelectric polarization Pf and the sum of the flexoelectric coefficients |e1+e3| for the bent-core LCs studied here are three to six times higher than for the calamitics. Pf is found to depend on the transverse dipole moment of LC molecules. However, |e1+e3| values are by no means giant as |e3| alone had been reported for a bent-core nematic system previously. The dependence of the sum of "splay and bend flexoelectric coefficients" is discussed in terms of the shape of the molecule and of the dipole moment directed normal to the molecular axis. PMID:26382418

  15. Lesson Study: The Core of Japanese Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine

    This paper describes research lessons, which form the core of a larger process called lesson study within Japanese elementary science faculty development. Research lessons are actual classroom lessons with students which are: observed by others; planned for a long time, usually collaboratively; designed to bring to life particular goals of…

  16. Mixed core conversion study with HEU and LEU fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mixed core study are presented for gradual replacement of HEU fuel with LEU fuel using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. The key parameters show that the transition can be accomplished safely and economically.

  17. Social Studies Core Curriculum in Fieldston Lower School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhmerker, Lisa, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of an elementary-level social studies core curriculum at Fieldston Lower School (in New York City) in which the moral and ethical development of students is seen as a priority. Fieldston Lower School is one of three branches of the Ethical Culture Schools. Article 1 focuses on the modification of the traditional elementary…

  18. Communication: X-ray absorption spectra and core-ionization potentials within a core-valence separated coupled cluster framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriani, Sonia; Koch, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple scheme to compute X-ray absorption spectra (e.g., near-edge absorption fine structure) and core ionisation energies within coupled cluster linear response theory. The approach exploits the so-called core-valence separation to effectively reduce the excitation space to processes involving at least one core orbital, and it can be easily implemented within any pre-existing coupled cluster code for low energy states. We further develop a perturbation correction that incorporates the effect of the excluded part of the excitation space. The correction is shown to be highly accurate. Test results are presented for a set of molecular systems for which well converged results in full space could be generated at the coupled cluster singles and doubles level of theory only, but the scheme is straightforwardly generalizable to all members of the coupled cluster hierarchy of approximations, including CC3.

  19. Cores in dwarf galaxies from dark matter with a Yukawa potential.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Abraham; Weiner, Neal

    2011-04-29

    We show that cold dark matter particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the recently observed cores in dwarf galaxies without affecting the dynamics of objects with a much larger velocity dispersion, such as clusters of galaxies. The velocity dependence of the associated cross section as well as the possible exothermic nature of the interaction alleviates earlier concerns about strongly interacting dark matter. Dark matter evaporation in low-mass objects might explain the observed deficit of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way halo and have important implications for the first galaxies and reionization. PMID:21635025

  20. A simple model for solute-solvent separation through nanopores based on core-softened potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vasconcelos, Cláudia K. B.; Batista, Ronaldo J. C.; da Rocha Régis, McGlennon; Manhabosco, Taíse M.; de Oliveira, Alan B.

    2016-07-01

    We propose an effective model for solute separation from fluids through reverse osmosis based on core-softened potentials. Such potentials have been used to investigate anomalous fluids in several situations under a great variety of approaches. Due to their simplicity, computational simulations become faster and mathematical treatments are possible. Our model aims to mimic water desalination through nano-membranes through reverse osmosis, for which we have found reasonable qualitative results when confronted against all-atoms simulations found in the literature. The purpose of this work is not to replace any fully atomistic simulation at this stage, but instead to pave the first steps towards coarse-grained models for water desalination processes. This may help to approach problems in larger scales, in size and time, and perhaps make analytical theories more viable.

  1. Towards a spectroscopically accurate set of potentials for heavy hydride laser cooling candidates: Effective core potential calculations of BaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Keith; McLaughlin, Brendan M.; Lane, Ian C.

    2016-04-01

    BaH (and its isotopomers) is an attractive molecular candidate for laser cooling to ultracold temperatures and a potential precursor for the production of ultracold gases of hydrogen and deuterium. The theoretical challenge is to simulate the laser cooling cycle as reliably as possible and this paper addresses the generation of a highly accurate ab initio 2Σ+ potential for such studies. The performance of various basis sets within the multi-reference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approximation with the Davidson correction is tested and taken to the Complete Basis Set (CBS) limit. It is shown that the calculated molecular constants using a 46 electron effective core-potential and even-tempered augmented polarized core-valence basis sets (aug-pCVnZ-PP, n = 4 and 5) but only including three active electrons in the MRCI calculation are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. The predicted dissociation energy De for the X2Σ+ state (extrapolated to the CBS limit) is 16 895.12 cm-1 (2.094 eV), which agrees within 0.1% of a revised experimental value of <16 910.6 cm-1, while the calculated re is within 0.03 pm of the experimental result.

  2. Potential application of carbon nanotube core as nanocontainer and nanoreactor for the encapsulated nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Pawan K.; Kumari, Reetu; Bhatta, Umananda M.; Juluri, Raghavendra Rao; Rath, Ashutosh; Kumar, Sanjeev; Satyam, P. V.; Gautam, Subodh K.; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-01

    Fe3C nanorod filled inside carbon nanotube has been irradiated inside transmission electron microscope at both room and high temperature. In-situ response of Fe3C nanorod as well as CNT walls has been studied. It has been found that when electron irradiation is performed at room temperature (RT), nanorod first bends and then tip makes at the end whereas at high temperature (∼490 °C) nanorod slides along the tube axis and then transforms into a faceting particle. Extrusion of solid particle filled in the core of CNT has also been demonstrated. It is suggested that these morphological changes in nanorod may have happened due to the compression which was generated either by shrinkage of tube or by local electron beam heating. Presented results demonstrate that CNT core could be used as nano-container or reactor.

  3. Taxonomic characterization and the bio-potential of bacteria isolated from glacier ice cores in the High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Roy, Utpal

    2016-03-01

    Glacier ice and firn cores have ecological and biotechnological importance. The present study is aimed at characterizing bacteria in crustal ice cores from Svalbard, the Arctic. Counts of viable isolates ranged from 10 to 7000 CFU/ml (mean 803 CFU/ml) while the total bacterial numbers ranged from 7.20 × 10(4) to 2.59 × 10(7)  cells ml(-1) (mean 3.12 × 10(6)  cells ml(-1) ). Based on 16S rDNA sequence data, the identified species belonged to seven species, namely Bacillus barbaricus, Pseudomonas orientalis, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas syncyanea, Sphingomonas dokdonensis, and Sphingomonas phyllosphaerae, with a sequence similarity ranging between 93.5 and 99.9% with taxa present in the database. The isolates exhibited unique phenotypic properties, and three isolates (MLB-2, MLB-5, and MLB-9) are novel species, yet to be described. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of cultured bacterial communities from Svalbard ice cores. We conclude that high lipase, protease, cellulase, amylase, and urease activities expressed by most of the isolates provide a clue to the potential industrial applications of these organisms. These microbes, producing cold-adapted enzymes may provide an opportunity for biotechnological research. PMID:26567474

  4. Hydrocarbon potential of lower Duperow Formation as cored in Hill and Chouteau Counties, central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, G.C.; Bereskin, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    A paleotopographic ridge existed in north-central Montana during southward transgression of Souris River (Giventian) and lower Duperow (Frasnian) seas. This ridge represented a southeasterly extension of Canadian Alberta Ridge, which served as a locus for reef development in western Alberta during the Devonian. Located on the back-reef shelf between the Cordilleran barrier reef and the intracratonic Williston basin, this ridge formed a regional high favorable to patch-reef development, much like the Alberta Ridge did for more extensive reef complexes in western Canada. Extensive coring of lower Duperow and Souris River carbonates in four wells detailed several depositional facies and demonstrated wide-spread distribution of stromatoporoidal buildups up to 20 ft in individual thickness. Faunal assemblages indicate mostly normal marine conditions and potential for patch-reef development. Equally attractive reservoir facies comprised of cross-bedded detrital dolomite bars and/or channels, leached soil horizons, and bedded anhydrite-laminated carbonate sabkha facies were encountered in cored intervals. These reservoir facies reflect lateral stratigraphic variations in otherwise regionally extensive cyclic sequences. Each regional cycle is terminated by an anhydritic phase reflecting separate pulses in the overall transgressive advance of the Devonian seas. The capping anhydrite and lateral facies variation within each cycle provide numerous opportunities for stratigraphic traps. Residual oil extracted from cored samples correlates well with Williston basin Red River-type oil. Source rock evaluation of Souris River carbonates coupled with diagenetic evidence of early oil migration into lower Duperow and Souris River reservoir facies indicate a favorable thermal history for oil preservation.

  5. The study in sub E class converter with saturating cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Usami, K.; Yamanaka, S.

    1985-09-01

    Recently, for switching power supplies it is best to be smaller in size, with electronic equipments' miniaturization by IC technology. Sub E class dc-to-dc converter with a saturating core has the properties of high efficiency, small size, light weight and high reliability. Hence, the applications of switching regulater power supply to this technique are studied by many investigators. The results of an experiment in sub E class dc-to-dc converter with magnetic amplifier is presented.

  6. A study of the structural efficiency of fluted core graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1990-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded graphite-epoxy sandwich panels with fluted cores is studied to determine their weight saving potential. Graphite-epoxy equilateral triangular elements are used to construct the fluted cores for the sandwich panels. Two panel configurations are considered. One configuration has two layers of triangular elements in the fluted core and the second configuration has only one layer of triangular elements in the core. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight design for each panel configuration. Laminate ply orientations are limited to approx. 45, 0, and 90 deg. A constraint on the axial stiffness is included in the design process so the panel will conform to typical constraints for aircraft wing structures. Minimum thickness requirements for each laminate and maximum allowable strains are also included. A comparison is made of the calculated structural efficiency of the fluted core panels to the structural efficiency of aluminum transport aircraft structures and simple blade-stiffened graphite-epoxy panels. Limited experimental results are also included for comparison with the analytical predictions and to identify the critical failure mechanisms of graphite-epoxy fluted-core sandwich panels.

  7. The absence of a dense potential core in supercritical injection: A thermal break-up mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuti, Daniel T.; Hannemann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Certain experiments in quasi-isobaric supercritical injection remain unexplained by the current state of theory: Without developing a constant value potential core as expected from the mechanical view of break-up, density is observed to drop immediately upon entering the chamber. Furthermore, this phenomenon has never been captured in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) despite having become a de facto standard case for real fluid CFD validation. In this paper, we present strong evidence for a thermal jet disintegration mechanism (in addition to classical mechanical break-up) which resolves both the theoretical and the computational discrepancies. A new interpretation of supercritical jet disintegration is introduced, based on pseudo-boiling, a nonlinear supercritical transition from gas-like to liquid-like states. We show that thermal disintegration may dominate classical mechanical break-up when heat transfer takes place in the injector and when the fluid state is sufficiently close to the pseudo-boiling point. A procedure which allows to capture subsided cores with standard CFD is provided and demonstrated.

  8. Self-assembly of core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticles and their potential as drug delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Loe, David T.; Awino, Joseph K.; Kröger, Martin; Rouge, Jessica L.; Li, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Herein a new multifunctional formulation, referred to as a core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticle, has been proposed and studied in silico via large scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. A PEGylated core with surface tethered polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains is used as the starting configuration, where the free ends of the PEG chains are covalently bonded with lipid molecules (lipid heads). A complete lipid bilayer is formed at the surface of the PEGylated particle core upon addition of free lipids, driven by the hydrophobic properties of the lipid tails, leading to the formation of a CPLS nanoparticle. The self-assembly process is found to be sensitive to the grafting density and molecular weight of the tethered PEG chains, as well as the amount of free lipids added. At low grafting densities the assembly of CPLS nanoparticles cannot be accomplished. As demonstrated by simulations, a lipid bud/vesicle can be formed on the surface when an excess amount of free lipids is added at high grafting density. Therefore, the CPLS nanoparticles can only be formed under appropriate conditions of both PEG and free lipids. The CPLS nanoparticle has been recognized to be able to store a large quantity of water molecules, particularly with high molecular weight of PEG chains, indicating its capacity for carrying hydrophilic molecules such as therapeutic biomolecules or imaging agents. Under identical size and surface chemistry conditions of a liposome, it has been observed that the CPLS particle can be more efficiently wrapped by the lipid membrane, indicating its potential for a greater efficiency in delivering its hydrophilic cargo. As a proof-of-concept, the experimental realization of CPLS nanoparticles is explicitly demonstrated in this study. To test the capacity of the CPLS to store small molecule cargo a hydrophilic dye was successfully encapsulated in the particles' water soluble layer. The results of this study show the power and

  9. Characterization of a 50-μm-core optical fiber for potential use in Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Our laboratory is currently studying the Thulium fiber laser (TFL) as a potential alternative laser lithotripter to the standard clinical Holmium:YAG laser. We have previously demonstrated efficient coupling of TFL energy into fibers as small as 100-μm-core-diameter without damage to the proximal end. Although smaller fibers have greater tendency to degrade at the distal tip during lithotripsy, fiber diameters (<= 200 μm) have been shown to increase saline irrigation rates through the working channel of a flexible ureteroscope, maximize ureteroscope deflection, and reduce stone retropulsion during laser lithotripsy. In this study, a 50-μm-core-diameter, 85-μm-outer-diameter fiber is characterized for TFL ablation of human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones, ex vivo. The stone ablation rate was measured to be 70 +/- 22 μg/s for 35-mJ-pulse-energy, 500-μs-pulse-duration, and 50-Hz-pulse-rate. The ureteroscope working channel flow rate including the 50-μm fiber decreased by only 10% with no impairment of ureteroscope deflection. The fiber delivered up to 15.4 +/- 5.9 W under extreme bending (5-mm-radius) conditions. Stone retropulsion and fiber burn-back averaged 201 +/- 336 and 3000 +/- 2600 μm, respectively, after 2 minutes. With further development, Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using ultra-small, 50-μm-core fibers may introduce new integration and miniaturization possibilities and potentially provide an alternatiμe to conventional Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy using larger fibers.

  10. Performance of Density Functional Theory and Relativistic Effective Core Potential for Ru-Based Organometallic Complexes.

    PubMed

    Paranthaman, Selvarengan; Moon, Jiwon; Kim, Joonghan; Kim, Dong Eon; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Herein a performance assessment of density functionals used for calculating the structural and energetic parameters of bi- and trimetallic Ru-containing organometallic complexes has been performed. The performance of four popular relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs) has also been assessed. On the basis of the calculated results, the MN12-SX (range-separated hybrid functional) demonstrates good performance for calculating the molecular structures, while MN12-L (local functional) performs well for calculating the energetics, including that of the Ru-Ru bond breaking process. The choice of appropriate density functional is a crucial factor for calculating the energetics. The LANL08 demonstrates the lowest performance of the RECPs for calculating the molecular structures, especially the Ru-Ru bond length. PMID:26986051

  11. Properties of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms calculated using an accurate effective core potential

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Robin; Christ, Kevin V.; Greene, Chris H.

    2004-04-01

    The first three electronically excited states in the alkaline-earth-metal atoms magnesium, calcium, and strontium comprise the (nsnp){sup 3}P{sub J}{sup o}(J=0,1,2) fine-structure manifold. All three states are metastable and are of interest for optical atomic clocks as well as for cold-collision physics. An efficient technique--based on a physically motivated potential that models the presence of the ionic core--is employed to solve the Schroedinger equation for the two-electron valence shell. In this way, radiative lifetimes, laser-induced clock shifts, and long-range interaction parameters are calculated for metastable Mg, Ca, and Sr.

  12. Efficient implementation of effective core potential integrals and gradients on graphical processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chenchen; Wang, Lee-Ping; Sachse, Torsten; Preiß, Julia; Presselt, Martin; Martínez, Todd J.

    2015-07-01

    Effective core potential integral and gradient evaluations are accelerated via implementation on graphical processing units (GPUs). Two simple formulas are proposed to estimate the upper bounds of the integrals, and these are used for screening. A sorting strategy is designed to balance the workload between GPU threads properly. Significant improvements in performance and reduced scaling with system size are observed when combining the screening and sorting methods, and the calculations are highly efficient for systems containing up to 10 000 basis functions. The GPU implementation preserves the precision of the calculation; the ground state Hartree-Fock energy achieves good accuracy for CdSe and ZnTe nanocrystals, and energy is well conserved in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. Functional splicing network reveals extensive regulatory potential of the core spliceosomal machinery.

    PubMed

    Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Tejedor, J Ramón; Vigevani, Luisa; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing relies on the poorly understood dynamic interplay between >150 protein components of the spliceosome. The steps at which splicing can be regulated remain largely unknown. We systematically analyzed the effect of knocking down the components of the splicing machinery on alternative splicing events relevant for cell proliferation and apoptosis and used this information to reconstruct a network of functional interactions. The network accurately captures known physical and functional associations and identifies new ones, revealing remarkable regulatory potential of core spliceosomal components, related to the order and duration of their recruitment during spliceosome assembly. In contrast with standard models of regulation at early steps of splice site recognition, factors involved in catalytic activation of the spliceosome display regulatory properties. The network also sheds light on the antagonism between hnRNP C and U2AF, and on targets of antitumor drugs, and can be widely used to identify mechanisms of splicing regulation. PMID:25482510

  14. Segmented contracted basis sets for one- and two-component Dirac-Fock effective core potentials.

    PubMed

    Weigend, Florian; Baldes, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Segmented contracted basis sets for 4d, 5d, 5s, and 6s elements of split (double zeta) valence to quadruple zeta valence quality optimized for Dirac-Fock effective core potentials (ECPs) are presented. They were obtained from previous bases optimized for Wood-Boring ECPs by comparably small modifications and reoptimizations. Additionally extensions for two-component self-consistent-field treatments accounting for spin-orbit (SO) coupling were designed and optimized. Reliability for chemical applications was assessed by comparing results to those obtained with a very large (19s16p17d7f6g) reference basis for a set of more than 80 representatively chosen 5s-5d compounds. Moreover, the effect of different types of ECPs and that of the SO-coupling at the basis set limit of density functional theory is documented for the above set of molecules extended by 40 5p-6p compounds. PMID:21054001

  15. Efficient implementation of effective core potential integrals and gradients on graphical processing units.

    PubMed

    Song, Chenchen; Wang, Lee-Ping; Sachse, Torsten; Preiss, Julia; Presselt, Martin; Martínez, Todd J

    2015-07-01

    Effective core potential integral and gradient evaluations are accelerated via implementation on graphical processing units (GPUs). Two simple formulas are proposed to estimate the upper bounds of the integrals, and these are used for screening. A sorting strategy is designed to balance the workload between GPU threads properly. Significant improvements in performance and reduced scaling with system size are observed when combining the screening and sorting methods, and the calculations are highly efficient for systems containing up to 10 000 basis functions. The GPU implementation preserves the precision of the calculation; the ground state Hartree-Fock energy achieves good accuracy for CdSe and ZnTe nanocrystals, and energy is well conserved in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26156472

  16. Potential core species and satellite species in the bacterial community within the rabbit caecum

    PubMed Central

    Monteils, Valérie; Cauquil, Laurent; Combes, Sylvie; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Gidenne, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    A bacteria library was constructed from the caecum of a rabbit maintained under standard conditions. The complete gene 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. The 228 clones obtained were distributed in 70 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The large majority of the OTUs were composed of one or two clones and seven OTUs contained half of the sequences. Fourteen sequences had high similarity to the sequence already registered in databases (threshold of 97%). Only one of these sequences has been identified as Variovorax sp. (99% identity). Units were distributed mainly (94%) in the Firmicutes phylum. Three sequences were related to Bacteroidetes. Nine clusters were defined in the phylogenic tree. A great diversity of caecal bacteria of the rabbit was shown. Half of the sequences generated in this library were distributed in the phylogenetic tree near the sequences characterized previously in rabbit caecum (potential core species), and the other half of the sequences were well separated (satellite species). PMID:19049656

  17. Structural and spectral studies of sunspots. [umbral core modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyller, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of umbral cores, both by multicolor photometry and by narrow band photometry in the vicinity of the sodium D lines, are described, and evidence is given which supports the validity of many umbral models, each of which describes different aspects of the observed umbral cores. Theoretical studies carried on at the observatory include the following: (1) Zeeman profiles of the sodium D sub 2 line and other lines; (2) turbulent heat conduction, sound waves, and the missing flux in sunspots; (3) chromospheric heating above spots by Alfven waves; (4) magnetic convection in the sun and solar neutrinos; (5) models of starspots on flare stars; (5) starspots on the primaries of contact binary systems; and (6) implications of starspots on red dwarfs.

  18. Neutrino oscillation studies with IceCube-DeepCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.

    2016-07-01

    IceCube, a gigaton-scale neutrino detector located at the South Pole, was primarily designed to search for astrophysical neutrinos with energies of PeV and higher. This goal has been achieved with the detection of the highest energy neutrinos to date. At the other end of the energy spectrum, the DeepCore extension lowers the energy threshold of the detector to approximately 10 GeV and opens the door for oscillation studies using atmospheric neutrinos. An analysis of the disappearance of these neutrinos has been completed, with the results produced being complementary with dedicated oscillation experiments. Following a review of the detector principle and performance, the method used to make these calculations, as well as the results, is detailed. Finally, the future prospects of IceCube-DeepCore and the next generation of neutrino experiments at the South Pole (IceCube-Gen2, specifically the PINGU sub-detector) are briefly discussed.

  19. Comparative study of the physical properties of core materials.

    PubMed

    Saygili, Gülbin; Mahmali, Sevil M

    2002-08-01

    This study was undertaken to measure physical properties of materials used for direct core buildups, including high-copper amalgam, visible light-cured resin composite, autocured titanium-containing composite, polyacid-modified composite, resin-modified glass-ionomer, and silver cermet cement. Compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength of six core materials of various material classes were measured for each material as a function of time up to 3 months at different storage conditions, using a standard specification test designed for the materials. Three different storage conditions (dry, humid, wet) at 37 degrees C were chosen. Materials were manipulated according to manufacturers' instructions for use as cores. Mean compressive, diametral tensile, and flexural strengths with associated standard deviations were calculated for each material. Multiple comparison and Newman-Keuls tests discerned many differences among materials. All materials were found to meet the minimum specification requirements, except in terms of flexural strength for amalgam after 1 hour and the silver cermet at all time intervals. PMID:12212682

  20. Multi-Core Processor Memory Contention Benchmark Analysis Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Tyler; McGalliard, James

    2009-01-01

    Multi-core processors dominate current mainframe, server, and high performance computing (HPC) systems. This paper provides synthetic kernel and natural benchmark results from an HPC system at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that illustrate the performance impacts of multi-core (dual- and quad-core) vs. single core processor systems. Analysis of processor design, application source code, and synthetic and natural test results all indicate that multi-core processors can suffer from significant memory subsystem contention compared to similar single-core processors.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of Synechococcus sp PCC 7002 phycobilisome core mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Gindt, Y.M.

    1993-04-01

    The role of the L{sub cm} (I), {beta}{sup 18} (II), and {alpha}{sup AP-B} (III) chromoproteins in the phycobilisome (PBS) core was investigated using genetically engineered strains of Synechococcus missing different polypeptides. Intact cells, isolated PBS, and subcore preparations for each mutant were studied to determine the effect of that mutation on energy transfer within the PBS core and to the reaction centers. Three mutants lacked the II and/or III polypeptides, while the I chromophore was altered in others. A lower energy absorbing chromophore, A{sub max} = 695 nm, was substituted for the I chromophore. The deletion of the II and III subunits had no discernible effect on energy transfer from the PBS to PSII. In cells and isolated PBS, the altered I chromophore acts to quench the PBS complex and to redirect the energy which would be transferred to PSII. In the PBS and subcore preparations, deletion of the III subunit did not alter energy transfer within the core. The deletion of the II subunit from the PBS caused a small decrease in the excited state lifetimes of the final emitters indicating more disorder within the core. The I chromophore was found to absorb at 670nm and to emit at 683nm within the intact PBS. The II chromophore emits at 679nm while the III chromophore emits at 682nm. A strong interaction exists between the I chromophore and the II subunit. Upon deletion of the II subunit from the PBS core, the I chromophore emits at a higher energy. The II subunit could act to stabilize the I chromophore-binding pocket, or exciton coupling could be occurring between the two. The role of the III chromophore is still unclear at this time. The III chromophore does contribute to the RT emission of the isolated PBS, but it transfers energy to I at 77 K. One can conclude that the III subunit is adjacent to the trimer containing the I polypeptide.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of Synechococcus sp PCC 7002 phycobilisome core mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Gindt, Y.M.

    1993-04-01

    The role of the L[sub cm] (I), [beta][sup 18] (II), and [alpha][sup AP-B] (III) chromoproteins in the phycobilisome (PBS) core was investigated using genetically engineered strains of Synechococcus missing different polypeptides. Intact cells, isolated PBS, and subcore preparations for each mutant were studied to determine the effect of that mutation on energy transfer within the PBS core and to the reaction centers. Three mutants lacked the II and/or III polypeptides, while the I chromophore was altered in others. A lower energy absorbing chromophore, A[sub max] = 695 nm, was substituted for the I chromophore. The deletion of the II and III subunits had no discernible effect on energy transfer from the PBS to PSII. In cells and isolated PBS, the altered I chromophore acts to quench the PBS complex and to redirect the energy which would be transferred to PSII. In the PBS and subcore preparations, deletion of the III subunit did not alter energy transfer within the core. The deletion of the II subunit from the PBS caused a small decrease in the excited state lifetimes of the final emitters indicating more disorder within the core. The I chromophore was found to absorb at 670nm and to emit at 683nm within the intact PBS. The II chromophore emits at 679nm while the III chromophore emits at 682nm. A strong interaction exists between the I chromophore and the II subunit. Upon deletion of the II subunit from the PBS core, the I chromophore emits at a higher energy. The II subunit could act to stabilize the I chromophore-binding pocket, or exciton coupling could be occurring between the two. The role of the III chromophore is still unclear at this time. The III chromophore does contribute to the RT emission of the isolated PBS, but it transfers energy to I at 77 K. One can conclude that the III subunit is adjacent to the trimer containing the I polypeptide.

  3. Isotope Fractionation Studies in Prestellar Cores: The Case of Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - N and N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments. Charnley and Rodgers showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles (HCN and HNC) was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: L1521E, L1498, L1544, and L1521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards LI544 were obtained with N2H+ and NIH3, yielding ratios of 446 and >700, respectively. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  4. Nondestructive X-Ray Computed Tomography Analysis of Sediment Cores: A Case Study from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oti, E.; Polyak, L. V.; Cook, A.; Dipre, G.

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of marine sediment records can help elucidate recent changes in the Arctic Ocean circulation and sea ice conditions. We examine sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean, representing Late to Early Quaternary age (potentially up to 1 Ma). Previous studies of Arctic sediment cores indicate that interglacial/interstadial periods with relatively high sea levels and reduced ice cover are characterized by vigorous bioturbation, while glacial intervals have little to no bioturbation. Traditional methods for studying bioturbation require physical dissection of the cores, effectively destroying them. To treat this limitation, we evaluate archival sections of the cores using an X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) scanner, which noninvasively images the sediment cores in three dimensions. The scanner produces density sensitive images suitable for quantitative analysis and for identification of bioturbation based on size, shape, and orientation. We use image processing software to isolate burrows from surrounding sediment, reconstruct them three-dimensionally, and then calculate their surface areas, volumes, and densities. Preliminary analysis of a core extending to the early Quaternary shows that bioturbation ranges from 0 to approximately 20% of the core's volume. In future research, we will quantitatively define the relationship between bioturbation activity and glacial regimes. XCT examination of bioturbation and other sedimentary features has the potential to shed light on paleoceanographic conditions such as sedimentation patterns and food flux. XCT is an alternative, underexplored investigation method that bears implications not only for illustrating paleoclimate variations but also for preserving cores for future, more advanced technologies.

  5. On the use of effective core potentials in the calculation of magnetic properties, such as magnetizabilites and magnetic shieldings.

    PubMed

    van Wüllen, Christoph

    2012-03-21

    State-of-the art effective core potentials (ECPs) that replace electrons of inner atomic cores involve non-local potentials. If such an effective core potential is added to the Hamiltonian of a system in a magnetic field, the resulting Hamiltonian is not gauge invariant. This means, magnetic properties such as magnetisabilities and magnetic shieldings (or magnetic susceptibilities and nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts) calculated with different gauge origins are different even for exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation. It is possible to restore gauge invariance of the Hamiltonian by adding magnetic field dependent terms arising from the effective core potential. Numerical calculations on atomic and diatomic model systems (potassium mono-cation and potassium dimer) clearly demonstrate that the standard effective core potential Hamiltonian violates gauge invariance, and this affects the calculation of magnetisabilities more strongly than the calculation of magnetic shieldings. The modified magnetic field dependent effective core potential Hamiltonian is gauge invariant, and therefore it is the correct starting point for distributed gauge origin methods. The formalism for gauge including atomic orbitals (GIAO) and individual gauge for localized orbitals methods is worked out. ECP GIAO results for the potassium dimer are presented. The new method performs much better than a previous ECP GIAO implementation that did not account for the non-locality of the potential. For magnetic shieldings, deviations are clearly seen, but they amount to few ppm only. For magnetisabilities, our new ECP GIAO implementation is a major improvement, as demonstrated by the comparison of all-electron and ECP results. PMID:22443751

  6. Experimental Study of the Compression Response of Fluted-Core Composite Panels with Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Guzman, J. Carlos; McCarville, Douglas; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Fluted-core sandwich composites consist of integral angled web members spaced between laminate face sheets, and may have the potential to provide benefits over traditional sandwich composites for certain aerospace applications. However, fabrication of large autoclave-cured fluted-core cylindrical shells with existing autoclaves will require that the shells be fabricated in segments, and joined longitudinally to form a complete barrel. Two different longitudinal fluted-core joint designs were considered experimentally in this study. In particular, jointed fluted-core-composite panels were tested in longitudinal compression because longitudinal compression is the primary loading condition in dry launch-vehicle barrel sections. One of the joint designs performed well in comparison with unjointed test articles, and the other joint design failed at loads approximately 14% lower than unjointed test articles. The compression-after-impact (CAI) performance of jointed fluted-core composites was also investigated by testing test articles that had been subjected to 6 ft-lb impacts. It was found that such impacts reduced the load-carrying capability by 9% to 40%. This reduction is dependent on the joint concept, component flute size, and facesheet thickness.

  7. Preliminary design study of advanced multistage axial flow core compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.; Koch, C. C.; Smith, L. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to identify an advanced core compressor for use in new high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines to be introduced into commercial service in the 1980's. An evaluation of anticipated compressor and related component 1985 state-of-the-art technology was conducted. A parametric screening study covering a large number of compressor designs was conducted to determine the influence of the major compressor design features on efficiency, weight, cost, blade life, aircraft direct operating cost, and fuel usage. The trends observed in the parametric screening study were used to develop three high-efficiency, high-economic-payoff compressor designs. These three compressors were studied in greater detail to better evaluate their aerodynamic and mechanical feasibility.

  8. Doppler Scanning of Sediment Cores: A Useful Method for Studying Sedimentary Structures and Defining the Cutting Angle for Half Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namik; Biltekin, Demet; Eris, Kadir; Albut, Gulum; Ogretmen, Nazik; Arslan, Tugce; Sari, Erol

    2014-05-01

    We tested the doppler ultrasound scanning of sediment cores in PVC liners using 8 megahertz ultrasonic waves for detection of angular laminations. The method was tested with artificially prepared cores as well as marine and lake sediment cores, and proven to be a useful and fast technique for imaging and determining the vertical angularity of sedimentary structures, such as laminations and beddings. Random cutting axes provide two angularities on X and Y dimensions. In this study, the main scientific problem is 'sequential angular disconformity'. Importance of detection of these anomalies on whole cores before dividing into half cores based on determining the right cutting axes. Successful imaging was obtained from top three centimeter depth of the sediments below the PVC liner, using a linear Doppler probe. Other Doppler probes (e.g., convex probe) did not work for core scanning because of their wave-form and reflection characteristics. Longitudinal and rotational scanning with gap filler and ultrasonic wave conductive gel material for keeping energy range of wave is necessary for detecting the variation in the dip of the bedding and laminae in the cores before separation. Another angular reasoned problem is about horizontal surface and can be easily solved with adjustable position of sensor or ray source placement. Border of sampling points between two different lithology must be stay with regard to neighbour sediment angles. Vertical angularity correction is not easy and its effect on signal propagation, detection biases and effectible to mixed samples contamination during physical sampling (particle size analyzing). Determining the attitude of angled bedding before core splitting is important for further core analyses such as elemental analysis and digital X-ray radiography. After Doppler scanning, the splitting direction (i.e., vertical to bedding and lamination) can be determined. The method is cheap, quick and non- hazardous to health, unlike the x

  9. A potential pollen proxy for ENSO derived from the Sajama ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kam-Biu; Reese, Carl A.; Thompson, Lonnie G.

    2007-05-01

    An annually resolved pollen record spanning a 39-year period (1958-1996) from the Sajama Ice Cap, located on the western Bolivian Altiplano, reveals significant interannual variations in both pollen concentration and composition. The pollen assemblages within the annual layers are dominated by typical Altiplano taxa, especially Poaceae and Asteraceae. On an annual basis the pollen concentrations are strongly negatively correlated (Pearson's r = -0.716) with the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). Studies from Sajama and other tropical ice caps have shown that during El Niño years, the weather on the Altiplano is decidedly warmer and drier, which enhances ablation on tropical ice caps through increased sublimation. This process results in the concentration of pollen within an annual layer, and thus provides a mechanism to reconstruct past El Niño events, so long as annual resolution is obtainable within the ice core.

  10. Experimental study of the Biot coefficient of Bakken cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed a series of exhaustive experiments to measure the Biot coefficient (α) of the tight cores from the Bakken shale oil play. Five distinct, bedding-normal cores from a vertical well were tested, covering the sequences of Three Forks, Lower, Middle, and Upper Bakken, and Lodgepole. The scope of this laboratory study is two-fold: (1) to obtain realistic Biot coefficient for modeling reservoir stress changes due to depletion and injection; (2) to characterize the poromechanical properties in relation to rock's mineral composition and microstructure. The experiments were carried out as follows: Argon-saturated specimen (1-inch length, 1-inch diameter) was subjected to hydrostatic confining pressure under drained conditions. Pore pressure was regulated as Argon was injected into both ends of the specimen. We drilled multiple non-through-going boreholes (1-mm diameter) in the specimen to facilitate pressure equilibrium, without compromising its integrity. The specimen was put through a loading path to experience confining pressure and pore pressure up to 70 and 60 MPa, respectively. Axial and lateral strains were recorded and used to calculate the rock's bulk stiffness, and subsequently the static Biot coefficient, which is related to reservoir deformation and associated stress changes. Results of all five cores unanimously show that α is less than unity and is a function of both confining and pore pressure. α generally varies between 0.3 and 0.9 for the pressure levels we applied. This implies that models of reservoir deformation and its stress change using Terzaghi's simple effective stress law (α = 1) or a constant α less than 1 may be erroneous. Typically, α rises significantly with pore pressure, but declines with confining pressure to the degree that is dependent on rock's bulk stiffness. We found the stiffness of these rocks does not correlate well with the content of compliant components (e.g., clay and kerogen), and the drastic difference in

  11. Self-assembly of core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticles and their potential as drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Loe, David T; Awino, Joseph K; Kröger, Martin; Rouge, Jessica L; Li, Ying

    2016-08-21

    Herein a new multifunctional formulation, referred to as a core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticle, has been proposed and studied in silico via large scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. A PEGylated core with surface tethered polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains is used as the starting configuration, where the free ends of the PEG chains are covalently bonded with lipid molecules (lipid heads). A complete lipid bilayer is formed at the surface of the PEGylated particle core upon addition of free lipids, driven by the hydrophobic properties of the lipid tails, leading to the formation of a CPLS nanoparticle. The self-assembly process is found to be sensitive to the grafting density and molecular weight of the tethered PEG chains, as well as the amount of free lipids added. At low grafting densities the assembly of CPLS nanoparticles cannot be accomplished. As demonstrated by simulations, a lipid bud/vesicle can be formed on the surface when an excess amount of free lipids is added at high grafting density. Therefore, the CPLS nanoparticles can only be formed under appropriate conditions of both PEG and free lipids. The CPLS nanoparticle has been recognized to be able to store a large quantity of water molecules, particularly with high molecular weight of PEG chains, indicating its capacity for carrying hydrophilic molecules such as therapeutic biomolecules or imaging agents. Under identical size and surface chemistry conditions of a liposome, it has been observed that the CPLS particle can be more efficiently wrapped by the lipid membrane, indicating its potential for a greater efficiency in delivering its hydrophilic cargo. As a proof-of-concept, the experimental realization of CPLS nanoparticles is explicitly demonstrated in this study. To test the capacity of the CPLS to store small molecule cargo a hydrophilic dye was successfully encapsulated in the particles' water soluble layer. The results of this study show the power and

  12. Reliability, construct validity and measurement potential of the ICF comprehensive core set for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the reliability and construct validity of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Comprehensive Core Set for osteoarthritis (OA) in order to test its possible use as a measuring tool for functioning. Methods 100 patients with OA (84 F, 16 M; mean age 63 yr) completed forms including demographic and clinical information besides the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36®) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis (WOMAC). The ICF Comprehensive Core Set for OA was filled by health professionals. The internal construct validities of "Body Functions-Body structures" (BF-BS), "Activity" (A), "Participation" (P) and "Environmental Factors" (EF) domains were tested by Rasch analysis and reliability by internal consistency and person separation index (PSI). External construct validity was evaluated by correlating the Rasch transformed scores with SF-36 and WOMAC. Results In each scale, some items showing disordered thresholds were rescored, testlets were created to overcome the problem of local dependency and items that did not fit to the Rasch model were deleted. The internal construct validity of the four scales (BF-BS 16 items, A 8 items, P 7 items, EF 13 items) were good [mean item fit (SD) 0.138 (0.921), 0.216 (1.237), 0.759 (0.986) and -0.079 (2.200); person item fit (SD) -0.147 (0.652), -0.241 (0.894), -0.310 (1.187) and -0.491 (1.173) respectively], indicating a single underlying construct for each scale. The scales were free of differential item functioning (DIF) for age, gender, years of education and duration of disease. Reliabilities of the BF-BS, A, P, and EF scales were good with Cronbach's alphas of 0.79, 0.86, 0.88, and 0.83 and PSI's of 0.76, 0.86, 0.87, and 0.71, respectively. Rasch scores of BF-BS, A, and P showed moderate correlations with SF-36 and WOMAC scores where the EF had significant but weak correlations only with SF36-Social

  13. Study on Spatial Cultural Heritage Integrated into the Core Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, W. H.; Lai, Y. P.

    2015-08-01

    These Many countries have put a lot of efforts, promoting education of cultural heritage, to raise the conservation awareness and increase people's participation. However, the development of Taiwan's higher education about cultural heritage has not shown a significant growth, so it didn't train talents with enough cultural heritage awareness. In the workplace, these professionals will inevitably lack of comprehensions and the appropriate professional assessments for cultural heritage. Hence, the main objective of this paper is to study and combine these concepts into the core curriculum of Department of Construction and Spatial Design at Tungnan University. It takes the local "Shenkeng historic cultural district" as a case study, and will gradually develop an proper interdisciplinary course in order to help local residents implement projects of conserving cultural heritage. This plan not only can increase schools' engagements toward communities, with an ability of social civilization, but also it can encourage the conservation and maintenance of cultural heritages.

  14. XNBR-grafted halloysite nanotube core-shell as a potential compatibilizer for immiscible polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paran, S. M. R.; Naderi, G.; Ghoreishy, M. H. R.

    2016-09-01

    Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) grafted with carboxylated nitrile byutadiene rubber (XNBR) were synthesized via a sol-gel method. The HNTs as an inorganic cores were pre-treated with 3-Glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane, then successfully coated with the XNBR as an organic shell. The properties of XNBR-grafted HNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results suggested that the XNBR grafted to the surfaces of HNTs successfully. Then the TPE nanocomposites based on polyamide-6 (PA6) and nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) containing various XNBR-grafted and pristine HNTs were prepared via a direct melt mixing method. The morphology, mechanical, dynamic mechanical and rheological properties of the prepared TPE nanocomposites were investigated. The results show that the XNBR-grafted HNTs can effectively improve the morphology and mechanical properties of the PA6/NBR TPEs. The morphology study of the prepared nanocomposites show that the effect of XNBR-grafted HNTs on the size reduction of NBR phase is markedly more effective than the pristine HNTs and rose by 50% in the same concentrations. Mechanical measurements show that the Young's modulus of the TPE nanocomposites rose by 60% in just 7 wt% of XNBR-grafted HNT loading. The results indicate that the introduction of HNT/XNBR core-shells into the PA6/NBR TPEs can enhances the interfacial interactions and provides a more fine rubber phase morphology and controlled mechanical properties in comparison with the accordingly TPE nanocomposites containing pristine HNTs.

  15. Direct potential and temperature effects on the MgHe line-core and far-wing photoabsorption profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reggami, L.; Bouledroua, M.

    2011-03-15

    The present study deals with the collisional broadening of monatomic magnesium, evolving in a helium buffer gas, in the wavelength and temperature ranges 260-310 nm and 100-3000 K, respectively. The computed emission and absorption spectral profiles are based on the most recent potential-energy curves and transition dipole moments. The required interatomic Mg(3s{sup 2})+He(1s{sup 2}) and Mg(3s3p)+He(1s{sup 2}) potentials are constructed from two different sets. The purpose of this treatment is twofold. First, using the quantum-mechanical Baranger impact approximation, the width and shift of the line-core spectra are determined and their variation law with temperature is examined. Then, the satellite structures in the blue and red wings are analyzed quantum mechanically. The calculations show especially that the free-free transitions contribute most to the MgHe photoabsorption spectra and that a satellite structure is observable beyond the temperature 1800 K around the wavelengths 272 or 276 nm, depending on the used potential set. Weak satellites have also been investigated and, for all cases, the obtained results showed good agreement with those already published.

  16. N Reactor core heatup sensitivity study for the 32-inch unit cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Zimmerman, B.; Heard, F.

    1988-02-01

    A number of N Reactor core heatup studies have been performed using the TRUMP-BD computer code. These studies were performed to address questions concerning the dependency of results on potential variations in the material properties and/or modeling assumptions. This report described and documents a series of 31 TRUMP-BD runs that were performed to determine the sensitivity of calculated inner-fuel temperatures to a variety of TRUMP input parameters and also to a change in the node density in a high-temperature-gradient region. The results of this study are based on the 32-in. model. 18 refs., 17 figs., 2 tab.

  17. Geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton salt dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Dennis P.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hofer, John H.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only

  18. Geochemical studies of backfill aggregates, lake sediment cores and the Hueco Bolson Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapalia, Anita

    This dissertation comprises of three different researches that focuses on the application of geochemistry from aggregates, lake sediment cores and Hueco Bolson Aquifer. Each study is independent and presented in the publication format. The first chapter is already published and the second chapter is in revision phase. Overall, three studies measure the large scale (field) as well as bench scale (lab) water-rock interactions influenced by the climatic and anthropogenic factors spans from the field of environmental geology to civil engineering. The first chapter of this dissertation addresses the chemical evaluation of coarse aggregates from six different quarries in Texas. The goal of this work is to find out the best geochemical methods for assessing the corrosion potential of coarse aggregates prior to their use in mechanically stabilized earth walls. Electrochemical parameters help to define the corrosion potential of aggregates following two different leaching protocols. Testing the coarse and fine aggregates demonstrate the chemical difference due to size-related kinetic leaching effects. Field fines also show different chemistry than the bulk rock indicating the weathering impact on carbonate rocks. The second chapter investigates zinc (Zn) isotopic signatures from eight lake sediment cores collected both from pristine lakes and those impacted by urban anthropogenic contamination. Zinc from the natural weathering of rocks and anthropogenic atmospheric pollutants are transported to these lakes and the signatures are recorded in the sediments. Isotopic analysis of core samples provides the signature of anthropogenic contamination sources. Dated sediment core and isotopic analysis can identify Zn inputs that are correlated to the landuse and population change of the watersheds. Comparison of isotopic data from both pristine and urban lake sediment core also serves as an analog in other lake sediment cores in the world. The third chapter studies on Hueco Bolson

  19. Pathologic evaluation of a new endoscopic ultrasound needle designed to obtain core tissue samples: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Douglas G.; Witt, Benjamin; Chadwick, Barbara; Wells, Jason; Taylor, Linda Jo; Dimaio, Christopher; Schmidt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Standard endoscopic ultrasound-fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) needles are in widespread use. Meaningful differences between the available needles have been difficult to identify. Recently, a new EUS needle (Shark Core®, Covidien, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland), has been introduced in an attempt to improve diagnostic accuracy, tissue yield, and to potentially obtain a core tissue sample. We performed a pilot study prospectively to evaluate this new needle when compared to a standard EUS-FNA needle. Materials and Methods: Analysis of the first 15 patients undergoing EUS-FNA with the Shark Core needle was performed and it was compared to EUS-FNA in 15 patients who underwent EUS-FNA with a standard needle. Results: The Shark Core needle required fewer needle passes to obtain diagnostic adequacy than the standard needle [(χ2(1) = 11.3, P < 0.001]. The Shark Core needle required 1.5 passes to reach adequacy, whereas the standard needle required three passes. For cases with cell blocks, the Shark Core needle produced diagnostic material in 85% of cases [95% confidence interval (CI): 54–98], whereas the standard needle produced diagnostic material in 38% of the cases (95% CI: 9-76). The Shark Core needle produced actual tissue cores 82% of the time (95% CI: 48–98) and the standard needle produced no tissue cores (95% CI: 0-71) (P = 0.03). Conclusion: This pilot study found that the Shark Core needle had a high rate of producing adequate cytologic material for the diagnosis of pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions sampled by EUS with fewer passes required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and with a high rate of tissue cores being obtained when compared to a standard FNA needle.

  20. Self-assembly of core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticles and their potential as drug delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Loe, David T.; Awino, Joseph K.; Kröger, Martin; Rouge, Jessica L.; Li, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Herein a new multifunctional formulation, referred to as a core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticle, has been proposed and studied in silico via large scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. A PEGylated core with surface tethered polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains is used as the starting configuration, where the free ends of the PEG chains are covalently bonded with lipid molecules (lipid heads). A complete lipid bilayer is formed at the surface of the PEGylated particle core upon addition of free lipids, driven by the hydrophobic properties of the lipid tails, leading to the formation of a CPLS nanoparticle. The self-assembly process is found to be sensitive to the grafting density and molecular weight of the tethered PEG chains, as well as the amount of free lipids added. At low grafting densities the assembly of CPLS nanoparticles cannot be accomplished. As demonstrated by simulations, a lipid bud/vesicle can be formed on the surface when an excess amount of free lipids is added at high grafting density. Therefore, the CPLS nanoparticles can only be formed under appropriate conditions of both PEG and free lipids. The CPLS nanoparticle has been recognized to be able to store a large quantity of water molecules, particularly with high molecular weight of PEG chains, indicating its capacity for carrying hydrophilic molecules such as therapeutic biomolecules or imaging agents. Under identical size and surface chemistry conditions of a liposome, it has been observed that the CPLS particle can be more efficiently wrapped by the lipid membrane, indicating its potential for a greater efficiency in delivering its hydrophilic cargo. As a proof-of-concept, the experimental realization of CPLS nanoparticles is explicitly demonstrated in this study. To test the capacity of the CPLS to store small molecule cargo a hydrophilic dye was successfully encapsulated in the particles' water soluble layer. The results of this study show the power and

  1. Core Proteomic Analysis of Unique Metabolic Pathways of Salmonella enterica for the Identification of Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections caused by Salmonella enterica, a Gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, are major threats to the health of humans and animals. The recent availability of complete genome data of pathogenic strains of the S. enterica gives new avenues for the identification of drug targets and drug candidates. We have used the genomic and metabolic pathway data to identify pathways and proteins essential to the pathogen and absent from the host. Methods We took the whole proteome sequence data of 42 strains of S. enterica and Homo sapiens along with KEGG-annotated metabolic pathway data, clustered proteins sequences using CD-HIT, identified essential genes using DEG database and discarded S. enterica homologs of human proteins in unique metabolic pathways (UMPs) and characterized hypothetical proteins with SVM-prot and InterProScan. Through this core proteomic analysis we have identified enzymes essential to the pathogen. Results The identification of 73 enzymes common in 42 strains of S. enterica is the real strength of the current study. We proposed all 73 unexplored enzymes as potential drug targets against the infections caused by the S. enterica. The study is comprehensive around S. enterica and simultaneously considered every possible pathogenic strain of S. enterica. This comprehensiveness turned the current study significant since, to the best of our knowledge it is the first subtractive core proteomic analysis of the unique metabolic pathways applied to any pathogen for the identification of drug targets. We applied extensive computational methods to shortlist few potential drug targets considering the druggability criteria e.g. Non-homologous to the human host, essential to the pathogen and playing significant role in essential metabolic pathways of the pathogen (i.e. S. enterica). In the current study, the subtractive proteomics through a novel approach was applied i.e. by considering only proteins

  2. Solutions for the electric potential and field distribution in cylindrical core-shell nanoparticles using the image charge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshfar, Nader; Moradbeigi, Nasrin

    2015-12-01

    This article considers the problem of finding the electrostatic potential that is given in terms of a scalar function called Green function in dielectric cylindrical nanoparticles with core-shell structure using the image charge method. By using this method that allows us to solve differential form of electric potential problem by the Green function, we investigate the distribution of the electric field in the configuration of a cylindrical nanoparticle surrounded by a continuum dielectric medium. By utilizing this well-known method, we obtain exact analytical formulas for the electrostatic potential and the electric field inside the shell, core and surrounding space of nanoparticle that can be applied to analysis of electromagnetic problems, electrostatic interactions in biomolecular simulations and also computer simulations of condensed-matter media.

  3. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Experiences Implementing Common Core State Literacy Standards: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Krista Faith Huskey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the experiences of secondary social studies teachers who implemented Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in history/social studies, science and technical subjects in social studies courses requiring End of Course Tests at secondary schools in one suburban…

  4. Core competencies for health professionals' training in pediatric behavioral sleep care: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Katelynn E; Coulombe, J Aimée; Corkum, Penny

    2015-01-01

    The need to train non-sleep-specialist health professionals in evidence-based pediatric behavioral sleep care is well established. The objective of the present study was to develop a list of core competencies for training health professionals in assisting families of 1- to 10-year old children with behavioral insomnia of childhood. A modified Delphi methodology was employed, involving iterative rounds of surveys that were administered to 46 experts to obtain consensus on a core competency list. The final list captured areas relevant to the identification and treatment of pediatric behavioral sleep problems. This work has the potential to contribute to the development of training materials to prepare non-sleep-specialist health professionals to identify and treat pediatric behavioral sleep problems, ideally within stepped-care frameworks. PMID:24628091

  5. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  6. From the Common Core to the Classroom: A Professional Development Efficacy Study for the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimbey, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    In this mixed-methods study, I examined the relationship between professional development based on the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and teacher knowledge, classroom practice, and student learning. Participants were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The 50-hour professional development treatment was administered…

  7. Cadmium Telluride, Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide Core/Shell, and Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide/Zinc Sulfide Core/Shell/Shell Quantum Dots Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yueran

    CdTe, CdTe/CdS core/shell, and CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs) are potential candidates for bio-imaging and solar cell applications because of some special physical properties in these nano materials. For example, the band gap energy of the bulk CdTe is about 1.5 eV, so that principally they can emit 790 nm light, which is in the near-infrared range (also called biological window). Moreover, theoretically hot exciton generated by QDs is possible to be caught since the exciton relaxation process in QDs is slower than in bulk materials due to the large intraband energy gap in QDs. In this dissertation, we have synthesized the CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs, characterized their structure, and analyzed their photophysical properties. We used organometallic methods to synthesize the CdTe QDs in a noncoordinating solvent. To avoid being quenched by air, ligands, solvent, or other compounds, CdS shell was successfully deposited on the CdTe QDs by different methods, including the slow injection method, the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, and thermal-cycling coupled single precursor method (TC-SP). Our final product, quasi-type- II CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were able to emit at 770 nm with a fluorescence quantum yield as high as 70%. We also tried to deposit a second shell ZnS on CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs since some compounds can quench CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs. Even though different methods were used to deposit ZnS shell on the CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs, CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs still can be quenched. Furthermore, the CdTe/CdS core/shell and CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs were transferred into aqueous phase, phosphate buffered saline or deionized water, by switching the hydrophilic ligands (thiol or PEG ligands). The thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs can be kept in aqueous phase with high fluorescence quantum yield (60%--70%) for more than two months. However, some other compounds in organic or

  8. Record of PCB congeners, sorbents and potential toxicity in core samples in Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2011-10-01

    Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal (IHSC) is an active navigational system that serves a heavily industrial area of southern Lake Michigan. We have determined the amount of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), congener distributions, sorbent types and potential for dioxin-like PCB toxicity from two IHSC sediment cores. Vertical distributions of ΣPCBs (sum of 161 individual or coeluting congeners) ranged from 410 to 91000 and 1800 to 41000 ng g(-1) dry weight (d.w.) for cores 1 and 2, respectively. Core 1 showed its highest accumulation rate for the year ∼1979 and exhibits a strong Aroclor 1248 signal in sediments accumulating over the last 60 years. It appears that from the late 1930s until the beginning of the 1980s there was a large and constant input of PCBs into this system. This pattern differs from lake cores from the Great Lakes region which commonly exhibit a rapid increase, a peak, followed by a sharp decrease in the PCB accumulation rates. Core 2 also has a strong Aroclor 1248 signal in the top layers, but deeper layers show evidence of mixtures of Aroclors and/or weathering processes. High levels of black carbon as a fraction of total organic carbon were found in both cores (median ∼30%), which reflect the long history of local combustion sources. No strong relationship was found between ΣPCB concentration and sorbents. Both cores contain dioxin-like PCBs that are highest in concentration below the surface. The high levels of PCBs in the deep sediments are of concern because of plans to dredge this system. PMID:21899876

  9. Influence of Different Post-Core Systems on Impact Stress: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Tomotaka; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Narimatsu, Keishiro; Konno, Michiyo; Fujii, Toshiki; Sekiguchi, Chieko; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ishigami, Keiichi; Shomura, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study compared impact strain at the core and root surfaces between two different post-core systems. Materials and Methods: The form of a bovine mandibular front tooth was modified to resemble that of a human maxillary incisor as a test specimen. A cast post and core (Metal PC) and composite resin and glass fiber-reinforced epoxy resin post (Fiber-Resin PC) system were tested. Four gauges were affixed to the buccal and lingual surfaces of the core and root. The specimens were then embedded in a metal mold using dental stone. A pendulum-type device with a pyramid-shaped metal impact object with a titanium alloy head was used to provide 2 different shock forces. Maximum distortion was measured and analyzed. Results: Distortion at the core at each measurement point and total amount of distortion with Fiber-Resin PC was significantly greater (p<0.05) than that with Metal PC against both impact forces. On the other hand, distortion at the root at the buccal measurement point with Fiber-Resin PC was significantly less than that with Metal PC against both impact forces. Total distortion was significantly less with Fiber-Resin PC than that with Metal PC against the greater impact shock. Acceleration with Fiber-Resin PC was significantly less than that with Metal PC against both impact forces. Conclusion: Fiber-Resin PC has the potential to protect remaining root against traumatic force. This suggests that a Fiber-Resin PC is more suitable for non-vital teeth against not only occlusal but also traumatic impact force. PMID:24358064

  10. 1024 QAM, 7-core (60 Gbit/s x 7) fiber transmission over 55 km with an aggregate potential spectral efficiency of 109 bit/s/Hz.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masato; Beppu, Shohei; Kasai, Keisuke; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2015-08-10

    We report the first 1024 QAM polarization-multiplexed transmission at 3 Gsymbol/s over a 55 km 7-core fiber, with a total bit rate of 420 Gbit/s (60 Gbit/s x 7 cores). The potential spectral efficiency per core reached 15.6 bit/s/Hz, which corresponds to an aggregate spectral efficiency as high as 109 bit/s/Hz in a multi-core single-mode fiber. PMID:26367928

  11. Gains in efficiency and scientific potential of continental climate reconstruction provided by the LRC LacCore Facility, University of Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, A.; Brady, K.; Myrbo, A.; Ito, E.

    2007-12-01

    Lacustrine sediment cores comprise an integral archive for the determination of continental paleoclimate, for their potentially high temporal resolution and for their ability to resolve spatial variability in climate across vast sections of the globe. Researchers studying these archives now have a large, nationally-funded, public facility dedicated to the support of their efforts. The LRC LacCore Facility, funded by NSF and the University of Minnesota, provides free or low-cost assistance to any portion of research projects, depending on the specific needs of the project. A large collection of field equipment (site survey equipment, coring devices, boats/platforms, water sampling devices) for nearly any lacustrine setting is available for rental, and Livingstone-type corers and drive rods may be purchased. LacCore staff can accompany field expeditions to operate these devices and curate samples, or provide training prior to device rental. The Facility maintains strong connections to experienced shipping agents and customs brokers, which vastly improves transport and importation of samples. In the lab, high-end instrumentation (e.g., multisensor loggers, high-resolution digital linescan cameras) provides a baseline of fundamental analyses before any sample material is consumed. LacCore staff provide support and training in lithological description, including smear-slide, XRD, and SEM analyses. The LRC botanical macrofossil reference collection is a valuable resource for both core description and detailed macrofossil analysis. Dedicated equipment and space for various subsample analyses streamlines these endeavors; subsamples for several analyses may be submitted for preparation or analysis by Facility technicians for a fee (e.g., carbon and sulfur coulometry, grain size, pollen sample preparation and analysis, charcoal, biogenic silica, LOI, freeze drying). The National Lacustrine Core Repository now curates ~9km of sediment cores from expeditions around the world

  12. A Deuterium NMR Study of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingemans, Theo J.; Madsen, Louis A.; Samulski, Edward T.

    2002-10-01

    We have synthesized two deuterated boomerang-shaped liquid crystals based on 2,5-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (ODBP). Deuterium was introduced in the rigid 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole core and in the aromatic ring of the terminal 4-dodecyloxyphenyl moiety using standard acid catalyzed deuterium exchange conditions. Both compounds, (4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl-d4) di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate: ODBP-d4-Ph-O-C12) and (4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl) di-4-dodecyloxy-benzoate-d4; ODBP-Ph-d4-O-C12) were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance, optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The optical textures and thermal behavior of both compounds were found to be identical to the non-deuterated analog 4,4(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl) di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate (ODBP-Ph-O-C12) which we reported earlier. These compounds exhibit behavior indicative of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase, which we hope to confirm using deuterium NMR spectroscopy in the next phase of this study.

  13. Fe-Si system: a potential major component of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracas, R.; Verstraete, M.; Fischer, R. A.; Campbell, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate Silicon in the Earth's core using first-principles calculations. Specifically we look at the phase diagram of the Fe-Si system, the solubility limits of Si into hcp Fe, and the effect of Si on the thermal and electrical conductivities of iron. We consider several Fe hcp supercells and replace some of the Fe atoms with Si in different amounts and configurations. In this way we mimic the dissolution of silicon into hcp and take into account a realistic solid solution. Silicon slightly increases the specific volume of iron, but the differences levels out at high pressures. We show that the density and seismic profiles of the core can be easily matched by Fe-Si alloys with small amounts of Si. Further phonon analysis suggests that stoichiometric Fe3Si is dynamically unstable at high pressure. This results in decomposition into Si-bearing hcp Fe and Fe-bearing B2 FeSi. Then we follow the evolution of the Fe-FeSi immiscibility gap as a function of pressure. Finally we compute the electrical and thermal conductivities of Si-bearing hcp iron at inner core conditions. We obtain that a relatively small amount of Si decreases the conductivity of iron. Based on these considerations we conclude that Si can be the preferred light element of the Earth's core.

  14. Potential Ramifications of Common Core State Standards Adoption on Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eubanks, Jacob Paul

    2014-01-01

    As of this writing, 45 United States and four territories have adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The quick implementation on the part of state policymakers is a marked response to the growing demand for career and college ready high school graduates. Current figures suggest that over the next 15 years the need for post-secondary…

  15. Potential Psychosocial and Instructional Consequences of the Common Core State Standards: Implications for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeki, Elina; Pendergast, Laura; Segool, Natasha K.; von der Embse, Nathaniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent rollout of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), CCSS-aligned assessments, and test-based teacher evaluation systems, questions remain regarding the impact that these accountability policies will have on teachers and students. This article discusses the psychosocial and instructional consequences of test-based accountability…

  16. Physical studies of small asteroids and cometary cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisniewski, Wieslaw Z.

    1988-01-01

    The main goal of the research is to carry on an extensive study of physical properties (colors and variability) of asteroids in the 1 to 10 km diameter range and of cometary cores, with the use of a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, PMT photometer, or both. Particular attention is paid to asteroids being observed by radar because the greatest gain is found from the combination of radar results with the data obtained by optical techniques. To satisfy the goal, 100 nights/year have been scheduled on the 2.3 m and 1.5 m telescopes. During the past 2 years small asteroids were observed. Out of 22 asteroids for which periods of rotation could be precisely measured, 17 have periods of rotation less than 5 hours. This indicates that small objects rotate faster. By now researchers know 14 asteroids with rotation periods in the 2 hour range. At the same time they confirmed the existence of a number of exceptionally slow rotators e.g., 1367 Nongoma with P = 5.65 days. Taxonomic observations lead to a conclusion that Apollo, Amor, and Aten asteroids represent a variety of classes and are not predominantly of class S. Apollo asteroid 3361 Orpheus was found to belong to the rare class V. In collaboration with Dr A. Harris of JPL the opposition effect was studied for 30 Urania and 64 Angelina. Seven comets: P/Helin, P/Brooks 2, P/Klemola, P/Borrelly, Wilson (1986 1) and Shoemaker (1987 o) were monitored for variability. The results were negative with the exception of P/Brooks 2 for which 0.35 mag amplitude was detected.

  17. Laboratory studies evaluating CO2 flood impact on the geomechanics of whole core samples

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.

    2005-06-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the injected CO2 in these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. Migration of the CO2 beyond the natural reservoir seals could become problematic, thus the identification of means to enhance the natural seals may help lead to the utilization of this sequestration methodology. Co-injection of a mineral reactant slurry, either with the CO2 or in separate, secondary injection wells, could provide a means to enhance the natural reservoir seals by providing the necessary cations for precipitation of mineral carbonates along the periphery of the injection plume. The subject study evaluates the merit of several mineral slurry co-injection strategies, by conduct of a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  18. Regional climate signal modified by local factors - multi core study records (Lake Czechowskie region, N Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiska, Izabela; Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Plessen, Birgit; Tjallingii, Rik; Słowiński, Michał; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments can be utilized as valuable paleoclimate and environmental archives as they contain information of past changes. Multi-proxy analyses of sedimentary compartments (e.g. pollen, diatoms, Cladocera) reveal those changes. However, to decipher the spatial variability of past climate changes and to define the proxies suited for local and regional scale reconstructions archive comparisons are needed. Here we present a detailed multi-proxy study from four different sediment cores covering the Younger Dryas cold period from the Lake Czechowskie region (N Poland). Three cores are located along a transect in the Lake Czechowskie basin from its deepest point towards a former lake bay close to today's shoreline. The fourth lacustrine sediment core was retrieved from the Trzechowskie paleolake, app. 1 km W from Lake Czechowskie. The dataset comprises information from pollen (AP, NAP, Juniperus, Betula-tree, Pinus silvestris), diatom (planktonic/benthic index, diatom valve concentration, dominant species), Cladocera (planktonic/benthic index, dominant species, number of Cladocera species, total sum of specimens) and geochemical (TOC and CaCO3 content, mineral matter, titanium) analyses. At the beginning of the Younger Dryas the AP pollen share decreased and NAP and Juniperus pollen increased in all studied locations. The mineral matter and titanium record showed higher values in two cores taken from the deepest parts of Lake Czechowskie and the core from Trzechowskie paleolake while in the core located at the marginal part of the lake it was already high in Allerød and it did not change much in Younger Dryas. The Cladocera based indexes: total sum of specimens and number of species decreased at the beginning of YD but on the contrary the Cladocera species composition changes were site-specific. The diatoms valve concentration index significantly lowered in core from the deep location while on the contrary increased in core from paleolake Trzechowskie. Our results

  19. Potential energy studies on silane dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlanen, Riina; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2011-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions and parameters for use in MD studies of large molecule systems have earlier been determined for hydrocarbons, carbon tetrahalides and sulfur. The paper reports a model representing nonbonding interactions between silane molecules, which were examined in the same way as hydrocarbons in an earlier (neopentane, isopropane, propane, and ethane) study. Intermolecular potentials were determined for 11 combinations of silane compound pairs (silane SiH 4, disilane Si 2H 6, trisilane Si 3H 8, isotetrasilane Si 4H 10 and neopentasilane Si 5H 12) with MP2/aug(df)-6-311G ∗ab initio calculations. The most stable dimer configurations were identified. With use of the modified Morse potential model to represent the interactions, 276 new potential energy surfaces were generated for silane dimers. Separate and generic pair potentials were calculated for the silanes. The pair potentials can be used in MD studies of silanes.

  20. Optical properties of Au-core Pt-shell nanorods studied using FDTD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Bo; Long, Lin; Zhang, Yu-Shi; Wang, Yue-Ping; Liu, Feng-Shou; Xu, Wei-Yao; Zong, Ming-Ji; Ma, Lei; Liu, Wen-Qi; Zhang, Hui; Yan, Jiao; Chen, Jia-Qi; Ji, Ying-Lu; Wu, Xiao-Chun

    2016-06-01

    Au-core/Pt-shell nanorods (Au@Pt NRs) have been prepared by a Au nanorod-mediated growth method, and they exhibit high electromagnetic field enhancements under coupling conditions. Boosted by a long-range effect of the high electromagnetic field generated by the Au core, the electromagnetic field enhancement can be controlled by changing the morphology of the nanostructures. In this study, we report the results on the simulations of the electromagnetic field enhancement using a finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, taking the real shapes of the Au@Pt NRs into account. Due to the "hot spot" effect, the electromagnetic field can be localized between the Pt nanodots. The electromagnetic field enhancement is found to be rather independent of the Pt content, whereas the local roughness and small sharp features might significantly modify the near-field. As the electromagnetic field enhancement can be tuned by the distribution of Pt nanodots over the Au-core, Au@Pt NRs can find potential applications in related areas.

  1. Study of High-Efficiency Motors Using Soft Magnetic Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokoi, Hirooki; Kawamata, Shoichi; Enomoto, Yuji

    We have been developed a small and highly efficient axial gap motor whose stator core is made of a soft magnetic core. First, the loss sensitivities to various motor design parameters were evaluated using magnetic field analysis. It was found that the pole number and core dimensions had low sensitivity (≤ 2.2dB) in terms of the total loss, which is the sum of the copper loss and the iron losses in the stator core and the rotor yoke respectively. From this, we concluded that to improve the motor efficiency, it is essential to reduce the iron loss in the rotor yoke and minimize other losses. With this in mind, a prototype axial gap motor is manufactured and tested. The motor has four poles and six slots. The motor is 123mm in diameter and the axial length is 47mm. The rotor has parallel magnetized magnets and a rotor yoke with magnetic steel sheets. The maximum measured motor efficiency is 93%. This value roughly agrees with the maximum calculated efficiency of 95%.

  2. A study of the core module simulator floor capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foreman, James W.

    1993-01-01

    The floor of the Core Module Simulator (CMS) is required to support various combinations of dead load and live load during the testing process. Even though there is published data on the structural capability of the grating, it is not always evident if the combined loadings with joint loads will cause structural failure.

  3. Soft-core processor study for node-based architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Houten, Jonathan Roger; Jarosz, Jason P.; Welch, Benjamin James; Gallegos, Daniel E.; Learn, Mark Walter

    2008-09-01

    Node-based architecture (NBA) designs for future satellite projects hold the promise of decreasing system development time and costs, size, weight, and power and positioning the laboratory to address other emerging mission opportunities quickly. Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based modules will comprise the core of several of the NBA nodes. Microprocessing capabilities will be necessary with varying degrees of mission-specific performance requirements on these nodes. To enable the flexibility of these reconfigurable nodes, it is advantageous to incorporate the microprocessor into the FPGA itself, either as a hardcore processor built into the FPGA or as a soft-core processor built out of FPGA elements. This document describes the evaluation of three reconfigurable FPGA based processors for use in future NBA systems--two soft cores (MicroBlaze and non-fault-tolerant LEON) and one hard core (PowerPC 405). Two standard performance benchmark applications were developed for each processor. The first, Dhrystone, is a fixed-point operation metric. The second, Whetstone, is a floating-point operation metric. Several trials were run at varying code locations, loop counts, processor speeds, and cache configurations. FPGA resource utilization was recorded for each configuration. Cache configurations impacted the results greatly; for optimal processor efficiency it is necessary to enable caches on the processors. Processor caches carry a penalty; cache error mitigation is necessary when operating in a radiation environment.

  4. Examination of Potential Management Decisions Based upon a Core Collection Derived from Last Circulation Date Data. Research Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Philip; Olson, Linda

    This study was conducted to fulfill two objectives: to gather the data necessary to define the core collection, i.e., a subset of the holdings that can be identified with reasonable assurance as being able to fulfill a certain predetermined percentage of the future demand on the present collection, and to examine the value of these data as a…

  5. Co-expression networks revealed potential core lncRNAs in the triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ye-Huan; Dong, Si-Yang; Yao, Zhi-Han; Lv, Lin; Ma, Rui-Min; Dai, Xuan-Xuan; Wang, Jiao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Ou-Chen

    2016-10-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive type of breast cancer with unfavorable outcome. It is urgent to explore novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in this malignancy. Increasing knowledge of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) significantly deepens our understanding of cancer biology. Here, we sequenced eight paired TNBC tumor tissues and non-cancerous tissues, and validated significantly differentially expressed lncRNAs. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway analysis were used to investigate the function of differentially expressed mRNAs. Further, potential core lncRNAs in TNBC were identified by co-expression networks. Kaplan-Meier analysis also indicated that breast cancer patients with lower expression level of rhabdomyosarcoma 2 associated transcript (RMST), one of the potential core lncRNAs, had worse overall survival. To the best of our knowledge, it was the first report that RMST was involved in breast cancer. Our research provided a rich resource to the research community for further investigating lncRNAs functions and identifying lncRNAs with diagnostic and therapeutic potentials in TNBC. PMID:27380926

  6. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Jun; Fisher, Darrell R.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-04-01

    We report a novel approach for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin core-shell nanoparticles based on an apoferritin template, conjugated to the protein biotin. To prepare the nanoparticle conjugates, we used non-radioactive lutetium as a model target or surrogate for radiolutetium (177Lu). The central cavity, multi-channel structure, and chemical properties of apoferritin are well-suited for sequentially diffusing lutetium and phosphate ions into the cavity--resulting in a stable core-shell composite. We characterized the synthesized LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We tested the pre-targeting capability of biotin-modified lutetium/apoferritin nanoparticle using streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and streptavidin-modified fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tracer. This paper presents a simple, fast, and efficient method for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle conjugates with biotin for potential applications in radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoimaging of cancer.

  7. Numerical studies of the margin of vortices with decaying cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, G. C.; Ting, L.

    1986-01-01

    The merging of vortices to a single one is a canonical incompressible viscous flow problem. The merging process begins when the core sizes or the vortices are comparable to their distances and ends when the contour lines of constant vorticity lines are circularized around one center. Approximate solutions to this problem are constructed by adapting the asymptotic solutions for distinct vortices. For the early stage of merging, the next-order terms in the asymptotic solutions are added to the leading term. For the later stage of merging, the vorticity distribution is reinitialized by vortices with overlapping core structures guided by the 'rule of merging' and the velocity of the 'vortex centers' are then defined by a minimum principle. To show the accuracy of the approximate solution, it is compared with the finite-difference solution.

  8. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Study of Barnett Shale Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameena, Fnu; Alsleben, Helge; Quarles, Carroll A.

    Measurements are reported of positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening parameters on 14 samples of Barnett shale core selected from 196 samples ranging from depths of 6107 to 6402 feet. The Barnett shale core was taken from EOG well Two-O-Five 2H located in Johnson county TX. The selected samples are dark clay-rich mudstone consisting of fine-grained clay minerals. The samples are varied in shape, typically a few inches long and about 1/2 inch in width and thickness, and are representative of the predominant facies in the core. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), petrographic analysis and geochemical analysis of total organic carbon (TOC) were already available for each of the selected samples. The lifetime data are analyzed in terms of three lifetime components with the shortest lifetime fixed at 125 ps. The second lifetime is attributed to positron annihilation in the bulk and positron trapping; and the third lifetime is due to positronium. Correlations of the lifetimes, intensities, the average lifetime and S and W parameters with TOC, XRF and XRD parameters are discussed. The observed correlations suggest that positron spectroscopy may be a useful tool in characterizing shale.

  9. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  10. A PILOT STUDY OF CORE STABILITY AND ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE: IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP?

    PubMed Central

    Sharrock, Chris; Cropper, Jarrod; Mostad, Joel; Johnson, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Study Design: Correlation study Objectives: To objectively evaluate the relationship between core stability and athletic performance measures in male and female collegiate athletes. Background: The relationship between core stability and athletic performance has yet to be quantified in the available literature. The current literature does not demonstrate whether or not core strength relates to functional performance. Questions remain regarding the most important components of core stability, the role of sport specificity, and the measurement of core stability in relation to athletic performance. Methods: A sample of 35 volunteer student athletes from Asbury College (NAIA Division II) provided informed consent. Participants performed a series of five tests: double leg lowering (core stability test), the forty yard dash, the T-test, vertical jump, and a medicine ball throw. Participants performed three trials of each test in a randomized order. Results: Correlations between the core stability test and each of the other four performance tests were determined using a General Linear Model. Medicine ball throw negatively correlated to the core stability test (r –0.389, p=0.023). Participants that performed better on the core stability test had a stronger negative correlation to the medicine ball throw (r =–0.527). Gender was the most strongly correlated variable to core strength, males with a mean measurement of double leg lowering of 47.43 degrees compared to females having a mean of 54.75 degrees. Conclusions: There appears to be a link between a core stability test and athletic performance tests; however, more research is needed to provide a definitive answer on the nature of this relationship. Ideally, specific performance tests will be able to better define and to examine relationships to core stability. Future studies should also seek to determine if there are specific sub-categories of core stability which are most important to allow for optimal training and

  11. Synthesis and cytotoxicity study of magnesium ferrite-gold core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nonkumwong, Jeeranan; Pakawanit, Phakkhananan; Wipatanawin, Angkana; Jantaratana, Pongsakorn; Ananta, Supon; Srisombat, Laongnuan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the core-magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4) nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal technique. Completed gold (Au) shell coating on the surfaces of MgFe2O4 nanoparticles was obtained by varying core/shell ratios via a reduction method. Phase identification, morphological evolution, optical properties, magnetic properties and cytotoxicity to mammalian cells of these MgFe2O4 core coated with Au nanoparticles were examined by using a combination of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), vibrating sample magnetometry and resazurin microplate assay techniques. In general, TEM images revealed different sizes of the core-shell nanoparticles generated from various core/shell ratios and confirmed the completed Au shell coating on MgFe2O4 core nanoparticles via suitable core/shell ratio with particle size less than 100nm. The core-shell nanoparticle size and the quality of coating influence the optical properties of the products. The UV-vis spectra of complete coated MgFe2O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles exhibit the absorption bands in the near-Infrared (NIR) region indicating high potential for therapeutic applications. Based on the magnetic property measurement, it was found that the obtained MgFe2O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles still exhibit superparamagnetism with lower saturation magnetization value, compared with MgFe2O4 core. Both of MgFe2O4 and MgFe2O4-Au core-shell also showed in vitro non-cytotoxicity to mouse areola fibroblast (L-929) cell line. PMID:26838832

  12. The Incomplete Impact Record and Implications for Ice Core Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay, R. C.; Rohde, R. A.; Price, P. B.

    2007-12-01

    The impact risk is extremely uncertain for objects of order 0.1-1 km diameter, with kinetic energies in the range 100 to 1 million Mt (megaton TNT ~ 4×1015 J) and recurrence times estimated in thousands to many tens of thousands of years. Millennial timescales are especially interesting, since the character of explosions (e.g. impacts, large volcanic eruptions) that only occur every 103 to 104 years lies just beyond the reckoning of modern cultural history. The impact rate predicted for the Earth based on observing nearby objects is much higher than the endemic rate estimated by counting known craters on Earth's surface. We have examined the latest account of confirmed craters from the Earth Impact Database (http://www.unb.ca/passc/ImpactDatabase/) over the last 100 Ma. The cratering record contains a large gap between 35 and 5 Ma, during which the apparent impact rate drops by an order of magnitude. The gap occurs during a period of substantial climate change, notably the initiation of large scale permanent glaciers, based on climate proxies from deep-sea sediment cores. A likely partial explanation is that climate change eroded or precluded crater formation in the recent geologic past. Taken together with constraints from inner solar system cratering and observations of near earth objects, the apparent gap in crater formation suggests that the terrestrial impact record is grossly incomplete over timescales much shorter than 100 Ma. If the true impact rate is more commensurate with the higher rates inferred from the local planetary environment, then some of the explosive fallout layers now observed in ice cores may actually be the result of recent impacts rather than volcanic eruptions. Like very large eruptions, impact ejecta are likely to be widely distributed, since impactors disrupt all levels of the atmosphere and generate ballistic debris and vapor plumes that can rise above the stratosphere. Polar ice core records of the last ~50-100 ka have become

  13. Feasibility study on nuclear core design for soluble boron free small modular reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie Hah, Chang Joo; Ju, Cho Sung

    2015-04-29

    A feasibility study on nuclear core design of soluble boron free (SBF) core for small size (150MWth) small modular reactor (SMR) was investigated. The purpose of this study was to design a once through cycle SMR core, where it can be used to supply electricity to a remote isolated area. PWR fuel assembly design with 17×17 arrangement, with 264 fuel rods per assembly was adopted as the basis design. The computer code CASMO-3/MASTER was used for the search of SBF core and fuel assembly analysis for SMR design. A low critical boron concentration (CBC) below 200 ppm core with 4.7 years once through cycle length was achieved using 57 fuel assemblies having 170 cm of active height. Core reactivity controlled using mainly 512 number of 4 wt% and 960 12 wt% Gd rods.

  14. Feasibility study on nuclear core design for soluble boron free small modular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie; Hah, Chang Joo; Ju, Cho Sung

    2015-04-01

    A feasibility study on nuclear core design of soluble boron free (SBF) core for small size (150MWth) small modular reactor (SMR) was investigated. The purpose of this study was to design a once through cycle SMR core, where it can be used to supply electricity to a remote isolated area. PWR fuel assembly design with 17×17 arrangement, with 264 fuel rods per assembly was adopted as the basis design. The computer code CASMO-3/MASTER was used for the search of SBF core and fuel assembly analysis for SMR design. A low critical boron concentration (CBC) below 200 ppm core with 4.7 years once through cycle length was achieved using 57 fuel assemblies having 170 cm of active height. Core reactivity controlled using mainly 512 number of 4 wt% and 960 12 wt% Gd rods.

  15. Lessons Learned in Conducting a Lottery-Based Study of Core Knowledge Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Thomas G.; Grissmer, David W.; Altenhofen, Shannon; Larson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The authors are presently in the fourth year of a six-year, lottery-based randomized control trial (RCT) studying the effectiveness of nine Colorado charter schools that have implemented Core Knowledge®. Core Knowledge (CK) is a comprehensive K-8 curriculum for language arts, math, science, social studies, visual arts, and music that is intended…

  16. Synthesis of the RGO/Al2O3 core-shell nanocomposite flakes and characterization of their unique electrostatic properties using zeta potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrzębska, A. M.; Karcz, J.; Letmanowski, R.; Zabost, D.; Ciecierska, E.; Zdunek, J.; Karwowska, E.; Siekierski, M.; Olszyna, A.; Kunicki, A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the influence of the modification of electrostatic properties of RGO/Al2O3 core-shell nanocomposite flakes. The amount of crystalline form of aluminum oxide was very small. It existed mostly in amorphous phase in the form of covalently bonded to GO surface. The morphological, structural and physicochemical investigations results showed that spherical Al2O3 nanoparticles (ca. 41 nm) in gamma phase completely covered the surface of curly-shaped RGO flakes and acted as a spreader between individual flakes. The high BET specific surface area of the analyzed composite (119.71 m2/g) together with very low open porosity (0.479 cm3/g) indicated that RGO/Al2O3 nanocomposite flakes showed low tendency to agglomeration. The zeta potential curves obtained for RGO/Al2O3 core-shell nanocomposite flakes were differing from curves obtained for GO and Al2O3 suspensions in distilled water and neutral environment. The specific electrostatic properties of the core-shell system of RGO/Al2O3 flakes had an influence on its surface charge (zeta potential) which was measured by applying an external electric field. The FTIR and Raman investigations results also confirmed that the Cdbnd O species were not taking part in the surface amphoteric reactions resulting in the formation of electrostatic surface charge.

  17. Influence of rigid core permittivity and double layer polarization on the electrophoresis of a soft particle: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, Simanta

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear electrophoresis of a soft particle with a polarizable uncharged rigid core coated with a polyelectrolyte layer is studied. Due to the coupled nature of the governing electrokinetic equations, a numerical approach is adopted. Our numerical solutions are in good agreement with the existing experimental and theoretical results for a particle with a non-polarizable core when the impacts of the nonlinear effects are low. The induced surface potential of the dielectric rigid core has an impact on the soft particle electrophoresis. The combined effects of the solid polarization of the core and double layer polarization have not been addressed previously in the context of soft particle electrophoresis. We have found that both these effects create retardation on the electrophoresis and are significant when the applied electric field is not weak. The double layer polarization is significant when the Debye length is in the order of the particle size. The range of the applied electric field for which the electrophoretic velocity of a soft particle with a non-polarizable core varies linearly with the applied electric field may create a nonlinear variation in electrophoretic velocity when the core is considered to be polarizable.

  18. The Kinematic and Chemical Properties of a Potential Core-forming Clump: Perseus B1-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Shirley, Y.; Di Francesco, J.; Henning, Th.; Currie, M. J.; André, Ph.; Pezzuto, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present 13CO and {{C}18}O (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) maps toward the core-forming Perseus B1-E clump using observations from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory, and the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that the 13CO and {{C}18}O line emission both have very complex velocity structures, indicative of multiple velocity components within the ambient gas. The (1-0) transitions reveal a radial velocity gradient across B1-E of ˜ 1 km {{s}-1} p{{c}-1} that increases from northwest to southeast, whereas the majority of the Perseus cloud has a radial velocity gradient increasing from southwest to northeast. In contrast, we see no evidence of a velocity gradient associated with the denser Herschel-identified substructures in B1-E. Additionally, the denser substructures have much lower systemic motions than the ambient clump material, which indicates that they are likely decoupled from the large-scale gas. Nevertheless, these substructures themselves have broad line widths (˜0.4 km {{s}-1}) similar to that of the {{C}18}O gas in the clump, which suggests they inherited their kinematic properties from the larger-scale, moderately dense gas. Finally, we find evidence of {{C}18}O depletion only toward one substructure, B1-E2, which is also the only object with narrow (transonic) line widths. We suggest that as prestellar cores form, their chemical and kinematic properties are linked in evolution, such that these objects must first dissipate their turbulence before they deplete in CO.

  19. A theoretical study on the advantage of core-shell particles with radially-oriented mesopores.

    PubMed

    Deridder, Sander; Catani, Martina; Cavazzini, Alberto; Desmet, Gert

    2016-07-22

    We report on a first-principles numerical study explaining the potential advantage of core-shell particles with strictly radially-oriented mesopores. Comparing the efficiency of these particles with fully porous and core-shell particles with a conventional (i.e., randomly oriented) mesopore network, the present numerical study shows a similar strong reduction in minimal reduced plate height (hmin) as was very recently observed in an experimental study by Wei et al. (respectively a hmin-reduction on the order of about 1 and 0.5 reduced plate height-units). As such, the present work provides a theoretical basis to understand and confirm their experimental findings and quantifies the general advantage of "radial-diffusion-only" particles. Determining the effective longitudinal diffusion (B-term contribution) in a series of dedicated, independent simulations, it was found that this contribution can be described by a very simple, yet fully exact mathematical expression for the case of "radial- diffusion-only" particles. Using this expression, the significant increase in efficiency of these particles can be fully attributed to their much smaller B-term band broadening, while their C-term band broadening (representing the mass transfer resistance) remains unaffected. PMID:27317003

  20. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  1. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at eight U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  2. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RCIC results.

  3. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

  4. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RCIC results.

  5. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at eight U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  6. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. I. BASIC MAGNETIC AND NON-MAGNETIC MODELS AND PARAMETER STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-07-01

    We combine dynamical and non-equilibrium chemical modeling of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores and investigate the evolution of molecular abundances in the contracting core. We model both magnetic cores, with varying degrees of initial magnetic support, and non-magnetic cores, with varying collapse delay times. We explore, through a parameter study, the competing effects of various model parameters in the evolving molecular abundances, including the elemental C/O ratio, the temperature, and the cosmic-ray ionization rate. We find that different models show their largest quantitative differences at the center of the core, whereas the outer layers, which evolve slower, have abundances which are severely degenerate among different dynamical models. There is a large range of possible abundance values for different models at a fixed evolutionary stage (central density), which demonstrates the large potential of chemical differentiation in prestellar cores. However, degeneracies among different models, compounded with uncertainties induced by other model parameters, make it difficult to discriminate among dynamical models. To address these difficulties, we identify abundance ratios between particular molecules, the measurement of which would have maximal potential for discrimination among the different models examined here. In particular, we find that the ratios between NH{sub 3} and CO, NH{sub 2} and CO, and NH{sub 3} and HCO{sup +} are sensitive to the evolutionary timescale, and that the ratio between HCN and OH is sensitive to the C/O ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that measurements of the central deviation (central depletion or enhancement) of abundances of certain molecules are good indicators of the dynamics of the core.

  7. A Core Invasiveness Gene Signature Reflects Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition but Not Metastatic Potential in Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Marsan, Melike; Van den Eynden, Gert; Limame, Ridha; Neven, Patrick; Hauspy, Jan; Van Dam, Peter A.; Vergote, Ignace; Dirix, Luc Y.; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Van Laere, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastases remain the primary cause of cancer-related death. The acquisition of invasive tumour cell behaviour is thought to be a cornerstone of the metastatic cascade. Therefore, gene signatures related to invasiveness could aid in stratifying patients according to their prognostic profile. In the present study we aimed at identifying an invasiveness gene signature and investigated its biological relevance in breast cancer. Methods & Results We collected a set of published gene signatures related to cell motility and invasion. Using this collection, we identified 16 genes that were represented at a higher frequency than observed by coincidence, hereafter named the core invasiveness gene signature. Principal component analysis showed that these overrepresented genes were able to segregate invasive and non-invasive breast cancer cell lines, outperforming sets of 16 randomly selected genes (all P<0.001). When applied onto additional data sets, the expression of the core invasiveness gene signature was significantly elevated in cell lines forced to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The link between core invasiveness gene expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition was also confirmed in a dataset consisting of 2420 human breast cancer samples. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that CIG expression is not associated with a shorter distant metastasis free survival interval (HR = 0.956, 95%C.I. = 0.896–1.019, P = 0.186). Discussion These data demonstrate that we have identified a set of core invasiveness genes, the expression of which is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines and in human tissue samples. Despite the connection between epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive tumour cell behaviour, we were unable to demonstrate a link between the core invasiveness gene signature and enhanced metastatic potential. PMID:24586640

  8. Potential Transference of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Contaminated Coring Knife to Field-cored Lettuce and Impact of Holding Time and Temperature on Its Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field coring is a recent development in iceberg lettuce harvesting, where the outer leaves and the cores of the lettuce heads are removed at the time of harvesting in order to reduce shipping waste and maximize production yield during processing for fresh-cut products. However, research on the effe...

  9. Non-universality of Dark-matter Halos: Cusps, Cores, and the Central Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, Jens; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Wojtak, Radosław; McLaughlin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Dark-matter halos grown in cosmological simulations appear to have central Navarro–Frenk–White-like density cusps with mean values of d{log}ρ /d{log}r≈ -1, and some dispersion, which is generally parametrized by the varying index α in the Einasto density profile fitting function. Non-universality in profile shapes is also seen in observed galaxy clusters and possibly dwarf galaxies. Here we show that non-universality, at any given mass scale, is an intrinsic property of DARKexp, a theoretically derived model for collisionless self-gravitating systems. We demonstrate that DARKexp—which has only one shape parameter, ϕ0—fits the dispersion in profile shapes of massive simulated halos as well as observed clusters very well. DARKexp also allows for cored dark-matter profiles, such as those found for dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We provide approximate analytical relations between DARKexp ϕ0, Einasto α, or the central logarithmic slope in the Dehnen–Tremaine analytical γ-models. The range in halo parameters reflects a substantial variation in the binding energies per unit mass of dark-matter halos.

  10. Developing a common bean core collection suitable for association mapping studies

    PubMed Central

    Perseguini, Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso; Silva, Gliciane Micaele Borges; Rosa, João Ricardo Bachega Feijó; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Marçal, Jéssica Fernanda; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2015-01-01

    Because of the continuous introduction of germplasm from abroad, some collections have a high number of accessions, making it difficult to explore the genetic variability present in a germplasm bank for conservation and breeding purposes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify and analyze the structure of genetic variability among 500 common bean accessions to construct a core collection. A total of 58 SSRs were used for this purpose. The polymorphism information content (PIC) in the 180 common bean accessions selected to compose the core collection ranged from 0.17 to 0.86, and the discriminatory power (DP) ranged from 0.21 to 0.90. The 500 accessions were clustered into 15 distinct groups and the 180 accessions into four distinct groups in the Structure analysis. According to analysis of molecular variance, the most divergent accessions comprised 97.2% of the observed genetic variability present within the base collection, confirming the efficiency of the selection criterion. The 180 selected accessions will be used for association mapping in future studies and could be potentially used by breeders to direct new crosses and generate elite cultivars that meet current and future global market needs. PMID:25983627

  11. Electron structure of molecules with very heavy atoms using effective core potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Pitzer, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Topics covered include effective potential, Hamiltonian for valence-electron motion, molecular calculations, spin-spin coupling, L-S coupling, numerical results of molecular calculations, and results of configuration-interaction Slater-orbital calculations in L-S coupling. (GHT)

  12. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Time Commitment When Addressing the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Russell, William Benedict, III

    2015-01-01

    In 2010 the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were officially released in America for mathematics and English language arts and soon adopted by 45 of the 50 states. However, within the English langue arts domain there were standards intended for secondary social studies teachers under the title, Common Core State Standards for English Language…

  13. Identifying Core Mobile Learning Faculty Competencies Based Integrated Approach: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbarbary, Rafik Said

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on the integrated approach as a concept framework to identify, categorize, and rank a key component of mobile learning core competencies for Egyptian faculty members in higher education. The field investigation framework used four rounds Delphi technique to determine the importance rate of each component of core competencies…

  14. Revisiting Traveling Books: Early Literacy, Social Studies, and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Holly Hilboldt; Coleman, Julianne

    2015-01-01

    With the development and institution of the Common Core Standards, teachers must be prepared to integrate content areas such as social studies within the language arts curriculum. Teachers following the suggestions of the Common Core Standards should develop practical and meaningful strategies within their classrooms that encourage and support…

  15. Electronic states of Al and Al{sub 2} using quantum Monte Carlo with an effective core potential

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, C.W.; Lester, W.A. Jr.; Hammond, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    The diffusion Monte Carlo method is applied in conjunction with an ab initio effective core potential to compute energies of some neutral and charged states of Al and Al{sub 2}. The computed ionization potentials, electron affinities and dissociation energies differ from measured values by at most a few hundredths of eV. The computed dissociation energy of Al{sub 2} agrees with the most extensive CI calculations. It appears that our dissociation energy for Al{sup {minus}}{sub 2} is the most accurate to date. The quality of the results indicates that the use of the pseudopotential is not an important limitation on the accuracy of these calculations. Variational wavefunctions with Boys-Handy correlation functions are found to give more than 70{percent} of the correlation energy with 8 optimized parameters. These optimized trial functions are used together with numerical integration to localize the pseudopotential. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Fluorescence studies of cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins: I. Spectroscopy of allophycocyanin core complexes. II. Spectroscopy of two phycobilisome core insertion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, P.

    1988-10-01

    The work described here relates to the mechanisms governing energy transfer in the core polypeptides of the cyanobacterial phycobilisome. Two approaches are represented: measurements were made on isolated core components for which a great deal of structural information is available; and the fluorescence properties were characterized for the whole phycobilisome from two phycobilisome core insertion mutants. 130 refs.

  17. A comprehensive core-phase study from reflected waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Schmandt, B.; Sun, D.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2012-12-01

    A recent event beneath central America produced an excellent set of core phases recorded by USArray ranging from 18 to 30 degree. The results from 1D modeling (Schmandt, 2012) indicate that the ratio of PKiKP/PcP is about 0.16 whereas the prediction from the reference model PREM is 0.085. The prediction can match this ratio by adding a weak ULVZ (with -5% in Vp, -10% in Vs, and 5% in density) at the CMB if the top is gradational. The variation in the core-phases ratios involving ScP, ScS, PcP, PKiKP displays considerable scatter with a factor of 4 or more. Here, we investigate this scatter by examining the roles of source directivity, variation in 3D velocity structures and attenuation, and the station site effects. Preliminary waveform complexity measured by the Multi-Path Detector analysis (Sun et.al, 2009) indicates that a small scale variation of the order of 100 to 200km near the CMB is involved. To localize the causes of these fluctuations we generate seismogram using both WKM ray code and numerical code. The former produced ray-path corrected for 2D structure while the latter are more complete. This is achieved by using a staggered grid finite difference with embedded earthquake sources. To reach high frequencies (1Hz) , we use a fine grid size of 0.7 km to reduce the dispersion. A correction account for out of plane spreading is applied as a post processing step.

  18. A comparison of measured radionuclide release rates from Three Mile Island Unit-2 core debris for different oxygen chemical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Baston, V.F.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Ryan, R.F.

    1987-03-01

    Chemical and radiochemical analyses of reactor coolant samples taken during defueling of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) reactor provide relevant data to assist in understanding the solution chemistry of the radionuclides retained within the TMI-2 reactor coolant system. Hydrogen peroxide was added to various plant systems to provide disinfection for microbial contamination and has provided the opportunity to observe radionuclide release under different oxygen chemical potentials. A comparison of the radionuclide release rates with and without hydrogen peroxide has been made for these separate but related cases, i.e., the fuel transfer canal and connecting spent-fuel pool A with the TMI-2 reactor plenum in the fuel transfer canal, core debris grab sample laboratory experiments, and the reactor vessel fluid and associated core debris. Correlation and comparison of these data indicate a physical parameter dependence (surface-to-volume ratio) affecting all radionuclide release; however, selected radionuclides also demonstrate a chemical dependence release under the different oxygen chemical potentials. Chemical and radiochemical analyses of reactor coolant samples taken during defueling of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) reactor provide relevant data to assist in understanding the solution chemistry of the radionuclides retained within the TMI-2 reactor coolant system.

  19. Generating relativistic pseudo-potentials with explicit incorporation of semi-core states using APE, the Atomic Pseudo-potentials Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Nogueira, Fernando

    2008-04-01

    We present a computer package designed to generate and test norm-conserving pseudo-potentials within Density Functional Theory. The generated pseudo-potentials can be either non-relativistic, scalar relativistic or fully relativistic and can explicitly include semi-core states. A wide range of exchange-correlation functionals is included. Program summaryProgram title: Atomic Pseudo-potentials Engine (APE) Catalogue identifier: AEAC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 287 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 649 959 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, C Computer: any computer architecture, running any flavor of UNIX Operating system: GNU/Linux RAM: <5 Mb Classification: 7.3 External routines: GSL ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/) Nature of problem: Determination of atomic eigenvalues and wave-functions using relativistic and nonrelativistic Density-Functional Theory. Construction of pseudo-potentials for use in ab-initio simulations. Solution method: Grid-based integration of the Kohn-Sham equations. Restrictions: Relativistic spin-polarized calculations are not possible. The set of exchange-correlation functionals implemented in the code does not include orbital-dependent functionals. Unusual features: The program creates pseudo-potential files suitable for the most widely used ab-initio packages and, besides the standard non-relativistic Hamann and Troullier-Martins potentials, it can generate pseudo-potentials using the relativistic and semi-core extensions to the Troullier-Martins scheme. APE also has a very sophisticated and user-friendly input system. Running time: The example given in this paper (Si) takes 10 s to run on a Pentium

  20. Differences between the Cell Populations from the Peritenon and the Tendon Core with Regard to Their Potential Implication in Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cadby, Jennifer A.; Buehler, Evelyne; Godbout, Charles; van Weeren, P. René; Snedeker, Jess G.

    2014-01-01

    The role of intrinsic and extrinsic healing in injured tendons is still debated. In this study, we characterized cell plasticity, proliferative capacity, and migration characteristics as proxy measures of healing potential in cells derived from the peritenon (extrinsic healing) and compared these to cells from the tendon core (intrinsic healing). Both cell populations were extracted from horse superficial digital flexor tendon and characterized for tenogenic and matrix remodeling markers as well as for rates of migration and replication. Furthermore, colony-forming unit assays, multipotency assays, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of markers of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation after culture in induction media were performed. Finally, cellular capacity for differentiation towards a myofibroblastic phenotype was assessed. Our results demonstrate that both tendon- and peritenon-derived cell populations are capable of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation, with higher expression of progenitor cell markers in peritenon cells. Cells from the peritenon also migrated faster, replicate more quickly, and show higher differentiation potential toward a myofibroblastic phenotype when compared to cells from the tendon core. Based on these data, we suggest that cells from the peritenon have substantial potential to influence tendon-healing outcome, warranting further scrutiny of their role. PMID:24651449

  1. Hematite Core Nanoparticles with Carbon Shell: Potential for Environmentally Friendly Production from Iron Mining Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stević, Dragana; Mihajlović, Dijana; Kukobat, Radovan; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Sagisaka, Kento; Kaneko, Katsumi; Atlagić, Suzana Gotovac

    2016-02-01

    Hematite nanoparticles with amorphous, yet relatively uniform carbon shell, were produced based exclusively on the waste sludge from the iron mine as the raw material. The procedure for acid digestion-based purification of the sludge with the full recovery of acid vapors and the remaining non-toxic rubble is described. Synthesis of the hematite nanoparticles was performed by the arrested precipitation method with cationic surfactant. The particles were thoroughly characterized and the potential of their economical production for the battery industry is indicated.

  2. Glucitol-core containing gallotannins inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end-products mediated by their antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hang; Liu, Weixi; Frost, Leslie; Kirschenbaum, Louis J; Dain, Joel A; Seeram, Navindra P

    2016-05-18

    Glucitol-core containing gallotannins (GCGs) are polyphenols containing galloyl groups attached to a 1,5-anhydro-d-glucitol core, which is uncommon among naturally occurring plant gallotannins. GCGs have only been isolated from maple (Acer) species, including the red maple (Acer rubrum), a medicinal plant which along with the sugar maple (Acer saccharum), are the major sources of the natural sweetener, maple syrup. GCGs are reported to show antioxidant, α-glucosidase inhibitory, and antidiabetic effects, but their antiglycating potential is unknown. Herein, the inhibitory effects of five GCGs (containing 1-4 galloyls) on the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) were evaluated by MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy, and BSA-fructose, and G.K. peptide-ribose assays. The GCGs showed superior activities compared to the synthetic antiglycating agent, aminoguanidine (IC50 15.8-151.3 vs. >300 μM) at the early, middle, and late stages of glycation. Circular dichroism data revealed that the GCGs were able to protect the secondary structure of BSA protein from glycation. The GCGs did not inhibit AGE formation by the trapping of reactive carbonyl species, namely, methylglyoxal, but showed free radical scavenging activities in the DPPH assay. The free radical quenching properties of the GCGs were further confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using ginnalin A (contains 2 galloyls) as a representative GCG. In addition, this GCG chelated ferrous iron, an oxidative catalyst of AGE formation, supported a potential antioxidant mechanism of antiglycating activity for these polyphenols. Therefore, GCGs should be further investigated for their antidiabetic potential given their antioxidant, α-glucosidase inhibitory, and antiglycating properties. PMID:27101975

  3. First-principles study of the influence of different interfaces and core types on the properties of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, V.; Rusz, J.; Eriksson, O.; Sarma, D. D.

    2015-06-01

    With the expanding field of nanoengineering and the production of nanocrystals (NCs) with higher quality and tunable size, having reliable theoretical calculations to complement the experimental results is very important. Here we present such a study of CdSe/CdS core-shell NCs using density functional theory, where we focus on dependence of the properties of these NCs on core types and interfaces between the core and the shell, as well as on the core/shell ratio. We show that the density of states and the absorption indices depend rather weakly on the type of interface and core type. We demonstrate that the HOMO wavefunction is mainly localised in the core of the nanocrystal, depending primarily on the core/shell ratio. On the other hand the LUMO wavefunction spreads more into the shell of the nanocrystal, where its confinement in the core is almost the same in each of the studied structural models. Furthermore, we show that the radiative lifetimes decrease with increasing core sizes due to changes in the dipolar overlap integral of the HOMO and LUMO wavefunctions. In addition, the electron-hole Coulomb interaction energies follow a similar pattern as the localisation of the wavefunctions, with the smaller NCs having higher Coulomb interaction energies.

  4. First-principles study of the influence of different interfaces and core types on the properties of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Kocevski, V.; Rusz, J.; Eriksson, O.; Sarma, D.D.

    2015-01-01

    With the expanding field of nanoengineering and the production of nanocrystals (NCs) with higher quality and tunable size, having reliable theoretical calculations to complement the experimental results is very important. Here we present such a study of CdSe/CdS core-shell NCs using density functional theory, where we focus on dependence of the properties of these NCs on core types and interfaces between the core and the shell, as well as on the core/shell ratio. We show that the density of states and the absorption indices depend rather weakly on the type of interface and core type. We demonstrate that the HOMO wavefunction is mainly localised in the core of the nanocrystal, depending primarily on the core/shell ratio. On the other hand the LUMO wavefunction spreads more into the shell of the nanocrystal, where its confinement in the core is almost the same in each of the studied structural models. Furthermore, we show that the radiative lifetimes decrease with increasing core sizes due to changes in the dipolar overlap integral of the HOMO and LUMO wavefunctions. In addition, the electron-hole Coulomb interaction energies follow a similar pattern as the localisation of the wavefunctions, with the smaller NCs having higher Coulomb interaction energies. PMID:26039582

  5. Core/shell structured hollow mesoporous nanocapsules: a potential platform for simultaneous cell imaging and anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Zeng, Deping; Tian, Yunbo; Chen, Feng; Feng, Jingwei; Shi, Jianlin

    2010-10-26

    A potential platform for simultaneous anticancer drug delivery and MRI cell imaging has been demonstrated by uniform hollow inorganic core/shell structured multifunctional mesoporous nanocapsules, which are composed of functional inorganic (Fe(3)O(4), Au, etc.) nanocrystals as cores, a thin mesoporous silica shell, and a huge cavity in between. The synthetic strategy for the creation of huge cavities between functional core and mesoporous silica shell is based on a structural difference based selective etching method, by which solid silica middle layer of Fe(2)O(3)@SiO(2)@mSiO(2) (or Au@SiO(2)@mSiO(2)) composite nanostructures was selectively etched away while the mesoporous silica shell could be kept relatively intact. The excellent biocompatibility of obtained multifunctional nanocapsules (Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2)) was demonstrated by very low cytotoxicity against various cell lines, low hemolyticity against human blood red cells and no significant coagulation effect against blood plasma. The cancer cell uptake and intracellular location of the nanocapsules were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and bio-TEM. Importantly, the prepared multifunctional inorganic mesoporous nanocapsules show both high loading capacity (20%) and efficiency (up to 100%) for doxorubicin simultaneously because of the formation of the cavity, enhanced surface area/pore volume and the electrostatic interaction between DOX molecules and mesoporous silica surface. Besides, the capability of Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) nanocapsules as contrast agents of MRI was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the simultaneous imaging and therapeutic multifunctionalities of the composite nanocapsules. Moreover, the concept of multifunctional inorganic nanocapsules was extended to design and prepare Gd-Si-DTPA grafted Au@mSiO(2) nanocapsules for nanomedical applications, further demonstrating the generality of this strategy for the preparation of various multifunctional mesoporous nanocapsules

  6. Switching probabilities of magnetic vortex core reversal studied by table top magneto optic Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterle, G.; Gangwar, A.; Gräfe, J.; Noske, M.; Förster, J.; Woltersdorf, G.; Stoll, H.; Back, C. H.; Schütz, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied vortex core reversal in a single submicron Permalloy disk by polar Kerr microscopy. A sophisticated lock-in-technique based on repetitive switching of the magnetic vortex core and a continuous calibration allows for a reliable determination of the switching probability. This highly sensitive method facilitates the detection of a change in the magnetic moment of the tiny magnetic vortex core which is about 1.5 × 10-17 A m2. We have investigated vortex core switching caused by excitation of the vortex core gyromode with varying frequencies and amplitudes. The frequency range in which switching occurs was found to broaden with increasing excitation amplitude, whereby the highest frequency in this range shifts stronger to higher frequencies than the lowest frequency to lower frequencies. The experimental results are in good agreement with micromagnetic simulations.

  7. Small Angle Neutron-Scattering Studies of the Core Structure of Intact Neurosecretory Vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Susan Takacs

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the state of the dense cores within intact neurosecretory vesicles. These vesicles transport the neurophysin proteins, along with their associated hormones, oxytocin or vasopressin, from the posterior pituitary gland to the bloodstream, where the entire vesicle contents are released. Knowledge of the vesicle core structure is important in developing an understanding of this release mechanism. Since the core constituents exist in a dense state at concentrations which cannot be reproduced (in solution) in the laboratory, a new method was developed to determine the core structure from SANS experiments performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. These studies were complemented by biochemical assays performed to determine the role, if any, played by phospholipids in the interactions between the core constituents. H_2O/D_2 O ratio in the solvent can be adjusted, using the method of contrast variation, such that the scattering due to the vesicle membranes is minimized, thus emphasizing the scattering originating from the cores. The applicability of this method for examining the interior of biological vesicles was tested by performing an initial study on human red blood cells, which are similar in structure to other biological vesicles. Changes in intermolecular hemoglobin interactions, occurring when the ionic strength of the solvent was varied or when the cells were deoxygenated, were examined. The results agreed with those expected for dense protein solutions, indicating that the method developed was suitable for the study of hemoglobin within the cells. Similar SANS studies were then performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. The experimental results were inconsistent with model calculations which assumed that the cores consisted of small, densely-packed particles or large, globular aggregates. Although a unique model could not be determined, the data suggest that the core constituents form long aggregates of

  8. Performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing unit and many integrated core for hartree potential calculations on a numerical grid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-09-15

    We investigated the performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing units (GPUs) and many integrated core (MIC) with 20 CPU cores (20×CPU). As a practical example toward large scale electronic structure calculations using grid-based methods, we evaluated the Hartree potentials of silver nanoparticles with various sizes (3.1, 3.7, 4.9, 6.1, and 6.9 nm) via a direct integral method supported by the sinc basis set. The so-called work stealing scheduler was used for efficient heterogeneous computing via the balanced dynamic distribution of workloads between all processors on a given architecture without any prior information on their individual performances. 20×CPU + 1GPU was up to ∼1.5 and ∼3.1 times faster than 1GPU and 20×CPU, respectively. 20×CPU + 2GPU was ∼4.3 times faster than 20×CPU. The performance enhancement by CPU + MIC was considerably lower than expected because of the large initialization overhead of MIC, although its theoretical performance is similar with that of CPU + GPU. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27431905

  9. A Combined He and Os Isotopic Study of the HSDP-2 Core from Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Walker, R. J.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kurz, M. D.

    2004-12-01

    Combined osmium and helium isotope systematics of hotspot lavas have the potential to reveal information about the deep Earth. A high 3He/4He ratio may represent an undegassed reservoir, generally associated with the lower mantle. There are two Os isotopes that can be studied to help to further elucidate the problem. The decay of 187Re to 187Os is the more frequently cited system; however, in terms of lower mantle processes, the decay of 190Pt to 186Os may be extremely useful. Both of these Os isotopes are enriched in the core relative to chondritic values. In a previous study, Brandon et al. (1999) examined several Hawaiian volcanoes for both He and Os isotopes. A correlation was noted between the 3He/4He, 187Os/188Os and 186Os/188Os ratios. In terms of 3He/4He and 187Os/188Os space, the three commonly cited Hawaiian end-members (Kea, Koolau and Loihi members) were clearly defined. A strong positive correlation was also observed for 186Os/188Os versus 3He/4He. These correlations were interpreted as a possible signature of core-mantle interaction. There were some limitations to previous studies. Only 2-3 samples from each volcano were studied, with these samples generally being subaerially erupted. The He data utilized were often not for the same samples for which the Os data were collected (volcano averages for He were used on some samples). With the introduction of data from the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP-2), which drilled 2.84 km into the Mauna Kea volcanics (DePaolo et al., 2000), an extensive history of a single volcano can be observed (from the early submarine stages to the later subaerial rocks). In the current study a detailed Os isotopic analysis of several samples that span a large depth range of the HSDP-2 core, in conjunction with previously collected He isotopic data (Kurz et al., 2004), was conducted. The samples define a relatively narrow range of slightly suprachondritic 187Os/188Os ratios (0.12865-0.13056), despite having a large

  10. Study of photodynamic activity of Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meena, K S; Dhanalekshmi, K I; Jayamoorthy, K

    2016-06-01

    Metal-semiconductor core-shell type Au@SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by Stober's method. They were characterized by absorption, XRD, HR-TEM and EDAX techniques. The resulting modified core-shell nanoparticles shows that the formation of singlet oxygen, which was confirmed by ESR technique. The photohemolysis studies were carried out under two different experimental conditions. It is observed that the photohemolysis increases with concentration as well as light dose. Cell viability of the core-shell nanoparticles against HeLa cell lines were studied by MTT assay method. The outcomes of the present study indicate that, the Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles are extremely stable with a very high photodynamic efficiency under visible light illumination. PMID:27040225

  11. Electric potential microelectrode for studies of electrobiogeophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgaard, Lars Riis; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-09-01

    Spatially separated electron donors and acceptors in sediment can be exploited by the so-called "cable bacteria." Electric potential microelectrodes (EPMs) were constructed to measure the electric fields that should appear when cable bacteria conduct electrons over centimeter distances. The EPMs were needle-shaped, shielded Ag/AgCl half-cells that were rendered insensitive to redox-active species in the environment. Tip diameters of 40 to 100 µm and signal resolution of approximately 10 μV were achieved. A test in marine sediments with active cable bacteria showed an electric potential increase by approximately 2 mV from the sediment-water interface to a depth of approximately 20 mm, in accordance with the location and direction of the electric currents estimated from oxygen, pH, and H2S microprofiles. The EPM also captured emergence and decay of electric diffusion potentials in the upper millimeters of artificial sediment in response to changes in ion concentrations in the overlying water. The results suggest that the EPM can be used to track electric current sources and sinks with submillimeter resolution in microbial, biogeochemical, and geophysical studies.

  12. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Zhuravleva, I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; King, A. L.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Morris, R. G.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a deep (280 ks) Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second-brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT~1 keV in the core to kT~9 keV at r~30 kpc. Beyond r~30 kpc the intra-cluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The sloshing is the result of the strongly perturbed gravitational potential in the cluster core, with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) being displaced southward from the global center of mass. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r~280 kpc. The cluster also harbors a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ~100 km/s. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r~120 kpc to the southeast of the cluster center. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger and not a result of an extraordinary active galactic nucleus (AGN) outburst. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the AGN only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets, indicating that currently it may be largely dormant. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.

  13. Radionuclide disequilibria studies for investigating the integrity of potential nuclear waste disposal sites: subseabed studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Thomas, C.W.; Petersen, M.R.; Perkins, R.W.

    1981-09-01

    This study of subseabed sediments indicates that natural radionuclides can be employed to define past long-term migration rates and thereby evaluate the integrity of potential disposal sites in ocean sediments. The study revealed the following conclusions: (1) the sedimentation rate of both the long and short cores collected in the North Pacific is 2.5 mm/1000 yr or 2.5 m/m.yr in the upper 3 meters; (2) the sedimentation rate has been rather constant over the last one million years; and (3) slow diffusive processes dominate within the sediment. Reworking of the sediment by physical processes or organisms is not observed.

  14. Study of the F ring core at high and low resolutions with Cassini ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deau, Estelle

    2014-11-01

    Saturn’s F ring evolution is still a mystery since its discovery by Pioneer 11. This ring is unique by its changing appearance, its spiral shape, its shepherd satellites Prometheus and Pandora, its ephemeral satellites, and its chaotic behavior. We focus here on the brightest and central region of the F ring called the core. Using Voyager data, the core was primarily believed to be one of the four strands of the F ring (Murray et al., 1997, Icarus, vol.129, p.304-316). However, the core is very different from the other stands, because we have demonstrated previously that the core reconnects on itself over 360 degrees, while the strands don't (Charnoz et al. 2005, Science, vol.310, p.1300-1304). Indeed, the strands originate from the core and are connected between themselves in a single feature that is a spiral, as explained in our previous works (Charnoz et al. 2005, Science, vol.310, p.1300-1304, Deau, 2007, PhD thesis University Paris 7 Denis Diderot). Our present study focus on the F ring core. We have established a protocol in (Deau, 2007, PhD thesis University Paris 7 Denis Diderot) to calculate the radial width and the radial local variations of the core using a Gaussian model. We use this method on Cassini ISS data to derive azimuthal profiles of core's radial width and local kicks. Our study shows that the F ring core is very stable on scale of several months, as suggested by the recent chaos theory of Cuzzi et al. (2014, Icarus, vol.232, p.157-175), while the spiral has a much smaller timescale, i.e. the order of a few weeks.

  15. Time-resolved SANS studies on block copolymer micelles with varying core-solvent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooksey, Tyler; Singh, Avantika; Marquez, Maria; Robertson, Megan

    The self-assembly of block copolymer micelles occurs through a relaxation process dominated by the exchange of individual polymer chains. The objective of this work is to probe the single chain exchange of block copolymer micelles with varying core-solvent interactions, utilizing time-resolved neutron scattering (TR-SANS). The interactions between the core-forming polymer and the solvent has many implications for the micelle structure, including the aggregation number, micelle size, and interfacial tension. However, few studies have investigated the effect of the core polymer-solvent interactions on the dynamics of micelle formation. We will focus our study on poly(epsilon-caprolactone-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers forming micelle structures in mixtures of water and tetrahydrofuran (THF). It was observed that changing the THF concentration, which varies the degree of repulsion between the core and solvent, greatly influences the single chain exchange rate in this system.

  16. Star formation in Chamaeleon I and III: a molecular line study of the starless core population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitali, A. E.; Belloche, A.; Garrod, R. T.; Parise, B.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The Chamaeleon dark molecular clouds are excellent nearby targets for low-mass star formation studies. Even though they belong to the same cloud complex, Cha I and II are actively forming stars while Cha III shows no sign of ongoing star formation. Aims: We aim to determine the driving factors that have led to the very different levels of star formation activity in Cha I and III and examine the dynamical state and possible evolution of the starless cores within them. Methods: Observations were performed in various molecular transitions with the APEX and Mopra telescopes. We examine the kinematics of the starless cores in the clouds through a virial analysis, a search for contraction motions, and velocity gradients. The chemical differences in the two clouds are explored through their fractional molecular abundances, derived from a non-LTE analysis, and comparison to predictions of chemical models. Results: Five cores are gravitationally bound in Cha I and one in Cha III. The so-called infall signature indicating contraction motions is seen toward 8-17 cores in Cha I and 2-5 cores in Cha III, which leads to a range of 13-28% of the cores in Cha I and 10-25% of the cores in Cha III that are contracting and may become prestellar. There is no significant difference in the turbulence level in the two clouds. Future dynamical interactions between the cores will not be dynamically significant in either Cha I or III, but the subregion Cha I North may experience collisions between cores within ~0.7 Myr. Turbulence dissipation in the cores of both clouds is seen in the high-density tracers N2H+ 1-0 and HC3N 10-9 which have lower non-thermal velocity dispersions compared to C17O 2-1, C18O 2-1, and C34S 2-1. Evidence of depletion in the Cha I core interiors is seen in the abundance distributions of the latter three molecules. The median fractional abundance of C18O is lower in Cha III than Cha I by a factor of ~2. The median abundances of most molecules (except

  17. Nondestructive observation of teeth post core space using optical coherence tomography: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Takuya; Mine, Atsushi; Omiya, Kouta; Matsumoto, Mariko; Nakatani, Hayaki; Iwashita, Taichi; Ohmi, Masato; Awazu, Kunio; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    Coronal tooth lesions, such as caries, enamel cracking, and composite resin restoration cavities, have been observed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). This pilot study was performed to verify whether OCT could reveal details of root canals filled with resin core build-up. A dual-cure, one-step, self-etch adhesive system-bonding agent (Clearfil Bond SE ONE, Kuraray Noritake Dental) and dual-cure resin composite core material (Clearfil DC Core Automix ONE, Kuraray Noritake Dental) were used according to the manufacturer's instructions in root canals. OCT was performed at three stages of the core build-up: after the post space preparation, after bonding application, and after resin core fabrication. The cementum was removed in the cementum absent group and the root was left untreated in the cementum present group. Bubbles were observed in the resin cores and gaps formed between the resin core and dentin. In the cementum absent group, the internal structure of the root could be visualized clearly compared with the cementum present group. The root internal structure could be observed by OCT and the image became clearer when cementum was removed. PMID:24711153

  18. Core outcome measures for exercise studies in people with multiple sclerosis: recommendations from a multidisciplinary consensus meeting.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lorna; Coote, Susan; Crosbie, Jean; Dixon, Diane; Hale, Leigh; Holloway, Ed; McCrone, Paul; Miller, Linda; Saxton, John; Sincock, Caroline; White, Lesley

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that exercise is beneficial for people with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, statistical pooling of data is difficult because of the diversity of outcome measures used. The objective of this review is to report the recommendations of an International Consensus Meeting for a core set of outcome measures for use in exercise studies in MS. From the 100 categories of the International Classification of Function Core Sets for MS, 57 categories were considered as likely/potentially likely to be affected by exercise and were clustered into seven core groups. Outcome measures to address each group were evaluated regarding, for example, psychometric properties. The following are recommended: Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) or Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) for energy and drive, 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) for exercise tolerance, Timed Up and Go (TUG) for muscle function and moving around, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) or Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 Instrument (MSQoL54) for quality of life and body mass index (BMI) or waist-hip ratio (WHR) for the health risks associated with excess body fat. A cost effectiveness analysis and qualitative evaluation should be included where possible. Using these core measures ensures that future meta-analyses of exercise studies in MS are more robust and thus more effectively inform practice. PMID:24639480

  19. Initial Studies of Core and Edge Transport of NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    E.J. Synakowski; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; C.E. Bush; C. Bourdelle; D. Darrow; W. Dorland; A. Ejiri; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; S. Kubota; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; R.J. Maqueda; J.E. Menard; D. Mueller; A. Rosenberg; S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; G. Taylor; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; W. Peebles; Y-K.M. Peng; A.L. Roquemore , C.H. Skinner; V.A. Soukhanovskii; and the NSTX Research Team

    2001-09-19

    Rapidly developing diagnostic, operational, and analysis capability is enabling the first detailed local physics studies to begin in high-beta plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These studies are motivated in part by energy confinement times in neutral-beam-heated discharges that are favorable with respect to predictions from the ITER-89P scaling expression. Analysis of heat fluxes based on profile measurements with neutral-beam injection (NBI) suggest that the ion thermal transport may be exceptionally low, and that electron thermal transport is the dominant loss channel. This analysis motivates studies of possible sources of ion heating not presently accounted for by classical collisional processes. Gyrokinetic microstability studies indicate that long wavelength turbulence with k(subscript ''theta'') rho(subscript ''i'') {approx} 0.1-1 may be suppressed in these plasmas, while modes with k(subscript ''theta'') rho(subscript ''i'') {approx} 50 may be robust. High-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) heating efficiently heats electrons on NSTX, and studies have begun using it to assess transport in the electron channel. Regarding edge transport, H-mode [high-confinement mode] transitions occur with either NBI or HHFW heating. The power required for low-confinement mode (L-mode) to H-mode transitions far exceeds that expected from empirical edge-localized-mode-free H-mode scaling laws derived from moderate aspect ratio devices. Finally, initial fluctuation measurements made with two techniques are permitting the first characterizations of edge turbulence.

  20. The fabrication and characterization of stable core-shell superparamagnetic nanocomposites for potential application in drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifabad, M. Eizadi; Mercer, T.; Sen, T.

    2015-05-01

    Two systems of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the size range of 45-80 nm have been fabricated by the coating of bare magnetite particles with either mesoporous silica or liposomes and the loading/release of the anti-cancer drug Mitomycin C (MMC) from their surfaces has been investigated. The magnetic cores of size ˜10 nm were produced by a co-precipitation method in aqueous solution, with the silica coating containing an unstructured network of pores of size around 6 nm carried out using a surfactant-templating approach and the liposome coating achieved by an evaporation-immersion technique of the particles in a lipid solution. Stability measurements using a scanning column magnetometry technique indicated that the lipid-coating of the particles halts the sedimentation otherwise apparent in <1 h for the bare magnetite to produce an ultra-stable system and thereby overcome one of the main barriers to potential in-vivo applications. Whilst an increase in stability was also observed in the silica-coated system, it was still unstable over a few hours and will require further investigation. Magnetization curves of the coated systems were indicative of superparamagnetic behavior whilst the in vitro loading and release of MMC resulted in two distinctly different outcomes for the two systems: (i) the silica-coated particles saturated in <4 h to a loading of around 7 μg/mg of material, releasing about 6% at a near constant rate over 48 h whilst (ii) the lipid-coated particles saturated to around only 4 μg/mg over the same time period but with a subsequent rapid release rate over the first 3 h to 27% then rising near-linearly to a value of about 45% at the 48 h mark. This gives scope for systems' to be tuned to the appropriate rate and load delivery as required by clinical need with further investigations underway.

  1. Phase Equilibrium Experiments on Potential Lunar Core Compositions: Extension of Current Knowledge to Multi-Component (Fe-Ni-Si-S-C) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous geophysical and geochemical studies have suggested the existence of a small metallic lunar core, but the composition of that core is not known. Knowledge of the composition can have a large impact on the thermal evolution of the core, its possible early dynamo creation, and its overall size and fraction of solid and liquid. Thermal models predict that the current temperature at the core-mantle boundary of the Moon is near 1650 K. Re-evaluation of Apollo seismic data has highlighted the need for new data in a broader range of bulk core compositions in the PT range of the lunar core. Geochemical measurements have suggested a more volatile-rich Moon than previously thought. And GRAIL mission data may allow much better constraints on the physical nature of the lunar core. All of these factors have led us to determine new phase equilibria experimental studies in the Fe-Ni-S-C-Si system in the relevant PT range of the lunar core that will help constrain the composition of Moon's core.

  2. Study of core-shell platinum-based catalyst for methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D.; Alon, M.; Burstein, L.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Peled, E.

    A Ru core-Pt shell, XC72-supported catalyst was synthesized in a two-step process: first, by deposition of Ru on XC72 by the polyol process and then by deposition of Pt on the XC72-supported Ru, with NaBH 4 as reducing agent. The structure and composition of this core-shell catalyst were determined by EDS, XPS, TEM and XRD. Electrochemical characterization was determined with the use of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation activities of the core-shell catalyst were studied at 80 °C and compared to those of a commercial catalyst. It was found to be significantly better (in terms of A g -1 of Pt) in the case of methanol oxidation and worse in the case of ethylene glycol oxidation. Possible reasons for the lower ethylene glycol oxidation activity of the core-shell catalyst are discussed.

  3. Magnetic studies of erosion in a Scottish lake catchment. 1. Core chronology and correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, P.G.; Dearing J.A.; Oldfield, F.

    1985-11-01

    Magnetic susceptibility, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 14/C, and paleomagnetic secular variation are used to establish the chronology of sedimentation in a set of cores from Loch Frisa in western Scotland. The /sup 14/C dates obtained are not compatible with the chronology derived from all the other techniques and this is ascribed to inwash of old particulate carbon from the watershed. Central cores show little evidence of changes in sedimentation rate over the last 150 years whereas marginal cores contain evidence of major increases arising from ploughing and from drainage associated with catchment afforestation since 1935. The results illustrate the value of a multiple core approach to sedimentation and erosion studies even where complex lake morphometry precludes calculation of sediment budgets.

  4. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Ilas, Dan; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Cisneros, Anselmo T; Kelly, Ryan P; Gehin, Jess C

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  5. Cycle 0(CY1991) NLS trade studies and analyses report. Book 1: Structures and core vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report (SR-1: Structures, Trades, and Analysis), documents the Core Tankage Trades and analyses performed in support of the National Launch System (NLS) Cycle 0 preliminary design activities. The report covers trades that were conducted on the Vehicle Assembly, Fwd Skirt, LO2 Tank, Intertank, LH2 Tank, and Aft Skirt of the NLS Core Tankage. For each trade study, a two page executive summary and the detail trade study are provided. The trade studies contain study results, recommended changes to the Cycle 0 Baselines, and suggested follow on tasks to be performed during Cycle 1.

  6. A Global Study of Inner Core Boundary Topography and its Temporal Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibourichene, A.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The inner core boundary (ICB) separates the solid inner core from the surrounding liquid outer core. Its detailed properties, such as its shape, the density jump across it or its topography are key for understanding the dynamics of the core and, ultimately, the generation and sustained character of the Earth's magnetic field. The determination of the ICB topography and its variation with time could also enhance our understanding of the inner core growth and its past history.Seismology makes use of two phases to study the shallow inner core : the PKiKP, reflected at the ICB and the PKIKP, refracted into the inner core. The PKiKP/PKIKP amplitude ratio and the travel time residual of these phases characterize the vicinity of the ICB and may help constrain ICB topography. Different studies propose various wavelengths for this topography: from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers. Several parameters can affect PKiKP/PKIKP amplitude ratios and the corresponding differential travel time, such as the quality factor of the shallow inner core, the density jump at the ICB, the geometry of the ray paths or even the reflection coefficient at the ICB. We present a global map of PKiKP/PKIKP amplitude ratios and differential travel times filtered in different pass-bands, with regional densification based, in particular, on the relatively short wavelength sampling afforded by large aperture broadband arrays, such as USArray, and discuss their spatial variability and interpretation in terms of ICB topography, as appropriate.We also have assembled a catalog of high quality doublets which provide a reference for the stability of the measurements, and point to possible time variability of the topography.

  7. Relationship of Core Self-Evaluation (CSE) to Approaches to Student Learning and Studying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starcher, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Insights on the use of the Core Self-Evaluation (CSE) and Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) instruments are presented. The relationship of students' CSE with their approach to studying and learning is explored. Differences in approach to studying are also analyzed based on several categorical variables.

  8. A study on reactor core failure thresholds to safety operation of LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuo, Haga; Hiroshi, Endo; Tomoko, Ishizu; Yoshihisa, Shindo

    2006-07-01

    Japan Nuclear Safety Organization (JNES) has been developing the methodology and computer codes for applying level-1 PSA to LMFBR. Many of our efforts have been directed to the judging conditions of reactor core damage and the time allowed to initiate the accident management. Several candidates of the reactor core failure threshold were examined to a typical proto-type LMFBR with MOX fuel based on the plant thermal-hydraulic analyses to the actual progressions leading to the core damage. The results of the present study showed that the judging condition of coolant-boundary integrity failure, 750 degree-C of the boundary temperature, is enough as the threshold of core damage to PLOHS (protected loss-of-heat sink). High-temperature fuel cladding creep failure will not take place before the coolant-boundary reaches the judging temperature and sodium boiling will not occur due to the system pressure rise. In cases of ATWS (anticipated transient without scrum) the accident progression is so fast and the reactor core damage will be inevitable even a realistic negative reactivity insertion due to the temperature rise is considered. Only in the case of ULOHS (unprotected loss-of-heat sink) a relatively long time of 11 min will be allowed till the shut-down of the reactor before the core damage. (authors)

  9. DFT study of structure, IR and Raman spectra of the fluorescent "Janus" dendron built from cyclotriphosphazene core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukova, I. I.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Fuchs, S.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2011-11-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the zero generation dendron, possessing five fluorescent dansyl terminal groups, cyclotriphosphazene core, and one carbamate function G0v were studied. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for G0v dendron on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that dendron molecule G0v has a concave lens structure with slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of G0v dendron were interpreted by means of potential energy distributions. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed. The frequency of ν(N-H) band in the IR spectrum reveal the presence of H-bonds in the G0v dendron.

  10. Ground-state properties of alkali dimers and their cations (including the elements Li, Na, and K) from ab initio calculations with effective core polarization potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolfgang; Meyer, Wilfried

    1984-04-01

    Extensive all-electron SCF and valence CI calculations are presented for alkali dimer systems with consideration of intershell correlation effects by use of an effective core polarization potential (CPP), which contains only a single adjustable atomic parameter. High accuracy is obtained for the ground-state spectroscopic constants of the studied molecules. The maximum deviations from accurate experimental data are as follows: 1% or 0.03 Å for Re, 2% or 100 cm-1 for De, 0.5% or 1 cm-1 for ωe, and 0.2% or 100 cm-1 for ionization energies. For experimentally uncertain or unknown values reliable predictions can thus be made. The calculated dipole moments for LiK and NaK agree with experiment to within 0.1%, but for LiNa we obtain a deviation of 8% or 0.036 D. An analysis of molecular core polarization contributions reveals the reasons for some systematic defects in previous pseudopotential calculations.

  11. Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-05-05

    A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance

  12. Study on Ultra-Long Life,Small U-Zr Metallic Fuelled Core With Burnable Poison

    SciTech Connect

    Kenji Tsuji; Hiromitsu Inagaki; Akira Nishikawa; Hisato Matsumiya; Yoshiaki Sakashita; Yasuyuki Moriki; Mitsuaki Yamaoka; Norihiko Handa

    2002-07-01

    A conceptual design for a 50 MWe sodium cooled, U-Pu-Zr metallic fuelled, fast reactor core, which aims at a core lifetime of 30 years, has been performed [1]. As for the compensation for a large burn-up reactivity through 30 years, an axially movable reflector, which is located around the core, carries the major part of it and a burnable poison does the rest. This concept has achieved not only a long core lifetime but also a high discharged burn-up. On this study, a conceptual design for a small fast reactor loading U-Zr metallic fuelled core instead of U-Pu-Zr fuelled core has been conducted, based on the original core arrangement of 4S reactor [2]. Within the range of this study including safety requirements, adopting the burnable poison would be effective to construct a core concept that achieves both a long lifetime and a high discharged burn-up. (authors)

  13. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  14. High School Teachers' Perspectives on the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2016-01-01

    This was an exploratory study that examined high school teachers' perspectives about their early experiences with the English language arts Common Core State Standards. The sources of data for the study included a survey and structured interviews. Twenty-three high school ELA teachers from one unified school district in Southern California…

  15. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1995-07-01

    MRCI (configuration interaction) calculations were used to examine possible pathways for the O{sub 2} + CCH reaction. The H{sub 2} + CN potential surface was examined. An initial survey was made of the HCl + CN potential energy surface at a low level of theory.

  16. EVALUATION OF INTACT SOIL-CORE MICROCOSMS FOR DETERMINING POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON NUTRIENT DYNAMICS BY GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient export from intact soil-core microcosms in leachate or by plant uptake was evaluated as a means to assess the ecosystem impacts from the environmental release of genetically modified root-colonizing bacteria. ntact cores of two soil types, a Burbank sandy loam and an Pal...

  17. A Chandra Study of the Image Power Spectra of 41 Cool Core and Non-cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenhao; Xu, Haiguang; Zhu, Zhenghao; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Gu, Liyi; Zhang, Zhongli; Liu, Chengze; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose a new diagnostic to segregate cool core (CC) clusters from non-CC (NCC) clusters by studying the two-dimensional power spectra of the X-ray images observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our sample contains 41 members (z=0.01{--}0.54) which are selected from the Chandra archive when a high photon count, an adequate angular resolution, a relatively complete detector coverage, and coincident CC–NCC classifications derived with three traditional diagnostics are simultaneously guaranteed. We find that in the log–log space the derived image power spectra can be well represented by a constant model component at large wavenumbers, while at small wavenumbers a power excess beyond the constant component appears in all clusters, with a clear tendency that the excess is stronger in CC clusters. By introducing a new CC diagnostic parameter, i.e., the power excess index (PEI), we classify the clusters in our sample and compare the results with those obtained with three traditional CC diagnostics. We find that the results agree with each other very well. By calculating the PEI values of the simulated clusters, we find that the new diagnostic works well at redshifts up to 0.5 for intermediately sized and massive clusters with a typical Chandra or XMM-Newton pointing observation. The new CC diagnostic has several advantages over its counterparts, e.g., it is free of the effects of the commonly seen centroid shift of the X-ray halo caused by merger event, and the corresponding calculation is straightforward, almost irrelevant to the complicated spectral analysis.

  18. Steric and electronic contributions to the core reactivity of monoprotonated 5-phenylporphyrin: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presselt, Martin; Wojdyr, Michal; Beenken, Wichard J. D.; Kruk, Mikalai; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-05-01

    We analyse the behaviour of mono-protonated 5-phenylporphyrin upon por-ph torsion to get insights into torsion-induced reactivity changes. In contrast to the majority of structures, nitrogen-accessibility volume (Vreact) is larger for front-side (exposed nitrogen) than for backside-attacks at the optimised structure. The high reactivity of nitrogen is determined by the electrostatic potential distribution inside the porphyrine core. Even if Vreact at certain structures is smaller for front side than for backside attacks the mean electrostatic-potential-density φ inside Vreact reveals a lower barrier for front side than for backside protonation, and this holds true for the majority of structures.

  19. Studies of mixed HEU-LEU-MTR cores using 3D models

    SciTech Connect

    Haenggi, P.; Lehmann, E.; Hammer, J.; Christen, R.

    1997-08-01

    Several different core loadings were assembled at the SAPHIR research reactor in Switzerland combining the available types of MTR-type fuel elements, consisting mainly of both HEU and LEU fuel. Bearing in mind the well known problems which can occur in such configurations (especially power peaking), investigations have been carried out for each new loading with a 2D neutron transport code (BOXER). The axial effects were approximated by a global buckling value and therefore the radial effects could be studied in considerably detail. Some of the results were reported at earlier RERTR meetings and were compared to those obtained by other methods and with experimental values. For the explicit study of the third dimension of the core, another code (SILWER), which has been developed in PSI for LWR power plant cores, has been selected. With the help of an adapted model for the MTR-core of SAPHIR, several important questions have been addressed. Among other aspects, the estimation of the axial contribution to the hot channel factors, the influence of the control rod position and of the Xe-poisoning on the power distribution were studied. Special attention was given to a core position where a new element was assumed placed near a empty, water filled position. The comparison of elements of low and high enrichments at this position was made in terms of the induced power peaks, with explicit consideration of axial effects. The program SILWER has proven to be applicable to MTR-cores for the investigation of axial effects. For routine use as for the support of reactor operation, this 3D code is a good supplement to the standard 2D model.

  20. Experimental Study on the Performance of IIST Passive Core Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-Jang Chang; Chien-Hsiung Lee; Wen-Tan Hong; Wang, Lance L.C.

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to conduct the experiments at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) Integral System Test (IIST) facility for evaluation of the performance of the passive core cooling system (PCCS) during the cold-leg small break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs). Five experiments were performed with (1) three different break sizes, 2%, 0.5%, and 0.2% (approximately corresponding to 1 1/4'', 2'', and 4'' breaks for Maanshan nuclear power plant), and (2) 0.2% and 0.5% without actuation of the first-stage and third-stage automatic depressurization valve (ADS-1 and ADS-3) to initiate PCCS for assessing its capacity in accident management. The detailed descriptions of general system response and the interactions of core makeup tanks (CMTs), accumulators (ACCs), automatic depressurization system (ADS), passive residual heat Removal (PRHR), and in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) on the core heat removal are included. The results show: (1) core long term cooling can be maintained for all cases following the PCCS procedures, (2) the core can be covered for the cases of the 0.2% and 0.5% breaks without actuation of ADS-1 and ADS-3. (authors)

  1. Flow visualization studies of the cores of thin vortex rings in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Ian; Niemela, Joseph; Donnelly, Russell

    2002-11-01

    We have been studying the propagation of thin core vortex rings in water with the aim of trying to describe them in considerable detail by simple equations. A major problem has been to measure the core radius by some means. Saffman has proposed a relationship for the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid in which the core parameter is the square root of the product of kinematic viscosity and time, where time is measured from some virtual origin. We have decided to take the relevant time as the stroke time for the piston creating the rings. We visualize our rings using the Baker Ph technique where the flow pattern is marked by thymol blue. We pass a laser beam through the ring as it passes and use a photocell to detect the transmitted intensity. We find a dip in intensity as the rings passes, and a distinctive notch in the center of the distribution which we take to be a measure of the core itself. Measurements show that the measured core size agrees reasonably well with Saffman's formula,scales properly with piston stroke time, and is independent of stroke length.

  2. Biomarker signatures in sediment cores of Lake Urmia (NW Iran): Potential implications for paleo-climate and paleo-environment reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghipour, Negar; Eglinton, Timothy Ian; McIntyre, Cameron; Darvishi Khatooni, Javad; Hunziker, Daniela; Mohammadi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Lake Urmia, in northwest Iran, is the largest saline lake in the Middle East with a surface area of ~ 5000km2. Historical documents indicate its existence since at least 2000 years BC, and palynological investigation of a 100 m-long core suggest it contains a sedimentary record spanning the last 200 ka. Despite this potential as an archive of paleo-climate and paleo-environmental information, to date there has been no molecular organic geochemical investigation or precise dating of these sediments. As part of an exploratory study, we have analyzed material from 3 recently collected 8 m-long cores from the eastern, western and middle part of the lake, with the aim of gaining insight in to past depositional and environmental conditions from biomarker signatures preserved in Lake Urmia sediments. The main objectives are to 1) constrain major source(s) of organic matter and gain insights into carbon cycle and depositional processes from bulk isotopic (δ13Corg, 14Corg) and molecular information, 2) determine the applicability of molecular proxies (TEX86 index derived from glyceroldialkylglycerol tetraethers, GDGTs, and unsaturation index UK37 based on long chain alkenones) for paleo-temperature reconstruction and 3) reconstruct the paleo- vegetation and hydrology from compound-specific stable isotopes (δ13C and δD of n-alkanes). In select samples examined from the three cores, we find the hydrocarbon fractions are dominated by long-chain n-alkanes, with n-C29 and C31 as the dominant homologues in most of the samples. Based on the n-alkane distribution, we distinguish two main types; Type 1 mainly includes the samples deeper than ca 4 m (CPI= 10.2, ACL= 30), characteristic of a terrestrial higher plant source; Type 2 comprises mainly shallower samples (CPI =1.5, ACL = 27.3) which may suggest an increased contribution of aquatic plants. Preliminary GDGT analyses indicate low BIT values for most samples, which suggest little input of soil-derived branched-GDGTs. The

  3. Motivation to Study Core French: Comparing Recent Immigrants and Canadian-Born Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mady, Callie J.

    2010-01-01

    As the number of Allophone students attending public schools in Canada continues to increase (Statistics Canada, 2008), it is clear that a need exists in English-dominant areas to purposefully address the integration of these students into core French. I report the findings of a mixed-method study that was conducted to assess and compare the…

  4. Studies of Medical Students' Activities on Core Surgical Clerkships: A Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, W. Robert; Wile, Marcia Z.

    The core surgical clerkship is described as the most intensive clinical experience during the student's first three years, and one which is extremely difficult to examine systematically. The research strategy, methodologies, data collected, and major findings of a study of such clerkships are reported. The data from more than 1000 hours of…

  5. Synthetic Study of Pactamycin: Enantioselective Construction of the Pactamycin Core with Five Contiguous Stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Mami; Hayashi, Minami; Hamada, Yasumasa; Nemoto, Tetsuhiro

    2016-05-20

    A synthetic study of pactamycin is described. Enantioselective construction of the aminocyclopentitol core of pactamycin bearing five contiguous stereocenters was achieved based on an organocatalytic asymmetric aziridination of 2-cyclopentene-1-one, a regio- and diastereoselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, and a rhodium-catalyzed C-H amination reaction. PMID:27171747

  6. History as the Core of the Precollege Social Studies Curriculum. A Statement of Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organization of History Teachers, Chicago, IL.

    This policy statement by a national professional association of history teachers from kindergarten through grade 12 begins by pointing out that history currently functions as the core of the social studies curriculum prior to college. This position should be expanded and enhanced as a matter of sound curriculum policy. History alone of the social…

  7. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Therapy for Deaf Children: Four Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Rosalind; Ford, Katie; Thomas, Jane; Oyebade, Natalie; Bennett, Danita; Dodd, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated whether core vocabulary intervention (CVT) improved single word speech accuracy, consistency and intelligibility in four 9-11-year-old children with profound sensori-neural deafness fitted with cochlear implants and/or digital hearing aids. Their speech was characterized by inconsistent production of different error forms for…

  8. Reframing a Social Studies Methods Course: Preparing Elementary Teacher Candidates for the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleeson, Ann Marie; D'Souza, Lisa Andries

    2016-01-01

    The emphasis on disciplinary literacy skills embedded within the Common Core State Standards requires a shift in preparing teachers to explicitly address the craft of reading and writing within social studies instruction. As teacher educators, we think it is imperative to understand the ways in which our teacher candidates integrate literacy…

  9. Contents of a Core Library in Continuing Medical Education: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.; Leist, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: In developing their professional competence, those who are interested in the practice of continuing medical education (CME) should recognize the knowledge base that defines their field. This study systematically identifies and organizes a list of books and journals comprising a core library (100 books/15 journals) for CME…

  10. A Pilot Study of Core Topics in Introductory Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, George I., III; Smith, Stephanie H.; Losonczy-Marshall, Marta

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the similarities and differences in the topics and references in selected chapters of eight introductory social psychology textbooks and six developmental psychology textbooks. We wanted to determine the extent to which there were core concepts and references presented in these chapters. We found a relatively small set of core…

  11. Design Core Commonalities: A Study of the College of Design at Iowa State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venes, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive study asks what a group of rather diverse disciplines have in common. It involves a cross-disciplinary examination of an entire college, the College of Design at Iowa State University. This research was intended to provide a sense of direction in developing and assessing possible core content. The reasoning was that material…

  12. Core Competencies: The Challenge for Graduate Peace and Conflict Studies Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windmueller, John; Wayne, Ellen Kabcenell; Botes, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    This article uses a case study of the assessment of a graduate program in negotiations and conflict management as a springboard for discussing several critical, but unanswered questions in our field. It raises questions regarding the lack of clear core competencies and expectations regarding curricula at the graduate-level of peace and conflict…

  13. Fabrication and Pilot In Vivo Study of a Collagen-BDDGE-Elastin Core-Shell Scaffold for Tendon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sandri, Monica; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Iafisco, Michele; Savini, Elisa; Sprio, Simone; Cunha, Carla; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Veronesi, Francesca; Fini, Milena; Salvatore, Luca; Sannino, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio; Tampieri, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The development of bio-devices for complete regeneration of ligament and tendon tissues is presently one of the biggest challenges in tissue engineering. Such device must simultaneously possess optimal mechanical performance, suitable porous structure, and biocompatible microenvironment. This study proposes a novel collagen-BDDGE-elastin (CBE)-based device for tendon tissue engineering, by the combination of two different modules: (i) a load-bearing, non-porous, “core scaffold” developed by braiding CBE membranes fabricated via an evaporative process and (ii) a hollow, highly porous, “shell scaffold” obtained by uniaxial freezing followed by freeze-drying of CBE suspension, designed to function as a physical guide and reservoir of cells to promote the regenerative process. Both core and shell materials demonstrated good cytocompatibility in vitro, and notably, the porous shell architecture directed cell alignment and population within the sample. Finally, a prototype of the core module was implanted in a rat tendon lesion model, and histological analysis demonstrated its safety, biocompatibility, and ability to induce tendon regeneration. Overall, our results indicate that such device may have the potential to support and induce in situ tendon regeneration. PMID:27446909

  14. Fabrication and Pilot In Vivo Study of a Collagen-BDDGE-Elastin Core-Shell Scaffold for Tendon Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Monica; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Iafisco, Michele; Savini, Elisa; Sprio, Simone; Cunha, Carla; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Veronesi, Francesca; Fini, Milena; Salvatore, Luca; Sannino, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio; Tampieri, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The development of bio-devices for complete regeneration of ligament and tendon tissues is presently one of the biggest challenges in tissue engineering. Such device must simultaneously possess optimal mechanical performance, suitable porous structure, and biocompatible microenvironment. This study proposes a novel collagen-BDDGE-elastin (CBE)-based device for tendon tissue engineering, by the combination of two different modules: (i) a load-bearing, non-porous, "core scaffold" developed by braiding CBE membranes fabricated via an evaporative process and (ii) a hollow, highly porous, "shell scaffold" obtained by uniaxial freezing followed by freeze-drying of CBE suspension, designed to function as a physical guide and reservoir of cells to promote the regenerative process. Both core and shell materials demonstrated good cytocompatibility in vitro, and notably, the porous shell architecture directed cell alignment and population within the sample. Finally, a prototype of the core module was implanted in a rat tendon lesion model, and histological analysis demonstrated its safety, biocompatibility, and ability to induce tendon regeneration. Overall, our results indicate that such device may have the potential to support and induce in situ tendon regeneration. PMID:27446909

  15. Correction of interstitial water changes in calibration methods applied to XRF core-scanning major elements in long sediment cores: Case study from the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Quan; Kissel, Catherine; Govin, Aline; Liu, Zhifei; Xie, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Fast and nondestructive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning provides high-resolution element data that are widely used in paleoclimate studies. However, various matrix and specimen effects prevent the use of semiquantitative raw XRF core-scanning intensities for robust paleoenvironmental interpretations. We present here a case study of a 50.8 m-long piston Core MD12-3432 retrieved from the northern South China Sea. The absorption effect of interstitial water is identified as the major source of deviations between XRF core-scanning intensities and measured element concentrations. The existing two calibration methods, i.e., normalized median-scaled calibration (NMS) and multivariate log-ratio calibration (MLC), are tested with this sequence after the application of water absorption correction. The results indicate that an improvement is still required to appropriately correct the influence of downcore changes in interstitial water content in the long sediment core. Consequently, we implement a new polynomial water content correction in NMS and MLC methods, referred as NPS and P_MLC calibrations. Results calibrated by these two improved methods indicate that the influence of downcore water content changes is now appropriately corrected. We therefore recommend either of the two methods to be applied for robust paleoenvironmental interpretations of major elements measured by XRF-scanning in long sediment sequences with significant downcore interstitial water content changes.

  16. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schroedinger equation must be solved. Our approach starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wave functions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Dynamical electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations. With this approach, we are able to provide chemically useful predictions of the energetics for many systems. A second aspect of this program is the development of techniques to fit multi-dimensional potential surfaces to convenient, global, analytic functions that can then be used in dynamics calculations.

  17. Accurate ab initio potential energy curve of O2. II. Core-valence correlations, relativistic contributions, and vibration-rotation spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bytautas, Laimutis; Matsunaga, Nikita; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2010-02-21

    In the first paper of this series, a very accurate ab initio potential energy curve of the (3)Sigma(g)(-) ground state of O(2) has been determined in the approximation that all valence shell electron correlations were calculated at the complete basis set limit. In the present study, the corrections arising from core electron correlations and relativity effects, viz., spin-orbit coupling and scalar relativity, are determined and added to the potential energy curve. From the 24 points calculated on this curve, an analytical expression in terms of even-tempered Gaussian functions is determined and, from it, the vibrational and rotational energy levels are calculated by means of the discrete variable representation. We find 42 vibrational levels. Experimental data (from the Schumann-Runge band system) only yield the lowest 36 levels due to significant reduction in the transition intensities of higher levels. For the 35 term values G(v), the mean absolute deviation between theoretical and experimental data is 12.8 cm(-1). The dissociation energy with respect to the lowest vibrational energy is calculated within 25 cm(-1) of the experimental value of 41,268.2+/-3 cm(-1). The theoretical crossing between the (3)Sigma(g)(-) state and the (1)Sigma(g)(+) state is found to occur at 2.22 A and the spin-orbit coupling in this region is analyzed. PMID:20170227

  18. Charge separation and energy transfer in the photosystem II core complex studied by femtosecond midinfrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pawlowicz, N P; Groot, M-L; van Stokkum, I H M; Breton, J; van Grondelle, R

    2007-10-15

    The core of photosystem II (PSII) of green plants contains the reaction center (RC) proteins D1D2-cytb559 and two core antennas CP43 and CP47. We have used time-resolved visible pump/midinfrared probe spectroscopy in the region between 1600 and 1800 cm(-1) to study the energy transfer and charge separation events within PSII cores. The absorption difference spectra in the region of the keto and ester chlorophyll modes show spectral evolution with time constants of 3 ps, 27 ps, 200 ps, and 2 ns. Comparison of infrared (IR) difference spectra obtained for the isolated antennas CP43 and CP47 and the D1D2-RC with those measured for the PSII core allowed us to identify the features specific for each of the PSII core components. From the presence of the CP43 and CP47 specific features in the spectra up to time delays of 20-30 ps, we conclude that the main part of the energy transfer from the antennas to the RC occurs on this timescale. Direct excitation of the pigments in the RC evolution associated difference spectra to radical pair formation of PD1+PheoD1- on the same timescale as multi-excitation annihilation and excited state equilibration within the antennas CP43 and CP47, which occur within approximately 1-3 ps. The formation of the earlier radical pair ChlD1+PheoD1-, as identified in isolated D1D2 complexes with time-resolved mid-IR spectroscopy is not observed in the current data, probably because of its relatively low concentration. Relaxation of the state PD1+PheoD1-, caused by a drop in free energy, occurs in 200 ps in closed cores. We conclude that the kinetic model proposed earlier for the energy and electron transfer dynamics within the D1D2-RC, plus two slowly energy-transferring antennas C43 and CP47 explain the complex excited state and charge separation dynamics in the PSII core very well. We further show that the time-resolved IR-difference spectrum of PD1+PheoD1- as observed in PSII cores is virtually identical to that observed in the isolated D1D2-RC

  19. Study of Hydrothermal Mineralization in 2013 Drill Core from Hawaii Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautze, N. C.; Calvin, W. M.; Moore, J.; Haskins, E.; Thomas, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project (HGRP) drilled a continuously-cored hole to nearly 2 km depth near the Saddle Road between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanoes on Hawaii Island in March of 2013. Temperatures at the bottom of the hole were unexpectedly high and reached over 100 C. A study is underway to characterize hydrothermal (secondary) mineralization in the core at depths below ~ 1 km. Secondary mineralization can indicate the presence, chemistry, and temperature of hydrothermal fluids, therein helping to characterize a present and/or past geothermal system. To date, the study is two pronged. In collaboration with University Nevada Reno (UNR) we used an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) FieldSpec instrument to obtain nearly 800 spectra from core depths spanning 3190 to 5785 feet. This device has a 2 cm contact probe that measures from 0.4 to 2.5 mm, and has been used successfully by UNR to identify depth-associated changes in alteration mineralogy and zoning in drill core from other pilot studies. The spectra indicate that rocks above a depth of ~1 km are only weakly altered. At greater depths to the base of the well, chlorite, possibly with some mica, and zeolites are common. The majority of zeolites are spectrally similar to each other at these wavelengths, however analcime and natrolite are uniquely identified in some sections. Epidote was not observed. The secondary mineral assemblages suggest that the alteration was produced by moderate temperature neutral pH fluids. Here, we used the spectral data as a survey tool to help identify and select over 20 sections of core for sampling and more detailed mineralogical analysis using traditional X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and petrographic techniques, conducted in collaboration with University of Utah. This presentation will include mineral maps with depth and results of the petrographic analyses.

  20. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.

  1. The identification of factors linked to the potential acceptance of transgenic biopharmaceuticals: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Duguay, Francois; Katsanis, Lea Prevel; Thakor, Mrugank V

    2003-01-01

    In this exploratory study, Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory was used to identify which factors are likely to contribute to the potential acceptance of transgenic biopharmaceuticals (TG-Bs). These products are not yet available to the general public. A scale was designed to assess three of five core attributes related to the potential adoption rate of innovations (Rogers 1995), as well as to measure potential acceptance characteristics for biotechnology products. These attributes were relative advantage, compatibility with existing values, and complexity. In addition, two other characteristics were included: knowledge (Gartrell and Gartrell 1979) and perceived risks (Bauer 1960). The survey was completed by 74 consumers (78% response rate) using convenience sampling. The research findings show that Rogers' three core attributes are supported, but that knowledge andperceived risks were excluded from the model. The model for transgenic biopharmaceuticals consists of: 1. Consumer-related benefits (positively correlated to potential adoption). 2. New types of animals (negatively correlated to potential 3. Perceived complexity (negatively correlated to potential adoption). All the scaled items developed for this study were highly significant, which indicates that they can be used successfully by other researchers working in this field. As TG-Bs are a discontinuous innovation, biotechnology companies may need to present the benefits of these products, as well as the ease of their use prior to their launch, in order to increase their potential acceptance by consumers. PMID:15271632

  2. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  3. Revised results for geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton Salt Dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-02-01

    This report is a revision of SAND2009-0852. SAND2009-0852 was revised because it was discovered that a gage used in the original testing was mis-calibrated. Following the recalibration, all affected raw data were recalculated and re-presented. Most revised data is similar to, but slightly different than, the original data. Following the data re-analysis, none of the inferences or conclusions about the data or site relative to the SAND2009-0852 data have been changed. A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to

  4. Studies of Deteriorated Heat Transfer in Prismatic Cores Stemming from Irradiation-Induced Geometry Distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian G.; Schultz, Richard R.; McEligot, Don M.; McCreery, Glenn

    2015-08-31

    A reference design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is to use General Atomics Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). For such a configuration in normal operation, the helium coolant flow proceeds from the upper plenum to the lower plenum principally through the core coolant channels and the interstitial gaps (bypass flow) that separate the prismatic blocks from one another. Only the core prismatic blocks have coolant channels. The interstitial gaps are present throughout the core, the inner reflector region, and the out reflector region. The bypass flows in a prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) are of potential concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels and, thereby, can increase outlet gas temperatures and maximum fuel temperatures. Consequently, it is appropriate to account for bypass flows in reactor thermal gas dynamic analyses. The objectives of this project include the following: fundamentally understand bypass flow and heat transfer at scaled, undistorted conditions and with geometry distortions; develop improved estimates of associated loss coefficients, surface friction and heat transfer for systems and network codes; and obtain related data for validation of CFD (computational fluid dynamic) or system (e.g., RELAP5) codes which can be employed in predictions for a GCR for normal power, reduced power, and residual heat removal operations.

  5. Image-guided Coring for Large-scale Studies in Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Montaser-Kouhsari, Laleh; Knoblauch, Nicholas W; Oh, Eun-Yeong; Baker, Gabrielle; Christensen, Stephen; Hazra, Aditi; Tamimi, Rulla M; Beck, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Sampling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks is a critical initial step in molecular pathology. Image-guided coring (IGC) is a new method for using digital pathology images to guide tissue block coring for molecular analyses. The goal of our study is to evaluate the use of IGC for both tissue-based and nucleic acid-based projects in molecular pathology. First, we used IGC to construct a tissue microarray (TMA); second, we used IGC for FFPE block sampling followed by RNA extraction; and third, we assessed the correlation between nuclear counts quantitated from the IGC images and RNA yields. We used IGC to construct a TMA containing 198 normal and breast cancer cores. Histopathologic analysis showed high accuracy for obtaining tumor and normal breast tissue. Next, we used IGC to obtain normal and tumor breast samples before RNA extraction. We selected a random subset of tumor and normal samples to perform computational image analysis to quantify nuclear density, and we built regression models to estimate RNA yields from nuclear count, age of the block, and core diameter. Number of nuclei and core diameter were the strongest predictors of RNA yields in both normal and tumor tissue. IGC is an effective method for sampling FFPE tissue blocks for TMA construction and nucleic acid extraction. We identify significant associations between quantitative nuclear counts obtained from IGC images and RNA yields, suggesting that the integration of computational image analysis with IGC may be an effective approach for tumor sampling in large-scale molecular studies. PMID:26186251

  6. Image-guided Coring for Large-scale Studies in Molecular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Montaser-Kouhsari, Laleh; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Oh, Eun-Yeong; Baker, Gabrielle; Christensen, Stephen; Hazra, Aditi; Tamimi, Rulla M.

    2016-01-01

    Sampling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks is a critical initial step in molecular pathology. Image-guided coring (IGC) is a new method for using digital pathology images to guide tissue block coring for molecular analyses. The goal of our study is to evaluate the use of IGC for both tissue-based and nucleic acid–based projects in molecular pathology. First, we used IGC to construct a tissue microarray (TMA); second, we used IGC for FFPE block sampling followed by RNA extraction; and third, we assessed the correlation between nuclear counts quantitated from the IGC images and RNA yields. We used IGC to construct a TMA containing 198 normal and breast cancer cores. Histopathologic analysis showed high accuracy for obtaining tumor and normal breast tissue. Next, we used IGC to obtain normal and tumor breast samples before RNA extraction. We selected a random subset of tumor and normal samples to perform computational image analysis to quantify nuclear density, and we built regression models to estimate RNA yields from nuclear count, age of the block, and core diameter. Number of nuclei and core diameter were the strongest predictors of RNA yields in both normal and tumor tissue. IGC is an effective method for sampling FFPE tissue blocks for TMA construction and nucleic acid extraction. We identify significant associations between quantitative nuclear counts obtained from IGC images and RNA yields, suggesting that the integration of computational image analysis with IGC may be an effective approach for tumor sampling in large-scale molecular studies. PMID:26186251

  7. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  8. Comparative structural and chemical studies of ferritin cores with gradual removal of their iron contents.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Natividad; Fernández, Belén; Sánchez, Purificación; Cuesta, Rafael; Ceolín, Marcelo; Clemente-León, Miguel; Trasobares, Susana; López-Haro, Miguel; Calvino, Jose J; Stéphan, Odile; Domínguez-Vera, José M

    2008-06-25

    Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS), Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), and SQUID magnetic studies were performed in a batch of horse spleen ferritins from which iron had been gradually removed, yielding samples containing 2200, 1200, 500, and 200 iron atoms. Taken together, findings obtained demonstrate that the ferritin iron core consists of a polyphasic structure (ferrihydrite, magnetite, hematite) and that the proportion of phases is modified by iron removal. Thus, the relative amount of magnetite in ferritin containing 2200 to 200 iron atoms rose steadily from approximately 20% to approximately 70% whereas the percentage of ferrihydrite fell from approximately 60% to approximately 20%. These results indicate a ferrihydrite-magnetite core-shell structure. It was also found that the magnetite in the ferritin iron core is not a source of free toxic ferrous iron, as previously believed. Therefore, the presence of magnetite in the ferritin cores of patients with Alzheimer's disease is not a cause of their increased brain iron(II) concentration. PMID:18507465

  9. Comparative study of mechanical properties of direct core build-up materials

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Shivrayan, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The strength greatly influences the selection of core material because core must withstand forces due to mastication and para-function for many years. This study was conducted to evaluate certain mechanical properties of commonly used materials for direct core build-up, including visible light cured composite, polyacid modified composite, resin modified glass ionomer, high copper amalgam, and silver cermet cement. Materials and Methods: All the materials were manipulated according to the manufacturer's recommendations and standard test specimens were prepared. A universal testing machine at different cross-head speed was used to determine all the four mechanical properties. Mean compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, and elastic modulus with standard deviations were calculated. Multiple comparisons of the materials were also done. Results: Considerable differences in compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength were observed. Visible light cured composite showed relatively high compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength compared with the other tested materials. Amalgam showed the highest value for elastic modulus. Silver cermet showed less value for all the properties except for elastic modulus. Conclusions: Strength is one of the most important criteria for selection of a core material. Stronger materials better resist deformation and fracture provide more equitable stress distribution, greater stability, and greater probability of clinical success. PMID:25684905

  10. [Ag20 {S2 P(OR)2 }12 ]: A Superatom Complex with a Chiral Metallic Core and High Potential for Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Rajendra S; Lin, Yan-Ru; Liao, Jian-Hong; Chen, Yuan-Jang; Liu, Yu-Chiao; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; Kahlal, Samia; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C W

    2016-07-11

    The synthesis and structural determination of a silver nanocluster [Ag20 {S2 P(OiPr)2 }12 ] (2), which contains an intrinsic chiral metallic core, is produced by reduction of one silver ion from the eight-electron superatom complex [Ag21 {S2 P(OiPr)2 }12 ](PF6 ) (1) by borohydrides. Single-crystal X-ray analysis displays an Ag20 core of pseudo C3 symmetry comprising a silver-centered Ag13 icosahedron capped by seven silver atoms. Its n-propyl derivative, [Ag20 {S2 P(OnPr)2 }12 ] (3), can also be prepared by the treatment of silver(I) salts and dithiophosphates in a stoichiometric ratio in the presence of excess amount of [BH4 ](-) . Crystal structure analyses reveal that the capping silver-atom positions relative to their icosahedral core are distinctly different in 2 and 3 and generate isomeric, chiral Ag20 cores. Both Ag20 clusters display an emission maximum in the near IR region. DFT calculations are consistent with a description within the superatom model of an 8-electron [Ag13 ](5+) core protected by a [Ag7 {S2 P(OR)2 }12 ](5-) external shell. Two additional structural variations are predicted by DFT, showing the potential for isomerism in such [Ag20 {S2 P(OR)2 }12 ] species. PMID:27189869

  11. Climatic implications of background acidity and other chemistry derived from electrical studies of the Greenland Ice Core Project ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Eric W.; Moore, John C.; Clausen, Henrik B.; Hammer, Claus U.

    1997-11-01

    High-resolution continuous profiles were obtained on the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ice core using two different electrical methods. After correction for temperature and density, the electrical conductivity method (ECM) technique responds only to acidity, while dielectric profiling (DEP) responds to acid, ammonium, and chloride. Detailed chemistry on a section of glacial-age ice allows us to confirm the calibration factor for chloride in DEP. Acidity dominates the DEP variability in the Holocene, Allerod/Bolling, and larger interstadials; ammonium dominates in the Younger Dry as, while chloride is the major contributor in cold periods including smaller interstadials. From the electrical signals plotted on a linear timescale we can deduce the background (nonvolcanic) acidity of the ice, varying from always acidic in the Holocene to always alkaline in the cold periods. In the interstadials, the ice is close to neutral, with most of it acidic in larger interstadials, most of it alkaline in smaller ones, and rapid alternations within interstadials. It is not clear whether neutralization of individual acidic particles occurred in the atmosphere or whether acid and alkaline particles coexisted until deposition in the snowpack. The changes in acidity observed at GRIP apply at least to all of Greenland and probably to much of North America. There would have been ecological effects and important changes in the uptake of some chemicals onto ice. If acidic sulfate particles were neutralized and removed from the atmosphere, which remains uncertain, then there are atmospheric chemistry and radiative effects that require further investigation.

  12. Extensional fault cores in micritic carbonate - Case studies from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastesen, Eivind; Braathen, Alvar; Nøttveit, Henning; Gabrielsen, Roy H.; Skar, Tore

    2009-04-01

    The major Pisia and Doumena faults of the Corinth Rift, Greece, are both hosted by micritic carbonate rock. Their common fault elements are principal slip surfaces, layers of fault rocks, fault rock and host rock lenses, corrugations, and smaller shear and tension fractures. Along planar fault segments, a corrugated slip surface with an associated thin fault rock layer is formed. Well-developed down-dip corrugations indicate movement along the same surface over many fault increments. Bends/jogs in the faults are sites of complex structural relations, hosting frequent lenses, more porous fault rocks, and dense networks of fractures. Major jogs in the slip surfaces have both strike and dip-oriented undulating curvature that are associated with higher order fracture networks as well as frequent lenses. Fault core lens shapes of the Doumena fault show relationship of length vs. width of 3/2. Similarly, principal slip surfaces of the two faults show undulations with aspect ratios of amplitude vs. wavelength (1:19 and 1:14) in strike-direction, despite a prominent difference in down-dip geometry. The intrinsic deformation in fault cores of micritic carbonate supports a model in which fluids entered the core by damage zone fractures that are linked to the principal slip surface. Flow along the fault core was controlled by the fracture system of lenses, and thereby lens connectivity, but may have been hampered by flow-retarding fault rocks. The flow potential is especially well developed in fault bends and breached relays due to frequent lenses and well-developed fracture networks.

  13. Generic BWR-4 degraded core in-vessel study. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Original intent of this project was to produce a phenomenological study of the in-vessel degradation which occurs during the TQUX and TQUV sequences for a generic BWR-4 from the initiation of the FSAR Chapter 15 operational transient through core debris bed formation to the failure of the primary pressure boundary. Bounding calculations were to be performed for the two high pressure and low pressure non-LOCA scenarios to assess the uncertainties in the current state of knowledge regarding the source terms for containment integrity studies. Source terms as such were defined in terms of hydrogen generation, unreacted metal, and coolant inventroy, and in terms of the form, sequencing and mode of dispersal through the primary vessel boundary. Fission product release was not to be considered as part of this study. Premature termination of the project, however, led to the dicontinuation of work on an as is basis. Work on the in-core phase from the point of scram to core debris bed formation was largely completed. A preliminary scoping calculation on the debris bed phase had been initiated. This report documents the status of the study at termination.

  14. Upping the Ante of Text Complexity in the Common Core State Standards: Examining Its Potential Impact on Young Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Mesmer, Heidi Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core Standards for the English Language Arts (CCSS) provide explicit guidelines matching grade-level bands (e.g., 2-3, 4-5) with targeted text complexity levels. The CCSS staircase accelerates text expectations for students across Grades 2-12 in order to close a gap in the complexity of texts typically used in high school and those of…

  15. A study of the earth's free core nutation using international deployment of accelerometers gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummins, Phil R.; Wahr, John M.

    1993-01-01

    In this study we consider the influence of the earth's free core nutation (FCN) on diurnal tidal admittance estimates for 11 stations of the globally distributed International Deployment of Accelerometers network. The FCN causes a resonant enhancement of the diurnal admittances which can be used to estimate some properties of the FCN. Estimations of the parameters describing the FCN (period, Q, and resonance strength) are made using data from individual stations and many stations simultaneously. These yield a result for the period of 423-452 sidereal days, which is shorter than theory predicts but is in agreement with many previous studies and suggests that the dynamical ellipticity of the core may be greater than its hydrostatic value.

  16. Paleomagnetic Study of Marine Sediment Core OR715-21 from Eastern Offshore of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Wei, K.; Huh, C.

    2009-12-01

    This study presents paleomagnetic secular variation results of a marine sediment core, named as OR715-21, taken from eastern offshore of Taiwan (121.5°E, 22.7°N, water depth 760 m). The total recovered length is 1.87 meters. Sediments in the core mainly consist of gray clay and silt. Planktonic foraminiferal shells (>250 μm, >6 mg, Globigerinoides spp. and Orbulina universa) were picked from six levels of the core and subjected to AMS 14C dating for constructing the age model. The results indicated that this core could support the information for the last 7000 years. The averaged sedimentation rate is estimated to be of about 26.5 cm/kyr. Psuedo-single domain (PSD) magnetite is identified as the most important magnetic carrier. Alternating field (AF) demagnetization was applied to treat the u-channel samples of the core. The median destructive field of the samples distributed between 15~25 mT. The characteristic remanent magnetization could be resolved after 20 mT cleaning. The paleo-declinations of the samples varied about ±200 around their mean and their paleo-inclinations varied between 300 and 500 . The variation pattern of the paleo-declination is somehow similar to the pattern compiled by Hyoto et al. (1993) based on the lake and marine sediment records from Japan except the varied amplitude is less between 4000 and 5000 yrB.P. Using NRM/ARM after 20 mT cleaning to simulate the paleo-intensity secular variation, our record shows that an increased trend began from 6500 yrB.P. to 3000 yrB.P., but decreased after. Magnetic proxies of this core indicate that 4 stages of environmental changes has happened in the area studied: (1) high magnetite abundance with relative low oxidized magnetic mineral contents occurred during ~6900 to 6200 yrB.P.; (2) a relative low abundance of magnetite with relative high oxidized magnetic minerals during ~6200 to ~5400 yrB.P.; (3) an abnormal low HIRM with relative higher ARM/SIRM could be found during the time period of ~5400

  17. Lack of Effect of Risperidone on Core Autistic Symptoms: Data from a Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Underwood-Riordan, Heather; Randall, Fellana; Zhang, Yi; Constantino, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the course of autistic symptoms, using a quantitative measure of core autistic traits, among risperidone-treated children who participated in a 10 year life course longitudinal study. Methods: Parents completed surveys of intervention history, as well as serial symptom severity measurements using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), on their autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-affected children. Fifty participants (out of a total of 184 with full intervention histories) were reported to have been treated with risperidone during the course of the study. Serial SRS scores during risperidone treatment were available for a majority of children whose parents reported a positive effect from risperidone. Results: Two thirds of risperidone-treated children (n=33) were reported by parents to have improved by taking the medication, with the principal effects described being that children were calmer, better focused, and less aggressive. SRS scores of children reported to have responded positively to risperidone did not improve over time. Conclusions: Risperidone's beneficial effect on aggression and other elements of adaptive functioning were not necessarily accompanied by reduction in core ASD symptoms, as serially assessed by the same caregivers who reported improvement in their children. These results reflect the distinction between reduction in core symptom burden and improvement in adaptive functioning. Given the cumulative risks of atypical neuroleptics, the findings underscore the importance of periodic re-evaluation of medication benefit for children with ASD receiving neuroleptic treatment. PMID:25361070

  18. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  19. Comprehensive assessment of radiation dose estimates for the CORE320 study.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Frank J; Mather, Richard T; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Brinker, Jeffrey; Chen, Marcus Y; Cox, Christopher; Matheson, Matthew B; Dewey, Marc; DiCarli, Marcelo F; Miller, Julie M; Geleijns, Jacob; George, Richard T; Paul, Narinder; Texter, John; Vavere, Andrea; Yaw, Tan Swee; Lima, Joao A C; Clouse, Melvin E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively study estimated radiation doses for subjects included in the main analysis of the Combined Non-invasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320 Detector Computed Tomography (CORE320) study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00934037), a clinical trial comparing combined CT angiography (CTA) and perfusion CT with the reference standard catheter angiography plus myocardial perfusion SPECT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Prospectively acquired data on 381 CORE320 subjects were analyzed in four groups of testing related to radiation exposure. Radiation dose estimates were compared between modalities for combined CTA and perfusion CT with respect to covariates known to influence radiation exposure and for the main clinical outcomes defined by the trial. The final analysis assessed variations in radiation dose with respect to several factors inherent to the trial. RESULTS. The mean radiation dose estimate for the combined CTA and perfusion CT protocol (8.63 mSv) was significantly (p < 0.0001 for both) less than the average dose delivered from SPECT (10.48 mSv) and the average dose from diagnostic catheter angiography (11.63 mSv). There was no significant difference in estimated CTA-perfusion CT radiation dose for subjects who had false-positive or false-negative results in the CORE320 main analyses in a comparison with subjects for whom the CTA-perfusion CT findings were in accordance with the reference standard SPECT plus catheter angiographic findings. CONCLUSION. Radiation dose estimates from CORE320 support clinical implementation of a combined CT protocol for assessing coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion. PMID:25539270

  20. Distributions and assemblages of microbial communities along a sediment core retrieved from a potential hydrate-bearing region offshore southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Wu, Li-Wei; Cheng, Ting-Wen; Tu, Wei-Xain; Lin, Ji-Rong; Yang, Tsanyao F.; Chen, Po-Chun; Wang, Yunshuen; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2014-10-01

    Assessing the impacts of methane released from hydrate-bearing environments on global carbon cycling would require detailed insights into the distributions and capacities of microbial communities at different horizons of sediment column. In this study, we conducted geochemical, gene abundance and diversity analyses for a sediment core retrieved from a potential hydrate-bearing region off southwestern Taiwan. Geochemical profiles were characterized by a sulfate-to-methane transition with decreasing total organic carbon and nitrogen in sediments, and increasing dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium and total sulfur in sediments. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA gene abundances decreased with depth. In contrast, ANME-1 and -2 16S rRNA gene abundances increased significantly across the sulfate-to-methane transition and peaked at different horizons below this interface. A total of 124,379 bacterial and 130,351 archaeal reads were recovered through tag-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and categorized into 9014 bacterial and 6394 archaeal operational taxonomic units on the basis of 97% sequence similarity, respectively. Major bacterial phyla/divisions and archaeal groups (>5% of the total reads) detected included Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, OP9, Deltaproteobacteria, BHI80-139, MBG-B, Halobacteria, MCG, Thermoplasmata, ANME-1 and MG-I. The abundance variations of most major OTUs (>0.5% of the total reads) were statistically correlated with those of geochemical parameters. These lines of evidence suggest that the populations represented by the major OTUs or detected by group-specific primers were compartmentalized into different horizons and involved directly or indirectly in the cycling of methane, sulfate, organic carbon and nitrogen. Overall, this study demonstrates that the deep sequencing coverage combined with the quantification of gene abundance and geochemical characterization would enable to uncover the detailed distributions and potential metabolic

  1. The potential value of discordant studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of the clinical application of gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been well established by multiple trials and studies. However, its utility in the elderly (i.e., the Medicare population in the USA) remains unclear. This is an important population due to its rapid growth, coupled with the increasing prevalence of coronary artery disease with age. A paper in this issue, Predictive value of exercise myocardial perfusion imaging in the Medicare population: the impact of the ability to exercise, indicates that while gated-SPECT clearly directs the performance of interventions at the level of the coronary arteries in the elderly, outcomes are worse for those receiving an intervention vs. those receiving medical therapy. While some literature supports this observation, there are also well documented studies that indicate that the opposite is the case. As consumers of discordant studies, we find ourselves in the unenviable position of having to pull at the threads of evidence and follow them through in an attempt to reconcile the conflicting literature. This is reminiscent of the mythical Gregorian knot, a knot that was impossible to unravel by conventional means. However, it was “solved” by cutting it with a sword. In our case, the sword that we have is the removal of bias. It has been said that there are no unbiased studies, since we only measure what we believe and we tend to believe what we measure. This is further compounded in clinical practice since the Hippocratic Oath requires that the physician above all do no harm. Therefore it follows that whatever action is done is at least not detrimental to the patient. These are powerful belief systems that on the one hand allow us to rapidly discard “irrelevant” information and quickly get to the important point, but on the other hand they may inhibit us from seeing what is truly of value. Discordant and negative studies are important disruptors along the path to easy data

  2. A comparative study of dissociation of thymidine molecules following valence or core photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itälä, E.; Huels, M. A.; Rachlew, E.; Kooser, K.; Hägerth, T.; Kukk, E.

    2013-11-01

    We have studied the fragmentation of gas phase thymidine following valence and core ionization using synchrotron radiation, combined with electron energy and ion mass resolved detection in coincidence. To identify certain fragment masses 13C labelled thymidine was also used. We find that in large part, the photofragmentation of thymidine can be described as separated thymine and 2-deoxy-d-ribose cations. However, also the intact thymidine radical cation, formation of intact base and sugar cations from glycosidic bond cleavage and several new thymidine-specific fragments are observed after valence ionization. Conversely, at the photoionization of C 1s electrons neither parent thymidine cations nor any fragments above 55 amu were detected, and only ion pairs with small masses survive core ionization, Auger decay and the subsequent Coulomb separation of the DNA sub-unit. This demonstrates the genotoxic nature of soft x-rays which in cells induce complex clustered damage similar to those yielded by heavy particles.

  3. Study of thermal diffusivity of nanofluids with bimetallic nanoparticles with Au(core)/Ag(shell) structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez Fuentes, R.; Pescador Rojas, J. A.; Jiménez-Pérez, J. L.; Sanchez Ramirez, J. F.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Mendoza-Alvarez, J. G.

    2008-11-01

    The thermal diffusivity of Au/Ag nanoparticles with core/shell structure, at different compositions (Au/Ag = 3/1, 1/1, 1/3, 1/6), was measured by using the mismatched mode of the dual-beam thermal lens (TL) technique. This study determines the effect of the bimetallic composition on the thermal diffusivity of the nanofluids. In these results we find a lineal increment of the nanofluid it thermal diffusivity when the Ag shell thickness is increased. Our results show that the nanoparticle structure is an important parameter to improve the heat transport in composites and nanofluids. These results could have importance for applications in therapies and photothermal deliberation of drugs. Complementary measurements with UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM, were used to characterize the Au(core)/Ag(shell) nanoparticles.

  4. Developing a competence-based core curriculum in biomedical laboratory science: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Edgren, Gudrun

    2006-08-01

    In this study the Delphi technique has been used to develop a core curriculum for education of the biomedical scientist. The rapid development in biomedicine and the corresponding changes in methodology in biomedical laboratories demand careful planning of the education of biomedical scientists. The Delphi technique uses an anonymous panel of experts for suggestions and assessments aiming at consensus. Twenty-six experts from different kinds of hospital and university laboratories took part in the investigation. They suggested and assessed necessary competences for a recently graduated biomedical scientist, and if 75% or more of the participants agreed on a competence, it was included in the core curriculum. The final list consisted of 66 competences of varying depth, in three categories. This list contained several generic competences, concerning for example basic laboratory methods, handling of samples, dealing with apparatus and applying relevant rules and laws; basic knowledge in chemistry, preclinical medicine and laboratory methods; and finally attitudes that the panel expected in the recently graduated person. The core was sufficiently restricted to be used in a three-year programme and still leave space for about one year of electives/special study modules. It became rather traditional, e.g. it did not include competences that many recent reports consider important for the future professional. PMID:16973452

  5. FDTD study of the formation of optical vortices associated with core-shell nanoparticle cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Mahfuzur; Lu, Jin You; Ni, George; Fang, Nicholas Xuanlai; Zhang, Tiejun; Ghaferi, Amal Al

    2015-03-01

    Light absorbing plasmonic metal-dielectric nanoparticles suspended in water, or nanofluids have recently been experimentally demonstrated to produce steam at high efficiencies upon solar illumination. This approach localizes high temperatures to the interior of the liquid through efficient trapping of incoming light via scattering and absorption mechanisms. In suspensions, nanoparticles may form clusters due to surface wetting properties, and little work has focused on understanding the optical properties of clusters. In this work, we use the FDTD method to accurately visualize the optical power flow through various plasmonic metal-silica core-shell nanoparticle pairs at different inter-particle separations (10-100 nm). At these separations phase singularities of the power flow can occur, such as vortices of light inside the dielectric core which can enhance the absorption cross-section of the cluster. We study the conditions required to form these vortices. We also consider titanium nitride as shell, other than the widely studied noble metals to visualize the extinction cross-section of a cluster which depends on the separation, and the permittivity of the dielectric core. The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable support from Masdar Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the soler thermal project grant.

  6. Trace elements profiles, notably Hg, from a preliminary study of the Apollo 15 deep-drill core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The possible thermal gradient near the surface during a lunation is considered together with the heat flow from the interior, the physical process of Hg migration, the results from core and trench samples from previous missions, and other temperature sensitive phenomena that may help understand the processes. U, Os, and Ru concentrations in the deep drill core samples are of potential interest and are summarized in a table. The Os tends to parallel the Hg profile with depth.

  7. TEM Study of the Growth Mechanism, Phase Transformation, and Core/shell Structure of Semiconductor Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tai Lun

    In this thesis, the fabrication and characterization of one-dimensional nanostructures have been studied systematically to understand the growth mechanism and structure transformation of one-dimensional nanostructures. The growth behavior of the ultrathin ZnSe nanowires with diameter less than 60 nm was found to be different from classical vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process. The growth rate increases when the diameter of nanowires decreases, in contrast to the classical VLS process in which the growth rate increases with the diameter. The nucleation, initial growth, growth rates, defects, interface structures and growth direction of the nanowires were investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We found the structure and growth direction of ultra-thin nanowires are highly sensitive to growth temperatures and diameters of nanowires. At a low growth temperature (380°C), the growth direction for most nanowires is along <111>. Planar defects were found throughout the nanowires. At a high growth temperature (530°C), uniform nanowires with diameters around 10nm were grown along <110> and <112> directions, and the nanowires with diameters larger than 20nm were mainly grown along <111> direction. The possible growth mechanism of ultrathin nanowires was proposed by combining the solid catalytic growth with the interface diffusion theory, in order to explain how the growth temperature and the size of the catalysts influent the morphology, growth direction and growth rate of ultrathin nanowires. Structural and phase transformation of a nickel coated Si nanowire to NiSi2/SiC core-shell nanowire heterostructures has been investigated by the in-situ Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The phase transformation is a single-site nucleation process and therefore a single crystalline NiSi2 core resulted in the core-shell nanowire heterostructures. The transformation of the Si nanowire to NiSi2/SiC core-shell nanowire heterostructures was extremely

  8. New seismological attempts to study the top of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.

    2007-12-01

    The seismological structure at the top of the Earth's core has been masked by the D", the base of the mantle, that is adjacent above the core. As increasing the high quality digital seismic data, the studies of the region have been revisited. First is the analysis of SmKS phases. Previously, the travel times of SKS, SKKS, and S3KS have been examined by using a regional array or an old global network of which distribution was sparse. Now I show that a new data set consisting of 1211 SmKS (m > 1) waveforms has been obtained from the recent permanent and temporary networks that exist between 1990 and 2003. The new data has been analyzed to investigate the radial seismic velocity structure around the core-mantle boundary (CMB). A stacked waveform at each distance bin coincides with reflectivity synthetic one for PREM very well, whereas those for other global models (iasp91, ak135, and SP6) yield disagreements. Furthermore, a waveform modeling for the D" structure results in a 30 km thick layer with a 10 percent S-wave velocity reduction at the mantle bottom as the best model while the SmKS modeling is insensitive to the lowermost mantle structures with thickness of several hundred kilometers. The possibility of a low P-wave velocity layer in the outermost core is remained because that the waveform fitness for the part of S4KS is improved by further introducing a 140 km thick layer with a 0.8 percent P-wave velocity reduction at the core top. However, a linear velocity gradient is assumed in the modeling of the outermost core. More complicated structure, such as the change of the velocity gradient, would be suffered from the trade-off between the velocity and the core radius. As discussed above, an independent approach is required to investigate to the core radius and topography of the CMB. Thus I have started another project. The combination of P4KP and PcP is suitable for canceling the hypocenter uncertainty and the regional variations in the mantle and the crust. To

  9. Anisotropic charged core envelope star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafa Takisa, P.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study a charged compact object with anisotropic pressures in a core envelope setting. The equation of state is quadratic in the core and linear in the envelope. There is smooth matching between the three regions: the core, envelope and the Reissner-Nordström exterior. We show that the presence of the electric field affects the masses, radii and compactification factors of stellar objects with values which are in agreement with previous studies. We investigate in particular the effect of electric field on the physical features of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 in the core envelope model. The gravitational potentials and the matter variables are well behaved within the stellar object. We demonstrate that the radius of the core and the envelope can vary by changing the parameters in the speed of sound.

  10. ACT-CCREC Core Research Program: Study Questions and Design. ACT Working Paper Series. WP-2015-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruce, Ty M.

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a non-technical overview of the guiding research questions and research design for the ACT-led core research program conducted on behalf of the GEAR UP College and Career Readiness Evaluation Consortium (CCREC). The core research program is a longitudinal study of the effectiveness of 14 GEAR UP state grants on the academic…

  11. A Study of a Failed Coronal Mass Ejection Core Associated with an Asymmetric Filament Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Filippov, Boris; Uddin, Wahab; Kayshap, Pradeep; Chandra, Ramesh

    2013-07-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of an asymmetric filament eruption and associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and coronal downflows on 2012 June 17 and 18 from 20:00-05:00 UT. We use SDO/AIA and STEREO-B/SECCHI observations to understand the filament eruption scenario and its kinematics, while LASCO C2 observations are analyzed to study the kinematics of the CME and associated downflows. SDO/AIA limb observations show that the filament exhibits a whipping-like asymmetric eruption. STEREO/EUVI disk observations reveal a two-ribbon flare underneath the southeastern part of the filament that most probably occurred due to reconnection processes in the coronal magnetic field in the wake of the filament eruption. The whipping-like filament eruption later produces a slow CME in which the leading edge and the core propagate, with an average speed of ≈540 km s-1 and ≈126 km s-1, respectively, as observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph. The CME core formed by the eruptive flux rope shows outer coronal downflows with an average speed of ≈56 km s-1 after reaching ≈4.33 R ⊙. Initially, the core decelerates at ≈48 m s-2. The plasma first decelerates gradually up to a height of ≈4.33 R ⊙ and then starts accelerating downward. We suggest a self-consistent model of a magnetic flux rope representing the magnetic structure of the CME core formed by an eruptive filament. This rope loses its previous stable equilibrium when it reaches a critical height. With some reasonable parameters, and inherent physical conditions, the model describes the non-radial ascending motion of the flux rope in the corona, its stopping at some height, and thereafter its downward motion. These results are in good agreement with observations.

  12. Assessment of the "6-31+G** + LANL2DZ" Mixed Basis Set Coupled with Density Functional Theory Methods and the Effective Core Potential: Prediction of Heats of Formation and Ionization Potentials for First-Row-Transition-Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Weaver, Michael N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2009-08-01

    Computational chemists have long demonstrated great interest in finding ways to reliably and accurately predict the molecular properties for transition-metal-containing complexes. This study is a continuation of our validation efforts of density functional theory (DFT) methods when applied to transition-metal-containing systems (Riley, K.E.; Merz, K. M., Jr. J. Phys. Chem. 2007, 111, 6044-6053). In our previous work we examined DFT using all-electron basis sets, but approaches incorporating effective core potentials (ECPs) are effective in reducing computational expense. With this in mind, our efforts were expanded to include evaluation of the performance of the basis set derived to approximate such an approach as well on the same set of density functionals. Indeed, employing an ECP basis such as LANL2DZ (Los Alamos National Laboratory 2 double ζ) for transition metals, while using all-electron basis sets for all other non-transition-metal atoms, has become more and more popular in computations on transition-metal-containing systems. In this study, we assess the performance of 12 different DFT functionals, from the GGA (generalized gradient approximation), hybrid-GGA, meta-GGA, and hybrid-meta-GGA classes, respectively, along with the 6-31+G** + LANL2DZ (on the transition metal) mixed basis set in predicting two important molecular properties, heats of formation and ionization potentials, for 94 and 58 systems containing first-row transition metals from Ti to Zn, which are all in the third row of the periodic table. An interesting note is that the inclusion of the exact exchange term in density functional methods generally increases the accuracy of ionization potential prediction for the hybrid-GGA methods but decreases the reliability of determining the heats of formation for transition-metal-containing complexes for all hybrid density functional methods. The hybrid-GGA functional B3LYP gives the best performance in predicting the ionization potentials, while the

  13. Bacterial study of Vostok drilling fluid: the tool to make ice core finding confident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhina, I. A.; Petit, J. R.; Lukin, V. V.; Bulat, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    Decontamination of Vostok ice core is a critical issue in molecular biology studies. Core surface contains a film of hardly removable 'dirty' drilling fluid representing a mixture of polyhydrocarbons (PHC) including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and freon. To make ice microbial finding more confident the original Vostok drilling fluid sampled from different depths (110m - 3600m) was analyzed for bacterial content by ribosomal DNA sequencing. Total, 33 clones of 16S ribosomal DNA were recovered from four samples of drilling fluid at 110, 2750, 3400, and 3600m leading to identification of 8 bacterial species. No overlapping was observed even for neighboring samples (3400m and 3600m). At present four major bacteria with the titer more than 103-104 cells per ml (as estimated from PCR results) are identified. Among them we found: unknown representative of Desulfobacteraceae which are able to oxidize sulphates and degrade benzenes (110m); PAH-degrading alpha-proteobacterium Sphingomonas natatoria (3400m); alpha-proteobacterium representing closely-related group of Sphingomonas sp. (e.g., S. aurantiaca) which are able to degrade PAH as well, and human pathogen closely related to Haloanella gallinarum of CFB group (3600m). Four additional species were revealed as single clones and showed relatedness to human pathogens and saprophytes as well as soil bacteria. These bacteria may represent drilling fluid contaminants introduced during its sampling or DNA extraction procedure. Of four major bacteria revealed, one species, Sphingomonas natatoria, has been met by us in the Vostok core from 3607 m depth (AF532054) whereas another Sphingomonas sp. which we refer to as S. aurantiaca was found in Antarctic microbial endolithic community (AF548567), hydrocarbon-containing soil near Scott Base in Antarctica (AF184221) and even isolated from 3593m Vostok accretion ice (AF324199) and Taylor Dome core (AF395031). The source for major human pathogen-related bacteria is rather uncertain

  14. Detailed petrophysical and geophysical characterization of core samples from the potential caprock-reservoir system in the Sulcis Coal Basin (South-Western Sardinia - Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fais, Silvana; Ligas, Paola; Cuccuru, Francesco; Maggio, Enrico; Plaisant, Alberto; Pettinau, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    The evaluation of the CO2 geologic storage site requires a robust experimental database especially with respect to spatial petrophysical heterogeneities. The integrated analysis of minero-petrographical, physical and geophysical parameters (e.g. longitudinal and transversal propagation velocity, VpVs ratio, dynamic elastic moduli, etc.) of the rocks that make up a caprock-reservoir system can substantially reduce the geologic uncertainity in the storage site characterization and in the geological and numerical modelling for the evaluation of the CO2 storage capacity. In this study the Middle Eocene - Lower Oligocene Cixerri Formation made up of siliciclastic rocks and the Upper Thanetian - Lower Ypresian Miliolitico Carbonate Complex in the Sulcis coal basin (South-Western Sardinia - Italy) have been identified respectively as potential caprock and reservoir for the CO2 storage. The petrographical, physical and geophysical parameters of the above mentioned geological Formations (Cixerri and Milolitico) were investigated to improve the geological model aimed at verifying the geological CO2 storage capacity within the carbonate reservoir rocks, in order to guarantee an efficient use of the reservoir, and to improve the numerical simulation of CO2 behaviour in the short, medium and long term after its injection in single or multiple wells. . The petrographical characteristics of the caprock-reservoir rocks were determined by optical and SEM analyses of core samples representing the different facies of the Cixerri Formation and of the Miliolitico Carbonate Complex, provided by Carbosulcis S.p.A.. Porosity analysis was completed by mercury porosimeter determinations which also provided quantitative information on the permeability of the study rocks and on the tortuosity of their pore system. Further physical properties, such as dry and saturated density and porosity, and water absorption were determined on the cylindrical core samples of intact rocks (ISRM, 1979) from

  15. The SNL100-02 blade : advanced core material design studies for the Sandia 100-meter blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A series of design studies are performed to investigate the effects of advanced core materials and a new core material strategy on blade weight and performance for large blades using the Sandia 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. The initial core material design studies were based on the SNL100-01 100- meter carbon spar design. Advanced core material with improved performance to weight was investigated with the goal to reduce core material content in the design and reduce blade weight. A secondary element of the core study was to evaluate the suitability of core materials from natural, regrowable sources such as balsa and recyclable foam materials. The new core strategy for the SNL100-02 design resulted in a design mass of 59 tons, which is a 20% reduction from the most recent SNL100-01 carbon spar design and over 48% reduction from the initial SNL100-00 all-glass baseline blade. This document provides a description of the final SNL100-02 design, includes a description of the major design modifications, and summarizes the pertinent blade design information. This document is also intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-02 that are made publicly available.

  16. A study of the compartmentalization of core-shell nanoparticles through fluorescence energy transfer of dopants.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Jorge L; Jiang, Hui; Duran, Randolph S

    2010-02-01

    Hybrid organic-inorganic templates and core-shell nanoparticles were used as models to study the communication between fluorescent probes placed inside nanoparticles. The hybrid templates were prepared on the basis of a mixed-surfactant system using octadecyltrimethoxysilane as a reactive amphiphile. The core-shell particles were obtained after coating of the templates with a siloxane shell, using the silanol groups on their surface. Atomic force microscopy imaging showed that the templates were made of a flexible material that flattened significantly after deposition on a substrate and evaporation of the solvent. Pyrene was sequestered by the templates in an aqueous suspension, which placed it in a nonpolar environment, as observed by its fluorescence response. Subsequently, double-doped templates were prepared by sequestering coumarin 153 (C153), with pyrene-doped hybrid templates. The communication between these probes was studied on the basis of their spectral properties, by means of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Energy transfer between the dyes with efficiencies up to 55% was observed. Similarly, double-doped core-shell particles prepared on the basis of the hybrid templates were doped with this pair of dyes. Despite the presence of the shell, which was intended to increment the average separation between the probes, interaction of the dyes was observed, although with lower efficiencies. A similar study was performed with C153 and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM). FRET studies indicated that the probes were placed in proximity to each other. We confirmed these observations by means of fluorescence lifetime measurements, which showed a decrease in the lifetime of the donor upon addition of the acceptor. PMID:20023306

  17. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 1: Blading design. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    A baseline compressor test stage was designed as well as a candidate rotor and two candidate stators that have the potential of reducing endwall losses relative to the baseline stage. These test stages are typical of those required in the rear stages of advanced, highly-loaded core compressors. The baseline Stage A is a low-speed model of Stage 7 of the 10 stage AMAC compressor. Candidate Rotor B uses a type of meanline in the tip region that unloads the leading edge and loads the trailing edge relative to the baseline Rotor A design. Candidate Stator B embodies twist gradients in the endwall region. Candidate Stator C embodies airfoil sections near the endwalls that have reduced trailing edge loading relative to Stator A. Tests will be conducted using four identical stages of blading so that the designs described will operate in a true multistage environment.

  18. From hypernuclei to the Inner Core of Neutron Stars: A Quantum Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardoni, D.; Pederiva, F.; Gandolfi, S.

    2014-08-01

    Auxiliary Field Diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations have been employed to revise the interaction beween A-hyperons and nucleons in hypernuclei. The scheme used to describe the interaction, inspired by the phenomenological Argonne-Urbana forces, is the ΛN + ΛNN potential firstly introduced by Bodmer, Usmani et al. Within this framework, we performed calculations on light and medium mass hypernuclei in order to assess the extent of the repulsive contribution of the three-body part. By tuning this contribution in order to reproduce the Λ separation energy in 5ΛHe and 17ΛO, experimental findings are reproduced over a wide range of masses. Calculations have then been extended to Λ-neutron matter in order to derive an analogous of the symmetry energy to be used in determining the equation of state of matter in the typical conditions found in the inner core of neutron stars.

  19. Vibrational spectra study of fluorescent dendrimers built from the cyclotriphosphazene core with terminal dansyl and carbamate groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukova, I. I.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Fuchs, S.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2011-08-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the "Janus"-type dendrimers, possessing five carbamate groups on one side and five fluorescent dansyl derivatives on the other side, with amide G1 and hydrazone G2 central linkages were studied. These surface-block dendrimers are obtained by the coupling of two different dendrons. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the zero generation dendrons, built from the hexafunctional cyclotriphosphazene core, with five dansyl terminal groups and one carbamate G0 v and one oxybenzaldehyde function G0v have been recorded. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for dendron G0v on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that dendron molecule G0v has a concave lens structure with planar -O-C6H4-CHdbnd O fragments and slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of dendron G0v were interpreted by means of potential energy distributions. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed. The strong band 1597 cm -1 show marked changes of the optical density in dependence of substituents in the aromatic ring. The frequencies of ν(N-H) bands in the IR spectra reveal the presence of the different types of H-bonds in the dendrimers.

  20. Core-shell nanoscale coordination polymers combine chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy to potentiate checkpoint blockade cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    He, Chunbai; Duan, Xiaopin; Guo, Nining; Chan, Christina; Poon, Christopher; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with a 5-year survival rate of only 12% for patients with the metastatic disease. Checkpoint inhibitors, such as the antibodies inhibiting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis, are among the most promising immunotherapies for patients with advanced colon cancer, but their durable response rate remains low. We herein report the use of immunogenic nanoparticles to augment the antitumour efficacy of PD-L1 antibody-mediated cancer immunotherapy. Nanoscale coordination polymer (NCP) core-shell nanoparticles carry oxaliplatin in the core and the photosensitizer pyropheophorbide-lipid conjugate (pyrolipid) in the shell (NCP@pyrolipid) for effective chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Synergy between oxaliplatin and pyrolipid-induced PDT kills tumour cells and provokes an immune response, resulting in calreticulin exposure on the cell surface, antitumour vaccination and an abscopal effect. When combined with anti-PD-L1 therapy, NCP@pyrolipid mediates regression of both light-irradiated primary tumours and non-irradiated distant tumours by inducing a strong tumour-specific immune response. PMID:27530650

  1. Core-shell nanoscale coordination polymers combine chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy to potentiate checkpoint blockade cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunbai; Duan, Xiaopin; Guo, Nining; Chan, Christina; Poon, Christopher; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with a 5-year survival rate of only 12% for patients with the metastatic disease. Checkpoint inhibitors, such as the antibodies inhibiting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis, are among the most promising immunotherapies for patients with advanced colon cancer, but their durable response rate remains low. We herein report the use of immunogenic nanoparticles to augment the antitumour efficacy of PD-L1 antibody-mediated cancer immunotherapy. Nanoscale coordination polymer (NCP) core-shell nanoparticles carry oxaliplatin in the core and the photosensitizer pyropheophorbide-lipid conjugate (pyrolipid) in the shell (NCP@pyrolipid) for effective chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Synergy between oxaliplatin and pyrolipid-induced PDT kills tumour cells and provokes an immune response, resulting in calreticulin exposure on the cell surface, antitumour vaccination and an abscopal effect. When combined with anti-PD-L1 therapy, NCP@pyrolipid mediates regression of both light-irradiated primary tumours and non-irradiated distant tumours by inducing a strong tumour-specific immune response. PMID:27530650

  2. Influence of polar substituent on central bending unit of bent core mesogens: Synthesis, photophysical, mesomorphism and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoj Kumar; Kalita, Gayatri; Bhattacharya, Barnali; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-09-01

    New five ring bent core mesogens derived from substituted 1,3-phenylenediamine (4-nitro-1,3-phenylenediamine, 4-chloro-1,3-phenylenediamine) were synthesized. Their molecular structures, photophysical properties and mesogenic behaviors were investigated. The molecular structures and the purity of the bent core molecule have been characterized by spectroscopic studies and elemental analysis respectively. Photophysical properties of bent core compounds were investigated in chloroform by using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The phase transition temperatures were detected by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and the phases are confirmed by polarizing optical microscopy. The polar substituents on bent core unit of bent shaped molecule influence the mesomorphic behaviors of the bent core mesogens. The polar nitro group at 4-position of the bent core unit displays tilted smectic C phase and unknown smectic X phase whereas chloro group at 4-position exhibits orthogonal smectic A phase. The bent core mesogens are fluorescent in nature. The density functional theory calculation was carried out to obtain the stable molecular conformation and chemical reactivity of the bent core molecules. Orbitals involved in the electronic transitions and their corresponding energies together with oscillator strengths have been reported.

  3. Surface Carrier Dynamics on Semiconductor Studied with Femtosecond Core-Level Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Extreme Ultraviolet High-Order Harmonic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, K.; Tsunoi, T.; Kato, K.; Nakano, H.; Nishikawa, T.; Gotoh, H.; Tateno, K.; Sogawa, T.

    2013-03-01

    We have used a femtosecond time-resolved core-level surface PES system based on the 92-eV harmonic source to study the surface carrier dynamics that induces the transient SPV on semiconductor surfaces. We clarified the temporal evolution of the transient SPV characterized by the time of the photo-generated carrier separation and recombination. This result demonstrates the potential of this technique for clarifying the initial stage of the surface carrier dynamics after photoexcitation.

  4. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 4: Data and performance report for the best stage configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The core compressor exit stage study program develops rear stage blading designs that have lower losses in their endwall boundary layer regions. The test data and performance results for the best stage configuration consisting of Rotor-B running with Stator-B are described. The technical approach in this efficiency improvement program utilizes a low speed research compressor. Tests were conducted in two ways: (1) to use four identical stages of blading to obtain test data in a true multistage environment and (2) to use a single stage of blading to compare with the multistage test results. The effects of increased rotor tip clearances and circumferential groove casing treatment are evaluated.

  5. First-Principles Study on β-SiC/BNNT Core/shell Nanocable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, X. C.; Ouyang, J.; Wu, M. S.; Liu, G.; Lei, X. L.; Ouyang, C. Y.; Xu, B.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we studied the structural and electronic properties of core/shell nanocables composed of cubic silicon carbide nanowires (β-SiCNW) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) using first-principles pseudopotential plane wave method within density functional theory. Our results show that the β-SiC/BNNT heterojunction structures are metallic, which primarily originates from the contributions of the BNNTs and the surfaces of SiCNWs. The BNNTs exhibit metallic characters after the SiC nanowires are inserted. The transition of the BNNTs is attributed to the charge transfer between BNNTs and SiCNWs.

  6. Core design studies for a 1000 MW{sub th} advanced burner reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the core design and performance characteristics of 1000 MW{sub th} Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts with a wide range of TRU conversion ratio. Using ternary metal alloy and mixed oxide fuels, reference core designs of a medium TRU conversion ratio of {approx}0.7 were developed by trade-off between burnup reactivity loss and TRU conversion ratio. Based on these reference core concepts, TRU burner cores with low and high TRU conversion ratios were developed by changing the intra-assembly design parameters and core configurations. Reactor performance characteristics were evaluated in detail, including equilibrium cycle core performances, reactivity feedback coefficients, and shutdown margins. The results showed that by employing different assembly designs, a wide range of TRU conversion ratios from {approx}0.2 to break-even can be achieved within the same core without introducing significant performance and safety penalties.

  7. Influence of Full Veneer Restoration on Fracture Resistance of Three Different Core Materials: An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, P.S; Shekhawat, Kuldeep Singh; Deb, Saikat; Chidambaram, S.; Konchada, Jagadish; Venugopal, Nirupa; Vadivel, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives One of the factor which affects the strength of the tooth restored with core material is the property of the material. In clinical situation all such restored teeth are protected by crowns. This study evaluated the strength of different core materials on a compromised tooth structure after restoration with a crown. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted intact human premolars were collected and mounted within a mould using auto-polymerizing resin. The teeth were divided in-to four groups - A, B, C and D. Each group contained 20 teeth except group A with 10 teeth. All the teeth were prepared for full veneer cast crown. Except for the teeth in group: A) extensive class-I cavities were prepared in the teeth of all the groups and restored with; B) composite resin, 3M EPSE Filtek P60; C) Silver reinforced glass ionomer, SHOFU Hi Dense XP and; (D) Resin reinforced glass ionomer, GC Gold Label light cure GIC. All the teeth were restored with cast-metal alloy and exposed to 1.2 million cycles of cyclic loading in a chewing simulator. Subsequently, the teeth that survived were loaded till fracture in the universal testing machine. Fracture loads and type of fractures were recorded. Results All the specimens survived cyclic loading. The mean fracture strength of the silver reinforced glass ionomer was greater with and without crown (p<0.001). Statistical analysis for the mean fracture load of each specimen showed significant difference between the groups. Conclusion Under the condition of this study, core materials when restored with artificial crown had a significant increase in fracture resistance. PMID:26501004

  8. FNAC Versus Core Needle Biopsy: A Comparative Study in Evaluation of Palpable Breast Lump

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Abhijit; Mukhopadhyay, Madhumita; Sarkar, Koushik; Saha, Ashis Kumar; Sarkar, Diptendra KR

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour and the leading cause of carcinoma death in women in world. The main purpose of FNAC or CNB of breast lumps is to confirm cancer preoperatively and to avoid unnecessary surgery in specific benign conditions. Aims and Objective The objective of the study was to compare between Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) and Core Needle Biopsy (CNB) in the diagnosis of breast carcinoma with final histological diagnosis from excision specimen as it is gold standard. Materials and Methods A prospective study was done on 50 cases. Patients undergoing all three procedures (Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology and Core Needle Biopsy done at Department of Pathology; subsequent excision surgeries done at Department of General Surgery) were selected. May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) and Papaniculou (PAP) staining were performed on cytology smears. Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining was done on both the CNB and tissue specimens obtained from subsequent excision surgeries to see the histological features. Results FNAC showed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were 69%, 100%, 100%, 38.1%, and 74% respectively in diagnosing carcinoma. CNB had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy of 88.3%, 100%, 100%, 53.3% and 86%. Both FNAC and CNB showed statistically significant correlation with confirmatory HPE of excision specimen (p-value <0.05) in the diagnosis of breast carcinoma. Conclusion Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a rapid, less complicated, economical, reliable and relevant method for the preoperative pathological diagnosis of breast carcinoma in a developing nation like ours. If the initial FNAC is inadequate, core needle biopsy (CNB) can be a useful second line method of pathological diagnosis in order to minimize the chance of missed diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:27042469

  9. Core Competencies: The Challenge For Graduate Peace and Conflict Studies Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmueller, John; Wayne, Ellen Kabcenell; Botes, Johannes (Jannie)

    2009-05-01

    This article uses a case study of the assessment of a graduate program in negotiations and conflict management as a springboard for discussing several critical, but unanswered questions in our field. It raises questions regarding the lack of clear core competencies and expectations regarding curricula at the graduate-level of peace and conflict studies programs, as well as concerns over how educators in this field can or should assess their own work and train students for practice. It also addresses, via a comparative case analysis in Tajikistan, the degree to which the competencies and pedagogical approaches in this field are culturally bound. The picture that emerges from these case studies suggests that there have been important omissions in the way that the varied educational programs and the larger peace and conflict studies field itself have developed thus far.

  10. The potential role of spatial dimension in the neutrino-driving mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Nordhaus, Jason; Almgren, Ann; Bell, John

    2011-09-01

    We have hydrodynamically explored the dependence on spatial dimension of the viability of the neutrino heating mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions and find that the tendency to explode is a monotonically increasing function of dimension. Moreover, we find that the delay to explosion for a given neutrino luminosity is always shorter in 3D than 2D, sometimes by many hundreds of milliseconds. The magnitude of this dimensional effect is much larger than the purported magnitude of a variety of other effects sometimes invoked to bridge the gap between the current ambiguous and uncertain theoretical situation and the fact of robust supernova explosions in Nature. Our finding, facilitated by access to state-of-the-art codes and large computers, may be an important step towards unraveling one of the most problematic puzzles in stellar astrophysics.

  11. Petrologic studies of drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, F.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Broxton, D.; Arney, B.; Heiken, G.; Byers, F.; Gooley, R.; Semarge, E.

    1982-07-01

    The tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation as a possible deep geologic site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. This report characterizes tuff retrieved in core from two drill holes, USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, at the Yucca Mountain block. The USW-G2 drill core is from the northernmost extent of the block, whereas UE25b-1H is adjacent to an earlier drill hole, UE25a-1. The drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H bottomed at 6000 and 4200 ft, respectively. Petrographic and x-ray diffraction studies of the two drill cores are presented in this report and indicate that tuffs (composed primarily of variably welded ash flows) are partially recrystallized to secondary minerals. Correlations of stratigraphy are also made with previous drill cores from Yucca Mountain.

  12. [Study on trace elements of lake sediments by ICP-AES and XRF core scanning].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ai-Ying; Yu, Jun-Qing; Gao, Chun-Liang; Zhang, Li-Sha; He, Xian-Hu

    2013-07-01

    It is the first time to study sediment of Toson lake in Qaidam Basin. Trace elements including Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb in lake sediment were measured by ICP-AES method, studied and optimized from different resolution methods respectively, and finally determined a optimum pretreatment system for sediment of Toson lake, namely, HCl-HNO3-HF-HClO4-H2O2 system in the proportions of 5 : 5 : 5 : 1 : 1 was determined. At the same time, the data measured by XRF core scanning were compared, the use of moisture content correction method was analyzed, and the influence of the moisture content on the scanning method was discussed. The results showed that, compared to the background value, the contents of Cd and Zn were a little higher, the content of Cr, Cu and Pb was within the background value limits. XRF core scanning was controlled by sediment elements as well as water content in sediment to some extent. The results by the two methods showed a significant positive correlation, with the correlation coefficient up to 0.673-0.925, and they have a great comparability. PMID:24059207

  13. Perforation of aluminium foam core sandwich panels under impact loading: A numerical and analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnasri, Ibrahim; Zhao, Han

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the numerical results of the inversed perforation test instrumented with Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar SHPB with an instrumented pressure bar on the AlSi7Mg0.5 aluminium foam core sandwich panels with 0.8 mm thick 2024 T3 aluminium top and bottom skin. The numerical models are developed in order to understand the origin of the enhancement of the top skin loads found under impact loading (paper published by [1]). Numerical predicted piercing force vs displacement curves are compared with experimental measurements (tests at impact velocities at 27 and 44 m/s). The simulation catches all process of the perforation of the sandwich panels (top skin, foam core, and bottom skin). Within experimental scatter, there is a good agreement between numerical predictions and experimental measurements. Virtual tests with different impact velocities up 200 m/s are presented and showed a significant enhancement of the piercing force under impact loading (top skin peak and foam core plateau loads). In order to understand the origin of these force enhancements, any difference of detailed local information between static and dynamic loading is studied and showed that a shock front effect is responsible for the enhancement piercing force. An analytical model using an improved RPPL shock model based a power law densification assumption is proposed to calculate the top skin piercing force. The improved RPPL shock model agrees with the FE results for small velocities and gives better prediction of the piercing force than the RPPL shock model for large velocities (>100 m/s).

  14. A STUDY OF A FAILED CORONAL MASS EJECTION CORE ASSOCIATED WITH AN ASYMMETRIC FILAMENT ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Uddin, Wahab; Kayshap, Pradeep; Filippov, Boris; Chandra, Ramesh E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com

    2013-07-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of an asymmetric filament eruption and associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and coronal downflows on 2012 June 17 and 18 from 20:00-05:00 UT. We use SDO/AIA and STEREO-B/SECCHI observations to understand the filament eruption scenario and its kinematics, while LASCO C2 observations are analyzed to study the kinematics of the CME and associated downflows. SDO/AIA limb observations show that the filament exhibits a whipping-like asymmetric eruption. STEREO/EUVI disk observations reveal a two-ribbon flare underneath the southeastern part of the filament that most probably occurred due to reconnection processes in the coronal magnetic field in the wake of the filament eruption. The whipping-like filament eruption later produces a slow CME in which the leading edge and the core propagate, with an average speed of Almost-Equal-To 540 km s{sup -1} and Almost-Equal-To 126 km s{sup -1}, respectively, as observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph. The CME core formed by the eruptive flux rope shows outer coronal downflows with an average speed of Almost-Equal-To 56 km s{sup -1} after reaching Almost-Equal-To 4.33 R{sub Sun }. Initially, the core decelerates at Almost-Equal-To 48 m s{sup -2}. The plasma first decelerates gradually up to a height of Almost-Equal-To 4.33 R{sub Sun} and then starts accelerating downward. We suggest a self-consistent model of a magnetic flux rope representing the magnetic structure of the CME core formed by an eruptive filament. This rope loses its previous stable equilibrium when it reaches a critical height. With some reasonable parameters, and inherent physical conditions, the model describes the non-radial ascending motion of the flux rope in the corona, its stopping at some height, and thereafter its downward motion. These results are in good agreement with observations.

  15. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  16. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma: a potential mimic of conventional clear cell renal carcinoma on core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Liddell, Heath; Mare, Anton; Heywood, Sean; Bennett, Genevieve; Chan, Hin Fan

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCP-RCC) is a recently described, relatively uncommon variant of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with a reported incidence of 4.1%. Thought to only arise in those with end stage renal disease, CCP-RCC is increasingly identified in those without renal impairment. CCP-RCCs have unique morphologic, genetic, and immunohistochemical features distinguishing them from both conventional clear cell renal cell carcinomas and papillary renal cell carcinomas. Immunohistochemically, these tumors are positive for CK7 and negative for CD10 and racemase. This is in contrast to conventional cell renal cell carcinomas (CK7 negative, CD10 positive) and papillary cell carcinomas (CK7, CD10, and racemase positive). These tumours appear to be indolent in nature, with no current documented cases of metastatic spread. We present the case of a 42-year-old female who presented with an incidental finding of a renal mass that on a core biopsy was reported as clear cell carcinoma, Fuhrman grade 1. She subsequently underwent a radical nephrectomy and further histological examination revealed the tumor to be a clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma, Fuhrman grade 1. PMID:25709850

  17. Energy transfer and trapping in the photosystem I core antenna. A temperature study.

    PubMed Central

    Werst, M; Jia, Y; Mets, L; Fleming, G R

    1992-01-01

    The fluorescence decay kinetics of the photosystem I-only mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, A4d, are used to study energy transfer and structural organization in photosystem I (PSI). Time-resolved measurements over a wide temperature range (36-295 K) have been made both on cells containing approximately 65 core chl a/P700 and an additional 60-70 chl a + b from LHC proteins and on PSI particles containing 40-50 chl a/P700. In each case, the fluorescence decay kinetics is dominated by a short component, tau 1 which is largely attributed to the lifetime of the excitations in the core complex. The results are discussed in terms of simulations of the temperature dependence of tau 1 in model systems. Spectral inhomogeneity and the temperature dependence of the spectral lineshapes are included explicitly in the simulations. Various kinds of antenna arrangements are modeled with and without the inclusion of pigments with lower absorption energies than the trap (red pigments). We conclude that funnel arrangements are not consistent with our measurements. A random model that includes one or two red pigments placed close to the trap shows temperature and wavelength dependence similar to that observed experimentally. A comparison of the temperature dependence of tau 1 for cells and PSI particles is included. PMID:1581501

  18. The Inhibitory Core of the Myostatin Prodomain: Its Interaction with Both Type I and II Membrane Receptors, and Potential to Treat Muscle Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Yutaka; Takayama, Kentaro; Nishimatsu, Shin-ichiro; Okada, Tadashi; Fujino, Masahiro; Fukai, Yuta; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Itoh, Fumiko; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Hayashi, Yoshio; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a muscle-specific transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. The N-terminal prodomain of myostatin noncovalently binds to and suppresses the C-terminal mature domain (ligand) as an inactive circulating complex. However, which region of the myostatin prodomain is required to inhibit the biological activity of myostatin has remained unknown. We identified a 29-amino acid region that inhibited myostatin-induced transcriptional activity by 79% compared with the full-length prodomain. This inhibitory core resides near the N-terminus of the prodomain and includes an α-helix that is evolutionarily conserved among other TGF-β family members, but suppresses activation of myostatin and growth and differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) that share identical membrane receptors. Interestingly, the inhibitory core co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with not only the ligand, but also its type I and type II membrane receptors. Deletion of the inhibitory core in the full-length prodomain removed all capacity for suppression of myostatin. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the inhibitory core (p29) ameliorates impaired myoblast differentiation induced by myostatin and GDF11, but not activin or TGF-β1. Moreover, intramuscular injection of p29 alleviated muscle atrophy and decreased the absolute force in caveolin 3-deficient limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C model mice. The injection suppressed activation of myostatin signaling and restored the decreased numbers of muscle precursor cells caused by caveolin 3 deficiency. Our findings indicate a novel concept for this newly identified inhibitory core of the prodomain of myostatin: that it not only suppresses the ligand, but also prevents two distinct membrane receptors from binding to the ligand. This study provides a strong rationale for the use of p29 in the amelioration of skeletal muscle atrophy in various clinical settings. PMID:26226340

  19. The Inhibitory Core of the Myostatin Prodomain: Its Interaction with Both Type I and II Membrane Receptors, and Potential to Treat Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ohsawa, Yutaka; Takayama, Kentaro; Nishimatsu, Shin-ichiro; Okada, Tadashi; Fujino, Masahiro; Fukai, Yuta; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Itoh, Fumiko; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Hayashi, Yoshio; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a muscle-specific transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. The N-terminal prodomain of myostatin noncovalently binds to and suppresses the C-terminal mature domain (ligand) as an inactive circulating complex. However, which region of the myostatin prodomain is required to inhibit the biological activity of myostatin has remained unknown. We identified a 29-amino acid region that inhibited myostatin-induced transcriptional activity by 79% compared with the full-length prodomain. This inhibitory core resides near the N-terminus of the prodomain and includes an α-helix that is evolutionarily conserved among other TGF-β family members, but suppresses activation of myostatin and growth and differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) that share identical membrane receptors. Interestingly, the inhibitory core co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with not only the ligand, but also its type I and type II membrane receptors. Deletion of the inhibitory core in the full-length prodomain removed all capacity for suppression of myostatin. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the inhibitory core (p29) ameliorates impaired myoblast differentiation induced by myostatin and GDF11, but not activin or TGF-β1. Moreover, intramuscular injection of p29 alleviated muscle atrophy and decreased the absolute force in caveolin 3-deficient limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C model mice. The injection suppressed activation of myostatin signaling and restored the decreased numbers of muscle precursor cells caused by caveolin 3 deficiency. Our findings indicate a novel concept for this newly identified inhibitory core of the prodomain of myostatin: that it not only suppresses the ligand, but also prevents two distinct membrane receptors from binding to the ligand. This study provides a strong rationale for the use of p29 in the amelioration of skeletal muscle atrophy in various clinical settings. PMID:26226340

  20. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment: design studies based on superconducting and hybrid toroidal field coils. Design overview

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1984-10-01

    This document is a design overview that describes the scoping studies and preconceptual design effort performed in FY 1983 on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) class of device. These studies focussed on devices with all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and on devices with superconducting TF coils supplemented with copper TF coil inserts located in the bore of the TF coils in the shield region. Each class of device is designed to satisfy the mission of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn. Typical design parameters are: major radius = 3.75 m, minor radius = 1.0 m, field on axis = 4.5 T, plasma current = 7.0 MA. These designs relay on lower hybrid (LHRH) current rampup and heating to ignition using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF). A pumped limiter has been assumed for impurity control. The present document is a design overview; a more detailed design description is contained in a companion document.

  1. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

    2010-01-01

    State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

  2. A mapping study of massive cores with 13CO J = 1 0 line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esimbek, Jarken; Wu, Yuefang; Wang, Yang

    2008-04-01

    Using 13.7 m telescope of Qinghai station of Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) at Delingha, 27 sources were observed with 12CO J = 1-0 and mapped with 13CO J = 1-0 lines. Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) images and IRAS point source catalogue (PSC) were used to identify stellar objects embedded in the detected cores. Forty-one 13CO cores were obtained. The sizes of these cores is from 0.4 pc to 7 pc. Their average excitation temperatures and masses are 23.4 K and 3.1 × 10 4M⊙, which shows that these cores are massive and relatively cold. The line widths are much wider than those of low-mass cores. The correlation between line widths and core sizes is weak. According to the radio, IRAS and MSX data, there are three kinds of cores in the entire sample: group A has 21 cores whose Tex and Δ V are 15.5 K and 3.2 km/s on the average. The cores in group A are not associated with infrared sources. Group B contains 17 cores, of which five are associated with IRAS sources, the remaining 12 are associated with MSX sources. All the 17 cores are not associated with UC HII regions. Group C contains three cores which are associated with UC HII regions. All these physical parameters indicate that there could be an evolutionary development from group A to group C. The bolometric luminosities of groups B and C are also investigated. The reason for the displacement of the cores and the infrared sources in group A was discussed.

  3. Angular distributions of electrons photoemitted from core levels of oriented diatomic molecules: Multiple scattering theory in non-spherical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Diez Muino, R.; Rolles, D.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Fadley, C.S.; Van Hove, M.A.

    2001-09-06

    We use multiple scattering in non-spherical potentials (MSNSP) to calculate the angular distributions of electrons photoemitted from the 1s-shells of CO and N2 gas-phase molecules with fixed-in-space orientations. For low photoelectron kinetic energies (E<50 eV), as appropriate to certain shape-resonances, the electron scattering must be represented by non-spherical scattering potentials, which are naturally included in our formalism. Our calculations accurately reproduce the experimental angular patterns recently measured by several groups, including those at the shape-resonance energies. The MSNSP theory thus enhances the sensitivity to spatial electronic distribution and dynamics, paving the way toward their determination from experiment.

  4. International perspective on common core competencies for occupational physicians: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Lalloo, Drushca; Demou, Evangelia; Kiran, Sibel; Cloeren, Marianne; Mendes, René; Macdonald, Ewan B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The competencies required of occupational physicians (OPs) have been the subject of peer-reviewed research in Europe and individual countries around the world. In the European Union (EU), there has been development of guidance on training and common competencies, but little research has extended beyond this. The aim of this study was to obtain consensus on and identify the common core competencies required of OPs around the world. Methods A modified Delphi study was carried out among representative organisations and networks of OPs in a range of countries around the world. It was conducted in 2 rounds using a questionnaire based on the specialist training syllabus of a number of countries, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. Results Responses were received from 51 countries around the world, with the majority from Europe (60%; 59%) and North and South America (24%; 32%) in rounds 1 and 2, respectively. General principles of assessment and management of occupational hazards to health and good clinical care were jointly considered most important in ranking when compared with the other topic areas. Assessment of disability and fitness for work, communication skills and legal and ethical issues completed the top five. In both rounds, research methods and teaching and educational supervision were considered least important. Conclusions This study has established the current priorities among OPs across 51 countries of the common competencies required for occupational health (OH) practice. These findings can serve as a platform for the development of common core competencies/qualifications within specific geographical regions or internationally. This is particularly pertinent with globalisation of commerce and free movement within the EU. PMID:27076063

  5. A comparative study on liquid core formulation on the diameter on the alginate capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Hui-Yen; Lee, Boon-Beng; Radzi, AkmalHadi Ma'; Zakaria, Zarina; Chan, Eng-Seng

    2015-08-01

    Liquid core capsule has vast application in biotechnology related industries such as pharmaceutical, medical, agriculture and food. Formulation of different types of capsule was important to determine the performance of the capsule. Generally, the liquid core capsule with different formulations generated different size of capsule.Therefore, the aim of this project is to investigate the effect of different liquid core solution formulations on the diameter of capsule. The capsule produced by extruding liquid core solutions into sodium alginate solution. Three types of liquid core solutions (chitosan, xanthan gum, polyethylene glycol (PEG)) were investigated. The results showed that there is significant change in capsule diameter despite in different types of liquid core solution were used and a series of capsule range in diameter of 3.1 mm to 4.5 mm were produced. Alginate capsule with chitosan formulation appeared to be the largest capsule among all.

  6. Synthetic Studies on Et-743. Assembly of the Pentacyclic Core and a Formal Total Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fishlock, Dan; Williams, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    A formal total synthesis of the potent anticancer agent Et-743 is described. The tetrahydroisoquinoline core is stereoselectively constructed using a novel radical cyclization of a glyoxalimine. Further elaboration of this core rapidly accessed the pentacyclic core of Et-743, but a mixture of regiosisomers was obtained in the key Pictet-Spengler ring closure. A known advanced intermediate in the synthesis of Et-743 was intercepted, constituting a formal synthesis of the molecule. PMID:18687003

  7. Six weeks of core stability training improves landing kinetics among female capoeira athletes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Simone; Cohen, Daniel; Hayes, Lawrence

    2015-03-29

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively) volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.05, effect size = 0.60]), and second landing phase (5.09 ± 1.17 vs. 3.02 ± 0.41 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.001, effect size = 0.87]). The average loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the second landing phase (30.96 ± 18.84 vs. 12.06 ± 9.83 N·NBW·s-1, respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.68]). The peak loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the first (220.26 ± 111.51 vs. 120.27 ± 64.57 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.64]), and second (99.52 ± 54.98 vs. 44.71 ± 30.34 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.70]) landing phase. Body weight, average loading rate during the first landing phase, and jump height were not significantly different between week 0 and week 6

  8. Six Weeks of Core Stability Training Improves Landing Kinetics Among Female Capoeira Athletes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Simone; Cohen, Daniel; Hayes, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively) volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.05, effect size = 0.60]), and second landing phase (5.09 ± 1.17 vs. 3.02 ± 0.41 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.001, effect size = 0.87]). The average loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the second landing phase (30.96 ± 18.84 vs. 12.06 ± 9.83 N·NBW·s-1, respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.68]). The peak loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the first (220.26 ± 111.51 vs. 120.27 ± 64.57 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.64]), and second (99.52 ± 54.98 vs. 44.71 ± 30.34 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.70]) landing phase. Body weight, average loading rate during the first landing phase, and jump height were not significantly different between week 0 and week 6

  9. Nanofilms on Hollow Core Fiber-Based Structures: An Optical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Javier; Matías, Ignacio R.; Del Villar, Ignacio; Corres, Jesús M.; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2006-05-01

    The optical characteristics of one multimode fiber (MMF)-hollow core fiber (HCF)-structure when a nanofilm is deposited on it has been theoretically and experimentally studied. The electrostatic self-assembly method has been used as the deposition technique, and the polymers chosen are polydiallyldimethylammonium and Poly R-478. Two different types of HCF have been used for the fabrication of the devices: 10/150 and 50/150 µm inner and outer diameters, respectively. Depending on several design parameters, the transmitted optical-power characteristic of the device experiences important changes that could be interesting towards development of several practical optical devices. The length and thickness of the HCF segment, the refractive index of the material deposited, the angle of the light when it reach the HCF section, and the wavelength of the light source will be analyzed.

  10. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Studies of lunar regolith dynamics using measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides in lunar rocks, soils and cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruchter, J. S.; Reeves, J. H.; Evans, J. C.; Perkins, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with two types of measurements. The first deals with the use of Al-26 to define regolith gardening processes which have occurred in the upper portion of the lunar cores that were collected both by the deep drilling and drive tube operations. The second portion of the study involves the use of Mn-53 and Al-26 concentrations to determine the surface exposure histories of individual rocks over the past ten million years. It is found that during the past two million years, 15011 has had a history of simple gardening with an accumulation rate of 2 cm/m.y. The Apollo 15 Station 2 boulder appears to have been in place for about five million years. The 'shadowed' soil (75237) shows a shielding effect of about 40%. The Apollo 16 Station 9 boulder appears to have been in place for about four million years and thus is apparently not related to the South Ray Crater event.

  12. Summary final report: Contract between the Japan atomic power company and the U.S. Department of Energy Improvement of core safety - study on GEM (III)

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T.M.; Lucoff, D.M.

    1997-03-18

    This report provides a summary of activities associated with the technical exchange between representatives of the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the development and testing of Gas Expansion Modules (GEM) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Issuance of this report completes the scope of work defined in the original contract between JAPC and DOE titled ''Study on Improvement of Core Safety - Study on GEM (III).'' Negotiations related to potential modification of the contract are in progress. Under the proposed contract modification, DOE would provide an additional report documenting FFTF pump start tests with GEMs and answer additional JAPC questions related to core safety with and without GEMs.

  13. Core-size-dependent catalytic properties of bimetallic Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Kundu, Simanta; Patra, Amitava

    2014-12-24

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles have recently emerged as a new class of functional materials because of their potential applications in catalysis, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate and photonics etc. Here, we have synthesized Au/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles with varying the core diameter. The red-shifting of the both plasmonic peaks of Ag and Au confirms the core-shell structure of the nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, line scan EDS measurement and UV-vis study confirm the formation of core-shell nanoparticles. We have examined the catalytic activity of these core-shell nanostructures in the reaction between 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and NaBH4 to form 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and the efficiency of the catalytic reaction is found to be increased with increasing the core size of Au/Ag core-shell nanocrystals. The catalytic efficiency varies from 41.8 to 96.5% with varying core size from 10 to 100 nm of Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles, and the Au100/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticle is found to be 12-fold more active than that of the pure Au nanoparticles with 100 nm diameter. Thus, the catalytic properties of the metal nanoparticles are significantly enhanced because of the Au/Ag core-shell structure, and the rate is dependent on the size of the core of the nanoparticles. PMID:25456348

  14. Using Animations to Study the Formation of Gas Giant Planets via the Core Accretion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubickyj, O.; Lissauer, J. J.; Bodemheimer, P.; D'Angelo, G.

    2009-12-01

    With the ever increasing number of extrasolar planets being discovered (373 as of 8/13/09 quoted by The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia: exoplanet.eu) and the recognition of their diverse nature it is very important to understand the formation processes of the gas giant planets. The core accretion model has successfully explained many features of the formation of gas giant planets in the Solar System (Pollack et al. 1996, Hubickyj et al. 2005) and it has provided an explanation of the characteristics of exoplanets. One example is the observed frequency of planets around stars with a high metal content (e.g. Kornet et al. 2005, Valenti and Fischer 2008). Improvements to the input physics to our computer model have resulted in the very important result that gas giant planets (i.e. Jupiter) can form via the core accretion model on a timescale that agrees with observations of protoplanetary disks (Hillenbrand 2008). These observations set the formation time to about 3 to 5 million years. We will present our recent results (Hubickyj et al. 2005,Lissauer et al. 2009) in the form of animations. Our models generate a substantial amount of data. Having published plots of the important values of our study: mass and radius growth, luminosity, and accretion rates as a function of time, we are now ready to study the second tier of information from our recorded data. We examine the energy profiles within the envelope as it evolves, the location and changes of the convective layers, and the location of the mass deposited by the planetesimals in the envelope as the protoplanet evolves. We find that by animating the data we can study the internal processes in the growing envelope of the protoplanet. The qualitative nature of the processes in the protoplanetary envelope is easily discerned in these animations and a deeper insight to the core accretion processes in the gas giant planets is gained. Hillenbrand, L. A. 2008. Disk-dispersal and planet-formation timescales. Physica

  15. An analytical study of volatile metallic fission product release from very high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel and core

    SciTech Connect

    Mitake, S.; Okamoto, F.

    1988-04-01

    Release characteristics of volatile metallic fission products from the coated fuel particle and the reactor core for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor during its power operation has been studied using numerical analysis. A computer code FORNAX, based on Fick's diffusion law and the evaporation mass transfer relation, has been developed, which considers, in particular, distribution and time histories of power density, fuel temperature, and failed and degraded fuel particle fractions in the core. Applicability of the code to evaluate the core design has been shown and the following have been indicated on the release of cesium from the reactor: 1. The release from the intact fuel particles by diffusion through their intact coatings shows larger contribution in the total core release at higher temperature. 2. The diffusion release from the intact particle is governed not only by the diffusion in the silicon carbide layer but also by that in the fuel kernel.

  16. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  17. Burn Survivors' Experience of Core Outcomes during Return to Life: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Lotfi, Mojgan; Salehi, Feridoon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Burn is one of the main and common health problems that face the victims with significant challenges in their lives. The main purpose of caring and rehabilitating these people is returning them to their previous life situation. Thus, the present study was conducted with the purpose of determining the experience of burn survivors with regard to returning to life in order to be able to obtain new concepts of acceptable implications in the present cultural and religious context. Methods: The present study is a qualitative study that was conducted using qualitative content analysis and in-depth unstructured interviews with 15 burn survivors in 2012 and 2013 in Tabriz. Results: During the process of qualitative analysis, the content of the category "balance", as the core essence of the experience of participants, was extracted according to three sub-categories: a- the physical integration (physiological stability, saving the affected limb), b-connecting to the life stream (self-care, getting accustomed, normalization), and c- return to the existence (sense of inner satisfaction and excellence). Conclusion: The results of this study confirmed the physical, psychological and social scales introduced by other studies. Also proposed the concept "return to the existence", that can be measured by the emergence of a sense of inner satisfaction and excellence in the individual, as one of the key and determinant scales in returning the victims of burn to life. PMID:25717453

  18. Ten-core versus 16-core transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy for detection of prostatic carcinoma: a prospective comparative study in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, V. Surya; Mohan, G. Chandra; Krishnaiah, S. Venkata; Vijaykumar, V.; Babu, G. Ramesh; Reddy, G. Vijaya Bhaskar; Mahaboob, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the cancer detection rate in patients with raised serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) results between the 10-core and the 16-core biopsy techniques in an Indian population. Methods: Between November 2010 and November 2012, 95 men aged >50 years who presented to the Urology Department with lower urinary tract symptoms, elevated serum PSA, and/or abnormal DRE findings underwent transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. A total of 53 patients underwent 10-core biopsy and 42 patients underwent 16-core biopsy. Results: Of the 53 men in the 10-core group, 8 had cancer, whereas in the 16-core biopsy group, 23 of 42 men had cancer. Detection of prostate cancer was significantly higher in patients who underwent 16-core biopsy than in those who underwent 10-core biopsy (P<0.001). Among the 95 men, 44 men had abnormal DRE findings (46.3%), of whom 23 showed cancer (52.27%). Of 51 men with normal DRE findings and elevated PSA, 8 men had malignancy with a cancer detection rate of 15.68%. Among 20 men with PSA between 4.1 and 10 ng/mL, 2 (10%) had cancer. In 31 men with PSA between 10.1 and 20 ng/mL, 3 cancers (9.67%) were detected, and in 44 men with PSA >20 ng/mL, 26 cancers were detected (59.09%). Conclusions: The cancer detection rate with 16-core TRUS-guided biopsy is significantly higher than that with 10-core biopsy (54.76% vs. 15.09%, P<0.001). In patients with both normal and abnormal DRE findings, 16-core biopsy has a better detection rate than the 10-core biopsy protocol. With increasing PSA, there is a high rate of detection of prostate cancer in both 10-core and 16-core biopsy patients. PMID:24392441

  19. Distribution of heavy metals in sediment cores of Lake Pamvotis (Greece): a pollution and potential risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, K; Stamoulis, K; Papachristodoulou, C; Tziamou, E; Markantonaki, C; Tsodoulos, I

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations and vertical distributions of metals in surface sediments of Lake Pamvotis (NW Greece) were assessed using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. A wide range of values was determined, associated with the specific types of contaminating effluents draining into different parts of the lake. Overall, Cr levels ranged from 43 to 3295 mg kg(-1), Ni from 13 to 372 mg kg(-1), Cu from 15 to 24,985 mg kg(-1), Zn from 129 to 22,983 mg kg(-1), Zr from 64 to 4063 mg kg(-1) and Pb from 19 to 2634 mg kg(-1). Principal component analysis revealed distinct elemental fingerprints in each sampling location, while correlation analysis and hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis provided insight to metal association and pollution sources. Enrichment factors and geoaccumulation indices were calculated to quantify sediment contamination, and potential ecotoxic effects were evaluated based on sediment quality guidelines. Moderate to very severe enrichment in Zn, Cu and Pb was evidenced in sediments near the lake's outflow. The proximity of these sampling points to a heavy traffic national road suggests that roadway runoff is the dominant source of elevated metal levels. Contribution from municipal sewage water discharges from the nearby communities should also be accounted for. Moderate to very severe Zn and Pb enrichment was determined in the vicinity on the main lake's inflow, primarily associated with runoff and leaching from agricultural land. Very severe to extremely severe Cr enrichment was detected in the same location, most likely associated with wastewater discharged into the lake over several decades, by nearby-operating leather tanneries. The above two locations were ranked at the highest priority level in terms of potential ecological risk. PMID:25527434

  20. Learning Potential Among the Moderately and Severely Retarded. Studies in Learning Potential, Volume 3, Number 52.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, James L.; Budoff, Milton

    The study investigated the feasibility of M. Budoff and M. Friedman's (1964) learning potential paradigm as an assessment approach with 40 moderately and severely mentally retarded persons (aged 12 to 22 years). Ss were tested three times: initially, after one week, and after one month with a match-to-sample block design test. Twenty of the Ss…

  1. Study on micro-bend light transmission performance of novel liquid-core optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Junyan; Zhao, Zhimin; Wang, Kaisheng; Guo, Linfeng

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing development of material technology and electronic integration technology, optical fiber and its using in smart structure have become hot in the field of material research. And liquid-core optical fiber is a special kind of optical fiber, which is made using liquid material as core and polymer material as optical layer and protective covering, and it has the characteristics of large core diameter, high numerical aperture, large-scope and efficient spectrum transmission and long life for using. So the liquid-core optical fiber is very suitable for spectrum cure, ultraviolet solidification, fluorescence detection, criminal investigation and evidence obtainment, etc, and especially as light transfer element in some new structures for the measurement of some signals, such as concentration, voltage, temperature, light intensity and so on. In this paper, the novel liquid-core optical fiber is self-made, and then through the test of its light transmission performance in free state, the relation between axial micro-bend and light-intensity loss are presented. When the liquid-core optical fiber is micro-bent axially, along with the axial displacement's increase, output power of light is reducing increasingly, and approximately has linear relation to micro-displacement in a range. According to the results liquid-core fiber-optic micro-bend sensor can be designed to measure micro-displacement of the tested objects. Experimental data and analysis provide experimental basis for further application of liquid-core optical fiber.

  2. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunfeng; Gao, Bin; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi

    2014-03-28

    The core-hole excitation spectra-near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C59N and its derivatives (C59N)(+), C59HN, (C59N)2, and C59N-C60, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C59N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C59N-C60 is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C59N part to the C60 part in this charge-transfer complex. PMID:24697438

  3. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yunfeng; Gao, Bin; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi

    2014-03-28

    The core-hole excitation spectra—near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its derivatives (C{sub 59}N){sup +}, C{sub 59}HN, (C{sub 59}N){sub 2}, and C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60}, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60} is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C{sub 59}N part to the C{sub 60} part in this charge-transfer complex.

  4. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  5. A 10 year record of black carbon and dust from a Mera Peak ice core (Nepal): variability and potential impact on melting of Himalayan glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginot, P.; Dumont, M.; Lim, S.; Patris, N.; Taupin, J.-D.; Wagnon, P.; Gilbert, A.; Arnaud, Y.; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Laj, P.

    2014-08-01

    A shallow ice core was extracted at the summit of Mera Peak at 6376 m a.s.l. in the southern flank of the Nepalese Himalaya range. From this core, we reconstructed the seasonal deposition fluxes of dust and refractory black carbon (rBC) since 1999. This archive presents well preserved seasonal cycles based on a monsoonal precipitation pattern. According to the seasonal precipitation regime in which 80% of annual precipitation falls between June and September, we estimated changes in the concentrations of these aerosols in surface snow. The analyses revealed that mass fluxes are a few orders of magnitude higher for dust (10.4 ± 2.8 g m-2 yr-1 than for rBC (7.9 ± 2.8 mg m-2 yr-1). The relative lack of seasonality in the dust record may reflect a high background level of dust inputs, whether from local or regional sources. Over the 10-year record, no deposition flux trends were detected for any of the species of interest. The data were then used to simulate changes in the surface snow albedo over time and the potential melting caused by these impurities. Mean potential melting caused by dust and rBC combined was 713 kg m-2 yr-1, and for rBC alone, 342 kg m-2 yr-1 for rBC under certain assumptions. Compared to the melting rate measured using the mass and energy balance at 5360 m a.s.l. on Mera Glacier between November 2009 and October 2010, i.e. 3000 kg m-2 yr-1 and 3690 kg m-2 yr-1 respectively, the impact of rBC represents less than 16% of annual potential melting while the contribution of dust and rBC combined to surface melting represents a maximum of 26%. Over the 10-year period, rBC variability in the ice core signal primarily reflected variability of the monsoon signal rather than variations in the intensity of emissions.

  6. Getting to the Core: Using Digital Resources to Enhance Content-Based Literacy in the Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Ilene R.; Berson, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    With the implementation of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, teachers across the United States are expanding their integrated approach to social studies instruction and literacy studies. They are challenged to infuse text and narratives linked to…

  7. Theoretical study of geometry relaxation following core excitation: H2O, NH3, and CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Kunitake, Naoto; Takaki, Saya

    2015-10-01

    Single core-hole (SCH) and double core-hole excited state molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for neutral and cationic H2O, NH3, and CH4 have been performed to examine geometry relaxation after core excitation. We observed faster X-H (X = C, N, O) bond elongation for the core-ionized state produced from the valence cationic molecule and the double-core-ionized state produced from the ground and valence cationic molecules than for the first resonant SCH state. Using the results of SCH MD simulations of the ground and valence cationic molecules, Auger decay spectra calculations were performed. We found that fast bond scission leads to peak broadening of the spectra.

  8. Photoluminescence study of high density Si quantum dots with Ge core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Makihara, K.; Ikeda, M.; Miyazaki, S.

    2016-01-01

    Si quantum dots (Si-QDs) with Ge core were self-assembled on thermally grown SiO2 from alternate thermal decomposition of pure SiH4 and GeH4 diluted with He. When the sample was excited by the 979 nm line of a semiconductor laser, fairly broad photoluminescence (PL) spectra in the region of 0.6-0.8 eV were observed at room temperature. The observed PL spectra suggested that radiative recombination of photo-generated carriers through quantized states of Ge core is the dominant pathway for the emission from the dots, reflecting the type II energy band discontinuity between the Si clad and Ge core. We also found that P-δ doping to Ge core plays an important role in recombination through the quantized states in the valence band of Ge core and P donor levels.

  9. Computational studies of polysiloxanes : oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Redfern, P. C.; Zhang, Z.; Amine, K.

    2011-06-23

    Silicon-containing solvents have tremendous potential for application as electrolytes for electrical energy storage devices such as lithium-ion (air) batteries and supercapacitors. Quantum chemical methods were employed to investigate trends in oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions of a series of polysiloxanes. Various electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents can be used to tune the oxidation potential in shorter chain siloxanes but not in longer ones. Decomposition reactions of siloxanes in their oxidized states were investigated and compared against their carbon analogues. These studies suggest that the Si-O group provides added stability for siloxanes over their carbon analogues. Computational studies have also been performed for various disiloxanes and siloxanes with spacer groups to understand their thermochemical stability and oxidation potentials.

  10. The ADNI PET Core

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Bandy, Dan; Chen, Kewei; Foster, Norman L.; Landau, Susan M.; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Reiman, Eric M.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Koeppe, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Background This is a progress report of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) PET Core. Methods The Core has supervised the acquisition, quality control, and analysis of longitudinal [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) data in approximately half of the ADNI cohort. In an “add on” study, approximately 100 subjects also underwent scanning with [11C]PIB-PET for amyloid imaging. The Core developed quality control procedures and standardized image acquisition by developing an imaging protocol that has been widely adopted in academic and pharmaceutical industry studies. Data processing provides users with scans that have identical orientation and resolution characteristics despite acquisition on multiple scanner models. The Core labs have used a number of different approaches to characterize differences between subject groups (AD, MCI, controls), to examine longitudinal change over time in glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition, and to assess the use of FDG-PET as a potential outcome measure in clinical trials. Results ADNI data indicate that FDG-PET increases statistical power over traditional cognitive measures, might aid subject selection, and could substantially reduce the sample size in a clinical trial. PIB-PET data showed expected group differences, and identified subjects with significant annual increases in amyloid load across the subject groups. The next activities of the PET core in ADNI will entail developing standardized protocols for amyloid imaging using the [18F]-labeled amyloid imaging agent AV45, which can be delivered to virtually all ADNI sites. Conclusions ADNI has demonstrated the feasibility and utility of multicenter PET studies and is helping to clarify the role of biomarkers in the study of aging and dementia. PMID:20451870

  11. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}6}/year.

  12. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  13. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  14. Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Brunetti, G; Marzouk, E R; Maoz-Shen, A; Smith, E; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-09-01

    The use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) has been advocated for the remediation of both soils and groundwater. A key parameter affecting nZVI remediation efficacy is the mobility of the particles as this influences the reaction zone where remediation can occur. However, by engineering nZVI particles with increased stability and mobility we may also inadvertently facilitate nZVI-mediated contaminant transport away from the zone of treatment. Previous nZVI mobility studies have often been limited to model systems as the presence of background Fe makes detection and tracking of nZVI in real systems difficult. We overcame this problem by synthesising Fe-59 radiolabelled nZVI. This enabled us to detect and quantify the leaching of nZVI-derived Fe-59 in intact soil cores, including a soil contaminated by Chromated-Copper-Arsenate. Mobility of a commercially available nZVI was also tested. The results showed limited mobility of both nanomaterials; <1% of the injected mass was eluted from the columns and most of the radiolabelled nZVI remained in the surface soil layers (the primary treatment zone in this contaminated soil). Nevertheless, the observed breakthrough of contaminants and nZVI occurred simultaneously, indicating that although the quantity transported was low in this case, nZVI does have the potential to co-transport contaminants. These results show that direct injection of nZVI into the surface layers of contaminated soils may be a viable remediation option for soils such as this one, in which the mobility of nZVI below the injection/remediation zone was very limited. This Fe-59 experimental approach can be further extended to test nZVI transport in a wider range of contaminated soil types and textures and using different application methods and rates. The resulting database could then be used to develop and validate modelling of nZVI-facilitated contaminant transport on an individual soil basis suitable for site specific risk assessment prior to n

  15. D, L-Sulforaphane Loaded Fe3O4@ Gold Core Shell Nanoparticles: A Potential Sulforaphane Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Kheiri Manjili, Hamidreza; Ma’mani, Leila; Tavaddod, Sharareh; Mashhadikhan, Maedeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    A novel design of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was fabricated as a potential delivery system to improve the efficiency and stability of d, l-sulforaphane as an anticancer drug. To this purpose, the surface of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was modified for sulforaphane delivery via furnishing its surface with thiolated polyethylene glycol-folic acid and thiolated polyethylene glycol-FITC. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques such as FTIR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The average diameters of the synthesized nanoparticles before and after sulforaphane loading were obtained ∼ 33 nm and ∼ 38 nm, respectively, when ∼ 2.8 mmol/g of sulforaphane was loaded. The result of cell viability assay which was confirmed by apoptosis assay on the human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 line) as a model of in vitro-cancerous cells, proved that the bare nanoparticles showed little inherent cytotoxicity, whereas the sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles were cytotoxic. The expression rate of the anti-apoptotic genes (bcl-2 and bcl-xL), and the pro-apoptotic genes (bax and bak) were quantified, and it was found that the expression rate of bcl-2 and bcl-xL genes significantly were decreased when MCF-7 cells were incubated by sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles. The sulforaphane-loaded into the designed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, acceptably induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:26982588

  16. D, L-Sulforaphane Loaded Fe3O4@ Gold Core Shell Nanoparticles: A Potential Sulforaphane Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Kheiri Manjili, Hamidreza; Ma'mani, Leila; Tavaddod, Sharareh; Mashhadikhan, Maedeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    A novel design of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was fabricated as a potential delivery system to improve the efficiency and stability of d, l-sulforaphane as an anticancer drug. To this purpose, the surface of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was modified for sulforaphane delivery via furnishing its surface with thiolated polyethylene glycol-folic acid and thiolated polyethylene glycol-FITC. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques such as FTIR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The average diameters of the synthesized nanoparticles before and after sulforaphane loading were obtained ∼ 33 nm and ∼ 38 nm, respectively, when ∼ 2.8 mmol/g of sulforaphane was loaded. The result of cell viability assay which was confirmed by apoptosis assay on the human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 line) as a model of in vitro-cancerous cells, proved that the bare nanoparticles showed little inherent cytotoxicity, whereas the sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles were cytotoxic. The expression rate of the anti-apoptotic genes (bcl-2 and bcl-xL), and the pro-apoptotic genes (bax and bak) were quantified, and it was found that the expression rate of bcl-2 and bcl-xL genes significantly were decreased when MCF-7 cells were incubated by sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles. The sulforaphane-loaded into the designed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, acceptably induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:26982588

  17. Retrospective study investigating the prevalence and clinical significance of hepatitis B virus precore and basal core promoter variants

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Meaghan; Casselman, Adara; Smart, Gerry; Gretchen, Ainsley; Kaita, Kelly; Kadkhoda, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) precore (PC) and basal core promoter (BCP) variants are well known; however, their prevalence in North America is unclear, especially among hepatitis B e antigen-negative patients. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of PC/BCP mutations and their clinical significance. METHODS: One hundred twenty-eight patients positive for both hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B e antibody were selected, and PC/BCP mutations were identified using a line probe assay. The subjects’ charts were reviewed for race/ethnicity, HBV genotype, HBV viral load, sex, liver enzyme levels, imaging and biopsy results up to 10 years before the study. RESULTS: The prevalence of PC and BCP variants were 47.6% and 62.5%, respectively. Older age was associated with aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet index ratio (APRI) ≥0.7 (P=0.011) and abnormal imaging/biopsy results (P=0.0008). Although the presence of BCP variant(s) was associated with APRI ≥0.7 (P=0.029), it was not associated with abnormal imaging/biopsy results. The combination of age ≥50 years and the presence of BCP variant(s) was associated with abnormal imaging/biopsy results, suggestive of either cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (not observed with PC mutation). Neither sex or genotype, or median HBV viral load showed significant influence on any of these outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that the prevalence of PC and BCP mutations are higher than what has been previously reported. One potential explanation would be increased immigration in the past decade. Considering the potential public health and clinical implications of these variants, long-term multicentre and prospective studies could further unravel the uncertainty around these variants. PMID:26401823

  18. Improving Middle School Parental Engagement in Transition to Common Core State Standards: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harla, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Parental involvement in schools is an important potential contributor to improving American education and making the U.S. more globally competitive. This qualitative and quantitative mixed-methodology action research study probed the viability of engaging parents around issues of educational improvement by inviting them to participate in training…

  19. Electrokinetic experimental study on saturated rock samples: zeta potential and surface conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Hengshan; Guan, Wei; Li, Hui

    2015-05-01

    It is important to know the electrokinetic properties of crustal rocks for interpreting the conductivity mechanisms and seismoelectric phenomena during earthquakes and seismoelectric well logging. In this study, electrokinetic experiments are conducted using a special core-holder by employing an AC lock-in technique. A series of experiments are conducted on 10 sandstone samples to measure the streaming potentials and streaming currents, and the experiments on each sample are done at six different salinities. The streaming potential coefficient and streaming current coefficient are calculated from the measured streaming potentials and streaming currents. The experimental results show that streaming potential coefficient and streaming current coefficient decrease as the salinity increases. The dependence of these two coefficients on permeability and pore radius are analysed and compared with previous works. At low salinities, the streaming potential coefficient and streaming current coefficient increase with the increasing permeability and pore radius. At high salinities, the streaming potential coefficient (streaming current coefficient) almost share a same value for 10 different samples. This conclusion indicates that the differences of rock parameters can only be well recognized at lower salinities, and the electrokinetic signals are invalid at high salinities, which offers a restrictive condition for using the amplitude of electrokinetic signals to estimate rock parameters. The zeta-potential have also been estimated through combined measurements of streaming potential and streaming current. The surface conductivity and its contribution to electrokinetic effects are determined from a comparison of zeta-potentials by two different methods, and then the validation of the Helmholz-Smoluchowski equation for a capillary tube is tested in rocks. We also compare our date with theoretical and experimental works, and set up an expression about the relationship between

  20. Study on size effect of the silica nanospheres with solid core and mesoporous shell on cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Peruzynska, M; Cendrowski, K; Barylak, M; Roginska, D; Tarnowski, M; Tkacz, M; Kurzawski, M; Machalinski, B; Mijowska, E; Drozdzik, M

    2015-12-01

    The properties of mesoporous silica nanoparticles including large surface area, large pore volume, easy surface functionalization and control of structure and pore size has made them promising drug carriers. In this study, the effect of different diameters (50 nm, 70 nm, 90 nm, 110 nm and 140 nm) of silica nanospheres with a solid core and mesoporous shell (mSiO2/SiO2) on cellular internalization in mouse fibroblast cells (L929) was evaluated. The physical properties of the nanostructures were characterized with various methods, such as transmission electron microscopy with x-ray dispersion spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and zeta potential. In order to define the cellular uptake, the nanostructures were labelled with fluorescent dye Alexa647, and imaging and quantitative methods were applied: laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and thermogravimetry. Our results indicate that cellular uptake of the studied nanospheres is size-dependent, and nanospheres of 90 nm in diameter showed the most efficient cell internalization. Thus, particle size is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake of nanoparticles and should be considered in designing drug delivery carriers. PMID:26586672

  1. Experimental terrestrial soil-core microcosm test protocol. A method for measuring the potential ecological effects, fate, and transport of chemicals in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Van Voris, P.; Tolle, D.A.; Arthur, M.F.

    1985-06-01

    In order to protect the environment properly and have a realistic appraisal of how a chemical will act in the environment, tests of ecological effects and chemical fate must be performed on complex assemblages of biotic and abiotic components (i.e., microcosms) as well as single species. This protocol is one which could be added to a series of tests recently developed as guidelines for Section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (P.L. 94-469; U.S.C., Section 2601-2629). The terrestrial soil-core microcosm is designed to supply site-specific and possibly regional information on the probable chemical fate and ecological effects resulting from release of a chemical substance to a terrestrial ecosystem. The EPA will use the data resulting from this test system to compare the potential hazards of a chemical with others that have been previously evaluated.

  2. Study of optical nonlinearity of CdSe and CdSe@ZnO core-shell quantum dots in nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepika; Dhar, Rakesh; Mohan, Devendra

    2015-12-01

    Thioglycolic acid capped cadmium selenide (CdSe) and CdSe@ZnO core-shell quantum dots have been synthesized in aqueous phase. The sample was characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometer, TEM and Z-scan technique. The nonlinear optical parameters viz. nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), nonlinear refractive index (n2) and third-order nonlinear susceptibilities (χ3) of quantum dots have been estimated using second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser. The study predicts that CdSe@ZnO quantum dots exhibits strong nonlinearity as compared to core CdSe quantum dots. The nonlinearity in quantum dots is attributed to the presence of resonant excitation and free optical processes. The presence of RSA in these nanoparticles makes them a potential material for the development of optical limiter.

  3. Paleomagnetic studies of Carboniferous and Permian in the U. K. Southern North Sea: Core orientation, paleocurrent analysis, and diagenetic application

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, P. ); Hartley, A.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The U.K. southern North Sea is a major gas province with production from Carboniferous and Permian reservoirs. It was a foreland basin in Carboniferous times uplifted to form a Lower Permian desert basin and subsequently deeply buried during the Mesozoic. Paleomagnetic methods have been used for burial analysis, core orientation, and paleocurrent studies. VRM is shown to be of only limited value for core orientation; problems relating to drilling effects and deflection by ChRM will be discussed. Detailed thermal demagnetization studies are most valuable. Blocking temperature spectra can be related to burial history curves, and ChRM directions isolated and compared with Carboniferous and Permian reference directions. ChRM is a valuable parameter for core orientation and thus paleocurrent studies. Examples will be shown from the Carboniferous and Lower Permian.

  4. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  5. A comparative study of the impact properties of sandwich materials with different cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, K. R.; Shankar, K.; Viot, P.; Guerard, S.

    2012-08-01

    Sandwich panels are made of two high strength skins bonded to either side of a light weight core and are used in applications where high stiffness combined with low structural weight is required. The purpose of this paper is to compare the mechanical response of several sandwich panels whose core materials are different. Sandwich panels with glass fibre-reinforced polymer face sheets were used, combined with five different cores; polystyrene foam, polypropylene honeycomb, two different density Balsa wood and Cork. All specimens were subjected to low velocity impact and their structural response (Force-displacement curves) were compared to quasistatic response of the panel tested using an hemispherical indenter.

  6. Fractographic study of the behavior of different ceramic veneers on full coverage crowns in relation to supporting core materials

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Román-Rodriguez, Juan L.; Solá-Ruíz, María F.; Granell-Ruíz, María; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To observe porcelain veneer behavior of zirconia and metal-ceramic full coverage crowns when subjected to compression testing, comparing zirconia cores to metal cores. Study Design: The porcelain fracture surfaces of 120 full coverage crowns (60 with a metal core and 60 with a zirconia core) subjected to static load (compression) testing were analyzed. Image analysis was performed using macroscopic processing with 8x and 12x enlargement. Five samples from each group were prepared and underwent scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis in order to make a fractographic study of fracture propagation in the contact area and composition analysis in the most significant areas of the specimen. Results: Statistically significant differences in fracture type (cohesive or adhesive) were found between the metal-ceramic and zirconia groups: the incidence of adhesive fracture was seen to be greater in metal-ceramic groups (92%) and cohesive fracture was more frequent in zirconium oxide groups (72%). The fracture propagation pattern was on the periphery of the contact area in the full coverage crown restorations selected for fractographic study. Conclusions: The greater frequency of cohesive fracture in restorations with zirconia cores indicates that their behavior is inadequate compared to metal-ceramic restorations and that further research is needed to improve their clinical performance. Key words:Zirconia, zirconium oxide, fractography, composition, porcelain veneers, fracture, cohesive, adhesive. PMID:24455092

  7. High-resolution core-level photoemission study of dense Pb overlayers on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Won Hoon; Kim, Keun Su; Yeom, Han Woong

    2008-11-01

    Structure and bonding configuration of dense Pb overlayers on the Si(111) surface have been studied by low-energy-electron diffraction and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. Several representative phases in its devil’s staircase phase diagram have been systematically investigated by varying the Pb coverage at 200-300 K. Pb5d photoelectron spectra indicate that there exist two distinct bonding configurations of Pb, which are interpreted as the hollow and on-top (T1) sites of the structure models proposed earlier. In case of surface Si atoms, mainly two different bonding environments are revealed by surface Si2p components for the low-density 7×3 phase. These can be assigned to T1 and modified on-top (T1') sites surrounding hollow-site adatoms. As the coverage increases, the minority site T1 converts to T1' making the topmost Si layer have a unique bonding configuration. This behavior is also consistent with the structure models. The temperature-dependent study reveals that the 7×3 phase undergoes a reversible phase transition into a 1×1 phase. This phase transition induces no significant change in Pb core levels but a marginal increase in the Si2p component for the T1' sites. We suggest a plausible scenario of the phase transition based on the structure model with 1.2 monolayer Pb and the active diffusion of hollow-site adatoms.

  8. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  9. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful.

  10. Preliminary Results of a Multi-Proxy Lake Sediment Core Study in East-Central France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misner, T.; Meyers, S.; Rosenmeier, M.; Strano, S.; Straffin, E.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a multi-proxy study of natural and human-induced changes in the Burgundian environment, as recorded in the sediment geochemistry of three small freshwater basins within the Arroux River Valley, east-central France. Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates constrain the age of core material collected from the basins, and indicate that these mill and farm ponds were constructed by at least 1200 A.D. The pond sediments are predominantly massive, organic-rich muds that contain discrete sand and gravel lenses likely related to episodic flooding and/or basin drainage. In this study, continuous X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning is used to quantify bulk geochemical variability throughout the lake sediment cores, and to investigate specific elemental proxies for paleoenvironmental change (detrital flux, biogenic flux, and redox state). The high-resolution XRF data are supplemented by sediment magnetic susceptibility measurements, and organic matter concentration as determined by loss on ignition. These records demonstrate a general increase in detrital sediment input from 1200 to 1300 A.D., during a period of known regional agricultural expansion. We infer these changes to be the consequence of increased catchment soil erosion and material flux to the water bodies. The data also suggest changes in mill and farm pond primary productivity, also related to soil erosion and changing transport of soil nutrients to the basins. Near the onset of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1500 A.D.) pond productivity reductions are apparent, likely indicating colder climates. These mill and farm pond sedimentary archives, in conjunction with historic records, can be used to better understand past land management strategies. Furthermore, historically documented landscape changes can be examined within the context of prevailing climatic conditions over the last ~800 years in an effort to establish future best management practices and the most

  11. The Expanded Core Curriculum at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringwalt, Gail Mulholland

    2013-01-01

    This case study investigated how the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC) was taught to high school students who are blind or visually impaired at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ISBVI). The study focused on three students pursing different academic tracks with varying degrees of vision. The students were observed throughout…

  12. Interaction of sigma 70 with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase core enzyme studied by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A L; Hughes, A D; Tufail, U; Baumann, C G; Scott, D J; Hoggett, J G

    2000-09-22

    The interaction between the core form of bacterial RNA polymerases and sigma factors is essential for specific promoter recognition, and for coordinating the expression of different sets of genes in response to varying cellular needs. The interaction between Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase and sigma 70 has been investigated by surface plasmon resonance. The His-tagged form of sigma 70 factor was immobilised on a Ni2+-NTA chip for monitoring its interaction with core polymerase. The binding constant for the interaction was found to be 1.9x10(-7) M, and the dissociation rate constant for release of sigma from core, in the absence of DNA or transcription, was 4x10(-3) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life of about 200 s. PMID:11007979

  13. Ab Initio Study of 40Ca with an Importance Truncated No-Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R; Navratil, P

    2007-05-22

    We propose an importance truncation scheme for the no-core shell model, which enables converged calculations for nuclei well beyond the p-shell. It is based on an a priori measure for the importance of individual basis states constructed by means of many-body perturbation theory. Only the physically relevant states of the no-core model space are considered, which leads to a dramatic reduction of the basis dimension. We analyze the validity and efficiency of this truncation scheme using different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and compare to conventional no-core shell model calculations for {sup 4}He and {sup 16}O. Then, we present the first converged calculations for the ground state of {sup 40}Ca within no-core model spaces including up to 16{h_bar}{Omega}-excitations using realistic low-momentum interactions. The scheme is universal and can be easily applied to other quantum many-body problems.

  14. Electron Cryotomography Studies of Maturing HIV-1 Particles Reveal the Assembly Pathway of the Viral Core

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Cora L.; Cheng, Sarah N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To better characterize the assembly of the HIV-1 core, we have used electron cryotomography (ECT) to image infected cells and the viral particles cryopreserved next to them. We observed progressive stages of virus assembly and egress, including flower-like flat Gag lattice assemblies, hemispherical budding profiles, and virus buds linked to the plasma membrane via a thin membrane neck. The population of budded viral particles contains immature, maturation-intermediate, and mature core morphologies. Structural characteristics of the maturation intermediates suggest that the core assembly pathway involves the formation of a CA sheet that associates with the condensed ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Our analysis also reveals a correlation between RNP localization within the viral particle and the formation of conical cores, suggesting that the RNP helps drive conical core assembly. Our findings support an assembly pathway for the HIV-1 core that begins with a small CA sheet that associates with the RNP to form the core base, followed by polymerization of the CA sheet along one side of the conical core toward the tip, and then closure around the body of the cone. IMPORTANCE During HIV-1 assembly and release, the Gag polyprotein is organized into a signature hexagonal lattice, termed the immature lattice. To become infectious, the newly budded virus must disassemble the immature lattice by proteolyzing Gag and then reassemble the key proteolytic product, the structural protein p24 (CA), into a distinct, mature hexagonal lattice during a process termed maturation. The mature HIV-1 virus contains a conical capsid that encloses the condensed viral genome at its wide base. Mutations or small molecules that interfere with viral maturation also disrupt viral infectivity. Little is known about the assembly pathway that results in the conical core and genome encapsidation. Here, we have used electron cryotomography to structurally characterize HIV-1 particles that are

  15. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-04

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  16. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-01

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  17. THE EFFECT OF SELF-SET GRADE GOALS AND CORE SELF-EVALUATIONS ON ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE: A DIARY STUDY.

    PubMed

    Bipp, Tanja; Kleingeld, Ad; Van Den Tooren, Marieke; Schinkel, Sonja

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this diary study was to examine the effect of self-set grade goals and core self-evaluations on academic performance. Data were collected among 59 university students (M age = 18.4 yr., SD = 0.8) in a 2-wk. exam period on up to five exam days. Multilevel analyses revealed that the individual grade goals students set for their exams were positively related to the grades they obtained for these exams. However, the goal-performance relationship only applied to students scoring high on core self-evaluations. The results of this study contribute to the understanding of the effect of self-set grade goals and core self-evaluations on academic performance and imply important practical applications to enhance academic performance. PMID:26595291

  18. Perceived pros and cons of smoking and quitting in hard-core smokers: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the last decade, so-called hard-core smokers have received increasing interest in research literature. For smokers in general, the study of perceived costs and benefits (or ‘pros and cons’) of smoking and quitting is of particular importance in predicting motivation to quit and actual quitting attempts. Therefore, this study aims to gain insight into the perceived pros and cons of smoking and quitting in hard-core smokers. Methods We conducted 11 focus group interviews among current hard-core smokers (n = 32) and former hard-core smokers (n = 31) in the Netherlands. Subsequently, each participant listed his or her main pros and cons in a questionnaire. We used a structural procedure to analyse the data obtained from the group interviews and from the questionnaires. Results Using the qualitative data of both the questionnaires and the transcripts, the perceived pros and cons of smoking and smoking cessation were grouped into 6 main categories: Finance, Health, Intrapersonal Processes, Social Environment, Physical Environment and Food and Weight. Conclusions Although the perceived pros and cons of smoking in hard-core smokers largely mirror the perceived pros and cons of quitting, there are some major differences with respect to weight, social integration, health of children and stress reduction, that should be taken into account in clinical settings and when developing interventions. Based on these findings we propose the ‘Distorted Mirror Hypothesis’. PMID:24548463

  19. A Numerical Study on the Effect of Facesheet-Core Disbonds on the Buckling Load of Curved Honeycomb Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Krivanek, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical study on the effect of facesheet-core disbonds on the post-buckling response of curved honeycomb sandwich panels is presented herein. This work was conducted as part of the development of a damage tolerance approach for the next-generation Space Launch System heavy lift vehicle payload fairing. As such, the study utilized full-scale fairing barrel segments as the structure of interest. The panels were composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The panels were analyzed numerically using the finite element method. Facesheet and core nodes in a predetermined circular region were detached to simulate a disbond induced via low-speed impact between the outer mold line facesheet and honeycomb core. Surface-to-surface contact in the disbonded region was invoked to prevent interpenetration of the facesheet and core elements. The diameter of this disbonded region was varied and the effect of the size of the disbond on the post-buckling response was observed. A significant change in the slope of the edge load-deflection response was used to determine the onset of global buckling and corresponding buckling load.

  20. Ice-cored moraine degradation mapped and quantified using an unmanned aerial vehicle: A case study from a polythermal glacier in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkin, T. N.; Midgley, N. G.; Cook, S. J.; Graham, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    Ice-cored lateral-frontal moraines are common at the margins of receding high-Arctic valley glaciers, but the preservation potential of these features within the landform record is unclear. Recent climatic amelioration provides an opportunity to study the morphological evolution of these landforms as they de-ice. This is important because high-Arctic glacial landsystems have been used as analogues for formerly glaciated areas in the mid-latitudes. This study uses SfM (Structure-from-Motion) photogrammetry and a combination of archive aerial and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) derived imagery to investigate the degradation of an ice-cored lateral-frontal moraine at Austre Lovénbreen, Svalbard. Across the study area as a whole, over an 11-year period, the average depth of surface lowering was - 1.75 ± 0.89 m. The frontal sections of the moraine showed low or undetectable rates of change. Spatially variable rates of surface lowering are associated with differences in the quantity of buried ice within the structure of the moraine. Morphological change was dominated by surface lowering, with limited field evidence of degradation via back-wastage. This permits the moraine a greater degree of stability than previously observed at other sites in Svalbard. It is unclear whether the end point will be a fully stabilised ice-cored moraine, in equilibrium with its environment, or an ice-free lateral-frontal moraine complex. Controls on geomorphological change (e.g. topography and climate) and the preservation potential of the lateral-frontal moraine are discussed. The methods used by this research also demonstrate the potential value of SfM photogrammetry and unmanned aerial vehicles for monitoring environmental change and are likely to have wider applications in other geoscientific sub-disciplines.

  1. Potential of E.coli O157:H7 to grow on field-cored lettuce as impacted by postharvest storage time and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent development in iceberg lettuce production is field coring where the outer leaves and the cores of the lettuce heads are removed at the time of harvesting in order to reduce shipping waste and maximize production yield. Using a coring knife contaminated with 2 x 105 cells of E. coli O157:H7,...

  2. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies.

    PubMed

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter (D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) (z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was

  3. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter ( D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) ( z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was detected

  4. A study of tachyon dynamics for broad classes of potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, Israel; Gonzalez, Tame; Gonzalez, Dania; Napoles, Yunelsy; García-Salcedo, Ricardo; Moreno, Claudia

    2010-11-01

    We investigate in detail the asymptotic properties of tachyon cosmology for a broad class of self-interaction potentials. The present approach relies on an appropriate re-definition of the tachyon field, which, in conjunction with a method formerly applied in the bibliography in a different context allows us to generalize the dynamical systems study of tachyon cosmology to a wider class of self-interaction potentials beyond the (inverse) square-law one. It is revealed that independent of the functional form of the potential, the matter-dominated solution and the ultra-relativistic (also matter-dominated) solution are always associated with equilibrium points in the phase space of the tachyon models. The latter is always the past attractor, while the former is a saddle critical point. For inverse power-law potentials V~phi-2λ the late-time attractor is always the de Sitter solution, while for sinh-like potentials V~sinh -α(λphi), depending on the region of parameter space, the late-time attractor can be either the inflationary tachyon-dominated solution or the matter-scaling (also inflationary) phase. In general, for most part of known quintessential potentials, the late-time dynamics will be associated either with de Sitter inflation, or with matter-scaling, or with scalar field-dominated solutions.

  5. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  6. Study of muons near shower cores at sea level using the E594 neutrino detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, J. A.; Gupta, S. C.; Freudenreich, H.; Sivaprasad, K.; Tonwar, S. C.; Yodh, G. B.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Goodman, M. C.; Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.

    1985-01-01

    The E594 neutrino detector has been used to study the lateral distribution of muons of energy 3 GeV near shower cores. The detector consists of a 340 ton fine grain calorimeter with 400,000 cells of flash chamber and dimensions of 3.7 m x 20 m x 3.7 m (height). The average density in the calorimeter is 1.4 gm/sq cm, and the average Z is 21. The detector was triggered by four 0.6 sq m scintillators placed immediately on the top of the calorimeter. The trigger required at least two of these four counters. The accompanying extensive air showers (EAS) was sampled by 14 scintillation counters located up to 15 m from the calorimeter. Several off line cuts have been applied to the data. Demanding five particles in at least two of the trigger detectors, a total of 20 particles in all of them together, and an arrival angle for the shower 450 deg reduced the data sample to 11053 events. Of these in 4869 cases, a computer algorithm found at least three muons in the calorimeter.

  7. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  8. Numerical Models of Starburst Galaxies: A Study of Outflows and ISM Morphology in Galactic Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, G. N.; Heitsch, F.

    2014-01-01

    Starbursts and AGN winds in galaxy cores can produce large scale outflows. Whether any given outburst can create an outflow depends on several variables including the rate at which the energy is injected into the interstellar medium (ISM), the distribution of clouds with in the ISM, and the overall shape of the ISM. Previous simulations by Cooper et al. (2008) reproduce linear filaments like that in M 82, but were limited in the parameter space that they could explore. We have modified the public Athena hydro code (Stone et al. 2008) to greatly reduce the computation time of high resolution 3D simulations similar to Cooper et al. (2008) and to handle accurate gas cooling down to lower molecule-forming temperatures (10 K). We are exploring the parameter space of a galactic “blowout”, the origin and evolution of interesting ISM morphology such as the curved filamentary “towers” observed at the center of NGC 3079, and how different ISM morphologies may influence the outflow. These simulations are being compared with spectral imaging obtained with the Herschel space telescope to study the connection between regions of the cold neutral medium, warm neutral medium, and warm ionized medium. Those observations are being presented in another session of this AAS meeting. Our work is supported by NASA/Herschel and NC Space Grant funding.

  9. Structural Study of the RIPoptosome Core Reveals a Helical Assembly for Kinase Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Receptor interaction protein kinase 1 (RIP1) is a molecular cell-fate switch. RIP1, together with Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) and caspase-8, forms the RIPoptosome that activates apoptosis. RIP1 also associates with RIP3 to form the necrosome that triggers necroptosis. The RIPoptosome assembles through interactions between the death domains (DDs) of RIP1 and FADD and between death effector domains (DEDs) of FADD and caspase-8. In this study, we analyzed the overall structure of the RIP1 DD/FADD DD complex, the core of the RIPoptosome, by negative-stain electron microscopy and modeling. The results show that RIP1 DD and FADD DD form a stable complex in vitro similar to the previously described Fas DD/FADD DD complex, suggesting that the RIPoptosome and the Fas death-inducing signaling complex share a common assembly mechanism. Both complexes adopt a helical conformation that requires type I, II, and III interactions between the death domains. PMID:25119434

  10. Hepatitis C Virus Core from Two Different Genotypes Has an Oncogenic Potential but Is Not Sufficient for Transforming Primary Rat Embryo Fibroblasts in Cooperation with the H-ras Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jun; Yang, Se-Hwan; Cho, Young-Gyu; Hwang, Soon Bong; Hahn, Young Shin; Sung, Young Chul

    1998-01-01

    Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To examine the oncogenic potential of the HCV core gene product, primary rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) were transfected with the core gene in the presence or absence of the H-ras oncogene. In contrast to a previous report (R. B. Ray, L. M. Lagging, K. Meyer, and R. Ray, J. Virol. 70:4438–4443, 1996), HCV core proteins from two different genotypes (type 1a and type 1b) were not found to transform REFs to tumorigenic phenotype in cooperation with the H-ras oncogene, although the core protein was successfully expressed 20 days after transfection. In addition, REFs transfected with E1A- but not core-expressing plasmid showed the phenotype of immortalized cells when selected with G418. The biological activity was confirmed by observing the transcription activation from two viral promoters, Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and simian virus 40 promoter, which are known to be activated by the core protein from HCV-1 isolate. In contrast to the result with primary cells, the Rat-1 cell line, stably expressing HCV core protein, exhibited focus formation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor formation in nude mice. HCV core protein was able to induce the transformation of Rat-1 cells with various efficiencies depending on the expression level of the core protein. These results indicate that HCV core protein has an oncogenic potential to transform the Rat-1 cell line but is not sufficient to either immortalize primary REFs by itself or transform primary cells in conjunction with the H-ras oncogene. PMID:9525629

  11. Flickr's Potential as an Academic Image Resource: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Emma; Stuart, David; Thelwall, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Many web 2.0 sites are extremely popular and contain vast amounts of content, but how much of this content is useful in academia? This exploratory paper investigates the potential use of the popular web 2.0 image site Flickr as an academic image resource. The study identified images tagged with any one of 12 subject names derived from recognized…

  12. Study of the malariogenic potential of Eastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Marí, R; Jiménez-Peydró, R

    2012-03-01

    Recent autochtonous malaria cases which occurred in Spain, France, Greece or Italy have shown the need to delve into the knowledge of potential influence of tropical diseases in Southern Europe. The malariogenic potential of a formerly endemic area of Spain was analyzed in present manuscript according to the epidemiological parameters of receptivity, infectivity and vulnerability. During a five years period (2005-2009) comprehensive larval surveys of anophelines and continuous analysis of imported malaria cases were conducted in a study region of about 23 260 km². The next seven potential malaria vectors were collected: Anopheles algeriensis, Anopheles atroparvus, Anopheles claviger, Anopheles maculipennis, Anopheles marteri, Anopheles petragnani and Anopheles plumbeus. The entomological results conclude that malaria receptivity is still high in different rural and hinterland regions where it is possible to find high densities of An. atroparvus. Moreover An. algeriensis was also commonly found breeding in irrigation channels surrounding urban areas. Although receptivity is relevant in much of the study area, fortunately the vulnerability of the territory is very low. In conclusion, despite our data together with current socio-economic and sanitary conditions of Spain indicate a relatively low malariogenic potential, we must maintain the entomological and epidemiological vigilance in order to prevent the potential appearance of indigenous malaria cases. Therefore, the present Spanish situation can be described as what malariologists of the first half of the last century would have called "anophelism without malaria." PMID:22543601

  13. The Potential of Adaptive Design in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam; Redgrave, Jessica; Teare, Dawn; Ali, Ali; Zemke, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are the backbone of medical research, and are often the last step in the development of new therapies for use in patients. Prior to human testing, however, preclinical studies using animal subjects are usually performed in order to provide initial data on the safety and effectiveness of prospective treatments. These studies can be costly and time consuming, and may also raise concerns about the ethical treatment of animals when potentially harmful procedures are involved. Adaptive design is a process by which the methods used in a study may be altered while it is being conducted in response to preliminary data or other new information. Adaptive design has been shown to be useful in reducing the time and costs associated with clinical trials, and may provide similar benefits in preclinical animal studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize various aspects of adaptive design and evaluate its potential for use in preclinical research. PMID:26473839

  14. The Potential of Adaptive Design in Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam; Redgrave, Jessica; Teare, Dawn; Ali, Ali; Zemke, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are the backbone of medical research, and are often the last step in the development of new therapies for use in patients. Prior to human testing, however, preclinical studies using animal subjects are usually performed in order to provide initial data on the safety and effectiveness of prospective treatments. These studies can be costly and time consuming, and may also raise concerns about the ethical treatment of animals when potentially harmful procedures are involved. Adaptive design is a process by which the methods used in a study may be altered while it is being conducted in response to preliminary data or other new information. Adaptive design has been shown to be useful in reducing the time and costs associated with clinical trials, and may provide similar benefits in preclinical animal studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize various aspects of adaptive design and evaluate its potential for use in preclinical research. PMID:26473839

  15. Taxonomic characterization, adaptation strategies and biotechnological potential of cryophilic yeasts from ice cores of Midre Lovénbreen glacier, Svalbard, Arctic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Tsuji, Masaharu; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Roy, Utpal; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-04-01

    Ten strains of cryophilic yeast were studied from glacier ice cores of Svalbard, Arctic. The ice melt samples contained about 3×10(3) - 1×10(4) colony forming unit (CFUs) per ml. Sequence analysis of the isolates, using D1/D2 domain identified five species of yeasts: Cryptococcus adeliensis (MLB-18 JX192655), Cryptococcus albidosimilis (MLB-19 JX192656), Cryptococcus saitoi (MLB-22 JX192659), Rhodosporidium lusitaniae (MLB-20 JX192657), and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (MLB-27 JX192664). Effect of temperature on growth of these isolates was studied. The strains are able to grow at temperatures ranging between 1 and 20°C. Screening of the cultures for amylase, cellulase, protease, lipase, urease and catalase activity were carried out indicating varying amounts of enzyme production at different temperatures. Characterization of lipase in strain Cryptococcus sp. MLB-24 was performed. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis of the cultures grown at four different temperatures (1, 4, 15, and 20°C) was also done. Decrease in temperature was reported to cause increase in concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. High amount of oleic acid accumulated with increase in temperature. These fatty acids possibly help the strains to survive in glacial ice core cold environment. The extracellular and intracellular filtrate of the cultures showed negative antifreeze protein (AFP) activity. The observations indicate that probably the isolates in the present undertaking adapt to low temperatures, by enzyme and PUFA secretion rather than by antifreeze protein secretion. PMID:23353800

  16. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proposed study plan and study plan meetings. 5.11 Section 5.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan..., including information and study requests, the potential applicant must file with the Commission a...

  17. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Zhuravleva, I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; King, A. L.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Morris, R. G.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a deep Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT ˜ 1 keV in the core to kT ˜ 9 keV at r ˜ 30 kpc. Beyond r ˜ 30 kpc, the intracluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing-induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r ˜ 280 kpc. The cluster also harbours a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ˜100 km s-1. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r ˜ 120 kpc to the south-east of the cluster centre. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.

  18. Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of histone and DNA dynamics in nucleosome cores.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, P R; Smith, R M; Rill, R L

    1986-05-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (67.9 MHz) were obtained for native nucleosome cores: cores dissociated in 2 M NaCl and 2 M NaCl, 6 M urea; and cores degraded with DNase I plus proteinase K. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectra of native and dissociated cores and core length DNA were also obtained at 60.7 MHz. The 31P resonance and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of DNA were only slightly affected by packaging in nucleosome cores, in agreement with other reports, but 13C resonances of DNA were essentially unobservable. The loss of DNA spectral intensity suggests that rapid internal motions of DNA sugar carbons in protein-free DNA previously demonstrated by 13C NMR methods are partly restricted in nucleosomes. The 13C spectrum of native cores contains many narrow intense resonances assigned to lysine side chain and alpha-carbons, glycine alpha-carbons, alanine alpha- and beta- carbons, and arginine side chain carbons. Several weaker resonances were also assigned. The narrow line widths, short T1 values, and non-minimal nuclear Overhauser enhancements of these resonances, including alpha- and beta-carbons, show that some terminal chain segments of histones in nucleosomes are as mobile as small random coil polypeptides. The mobile segments include about 9% of all histone residues and 25% of all lysines, but only 10% of all arginines. The compositions of these segments indicate that mobile regions are located in amino- or carboxyl-terminal sequences of two or more histones. In addition, high mobility was observed for side chain carbons of 45-50% of all lysines (delta and epsilon carbons) and about 25% of all arginines (zeta carbon) in histones (including those in mobile segments), suggesting that basic residues in terminal histone sequences are not strongly involved in nucleosome structure and may instead help stabilize higher order chromatin structure. PMID:3700380

  19. Evaluation of shear bond strength between zirconia core and ceramic veneers fabricated by pressing and layering techniques: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Subash, M.; Vijitha, D.; Deb, Saikat; Satish, A.; Mahendirakumar, N.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Although ceramic veneered on to zirconia core have been in use for quite some time, information regarding the comparative evaluation of the Shear bond strength of Pressable & Layered ceramic veneered on to zirconia core is limited. Purpose of study: To evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia core and ceramic veneer fabricated by two different techniques, Layering (Noritake CZR) and Pressing (Noritake, CZR Press). Materials and Method: 20 samples of zirconia blocks were fabricated and the samples were divided into group A & B. Group A - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by pressing using Noritake CZR Press. Group B - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by layering using Noritake CZR. The veneered specimens were mounted on to the center of a PVC tube using self-cure acrylic resin leaving 3 mm of the veneered surface exposed as cantilever. Using a Universal testing machine the blocks were loaded up to failure. Result: The results were tabulated by using independent samples t-test. The mean shear bond strength for Pressed specimens was 12.458 ± 1.63(S.D) MPa and for layered specimens was 8.458 ± 0.845(S.D) MPa. Conclusion: Pressed specimens performed significantly better than the layered specimen with a P value 0.001. Clinicians and dental laboratory technicians should consider the use of pressed ceramics as an alternative to traditional layering procedures to reduce the chances of chipping or de-lamination of ceramics PMID:26538929

  20. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  1. Development of a new academic digital library: a study of usage data of a core medical electronic journal collection

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Barbara S.; Klatt, Carolyn; Nagy, Suzanne P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The current study evaluates the results of a previously reported method for creating a core medical electronic journal collection for a new medical school library, validates the core collection created specifically to meet the needs of the new school, and identifies strategies for making cost-effective e-journal selection decisions. Methods: Usage data were extracted for four e-journal packages (Blackwell-Synergy, Cell Press, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, and ScienceDirect). Usage was correlated with weighted point values assigned to a core list of journal titles, and each package was evaluated for relevancy and cost-effectiveness to the Florida State University College of Medicine (FSU COM) population. Results: The results indicated that the development of the core list was a valid method for creating a new twenty-first century, community-based medical school library. Thirty-seven journals are identified for addition to the FSU COM core list based on use by the COM, and areas of overlapping research interests between the university and the COM are identified based on use of specific journals by each population. Conclusions: The collection development approach that evolved at the FSU COM library was useful during the initial stages of identifying and evaluating journal selections and in assessing the relative value of a particular journal package for the FSU COM after the school was established. PMID:19404499

  2. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Afifah, Maryam Su’ud, Zaki; Miura, Ryosuke; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-30

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don’t need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  3. Structural and electronic properties of CdS/ZnS core/shell nanowires: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo Seok; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    Carrying out density functional theory (DFT) calculation, we studied the relative effects of quantum confinement and strain on the electronic structures of II-IV semiconductor compounds with a large lattice-mismatch, CdS and ZnS, in the core/shell nanowire geometry. We considered different core radii and shell thickness of the CdS/ZnS core/shell nanowire, different surface facets, and various defects in the core/shell interface and surface regions. To properly describe the band level alignment at the core/shell boundary, we adopted the self-interaction correction (SIC)-DFT scheme. Implications of our findings in the context of device applications will be also discussed. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Grant (No. 2012R1A1A2044793), Global Frontier Program (No. 2013-073298), and Nano-Material Technology Development Program (2012M3A7B4049888) of the National Research Foundation funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology of Korea. Corresponding author

  4. A finite element study of teeth restored with post and core: Effect of design, material, and ferrule

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Viram; Bhargava, Akshay; Parkash, Hari; Chittaranjan, B.; Kumar, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different postdesigns and materials are available; however, no consensus exists regarding superiority for stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and material of post with or without ferrule on stress distribution using finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 three-dimensional (3D) axisymmetric models of postretained central incisors were made: Six with ferrule design and six without it. Three of these six models had tapered posts, and three had parallel posts. The materials tested were titanium post with a composite resin core, nickel chromium cast post and core, and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) post with a composite resin core. The stress analysis was done using ANSYS software. The load of 100 N at an angle of 45΀ was applied 2 mm cervical to incisal edge on the palatal surface and results were analyzed using 3D von Mises criteria. Results: The highest amount of stress was in the cervical region. Overall, the stress in the tapered postsystem was more than the parallel one. FRC post and composite resin core recorded minimal stresses within the post but the stresses transmitted to cervical dentin were more as compared to other systems. Minimal stresses in cervical dentine were observed where the remaining coronal dentin was strengthen by ferrule. Conclusion: A rigid material with high modulus of elasticity for post and core system creates most uniform stress distribution pattern. Ferrule provides uniform distribution of stresses and decreases the cervical stresses. PMID:27274343

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Virion Core Protein of Orf Virus Strain NA1/11 As Potential Diagnostic Tool for Orf Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jiafeng; Hao, Wenbo; Peng, Yongzheng; Li, Hong; Li, Wei; Li, Ming; Luo, Shuhong

    2015-08-01

    Orf is caused by the orf virus (ORFV) and is a non-systemic, widespread disease afflicting sheep, goats, wild ruminants, and humans. Recent outbreaks in sheep and goats in Jilin and other northern Chinese provinces raise concerns about orf control in China. Thirty-five hybridoma clones were constructed from splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with natural orf virus protein. These hybridomas were used to produce antibodies targeting ORFV proteins. Immunological characterization of these monoclonal antibodies (MAb) showed that the 5F2D8 hybridoma line produced MAb that can recognize the 100, 70, and 20 kDa bands from total viral lysate. This hybridoma was further characterized by immunoprecipitation and peptide sequencing. The results indicate that 5F2D8 specifically recognizes orf virus encoded protein ORFV086, a late expression virion core protein that plays important roles in progeny virus particle assembly, morphogenesis, and maturity. Further experiments demonstrate that this MAb did not react with other viral proteins of ORFV orthopoxviruses, but reacted strongly to different field isolates of orf viruses from China. Additionally, this anti-ORFV086 MAb possesses ORFV neutralizing capability. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis determined that ORFV086 of NA1/11, clustered together with NZ2 and IA82, is highly conserved and has structural similarities with the Vaccinia virus core protein P4a. As such, this MAb has great potential as a diagnostic tool for orf viruses, in the further exploration of orf pathogenesis, and in disease control and prevention. PMID:26301926

  6. Image guided versus palpation guided core needle biopsy of palpable breast masses: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Smriti; Kumari, Swati; Srivastava, Anurag; Thulkar, Sanjay; Mathur, Sandeep; Veedu, Prasad Thotton

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biopsy of palpable breast masses can be performed manually by palpation guidance or under imaging guidance. Based on retrospective studies, image guided biopsy is considered more accurate than palpation guided breast biopsy; however, these techniques have not been compared prospectively. We conducted this prospective study to verify the superiority and determine the size of beneficial effect of image guided biopsy over palpation guided biopsy. Methods: Over a period of 18 months, 36 patients each with palpable breast masses were randomized into palpation guided and image guided breast biopsy arms. Ultrasound was used for image guidance in 33 patients and mammographic (stereotactic) guidance in three patients. All biopsies were performed using 14 gauge automated core biopsy needles. Inconclusive, suspicious or imaging-histologic discordant biopsies were repeated. Results: Malignancy was found in 30 of 36 women in palpation guided biopsy arm and 27 of 36 women in image guided biopsy arm. Palpation guided biopsy had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 46.7, 100, 100, 27.3 per cent, respectively, for diagnosing breast cancer. Nineteen of 36 women (52.8%) required repeat biopsy because of inadequate samples (7 of 19), suspicious findings (2 of 19) or imaging-histologic discordance (10 of 19). On repeat biopsy, malignancy was found in all cases of imaging-histologic discordance. Image guided biopsy had 96.3 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity. There was no case of inadequate sample or imaging-histologic discordance with image guided biopsy. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in palpable breast masses, image guided biopsy was superior to palpation guided biopsy in terms of sensitivity, false negative rate and repeat biopsy rates. PMID:27488003

  7. Core to Atmosphere Exploration of Ice Giants: A Uranus Mission Concept Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensema, R. J.; Arias-Young, T. M.; Wilkins, A. N.; Ermakov, A.; Bennett, C.; Dietrich, A.; Hemingway, D.; Klein, V.; Mane, P.; Marr, K. D.; Masterson, J.; Siegel, V.; Stober, K. J.; Talpe, M.; Vines, S. K.; Wetteland, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ice giants remain largely unexplored, as their large distance from the Sun limits both Earth-based observations and spacecraft visits. The significant occurrence of ice giant-sized planets among detected exoplanets presents an impetus to study Uranus to understand planetary formation, dynamics, and evolution. In addition, Uranus is also uniquely interesting, given the large inclination of its rotation axis and magnetospheric configuration. In this work, we design a mission concept that aims to maximize scientific return by measuring Uranus' chemical composition, internal structure, and magnetosphere, the first two being primary indicators of ice giant formation mechanisms. For this study, we analyze the trade space for a Uranus mission constrained by a cost cap of $1B. We discuss the decision making processes behind our choices of the science priorities, instrument suite and orbital configuration. Trade space decisions include a strong onboard instrument suite in lieu of a descent probe, an orbiter instead of a flyby mission, and design constraints on the power and propulsion systems. The mission, CAELUS (Core and Atmospheric Evolution Laboratory for Uranus Science), is designed for an August 2023 launch. Following a 14-year cruise with multiple planetary gravity assists, the spacecraft would begin its science mission, which consists of a series of ten 30-day near-polar orbits around Uranus. The instrument suite would consist of a microwave radiometer, Doppler seismometer, magnetometer, and UV spectrometer. These four instruments, along with a high-gain antenna capable of gravity science, would provide a comprehensive science return that meets the bulk of the scientific objectives of the 2013 NRC Planetary Science Decadal Survey for ice giants, most notably those regarding the chemical composition, interior structure, and dynamo of Uranus. This mission concept was created as part of an educational exercise for the 2014 Planetary Science Summer School at the Jet

  8. A Study of the Economic Benefit Potential of Intermodal Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. M.; Kawai, R. T.; Gregg, R. D.; McKinley, Robert E., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A conceptual study was conducted to determine the benefit potential of an Intermodal Transport in which quick change payload modules are used to reduce the cost of air travel by increasing daily utilization. Three basic concepts varying the degree of modularity were investigated for a 122,000 pounds payload 3,000 NM range regional wide body transport. The profit potential for operating as a passenger transport during the day and as a freighter at night was assessed. Assuming current levels of profitability, Intermodal operations could offer an operating cost reduction potential up to 20%. Enabling technology needs are identified as very quiet aircraft for expanded night operations, distributed load carrying quick disconnect latching, and configuration dependent safety issues. Recommendations are made to explore if additional benefits are possible from alternative mission and usage modules.

  9. Study of Several Potentials as Scalar Field Dark Matter Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Vazquez-Gonzalez, Alberto; Magan a, Juan

    2008-12-04

    In this work we study several scalar field potentials as a plausible candidate to be the dark matter in the universe. The main idea is the following; if the scalar field is an ultralight boson particle, it condensates like a Bose-Einstein system at very early times and forms the basic structure of the Universe. Real scalar fields collapse in equilibrium configurations which oscillate in space-time (oscillatons). The cosmological behavior of the field equations are solved using the dynamical system formalism. We use the current cosmological parameters as constraints for the free parameters of the scalar field potentials. We are able to reproduce very well the cosmological predictions of the standard {lambda}CDM model with some scalar field potentials. Therefore, scalar field dark matter seems to be a good alternative to be the nature of the dark matter of the universe.

  10. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  11. A Study on Factors Influencing Toughness of Basic Flux-Cored Weld of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Kamaraj, M.

    2011-10-01

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is relatively a new process for joining of modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) steel. In this study, effect of shielding gas composition, inclusion content, gas tungsten-arc welding (GTAW) surface remelting, and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on toughness were investigated. The high amount of silicon resulted in the formation of δ-ferrite in basic flux-cored weld. A mixture of 80% argon + 20% (80A) carbon dioxide shielding gas during welding resulted in the required toughness of 47 J at room temperature. The 95% argon + 5% carbon dioxide (95A) gas-shielded welds have lower toughness due to higher amount of δ-ferrite (4%) than 80% argon + 20% carbon dioxide welds (2%). In essence, most desirable shielding gas medium to achieve optimum toughness was 80% argon + 20% carbon dioxide in basic flux-cored arc welding.

  12. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDIES FOR TANK 241-AN-107 CORE 309 SEGMENTS 21R1 & 21R2

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-11-13

    Liquid waste in tank 241-AN-107 is below Technical Safety Requirements Administrative Control 5.16 (AC 5.16) limits. Electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on Core 309, Segments 21R1 and 21R2, to provide information on the conductivity and corrosive tendencies of the tank saltcake and interstitial liquid. This report describes data obtained under the execution of RPP-PLAN-29001, 'Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Tank 241-AN-107 Core 309, Segments 21R1 and 21R2'. Analytical results are presented that show supernatant was within the limits while the interstitial liquid remained below the limits for the analytical cores. Applicable AC 5.16 chemistry control limits for AN-107 are presented.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of core-shell acrylate based latex and study of its reactive blends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Fan, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Min-Feng; Nie, Ying

    2008-03-01

    Techniques in resin blending are simple and efficient method for improving the properties of polymers, and have been used widely in polymer modification field. However, polymer latex blends such as the combination of latexes, especially the latexes with water-soluble polymers, were rarely reported. Here, we report a core-shell composite latex synthesized using methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA), 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) as monomers and ammonium persulfate and sodium bisulfite redox system as the initiator. Two stages seeded semi-continuous emulsion polymerization were employed for constructing a core-shell structure with P(MMA-co-BA) component as the core and P(EHA-co-GMA) component as the shell. Results of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Dynamics Light Scattering (DLS) tests confirmed that the particles obtained are indeed possessing a desired core-shell structural character. Stable reactive latex blends were prepared by adding the latex with waterborne melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF) or urea-formaldehyde resin (UF). It was found that the glass transition temperature, the mechanical strength and the hygroscopic property of films cast from the latex blends present marked enhancements under higher thermal treatment temperature. It was revealed that the physical properties of chemically reactive latexes with core-shell structure could be altered via the change of crosslinking density both from the addition of crosslinkers and the thermal treatment. PMID:19325753

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Core-Shell Acrylate Based Latex and Study of Its Reactive Blends

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang; Fan, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Min-Feng; Nie, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Techniques in resin blending are simple and efficient method for improving the properties of polymers, and have been used widely in polymer modification field. However, polymer latex blends such as the combination of latexes, especially the latexes with water-soluble polymers, were rarely reported. Here, we report a core-shell composite latex synthesized using methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA), 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) as monomers and ammonium persulfate and sodium bisulfite redox system as the initiator. Two stages seeded semi-continuous emulsion polymerization were employed for constructing a core-shell structure with P(MMA-co-BA) component as the core and P(EHA-co-GMA) component as the shell. Results of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Dynamics Light Scattering (DLS) tests confirmed that the particles obtained are indeed possessing a desired core-shell structural character. Stable reactive latex blends were prepared by adding the latex with waterborne melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF) or urea-formaldehyde resin (UF). It was found that the glass transition temperature, the mechanical strength and the hygroscopic property of films cast from the latex blends present marked enhancements under higher thermal treatment temperature. It was revealed that the physical properties of chemically reactive latexes with core-shell structure could be altered via the change of crosslinking density both from the addition of crosslinkers and the thermal treatment. PMID:19325753

  15. Models of molecular cloud cores. II. Multitransition study of CS-34

    SciTech Connect

    Mundy, L.G.; Evans, N.J.,II; Snell, R.L.; Goldsmith, P.F.; Bally, J.

    1986-07-01

    The dense cores embedded in the M17, S140 and NGC 2024 molecular clouds are mapped in the J = 5-4, J = 3-2, and J = 2-1 transitions of CS-34, and these lines are found to be a factor of 3-4 weaker, and 25 percent narrower, than the CS lines mapped in these cores by Snell et al. (1984). The data are well fitted by spherical LGV models for the excitation, and the excellent correlation between the CS-34 and CS column densities corroborates the absence of a systematic increase in the gas density with decreasing core radius found by Snell et al. Though the CS/CS-34 column density ratio is 9-17, rather than the terrestrial value of 22.5, the column density relationship is linear. The data support of a clump model in which the column density distribution in the core is determined by the volume filling factor of clumps with high, fairly uniform gas density, and it is suggested that the dense gas in the data represents the dominant component of the core gas. 22 references.

  16. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects ("the Standards") are the culmination of an extended, broad-based effort to fulfill the charge issued by the states to create the next generation of K-12 standards in order to help ensure that all students are college and…

  17. Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: A Mixed Methods Study of Elementary Teachers' Experiences and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swars, Susan Lee; Chestnutt, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored elementary teachers' (n = 73) experiences with and perspectives on the recently implemented Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-Mathematics) at a high-needs, urban school. Analysis of the survey, questionnaire, and interview data reveals the findings cluster around: familiarity with and preparation…

  18. The Common Core State Standards: An Opportunity to Enhance Formative Assessment in History/Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ateh, Comfort M.; Wyngowski, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the opportunity that the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) present for enhancing formative assessment (FA) in history and social studies classrooms. There is evidence that FA can enhance learning for students if implemented well. Unfortunately, teachers continue to be challenged in implementing FA in their classrooms. We…

  19. Professional Development for Promoting 21st Century Skills and Common Core State Standards in Foreign Language and Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beriswill, Joanne Elizabeth; Bracey, Pamela Scott; Sherman-Morris, Kathleen; Huang, Kun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    To help satisfy the pressing need for technology-related professional development for in-service teachers, the Global Academic Essentials Teacher Institute (GAETI) was implemented to provide in-service foreign language and social studies teachers with content, pedagogy, and technology explorations centered on the teaching of the Common Core State…

  20. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, R. T.; Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T.; Williams, K. A.; Moses, D. L.

    2006-11-01

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, “continuously graded” fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 μm is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457μm. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

  1. Computational Study on the Steady-state Impedance of Saturated-core Superconducting Fault Current Limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Tang, Y.; Liang, S.; Ren, L.; Wang, Z.; Xu, Y.

    This paper presents the electromagnetic analysis of a high voltage saturated-core superconducting fault current limiter (SCSFCL). The numerical analyses of a three-dimensional (3D) model is shown, and the specific parameters are given. The model focus on the steady-state impedance of the limiter when connected to the power grid. It analyzed the dependence of steady-state impedance on the AC coil current, and the relationship between oil gap and coil inductance. The results suggest that, adding oil gap between slice of silicon steel can reduce the core cross-section, restrain the ultraharmonic and decrease the steady-state impedance. As the core cross-section of AC limb decreased from 4344 cm2 to 3983 cm2, the total harmonic distortion for voltage decreased from 2.4% to 1.8%, and the impedance decreased from 1.082 Ω to 1.069 Ω(Idc=400A,Iac=1296A).

  2. Ab initio study of 3s core-level x-ray photoemission spectra in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Manabu; Igarashi, Jun-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the 3s - and 4s -core-level x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) spectra in the ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic transition metals by developing an ab initio method. We obtain the spectra exhibiting the characteristic shapes as a function of binding energy in good agreement with experimental observations. The spectral shapes are strikingly different between the majority spin channel and the minority spin channel for ferromagnetic metals Ni, Co, and Fe, that is, large intensities appear in the higher binding-energy side of the main peak (satellite) in the majority spin channel. Such satellite or shoulder intensities are also obtained for nonmagnetic metals V and Ru. These behaviors are elucidated in terms of the change of the one-electron states induced by the core-hole potential.

  3. Particle-core study of halo dynamics in periodic-focusing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tai-Sen F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on an approach to investigate the dynamics of halo particles in mismatched charged-particle beams propagating through periodic-focusing channels using the particle-core model. The proposed method employs canonical transformations to minimize, in new phase-space variables, the flutter due to the periodic focusing to allow making stroboscopic plots. Applying this method, we find that in periodic-focusing systems, certain particles initially not in the halo region can be brought into resonance with the core oscillation to become halo particles. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Potassium-induced charge redistribution on Si(111) surfaces studied by core-level photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y. ); Chen, C.T.; Meigs, G.; Sette, F. ); Illing, G. ); Shigakawa, H. )

    1992-03-15

    High-resolution core-level photoemission spectra of the K/Si(111)(7{times}7) surface system are presented. The Si 2{ital p} results show that potassium adsorption induces a Si 2{ital p} core level to shift to o/Ihighero/P binding energy, i.e., to the opposite direction than that expected from the Si-K electronegativity differences. This result is compared with that of the K/Si(111)({radical}3 {times} {radical}3 ){ital R}30{degree}-B system and is interpreted in terms of the K-induced charge redistribution between the Si-adatom--rest-atom pair.

  5. Collecting core data in severely injured patients using a consensus trauma template: an international multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction No worldwide, standardised definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data from severely injured trauma patients. This study evaluated the feasibility of collecting the data variables of the international consensus-derived Utstein Trauma Template. Methods Trauma centres from three different continents were invited to submit Utstein Trauma Template core data during a defined period, for up to 50 consecutive trauma patients. Directly admitted patients with a New Injury Severity Score (NISS) equal to or above 16 were included. Main outcome variables were data completeness, data differences and data collection difficulty. Results Centres from Europe (n = 20), North America (n = 3) and Australia (n = 1) submitted data on 965 patients, of whom 783 were included. Median age was 41 years (interquartile range (IQR) 24 to 60), and 73.1% were male. Median NISS was 27 (IQR 20 to 38), and blunt trauma predominated (91.1%). Of the 36 Utstein variables, 13 (36%) were collected by all participating centres. Eleven (46%) centres applied definitions of the survival outcome variable that were different from those of the template. Seventeen (71%) centres used the recommended version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Three variables (age, gender and AIS) were documented in all patients. Completeness > 80% was achieved for 28 variables, and 20 variables were > 90% complete. Conclusions The Utstein Template was feasible across international trauma centres for the majority of its data variables, with the exception of certain physiological and time variables. Major differences were found in the definition of survival and in AIS coding. The current results give a clear indication of the attainability of information and may serve as a stepping-stone towards creation of a European trauma registry. PMID:21992236

  6. An experimental study of counter-rotating cores in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Roelofs, G. R.; Smith, B. F.

    1990-01-01

    Recent observational studies (Franx and Illingworth 1987; Jedrzejewski and Schechter 1988; Bender 1988; Illingworth and Franx 1989) have shown that some elliptical galaxies have a small region near the center that rotates in the opposite direction from the outer parts of the galaxy. Often the rotation in the central part is much faster than that in the outer part. A few other galaxies show a small region near the center that rotates in the same direction as the rest of the galaxy, but much faster. Either way, the part near the center that shows a strange pattern of rotation (the 'core') has been interpreted as a distinct dynamical subsystem. Very briefly, the observational data seem to be that anomalies show up in rotation curves near the centers of some elliptical galaxies and that galaxies with these strange rotational properties do not show a photometric signature: there are no noticeable bumps in the brightness profile and no unusual shapes of isophotal contours that would suggest an excess of matter concentrated near the center. No strong color variations have been reported. The puzzle is to learn what we can about elliptical galaxies in general, and about galaxies with strange central regions in particular, from these observational facts. The authors' approach is experimental. They make a guess about the form of the dynamically distinct subsystem, and then build a galaxy model to test experimental consequences such as the amount of matter required to produce observable effects and the length of time over which these effects would remain observable. They sidestep questions about how the galaxy might have gotten to be that way in the first place. That gives them more freedom to explore a variety of suggestions about what kind of dynamical system might give rise to the observed rotational patterns.

  7. High-Pressure Studies on Iron Analogs with Application to Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, B. K.; Raju, S.; Geballe, Z.; Jeanloz, R.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals at high pressures are of geophysical interest because hcp Fe is likely to be the primary constituent of Earth's inner core. Zinc and cadmium crystallize in a distorted hcp structure, and undergo electronic topological transitions at high pressures manifested through anomalous values of the c/a crystal-axis ratio, compressibility and electron transport properties. There is renewed interest in such electronic transitions due to their recent association with anomalies in c/a, Debye velocity and Mössbauer center shift in Fe and Fe-Ni alloy near 40 GPa. Past high-pressure studies have shown that the c/a anomaly is larger in Cd as compared to Zn. Nonhydrostatic measurements on Cd reveal texture development, which is used in identifying deformation mechanisms in Os and Fe. Angular x-ray diffraction measurements in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell, with argon as pressure medium, were carried out on Cd up to 25 GPa at room temperature. We minimized nonhydrostatic conditions by thermally annealing the sample at each pressure by heating it to 100° C, which resulted in sharpening of diffraction peaks. Variations of c/a with pressure revealed anomalies near 2, 7, 15 and 22 GPa, with corresponding anomalies in compression at similar pressures. We associate these anomalies with electronic topological transitions, based on results of first-principles electronic structure calculations at high pressures. Our data are in good agreement with independent measurements using helium as a pressure medium, so the anomalies cannot be ascribed to nonhydrostaticity. Also, in-situ x-ray powder-diffraction shows that the melting curve of Cd deviates from the Lindemann law above 1 GPa, consistent with the occurrence of electronic transitions.

  8. Secondary malignancies diagnosed using kidney needle core biopsies: a clinical and pathological study of 75 cases.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Tamboli, Pheroze; Karam, Jose A; Vikram, Raghu; Zhang, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Involvement of the kidney by secondary malignancies is uncommon. Differentiating secondary malignancies from primary kidney/urothelial tumors can be challenging, especially on limited biopsy material. A retrospective search of our institutional archive from January 2002 to May 2015 identified 1572 cases of imaging-guided needle core biopsies of the kidney. Of these, 75 (5%) cases revealed a secondary malignancy; 48 (64%) patients had undergone the biopsy with a primary kidney tumor favored clinically. There were 39 male and 36 female patients with a mean age of 59.4 years (range, 21-83 years). The majority of the cases (n = 55, 73%) were metastases from solid tumors, with lung being the most common primary site (n = 22, 29%). Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the most common hematological malignancy (n = 6) secondarily involving the kidney. Radiographically, 58 (77%) cases presented as a solitary kidney mass. The primary malignancy was known prior to the kidney biopsy in 66 (88%) cases. The mean interval between diagnoses of the primary tumor and secondary involvement of the kidney was 4.5 years. Immunohistochemical stains were performed in 65 (87%) cases. Follow-up information was available for 73 patients; mean survival was 19.4 months, with 43 patients dead of their disease (mean, 12 months) and 30 patients alive at last follow-up (21 with and 9 without disease; mean, 30 months). Secondary malignancy in the kidney may clinically and pathologically mimic primary kidney tumors. Accurate diagnosis can be rendered by correlating pathological features with clinical and radiographic findings and judicious use of ancillary studies. PMID:26980018

  9. Core-shell hybrid upconversion nanoparticles carrying stable nitroxide radicals as potential multifunctional nanoprobes for upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Xu, Ting; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Guo, Xiangqun

    2015-03-01

    Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). However, their rapid one-electron bioreduction to diamagnetic N-hydroxy species when administered intravenously has limited their use in in vivo applications. In this article, a new approach of silica coating for carrying stable radicals was proposed. A 4-carboxyl-TEMPO nitroxide radical was covalently linked with 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane to produce a silanizing TEMPO radical. Utilizing a facile reaction based on the copolymerization of silanizing TEMPO radicals with tetraethyl orthosilicate in reverse microemulsion, a TEMPO radicals doped SiO2 nanostructure was synthesized and coated on the surface of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to generate a novel multifunctional nanoprobe, PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 for upconversion luminescence (UCL) and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging. The electron spin resonance (ESR) signals generated by the TEMPO@SiO2 show an enhanced reduction resistance property for a period of time of up to 1 h, even in the presence of 5 mM ascorbic acid. The longitudinal relaxivity of PEGylated UCNPs@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites is about 10 times stronger than that for free TEMPO radicals. The core-shell NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 UCNPs synthesized by this modified user-friendly one-pot solvothermal strategy show a significant enhancement of UCL emission of up to 60 times more than the core NaYF4:Yb,Er. Furthermore, the PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites were further used as multifunctional nanoprobes to explore their performance in the UCL imaging of living cells and T1-weighted MRI in vitro and in vivo.Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron

  10. DFT study of structure, IR and Raman spectra of the first generation dendron built from cyclotriphosphazene core with terminal carbamate and ester groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Fuchs, S.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the first generation dendron built from the cyclotriphosphazene core, five arms sbnd Osbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd N(CH3)sbnd P(S)rbond2 with ten carbamate terminal groups and one ester function Gv1 have been recorded. The IR and Raman spectra of the zero generation dendron Gv0 and first generation dendrimer G1 with the same core and terminal groups were also examined. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for dendron Gv1 on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that Gv1 has a concave lens structure with planar sbnd Osbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd N(CH3)sbnd P(S)rbond2 fragments and slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The carbamate groups attached to different arms show significant deviations from a symmetrical arrangement relative to the local planes of repeating units. The experimental IR spectrum of Gv1 dendron was interpreted by means of potential energy distributions. The strong band 1604 cm-1 shows marked changes of the optical density in dependence of the carbamate, ester or azomethyne substituents in the aromatic ring. The frequencies of ν(Nsbnd H) and ν(Cdbnd O) bands in the IR spectra reveal the presence of the different types of H-bonds in the studied dendrimers.

  11. Using core sets of the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) to measure disability in vestibular disorders: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Grill, Eva; Furman, Joseph M; Alghwiri, Alia A; Müller, Martin; Whitney, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Symptom frequency and severity in vestibular disorders often do not correlate well with patients' restrictions of activities of daily living and limitations of participation. Due to the lack of appropriate patient reported outcome measures (PRO), the extent of limitations and restrictions is mostly unknown. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is a conceptual framework and classification to evaluate all aspects of health and disability. An ICF-based measure, the Vestibular and Participation Measure (VAP), was recently proposed. Also, an ICF Core Set for vertigo, dizziness and balance disorders was developed to describe what aspects of functioning should be measured. This study protocol describes the development and cross-cultural validation of a new measure, the VAP-extended (VAP-e), based on VAP and ICF Core Set on three continents. To determine objectivity and cross-cultural validity of the VAP and to find potentially redundant items, Rasch models will be used. The VAP-e will be created by modifying or adding items from the Activities and Participation and Environmental Factors component of the ICF Core Set. Reliability, objectivity and responsiveness of the VAP-e will be tested. PMID:24447970

  12. A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-11-01

    A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify

  13. The Hollow Core: Failure of the General Education Curriculum. A Fifty College Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latzer, Barry

    2004-01-01

    This report provides empirical proof of a disturbing trend in higher education. Over the last several decades colleges and universities have substituted so-called "distribution requirements" for a solid core curriculum. Distribution requirements enable students freely to choose their general education courses, the courses outside their…

  14. Common Core Implementation: Units of Study in Sacramento City. Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Joel

    2014-01-01

    As district leaders search for the best ways to improve student learning with the Common Core State Standards, California districts are leading the way as early implementers of the new standards. The ideas and lessons emerging from their work can help other educators maximize the effectiveness of their own implementation efforts. This brief…

  15. The University of Utah's Integrated Core: A Case Study from a "Commuter Campus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paisley, Karen; Spencer, Callie; Wells, Mary Sarah; Schwab, Keri

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Integrated Core (IC), the University of Utah's version of integrated curricula. We begin with a rationale for the IC, providing a background on the unique student demographics, and University-wide requirements that propelled our design. Our IC focuses specifically on active living, sustainability, and social justice…

  16. Synthetic Studies to Lyngbouilloside: A Phosphate Tether-Mediated Synthesis of the Macrolactone Core

    PubMed Central

    Chegondi, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    A concise synthetic pathway to the originally assigned structure of lyngbouilloside macrolactone (3) is reported. The core macrocycle 3 was synthesized via a phosphate tether-mediated, one-pot, sequential RCM/CM/chemoselective hydrogenation reaction, Roskamp homologation, and a high yielding Boeckman acylketene cyclization. PMID:26388654

  17. Core muscle strengthening's improvement of balance performance in community-dwelling older adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Nicole; Tevald, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of core muscle strengthening on balance in community-dwelling older adults, 24 healthy men and women between 65 and 85 years old were randomized to either exercise (EX; n = 12) or control (CON; n = 12) groups. The exercise group performed a core strengthening home exercise program thrice weekly for 6 wk. Core muscle (curl-up test), functional reach (FR) and Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) were assessed at baseline and follow-up. There were no group differences at baseline. At follow-up, EX exhibited significantly greater improvements in curl-up (Cohen's d = 4.4), FR (1.3), and SEBT (>1.9 for all directions) than CON. The change in curl-up was significantly correlated with the change in FR (r = .44, p = .03) and SEBT (r > .61, p ≤ .002). These results suggest that core strengthening should be part of a comprehensive balance-training program for older adults. PMID:23348043

  18. Study of Core Competency Elements and Factors Affecting Performance Efficiency of Government Teachers in Northeastern Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chansirisira, Pacharawit

    2012-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the core competency elements and the factors affecting the performance efficiency of the civil service teachers in the northeastern region, Thailand. The research procedure consisted of two steps. In the first step, the data were collected using a questionnaire with the reliability (Cronbach's Alpha) of 0.90. The…

  19. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Natural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducting junior high…

  20. Apps-olutely Perfect! Apps to Support Common Core in the History/Social Studies Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Stewart; Kenna, Joshua; Bruce, Darrian

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of technology in the classroom is an increasingly important feature of effective instruction. The implementation of Common Core Standards in many states also requires teachers to consider new pedagogical strategies to support meaningful learning. This article explores the intersection between technology demands and curricular change…

  1. The Study on the Core Concepts of Contemporary Sociology of Education and Its Theoretical Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Min-hui

    2006-01-01

    Within the sphere of contemporary social sciences, the terms "modernity," "post-modernity" and "globalization" have penetrated, as the core concepts, into various fields of social sciences in a logical way. In constituting the concept of "modernity," sociology of education develops the educational theory, as sociological theory does, into a "grand…

  2. Synthetic studies of callyspongiolide: synthesis of the macrolactone core of the molecule.

    PubMed

    Athe, Sudhakar; Sharma, Ashish; Marumudi, Kanakaraju; Ghosh, Subhash

    2016-07-12

    A concise synthetic strategy has been developed for the synthesis of the macrolactone core 2 of a unique polyketide callyspongiolide 1. The key features of the strategy included an Evan's asymmetric alkylation, diastereoselective Michael type alkylation, Brown's asymmetric allylation reaction, an allylic alkylation of an activated Z-allylic alcohol and an intramolecular Z-selective intramolecular H-W-E olefination. PMID:27337038

  3. Preservice Teacher Preparation for Common Core Standards and Assessments: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Holly; Freeman, Greta G.; Wash, Pamela D.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher preparation programs face great challenges in ensuring their graduates are prepared for the demands of today's classrooms. The authors explore how teacher accountability has evolved based upon federal legislation leading to adoption of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Recognizing that future teachers will be held accountable…

  4. Biogas Potential on Long Island, New York: A Quantification Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, D.; Patel, S.; Tonjes, D.

    2011-08-25

    Biogas is the product of anaerobic digestion of waste, whether occurring spontaneously in landfills or under controlled conditions in digesters. Biogas is viewed as an important energy source in current efforts to reduce the use of fossil fuels and dependency on imported resources. Several studies on the assessment of biogas potential have been made at regional, national, and global scales. However, because it is not economically feasible to transport biogas feedstock over long distances, it is more appropriate to consider local waste sources for their potential to produce biogas. An assessment of the biogas potential on Long Island, based on the review of local landfills, wastewater treatment plants, solid waste generation and management, and agricultural waste, found that 234 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} of methane (CH{sub 4}) from biogas might be harvestable, although substantial barriers for complete exploitation exist. This number is equivalent to 2.52 TW-h of electricity, approximately 12% of fossil fuel power generation on Long Island. This work can serve as a template for other areas to rapidly create or approximate biogas potentials, especially for suburban U.S. locations that are not usually thought of as sources of renewable energy.

  5. An evaluation of the clinical potential of tissue diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, R.; Abuchi, S.; Zheng, Y.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A.; Griffiths, J.

    2015-09-01

    Medical imaging is a long established part of patient management in the treatment of disease. However, in most cases it only provides anatomical detail and does not provide any form of tissue characterisation. This is particularly true for X-ray imaging. Recent studies on tissue diffraction have shown that true molecular signatures can be derived for different tissue types. Breast cancer samples and liver tissue have been studied. It has been shown that diffraction profiles can be traced away from the primary tumour in excised breast tissue samples and that potentially 3mm fat nodules in liver tissue can be identified in patients at acceptable doses.

  6. GENIE: a software package for gene-gene interaction analysis in genetic association studies using multiple GPU or CPU cores

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene-gene interaction in genetic association studies is computationally intensive when a large number of SNPs are involved. Most of the latest Central Processing Units (CPUs) have multiple cores, whereas Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) also have hundreds of cores and have been recently used to implement faster scientific software. However, currently there are no genetic analysis software packages that allow users to fully utilize the computing power of these multi-core devices for genetic interaction analysis for binary traits. Findings Here we present a novel software package GENIE, which utilizes the power of multiple GPU or CPU processor cores to parallelize the interaction analysis. GENIE reads an entire genetic association study dataset into memory and partitions the dataset into fragments with non-overlapping sets of SNPs. For each fragment, GENIE analyzes: 1) the interaction of SNPs within it in parallel, and 2) the interaction between the SNPs of the current fragment and other fragments in parallel. We tested GENIE on a large-scale candidate gene study on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 graphics card, the GPU mode of GENIE achieves a speedup of 27 times over its single-core CPU mode run. Conclusions GENIE is open-source, economical, user-friendly, and scalable. Since the computing power and memory capacity of graphics cards are increasing rapidly while their cost is going down, we anticipate that GENIE will achieve greater speedups with faster GPU cards. Documentation, source code, and precompiled binaries can be downloaded from http://www.cceb.upenn.edu/~mli/software/GENIE/. PMID:21615923

  7. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  8. Two-component relativistic density-functional calculations of the dimers of the halogens from bromine through element 117 using effective core potential and all-electron methods.

    PubMed

    Mitin, Alexander V; van Wüllen, Christoph

    2006-02-14

    A two-component quasirelativistic Hamiltonian based on spin-dependent effective core potentials is used to calculate ionization energies and electron affinities of the heavy halogen atom bromine through the superheavy element 117 (eka-astatine) as well as spectroscopic constants of the homonuclear dimers of these atoms. We describe a two-component Hartree-Fock and density-functional program that treats spin-orbit coupling self-consistently within the orbital optimization procedure. A comparison with results from high-order Douglas-Kroll calculations--for the superheavy systems also with zeroth-order regular approximation and four-component Dirac results--demonstrates the validity of the pseudopotential approximation. The density-functional (but not the Hartree-Fock) results show very satisfactory agreement with theoretical coupled cluster as well as experimental data where available, such that the theoretical results can serve as an estimate for the hitherto unknown properties of astatine, element 117, and their dimers. PMID:16483205

  9. Carboxyl-cored dendrimer and toluene-assisted fabrication of uniform platinum nanodendrites at a water/oil interface and their potential application as a catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuyan; Zhang, Hongjie; Liu, Xudong; Wang, Xiaomei; Sun, Dehui; Peng, Chunyun; Zheng, Guoli

    2006-03-01

    Uniform platinum nanodendrites have been prepared at a water/oil interface by a facile catalyst-free method at room temperature. This is carried out by introducing NaBH4 into the platinum precursor solution in the presence of the second generation of carboxyl-cored dendrimer ([G-2]-CO2H dendrimer) and toluene to act as a protective agent and a linker, respectively. The average fractal dimension of 1.61 of the obtained platinum nanodendrites is calculated by analysing the transmission electron micrographs using the programs Fractal Dimension Version 1.1 and Fractal Dimension Calculator. Control experiments show that the fabrication of platinum nanodendrites can be operated with a wide parameter window, which undoubtedly raises the degree of control of the synthesis process. The potential application of such a nanostructure as a catalyst is investigated, and the results reveal that they show highly efficient catalytic properties for the typical redox reaction between hexacyanoferrate (III) and thiosulfate ions at 301 K.

  10. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  11. Contrastive studies of potential energy functions of some diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Hassan H.; Abdullah, Hewa Y.

    2016-03-01

    It was proposed that iron hydride, FeH, would be formed only on grains at the clouds through the reaction of the adsorbed H atoms or H2 molecules with the adsorbed Fe atoms on the grains. The importance of FeH in Astrophysics presents an additional motivation to study its energetic, spectroscopic constants and Potential Energy Curves. The structural optimization for ground state of FeH was calculated by different theoretical methods, namely, Hartree-Fock (HF), the density functional theory (DFT), B3LYP, MP2 method and QCISD(T) methods and compared with available data from the literature. The single ionized forms, cation and anion, were also obtained at the same level of calculations. Charges, dipole moment, geometrical parameters, molecular orbital energies and spectroscopic parameters were calculated and reported. In addition, the molecular ionization potential, electron affinity and dissociation energy were investigated.

  12. Soft X-ray appearance potential study of rare earth-manganese compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chourasia, A. R.; Deshpande, S. D.

    1999-06-10

    Soft X-ray appearance potential spectroscopy (SXAPS) has been employed to study the changes in the electronic structure of RMn{sub 2} compounds (where R=Pr, Sm, Gd and Dy). In this technique the total x-ray emission associated with the thresholds for the excitation of core levels of the atoms in the surface region of the materials is measured. The SXAPS spectra of the Mn L{sub 2,3} levels in these intermetallics are compared with the corresponding elemental manganese spectrum. The normalized spectra exhibit an increasing trend in the unoccupied density of states at the Fermi level as the atomic number of R increases. This has been interpreted as increasing hybridization between the R 5d and Mn 3d bands. The hybridization is found to influence the magnetic properties of these intermetallics. The core levels are also found to display crystal field splitting that seems to disappear for DyMn{sub 2}. This correlates very well with the disappearance of the Mn magnetic moment at Dy in these intermetallics.

  13. Compensation temperature in a dendrimer nano-system with a core-shell structure: Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhaj, A.; Jabar, A.; Labrim, H.; Ziti, S.; Bahmad, L.; Laânab, L.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the magnetic properties of a nanostructure based on an hexagonal core-shell geometry. The model is formed with core spins σ =3/2 and surface spins S=2. More precisely, we investigate the effect of the coupling exchange interactions in the absence/presence of both an external magnetic and crystal fields. In a first step, we elaborate the ground state phase diagrams, and then we discuss the stable phases. At different non null temperatures, we explore Monte Carlo to study computation and the magnetic properties. Among others, we find a compensation temperature between the spins σ and S. To close this study, we examine the hysteresis loop behaviors.

  14. [Nationwide questionnaire study in "the Model Core Curriculum" and current status for the undergraduate education in neurology].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Itoyama, Yasuto; Kwak, Shin; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Nakashima, Kenji; Amano, Takahiro; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Uozumi, Takenori; Kohara, Nobuo; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Tamagawa, Akira; Toyoshima, Itaru; Mizutani, Tomohiko; Yoshii, Fumihito; Sobue, Gen; Shimizu, Teruo

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the current state of education for undergraduates, the subcommittee of the Japanese Society of Neurology for undergraduate education sent a questionnaire on the 2001-version of Model Core Curriculum to the department of neurology in 80 medical universities and their 7 associate medical institutes throughout Japan. Answers were obtained from 56 out of those 87 institutes (64.4%). According to the answers, the Core Curriculum was introduced to the program of undergraduate education in 93% of those 56 universities. For the revision of neurology part in the current Core Curriculum, there are number of requests for improving the description on the neurological examination, list of common symptoms and disorders, and addition of therapeutics. Despite application of the Model Core Curriculum in medical education, the present study disclosed that there were considerable difference in the number and content of the lectures, and the duration of clinical clerkship in neurology ward. These differences of the curriculum and training program depends on not only the number of staffs, but also whether they are working as staffs in a department of neurology or as a small group of neurologists within a department other than neurology. PMID:18939474

  15. Systematic Studies of Shock Revival and the Subsequent Evolutions in Core-collapse Supernovae with Parametric Progenitor Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yu; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    We conducted one-dimensional and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of post-shock revival evolutions in core-collapse supernovae, employing the simple neutrino light bulb approximation to produce explosions rather easily. In order to estimate the explosion energy, we took into proper account nuclear recombinations and fusions consistently with the equation of state for matter not in statistical equilibrium in general. The methodology is similar to our previous work, but is somehow improved. In this paper, we studied the influence of the progenitor structure on the dynamics systematically. In order to expedite our understanding of the systematics, we constructed six parametric progenitor models, which are different in masses of Fe iron core and Si+S layer, instead of employing realistic models provided by stellar evolution calculations, which are sometimes of stochastic nature as a function of stellar mass on the main sequence. We found that the explosion energy is tightly correlated with the mass accretion rate at shock revival irrespective of dimension and the progenitors with light iron cores but with rather high entropies, which have yet to be produced by realistic stellar evolution calculations, may reproduce the canonical values of explosion energy and nickel mass. The mass of the Si+S layer is also important in the mass accretion history after bounce, on the other hand; the higher mass accretion rates and resultant heavier cores tend to hamper strong explosions.

  16. Relationship between cycling mechanics and core stability.

    PubMed

    Abt, John P; Smoliga, James M; Brick, Matthew J; Jolly, John T; Lephart, Scott M; Fu, Freddie H

    2007-11-01

    Core stability has received considerable attention with regards to functional training in sports. Core stability provides the foundation from which power is generated in cycling. No research has described the relationship between core stability and cycling mechanics of the lower extremity. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between cycling mechanics and core stability. Hip, knee, and ankle joint kinematic and pedal force data were collected on 15 competitive cyclists while cycling untethered on a high-speed treadmill. The exhaustive cycling protocol consisted of cycling at 25.8 km x h(-1) while the grade was increased 1% every 3 minutes. A core fatigue workout was performed before the second treadmill test. Total frontal plane knee motion (test 1: 15.1 +/- 6.0 degrees ; test 2: 23.3 +/- 12.5 degrees), sagittal plane knee motion (test 1: 69.9 +/- 4.9 degrees ; test 2: 79.3 +/- 10.1 degrees), and sagittal plane ankle motion (test 1: 29.0 +/- 8.5 degrees ; test 2: 43.0 +/- 22.9 degrees) increased after the core fatigue protocol. No significant differences were demonstrated for pedaling forces. Core fatigue resulted in altered cycling mechanics that might increase the risk of injury because the knee joint is potentially exposed to greater stress. Improved core stability and endurance could promote greater alignment of the lower extremity when riding for extended durations as the core is more resistant to fatigue. PMID:18076271

  17. An Observational Study of the Molecular Cloud Core Toward IRAS 23133+6050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Yang, Ji; Geng, Tao; Zhu, Liu-bin

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports 13CO, C 18O, HCO + (J = 1-0) spectral observations toward IRAS 23133+6050 with the 13.7 m millimeter-wave telescope at Qinghai Station of PMO. Corresponding to the 13CO, C 18O, HCO + line emissions, the size of the observed molecular cloud core is 4.0 pc, 2.1 pc and 2.3 pc, the virial mass is 2.7 × 10 3 M⊙, 0.9 × 10 3 M⊙ and 2.3 × 10 3 M⊙, and the volume density of H 2 is 2.7 × 10 3 cm -3, 5.1 × 10 3 cm -3 and 4.6 × 10 3 cm -3, respectively. Using the power-law function n( r) ˜ r- p, the spatial density distribution of the cloud core was analyzed, the obtained exponent p is respectively 1.75, 1.56 and 1.48 for the 13CO, C 18O and HCO + cores, and it is found that the density distribution becomes gradually flatter from the outer region to the inner region of the core. The HCO + abundance is 4.6 × 10 -10, one order of magnitude less than the value for dark clouds, and slightly less than that for giant molecular clouds. The 13CO/C 18O relative abundance ratio is 12.2, comparable with the value 11.8 for dark clouds, and the value 9.0 ˜ 15.6 for giant molecular clouds. A 13CO bipolar outflow is found in this region. The IRAS far-infrared luminosity and the virial masses give the luminosity-mass ratios 18.1, 51.1 and 21.2 from the three lines.

  18. A high-resolution study of complex organic molecules in hot cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcutt, Hannah; Viti, Serena; Codella, Claudio; Beltrán, Maria T.; Fontani, Francesco; Woods, Paul M.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a line identification analysis using data from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Plateau de Bure Interferometer, focusing on six massive star-forming hot cores: G31.41+0.31, G29.96-0.02, G19.61-0.23, G10.62-0.38, G24.78+0.08A1 and G24.78+0.08A2. We identify several transitions of vibrationally excited methyl formate (HCOOCH3) for the first time in these objects as well as transitions of other complex molecules, including ethyl cyanide (C2H5CN), and isocyanic acid (HNCO). We also postulate a detection of one transition of glycolaldehyde (CH2(OH)CHO) in two new hot cores. We find G29.96-0.02, G19.61-0.23, G24.78+0.08A1 and G24.78+0.08A2 to be chemically very similar. G31.41+0.31, however, is chemically different: it manifests a larger chemical inventory and has significantly larger column densities. We suggest that it may represent a different evolutionary stage to the other hot cores in the sample, or it may surround a star with a higher mass. We derive column densities for methyl formate in G31.41+0.31, using the rotation diagram method, of 4 × 1017 cm-2 and a Trot of ˜170 K. For G29.96-0.02, G24.78+0.08A1 and G24.78+0.08A2, glycolaldehyde, methyl formate and methyl cyanide, all seem to trace the same material and peak at roughly the same position towards the dust emission peak. For G31.41+0.31, however, glycolaldehyde shows a different distribution to methyl formate and methyl cyanide and seems to trace the densest, most compact inner part of hot cores.

  19. An RXTE Study of M87 and the Core of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Heinz, Sebastian; Fabian, Andrew C.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present hard X-ray observations of the nearby radio galaxy M87 and the core of the Virgo cluster using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. These are the first hard X-ray observations of M87 not affected by contamination from the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4388. Thermal emission from Virgo's intracluster medium is clearly detected and has a spectrum indicative of kT approx. = 2.5 keV plasma with approximately 25% cosmic abundances. No non-thermal (power-law) emission from M87 is detected in the hard X-ray band, with fluctuations in the Cosmic X-ray Background being the limiting factor. Combining with ROSAT data, we infer that the X-ray spectrum of the M87 core and jet must be steep (Gamma(sub core) greater than 1.90 and Gamma(sub jet) greater than 1.75), and we discuss the implications of this result. In particular, these results are consistent with M87 being a mis-aligned BL-Lac object.

  20. An RXTE Study of M87 and the Core of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Heinz, Sebastian; Fabian, Andrew C.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present hard X-ray observations of the nearby radio galaxy M87 and the core of the Virgo cluster using the Rossi X-ray 7Tming Explorer. These are the first hard X-ray observations of M87 not affected by contamination from the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4388. Thermal emission from Virgo's intracluster medium is clearly detected and has a spectrum indicative of kT is approximately equal to 2.5 keV plasma with approximately 25% cosmic abundances. No non-thermal (power-law) emission from M87 is detected in the hard X-ray band, with fluctuations in the Cosmic X-ray Background being the limiting factor. Combining with ROSAT data, we infer that the X-ray spectrum of the M87 core and jet must be steep (Gamma (sub core) > 1.90 and Gamma (sub jet) > 1.75), and we discuss the implications of this result. In particular, these results are consistent with M87 being a mis-aligned BL-Lac object.

  1. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    2006-01-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces (PES) involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. Most of our work focuses on general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of molecular geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  2. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. This difficult challenge is met with general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions, are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  3. Evoked potential application to study of echolocation in cetaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supin, Alexander Ya.; Nactigall, Paul E.; Pawloski, Jeffrey; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2002-05-01

    The evoked-potential (EP) method is effective in studies of hearing capabilities of cetaceans. However, until now EP studies in cetaceans were performed only in conditions of passive hearing by recording EP to external stimuli. Can this method be applied to study active echolocation in odontocetes? To answer this question, auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABR) were recorded in a false killer whale while the animal echolocated a target within an experiment in which the animal reported the target present or absent. The ABR collection was triggered by echolocation clicks. In these conditions, the recorded ABR pattern contained a duplicate set of waves. A comparison of ABR wave delays recorded during echolocation with those recorded during regular external stimulation has shown that the first set of waves is a response to the emitted click whereas the second one is a response to the echo. Both responses, to the emitted click and to the echo, were of comparable amplitude in spite of the intensity difference of these two sounds of more than 40 dB near the animal's head. This finding indicates some mechanisms releasing responses to echoes from masking by loud emitted clicks. The evoked-potential method may be productive to investigate these mechanisms.

  4. Feasibility Study: Potential Enhancements for the LLNL Renewables Website

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, F; Krawchuk, M; Moritz, M; Stephens, S; Goldstein, N

    2008-01-25

    This feasibility study investigates additional improvements/extensions to the LLNL Renewables Website. Currently, the Renewables Website focuses on wind energy in California. Future enhancements will include other renewable energy sources. The extensions described below are focused along two separate yet related avenues: (1) Forecasting wildfire risk in the regions of California where new development may occur, as a part of the 'Million Solar Roofs' program. (2) Gaining a better understanding of the ecological components and potential of biofuels from forests in California. These two avenues are further described in the report. Following is a technical description of the Center for Fire Research and Outreach computing and web service capabilities.

  5. Chemical and preclinical studies on Hedyotis diffusa with anticancer potential.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yu; Meng, Qiu-Xia

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the chemical and preclinical anticancer research on Hedyotis diffusa Willd. in detail, one of the most renowned herbs often prescribed in the polyherbal formulas for cancer treatment in traditional Chinese medicine. Anthraquinones, flavonoids, and terpenoids constitute the majority of the 69 compounds that have been isolated and identified from H. diffusa. The anticancer effects of the methanolic, ethanolic, and aqueous extracts in various preclinical cancer models have been described. This review also summarized the anticancer activity of constituents of the herb and the mechanisms of action. All the studies suggest that H. diffusa has enormous potential in the therapy of cancer and warrants further chemical and pharmacological investigation. PMID:23600735

  6. Genetic toxicology and preliminary in vivo studies of nitric oxide donor tocopherol analogs as potential new class of antiatherogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Mauricio; López, Gloria V; Gómez, Luis E; Breijo, Martín; Pintos, Cristina; Botti, Horacio; Raymondo, Stella; Vettorazzi, Ariane; Ceráin, Adela López de; Monge, Antonio; Rubbo, Homero; González, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo

    2011-07-01

    Nitric oxide donor tocopherol analogs were found to be incorporated in low-density lipoprotein to release nitric oxide into the hydrophobic core of the lipoprotein, thus inhibiting lipid oxidation processes associated with atheroma plaque formation. Previously, we studied their cytotoxicity against human and murine macrophages as first selection for in vivo studies. Herein, we examined both the in vitro mutagenic and DNA-damage effects of selected compounds to further evaluate drug potential. While the compounds of interest were nongenotoxics in both experimental tests (Ames and alkaline comet), one of the potential blood metabolites exhibited genotoxicity (alkaline comet test), and the furazan derivative was mutagenic (Ames test). Two selected (nitrooxy and furoxan) compounds were studied in long- and short-term in vivo treatment, and in these conditions, animal toxicity was not evidenced, suggesting the possibility of these compounds as potential antiatherogenic drugs. PMID:21649483

  7. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    -grain sand in ice. Results with this core showed that the viscosity of the drilling fluid must also be carefully controlled. When coarse sand was being cored, the core barrel became stuck because the drilling fluid was not viscous enough to completely remove the large grains of sand. These tests were very valuable to the project by showing the difficulties in coring permafrost or hydrates in a laboratory environment (as opposed to a field environment where drilling costs are much higher and the potential loss of equipment greater). Among the conclusions reached from these simulated hydrate coring tests are the following: Frozen hydrate core samples can be recovered successfully; A spring-finger core catcher works best for catching hydrate cores; Drilling fluid can erode the core and reduces its diameter, making it more difficult to capture the core; Mud must be designed with proper viscosity to lift larger cuttings; and The bottom 6 inches of core may need to be drilled dry to capture the core successfully.

  8. Study on Colloidal Model of Petroleum Residues through the Attraction Potential between Colloids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long-li; Yang, Guo-hua; Yang, Chao-he; Que, Guo-he

    2016-01-01

    The samples of DaGang atmospheric residue (DG-AR), Middle East atmospheric residue (ME-AR), TaHe atmospheric residue (TH-AR), and their thermal reaction samples were chosen for study. All the samples were fractioned into six components separately, including saturates plus light aromatics, heavy aromatics, light resins, middle resins, heavy resins, and asphaltenes. The dielectric permittivity of the solutions of these components was measured, and the dielectric permittivity values of the components can be determined by extrapolation, which increased steadily from saturates plus light aromatics to asphaltenes. Moreover, the Hamaker constants of the components were calculated from their dielectric permittivity values. The Van der Waals attractive potential energy between colloids corresponding to various models could be calculated from the fractional composition and the Hamaker constants of every component. It was assumed that the cores of colloidal particles were formed by asphaltenes and heavy resins mainly; the other fractions acted as dispersion medium. For the three serials of thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy between colloids for this kind of model was calculated. For TH-AR thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy presented the maximum as thermal reaction is going on, which was near to the end of coke induction period. PMID:27274729

  9. Study on Colloidal Model of Petroleum Residues through the Attraction Potential between Colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Li; Yang, Guo-Hua; Yang, Chao-He; Que, Guo-He

    2016-01-01

    The samples of DaGang atmospheric residue (DG-AR), Middle East atmospheric residue (ME-AR), TaHe atmospheric residue (TH-AR), and their thermal reaction samples were chosen for study. All the samples were fractioned into six components separately, including saturates plus light aromatics, heavy aromatics, light resins, middle resins, heavy resins, and asphaltenes. The dielectric permittivity of the solutions of these components was measured, and the dielectric permittivity values of the components can be determined by extrapolation, which increased steadily from saturates plus light aromatics to asphaltenes. Moreover, the Hamaker constants of the components were calculated from their dielectric permittivity values. The Van der Waals attractive potential energy between colloids corresponding to various models could be calculated from the fractional composition and the Hamaker constants of every component. It was assumed that the cores of colloidal particles were formed by asphaltenes and heavy resins mainly; the other fractions acted as dispersion medium. For the three serials of thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy between colloids for this kind of model was calculated. For TH-AR thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy presented the maximum as thermal reaction is going on, which was near to the end of coke induction period. PMID:27274729

  10. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potential Applicant's... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study...

  11. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potential Applicant's... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study...

  12. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potential Applicant's... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study...

  13. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potential Applicant's... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study...

  14. High resolution photoemission study of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, H.; Talapin, D. V.; McGinley, C.; Adam, S.; Lobo, A.; de Castro, A. R. B.; Möller, T.; Weller, H.

    2003-07-01

    Colloidally prepared CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals passivated with trioctylphosphine/trioctylphosphine oxide and hexadecylamine have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with tuneable synchrotron radiation. High-resolution spectra of the Se 3d level in CdSe nanocrystals indicate the bonding of organic ligands not only to surface Cd but also to surface Se atoms. The investigation of the CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals allows us to determine the average thickness of the ZnS shell and to study the interface between the two semiconductor nanomaterials. The photoemission spectra indicate a rather well ordered interface. No evidence for interfacial bonds other than Cd-S and Se-Zn is found.

  15. INTACT SOIL-CORE MICROCOSMS FOR EVALUATING THE FATE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACT OF THE RELEASE OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intact soil-core microcosms were studied to determine their applicability for evaluating the transport, survival and potential ecosystem effects of genetically engineered microorganisms before they are released into the environment. oi1-core microcosms were planted with wheat and...

  16. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  17. Dark Filaments, Clouds and Cores: A Multiband IR Study of the Early Stages of Star Formation in Extended Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard

    Star formation typically begins in cold, dark clouds that are not spherically symmetric, but elongated as infrared dark clouds or long linear filaments. Their star-forming characteristics are thought to be sensitive to the geometries. We propose a systematic, detailed study of a sample of 168 of these dark clouds spanning a wide range of parameters using new archival data from Herschel and Spitzer. Archival Herschel photometry in particular enables for the first time a sensitive, systematic study of the full far-infrared continuum of these objects. We have distance determinations and ancillary molecule line measurements for all of our sources. Ten-band photometry (from 3.5um to 500um) will let us determine the luminosities, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and estimate masses of these cold structures as functions of their star-formation activity. We will produce dust temperature and optical depth maps that will enable statistical studies of filaments and their cores; we expect statistics on over 500 protostellar cores. Our selected sources span a range of physical conditions: distances from 1 to 8 kpc, lengths from 0.1 to 80 pc, aspect ratios from below 2 to above 8, nominal core masses from about 1 to 500 Mo, and a range of geometries including linear, branching, hub-filament, and network configurations. We plan to use the extended Robitaille YSO models and SUNRISE radiative transfer models for prestellar cores to analyze a generic set of the most common objects, and then test their applicability across the sample. We will also bring other data to bear (WISE; 2MASS, millimeter) as is useful. We address three current, multi-faceted problems: (1) What are the density, temperature and optical depth structures of filaments and their cores? How do these parameters vary spatially for cores and the inter-core regions? How do these parameters correlate to filamentary or environmental properties? (2) What is the statistical distribution of these properties; in

  18. Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Potential Model for Toxinological Studies.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rafael Antonio; Sarmiento, Karen; Vásquez, Isabel Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Zebrafish are an emerging basic biomedical research model that has multiple advantages compared with other research models. Given that biotoxins, such as toxins, poisons, and venoms, represent health hazards to animals and humans, a low-cost biological model that is highly sensitive to biotoxins is useful to understand the damage caused by such agents and to develop biological tests to prevent and reduce the risk of poisoning in potential cases of bioterrorism or food contamination. In this article, a narrative review of the general aspects of zebrafish as a model in basic biomedical research and various studies in the field of toxinology that have used zebrafish as a biological model are presented. This information will provide useful material to beginner students and researchers who are interested in developing toxinological studies with the zebrafish model. PMID:26196742

  19. Release of quercetin from micellar nanoparticles with saturated and unsaturated core forming polyesters--a combined computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Salman; Khoee, Sepideh; Beheshti, Abolghasem; Hakkarainen, Minna

    2015-01-01

    Computational and experimental studies were combined to obtain new insight into the widely reported anomalous release mechanism of hydrophobic drug (quercetin) from polymeric micellar nanoparticles. Saturated and unsaturated amphiphilic triblock copolymers from monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG), poly(butylene adipate) (PBA) and poly(cis-2-butene adipate) (PCBA) (mPEG-PBA-mPEG and mPEG-PCBA-mPEG) were utilized as model polymers to specify the contribution of polymer-micelle degradation and polymer-drug interactions on the observed differences in the release rates by applicable computational investigation and experimental evaluations. Monitoring the size of the micelles through the releasing process together with hydrolytic degradation studies of the core forming polymers proved that the contribution of polymer hydrolysis and micelle degradation on the observed differences in the release rates during the release time window was minimal. The compatibility between quercetin and the core forming polymer is another factor influencing the drug encapsulation and the relative release rate and it was therefore investigated theoretically (using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-311(++)G level of theory) and experimentally (FT-IR imaging). The drug-polymer interactions in the core were shown to be much more important than the polymer and/or micelle swelling-dissociation-degradation processes under the studied conditions. PMID:25492006

  20. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  2. Effect of charge distribution over a chlorophyll dimer on the redox potential of P680 in photosystem II as studied by density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryouta; Hasegawa, Koji; Noguchi, Takumi

    2008-06-17

    The effect of charge distribution over a chlorophyll dimer on the redox potential of P680 in photosystem II was studied by density functional theory calculations using the P680 coordinates in the X-ray structure. From the calculated ionization potentials of the dimer and the monomeric constituents, the decrease in the redox potential by charge delocalization over the dimer was estimated to be approximately 140 mV. Such charge delocalization was previously observed in the isolated D1-D2-Cyt b 559 complexes, whereas the charge was primarily localized on P D1 in the core complexes. The calculated potential decrease of approximately 140 mV can explain the inhibition of Y Z oxidation in the former complexes and in turn implies that the charge localization on P D1 upon formation of the core complex increases the P680 potential to the level necessary for water oxidation. PMID:18500822

  3. Reducing Blinking in Small Core-Multishell Quantum Dots by Carefully Balancing Confinement Potential and Induced Lattice Strain: The "Goldilocks" Effect.

    PubMed

    Omogo, Benard; Gao, Feng; Bajwa, Pooja; Kaneko, Mizuho; Heyes, Colin D

    2016-04-26

    Currently, the most common way to reduce blinking in quantum dots (QDs) is accomplished by using very thick and/or perfectly crystalline CdS shells on CdSe cores. Ideally, a nontoxic material such as ZnS is preferred to be the outer material in order to reduce environmental and cytotoxic effects. Blinking suppression with multishell configurations of CdS and ZnS has been reported only for "giant" QDs of 15 nm or more. One of the main reasons for the limited progress is that the role that interfacial trap states play in blinking in these systems is not very well understood. Here, we show a "Goldilocks" effect to reduce blinking in small (∼7 nm) QDs by carefully controlling the thicknesses of the shells in multishell QDs. Furthermore, by correlating the fluorescence lifetime components with the fraction of time that a QD spends in the on-state, both with and without applying a threshold, we found evidence for two types of blinking that separately affect the average fluorescence lifetime of a single QD. A thorough characterization of the time-resolved fluorescence at the ensemble and single-particle level allowed us to propose a detailed physical model involving both short-lived interfacial trap states and long-lived surface trap states that are coupled. This model highlights a strategy of reducing QD blinking in small QDs by balancing the magnitude of the induced lattice strain, which results in the formation of interfacial trap states between the inner shell and the outer shell, and the confinement potential that determines how accessible the interfacial trap states are. The combination of reducing blinking while maintaining a small overall QD size and using a Cd-free outer shell of ZnS will be useful in a wide array of applications, particularly for advanced bioimaging. PMID:27058120

  4. In situ high-pressure study of FeP: Implications for planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Tingting; Wu, Xiang; Qin, Shan; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2011-02-01

    FeP with MnP-type structure is isostructural with high-pressure FeS polymorphs (both post-troilite FeS and FeS VI), which are believed to exist in planetary cores. Due to similar PTX phase diagrams of binary Fe-P and Fe-S, phosphorus can incorporate with iron-sulfur at planetary core conditions. To understand such substitution and the high-pressure behavior of FeP, we investigate the structural stability of FeP up to 15.6 GPa and 1800 ± 200 K by combined in situ powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our experimental results show that FeP remains the MnP-type structure throughout the PT range covered. Isothermal equation of state of FeP is obtained with V0 of 92.91(8) Å 3, B0 of 205(7) GPa, and B0 of 4. The shortest axis of the MnP-type FeP cell, the b-axis, is the most compressible, due to the soft edge-sharing octahedra along the b-axis. Mössbauer results show that no electronic structure changes occur up to 15.6 GPa, but indicate decreasing distortion of FeP 6 octahedron with pressure increasing. The behavior of FeP is quite different from that of FeS under high pressure and high temperature, suggesting that phosphorus will have a significant impact on stability and electronic properties of FeS within terrestrial planet cores.

  5. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

  6. Developing High-Potential Youth Program: A Return on Investment Study for U.S. Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millett, Catherine M.; Nettles, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    When The Goldman Sachs Foundation (GSF) made its first strategic social investment decision in 1999, it took note of one of Goldman Sachs' core corporate values: People are its greatest asset. The program's objective was--and is--clear and simple: to increase the number of high-potential young adults from historically underrepresented backgrounds…

  7. Lead phytoremediation potential of Vetiver grass: a hydroponic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachanoor, D. S.; Andra, S. P.; Datta, R.; Sarkar, D.

    2006-05-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic heavy metal that is released into the environment from a variety of sources. Sources of Pb contamination in soils can be divided into three broad categories: industrial activities, such as mining and smelting processes, agricultural activities, such as application of insecticide and municipal sewage sludge, and urban activities, such as use of Pb in gasoline, paints, and other materials. Severe Pb contamination of soils may cause a variety of environmental problems, including loss of vegetation, groundwater contamination and Pb toxicity in plants, animals and humans. The use of plants to remove toxic metals from soils (phytoremediation) is fast emerging as an acceptable strategy for cost-effective and environmentally sound remediation of contaminated soils. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the lead uptake potential and biochemical stress response mechanism in vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) upon exposure to Pb in contaminated soils. We investigated the effect of increasing concentrations of Pb on vetiver grass grown in a hydroponic system. Plant response to the addition of phosphate in the presence of Pb was also studied. Biochemical stress response was studied by monitoring the activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymes. The results indicated that exposure to Pb in the range of 0 ppm -1200 ppm had no significant negative effects on the growth of vetiver grass. There was no considerable decrease in vetiver biomass, implying the potential of this grass for Pb phytoremediation. The translocation of Pb from the root to the shoot was up to 20%. The SOD activity was in positive correlation with Pb concentrations in the solution, but no such trend was observed with GPx. In systems containing phosphate fertilizer, lead precipitated out immediately, thereby decreasing the soluble concentration of lead, resulting in less availability of Pb to the grass.

  8. A study on fast reactor core mechanics by an ex-reactor test and comparisons with calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Tottori, Shoji; Kawanaka, Ikunori; Nakagawa, Masatoshi; Arie, Kazuo; Itoh, Kunihiro; Ohya, Takeaki; Motomiya, Takeo; Adachi, Hironori

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents and discusses the results of core bowing experiments performed with an ex-reactor rig holding a half hexagon array of 22 sub-assemblies (S/As) simulating the Japanese DFBR conditions and the comparisons of the measured results with calculations by individually developed codes--ARKAS, RAINBOW, SANBOW. The main conclusions of this study are (1) interwrapper loads and S/A displacements within the array were measured at selected positions for a series of five tests simulating the DFBR core bowing modes, (2) the overall comparison between the non-friction calculation and measurement showed good agreement for loads, displacements and their directions, and (3) validation of the friction algorithm has also been carried out and further improvement of the agreement was obtained.

  9. Direct laser-driven ramp compression studies of iron: A first step toward the reproduction of planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Guyot, F.; Mazevet, S.; Morard, G.; de Resseguier, T.; Vinci, T.; Myanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Boehly, T.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Koenig, M.

    2013-06-01

    The study of iron under quasi-isentropic compression using high energy lasers, might allow to understand its thermodynamical properties, in particular its melting line in conditions of pressure and temperature relevant to Earth-like planetary cores (330-1500 GPa, 5000-8000 K). However, the iron alpha-epsilon solid-solid phase transition at 13 GPa favors shock formation during the quasi-isentropic compression process which can depart from the appropriate thermodynamical path. Understanding this shock formation mechanism is a key issue for being able to reproduce Earth-like planetary core conditions in the laboratory by ramp compression. In this article, we will present recent results of direct laser-driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments on iron samples obtained on the LULI 2000 and LIL laser facilities.

  10. Design study of an air pump and integral lift engine ALF-504 using the Lycoming 502 core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, D.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies were conducted for an integral lift fan engine utilizing the Lycoming 502 fan core with the final MQT power turbine. The fan is designed for a 12.5 bypass ratio and 1.25:1 pressure ratio, and provides supercharging for the core. Maximum sea level static thrust is 8370 pounds with a specific fuel consumption of 0.302 lb/hr-lb. The dry engine weight without starter is 1419 pounds including full-length duct and sound-attenuating rings. The engine envelope including duct treatment but not localized accessory protrusion is 53.25 inches in diameter and 59.2 inches long from exhaust nozzle exit to fan inlet flange. Detailed analyses include fan aerodynamics, fan and reduction gear mechanical design, fan dynamic analysis, engine noise analysis, engine performance, and weight analysis.

  11. Contributions from geomagnetic inverse theory to the study of hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1991-01-01

    The Final Report on contributions from geomagnetic inverse theory to the study of hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is presented. The original proposal was to study five questions concerning what the surface and satellite magnetic data imply about hydromagnetic and electromagnetic conditions near the CMB. The five questions are: (1) what do the surface and satellite data imply about the geomagnetic field B near the surface of the earth; (2) how does one extrapolate B down through the conducting mantle to the CMB; (3) if B on the CMB is visible, how accurately does it satisfy the frozen-flux approximation; (4) if frozen flux is a good approximation on the CMB, what can be inferred about the fluid velocity v in the upper core; and (5) if v at the CMB is visible, does it suggest any dynamical properties of the core, such as vertical advection, Alfven-inertial waves, link instabilities, or mantle effects. A summary of the research is provided.

  12. Studying bubble-particle interactions by zeta potential distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chendi; Wang, Louxiang; Harbottle, David; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-07-01

    Over a decade ago, Xu and Masliyah pioneered an approach to characterize the interactions between particles in dynamic environments of multicomponent systems by measuring zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures. Using a Zetaphoremeter, the measured zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures were used to determine the conditions of preferential attachment in multicomponent particle suspensions. The technique has been applied to study the attachment of nano-sized silica and alumina particles to sub-micron size bubbles in solutions with and without the addition of surface active agents (SDS, DAH and DF250). The degree of attachment between gas bubbles and particles is shown to be a function of the interaction energy governed by the dispersion, electrostatic double layer and hydrophobic forces. Under certain chemical conditions, the attachment of nano-particles to sub-micron size bubbles is shown to be enhanced by in-situ gas nucleation induced by hydrodynamic cavitation for the weakly interacting systems, where mixing of the two individual components results in negligible attachment. Preferential interaction in complex tertiary particle systems demonstrated strong attachment between micron-sized alumina and gas bubbles, with little attachment between micron-sized alumina and silica, possibly due to instability of the aggregates in the shear flow environment. PMID:25731913

  13. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Epidermal Heat Flux Sensors for Measurements of Core Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Webb, Richard Chad; Luo, Hongying; Xue, Yeguang; Kurniawan, Jonas; Cho, Nam Heon; Krishnan, Siddharth; Li, Yuhang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2016-01-01

    Long-term, continuous measurement of core body temperature is of high interest, due to the widespread use of this parameter as a key biomedical signal for clinical judgment and patient management. Traditional approaches rely on devices or instruments in rigid and planar forms, not readily amenable to intimate or conformable integration with soft, curvilinear, time-dynamic, surfaces of the skin. Here, materials and mechanics designs for differential temperature sensors are presented which can attach softly and reversibly onto the skin surface, and also sustain high levels of deformation (e.g., bending, twisting, and stretching). A theoretical approach, together with a modeling algorithm, yields core body temperature from multiple differential measurements from temperature sensors separated by different effective distances from the skin. The sensitivity, accuracy, and response time are analyzed by finite element analyses (FEA) to provide guidelines for relationships between sensor design and performance. Four sets of experiments on multiple devices with different dimensions and under different convection conditions illustrate the key features of the technology and the analysis approach. Finally, results indicate that thermally insulating materials with cellular structures offer advantages in reducing the response time and increasing the accuracy, while improving the mechanics and breathability. PMID:25953120

  14. Effect of Au nanorods on potential barrier modulation in morphologically controlled Au@Cu2O core-shell nanoreactors for gas sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Sanjit Manohar; Rai, Prabhakar; Raj, Sudarsan; Chon, Bum-Soo; Park, Kyung-Kuen; Yu, Yeon-Tae

    2014-05-28

    In this work, Au@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simple solution route and applied for CO sensing applications. Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs were formed by the deposition of 30-60 nm Cu2O shell layer on Au nanorods (NRs) having 10-15 nm width and 40-60 nm length. The morphology of Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs was tuned from brick to spherical shape by tuning the pH of the solution. In the absence of Au NRs, cubelike Cu2O NPs having ∼200 nm diameters were formed. The sensor having Au@Cu2O core-shell layer exhibited higher CO sensitivity compared to bare Cu2O NPs layer. Tuning of morphology of Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs from brick to spherical shape significantly lowered the air resistance. Transition from p- to n-type response was observed for all devices below 150 °C. It was demonstrated that performance of sensor depends not only on the electronic sensitization of Au NRs but also on the morphology of the Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs. PMID:24779525

  15. Structural Studies of Lipopolysaccharide-defective Mutants from Brucella melitensis Identify a Core Oligosaccharide Critical in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Ståhle, Jonas; Holst, Otto; Iriarte, Maite; Zhao, Yun; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Hanniffy, Seán; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moriyón, Ignacio; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-04-01

    The structures of the lipooligosaccharides fromBrucella melitensismutants affected in the WbkD and ManBcoreproteins have been fully characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The results revealed that disruption ofwbkDgives rise to a rough lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) with a complete core structure (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-α-d-Manp-(1→5)]-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P), in addition to components lacking one of the terminal β-d-GlcpN and/or the β-d-Glcpresidues (48 and 17%, respectively). These structures were identical to those of the R-LPS fromB. melitensisEP, a strain simultaneously expressing both smooth and R-LPS, also studied herein. In contrast, disruption ofmanBcoregives rise to a deep-rough pentasaccharide core (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P) as the major component (63%), as well as a minor tetrasaccharide component lacking the terminal β-d-Glcpresidue (37%). These results are in agreement with the predicted functions of the WbkD (glycosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of the O-antigen) and ManBcoreproteins (phosphomannomutase involved in the biosynthesis of a mannosyl precursor needed for the biosynthesis of the core and O-antigen). We also report that deletion ofB. melitensis wadCremoves the core oligosaccharide branch not linked to the O-antigen causing an increase in overall negative charge of the remaining LPS inner section. This is in agreement with the mannosyltransferase role predicted for WadC and the lack of GlcpN residues in the defective core oligosaccharide. Despite carrying the O-antigen essential inB. melitensisvirulence, the core deficiency in thewadCmutant structure resulted in a more efficient detection by innate immunity and attenuation, proving the role of the β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-α-d-Manp-(1→5) structure

  16. Structural Studies of Lipopolysaccharide-defective Mutants from Brucella melitensis Identify a Core Oligosaccharide Critical in Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Carolina; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Ståhle, Jonas; Holst, Otto; Iriarte, Maite; Zhao, Yun; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Hanniffy, Seán; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moriyón, Ignacio; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the lipooligosaccharides from Brucella melitensis mutants affected in the WbkD and ManBcore proteins have been fully characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The results revealed that disruption of wbkD gives rise to a rough lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) with a complete core structure (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-α-d-Manp-(1→5)]-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P), in addition to components lacking one of the terminal β-d-GlcpN and/or the β-d-Glcp residues (48 and 17%, respectively). These structures were identical to those of the R-LPS from B. melitensis EP, a strain simultaneously expressing both smooth and R-LPS, also studied herein. In contrast, disruption of manBcore gives rise to a deep-rough pentasaccharide core (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P) as the major component (63%), as well as a minor tetrasaccharide component lacking the terminal β-d-Glcp residue (37%). These results are in agreement with the predicted functions of the WbkD (glycosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of the O-antigen) and ManBcore proteins (phosphomannomutase involved in the biosynthesis of a mannosyl precursor needed for the biosynthesis of the core and O-antigen). We also report that deletion of B. melitensis wadC removes the core oligosaccharide branch not linked to the O-antigen causing an increase in overall negative charge of the remaining LPS inner section. This is in agreement with the mannosyltransferase role predicted for WadC and the lack of GlcpN residues in the defective core oligosaccharide. Despite carrying the O-antigen essential in B. melitensis virulence, the core deficiency in the wadC mutant structure resulted in a more efficient detection by innate immunity and attenuation, proving the role of the β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-

  17. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  18. gC1qR expression in chimpanzees with resolved and chronic infection: Potential role of HCV core/gC1qR-mediated T cell suppression in the outcome of HCV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zhiqang; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Tricoche, Nancy; Shan, M.M.; Brotman, Betsy; Pfahler, Wolfram; Hahn, Young S. . E-mail: ysh5e@virginia.edu; Prince, Alfred M.

    2006-03-15

    Chimpanzee is a unique animal model for HCV infection, in which about 50% of infections resolve spontaneously. It has been reported that the magnitude of T cell responses to HCV core in recovered chimpanzees is greater than that in chronically infected ones. However, the mechanism(s) by which the chimpanzees with resolved infection overcome core-mediated immunosuppression remains unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of HCV core on T cell responsiveness in chimpanzees with resolved and chronic HCV infection. We found that core protein strongly inhibited T cell activation and proliferation in chimpanzees with chronic infection, while this inhibition was limited in chimpanzees with resolved infection. Notably, the level of gC1qR, as well as the binding of core protein, on the surface of T cells was lower in recovered chimpanzees when compared to chimpanzees with chronic HCV infection. Intriguingly, the observed differences in gC1qR expression levels and susceptibility to core-induced suppression amongst HCV-chronically infected and recovered chimpanzees were observed prior to HCV challenge, suggesting a possible genetic determination of the outcome of infection. These findings suggest that gC1qR expression on the surface of T cells is crucial for HCV core-mediated T cell suppression and viral clearance, and that represents a novel mechanism by which a virus usurps host machinery for persistence.

  19. Trace element fluxes and natural potential risks from 210Pb-dated sediment cores in lacustrine environments at the Central Mexican Plateau.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Cuadras, J F; Ruiz-Fernández, A C; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A; Pérez-Bernal, L H; Sericano, J L; Preda, M; Wee Kwong, L Liong; Páez-Osuna, F

    2014-01-15

    The accumulation, enrichment and provenance of selected trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) were studied in sediment cores collected from three lakes located in the Central Mexican Plateau, selected on the basis of their contrasting degree of urbanization: Santa Elena Lake, in a rural and remote area; El Tule Lake, in a rural and slightly urbanized area; and Chapala Lake, in a highly urbanized area. Grain size, magnetic susceptibility and sedimentary constituents such as organic carbon, calcium carbonate, as well as major (Al, Fe, Mn) and minor (Ca, Li, Rb, Sr, Th) elements were analyzed to explain the concentration trends of trace metals. Factor analysis (FA) was used to assess the provenance of the trace elements. The highest metal enrichment factor (EF) above natural concentration levels was found at Chapala Lake for Ag (EF = 3.9), although other trace element EF in all lakes was <2.0, indicating slight contamination. However, the concentration levels of Cr and Ni in all lakes, Hg and Zn in Chapala Lake, Cu in El Tule Lake and As in Santa Elena Lake were above international benchmarks for which adverse effects are expected to occur frequently, even for those metals only slightly enriched (e.g. As, Cr). Through FA, the terrigenous contribution was identified as the most important source of trace metals to the three lakes, most likely related to deforestation and erosion of the surrounding areas, followed by atmospheric transport of volcanic ashes, rather than to direct sources. PMID:24061059

  20. The stimuli-responsive multiphase behavior of core-shell nanogels with opposite charges and their potential application in in situ gelling system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tin; Geng, Shinan; Li, Han; Wan, Jiangshan; Peng, Xiaole; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Yanbing; Yang, Xiangliang; Xu, Huibi

    2015-12-01

    Concentrated p(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) nanogel dispersions exhibited rich temperature-sensitive sol-gel phase transition behavior. In the present work, the influence of electrostatic forces between nanogel particles, including attraction and repulsion, on the sol-gel phase transition behavior of PNIPAM nanogel dispersions has been studied. Both oppositely charged nanogels with core-shell structures (NIA and PND nanogels) were synthesized, and their shell charges were calculated to -0.33 and 0.082 mmol/g by potentiometric titration method. When mixed with various ratio of negative and positive charge (NC value), the resultant mixture dispersions of NIA and PND nanogel (OCNs) exhibited different aggregating behavior from NIA and PND nanogels. OCN-e aggregates (NC value=1/4), which exhibited temperature-independence of electric neutrality, had the maximum size, about 1.9-2.2 times larger than NIA or PND nanogels. Concentrated OCN-e dispersions exhibited stronger ability to form shrunken gel. Its CGC was about 2.0 wt%, 4-times lower than that of NIA and PND nanogels (about 8.0 wt%). In vitro and in vivo gelling results indicated that OCN-e aggregates could form free-standing gel with good mechanical strength, and were promising to be developed as new in situ gelling system. PMID:26364090

  1. Cornerstones and Capstones: A Case Study on the Value of a Holistic Core in the Discipline of Communication Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Richard K.; Weber, David E.; Trimble, Frank P.

    2002-01-01

    Argues for a holistic core that balances the dialectic tensions between social science and humanities, scholarly discipline and craft/praxis, and common and special topics within the discipline. Offers rationales for two other unique features of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington curriculum: research methods at the front end of the…

  2. Exploring effective core drug patterns in primary insomnia treatment with Chinese herbal medicine: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chinese herbal medicine is one of the most popular Chinese medicine (CM) therapies for primary insomnia. One of the important characteristics of CM is that different Chinese clinicians give different prescriptions even for the same patient. However, there must be some fixed drug patterns in every clinician’s prescriptions. This study aims to screen the effective core drug patterns in primary insomnia treatment of three prestigious Chinese clinicians. Methods/design A triple-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group clinical trial will be performed. Three clinicians will diagnose and treat every eligible patient individually and independently, producing three prescriptions from three clinicians for every patient. Patients will equally be randomized to one of four groups – medical group A, medical group B, medical group C, or placebo group – and observed for efficacy of treatment. The sample will include primary insomnia patients meeting DSM IV-TR criteria, Spiegel scale score >18, and age 18 to 65 years. A sequential design is employed. Interim analysis will be conducted when between 80 and 160 patients complete the study. The interim study could be stopped and treated as final if a statistically significant difference between treatment and placebo groups can be obtained and core effective drug patterns can be determined. Otherwise, the study continues until the maximum sample size reaches 300. Treatment of the CM group is one of three Chinese clinicians’ prescriptions, who provide independently prescriptions based on their own CM theory and the patient’s disease condition. Assessment will be by sleep diary and Pittsburgh sleep quality index, and CM symptoms and signs will be measured. Primary outcome is total sleep time. Assessment will be carried out at the washout period, weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4 and 4th week after the end of treatment. Effectiveness analysis will be per intent to treat. A multi-dimension association rule and scale

  3. 100 Gbit/s WDM transmission at 2 µm: transmission studies in both low-loss hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and solid core fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Kavanagh, N; Li, Z; Zhao, J; Ye, N; Chen, Y; Wheeler, N V; Wooler, J P; Hayes, J R; Sandoghchi, S R; Poletti, F; Petrovich, M N; Alam, S U; Phelan, R; O'Carroll, J; Kelly, B; Grüner-Nielsen, L; Richardson, D J; Corbett, B; Garcia Gunning, F C

    2015-02-23

    We show for the first time 100 Gbit/s total capacity at 2 µm waveband, using 4 × 9.3 Gbit/s 4-ASK Fast-OFDM direct modulation and 4 × 15.7 Gbit/s NRZ-OOK external modulation, spanning a 36.3 nm wide wavelength range. WDM transmission was successfully demonstrated over 1.15 km of low-loss hollow core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBGF) and over 1 km of solid core fiber (SCF). We conclude that the OSNR penalty associated with the SCF is minimal, while a ~1-2 dB penalty was observed after the HC-PBGF probably due to mode coupling to higher-order modes. PMID:25836529

  4. Ab initio treatment of the structures of square-planar Pt(PH/sub 3/)/sub 2/XY species (X, Y = H, Cl) using relativistic effective core potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Noell, J.O.; Hay, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    The structures and relative energies of Pt(PH/sub 3/)XY isomers are investigated with use of ab initio molecular orbital theory and effective potentials. In particular, the cis and trans isomers of the dihydride, dichloride, and hydrochloride are studied. In all cases, the trans isomer is the more stable. Available experimental information is in good agreement with calculated bond lengths, bond angles, and vibrational frequencies.

  5. The Nature of Fault Creep and Weakening in the San Andreas System Deduced from Studies of SAFOD Core (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. E.; Rymer, M. J.; Lockner, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the processes operative at depth in fault zones is severely hampered by the general inability to study the actively deforming fault rocks in situ. One of the main goals of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), a key component of Earthscope, was the recovery of core to allow petrographic, chemical, and physical examination of an active, plate-boundary fault at seismogenic depths, something that had never before been attempted. The SAFOD drill site is located 14 km northwest of Parkfield in central California, along a portion of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) that is characterized by a combination of aseismic slip and microseismicity. Innovations in the design and implementation of SAFOD (summarized in Zoback, Hickman and Ellsworth, Scientific Drilling, No. 11, March 2011) led to the identification of two actively creeping fault traces at 2.65 and 2.70 km vertical depth (~112°C). Subsequent multilateral coring operations successfully sampled the two zones of foliated gouge where creep is localized: the 2.6-m-wide central deforming zone (CDZ) and the 1.6-m-wide southwest deforming zone (SDZ). The two gouge zones are closely similar in character, consisting of porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock dispersed in a fine-grained, foliated matrix of Mg-rich smectitic clays (saponite × corrensite). The boundaries of the CDZ and SDZ with adjoining sedimentary rocks of the Great Valley Group are mineralogically, chemically, and texturally sharp. The Mg-rich clay minerals in the gouge zones are interpreted to be the product of fluid-assisted, shear-enhanced metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite that was tectonically entrained in the SAF from a source in the Coast Range ophiolite. Laboratory friction tests indicate that gouge from the CDZ and SDZ deforms stably (i.e., creeps) at anomalously low levels of shear stress (coefficient of friction, μ ~ 0.15), which is sufficient to explain the

  6. Zeta potential study of the water treatment of geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Wikoff, P.M.; Suciu, D.F.

    1981-11-01

    Before the cooled geothermal fluid can be used as a coolant in the operation of the 5MW(e) Geothermal Pilot Power Plant, the fluid must be treated to reduce the silica and hardness and to control corrosion. Prior to reinjection, the blowdown must be treated to remove the phosphate (one of the corrosion inhibitors added to the system). The zeta potential study was conducted to study the surface reactions occurring in the flash mixing of the cooled geothermal with magnesium oxide, lime, and polyelectrolyte for silica removal and to determine the optimum polyelectrolyte necessary in the silica reduction system and the reduction of the phosphate in the tower blowdown with ferrous sulfate. The investigation indicates a bridging type adsorption occurs in the silica reduction system. The proposed mechanism is described. The study indicated that between 150 and 250 ppM of magnesium oxide was necessary to achieve this reduction with one ppM of Betz 1125L. This is a substantial savings over the planned value. Investigation of the phosphate reduction system showed that a cationic polymer was necessary to achieve good flocculation and settling.

  7. Lunar core: occam's razor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Whether or not the earth's moon has a core is a much bandied question. Like many notions about the properties of the moon, ideas of a lunar core changed drastically after the Apollo studies. A review of the development of these ideas was given a scholarly treatment by S.K. Runcorn recently (Nature, 304, 589-596, 1983). In contrast, L.L. Hood, C.P. Sonett, and L.J. Srnka have questioned the concept in serious detail (Nature, 307, 661-662, 1984).Whether or not the moon actually has or has had a fluid metallic core is of great consequence for a number of geophysical theories about the solar system. Most investigators concede that the possible existence of a lunar core remains one of the major unanswered, and yet most critical, questions about the moon. A lot rides on the answer: Can a lunar-sized body have a core? Is the core metallic? How is the core related to lunar magnetism and its paleomagnetism? Is or was a lunar core related to lunar volcanism? If the moon can have a core, is planetary core formation in the solar system a simple matter of gravitationally segregating metallic fragments that were formed elsewhere? Implications of the questions are without limit. There is, perhaps, no more valid issue about the moon to explore scientifically.

  8. Mineral Physics Quest to the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2009-01-01

    Because of its remoteness, together with pressures from 140 to 360 gigapascals and temperatures from 4000 to 7000 K, most direct observations of the Earth's core properties have come from teleseismic studies, requiring large earthquake sources and well-positioned seismometers to detect weak wave signals that have traversed the Earth's deepest interior. The decoding of geochemical signatures of the core—potentially carried to the surface in plumes originating at the core-mantle boundary—faces numerous challenges of the debated integrity of this hypothesis. For these reasons, understanding the Earth's core requires multidisciplinary efforts. In the past two decades, deep-Earth scientists have unveiled a number of unusual and enigmatic phenomena of the core, including inner core anisotropy, differential rotation of the inner core, fine-scale seismic heterogeneity, and the possible existence of the prefer-oriented hexagonal close packed (hcp, in which two closely packed layers stack alternately along a crystallographic axis) and/or body-centered cubic (bcc, in which eight atoms reside at the corners and one atom resides at the center of the cubic cell) iron/nickel/light element alloys in the inner core (Figure 1). In this feature article, we summarize recent new findings and frontiers about the nature of the core from mineral physics research.

  9. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chul-ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson “drop” technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation. PMID:26504350

  10. Time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdSe/CdMnS/CdS core/multi-shell nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. R.; Delikanli, S.; Scrace, T.; Zhang, P.; Norden, T.; Thomay, T.; Cartwright, A. N.; Demir, H. V.; Petrou, A.

    2016-06-01

    We used photoluminescence spectroscopy to resolve two emission features in CdSe/CdMnS/CdS and CdSe/CdS core/multi-shell nanoplatelet heterostructures. The photoluminescence from the magnetic sample has a positive circular polarization with a maximum centered at the position of the lower energy feature. The higher energy feature has a corresponding signature in the absorption spectrum; this is not the case for the low-energy feature. We have also studied the temporal evolution of these features using a pulsed-excitation/time-resolved photoluminescence technique to investigate their corresponding recombination channels. A model was used to analyze the temporal dynamics of the photoluminescence which yielded two distinct timescales associated with these recombination channels. The above results indicate that the low-energy feature is associated with recombination of electrons with holes localized at the core/shell interfaces; the high-energy feature, on the other hand, is excitonic in nature with the holes confined within the CdSe cores.

  11. A molecular dynamics study of the collective correlation functions of a hard-core fluid with a Yukawa tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, M. M. G.; Rey, C.; Gallego, L. J.

    1996-11-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the collective correlation functions of a hard-core system with an attractive Yukawa tail, for various thermodynamic states in the fluid and liquid regions of the phase diagram. The results are compared with available information for hard spheres. The small-q behavior of the intermediate scattering functions indicates the propagation of sound waves, i.e., phononlike collective excitations, in the hard-core Yukawa system. The upper limit of q for these collective modes is practically independent of the thermodynamic state. The computed transverse current correlation functions show that at liquid densities the hard-core Yukawa system is able to sustain shear wave propagation above a critical q; the upper limit of q for sound waves and the lower limit for shear waves nearly coincide. All of these features are qualitatively similar to those found for hard spheres. However, there are significant quantitative differences, which reflect the influence of the attractive Yukawa tail on the dynamical behavior of the system.

  12. Material combinations and parametric study of thermal and mechanical performance of pyramidal core sandwich panels used for hypersonic aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Lorenzini, Giulio; Xie, Gongnan

    2016-07-01

    A novel kind of lightweight integrated thermal protection system, named pyramidal core sandwich panel, is proposed to be a good safeguard for hypersonic aircrafts in the current study. Such system is considered as not only an insulation structure but also a load-bearing structure. In the context of design for hypersonic aircrafts, an efficient optimization should be paid enough attention. This paper concerns with the homogenization of the proposed pyramidal sandwich core panel using two-dimensional model in subsequent research for material selection. According to the required insulation performance and thermal-mechanical properties, several suitable material combinations are chosen as candidates for the pyramidal core sandwich panel by adopting finite element analysis and approximate response surface. To obtain lightweight structure with an excellent capability of heat insulation and load-bearing, an investigation on some specific design variables, which are significant for thermal-mechanical properties of the structure, is performed. Finally, a good balance between the insulation performance, the capability of load-bearing and the lightweight has attained.

  13. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  14. Study on the synthesis of the cyclopenta[f]indole core of raputindole A.

    PubMed

    Marsch, Nils; Kock, Mario; Lindel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The raputindoles from the rutaceous tree Raputia simulans share a cyclopenta[f]indole partial structure the synthesis of which is subject of this investigation. An efficient route to a series of 1,5-di(indol-6-yl)pentenones was developed via Mo/Au-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement of tertiary propargylic alcohol precursors. However, none of the enones underwent the desired Nazarov cyclization to a cyclopenta[f]indole. More suitable were 6-hydroxyallylated indolines which gave good yields of cyclopenta[f]indolines after treatment with SnCl4, as soon as sterically demanding β-cyclocitral adducts were reacted. Most successful were Pt(II) and Au(I)-catalyzed cyclizations of N-TIPS-protected indolin-6-yl-substituted propargylacetates which provided the hydrogenated tricyclic cyclopenta[f]indole core system in high yield. PMID:26977193

  15. An experimental and theoretical core-level study of tautomerism in guanine.

    PubMed

    Plekan, Oksana; Feyer, Vitaliy; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Vall-Llosera, Gemma; Prince, Kevin C; Trofimov, Alexander B; Zaytseva, Irina L; Moskovskaya, Tatyana E; Gromov, Evgeniy V; Schirmer, Jochen

    2009-08-20

    The core level photoemission and near edge X-ray photoabsorption spectra of guanine in the gas phase have been measured and the results interpreted with the aid of high level ab initio calculations. Tautomers are clearly identified spectroscopically, and their relative free energies and Boltzmann populations at the temperature of the experiment (600 K) have been calculated and compared with the experimental results and with previous calculations. We obtain good agreement between experiment and the Boltzmann weighted theoretical photoemission spectra, which allows a quantitative determination of the ratio of oxo to hydroxy tautomer populations. For the photoabsorption spectra, good agreement is found for the C 1s and O 1s spectra but only fair agreement for the N 1s edge. PMID:19634878

  16. Self-consistent-field studies of core-level shifts in ionic crystals: LiF

    SciTech Connect

    Broughton, J.Q.; Bagus, P.S.

    1984-10-15

    Restricted-Hartree-Fock, self-consistent-field calculations have been performed for the ground and ionic states of clusters of lithium and fluorine atoms. These clusters are appropriately charged to represent an Li/sup +/F/sup -/ ionic crystal and point charges are used to represent the Madelung field due to ions not explicitly included in the cluster. Factors giving rise to core- and valence-level binding-energy shifts have been examined and separated into compressional, relaxational, and effective Madelung contributions. Many tests of ionicity are shown to be well satisfied, although this is often caused by fortuitous cancellations. Extra-ionic relaxation energies on both the cation and anion are shown to be small, and shakeup probabilities are calculated.

  17. Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

  18. Carbon combustion supernovae - Numerical studies of the final evolution of degenerate carbon-oxygen cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, E.; Arnett, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of polytropic 1.46-solar-mass 3-Gg/cu cm (4 x 10 to the 8th)-K pure C cores is investigated theoretically by means of model computations starting from the runaway stage. The temperature in central zones is raised to the runaway temperature, and the evolution is followed in a spherical coordinate system. In models of burning without detonation, it is found that the initially spherical burning front is Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, without bipolar jets or equatorial rings; that some C is not burned to Ni; and that the Ni in the 0.8-1.0 solar mass of burned fuel produced can account for observed properties of type I supernovae.

  19. Study on the synthesis of the cyclopenta[f]indole core of raputindole A

    PubMed Central

    Marsch, Nils; Kock, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Summary The raputindoles from the rutaceous tree Raputia simulans share a cyclopenta[f]indole partial structure the synthesis of which is subject of this investigation. An efficient route to a series of 1,5-di(indol-6-yl)pentenones was developed via Mo/Au-catalyzed Meyer–Schuster rearrangement of tertiary propargylic alcohol precursors. However, none of the enones underwent the desired Nazarov cyclization to a cyclopenta[f]indole. More suitable were 6-hydroxyallylated indolines which gave good yields of cyclopenta[f]indolines after treatment with SnCl4, as soon as sterically demanding β-cyclocitral adducts were reacted. Most successful were Pt(II) and Au(I)-catalyzed cyclizations of N-TIPS-protected indolin-6-yl-substituted propargylacetates which provided the hydrogenated tricyclic cyclopenta[f]indole core system in high yield. PMID:26977193

  20. AN Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, Andrea; Tomatis, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Several alternative approximations of neutron transport have been proposed in years to move around the known limitations imposed by neutron diffusion in the modeling of nuclear cores. However, only a few complied with the industrial requirements of fast numerical computation, concentrating more on physical accuracy. In this work, the AN transport methodology is discussed with particular interest in core performance calculations. The implementation of the methodology in full core codes is discussed with particular attention to numerical issues and to the integration within the entire simulation process. Finally, first results from core studies in AN transport are analyzed in detail and compared to standard results of neutron diffusion.