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Sample records for corevalve aortic valve

  1. Limited Expansion of the New Self-Expandable Transcathether Aortic Valve Prosthesis (CoreValve Evolut R).

    PubMed

    Serio, Daniela; Doss, Mirko; Kim, Won-Keun; Möllmann, Helge; Walther, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been established as a therapeutic option in patients with a high procedural risk presenting with severe aortic stenosis. Recent improvements of TAVI technology made it possible to treat degenerated bioprosthesis using the valve-in-valve implantation concept. The self-expanding CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) prosthesis has recently been redesigned and was introduced into clinical practice. We report a case of a not fully expanded Medtronic CoreValve Evolut R after deploying a 26 mm prosthesis into a degenerated 25 mm Carpentier-Edwards Perimount prosthesis. PMID:27106459

  2. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Women Versus Men (from the US CoreValve Trials).

    PubMed

    Forrest, John K; Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Reardon, Michael J; Deeb, G Michael; Yakubov, Steven J; Hermiller, James B; Huang, Jian; Skelding, Kimberly A; Lansky, Alexandra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has changed significantly in recent years due to advances in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Recent studies with the CoreValve prosthesis have demonstrated superior results compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in patients at increased risk for surgery, but there are limited data on gender-related differences in patient characteristics and outcomes with this device. We compared baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes in women and men undergoing TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis. A total of 3,687 patients (1,708 women and 1,979 men) were included. At baseline, women tended to be slightly older and to have increased frailty, but they had fewer cardiac co-morbidities, higher left ventricular systolic function, less coronary artery disease, and fewer previous strokes. All-cause mortality was 5.9% for women and 5.8% for men at 30 days (p = 0.87) and 24.1% and 21.3%, respectively, at 1 year (p = 0.08). The incidence of stroke was 5.7% in women and 4.0% in men at 30 days (p = 0.02) and 9.3% and 7.7%, respectively, at 1 year (p = 0.05). Women had a higher incidence of bleeding, including more life-threatening bleeds, and a greater incidence of major vascular complications than men at 30 days. Device success was achieved in 86.9% of women and 86.1% of men (p = 0.50). In conclusion, although there were significant baseline differences and procedure-related complications between women and men undergoing TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis, this analysis found no significant difference in 30-day or 1-year mortality. PMID:27346591

  3. Three-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Varying Levels of Surgical Risk (from the CoreValve ADVANCE Study).

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Schiltgen, Molly; Verdoliva, Sarah; Bosmans, Johan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Gerckens, Ulrich; Wenaweser, Peter; Brecker, Stephen; Gulino, Simona; Tamburino, Corrado; Linke, Axel

    2016-03-01

    This study compared 3-year clinical outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score ≤7% to those of patients with a score >7%. Data were drawn from the ADVANCE study, a multinational post-market clinical trial that enrolled real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with the CoreValve bioprosthesis. Events were independently adjudicated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-1 definitions. A total of 996 patients were implanted: STS ≤7% (n = 697, median STS 4.3%, interquartile range 3.1% to 5.4%) and STS >7% (n = 298, median STS 9.7%, interquartile range 8.0% to 12.4%). At 3 years, the STS ≤7% group had lower rates of all-cause mortality (28.6 vs 45.9, p <0.01) and cardiovascular mortality (19.0 vs 30.2, p <0.01) than the STS >7% group. No differences were observed in cerebrovascular accidents, vascular complications, bleeding, or myocardial infarction. In patients with STS ≤7%, mortality at 3 years was higher in those with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) at discharge than in those with mild or less AR (39.9% vs 22.9%; hazard ratio 1.98; 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.86; p <0.01). Conversely, the severity of AR at discharge did not affect 3-year mortality in patients with STS >7% (42.9% vs 44.6%, moderate/severe vs mild/less; hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.62 to 1.75; p = 0.861; p for interaction = 0.047). In conclusion, patients with STS ≤7% had lower rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 3 years after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Complication rates were low and stable in both groups, demonstrating the safety of this procedure for patients at various levels of surgical risk. PMID:26762727

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Versus Surgery in Women at High Risk for Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement (from the CoreValve US High Risk Pivotal Trial).

    PubMed

    Skelding, Kimberly A; Yakubov, Steven J; Kleiman, Neal S; Reardon, Michael J; Adams, David H; Huang, Jian; Forrest, John K; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-15

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in women after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a self-expanding prosthesis in patients with severe aortic stenosis who were at high risk for SAVR. Although registries and meta-analyses have suggested that TAVR is of considerable benefit in women, perhaps even more so than in men, a rigorous evaluation of TAVR with a self-expanding valve versus SAVR in women from a randomized trial has not been performed. Patients with severe aortic stenosis were randomized 1:1 to either TAVR or SAVR. Outcomes at 1 year are reported. Treatment was attempted in a total of 353 women (183 TAVR and 170 SAVR). Baseline characteristics and predicted risk of the 2 groups were comparable, although the frequency of diabetes mellitus was lower in patients undergoing TAVR (33.3% vs 45.3%; p = 0.02). TAVR-treated patients experienced a statistically significant 1-year survival advantage compared with SAVR patients (12.7% vs 21.8%; p = 0.03). The composite all-cause mortality or major stroke rate also favored TAVR (14.9% vs 24.2%; p = 0.04). Quality of life, as measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire summary score, for both the TAVR and SAVR groups increased significantly from baseline to 1 year. In conclusion, female TAVR patients had lower 1-year mortality and lower 1-year all-cause mortality or major stroke compared with women undergoing SAVR, with both cohorts experiencing improved quality of life. Further studies specifically in women are warranted to validate these findings. PMID:27381665

  5. Limitations and difficulties of echocardiographic short-axis assessment of paravalvular leakage after corevalve transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Geleijnse, Marcel L; Di Martino, Luigi F M; Vletter, Wim B; Ren, Ben; Galema, Tjebbe W; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; de Jaegere, Peter P T; Soliman, Osama I I

    2016-01-01

    To make assessment of paravalvular aortic leakage (PVL) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) more uniform the second Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) recently updated the echocardiographic criteria for mild, moderate and severe PVL. In the VARC recommendation the assessment of the circumferential extent of PVL in the short-axis view is considered critical. In this paper we will discuss our observational data on the limitations and difficulties of this particular view, that may potentially result in overestimation or underestimation of PVL severity. PMID:27600600

  6. TAVI: New trials and registries offer further welcome evidence – U.S. CoreValve, CHOICE, and GARY

    PubMed Central

    Pighi, Michele; Serdoz, Roberta; Kilic, Ismail Dogu; Sherif, Sara Abou; Lindsay, Alistair; Di Mario, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has resulted in a paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis. Data from the recent U.S CoreValve Trial suggest, for the first time, that TAVI is associated with a significantly higher rate of survival at one year compared to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in the treatment of high-risk patients affected by severe aortic stenosis. The present review discusses this study and the current evidence about TAVI, for the treatment of severe aortic stenosis, from major trials and real world registries. PMID:25054123

  7. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care. PMID:27021619

  8. A second-time percutaneous aortic-valve implantation for bioprosthetic failure

    PubMed Central

    Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin Assa, Hana; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a case of an 84-year-old man with a history of surgical aortic-valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) who later developed severe prosthetic valve AR. Subsequent treatment with a Corevalve® was unsuccessful with severe AR seen at 3 years after the valve-in-valve procedure. The patient was then successfully treated with a second catheter-based Corevalve® implantation. PMID:26401281

  9. Self-expandable CoreValve implantation without contrast media.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; De Marco, Federico; Barosi, Alberto; Mauri, Silvia; Klugmann, Silvio

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been designed to treat high-risk surgical patients affected by severe aortic stenosis, many of whom are affected by chronic kidney disease. To perform transcatheter self-expandable valve implantation, multiple contrast injections are required to monitor the procedure, so these patients are at increased risk of acute kidney injury. We described self-expandable transcatheter aortic valve implantation without contrast media in an 80-year-old man affected by severe aortic stenosis and endstage chronic kidney disease. PMID:26068936

  10. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  11. Valve-in-Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation to Treat a Degenerated Surgical Bioprosthesis in a Subaortic Position

    PubMed Central

    Nuis, Rutger-Jan; Benitez, Luis M.; Nader, Carlos A.; Perez, Sergio; de Marchena, Eduardo J.; Dager, Antonio E.

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis has evolved as an alternative treatment for patients who are at high or excessive surgical risk. We report the case of an 84-year-old man with a degenerated surgically implanted valve in a subaortic position (9 mm below the native annulus) who underwent “valve-in-valve” transcatheter aortic valve implantation with use of a Medtronic CoreValve system. We planned to deploy the CoreValve at a conventional depth in the left ventricular outflow tract; we realized that this might result in paravalvular regurgitation, but it would also afford a “deep” landing site for a second valve, if necessary. Ultimately, we implanted a second CoreValve deep in the left ventricular outflow tract to seal a paravalvular leak. The frame of the first valve—positioned at the conventional depth—enabled secure anchoring of the second valve in a deeper position, which in turn effected successful treatment of the failing subaortic surgical prosthesis without paravalvular regurgitation. PMID:23914032

  12. CoreValve® transcatheter self-expandable aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; De Marco, Federico; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been designed to treat patients affected by severe symptomatic aortic stenosis considered extremely high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. The CoreValve® (Medtronic Inc., MN, USA) is a multilevel self-expanding and fully radiopaque nitinol frame with a diamond cell configuration that holds a trileaflet porcine pericardial tissue valve and anchors the device in the native anatomy. CoreValve was the first percutaneous valve to be granted the CE mark for transfemoral implantation in May 2007 and the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial is actively underway. The CoreValve is available in four sizes (23, 26, 29 and 31 mm) to serve a broad range of patients' annulus from 18 to 29 mm. All the valves fit into an 18-Fr size catheter. Currently, more than 35,000 patients have been treated in more than 60 countries worldwide from the femoral artery, the axillary artery and, more recently, from a direct aortic approach, with excellent results up to 4-year follow-up. PMID:23278219

  13. New frontiers in aortic therapy: focus on current trials and devices in transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Gutsche, Jacob T; Patel, Prakash A; Walsh, Elizabeth K; Sophocles, Aris; Chern, Sy-Yeu S; Jones, David B; Anwaruddin, Saif; Desai, Nimesh D; Weiss, Stuart J; Augoustides, John G T

    2015-04-01

    The first decade of clinical experience with transcatheter aortic valve replacement since 2002 saw the development of 2 main valve systems, namely the Edwards Sapien balloon-expandable valve series and the Medtronic self-expanding CoreValve. These 2 valve platforms now have achieved commercial approval and application worldwide in patients with severe aortic stenosis whose perioperative risk for surgical intervention is high or extreme. In the second decade of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, clinical experience and refinements in valve design have resulted in clinical drift towards lower patient risk cohorts. There are currently 2 major trials, PARTNER II and SURTAVI, that are both evaluating the role of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in intermediate-risk patient cohorts. The results from these landmark trials may usher in a new clinical paradigm for transcatheter aortic valve replacement in its second decade. PMID:25572322

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Oliemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease. PMID:25374670

  15. Recently patented and widely used valves for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Michler, Robert E

    2012-12-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a serious condition in the aging US and European populations. Management of a stenotic valve is crucial as it can become symptomatic quickly leading to ventricular deterioration and overall poor quality of life. Considering that AS is a disease of the elderly patient population, surgical intervention may not be well tolerated by some patients. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative approach for patients who are unsuitable surgical candidates. Since the first balloon-expandable Edwards SAPIEN valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) was implanted by Dr. Cribier, many other valves have been introduced into clinical practice. Self-expanding valves such as the CoreValve ReValving system (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) for retrograde implantation and Symetis TX for antegrade and transapical implantation are the most frequently used self-expanding valves. The SAPIEN valve, on the other hand can be implanted both antegrade as well as retrograde. Overall, the most widely used valves are the Edwards SAPIEN and the CoreValve, which have been implanted in more than 40,000 patients worldwide. The Symetis valve has shown promising results in small series in Europe and may be introduced to the US market in the near future. This manuscript will review these 3 recently patented valves and discuss some of the clinical results that are available. PMID:23095028

  16. Aortic valve decalcification revisited.

    PubMed

    Marty, A T; Mufti, S; Murabit, I

    1989-11-01

    A 75-year-old woman with a small calcified aortic root, severe aortic stenosis and triple vessel coronary artery disease developed angina at rest. Aortic valve decalcification and quadruple aorto-coronary bypass were done as her aortic root was too small and calcified to do anything else. Postoperative clinical and hemodynamic results have been excellent. Literature review supports application of this therapy in selected patients with trileaflet senescent aortic stenosis. PMID:2614067

  17. Aortic valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... choose to have your aortic valve surgery at a center that does many of these procedures. ... DA, Harken AH. Acquired heart disease: valvular. In: Townsend CM, ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  18. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  19. Aortic valve replacement in rheumatoid aortic incompetence.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A B; Goldstraw, P; Caves, P K

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatoid aortic valve disease is uncommon. and there are few reports of valve replacement in this condition. Aortic valve replacement and partial pericardiectomy was performed in a patient with acute rheumatoid aortitis and aortic incompetence. Previous reports suggest that any patient with rheumatoid arthritis who develops cardiac symptoms should be carefully assessed for surgically treatable involvement of the pericardium or heart valves. Images PMID:725829

  20. Recently patented transcatheter aortic valves in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Salemi, Arash; Girardi, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    The most widely used heart valve worldwide is the Edwards Sapien, which currently has 60% of the worldwide transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) market. The CoreValve is next in line in popularity, encompassing 35% of the worldwide TAVI market. Although these two valves dominate the TAVI market, a number of newer transcatheter valves have been introduced and others are in early clinical evaluation. The new valves are designed to reduce catheter delivery diameter, improve ease of positioning and sealing, and facilitate repositioning or removal. The most recent transcatheter valves for transapical use include Acurate TA (Symetis), Engager (Medtronic), and JenaValve the Portico (St Jude), Sadra Lotus Medical (Boston Scientific), and the Direct Flow Medical. These new inventions may introduce more effective treatment options for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Improvements in transcatheter valves and the developing variability among them may allow for more tailored approaches with respect to patient's anatomy, while giving operators the opportunity to choose devices they feel more comfortable with. Moreover, introducing new devices to the market will create a competitive environment among producers that will reduce high prices and expand availability. The present review article includes a discussion of recent patents related to Transcatheter Aortic Valves. PMID:24279506

  1. Bicuspid aortic valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... is unclear, but it is the most common congenital heart disease . It often runs in families. The bicuspid aortic ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Congenital Heart Defects Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  3. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  4. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve. PMID:27393846

  5. Aortic Valve Sparing in Different Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Conditions.

    PubMed

    David, Tirone E

    2016-08-01

    The development of aortic valve-sparing operations (reimplantation of the aortic valve and remodeling of the aortic root) expanded the surgical armamentarium for treating patients with aortic root dilation caused by a variety of disorders. Young adults with aortic root aneurysms associated with genetic syndromes are ideal candidates for reimplantation of the aortic valve, and the long-term results have been excellent. Incompetent bicuspid aortic valves with dilated aortic annuli are also satisfactorily treated with the same type of operation. Older patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic insufficiency secondary to dilated sinotubular junction and a normal aortic annulus can be treated with remodeling of the aortic root or with reimplantation of the aortic valve. The first procedure is simpler, and both procedures are likely equally effective. As with any heart valve-preserving procedure, patient selection and surgical expertise are keys to successful and durable repairs. PMID:27491910

  6. Recent advances in aortic valve disease: highlights from a bicuspid aortic valve to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Augoustides, John G T; Wolfe, Yanika; Walsh, Elizabeth K; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2009-08-01

    There have been major advances in the management of aortic valve disease. Because bicuspid aortic valve is common and predicts an increased risk of adverse aortic events, these patients merit aortic surveillance and consideration for ascending aortic replacement when its diameter exceeds 4.0 cm. Serial quantitative echocardiographic analysis, as compared with traditional clinical markers, can result in better timing of surgical intervention for aortic regurgitation. Furthermore, echocardiographic analysis of aortic regurgitation can classify the mechanism based on cusp mobility to guide aortic valve repair. In aortic root replacement, aortic valve preservation with reimplantation is a mainstream surgical option in Marfan syndrome to offer freedom from valve-related anticoagulation. Prosthetic aortic root replacement has further alternatives with the introduction of the aortic neosinus design and acceptable clinical outcomes with the porcine xenograft. Because aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may adversely affect patient outcome, its perioperative prevention is important. Furthermore, significant functional mitral regurgitation in association with aortic stenosis often resolves after aortic valve replacement. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve must include valve area because the transaortic pressure gradient may be low in severe stenosis. Aortic valve replacement with partial sternotomy is safe and offers a reasonable less invasive alternative. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement, whether transfemoral or transapical, has revolutionized aortic valve replacement; it remains a major theme in the specialty for 2009 and beyond. PMID:19497768

  7. Aortic valve annuloplasty: new single suture technique.

    PubMed

    Schöllhorn, Joachim; Rylski, Bartosz; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction strategies for aortic valve insufficiency in the presence of aortic annulus dilatation are usually surgically challenging. We demonstrate a simple, modified Taylor technique of downsizing and stabilization of the aortic annulus using a single internal base suture. Since April 2011, 22 consecutive patients have undergone safe aortic valve annuloplasty. No reoperations for aortic valve insufficiency and no deaths occurred. PMID:24882316

  8. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  9. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  10. Aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nikos; Sinning, Jan-Malte

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) negatively affects prognosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). As transcatheter heart valves (THV) are anchored using a certain degree of oversizing at the level of the aortic annulus, incomplete stent frame expansion because of heavily annular calcifications, suboptimal placement of the prosthesis, and/or annulus-prosthesis size-mismatch can contribute to paravalvular AR with subsequent increased mortality risk. Echocardiography is essential to differentiate between transvalvular and paravalvular AR and to further elucidate the etiology of AR during the procedure. However, because echocardiographic quantification of AR in TAVR patients remains challenging, especially in the implantation situation, a multimodal approach to the evaluation of AR with use of hemodynamic measurements and imaging modalities is useful to precisely quantify the severity of AR immediately after valve deployment. "Next-generation" THVs are already on the market and first results show that paravalvular AR related to design modifications (eg, paravalvular space-fillers, full repositionability) are rarely seen in these valve types.  PMID:24632758

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: current application and future directions.

    PubMed

    Fassa, Amir-Ali; Himbert, Dominique; Vahanian, Alec

    2013-04-01

    During the last decade, the rapid evolution of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has revolutionized the treatment of severe aortic stenosis. Since the PARTNER A and B trials, this technique has become the treatment of reference for inoperable patients, and an attractive alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in those at high risk for surgery. Large multicenter registries conducted since 2007, mainly in Europe, confirmed the excellent hemodynamic performances of the 2 percutaneous valves currently available on the market, the Edwards SAPIEN, and the Medtronic CoreValve, as well as their benefits in terms of symptom relief and survival. The whole process of TAVR, from patient selection to post-procedural care and result evaluation, should be conducted by a dedicated multidisciplinary "heart team," within centers with expertise in valve disease. Though currently limited to those deemed at high risk for surgery or inoperable, indications for TAVR will likely be extended to a broader spectrum of patients, in particular those with surgical bioprosthetic failure or at intermediate risk for surgery. Beforehand, it will be essential to obtain more extensive data on the durability of percutaneous prostheses, since the available follow-up is seldom longer than 5 years, and in order to further decrease the rate of complications, mainly stroke, paravalvular regurgitation, and access site complications. Furthermore, the use of the transfemoral route will undoubtedly increase because of the miniaturization of the devices, at the expense of other approaches. Above all, multidisciplinary approach, excellent imaging, and careful evaluation will remain key to the success of this technique. PMID:23420448

  12. Aortic valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two main types of new valves: Mechanical, made of man-made materials, such as titanium ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood ...

  13. Surgical Aortic Valvuloplasty Versus Balloon Aortic Valve Dilatation in Children.

    PubMed

    Donald, Julia S; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2016-09-01

    Balloon aortic valve dilatation (BAD : is assumed to provide the same outcomes as surgical aortic valvuloplasty (SAV). However, the development of precise modern surgical valvuloplasty techniques may result in better long-term durability of the aortic valve repair. This review of the recent literature suggests that current SAV provides a safe and durable repair. Furthermore, primary SAV appears to have greater freedom from reintervention and aortic valve replacement when compared to BAD. PMID:27587493

  14. Giant Thoracic Aneurysm Following Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cao; Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Nguyen, Ngoc; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is a common congenital anomaly associated with aortopathy, which can cause aortic root dilatation, necessitating regular screening if the aortic root is > 4.0 cm. Despite the low absolute incidence of aortic complications associated with bicuspid aortic valve in the general population, the consequences of such complications for an individual patient can be devastating. Herein we propose a balanced algorithm that incorporates recommendations from the three major guidelines for follow-up imaging of the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, maintaining the current recommendations with regard to surgical thresholds. PMID:26827748

  15. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR. PMID:27295772

  16. Aortic valve allografts in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, John; Hill, G. L.

    1968-01-01

    Some of the mechnical and biological problems surrounding the use of fresh allograft inverted aortic valves as mitral valve substitutes are described. Certain aspects of the problem have been studied experimentally. In three sheep `fresh' aortic valve allografts were inserted, using cardiopulmonary bypass, into the main pulmonary artery, and were observed from 5 to 7 months after operation. The animals survived normally. Their normal pulmonary valves remained in situ. The technique is described. At subsequent necropsy, macroscopically the valves were found to be free from vegetation, and the cusps were pliable and apparently normal. Microscopically, the supporting allograft myocardium showed necrosis and early calcification. The valve cusp showed hyalinization of collagen, although beneath the endocardium this hyalinized collagen contained moderate numbers of fibroblasts with no evidence of proliferation. The endocardium and arterial intima of the allograft showed evidence of ingrowth from adjacent normal host endocardial tissues. The allograft itself was invested in a loose layer of fibro-fatty tissue, which, in view of the necrotic state of the graft myocardium, could well have been a reparative reaction rather than a homograft reaction. It is concluded that, although the cusps could function normally, the necrosis of the myocardium might in time lead to late failure of the graft. Further studies with the valve inserted at mitral level are indicated. Images PMID:5656757

  17. Brucellosis complicated by aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Skillington, P D; McGiffin, D C; Kemp, R; Bett, J H; Holt, G; Forgan-Smith, R

    1988-12-01

    A 30 year old veterinary surgeon developed a febrile illness with serological evidence of Brucellosis. He was known to have aortic valve disease and during the course of the illness, the clinical features of endocarditis became evident, with a vegetation visible echocardiographically on the aortic valve. Because of persisting fever despite appropriate antibiotic therapy, aortic valve replacement with a viable cryopreserved allograft aortic valve was undertaken. Organisms consistent with Brucella species were demonstrated in the excised vegetation. The patient received a six week course of antibiotics and his post-operative course was uneventful. PMID:3250411

  18. Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation for degenerated surgical bioprostheses: the first case series in Asia with one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Paul Toon Lim; Ewe, See Hooi; Soon, Jia Lin; Ho, Kay Woon; Sin, Yong Koong; Tan, Swee Yaw; Lim, Soo Teik; Koh, Tian Hai; Chua, Yeow Leng

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established therapy for inoperable and high-surgical-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although TAVI in patients with degenerated surgical aortic bioprostheses (i.e. valve-in-valve TAVI) is increasingly reported in Western studies, such data is lacking in Asian patients. We describe the initial experience of valve-in-valve TAVI in Asia. METHODS Eight patients who underwent valve-in-valve TAVI due to degenerated aortic bioprostheses were enrolled. The mechanism of bioprosthetic valve failure was stenotic, regurgitation or mixed. All procedures were performed via transfemoral arterial access, using the self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis or balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT prosthesis. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 71.6 ± 13.2 years and five were male. Mean duration to surgical bioprosthesis degeneration was 10.2 ± 4.1 years. Valve-in-valve TAVI was successfully performed in all patients. CoreValve and SAPIEN XT prostheses were used in six and two patients, respectively. There were no deaths, strokes or permanent pacemaker requirement at 30 days, with one noncardiac mortality at one year. All patients experienced New York Heart Association functional class improvement. Post-procedure mean pressure gradients were 20 ± 11 mmHg and 22 ± 8 mmHg at 30 days and one year, respectively. Residual aortic regurgitation (AR) of more than mild severity occurred in one patient at 30 days. At one year, only one patient had mild residual AR. CONCLUSION In our experience of valve-in-valve TAVI, procedural success was achieved in all patients without adverse events at 30 days. Good clinical and haemodynamic outcomes were sustained at one year. PMID:27193081

  19. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D L H; Garreau, M; Auffret, V; Le Breton, H; Verhoye, J P; Haigron, P

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels (≈2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  20. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field. PMID:27600519

  1. Mechanical versus biological aortic valve replacement strategies.

    PubMed

    Reineke, D; Gisler, F; Englberger, L; Carrel, T

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the most frequently performed procedure in valve surgery. The controversy about the optimal choice of the prosthetic valve is as old as the technique itself. Currently there is no perfect valve substitute available. The main challenge is to choose between mechanical and biological prosthetic valves. Biological valves include pericardial (bovine, porcine or equine) and native porcine bioprostheses designed in stented, stentless and sutureless versions. Homografts and pulmonary autografts are reserved for special indications and will not be discussed in detail in this review. We will focus on the decision making between artificial biological and mechanical prostheses, respectively. The first part of this article reviews guideline recommendations concerning the choice of aortic prostheses in different clinical situations while the second part is focused on novel strategies in the treatment of patients with aortic valve pathology. PMID:26678683

  2. Bicuspid Aortic Valve: Unlocking the Morphogenetic Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Longobardo, Luca; Jain, Renuka; Carerj, Scipione; Zito, Concetta; Khandheria, Bijoy K

    2016-08-01

    Although bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital abnormality, it is perhaps erroneous to consider this disease one clinical entity. Rather, it may be useful to consider it a cluster of diseases incorporating different phenotypes, etiologies, and pathogenesis. Discussion of bicuspid aortic valve can be difficult because there is no clear consensus on a phenotypic description among authors, and many classification schemes have been proposed. The literature suggests that different phenotypes have different associations and clinical manifestations. In addition, recent studies suggest a genetic basis for the disease, yet few genes have so far been described. Furthermore, recent scientific literature has been focusing on the increased risk of aortic aneurysms, but the pathogenesis of bicuspid aortic valve aortopathy is still unclear. The aim of this paper is to review the current evidence about the unsolved issues around bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:27059385

  3. Quadricuspid aortic valve with ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz Khan; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Burkhart, Harold M; Araoz, Philip A; Young, Phillip M

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of a 24-year-old woman who was diagnosed with quadricuspid aortic valve with ruptured sinus of Valsalva. Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly. The recognition of quadricuspid aortic valve has clinical significance as it causes aortic valve dysfunction, and is often associated with other congenital cardiac abnormalities. We showed the important role of multimodality imaging in diagnosing a quadricuspid aortic valve associated with ruptured sinus of Valsalva. PMID:22874066

  4. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  5. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  6. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nanobacteria-associated calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Chang, Ho-Huang; Roque, Rod; Malas, Amer M; Warren, Stafford G; Sommer, Andrei P

    2007-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in developed countries, and the major reason for operative valve replacement. In the US, the current annual cost of this surgery is approximately 1 billion dollars. Despite increasing morbidity and mortality, little is known of the cellular basis of the calcifications, which occur in high-perfusion zones of the heart. The case is presented of a patient with calcific aortic valve stenosis and colonies of progressively mineralized nanobacteria in the fibrocalcific nodules of the aortic cusps, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with their outstanding bioadhesivity, nanobacteria might serve as causative agents in the development of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:17315391

  8. Aortic valve repair for papillary fibroelastoma.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Luca; Al-Basheer, Amin; Glineur, David; Oppido, Guido; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; El-Khoury, Gebrine

    2006-05-01

    We report the case of aortic valve-papillary fibroelastoma in a 66-year-old Belgian woman with a previous single episode of cerebral transient ischemic attack. Transthoracic two-dimensional echocardiography revealed a small mass adherent to the noncoronary cusp of the valve, which was confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography. Indication for surgery was performed because of a previous cerebral transient ischemic attack and for its potential risk of cerebral and coronary embolization. Surgical excision of the mass was performed with the need for glutaraldehyde-treated autologous pericardial patch repair of the aortic cusp. Intraoperative and postoperative transesophageal echocardiography both showed the valve to be competent. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. After a review of the literature, we conclude that, even if asymptomatic, and independent of their size, aortic valve papillary fibroelastomas justify surgical excision for their potential to systemic embolization. Moreover, we believe that a valve-sparing approach might be feasible with no recurrence after complete excision. PMID:16645416

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Self-Expanding Prosthesis Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine A.; Magnuson, Elizabeth A.; Galper, Benjamin Z.; Meduri, Christopher U.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Baron, Suzanne J.; Reardon, Michael J.; Adams, David H.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies of the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have been based primarily on a single balloon-expandable system. Objectives The goal of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. Methods We performed a formal economic analysis on the basis of individual, patient-level data from the CoreValve U.S. High Risk pivotal trial. Empirical data regarding survival and quality of life (QOL) over 2 years, and medical resource use and hospital costs through 12 months were used to project life expectancy, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and lifetime medical costs in order to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of TAVR versus SAVR from a U.S. perspective. Results Relative to SAVR, TAVR reduced initial length of stay an average of 4.4 days, decreased the need for rehabilitation services at discharge, and resulted in superior 1-month QOL. Index admission and projected lifetime costs were higher with TAVR than with SAVR (differences $11,260 and $17,849 per patient, respectively), whereas TAVR was projected to provide a lifetime gain of 0.32 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; 0.41 life-years [LYs]) with 3% discounting. Lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were $55,090 per QALY gained and $43,114 per LY gained. Sensitivity analyses indicated that a reduction in the initial cost of TAVR by ~$1,650 would lead to an ICER <$50,000/QALY gained. Conclusions In a high-risk clinical trial population, TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis provided meaningful clinical benefits compared with SAVR, with incremental costs considered acceptable by current U.S. standards. With expected modest reductions in the cost of index TAVR admissions, the value of TAVR compared with SAVR in this patient population would become high. PMID:26764063

  10. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Rare Congenital Cause of Aortic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Shah, Priyank; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly causing aortic regurgitation usually in the fifth to sixth decade of life. Earlier, the diagnosis was mostly during postmortem or intraoperative, but now with the advent of better imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, more cases are being diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who was found to have QAV, with the help of TEE, while undergoing evaluation for a diastolic murmur. The patient was found to have Type B QAV with moderate aortic regurgitation. We also present a brief review of classification, pathophysiology, and embryological basis of this rare congenital anomaly. The importance of diagnosing QAV lies in the fact that majority of these patients will require surgery for aortic regurgitation and close follow-up so that aortic valve replacement/repair is done before the left ventricular decompensation occurs. PMID:27195176

  11. Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Neal S.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming widely used for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. Data from The PARTNER Trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) and the Medtronic CoreValve® U.S. Pivotal Investigational Device Exemption trial indicate that survival for extreme-risk patients is superior to best medical therapy and equivalent or superior to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), although long-term durability remains unknown. Paravalvular leak remains higher in TAVR than SAVR, as does permanent pacemaker implantation in self-expanding valves. New-generation valves are addressing these issues, especially for paravalvular leak. There is strong evidence that TAVR is appropriate for both extreme-risk and high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, and the continued development of new valves are making implantation more reliable. This review discusses the studies supporting the use of TAVR and explores current advances in the field. PMID:27127560

  12. Usefulness of Predilation Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Pagnesi, Matteo; Jabbour, Richard J; Latib, Azeem; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Akihito; Regazzoli, Damiano; Mangieri, Antonio; Montalto, Claudio; Ancona, Marco B; Giannini, Francesco; Chieffo, Alaide; Montorfano, Matteo; Monaco, Fabrizio; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Balloon predilation is historically considered a requirement before performing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). As the procedure has evolved, it has been questioned whether it is actually needed, but data are lacking on mid-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of balloon predilation before TAVI. A total of 517 patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI from November 2007 to October 2015 were analyzed. The devices implanted included the Medtronic CoreValve (n = 216), Medtronic Evolut R (n = 30), Edwards SAPIEN XT (n = 210), and Edwards SAPIEN 3 (n = 61). Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether pre-implantation balloon aortic valvuloplasty (pre-BAV) was performed (n = 326) or not (n = 191). Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were primarily evaluated. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics and potential confounders (n = 113 pairs). In the overall cohort, patients without pre-BAV had a significantly higher MACCE rate at 30 days, driven by a higher incidence of stroke (0.3% pre-BAV vs 3.7% no-pre-BAV, p <0.01). MACCE and mortality at 1 year were, however, similar in both groups. Independent predictors of MACCE at 1 year included serum creatinine, NYHA class 3 to 4, logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation, and postdilation. Of note, the postdilation rate was higher in the no-pre-BAV group (21.5% pre-BAV vs 35.6% no-pre-BAV, p <0.001). After propensity score matching, there were no differences in MACCE between the 2 groups. In conclusion, this study showed that, in selected patients and with specific transcatheter valves, TAVI without pre-BAV appears to be associated with similar mid-term outcomes compared with TAVI with pre-BAV, but it may increase the need for postdilation. PMID:27184169

  13. Challenging transfemoral valve-in-valve implantation in a degenerated stentless bioprosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Halapas, A; Chrissoheris, M; Spargias, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    Bioprosthetic heart valves are often preferred over mechanical valves as they may preclude the need for anticoagulation. Reoperation is the standard treatment for structural failure of bioprosthetic valves; however, it carries significant risk especially in inoperable elderly patients. Valve-in-valve (ViV) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) seems to be an effective and promising procedure in patients with degenerated bioprosthetic aortic valves avoiding the risks associated with the use of cardioplegia and redo cardiac surgery. We report an interesting case of a high-risk 74-year-old patient with a degenerated Sorin Freedom Solo stentless valve treated successfully with ViV TAVR. PMID:25091103

  14. Has percutaneous aortic valve replacement taken center stage in the treatment of aortic valve disease?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gideon Praveen; Cui, Fangsen; Mathew, Lazar; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2013-01-01

    Modern biomedical advances have propelled percutaneous valve replacement into an effective and powerful therapy for many heart valve diseases, especially aortic valve stenosis. Experiences so far suggest that outcomes for new percutaneous valve replacement surgery compare favorably with that of traditional valve surgery in selected patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The inception of percutaneous aortic valve replacement (PAVR) began in 1992 when the potential for treating valve diseases was demonstrated through a modern technique of endoluminal deployment of a catheter-mounted crimped stented heart valve in an animal model. The first successful demonstration of such novel technique of surgical replacement of a heart valve was performed in 2002, when valve implantation in a patient with aortic stenosis was reported. Despite initial stumbles and a perception of being an uphill task, PAVR has emerged as one of the breakthroughs in surgical procedures. More than 1500 citations were found in PubMed, half of which were available after 2011. This is primarily because more than 50,000 procedures are being performed in more than 40 countries worldwide, with encouraging outcomes, and several stented valves have been launched in the market. This review provides a detailed analysis of the current state of the art of PAVR. Moreover, a competitive landscape of various devices available in the market and their design considerations, biomaterial selections, and overall hemodynamic performance are presented. PMID:24941416

  15. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two main types of new valves: Mechanical, made of man-made materials, such as titanium ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood ...

  16. WUnicuspid Aortic Valve- An Uncommon Anomaly With a Common Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sitwala, Puja; Abusara, Ashraf; Ladia, Vatsal; Ladia, Vatsal; Panchal, Hemang B; Raudat, Charles; Paul, Timir K

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV), which is a rare congenital anomaly, usually presents as aortic stenosis and/or aortic regurgitation. Here we present a case of UAV co-existent with an ascending aortic aneurysm. A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the hospital after two episodes of syncope. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed an ejection fraction of 62%, severely stenotic aortic valve, and moderate aortic regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed calcification of the aortic valve, compatible with aortic stenosis and aneurysm of the ascending aorta measuring 4.3 cm in diameter. He underwent successful aortic valve replacement and repair of ascending aortic aneurysm. He recovered well without any complications. This case suggests that any young patient who presents with syncope, aortic stenosis would be a differential and further workup by any available non-invasive modality needs to be performed. PMID:27383857

  17. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  18. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  19. The Effects of Positioning of Transcatheter Aortic Valve on Fluid Dynamics of the Aortic Root

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a novel treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis. Due to the recent use of this technology and the procedural variability, there is very little data that quantifies the hemodynamic consequences of variations in valve placement. Changes in aortic wall stresses and fluid retention in the sinuses of Valsalva can have a significant effect on the clinical response a patient has to the procedure. By comprehensively characterizing complex flow in the sinuses of Valsalva using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry and an advanced heart flow simulator, various positions of a deployed transcatheter valve with respect to a bioprosthetic aortic valve (valve-in-valve) were tested in vitro. Displacements of the transcatheter valve were axial and directed below the simulated native valve annulus. It was determined that for both blood residence time and aortic Reynolds stresses, it is optimal to have the annulus of the transcatheter valve deployed as close to the aortic valve annulus as possible. PMID:25010918

  20. The utility of trans-catheter aortic valve replacement after commercialization: does the European experience provide a glimpse into the future use of this technology in the United States?

    PubMed

    Linke, Axel; Walther, Thomas; Schuler, Gerhard

    2010-03-01

    Treatment of aortic stenosis remains challenging in older individuals, as their perioperative mortality for open heart surgery is increased due to comorbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the CoreValve ReValving System (Medtronic, Minneapolis, USA) and the Edwards SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve (THV; Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, California, USA) represents an alternative to conventional valve replacement in elderly patients that have a high risk for conventional surgery. This article summarizes the evidence-base from recent clinical trials. The early results of these landmark studies suggest that transcatheter aortic valve implantation with either one of the prosthesis is feasible, safe, improves hemodynamics and, therefore, might be an alternative to conventional aortic valve replacement in very high-risk patients. However, all of the available transcatheter heart valves have certain disadvantages, limiting their use in daily clinical practice. The process of decision making, which valve to use and which access route to choose is illustrated in this article through clinical case scenarios. Additionally, the lessons learned thus far from the European perspective and the potential impact on the future use in the US are discussed. Despite of the progress in this field, we are still lacking an optimal transcatheter heart valve. Once it is available, we can take the plunge to compare transcatheter valve implantation with convention surgery in severe aortic stenosis! PMID:20088019

  1. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Harish; DeValeria, Patrick A.; Sweeney, John P.; Mookaram, Farouk

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves. PMID:25849702

  2. Coronary Ostial Stenosis after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios G.; Economou, Fotios I.; Charokopos, Nicholas A.; Pitsis, Antonios A.; Parharidou, Despina G.; Papadopoulos, Thomas I.; Parharidis, Georgios E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis is a rare but potentially serious sequela after aortic valve replacement. It occurs in the left main or right coronary artery after 1% to 5% of aortic valve replacement procedures. The clinical symptoms are usually severe and may appear from 1 to 6 months postoperatively. Although the typical treatment is coronary artery bypass grafting, patients have been successfully treated by means of percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the cases of 2 patients in whom coronary ostial stenosis developed after aortic valve replacement. In the 1st case, a 72-year-old man underwent aortic valve replacement and bypass grafting of the saphenous vein to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Six months later, he experienced a non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography revealed a critical stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. In the 2nd case, a 78-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement and grafting of the saphenous vein to an occluded right coronary artery. Four months later, she experienced unstable angina. Coronary angiography showed a critical left main coronary artery ostial stenosis and occlusion of the right coronary artery venous graft. In each patient, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention and deployed a drug-eluting stent. Both patients were asymptomatic on 6-to 12-month follow-up. We attribute the coronary ostial stenosis to the selective ostial administration of cardioplegic solution during surgery. We conclude that retrograde administration of cardioplegic solution through the coronary sinus may reduce the incidence of postoperative coronary ostial stenosis, and that stenting may be an efficient treatment option. PMID:20844624

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Wenaweser, Peter; Praz, Fabien; Stortecky, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in Western industrial countries (including Switzerland) with a prevalence of about 5% in the population aged 75 and over. If left untreated, symptomatic patients have a rate of death of more than 50% within 2 years. As a result of age and elevated surgical risk, an important proportion of elderly patients are not referred to surgery. Thus, the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in 2002 has initiated a paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. The early technical and procedural success of this minimal invasive treatment in high-risk patients has promoted further innovation and development of transcatheter heart valve (THV) systems during the last 13 years. Downsizing of the delivery catheters along with technical improvements aiming to reduce postprocedural paravalvular regurgitation have resulted in a significant reduction in mortality. As a consequence, TAVI is nowadays established as safe and effective treatment for selected inoperable and high-risk patients. Ongoing studies are investigating the outcome of intermediate risk patients allocated to either surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or TAVI. Despite these advancements, some specific areas of concern still require attention and need further investigations including conduction disturbances, valve degeneration and antithrombotic management. Although the off-label use of TAVI devices in the mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary position has recently developed, important limitations still apply and careful patient selection remains crucial. This review aims to summarise the available clinical evidence of transcatheter aortic valve treatment during the last 13 years and to provide a glimpse of future technologies. PMID:26999727

  4. In the era of the valve-in-valve: is transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in sutureless valves feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Francesco; Pellicciari, Giovanni; Phan, Kevin; Ferlito, Marinella; Dall’Ara, Gianni; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Sutureless aortic valve implantation has emerged as an innovative alternative for treatment of aortic stenosis. By avoiding the placement of sutures, this approach aims to improve surgical outcomes by facilitating less traumatic minimally invasive approaches and reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass duration. However, the absence of sutures may have detrimental effects after sutureless interventions, including paravalvular leakages, valve dislocation, and stent-infolding. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation (A-ViV) is emerging as a valuable procedure in patients with dysfunctioning biological aortic valves who are deemed inoperable with conventional surgery. Here we present the first-in-man case of trans-femoral implant of a balloon expandable aortic valve in a leaking sutureless self-expandable valve. PMID:25870827

  5. In the era of the valve-in-valve: is transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in sutureless valves feasible?

    PubMed

    Di Eusanio, Marco; Saia, Francesco; Pellicciari, Giovanni; Phan, Kevin; Ferlito, Marinella; Dall'Ara, Gianni; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Sutureless aortic valve implantation has emerged as an innovative alternative for treatment of aortic stenosis. By avoiding the placement of sutures, this approach aims to improve surgical outcomes by facilitating less traumatic minimally invasive approaches and reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass duration. However, the absence of sutures may have detrimental effects after sutureless interventions, including paravalvular leakages, valve dislocation, and stent-infolding. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation (A-ViV) is emerging as a valuable procedure in patients with dysfunctioning biological aortic valves who are deemed inoperable with conventional surgery. Here we present the first-in-man case of trans-femoral implant of a balloon expandable aortic valve in a leaking sutureless self-expandable valve. PMID:25870827

  6. Decellularized aortic homografts for aortic valve and aorta ascendens replacement†

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Igor; Horke, Alexander; Cebotari, Serghei; Sarikouch, Samir; Boethig, Dietmar; Breymann, Thomas; Beerbaum, Philipp; Bertram, Harald; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Theodoridis, Karolina; Bobylev, Dmitry; Cheptanaru, Eduard; Ciubotaru, Anatol; Haverich, Axel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The choice of valve prosthesis for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young patients is challenging. Decellularized pulmonary homografts (DPHs) have shown excellent results in pulmonary position. Here, we report our early clinical results using decellularized aortic valve homografts (DAHs) for AVR in children and mainly young adults. METHODS This prospective observational study included all 69 patients (44 males) operated from February 2008 to September 2015, with a mean age of 19.7 ± 14.6 years (range 0.2–65.3 years). In 18 patients, a long DAH was used for simultaneous replacement of a dilated ascending aorta as an extended aortic root replacement (EARR). Four patients received simultaneous pulmonary valve replacement with DPH. RESULTS Thirty-nine patients (57%) had a total of 62 previous operations. The mean aortic cross-clamp time in isolated cases was 129 ± 41 min. There was 1 conduit-unrelated death. The mean DAH diameter was 22.4 ± 3.7 mm (range, 10–29 mm), the average peak gradient was 14 ± 15 mmHg and the mean aortic regurgitation grade (0.5 = trace, 1 = mild) was 0.6 ± 0.5. The mean effective orifice area (EOA) of 25 mm diameter DAH was 3.07 ± 0.7 cm2. DAH annulus z-values were 1.1 ± 1.1 at implantation and 0.7 ± 1.3 at the last follow-up. The last mean left ventricle ejection fraction and left ventricle end diastolic volume index was 63 ± 7% and 78 ± 16 ml/m2 body surface area, respectively. To date, no dilatation has been observed at any level of the graft during follow-up; however, the observational time is short (140.4 years in total, mean 2.0 ± 1.8 years, maximum 7.6 years). One small DAH (10 mm at implantation) had to be explanted due to subvalvular stenosis and developing regurgitation after 4.5 years and was replaced with a 17 mm DAH without complication. No calcification of the explanted graft was noticed intraoperatively and after histological analysis, which revealed extensive recellularization without inflammation

  7. [Acute coronary artery dissection after aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernando de Paula; Sampaio, Roney Orismar; Mazzucato, Fernanda Lopez; Tarasoutchi, Flávio; Spina, Guilherme Sobreira; Grinberg, Max

    2010-02-01

    Late aortic dissection can occur after aortic valve replacement surgery, but rarely in the first postoperative month. Coronary artery dissection is rare and usually occurs after coronary angiography. We report a rare case of coronary artery dissection followed by myocardial infarction in the immediate postoperative period of a successful aortic valve replacement with a good postoperative evolution. PMID:20428604

  8. Biomechanics of the pulmonary autograft valve in the aortic position.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, A; Trenkner, M; Anisimowicz, L; Gutkowski, R; Drapella, A; Kwiatkowska, E; Dobke, M

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary autograft valve replacement has been simulated by implanting the pulmonary valve into the aortic position of the same cadaver heart from both human and porcine sources. The forces acting on the pulmonary valve leaflets have been calculated on the basis of a triaxial ellipsoid mathematical model. These forces on the pulmonary autograft valve were shown to be essentially similar to those previously reported for aortic valve leaflets. Biomechanical measurements have been made on the simulated autograft valves and on the isolated pulmonary valve cusps. The tensile strengths of the pulmonary valve cusps in both circumferential and radial directions were roughly three times greater than those of aortic valve cusps. This indicated the ability of the pulmonary valves to accept, ab initio, aortic valve closing pressures. Pressure-induced changes in dimension, calculated on the basis of diameters of the simulated pulmonary autograft root, also indicated that the distensibility of the autograft valve was limited. It reached a maximum at 30 mm Hg (4 kPa) without any suggestion of further distension to the point of distortion and incompetence. The combination of the calculated forces acting on the valve and the biomechanical measurements have shown that pulmonary valves used as autograft aortic valve replacements are able to tolerate aortic pressures from the time of implantation. These experimental results from simulated autografts support the clinical use of this valve over the past 13 years. PMID:7135295

  9. Transfemoral Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) in a Patient With Previous Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR).

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Frame, Angela; Nathan, Anthony W; Ariff, Ben; Jaffer, Usman; Sutaria, Nilesh; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Mikhail, Ghada W; Malik, Iqbal S

    2016-07-01

    A 90-year-old man presented with increasing exertional breathlessness. He had previous implantation of a Perimount bioprosthetic aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Due to severe transvalvular bioprosthetic regurgitation with preserved left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction, the heart team decided on valve-in- valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the transfemoral route in view of the patient's prohibitively high surgical and anesthetic risk. The patient had an uncomplicated recovery and was symptomatically much improved at 3-month follow-up. PMID:27342209

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI): a review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Hughes, G; Roobottom, C

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) has transformed the care provided for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The uptake of this procedure is increasing rapidly, and clinicians from all disciplines are likely to increasingly encounter patients being assessed for or having undergone this intervention. Successful TAVI heavily relies on careful and comprehensive imaging assessment, before, during and after the procedure, using a range of modalities. This review outlines the background and development of TAVI, describes the nature of the procedure and considers the contribution of imaging techniques, both to successful intervention and to potential complications. PMID:24258463

  11. [Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves].

    PubMed

    Chain, Sergio; Luciardi, Hector; Feldman, Gabriela; Berman, Sofia; Estrella, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Nocardia endocarditis in native valve is an uncommon infection that usually arises in immunodepressed patients. We report a 51-year-old man diagnosed as having Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves, which received antimicrobial therapy and required aortic valve replacement. In 6 month follow up the patient remained asymptomatic with good clinical evolution. PMID:17628917

  12. Imaging and minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Loor, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging has been the most important tool allowing for innovation in cardiac surgery. There are now a variety of approaches available for treating aortic valve disease, including standard sternotomy, minimally invasive surgery, and percutaneous valve replacement. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery relies on maximizing exposure within a limited field of view. The complexity of this approach is increased as the relationship between the great vessels and the bony thorax varies between individuals. Ultimately, the success of minimally invasive surgery depends on appropriate choices regarding the type and location of the incision, cannulation approach, and cardioprotection strategy. These decisions are facilitated by preoperative imaging, which forms the focus of this review. PMID:25694979

  13. Early Outcomes of Sutureless Aortic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Hanedan, Muhammet Onur; Mataracı, İlker; Yürük, Mehmet Ali; Özer, Tanıl; Sayar, Ufuk; Arslan, Ali Kemal; Ziyrek, Uğur; Yücel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Background In elderly high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR) should be an alternative to standard AVR. The potential advantages of sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time and facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, while maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low rates of paravalvular leakage. The current study reports our single-center experience regarding the early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation. Methods Between October 2012 and June 2015, 65 patients scheduled for surgical valve replacement with symptomatic aortic valve disease and New York Heart Association function of class II or higher were included to this study. Perceval S (Sorin Biomedica Cardio Srl, Sallugia, Italy) and Edwards Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) valves were used. Results The mean age of the patients was 71.15±8.60 years. Forty-four patients (67.7%) were female. The average preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 56.9±9.93. The CPB time was 96.51±41.27 minutes and the cross-clamping time was 60.85±27.08 minutes. The intubation time was 8.95±4.19 hours, and the intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.89±1.42 days and 7.86±1.42 days, respectively. The mean quantity of drainage from chest tubes was 407.69±149.28 mL. The hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. A total of five patients (7.69%) died during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 687.24±24.76 days. The one-year survival rate was over 90%. Conclusion In the last few years, several models of valvular sutureless bioprostheses have been developed. The present study evaluating the single-center early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation presents the results of an innovative surgical technique, finding that it resulted in appropriate hemodynamic conditions with acceptable ischemic time. PMID:27298793

  14. Absent Aortic Valve in DiGeorge Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Elizabeth C; Minturn, Lucy; Gotteiner, Nina L; Ernst, Linda M

    2016-01-01

    A 20-week-old fetus with the 22q11.2 deletion characteristic of DiGeorge syndrome is described with vertebral segmentation abnormalities and complex cardiovascular anomalies including an absent aortic valve. This is only the second known case of absent aortic valve in association with DiGeorge syndrome. We discuss the association of absent aortic valve with other conotruncal defects and the utility of fetal echocardiography in the diagnosis of DiGeorge syndrome. PMID:26230226

  15. Thrombocytosis following splenectomy and aortic valve replacement for idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura with bicuspid aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Sarika; Ganjsinghani, Payal Kamlesh; Jain, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP) patients are at high risk for complications during and after cardiac surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass. The main clinical problem of primary ITP is an increased risk of bleeding although bleeding may not always be present. More recently, thrombosis has become appreciated as another potential complication of the procedure. We report a 22-year-old female patient with ITP with bicuspid aortic valve and splenomegaly, who underwent uncomplicated aortic valve replacement and splenectomy simultaneously. She was readmitted with chest pain due to coronary thrombosis following splenectomy which made the management difficult. We describe our experience in managing this patient who presented with thrombotic complication rather than bleeding in post-operative period and the challenges met in maintaining appropriate anticoagulation for aortic valve replacement as well as thrombosis, post-splenectomy PMID:26379295

  16. Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years there have been experimental efforts at catheter-based management of aortic valve regurgitation with the idea of extending treatment to nonsurgical candidates. A new catheter-based aortic valve design is described.Methods: The new catheter-delivered valve consists of a stent-based valve cage with locking mechanism and a prosthetic flexible tilting valve disc. The valve cage is delivered first followed by deployment and locking of the disc. In acute experiments, valve implantation was done in four dogs.Results: Valve implantation was successful in all four animals. The implanted valve functioned well for the duration of the experiments (up to 3 hr).Conclusion: The study showed the implantation feasibility and short-term function of the tested catheter-based aortic disc valve. Further experimental studies are warranted.

  17. Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation: the new playground for prosthesis-patient mismatch.

    PubMed

    Faerber, Gloria; Schleger, Simone; Diab, Mahmoud; Breuer, Martin; Figulla, Hans R; Eichinger, Walter B; Doenst, Torsten

    2014-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established procedure for patients with aortic valve stenosis and significant comorbidities. One option offered by this technique is the implantation of a transcatheter valve inside a surgically implanted bioprosthesis. Many reports address the feasibility but also the pitfalls of these valve-in-valve (VIV) procedures. Review articles provide tables listing which valve sizes are appropriate based on the size of the initially implanted bioprosthesis. However, we previously argued that the hemodynamic performance of a prosthetic tissue valve is in large part a result of the dimensions of the bioprosthesis in relation to the patient's aortic outflow dimensions. Thus, the decision if a VIV TAVI procedure is likely to be associated with a favorable hemodynamic result cannot safely be made by looking at premade sizing tables that do not include patient dimensions and do not inquire about the primary cause for bioprosthetic valve stenosis. Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may therefore be more frequent than expected after conventional aortic valve replacement. Importantly, it may be masked by a potentially flawed method assessing its relevance. Such PPM may therefore impact significantly on hemodynamic outcome after VIV TAVI. Fifteen percent of currently published VIV procedures show only a minimal reduction of pressure gradients. We will address potential pitfalls in the current determination of PPM, outline the missing links for reliable determination of PPM, and present a simplified algorithm to guide decision making for VIV TAVI. PMID:24612128

  18. Echocardiographic detection of subvalvar aortic root aneurysm extending to mitral valve annulus as complication of aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, B E; Petch, M C; English, T A

    1982-01-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation as a consequence of infective endocarditis developed in a young man after peritonitis. A large subvalvar aortic root aneurysm extending to the mitral valve annulus together with features of severe acute aortic regurgitation were shown by M-mode echocardiography. The echocardiographic findings were confirmed at operation when obliteration of the aneurysmal space and aortic valve replacement were performed. Postoperative echocardiography confirmed obliteration of the aneurysmal space. Images PMID:6895998

  19. [Use of sutureless prosthetic aortic valves in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Santarpino, Giuseppe; Fischlein, Theodor

    2014-03-01

    In the last years, an increasing proportion of high-risk patients undergo surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the risk associated with cross-clamp time or cardioplegic ischemic time, sutureless aortic prostheses have been developed. These bioprosthetic valves are not hand sewn, and this technological advance translates into reduced implantation times, thus improving outcome of patients referred for aortic valve replacement. At present, three sutureless bioprostheses are available on the market: 3f Enable (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA), Perceval (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy) and Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California, USA). This article provides an overview of the available literature on sutureless aortic valves with the aim to better define current role and future perspectives of sutureless aortic bioprostheses for the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:24770430

  20. Transluminal aortic valve placement. A feasibility study with a newly designed collapsible aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Moazami, N; Bessler, M; Argenziano, M; Choudhri, A F; Cabreriza, S E; Allendorf, J D; Rose, E A; Oz, M C

    1996-01-01

    Percutaneous stents are used in vascular applications in conjunction with angioplasty and in combination with graft material for repair of abdominal aneurysms. The authors have designed a collapsible bioprosthetic aortic valve for placement by a transluminal catheter technique. This trileaflet stent valve is composed of stainless steel and bovine pericardium. Stent valves, 23 and 29 mm, were tested in a pulse duplicator system with rigid rings from 21 to 31 mm in 2 mm increments. At a mean flow of 3.1 L/min (+/-0.7), normal systemic aortic pressure was generated with a transvalvular gradient of 14.9 +/- 7 mmHg (mean +/- SD). Regurgitation fraction ranged from 10 to 18% (mean 13.8 +/- 3%) in the best ring size. Valves with the best hemodynamic profile were used for implantation in three 70 kg pigs in an open chest model. The valve was collapsed in a 24 Fr catheter designed to allow slow, controlled release. After resection of the native leaflets, the new valve was placed in the subcoronary position. No additional sutures were used for securing the valve. Two animals were successfully weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass and maintained systemic pressures of 100/45 (+/-10) and 116/70 (+/-15) mmHg, respectively. Intraoperative color echocardiography revealed minimal regurgitation, central flow, full apposition of all leaflets, and no interference with coronary blood flow. Both animals were sacrificed after being off bypass for 2 hr. Postmortem examination revealed the valves to be securely anchored. The third animal was weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass but developed refractory ventricular fibrillation because of valve dislodgment due to structural failure. Although long term survival data are needed, development of a hemodynamically acceptable prosthetic aortic valve for transluminal placement is feasible. PMID:8944912

  1. Prognostic value of the ratio between prosthesis area and indexed annulus area measured by MultiSlice-CT for transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures

    PubMed Central

    Debry, Nicolas; Sudre, Arnaud; Elquodeimat, Ibrahim; Delhaye, Cédric; Schurtz, Guillaume; Bical, Antoine; Koussa, Mohamad; Fattouch, Khalil; Modine, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Postprocedural aortic regurgitations following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures remain an issue. Benefit of oversizing strategies to prevent them isn't well established. We compared different level of oversizing in our cohort of consecutive patients to address if severe oversizing compared to normal sizing had an impact on post-procedural outcomes. Methods From January 2010 to August 2013, consecutive patients were referred for TAVI with preoperative Multislice-CT (MSCT) and the procedures were achieved using Edwards Sapien® or Corevalve devices®. Retrospectively, according to pre-procedural MSCT and the valve size, patients were classified into three groups: normal, moderate and severe oversizing; depending on the ratio between the prosthesis area and the annulus area indexed and measured on MSCT. Main endpoint was mid-term mortality and secondary endpoints were the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) endpoints. Results Two hundred and sixty eight patients had a MSCT and underwent TAVI procedure, with mainly Corevalve®. While all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates were similar in all groups, post-procedural new pacemaker (PM) implantation rate was significantly higher in the severe oversizing group (P = 0.03), while we observed more in-hospital congestive heart-failure (P = 0.02) in the normal sizing group. There was a trend toward more moderate to severe aortic regurgitation (AR) in the normal sizing group (P = 0.07). Conclusions Despite a higher rate of PM implantation, oversizing based on this ratio reduces aortic leak with lower rates of post-procedural complications and a similar mid-term survival. PMID:27582762

  2. Mathematical modeling of aortic valve dynamics during systole.

    PubMed

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Savic, Dragana; Campbell, Stuart G

    2015-01-21

    We have derived a mathematical model describing aortic valve dynamics and blood flow during systole. The model presents a realistic coupling between aortic valve dynamics, sinus vortex local pressure, and variations in the systemic vascular resistance. The coupling is introduced by using Hill׳s classical semi-spherical vortex model and an aortic pressure-area compliance constitutive relationship. The effects of introducing aortic sinus eddy vortices and variable systemic vascular resistance on overall valve opening-closing dynamics, left ventricular pressure, aortic pressure, blood flow rate, and aortic orifice area are examined. In addition, the strength of the sinus vortex is coupled explicitly to the valve opening angle, and implicitly to the aortic orifice area in order to predict how vortex strength varies during the four descriptive phases of aortic valve motion (fast-opening, fully-opening, slow-closing, and fast-closing). Our results compare favorably with experimental observations and the model reproduces well-known phenomena corresponding to aortic valve function such as the dicrotic notch and retrograde flow at end systole. By invoking a more complete set of physical phenomena, this new model will enable representation of pathophysiological conditions such as aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, making it possible to predict their integrated effects on cardiac load and systemic hemodynamics. PMID:25451522

  3. Molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Hakuno, Daihiko; Kimura, Naritaka; Yoshioka, Masatoyo; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    Morbidity from degenerative aortic valve disease is increasing worldwide, concomitant with the ageing of the general population and the habitual consumption of diets high in calories and cholesterol. Immunohistologic studies have suggested that the molecular mechanism occurring in the degenerate aortic valve resembles that of atherosclerosis, prompting the testing of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) for the prevention of progression of native and bioprosthetic aortic valve degeneration. However, the effects of these therapies remain controversial. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of aortic valve degeneration are largely unknown, research in this area is advancing rapidly. The signaling components involved in embryonic valvulogenesis, such as Wnt, TGF-beta(1), BMP, and Notch, are also involved in the onset of aortic valve degeneration. Furthermore, investigations into extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, and osteogenesis in the aortic valve have been reported. Having noted avascularity of normal cardiac valves, we recently identified chondromodulin-I (chm-I) as a crucial anti-angiogenic factor. The expression of chm-I is restricted to cardiac valves from late embryogenesis to adulthood in the mouse, rat, and human. In human degenerate atherosclerotic valves, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases and angiogenesis is observed in the area of chm-I downregulation. Gene targeting of chm-I resulted in VEGF expression, angiogenesis, and calcification in the aortic valves of aged mice, and aortic stenosis is detected by echocardiography, indicating that chm-I is a crucial factor for maintaining normal cardiac valvular function by preventing angiogenesis. The present review focuses on the animal models of aortic valve degeneration and recent studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease. PMID:18766323

  4. Valve Replacement with a Sutureless Aortic Prosthesis in a Patient with Concomitant Mitral Valve Disease and Severe Aortic Root Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Scafuri, Antonio; Nicolò, Francesca; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement with concomitant mitral valve surgery in the presence of severe aortic root calcification is technically difficult, with long cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times. We performed sutureless aortic valve replacement and mitral valve annuloplasty in a 68-year-old man who had severe aortic stenosis and moderate-to-severe mitral regurgitation. Intraoperatively, we found severe calcification of the aortic root. We approached the aortic valve through a transverse aortotomy, performed in a higher position than usual, and we replaced the valve with a Sorin Perceval S sutureless prosthesis. In addition, we performed mitral annuloplasty with use of an open rigid ring. The aortic cross-clamp time was 63 minutes, and the cardiopulmonary bypass time was 83 minutes. No paravalvular leakage of the aortic prosthesis was detected 30 days postoperatively. Our case shows that the Perceval S sutureless bioprosthesis can be safely implanted in patients with aortic root calcification, even when mitral valve disease needs surgical correction. PMID:27127442

  5. Mechanics of the pulmonary valve in the aortic position.

    PubMed

    Soares, A L F; van Geemen, D; van den Bogaerdt, A J; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models can provide valuable information to assess and evaluate the mechanical behavior and remodeling of native tissue. A relevant example when studying collagen remodeling is the Ross procedure because it involves placing the pulmonary autograft in the more demanding aortic valve mechanical environment. The objective of this study was therefore to assess and evaluate the mechanical differences between the aortic valve and pulmonary valve and the remodeling that may occur in the pulmonary valve when placed in the aortic position. The results from biaxial tensile tests of pairs of human aortic and pulmonary valves were compared and used to determine the parameters of a structurally based constitutive model. Finite element analyzes were then performed to simulate the mechanical response of both valves to the aortic diastolic load. Additionally, remodeling laws were applied to assess the remodeling of the pulmonary valve leaflet to the new environment. The pulmonary valve showed to be more extensible and less anisotropic than the aortic valve. When exposed to aortic pressure, the pulmonary leaflet appeared to remodel by increasing its thickness and reorganizing its collagen fibers, rotating them toward the circumferential direction. PMID:24035437

  6. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  7. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Navin C; Kapur, K K; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  8. Mitral and aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Sorysz, Danuta; Kochman, Janusz; Jastrzębski, Jan; Kukulski, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the impact of postprocedural mitral regurgitation (MR), in an interaction with aortic regurgitation (AR), on mortality following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods To assess the interaction between MR and AR, we compared the survival rate of patients (i) without both significant MR and AR versus (ii) those with either significant MR or significant AR versus (iii) with significant MR and AR, all postprocedure. 381 participants of the Polish Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Registry (166 males (43.6%) and 215 females (56.4%), age 78.8±7.4 years) were analysed. Follow-up was 94.1±96.5 days. Results Inhospital and midterm mortality were 6.6% and 10.2%, respectively. Significant MR and AR were present in 16% and 8.1% patients, including 3.1% patients with both significant MR and AR. Patients with significant versus insignificant AR differed with respect to mortality (log rank p=0.009). This difference was not apparent in a subgroup of patients without significant MR (log rank p=0.80). In a subgroup of patients without significant AR, there were no significant differences in mortality between individuals with versus without significant MR (log rank p=0.44). Significant MR and AR had a significant impact on mortality only when associated with each other (log rank p<0.0001). At multivariate Cox regression modelling concomitant significant MR and AR were independently associated with mortality (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.54 to 5.71, p=0.002). Conclusions Significant MR or AR postprocedure, when isolated, had no impact on survival. Combined MR and AR had a significant impact on a patient's prognosis. PMID:26908096

  9. Aortic valve surgery: what is the future?

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis

    2008-04-01

    Modern surgical treatment for aortic valve disease has undergone significant improvements in all areas of this procedure. Successful treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases have often been initiated and driven by surgeons. Radical excision of diseased tissue, repair and replacement strategies lead to long-term successful treatment of the underlying diseases and clearly improved patient outcome. In highly developed nations, valve surgery will be increasing applied in older people, with more co-morbidities and a higher incidence of concomitant coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular surgeons will be facing increased competition from the catheter-based procedures; these are already applied clinically, and their numbers will rise in near future. Right now interventional cardiologists supported by some cardiac surgeons are on their way to transform some conventional open surgical procedures into catheter-based less invasive interventions, such as valve repair and replacement. Cardiovascular surgery is undergoing a rapid transformation; socio-economic factors and recent advances in medical technology contribute to these changes. Further developments will come, and surgeons with all their expertise in the treatment of valvular heart disease need to be part of it. Cardiovascular surgeons have to adapt the exciting new approaches of transapical and transfemoral transcatheter valve implantation techniques. PMID:17573248

  10. Turbulence downstream of subcoronary stentless and stented aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Funder, Jonas Amstrup; Frost, Markus Winther; Wierup, Per; Klaaborg, Kaj-Erik; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael

    2011-08-11

    Regions of turbulence downstream of bioprosthetic heart valves may cause damage to blood components, vessel wall as well as to aortic valve leaflets. Stentless aortic heart valves are known to posses several hemodynamic benefits such as larger effective orifice areas, lower aortic transvalvular pressure difference and faster left ventricular mass regression compared with their stented counterpart. Whether this is reflected by diminished turbulence formation, remains to be shown. We implanted either stented pericardial valve prostheses (Mitroflow), stentless valve prostheses (Solo or Toronto SPV) in pigs or they preserved their native valves. Following surgery, blood velocity was measured in the cross sectional area downstream of the valves using 10MHz ultrasonic probes connected to a dedicated pulsed Doppler equipment. As a measure of turbulence, Reynolds normal stress (RNS) was calculated at two different blood pressures (baseline and 50% increase). We found no difference in maximum RNS measurements between any of the investigated valve groups. The native valve had significantly lower mean RNS values than the Mitroflow (p=0.004), Toronto SPV (p=0.008) and Solo valve (p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences between the artificial valve groups (p=0.3). The mean RNS was significantly larger when increasing blood pressure (p=0.0006). We, thus, found no advantages for the stentless aortic valves compared with stented prosthesis in terms of lower maximum or mean RNS values. Native valves have a significantly lower mean RNS value than all investigated bioprostheses. PMID:21696741

  11. Determinants of image quality of rotational angiography for on-line assessment of frame geometry after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Olivares, Ramón; El Faquir, Nahid; Rahhab, Zouhair; Maugenest, Anne-Marie; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Schultz, Carl; Lauritsch, Guenter; de Jaegere, Peter P T

    2016-07-01

    To study the determinants of image quality of rotational angiography using dedicated research prototype software for motion compensation without rapid ventricular pacing after the implantation of four commercially available catheter-based valves. Prospective observational study including 179 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with either the Medtronic CoreValve (MCS), Edward-SAPIEN Valve (ESV), Boston Sadra Lotus (BSL) or Saint-Jude Portico Valve (SJP) in whom rotational angiography (R-angio) with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction was performed. Image quality was evaluated from grade 1 (excellent image quality) to grade 5 (strongly degraded). Distinction was made between good (grades 1, 2) and poor image quality (grades 3-5). Clinical (gender, body mass index, Agatston score, heart rate and rhythm, artifacts), procedural (valve type) and technical variables (isocentricity) were related with the image quality assessment. Image quality was good in 128 (72 %) and poor in 51 (28 %) patients. By univariable analysis only valve type (BSL) and the presence of an artefact negatively affected image quality. By multivariate analysis (in which BMI was forced into the model) BSL valve (Odds 3.5, 95 % CI [1.3-9.6], p = 0.02), presence of an artifact (Odds 2.5, 95 % CI [1.2-5.4], p = 0.02) and BMI (Odds 1.1, 95 % CI [1.0-1.2], p = 0.04) were independent predictors of poor image quality. Rotational angiography with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction using a dedicated research prototype software offers good image quality for the evaluation of frame geometry after TAVI in the majority of patients. Valve type, presence of artifacts and higher BMI negatively affect image quality. PMID:27139459

  12. Futility, Benefit, and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Alexander, Karen P.; O'Gara, Patrick T.; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a transformative innovation that provides treatment for high or prohibitive surgical risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) who were previously either not referred for or denied operative intervention. Trials have demonstrated improvements in survival and symptoms after TAVR compared to medical therapy, however there remains a sizable group of patients who die or lack improvement in quality of life soon after TAVR. This raises important questions about the need to identify and acknowledge the possibility of futility in some patients considered for TAVR. In this very elderly population, a number of factors in addition to traditional risk stratification need to be considered including multimorbidity, disability, frailty, and cognition in order to assess the anticipated benefit of TAVR. Consideration by a multidisciplinary heart valve team with broad areas of expertise is critical for assessing likely benefit from TAVR. Moreover, these complicated decisions should take place with clear communication around desired health outcomes on behalf of the patient and provider. The decision that treatment with TAVR is futile should include alternative plans to optimize the patient's health state or, in some cases, discussions related to end of life care. We review issues to be considered when making and communicating these difficult decisions. PMID:24954571

  13. [Vasoplegic Syndrome after Aortic Valve Replacement].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kazuto; Shigematsu, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of vasoplegic syndrome (VS) after aortic valve replacement in a 65 year old male with aortic stenosis. The patient developed hypotension after separation from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Transesophageal echocardiography revealed well-maintained cardiac function and normal prosthetic valve function. However, his cardiac index was 3.0 l x min(-1) x m(-2) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) was 1100 dynes x sec(-1) x cm(-5) x m(-2). Diagnosing VS, norepinephrine administration was commenced. Since his respiratory status was good, the patient was extubated on the day of surgery. Two days after surgery, catecholamines were discontinued with the stabilization of his circulatory status. However, his respiratory status showed gradual deterioration, and he was re-intubated. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pleural effusion, which was treated by drainage and fluid restriction. With this, his oxygenation improved and he could be extubated 5 days after surgery. Vasoplegic syndrome is a potentially life-threatening complication following cardiac surgery. Hypotension at the time of separation from CPB can be due to multiple factors. Despite an incidence rate of 10%, little is known about VS. We hope that, in future, tailored therapeutic protocols for VS will be developed. PMID:27004393

  14. Aortic valve patch closure: an alternative to replacement with HeartMate LVAS insertion.

    PubMed

    Savage, E B; d'Amato, T A; Magovern, J A

    1999-09-01

    A PTFE patch sewn to the aortic valve and annulus, to occlude the ventriculoaortic junction is used to successfully correct aortic insufficiency with HeartMate (LVAS) insertion. This represents an inexpensive alternative to aortic valve replacement for aortic insufficiency or the presence of a mechanical aortic valve. PMID:10554859

  15. Rapidly progressive aortic valve incompetence in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, J P; Douglas-Jones, A G; Pritchard, M H

    1991-10-01

    A 27-year-old female with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis of onset at age 18 years developed progressive aortic valve incompetence requiring urgent aortic valve replacement. Rheumatoid aortic valve disease may be more rapidly progressive than aortic valve disease from other causes and awareness of this by the monitoring physicians may help to avoid the possible complications. PMID:1913010

  16. What is the best approach in a patient with a failed aortic bioprosthetic valve: transcatheter aortic valve replacement or redo aortic valve replacement?

    PubMed

    Tourmousoglou, Christos; Rao, Vivek; Lalos, Spiros; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve replacement (viv-TAVR) or redo aortic valve replacement (rAVR) is the best strategy in a patient with a degenerative bioprosthetic aortic valve. Altogether, 162 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date, country of publication, patient group, study type, outcomes and results of papers are tabulated. The results of the studies provided interesting results. All the studies are retrospective. Four papers reported the results of redo aortic valve replacement in patients with failed aortic bioprosthetic valve, six papers demonstrated their results with transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve replacement for the same indication and two papers reported their propensity-matched analysis of outcomes between viv-TAVR and rAVR in patients with previous cardiac surgery. Thirty-day mortality for rAVR was 2.3-15.5% and 0-17% for viv-TAVR. For rAVR, survival rate at 30 days was 83.6%, 76.1% at 1 year, 70.8% at 3 years, at 51.3-66% at 5 years, 61% at 8 years and 61.5% at 10 years. For viv-TAVR, the overall Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 1 year was 83.2%. After viv-TAVR at 1 year, 86.2% of surviving patients were at New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I/II. The complications after rAVR were stroke (4.6-5.8%), reoperation for bleeding (6.9-9.7%), low-cardiac output syndrome (9.9%) whereas complications after viv-TAVR at 30 days were major stroke (1.7%), aortic regurgitation of at least moderate degree (25%), new permanent pacemaker implantation rate (0-11%), ostial coronary obstruction (2%), need for implantation of a second device (5.7%) and major vascular complications (9.2%). It is noteworthy to mention that there is a valve-in-valve application that provides information to surgeons for choosing the correct size of the TAVR valve

  17. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Byung Kwon; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Joon Bum

    2016-01-01

    Background Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV) and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years) who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29). Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12), pseudoaneurysm (n=1), or dissection (n=6) of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%), native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%), structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%), and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%). There were 3 early deaths (4.5%). During follow-up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months), there were 14 late deaths (21.2%), and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients. PMID:27525233

  18. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W L; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R; de Mol, Bas A J M

    2016-08-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred after the aneurysm perforated. The patient showed no signs of heart failure and completed a 6-week regimen of antibiotic therapy before undergoing successful aortic and mitral valve replacement. In addition to the patient's case, we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:27547149

  19. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wilson W.L.; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R.; de Mol, Bas A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred after the aneurysm perforated. The patient showed no signs of heart failure and completed a 6-week regimen of antibiotic therapy before undergoing successful aortic and mitral valve replacement. In addition to the patient's case, we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:27547149

  20. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  1. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a treatment option in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Sutaria, Nilesh; Ariff, Ben; Fertleman, Michael; Malik, Iqbal; Mikhail, Ghada W

    2015-05-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the commonest encountered valvular pathology and a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in cases of severe stenosis. Definitive treatment has traditionally been offered in the form of surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with an acceptable surgical risk and more recently with the less invasive transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in those where surgery is not a viable option. Prior to the introduction of TAVI, inoperable patients were treated medically and where appropriate with balloon aortic valvuloplasty, a procedure which although effective only provided short-term relief and was associated with high complication rates especially during its infancy. Here we discuss whether balloon aortic valvuloplasty continues to have a role in contemporary clinical practice in an era where significant advances have been achieved in the fields of surgical aortic valve replacement, TAVI and postoperative care. PMID:25865236

  2. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels. PMID:27246132

  3. Successful treatment of pure aortic insufficiency with transapical implantation of the JenaValve.

    PubMed

    Bleiziffer, Sabine; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Ried, Thomas; Lange, Rüdiger

    2013-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was predominantly developed for patients with severe calcified aortic stenosis, as most devices are designed to anchor within the native valve calcium. We report on a patient with pure insufficiency of a non-calcified aortic valve, in whom an anatomically oriented catheter valve was implanted successfully. The design of the prosthesis with position feelers engaging the native aortic valve leaflets proved to be suitable for the treatment of pure aortic insufficiency. PMID:23344750

  4. Minimally Invasive Versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rizwan Q.; Hickey, Graeme L.; Grant, Stuart W.; Bridgewater, Ben; Roxburgh, James C.; Kumar, Pankaj; Ridley, Paul; Bhabra, Moninder; Millner, Russell W. J.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Casula, Roberto; Chukwuemka, Andrew; Pillay, Thasee; Young, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has been demonstrated as a safe and effective option but remains underused. We aimed to evaluate outcomes of isolated MIAVR compared with conventional aortic valve replacement (CAVR). Methods Data from The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) were analyzed at seven volunteer centers (2006–2012). Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and midterm survival. Secondary outcomes were postoperative length of stay as well as cumulative bypass and cross-clamp times. Propensity modeling with matched cohort analysis was used. Results Of 307 consecutive MIAVR patients, 151 (49%) were performed during the last 2 years of study with a continued increase in numbers. The 307 MIAVR patients were matched on a 1:1 ratio. In the matched CAVR group, there was no statistically significant difference in in-hospital mortality [MIAVR, 4/307,(1.3%); 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%–3.4% vs CAVR, 6/307 (2.0%); 95% CI, 0.8%–4.3%; P = 0.752]. One-year survival rates in the MIAVR and CAVR groups were 94.4% and 94.6%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in midterm survival (P = 0.677; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.56–1.46). Median postoperative length of stay was lower in the MIAVR patients by 1 day (P = 0.009). The mean cumulative bypass time (94.8 vs 91.3 minutes; P = 0.333) and cross-clamp time (74.6 vs 68.4 minutes; P = 0.006) were longer in the MIAVR group; however, this was significant only in the cross-clamp time comparison. Conclusions Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a safe alternative to CAVR with respect to operative and 1-year mortality and is associated with a shorter postoperative stay. Further studies are required in high-risk (logistic EuroSCORE > 10) patients to define the role of MIAVR. PMID:26926521

  5. Bilateral ostial coronary stenosis and rheumatic aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Alexeyi; Weich, Hellmuth; Doubell, Anton; Moolman, Johannes A

    2006-01-01

    A 49-year-old patient presented with angina pectoris and clinical findings of aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation. Rheumatic aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation was diagnosed on echocardiography. Coronary angiography findings showed severe calcification in the aorta root with right coronary ostial occlusion, and were suggestive of left main ostial stenosis and proximal main stem stenosis, which was confirmed on CT angiography. Curvilinear calcification of the aorta was present on CT angiography. The findings suggested syphilitic aortitis. Syphilis serology was positive (RPR titre 1/16). The angina was caused by severe coronary ostial disease likely due to syphilitic aortitis and exacerbated by the rheumatic aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation. PMID:16885079

  6. Aortic regurgitation caused by rupture of the abnormal fibrous band between the aortic valve and aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Yamada, Akitoshi; Sato, Masanobu

    2011-07-01

    This report documents the sudden onset of aortic regurgitation (AR) by an exceptional cause. A 68-year-old woman suddenly experienced general fatigue, and AR was diagnosed. One year later, we performed aortic valve replacement. At surgery, three aortic cusps with a larger noncoronary cusp had prolapsed along with a free-floating fibrous band that had previously anchored the cusp to the aortic wall. Its rupture had induced the sudden onset of AR. There was no sign of infectious endocarditis. We performed successful aortic valve replacement. PMID:21751110

  7. Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis Treated With the Repositionable and Retrievable Lotus Valve.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Julia; Gonska, Birgid; Rodewald, Christoph; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis is a well-established and safe therapeutic option. However, data on TAVI in bicuspid aortic valve stenosis are limited and show a higher rate of moderate-severe aortic regurgitation compared with TAVI for tricuspid aortic valve stenosis. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, the use of the mechanically deployed Lotus valve in bicuspid aortic stenosis. In our patient who had severe bicuspid aortic stenosis and was at high surgical risk, the implantation of the repositionable and completely retrievable Lotus valve was a safe and controlled procedure resulting in no relevant aortic regurgitation. PMID:26604121

  8. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy may reduce the risk of complications secondary to NOAF. PMID:25589700

  9. Techniques of autologous pericardial leaflet replacement for aortic valve reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rankin, J Scott; Nöbauer, Christian; Crooke, Philip S; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger; Mazzitelli, Domenico

    2014-08-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed autologous pericardium rarely calcifies or retracts, and it is a useful substitute for cardiac valve leaflets. Current understanding of aortic valve geometry provides good models for aortic leaflet design, and pericardial leaflet construction is illustrated in this article for bicuspid and tri-leaflet valves. Outcomes have been characterized by low valve-related complication rates, and results of recent series are encouraging. Perhaps sufficient data are available to consider autologous pericardial leaflet replacement in highly selected younger patients with irreparable leaflets and contraindications to warfarin. PMID:25087813

  10. Pathological Investigation of Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis, Compared with Atherosclerotic Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis and Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Hamatani, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (CBAV) is the main cause of aortic stenosis (AS) in young adults. However, the histopathological features of AS in patients with CBAV have not been fully investigated. Methods and Results We examined specimens of aortic valve leaflets obtained from patients who had undergone aortic valve re/placement at our institution for severe AS with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AS group), severe AS with tricuspid aortic valve (n = 24, TAV-AS group), and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AR group). We compared the histopathological features among the three groups. Pathological features were classified using semi-quantitative methods (graded on a scale 0 to 3) by experienced pathologists without knowledge of the patients’ backgrounds. The severity of inflammation, neovascularization, and calcium and cholesterol deposition did not differ between the CBAV-AS and TAV-AS groups, and these four parameters were less marked in the CBAV-AR group than in the CBAV-AS (all p<0.01). Meanwhile, the grade of valvular fibrosis was greater in the CBAV-AS group, compared with the TAV-AS and CBAV-AR groups (both p<0.01). In AS patients, thickness of fibrotic lesions was greater on the aortic side than on the ventricular side (both p<0.01). Meanwhile, thickness of fibrotic lesions was comparable between the aortic and ventricular sides in CBAV-AR patients (p = 0.35). Conclusions Valvular fibrosis, especially on the aortic side, was greater in patients with CBAV-AS than in those without, suggesting a difference in the pathogenesis of AS between CBAV and TAV. PMID:27479126

  11. Percutaneous transluminal alcohol septal myocardial ablation after aortic valve replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitges, M.; Kapadia, S.; Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.; Tuzcu, M. E.; Lever, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    When left ventricular outflow tract obstruction develops after aortic valve replacement, few treatment choices have been available until now. We present a patient with prior aortic valve replacement who developed left ventricle outflow tract obstruction that was successfully treated with a percutaneous transcoronary myocardial septal alcohol ablation. This technique is a useful tool for the treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, especially in those patients with prior heart surgery. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. "Killer coronary artery" and aortic valve stenosis: A tricky case.

    PubMed

    Nader, Joseph; Labont, Béatris Alina; Houpe, David; Caus, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery from the right coronary sinus is rarely diagnosed in elderly patients. We report such an anomaly in a 75-year-old lady presenting with chest pain and syncope. Preoperative screening revealed that her aortic valve was moderately stenotic. The patient underwent a successful unroofing procedure combined with aortic valve replacement. The outcome was uncomplicated and the patient remained asymptomatic at one year postoperatively. PMID:24787552

  13. [The research progress of transcatheter aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Maobo; Shi, Xinli; Jia, Jianxiong; Miao, Jingjing; Liu, Wei; Nie, Feilong

    2014-09-01

    During the past years transcatheter aortic valve replacement has evolved to a promising technique for the treatment of the patients who suffered from severe aortic stenosis, the progress and basic consideration on clinical study have been summarized in the article. PMID:25597083

  14. Shape-based diagnosis of the aortic valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Tsymbal, Alexey; Vitanovski, Dime; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, S. Kevin; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-02-01

    Disorders of the aortic valve represent a common cardiovascular disease and an important public-health problem worldwide. Pathological valves are currently determined from 2D images through elaborate qualitative evalu- ations and complex measurements, potentially inaccurate and tedious to acquire. This paper presents a novel diagnostic method, which identies diseased valves based on 3D geometrical models constructed from volumetric data. A parametric model, which includes relevant anatomic landmarks as well as the aortic root and lea ets, represents the morphology of the aortic valve. Recently developed robust segmentation methods are applied to estimate the patient specic model parameters from end-diastolic cardiac CT volumes. A discriminative distance function, learned from equivalence constraints in the product space of shape coordinates, determines the corresponding pathology class based on the shape information encoded by the model. Experiments on a heterogeneous set of 63 patients aected by various diseases demonstrated the performance of our method with 94% correctly classied valves.

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in the Elderly: Who to Refer?

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Matthew; Green, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation has led to improved outcomes in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who may not have previously been considered for intervention. These patients are often frail with significant comorbid conditions. As the prevalence of AS increases, there is a need for improved assessment parameters to determine the patients most likely to benefit from this novel procedure. This review discusses the diagnostic criteria for severe AS and the trials available to aid in the decision to refer for aortic valve procedures in the elderly. PMID:25216621

  16. Simultaneous surgery of the aortic valve and sternal osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Urbanski, Paul P; Lindemann, Yvonne; Babin-Ebell, Jörg; Fröhner, Steffen; Diegeler, Anno

    2009-09-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred for aortic valve replacement due to severe stenosis. He also suffered chronic sternal osteomyelitis with skin fistula subsequent to radiation therapy. Both pathologies were approached simultaneously by sternal resection, omental plasty, and valve replacement, which led to favorable primary and mid-term result. PMID:19699936

  17. Relation of Aortic Valve Morphologic Characteristics to Aortic Valve Insufficiency and Residual Stenosis in Children With Congenital Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Balloon Valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Petit, Christopher J; Gao, Kevin; Goldstein, Bryan H; Lang, Sean M; Gillespie, Scott E; Kim, Sung-In H; Sachdeva, Ritu

    2016-03-15

    Aortic valve morphology has been invoked as intrinsic to outcomes of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) for congenital aortic valve stenosis. We sought to use aortic valve morphologic features to discriminate between valves that respond favorably or unfavorably to BAV, using aortic insufficiency (AI) as the primary outcome. All patients who underwent BAV at 2 large-volume pediatric centers from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. Morphologic features assessed on pre-BAV echo included valve pattern (unicuspid, functional bicuspid, and true bicuspid), leaflet fusion length, leaflet excursion angle, and aortic valve opening area and on post-BAV echo included leaflet versus commissural tear. Primary end point was increase in AI (AI+) of ≥2°. Eighty-nine patients (median age 0.2 years) were included in the study (39 unicuspid, 41 functional bicuspid, and 9 true bicuspid valves). Unicuspid valves had a lower opening area (p <0.01) and greater fusion length (p = 0.01) compared with functional and true bicuspid valves. Valve gradient pre-BAV and post-BAV were not different among valve patterns. Of the 16 patients (18%) with AI+, 14 had leaflet tears (odds ratio 13.9, 3.8 to 50). True bicuspid valves had the highest rate (33%) of AI+. On multivariate analysis, leaflet tears were associated with AI+, with larger opening area pre-BAV and lower fusion length pre-BAV. AI+ was associated with larger pre-BAV opening area. Gradient relief was associated with reduced angle of excursion. Valve morphology influences outcomes after BAV. Valves with lesser fusion and larger valve openings have higher rates of leaflet tears which in turn are associated with AI. PMID:26805657

  18. Intracardiac echocardiography to diagnose pannus formation after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Ohara, Takahiro; Funada, Akira; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A 66-year-old female, under regular follow-up for 20 years after aortic valve replacement (19-mm Carbomedics), presented dyspnea on effort and hypotension during hemodialysis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed elevation of transvalvular velocity up to 4 m/s, but the structure around the aortic prosthesis was difficult to observe due to artifacts. Fluoroscopy revealed normal motion of the leaflets of the mechanical valve. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) revealed a pannus-like structure in the left ventricular outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiogram also revealed this structure. ICE can visualize structural abnormalities around a prosthetic valve after cardiac surgery even in patients in whom conventional imaging modalities failed. PMID:26732266

  19. Transcatheter Aortic and Mitral Valve Implantation (TAMVI) in Native Rheumatic Valves.

    PubMed

    Akujuo, Adanna C; Dellis, Sophia L; Britton, Lewis W; Bennett, Edward V

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old female with moderate to severe aortic stenosis and severe mitral stenosis, deemed too high risk for surgery (STS mortality risk = 12.3%) with a porcelain aorta, was successfully treated with a transcatheter aortic and mitral valve implantation (TAMVI) via a transapical approach. A 23 mm Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was placed in the aortic position and a 29 mm inverted Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences) in the mitral position. PMID:26347492

  20. Delayed Chylous Pericardial Effusion after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Vishal; Savage, Edward B.; Novaro, Gian M.; Asher, Craig R.

    2011-01-01

    Chylopericardium after cardiac surgery is rare, and there are few reports of its occurrence after aortic valve surgery. Chylous pericardial effusion 4 months after aortic valve replacement for endocarditis is highly unusual. Herein, we report the case of a 54-year-old man who had undergone bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement because of endocarditis and valvular dysfunction. Two months later, he underwent pericardiocentesis twice because of large pericardial effusions consisting of pinkish white fluid with predominant lymphocytes. Four months after valve replacement, he presented with recurrent effusion consistent with early tamponade, and a pericardial window was created. At surgery, 1,500 cc of milky white fluid was recovered, and the diagnosis of chylopericardium was made. Postoperative high-volume drainage prompted thoracic duct ligation, which was curative. PMID:21841877

  1. [Heart valves after 22 years - good long-term function of aortic homograft, advanced impairment in function of atrioventricular valves].

    PubMed

    Michalski, Błazej; Chrzanowski, Lukasz; Krzemińska-Pakula, Maria; Kasprzak, Jarosław D

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old female patient with a history of aortic valve replacement, who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms and signs of decompensated heart failure (NYHA class III). Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed mitral valve and tricuspid valve regurgitation (III grade) with normal function of aortic valve homograft implanted 22 years ago. The patient underwent cardiosurgical mitral valve replacement and tricuspid valve annuloplasty with very good result. An aortic valve homograft may be the best alternative to a mechanical valves for a young female patients. PMID:20411462

  2. One-year results of health-related quality of life among patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Krane, Markus; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Piazza, Nicolo; Muhtarova, Teodora; Elhmidi, Yacine; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Voss, Bernhard; Ruge, Hendrik; Badiu, Catalin C; Kornek, Matthias; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Lange, Rüdiger

    2012-06-15

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can result in significant improvement in patients' quality of life (QOL) in the short term. At present, however, little is known about the long-term improvements in QOL after TAVI. Thus, our aim was to prospectively assess the 1-year QOL outcome of patients undergoing TAVI. We performed a prospective analysis of 186 patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis ineligible for conventional aortic valve replacement, who underwent TAVI with either the Medtronic CoreValve or Edwards Sapien device. A total of 106 patients completed the 1-year follow-up protocol. The QOL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey questionnaire at baseline and at 3 months and 1 year of follow-up. At 1 year of follow-up, significant improvements in the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey questionnaire scores for physical functioning (baseline 34.6 ± 2.3 vs 1 year of follow-up 45.6 ± 2.7; p <0.001), role physical (20 ± 3.0 vs 34.2 ± 4.4; p <0.001), bodily pain (59.9 ± 3 vs 70 ± 2.7; p <0.01), general health (47.3 ± 1.5 vs 55.2 ± 2.1, p <0.001), vitality (35.9 ± 2 vs 48.5 ± 2; p <0.001), and mental health (62.2 ± 2.2 vs 67.3 ± 1.8; p <0.05) were observed compared to baseline. No significant improvement could be detected for social functioning (75.4 ± 2.5 vs 76.5 ± 2.6; p = 0.79) and role emotional (61.1 ± 4.3 vs 66.5 ± 4.7; p = 0.29). At 1 year of follow-up, the various physical and mental scores were comparable to an age-matched standard population. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated that TAVI can improve the QOL status of high-surgical risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis that can be maintained for ≤1 year postproceduraly in survivors. Although the mental subscales improved slightly, the mental component summary score failed to reach statistical significance in our study population. PMID:22520622

  3. Impact of Pulmonary Hypertension on Outcomes Following Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Melby, Spencer J.; Moon, Marc R.; Lindman, Brian R.; Bailey, Marci S.; Hill, Laureen L.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The presence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) historically has been considered a significant risk factor affecting early and late outcomes following valve replacement. Given the number of recent advances in the management of PH following cardiac surgery a better understanding of the impact of PH on outcomes may assist in the clinical management of these patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if pulmonary hypertension remains a risk factor in the modern era for adverse outcomes following aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic valve stenosis. Methods From January 1996 to June 2009, 1,080 patients underwent AVR for primary aortic valve stenosis, of which 574 (53%) had normal systolic pulmonary artery pressures (sPAP) and 506 (47%) had PH. PH was defined as mild (sPAP 35-44 mmHg), moderate (45-59mmHg), or severe (≥ 60mmHg). In the group of patients with PH, 204 had postoperative echocardiograms. Results Operative mortality was significantly higher in patients with PH (47/506, 9% versus 31/574, 5%; p=0.02). The incidence of postoperative stroke was similar (p=0.14), but patients with PH had an increased median hospital LOS (8 versus 7 days, p=0.001) and an increased incidence of prolonged ventilation (26% versus 17%, p<0.001). Preoperative PH was an independent risk factor for decreased long term survival (RR 1.7, p=0.02). Those with persistent PH postoperatively had decreased survival. Five-year survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 78 ± 6% with normal sPAP and 77 ± 7% with mild PH postoperatively, compared to 64 ± 8% with moderate PH and 45 ± 12% with severe PH (p<0.001). Conclusion In patients undergoing AVR, preoperative PH increased operative mortality and decreased long-term survival. Patients with persistent moderate or severe PH after AVR had decreased long-term survival. These data suggest that PH had a significant impact on outcomes in patients undergoing AVR and should be considered in preoperative risk assessment. PMID:21596173

  4. Decision-making in aortic valve replacement: bileaflet mechanical valves versus stented bioprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Takkenberg, J.J.M.; Puvimanasinghe, J.P.A.; van Herwerden, L.A.; Eijkemans, M.J.C.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Habbema, J.D.F.; Bogers, A.J.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Background Valve prosthesis selection for patients who require aortic valve replacement is dependent on several interrelated factors. Often, more than one valve type seems suitable for the individual patient and selection of a valve type may be difficult. Methods The application of an evidence-based microsimulation model as an objective tool to support the choice between a bileaflet mechanical prosthesis and a stented bioprosthesis in the individual patient is described. In addition, a pilot study investigating the effect of knowledge gained by this microsimulation model on prosthetic valve choice by cardiothoracic surgeons and cardiologists is presented for two hypothetical patients. Results After implantation of a mechanical valve, bleeding and thromboembolism are common, especially in the elderly. After implantation of a bioprosthesis, reoperation for structural failure is the most important valve-related complication, especially in younger patients. Life expectancy after aortic valve replacement is markedly reduced compared with the general Dutch age-matched population, regardless of the type of valve implanted. In the pilot study knowledge gained by the microsimulation model caused a shift in the preference towards a mechanical prosthesis in clinical experts. Conclusion Microsimulation incorporating current epidemiological data provides an objective tool to estimate prognosis for individual patients after aortic valve replacement with different valve prostheses. It may develop towards a useful clinical decision support system for valve prosthesis selection. ImagesFigure 6 PMID:25696138

  5. Left Main Coronary Artery Obstruction by Dislodged Native-Valve Calculus after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Tahir; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement. PMID:25120396

  6. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  7. Deformation of Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Systole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kai; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2012-11-01

    Clinical studies have shown that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs and the associate changes in flow shear stresses and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both BAVs and TAVs by tracking the 3-D motion of small dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet experiences an almost 30% increase in the radial stretching when fully open. RNA profiling of human aortic valve interstitial cells exposed to cyclic stretch shows that the increased stretch experienced by the BAVs results in increased levels of INTERLEUKINS (ILs) and other known inflammatory markers associated with aortic valve calcification. Together, these observations suggest that the abnormal stretch experienced by BAVs activates inflammation gene expression.

  8. Robotic System for Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement with MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our work on developing a robotic surgical system for transapical beating heart aortic valve replacement (AVR) under interactive real-time magnetic resonance imaging (rtMRI) guidance. Our system integrates a real-time MRI system, a compound MRI robot, as well as an interface for the surgeon to plan the procedure and manipulate the robot. The compound robot consists of a positioning module and a valve delivery module. A 5-DOF Inno-motion positioning arm provides and maintains direct access to the native aortic valve. A newly developed 3-DOF robotic valve delivery module allows the surgeon to remotely control bioprosthetic valve delivery with MRI guidance. Preliminary evaluation of the parameters of the robotic system demonstrates it can provide sufficient capability to successfully assist the surgeon. PMID:18982639

  9. Complete Aortic Valve Cusp Replacement in the Pediatric Population Using Tissue-Engineered Bovine Pericardium.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Rankin, J Scott; Vogt, Manfred; Lange, Rüdiger; Schreiber, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Three clinical cases of severe pediatric aortic valve defects undergoing complete aortic valve cusp replacement using tissue-engineered bovine pericardium are reported. All patients achieved excellent early results, and are being followed without complications. PMID:26522549

  10. Aortic Valve Reconstruction with Use of Pericardial Leaflets in Adults with Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease: Early and Midterm Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Meong Gun; Yang, Hyun Suk; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of adults with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease who underwent aortic valve reconstructive surgery (AVRS), consisting of replacement of the diseased BAV with 2 or 3 pericardial leaflets plus fixation of the sinotubular junction for accurate and constant leaflet coaptation. From December 2007 through April 2013, 135 consecutive patients (mean age, 49.2 ± 13.1 yr; 73.3% men) with symptomatic BAV disease underwent AVRS. Raphe was observed in 84 patients (62.2%), and the remaining 51 patients had pure BAV without raphe. A total of 122 patients (90.4%) underwent 3-leaflet reconstruction, and 13 (9.6%) underwent 2-leaflet reconstruction. Concomitant aortic wrapping with an artificial graft was performed in 63 patients (46.7%). There were no in-hospital deaths and 2 late deaths (1.5%); 6 patients (4.4%) needed valve-related reoperation. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 98% ± 1.5%, and freedom from valve-related reoperation at 5 years was 92.7% ± 3.6%. In the last available echocardiograms, aortic regurgitation was absent or trivial in 116 patients (85.9%), mild in 16 (11.9%), moderate in 2 (1.5%), and severe in one (0.7%). The mean aortic valve gradient was 10.2 ± 4.5 mmHg, and the mean aortic valve orifice area index was 1.3 ± 0.3 cm2/m2. The 3-leaflet technique resulted in lower valve gradients and greater valve areas than did the 2-leaflet technique. Thus, in patients with BAV, AVRS yielded satisfactory early and midterm results with low mortality rates and low reoperation risk after the initial procedure. PMID:25593520

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve-in-Valve Replacement Instead of a 4th Sternotomy in a 21-Year-Old Woman with Aortic Homograft Failure

    PubMed Central

    Díez, José G.; Schechter, Michael; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Preventza, Ourania

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a well-established method for replacing native aortic valves; however, it was conceived for elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis, and the lack of data on long-term durability has led practitioners to restrict the use of TAVR to patients who have short life expectancies. Here, we describe the case of a 21-year-old woman who had undergone 3 previous open aortic valve replacements and who presented with symptoms of recurrent valvular failure. Transthoracic echocardiograms and computed tomographic angiograms revealed a degenerating aortic root homograft with substantial calcification, moderate-to-severe aortic valve stenosis, and severe aortic valve regurgitation. Open surgical valve replacement posed substantial risk to our patient, so we decided to perform valve-in-valve TAVR with use of the Edwards Sapien XT Transcatheter Heart Valve. The patient's pulmonary artery pressure, valvular regurgitation, and symptoms improved substantially thereafter. We found that valve-in-valve TAVR into a failing aortic root homograft was less invasive than repeat surgical valve replacement in this young patient who had congenital vascular anomalies and a complex surgical history. PMID:27547146

  12. Role of Echocardiography Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Badiani, Sveeta; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Lloyd, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common primary valve disorder in the elderly with an increasing prevalence; transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) in the high risk or inoperable patient. Appropriate selection of patients for TAVI is crucial and requires a multidisciplinary approach including cardiothoracic surgeons, interventional cardiologists, anaesthetists, imaging experts and specialist nurses. Multimodality imaging including echocardiography, CT and MRI plays a pivotal role in the selection and planning process; however, echocardiography remains the primary imaging modality used for patient selection, intra-procedural guidance, post-procedural assessment and long-term follow-up. The contribution that contemporary transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography make to the selection and planning of TAVI is described in this article. PMID:26960423

  13. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models. PMID:23125924

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: from fantasy to reality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Increased life expectancy has led to the presentation of more complicated patients in old age for the replacement of the aortic valve. The emergence of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) was considered as a significant breakthrough in the management of symptomatic, moribund patients suffering from aortic valve stenosis who had been rejected for surgical intervention. A novel technology often has a long journey from the point at which it is created to its every-day-use. It is now obvious that TAVI practice in multiple institutes around the world has gone beyond the evidence. Serious concerns have been raised questioning the current TAVI practice. Analysis of future TAVI use may assist clinicians and healthcare managers to understand and deploy this technology in accordance with the evidence. PMID:24602509

  15. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis—Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wöhrle, Jochen; Gonska, Birgid; Rodewald, Christoph; Seeger, Julia; Scharnbeck, Dominik; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aims The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California) system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications. Methods and Results 235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77), 26mm (N = 91) or 29mm (N = 67) valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6%) and stroke (2.1%) were low. Conclusions In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069 PMID:27003573

  16. Hemolytic anemia with aortic stenosis resolved by urgent aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Isamu; Matsuo, Tatsuro; Sasayama, Koji; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Hideo

    2008-08-01

    A 78-year-old man with aortic stenosis complained of dark colored urine followed by recurrent chest pain and syncopal episodes. Echocardiography showed severely calcified aortic stenosis with the maximal pressure gradient of 125 mm Hg. Hemoglobin was 7.9 g/dL, lactate dehydrogenase was 2,295 IU/L, haptoglobin was less than 10 mg/dL, reticulocyte count was elevated, and Coombs' test was negative. We performed an urgent aortic valve replacement. After the surgery, the patient's urine became clear and his chest pain and syncope abated. All laboratory data returned to normal physiological values. In conclusion, the observed hemolysis was related to the aortic shear stress of a calcified aortic valve. PMID:18640351

  17. Pioneering transcatheter aortic valve Implant (Inovare®) via transfemoral.

    PubMed

    Pontes, José Carlos Dorsa Vieira; Duarte, João Jackson; Silva, Augusto Daige da; Dias, Amaury Mont'Serrat Ávila Souza; Benfatti, Ricardo Adala; Gardenal, Neimar; Benfatti, Amanda Ferreira Carli; Gomes, Jandir Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    We present a patient with severe aortic valvular bioprosthesis dysfunction implanted for 11 years, presenting with acute pulmonary edema due to severe valvular insufficiency with severe systolic dysfunction (EF <30%) and comorbid conditions that amounted operative risk (STS score > 10). We carried out the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (Inovare® - Braile Biomedica), which was implemented successfully by transfemoral access and good patient outcomes. PMID:23288191

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for failing surgical aortic bioprosthetic valve: from concept to clinical application and evaluation (part 1).

    PubMed

    Piazza, Nicolo; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Brockmann, Gernot; Hendrick, Ruge; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Opitz, Anke; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Tassani-Prell, Peter; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2011-07-01

    With an aging population, improvement in life expectancy, and significant increase in the use of bioprosthetic valves, structural valve deterioration will become more and more prevalent. The operative mortality for an elective redo aortic valve surgery is reported to range from 2% to 7%, but this percentage can increase to more than 30% in high-risk and nonelective patients. Because transcatheter aortic valve (TAV)-in-surgical aortic valve (SAV) implantation represents a minimally invasive alternative to conventional redo surgery, it may prove to be safer and just as effective as redo surgery. Of course, prospective comparisons with a large number of patients and long-term follow-up are required to confirm these potential advantages. It is axiomatic that knowledge of the basic construction and dimensions, radiographic identification, and potential failure modes of SAV bioprostheses is fundamental in understanding key principles involved in TAV-in-SAV implantation. The goals of this paper are: 1) to review the classification, physical characteristics, and potential failure modes of surgical bioprosthetic aortic valves; and 2) to discuss patient selection and procedural techniques relevant to TAV-in-SAV implantation. PMID:21777879

  19. Bartonella henselae aortic valve endocarditis mimicking systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Laurence S G; Hart, Hamish H; Soh, May Ching; Christiansen, Jonathan P; Bhally, Hasan; Philips, Martin S; Rai-Chaudhuri, Dominic S

    2010-01-01

    A 28-year-old man with a bicuspid aortic valve presented with facial droop and slurred speech with several months of constitutional symptoms of night sweats, weight loss and productive cough. Examination confirmed aortic regurgitation, palpable spleen and left facial droop. Multiple peripheral blood cultures were negative. Inflammatory markers, cytoplasmic staining antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (cANCA) and anti-PR3 antibody were all elevated. MRI of the brain and CT of the chest and abdomen confirmed embolic infarcts to brain, kidney and spleen. Transoesophageal echocardiogram (ECG) showed valve vegetations and severe aortic regurgitation. Endocardial Wegener's granulomatosis was considered. Aortic valve replacement was performed. Grindings from aortic valve leaflets were analysed for rpoB gene, which confirmed the presence of Bartonella henselae. Serological assays demonstrated B henselae IgM 20 (normal <20) and IgG >2048 (normal < 64). The patient completely recovered after prolonged antibiotic treatment. Culture-negative infective endocarditis may mimic vasculitis and be associated with positive cANCA. Serology and molecular techniques may aid diagnosis. PMID:22791485

  20. Right infraaxillary thoracotomy for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Hoshino, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yasunari

    2013-08-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement has been performed via partial sternotomy, the parasternal approach, and anterior intercostal approaches. We successfully performed aortic valve replacement through a small right infraaxillary thoracotomy in 25 patients, with the aid of a thoracoscope and a knot-pusher. The patients were 9 men and 16 women with a mean age of 72.6 years. Our approach had better cosmetic results than traditional approaches through the anterior chest wall. This method did not require rib transection or sacrifice of the internal thoracic artery. PMID:23910127

  1. Aortic valve endocarditis due to abiotrophia defectiva: a rare etiology.

    PubMed

    Yerebakan, Can; Westphal, Bernd; Skrabal, Christian; Kaminski, Alexander; Ugurlucan, Murat; Bomke, Anne-Kathrin; Liebold, Andreas; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2008-01-01

    Abiotrophia defectiva is a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Besides an association with often negative blood cultures and difficult treatment, high rates of relapse and higher mortality than endocarditis caused by other viridans streptococci are known features of this entity. We report on the surgical and medical management of the aortic valve endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva in a 19-year-old patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient to have Down syndrome and Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis requiring aortic valve replacement. PMID:18421556

  2. Posttranscatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Ventricular Septal Defect During Transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Aaron; Hoaglan, Carli; Helman, James

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is gaining favor as a treatment for aortic stenosis in patients at high risk for the open surgical approach. The following is a report of a 95-year-old woman with severe aortic stenosis who presented for TAVR with an Edwards SAPIEN valve. Her medical history included pacemaker-dependent complete heart block and a recent episode of congestive heart failure secondary to a non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. The TAVR was performed successfully through an open left femoral artery approach, and the patient was found to have a new perimembranous ventricular septal defect identified postoperatively. PMID:27243581

  3. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Daniel Alejandro; Prasad, Sai; Alotti, Nasri

    2016-01-01

    Calcification occurs in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and In the aortic valve. Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a slow, progressive disorder that ranges from mild valve thickening without obstruction of blood flow, termed aortic sclerosis, to severe calcification with impaired leaflet motion, termed aortic stenosis. In the past, this process was thought to be ‘degenerative’ because of time-dependent wear and tear of the leaflets, with passive calcium deposition. The presence of osteoblasts in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and in CAVD implies that calcification is an active, regulated process akin to atherosclerosis, with lipoprotein deposition and chronic inflammation. If calcification is active, via pro-osteogenic pathways, one might expect that development and progression of calcification could be inhibited. The overlap in the clinical factors associated with calcific valve disease and atherosclerosis provides further support for a shared disease mechanism. In our recent research we used an in vitro porcine valve interstitial cell model to study spontaneous calcification and potential promoters and inhibitors. Using this model, we found that denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand may, at a working concentration of 50 μg/mL, inhibit induced calcium deposition to basal levels.

  4. Left main coronary artery occlusion after percutaneous aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Bartorelli, Antonio L; Andreini, Daniele; Sisillo, Erminio; Tamborini, Gloria; Fusari, Melissa; Biglioli, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Left main coronary artery occlusion occurred immediately after transfemoral aortic valve implantation in an 87-year-old woman, which resulted in ventricular fibrillation and hemodynamic collapse. This life-threatening complication was promptly diagnosed with transesophageal echocardiography, which showed the disappearance of diastolic left main coronary artery jet flow and was confirmed with aortic root angiography. After prompt defibrillation, hemodynamic support was obtained with intra-aortic balloon pump and inotropic drugs. Functional recovery and survival were achieved with coronary stenting. This report highlights the importance of an integrated team approach of highly skilled specialists for these novel interventions. PMID:20172163

  5. Uncommon acquired Gerbode defect following extensive bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gerbode defect is a rare type of left ventricle to right atrium shunt. It is usually congenital in origin, but acquired cases are also described, mainly following infective endocarditis, valve replacement, trauma or acute myocardial infarction. We report a case of a 50-year-old man who suffered an extensive and complex infective endocarditis involving a bicuspid aortic valve, the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa and the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. After dual valve replacement and annular reconstruction, a shunt between the left ventricle and the right atrium - Gerbode defect, and a severe leak of the mitral prosthesis were detected. Reintervention was performed with successful shunt closure with an autologous pericardial patch and paravalvular leak correction. No major complications occurred denying the immediate post-surgery period and the follow-up at the first year was uneventful. PMID:22360824

  6. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Argiriou, Michalis; Argiriou, Orestis; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography. PMID:26750695

  7. Replacement of a Dislocated Aortic Prosthesis After Transcatheter Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Mandegar, Mohammad Hossein; Moradi, Bahieh; Roshanali, Farideh

    2016-06-01

    A 77-year-old woman who had severe symptomatic aortic stenosis and was a high risk for conventional surgery underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation by means of the transfemoral approach. The prosthesis migrated and became embolized in the left ventricle after inflation, causing interference with the mitral valve and also partial outflow tract obstruction. The patient was emergently transferred to the operating room. Vertical aortotomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass, and the calcified native leaflets were removed. The migrated Edwards SAPIEN XT valve was extracted and subsequently successfully sewn into the annulus after examination for leaflet and stent competence. The hemodynamic performance of the implanted valve was surprisingly more favorable than that of the conventional tissue prosthesis. PMID:27211978

  8. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf.

    PubMed

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Argiriou, Michalis; Argiriou, Orestis; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography. PMID:26750695

  9. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. PMID:25295408

  10. Biomechanical factors in the biology of aortic wall and aortic valve diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bäck, Magnus; Gasser, T. Christian; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Caligiuri, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    The biomechanical factors that result from the haemodynamic load on the cardiovascular system are a common denominator of several vascular pathologies. Thickening and calcification of the aortic valve will lead to reduced opening and the development of left ventricular outflow obstruction, referred to as aortic valve stenosis. The most common pathology of the aorta is the formation of an aneurysm, morphologically defined as a progressive dilatation of a vessel segment by more than 50% of its normal diameter. The aortic valve is exposed to both haemodynamic forces and structural leaflet deformation as it opens and closes with each heartbeat to assure unidirectional flow from the left ventricle to the aorta. The arterial pressure is translated into tension-dominated mechanical wall stress in the aorta. In addition, stress and strain are related through the aortic stiffness. Furthermore, blood flow over the valvular and vascular endothelial layer induces wall shear stress. Several pathophysiological processes of aortic valve stenosis and aortic aneurysms, such as macromolecule transport, gene expression alterations, cell death pathways, calcification, inflammation, and neoangiogenesis directly depend on biomechanical factors. PMID:23459103

  11. Coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection: the role of 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Das, K M; Abdou, Sayed M; El-Menyar, Ayman; Ayman, El Menyar; Khulaifi, A A; Nabti, A L

    2008-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection is described. 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was able to demonstrate both this findings along with involvement of other neck vessels. TEE demonstrated the severity and mechanisms of aortic valve damage and assisted the surgeon in valve repair. MDCT has played an invaluable role in the diagnosis of the abnormal details of such life-threatening vascular complications. PMID:18384568

  12. Salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Prior to "Bridge" Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Fearon, William F; Raleigh, Lindsay A; Burdon, Grayson; Rao, Vidya; Boyd, Jack H; Yeung, Alan C; Miller, David Craig; Fischbein, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    We describe a patient who presented in profound cardiogenic shock due to bioprosthetic aortic valve stenosis requiring salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation followed by a "bridge" valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12750 (J Card Surg 2016;31:403-405). PMID:27109017

  13. [Pannus Formation Two Years after Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Implantation;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Ono, Kimiyo; Kuroda, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of early deterioration of the bioprosthetic aortic valve 23 months postoperatively. A 77-year-old man who had undergone aortic valve replacement with a 23-mm Epic valve( St. Jude Medical [SJM])presented to us after a syncopal episode. Echocardiography revealed severe aortic stenosis, and redo aortic valve replacement with a 21-mm SJM mechanical valve was performed. All 3 cusps of the tissue valve were thickened by fibrous pannus overgrowth. Neither calcification nor invasion of inflammatory cells was observed. The cause of pannus formation at such an early stage after implantation remains unknown. PMID:26329714

  14. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  15. [Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: An Introduction and Patient Care].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ju; Wang, Shiao-Pei

    2015-06-01

    Aortic stenosis has a high prevalence among individuals over 75 years of age. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a novel valve-replacement technique for patients with multiple chronic diseases who are at high risk of requiring aortic valve replacement surgery. Most of the time, the indicators of TAVI are detected during an echocardiographic exam. The femoral artery is the primary insertion site. The complications of TAVI include stroke, vascular dissection, bleeding, aortic valve regurgitation, and arrhythmia. In terms of clinical effectiveness, the mortality rate of TAVI is lower than percutaneous ballon valvuloplasty but similar to AVR. The unplanned cardiac-related re-admission rate within 30 days of discharge is lower for TAVI than for AVR. In terms of activity tolerance, TAVI is significantly better than both percutaneous ballon valvuloplasty and AVR. Comprehensive nursing care may reduce the incidence of complications associated with TAVI. Nursing care of TAVI includes explaining and providing instructions regarding TAVI prior to the procedure. After the TAVI procedure and while the patient is in the ICU, remove the endotracheal tube as soon as possible, monitor his / her neuro-cognitive status, monitor for early detection of a stroke event, record urine output to assess renal function, observe bleeding in the puncture site, and evaluate cardiac arrhythmia and pain. While in the general ward, resume early physical activities and educate the patient regarding the risks and the prevention of bleeding. This article provides references for clinical staff responsible to care for post-TAVI surgery patients. PMID:26073960

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Freidoon; MacCarthy, Philip

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is one of the most significant technological advances in cardiovascular medicine. It offers a safe alternative in high risk cardiac patients with proven durability, economical viability and survival advantage. Current trials may expand its application in intermediate or low risk groups. PMID:26961440

  17. Quadricuspid aortic valves in Syrian hamsters and their formation according to current knowledge on valvulogenesis.

    PubMed

    López-García, Alejandro; Carmen Fernández, M; Durán, Ana Carmen; Sans-Coma, Valentín; Fernández, Borja

    2015-02-01

    Occurrence of quadricuspid aortic valves has been reported in humans, in nine dogs and in a greater white-toothed shrew. Moreover, two cases of developing aortic valves with four anticipated leaflets have been described in Syrian hamster embryos. Currently, however, no case of quadricuspid aortic valve in adult hamsters has been recorded. The aim here is to present four adults of this rodent species, two of them with unequivocally quadricuspid aortic valves and the other two with quadricuspid-like aortic valves. The four anomalous aortic valves were detected among 4,190 Syrian hamsters examined in our laboratory, representing an incidence of 0.09%. None of the affected hamsters showed apparent signs of disease. The present findings are considered on the light of current empirical knowledge about the morphogenesis of quadricuspid and bicuspid aortic and pulmonary valves. Quadricuspid aortic valves result from the partition of one of the normal mesenchymal cushions which normally give rise to normal (tricuspid) valves, while quadricuspid-like valves might be the product of a combined mechanism of fusion and partition of the cushions at the onset of the valvulogenesis. The presence of aortic valves with four leaflets in ancient mammalian lineages such as insectivors and rodents suggest that quadricuspid aortic valves, although showing almost certainly a low incidence, may be widespread among the different groups of mammals, including domestic animals. PMID:25854086

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: a Kidney’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Kashani, Kianoush

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has now emerged as a viable treatment option for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are not suitable candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Despite encouraging published outcomes, acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and lowers the survival of patients after TAVR. The pathogenesis of AKI after TAVR is multifactorial including TAVR specific factors such as the use of contrast agents, hypotension during rapid pacing, and embolization; preventive measures may include pre-procedural hydration, limitation of contrast dye exposure, and avoidance of intraprocedural hypotension. In recent years, the number of TAVR performed worldwide has been increasing, as well as published data on renal perspectives of TAVR including AKI, chronic kidney disease, end-stage kidney disease, and kidney transplantation. This review aims to present the current literature on the nephrology aspects of TAVR, ultimately to improve the patients’ quality of care and outcomes. PMID:27069960

  19. COX2 Inhibition Reduces Aortic Valve Calcification In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wirrig, Elaine E.; Gomez, M. Victoria; Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, which affects approximately 1% of the US population and is characterized by calcific nodule formation and stenosis of the valve. Klotho-deficient mice were used to study the molecular mechanisms of CAVD as they develop robust aortic valve (AoV) calcification. Through microarray analysis of AoV tissues from klotho-deficient and wild type mice, increased expression of the gene encoding cyclooxygenase 2/COX2 (Ptgs2) was found. COX2 activity contributes to bone differentiation and homeostasis, thus the contribution of COX2 activity to AoV calcification was assessed. Approach and Results In klotho-deficient mice, COX2 expression is increased throughout regions of valve calcification and is induced in the valvular interstitial cells (VICs) prior to calcification formation. Similarly, COX2 expression is increased in human diseased AoVs. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic VICs with osteogenic media induces bone marker gene expression and calcification in vitro, which is blocked by inhibition of COX2 activity. In vivo, genetic loss of function of COX2 cyclooxygenase activity partially rescues AoV calcification in klotho-deficient mice. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of COX2 activity in klotho-deficient mice via celecoxib-containing diet reduces AoV calcification and blocks osteogenic gene expression. Conclusions COX2 expression is upregulated in CAVD and its activity contributes to osteogenic gene induction and valve calcification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25722432

  20. Successful repair of aortic annulus rupture during transcatheter aortic valve replacement using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support.

    PubMed

    Negi, Smita I; Patel, Jay; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor

    2015-09-01

    Aortic annular rupture is a rare and much dreaded complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Device oversizing to prevent post-procedural paravalvular leak is the most commonly identified cause of this complication. However, mechanical stress in a heavily calcified non-compliant vessel can also lead to annular rupture in this older population. We describe a case of aortic annular rupture with involvement of right coronary artery ostium leading to cardiac tamponade and cardiac arrest, successfully managed by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support, open drainage of the pericardial space, pericardial patching of the defect and bypass of the affected vessel with excellent post-procedural results. PMID:23990118

  1. Performance of Surgical Risk Scores to Predict Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Leonardo Sinnott; Caramori, Paulo Ricardo Avancini; Nunes Filho, Antonio Carlos Bacelar; Katz, Marcelo; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; Lemos, Pedro; Lima, Valter; Abizaid, Alexandre; Tarasoutchi, Flavio; de Brito Jr, Fabio S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Predicting mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains a challenge. Objectives To evaluate the performance of 5 risk scores for cardiac surgery in predicting the 30-day mortality among patients of the Brazilian Registry of TAVI. Methods The Brazilian Multicenter Registry prospectively enrolled 418 patients undergoing TAVI in 18 centers between 2008 and 2013. The 30-day mortality risk was calculated using the following surgical scores: the logistic EuroSCORE I (ESI), EuroSCORE II (ESII), Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score, Ambler score (AS) and Guaragna score (GS). The performance of the risk scores was evaluated in terms of their calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow test) and discrimination [area under the receiver–operating characteristic curve (AUC)]. Results The mean age was 81.5 ± 7.7 years. The CoreValve (Medtronic) was used in 86.1% of the cohort, and the transfemoral approach was used in 96.2%. The observed 30-day mortality was 9.1%. The 30-day mortality predicted by the scores was as follows: ESI, 20.2 ± 13.8%; ESII, 6.5 ± 13.8%; STS score, 14.7 ± 4.4%; AS, 7.0 ± 3.8%; GS, 17.3 ± 10.8%. Using AUC, none of the tested scores could accurately predict the 30-day mortality. AUC for the scores was as follows: 0.58 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49 to 0.68, p = 0.09] for ESI; 0.54 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.64, p = 0.42) for ESII; 0.57 (95% CI: 0.47 to 0.67, p = 0.16) for AS; 0.48 (95% IC: 0.38 to 0.57, p = 0.68) for STS score; and 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42 to 0.62, p = 0.64) for GS. The Hosmer–Lemeshow test indicated acceptable calibration for all scores (p > 0.05). Conclusions In this real world Brazilian registry, the surgical risk scores were inaccurate in predicting mortality after TAVI. Risk models specifically developed for TAVI are required. PMID:26247244

  2. Deep Crater in Heavily Calcified Aortic Valve Leaflet: A "Smoking Gun" for Embolic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sarah Chaoying; Canter, Lisa; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John A

    2015-10-01

    The association of severe calcific aortic stenosis with clinically significant stroke has not been well established. This case vividly describes the relationship with clinical and pathological (gross and microscopic) findings in a 62-year-old man with a severely calcified bicuspid aortic valve. Eleven months prior to aortic valve surgery, the patient had stigmata of cerebral embolic events in the absence of any other embolic source. During the aortic valve replacement surgery for aortic stenosis, he was found to have a large atheroma on the aortic valve cusp with a crater containing friable debris in its center. These findings support the potential for embolic stroke in patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. We recommend that the aortic valve be considered as an embolic source in patients with an otherwise cryptogenic cerebrovascular accident. PMID:27175368

  3. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation versus reoperative conventional aortic valve replacement: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Zhao, Dong-Fang; Wang, Nelson; Huo, Ya Ruth; Di Eusanio, Marco; Yan, Tristan D

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation for degenerated aortic bioprostheses has emerged as a promising alternative to redo conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR). However there are concerns surrounding the efficacy and safety of VIV. This systematic review aims to compare the outcomes and safety of transcatheter VIV implantation with redoes cAVR. Six databases were systematically searched. A total of 18 relevant studies (823 patients) were included. Pooled analysis demonstrated VIV achieved significant improvements in mean gradient (38 mmHg preoperatively to 15.2 mmHg postoperatively, P<0.001) and peak gradient (59.2 to 23.2 mmHg, P=0.0003). These improvements were similar to the outcomes achieved by cAVR. The incidence of moderate paravalvular leaks (PVL) were significantly higher for VIV compared to cAVR (3.3% vs. 0.4%, P=0.022). In terms of morbidity, VIV had a significantly lower incidence of stroke and bleeding compared to redo cAVR (1.9% vs. 8.8%, P=0.002 & 6.9% vs. 9.1%, P=0.014, respectively). Perioperative mortality rates were similar for VIV (7.9%) and redo cAVR (6.1%, P=0.35). In conclusion, transcatheter VIV implantation achieves similar haemodynamic outcomes, with lower risk of strokes and bleeding but higher PVL rates compared to redo cAVR. Future randomized studies and prospective registries are essential to compare the effectiveness of transcatheter VIV with cAVR, and clarify the rates of PVLs. PMID:26904259

  4. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation versus reoperative conventional aortic valve replacement: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Fang; Wang, Nelson; Huo, Ya Ruth; Di Eusanio, Marco; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation for degenerated aortic bioprostheses has emerged as a promising alternative to redo conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR). However there are concerns surrounding the efficacy and safety of VIV. This systematic review aims to compare the outcomes and safety of transcatheter VIV implantation with redoes cAVR. Six databases were systematically searched. A total of 18 relevant studies (823 patients) were included. Pooled analysis demonstrated VIV achieved significant improvements in mean gradient (38 mmHg preoperatively to 15.2 mmHg postoperatively, P<0.001) and peak gradient (59.2 to 23.2 mmHg, P=0.0003). These improvements were similar to the outcomes achieved by cAVR. The incidence of moderate paravalvular leaks (PVL) were significantly higher for VIV compared to cAVR (3.3% vs. 0.4%, P=0.022). In terms of morbidity, VIV had a significantly lower incidence of stroke and bleeding compared to redo cAVR (1.9% vs. 8.8%, P=0.002 & 6.9% vs. 9.1%, P=0.014, respectively). Perioperative mortality rates were similar for VIV (7.9%) and redo cAVR (6.1%, P=0.35). In conclusion, transcatheter VIV implantation achieves similar haemodynamic outcomes, with lower risk of strokes and bleeding but higher PVL rates compared to redo cAVR. Future randomized studies and prospective registries are essential to compare the effectiveness of transcatheter VIV with cAVR, and clarify the rates of PVLs. PMID:26904259

  5. Vascular Complications Associated with Transfemoral Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hines, George L; Jaspan, Vita; Kelly, Brian J; Calixte, Rose

    2016-06-01

    Background Transfemoral aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a novel technique for treating aortic stenosis, yet vascular complications are yet to be delineated. Objectives This study aims to study the vascular complications of TAVR with Edwards Sapien valves (Edwards Lifesciences Corp., Irvine, CA). Methods We performed a retrospective evaluation of TAVR patients. Standard demographics, femoral vessel and sheath size, access type (femoral cut-down [FC], percutaneous access [PFA], and iliac conduit [IC]), and treatment method were recorded. Complications were defined by the Valve Academic Research Consortium Criteria. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 99 patients underwent TAVR between February 15, 2012 and July 17, 2013 with an Edwards Sapien valve. Out of which, 48 were males with a mean age of 83 ± 7 years. Overall, 33 had FC, 58 had PFA, and 6 had an IC. A total of 17 major (2 aortic and 15 iliac) and 38 minor complications (36 access and 2 emboli) occurred. Aortic complications were managed by open repair (OR, 1) or percutaneous repair (PR, 1). Overall, 12 iliac injuries were managed by PR and 3 by OR. Out of the 33 groin complications in FC patients 8 (24%) were treated by OR, whereas 30 (52%) of the 58 groin complications in PTA patients were treated by PR. There were no differences in transfusion requirements or length of stay. Conclusion Vascular complications of TAVR are common with most being minor, related to access site and causing no immediate sequelae. Iliac injury can be managed by PR or OR. Aortic injury is associated with significant mortality. These findings increase vascular surgeons' awareness of these complications and how to manage them. PMID:27231425

  6. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  7. Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Pseudoaneurysm after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Masood A.; Martingano, Daniel; Khan, Usman; Goyal, Nikhil; Sharma, Raman; Rizvi, Syed B.; Motivala, Apurva; Asgarian, Kourosh T.; Nabagiez, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular outflow tract pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication following aortic valve replacement (AVR), occurring most frequently secondary to endocarditis. We present a case of a 47-year-old female with a history of intravenous drug abuse and a past surgical history of two AVRs (2001 and 2009 with aortic root replacement for endocarditis) who presented with symptoms of lower extremity weakness. Subsequent radiologic imaging revealed the presence of a left ventricular outflow tract pseudoaneurysm, which was surgically managed with a homologous conduit. PMID:27175367

  8. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Experience with SAPIEN 3.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Y; Tamburino, C; Barbanti, M

    2015-06-01

    Based on randomized trials with first generation devices, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI) has been included into the treatment strategy for high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis. Procedural complications remain a concern with TAVI, including stroke, vascular complications, paravalvular leak (PVL) and conduction disturbances. Addressing these limitations will support TAVI use in lower risk populations. This review discussed features and most recent clinical evidence of the new balloon-expandable THV (SAPIEN 3, Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, CA, USA). PMID:25900559

  9. Severe Systolic Anterior Motion After Aortic Valve Replacement and Cox MAZE Surgery.

    PubMed

    den Uil, Corstiaan A; Ter Horst, Maarten; Akin, Sakir; Galema, Tjebbe W

    2016-07-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement may be complicated by severe dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and cardiogenic shock in the postoperative period. We present a patient who developed severe anterior motion following aortic valve and Cox MAZE surgery which necessitated a mitral valve replacement. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12763 (J Card Surg 2016;31:429-431). PMID:27212634

  10. Consecutive transcatheter valve-in-valve implantations: the first in the aortic position, the second in the mitral position, in a patient with failing aortic and mitral bioprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Alison; Davies, Simon; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Moat, Neil

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with a failing aortic valve homograft and failing mitral valve xenograft was admitted with an inability to complete full sentences and pulmonary oedema with right ventricular overload. Severe aortic and mitral regurgitation, severe biventricular impairment and pulmonary hypertension were confirmed on transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography. An urgent transfemoral valve-in-valve transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI) was performed within the aortic valve homograft with full resolution of aortic regurgitation. Three months later, a semielective trans-apical valve-in-valve procedure was performed in the mitral position, under cardiopulmonary bypass, with full resolution of mitral regurgitation. His exercise tolerance increased from 5 yards to half a mile. This case report summarises a staged double valve-in-valve procedure in a patient who had three previous sternotomies and who had severe heart failure due to failing aortic and mitral bioprostheses. We report two different delivery approaches, using two different transcatheter devices, and describe valve-in-valve techniques, including cardiopulmonary bypass, in the catheter laboratory. PMID:25053698

  11. Perinatal Changes in Mitral and Aortic Valve Structure and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Post, Allison D.; Laucirica, Daniel R.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    At birth, the mechanical environment of valves changes radically as fetal shunts close and pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances change. Given that valves are reported to be mechanosensitive, we investigated remodeling induced by perinatal changes by examining compositional and structural differences of aortic and mitral valves (AVs, MVs) between 2-day-old and 3rd fetal trimester porcine valves using immunohistochemistry and Movat pentachrome staining. Aortic valve composition changed more with birth than the MV, consistent with a greater change in AV hemodynamics. At 2 days, AV demonstrated a trend of greater versican and elastin (P = 0.055), as well as greater hyaluronan turnover (hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis, P = 0.049) compared with the 3rd-trimester samples. The AVs also demonstrated decreases in proteins related to collagen synthesis and fibrillogenesis with birth, including procollagen I, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, biglycan (all P ≤ 0.005), and decorin (P = 0.059, trend). Both AVs and MVs demonstrated greater delineation between the leaflet layers in 2-day-old compared with 3rd-trimester samples, and AVs demonstrated greater saffron-staining collagen intensity, suggesting more mature collagen in 2-day-old compared with 3rd-trimester samples (each P < 0.05). The proportion of saffron-staining collagen also increased in AV with birth (P < 0.05). The compositional and structural changes that occur with birth, as noted in this study, likely are important to proper neonatal valve function. Furthermore, normal perinatal changes in hemodynamics often do not occur in congenital valve disease; the corresponding perinatal matrix maturation may also be lacking and could contribute to poor function of congenitally malformed valves. PMID:20536360

  12. Unicuspid aortic valve presenting with cardiac arrest in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Tara; Kolcow, Walenty; Smyth, Yvonne; Veerasingham, David

    2015-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is a rare congenital anomaly typically affecting patients in their fourth and fifth decades and presenting with signs of heart failure. Our case is one of a previously asymptomatic teenage girl with a UAV, who presented with cardiac arrest and was successfully treated. Only two other similar cases have been reported in the literature, both were of slightly older male patients. Our case highlights the morbidity associated with the anomaly supporting the need for careful assessment of the valve in cases where UAV is suspected. PMID:26178230

  13. Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis in Association with Enterococcus durans

    PubMed Central

    Di Gioacchino, Lorena; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are common organisms associated with endocarditis, but infection by Enterococcus durans is very rare. To our knowledge, only 3 cases have been reported in the medical literature, and all 3 have involved native valves. Here we publish the first reported case (to our knowledge) of E. durans endocarditis in association with a bioprosthetic aortic valve. After the organism and its antibiotic susceptibility were identified, the 74-year-old male patient was treated successfully with teicoplanin and gentamicin, over a course of 6 weeks. PMID:27127436

  14. Impact of Different Iterations of Devices and Degree of Aortic Valve Calcium on Paravalvular Regurgitation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kong, William K F; van Rosendael, Philippe J; van der Kley, Frank; de Weger, Arend; Kamperidis, Vasileios; Regeer, Madelien V; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2016-08-15

    The iterations of the SAPIEN prosthesis might impact the incidence and grade of paravalvular regurgitation (PVR). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of iterations of balloon-expandable valves (SAPIEN, SAPIEN XT, and SAPIEN 3) and degree of aortic valve calcification (AVC) on the severity of PVR after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Comprehensive echocardiographic examinations and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) were performed in 272 patients (127 men, 81 ± 7 years old, logistic EuroScore of 21 ± 13%) who underwent TAVI with 23- and 26-mm balloon-expandable valves. The degree of AVC was assessed with MDCT. PVR grade was assessed with echocardiography. The cover index was calculated as (prosthesis area - MDCT annulus area)/prosthesis area. SAPIEN, SAPIEN XT, and SAPIEN 3 prostheses were implanted in 103 patients (38%), 105 patients (38.5%), and 64 patients (23.5%), respectively. Significant PVR (≥moderate) occurred in 14%, 10%, and 0% of patients receiving the SAPIEN, SAPIEN XT, and SAPIEN 3, respectively (p = 0.010). Across the groups, the aortic annulus size, degree of calcification, and cover index were comparable. Larger burden of AVC was independently associated with significant PVR (odds ratio 3.48, p = 0.006) after adjusting for age, body surface area, gender, aortic annulus area, cover index, and prosthesis iteration. SAPIEN 3 was associated with lower frequency of significant PVR (odds ratio 0.31, p = 0.002). In conclusion, the incidence of significant PVR significantly decreased over time with improvement in valve design. SAPIEN 3 was associated with less significant PVR after TAVI independently of the AVC burden. PMID:27328953

  15. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement: the “Miami Method”

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    For patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR), a minimally invasive approach performed via a right anterior thoracotomy is the preferred method at our institution. This method has evolved over a 10-year span, being applied to over 1,500 patients with the commitment of one surgeon seeking to offer a simplistic and reproducible minimally invasive alternative. We believe that this is truly the least invasive approach to the aortic valve since it avoids sternal invasion. By virtue of being less traumatic, the morbidity is diminished and therefore the recovery is enhanced. We believe that this approach is most beneficial in the high risk patient such as the elderly, the obese, those with chronic obstructive pulmonary, chronic kidney disease and those requiring re-operative surgery. This method has proven to be safe and effective in all patients requiring isolated AVR surgery. The only relative exclusion criteria would be a porcelain aorta with the inability to cannulate the patient. PMID:25694981

  16. AKI after Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Srivali, Narat; Harrison, Andrew M; Gunderson, Tina M; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Greason, Kevin L; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk of perioperative mortality. Previous studies showed increased risk of postoperative AKI with TAVR, but it is unclear whether differences in patient risk profiles confounded the results. To conduct a propensity-matched study, we identified all adult patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota from January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2014. Using propensity score matching on the basis of clinical characteristics and preoperative variables, we compared the postoperative incidence of AKI, defined by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, and major adverse kidney events in patients treated with TAVR with that in patients treated with SAVR. Major adverse kidney events were the composite of in-hospital mortality, use of RRT, and persistent elevated serum creatinine ≥200% from baseline at hospital discharge. Of 1563 eligible patients, 195 matched pairs (390 patients) were created. In the matched cohort, baseline characteristics, including Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score and eGFR, were comparable between the two groups. Furthermore, no significant differences existed between the TAVR and SAVR groups in postoperative AKI (24.1% versus 29.7%; P=0.21), major adverse kidney events (2.1% versus 1.5%; P=0.70), or mortality >6 months after surgery (6.0% versus 8.3%; P=0.51). Thus, TAVR did not affect postoperative AKI risk. Because it is less invasive than SAVR, TAVR may be preferred in high-risk individuals. PMID:26487562

  17. Midterm follow-up dynamic echocardiography evaluation after aortic valve repair for aortic valve insufficiency.

    PubMed

    D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Amaducci, Andrea; Prodromo, John; Pirone, Francesco; Follis, Marco; Falletta, Calogero; Pilato, Michele

    2012-06-01

    We prospectively evaluated 46 patients who underwent aortic valve repair (AVR) for AV regurgitation. Rest/stress echocardiography follow-up was performed. Follow-up duration was 30.7 months, age 56 ± 14 years, ejection fraction% 57.5 ± 10.5%. Preoperative bicuspid AV was present in 14 (30.4%), leaflets calcifications in 8 (17.4%), thickening in 17 (37.0%) and prolapse in 22 (47.8%). Surgical technique included commissuroplasty (22, 47.8%), leaflet remodelling (17, 37.0%), decalcification (7, 15.2%) and raphe removal (14, 30.4%). At follow-up, rest/stress echocardiography median AV regurgitation (rest 1.0 vs. stress 1.0) and mean indexed AV area (IAVA) (rest 2.6 ± 0.74 cm(2)/m(2) vs. stress 2.8 ± 0.4 cm(2)/m(2)) were unchanged (P = ns). Mean (rest 4.7 ± 3.9 mmHg vs. stress 9.7 ± 5.8 mmHg) and peak (rest 9.5 ± 7.2 mmHg vs. stress 19.0 ± 10.5 mmHg) transvalvular gradients were significantly increased (P < 0.0001). At linear regression, there was an independent inverse correlation between commissuroplasty and AV gradients during stress (B = -9.9, P = 0.01, confidence interval= -17.7 to -2.1). Although follow-up haemodynamics of repaired AVs are satisfactory, there was a fixed IAVA and significant increase in AV gradients. We were not able to identify any pre-existing anatomical condition independently related to this non-physiological behaviour under stress. Moreover, commissuroplasty seems to prevent abnormal increase of the AV gradients. PMID:22368109

  18. [Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement Via Right Mini-thoracotomy].

    PubMed

    Totsugawa, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    Here we demonstrate our surgical procedure of minimally invasive aortic valve replacement through right anterolateral mini-thoracotomy. Preoperative evaluation of the whole aorta by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan is important to prevent cerebrovascular complications. The patient is set in a mild left lateral decubitus position. A skin incision is made along the anterior axillary line to the inframammary fold and the chest is opened at the 3rd or 4th intercostal space. Cardiopulmonary bypass is usually established by femoro-femoral bypass. The ascending aorta is clamped with a Chitwood clamp and antegrade or selective cardioplegia is administered. Four traction sutures placed at the aortotomy widely open the aortotomy and offer fine surgical view of the aortic valve. The annular calcifications are excised using a cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator. Double-needle braided sutures with pledgets are placed in a non-everting mattress manner. Then the prosthetic valve is sewn onto the aortic annulus. Finger knot tying through anterolateral mini-thoracotomy is usually challenging;therefore, all sutures are tied using a knot pusher. The aortotomy is closed and the aorta is de-clamped. The pericardium is loosely closed;chest tubes are placed;and the thoracotomy is closed in a usual manner. PMID:27440021

  19. Aortic stenosis associated with Scheie's syndrome. Report of successful valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Masuda, H; Morishita, Y; Taira, A; Kuriyama, M

    1993-03-01

    A 62-year-old man who had aortic stenosis associated with Scheie's syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis [MPS], type I-S) successfully underwent aortic valve replacement. The composition of acidic glycosaminoglycans (acid mucopolysaccharides) of the excised aortic valve analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) supported the diagnosis of Scheie's syndrome. This article reviews the literature on aortic stenosis in MPS, a rare inherited metabolic disorder, and discusses biochemical features and surgical repair. PMID:8449111

  20. Left ventricular outflow tract false aneurysm late after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Bizzarri, Federico; Braconi, Lucio; Rossi, Alessandra; Sorbara, Carlo; Stefano, Pier Luigi

    2005-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) pseudoaneurysm late after aortic valve replacement. A 77-year-old man, who had undergone aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis 7 years ago, presented, asymptomatic, with a transesophageal echocardiography (TTE) diagnosis of a large cavitary mass arising behind the aortic wall. The orifice of the pseudoaneurysm was successfully surgically closed and the aortic root reconstructed with cryopreserved homograft. PMID:15870043

  1. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in the presence of coronary anomalies.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Rankin, J Scott; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2014-11-01

    Aortic root replacement in the presence of coronary anomalies can be challenging. Because the anomalous coronary often arises close to a commissure, reconstruction with traditional buttons can be technically difficult without compromising either the leaflets or the coronary artery. A method of valve sparing root surgery termed "aortic valve and root restoration," using aortic ring annuloplasty and formal valve repair, and then incorporating the anomalous coronary into the commissural suture line, may offer a simple solution to this problem. PMID:25441812

  2. New St. Jude Medical Portico™ transcatheter aortic valve: features and early results.

    PubMed

    Spence, M S; Lyons, K; McVerry, F; Smith, B; Manoharan, G B; Maguire, C; Doherty, R; Anderson, L; Morton, A; Hughes, S; Hoeritzauer, I; Manoharan, G

    2013-06-01

    Patients with symptomatic aortic valve disease who are inoperable or have high surgery-related risks may be treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation devices. With this method increasingly applied, device innovations are aimed at achieving improved procedural results and therapeutic outcome. This paper describes the innovations implemented in the St. Jude Medical Portico™ system for transcatheter aortic valve implantation, the application of this system and initial clinical experience. PMID:23681129

  3. Transcatheter ACURATE-TA Aortic Valve Implantation in a Patient With a Previous Mechanical Mitral Valve.

    PubMed

    Bagur, Rodrigo; Kiaii, Bob; Teefy, Patrick J; Diamantouros, Pantelis; Harle, Christopher; Goela, Aashish; Chan, Ian; Chu, Michael W A

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in the presence of a mechanical mitral valve (MMV) prosthesis is still challenging because of the rigid mitral frame within the aortomitral curtain. Moreover, low-lying coronary ostia represent a hazardous problem of coronary obstruction, especially in narrow or porcelain aortic roots. The present case demonstrates the successful management of 2 challenging anatomical issues, the rigid cage of the MMV and the low-lying left main coronary ostium (LMCO), with the implantation of the ACURATE-TA bioprosthesis (Symetis SA, Ecublens, Switzerland). It also highlights the importance of having multiple TAVI devices in order to choose the ideal transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis to fit the unique anatomical presentation of the patient. PMID:26522576

  4. A Modified Epicardial Radiofrequency Ablation for Preoperative Atrial Fibrillation Combined With Isolated Aortic Valve Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaolei; Ma, Nan; Liu, Hao; Tang, Min; Ding, Fangbao; Bao, Chunrong; Mei, Ju

    2016-06-01

    Isolated aortic valve diseases can lead to atrial fibrillation (AF) by causing left atrium pressure overload and enlargement. At present, most patients with preoperative AF and isolated aortic valve disease have undergone a Cox-maze IV procedure through a left atriotomy under cardiopulmonary bypass with aortic cross-clamping. Here, we describe a novel modified epicardial radiofrequency ablation procedure performed on a beating heart without aortic cross-clamping or opening the left atrium. This technique has proved to be safe and feasible, with good clinical outcomes. It may be useful in selecting the best ablation approaches for patients with AF and aortic valve disease. PMID:27211963

  5. Sex Differences in Aortic Stenosis and Outcome Following Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Laura E; Fairbairn, Timothy A; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2015-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the commonest valve defect in the developed world and is associated with a high mortality once symptomatic. There is a difference in the way that male and female hearts remodel in the face of chronic pressure overload: women develop a concentrically hypertrophied, small cavity left ventricle (LV), whereas men are more prone to the development of eccentric hypertrophy. At a cellular level, there is an increase in collagen and metalloproteinase gene expression in males suggesting a different regulation of extracellular volume composition according to sex. Male hearts with aortic stenosis appear to have more fibrosis than their female comparators. The trigger for this appears to be in part related to estrogen receptor signaling, but other factors such as renin-angiotensin activation, nitric oxide, and circulating noradrenaline levels may also be implicated. Treatment options include surgical valve replacement (SAVR) and more recently transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Female sex may be a risk factor for adverse outcome following SAVR and conversely appears to confer a survival advantage when undergoing TAVR. Whether the lower mortality seen following TAVR in women compared with men (despite their increased age and frailty) reflects their longer life expectancy, smaller annular size (and less post-TAVR aortic regurgitation), more favorable LV reverse remodeling, or more likely, a combination of these factors remains to be established. PMID:26653869

  6. Calcific aortic valve disease: A consensus summary from the Alliance of Investigators on Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yutzey, Katherine E.; Demer, Linda L.; Body, Simon C.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Towler, Dwight A.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.; Hofmann-Bowman, Marion A.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Rogers, Melissa B.; Sadeghi, Mehran M.; Aikawa, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Calcific Aortic Valve Disease (CAVD) is increasingly prevalent worldwide with significant morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic options beyond surgical valve replacement are currently limited. In 2011, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute assembled a working group on aortic stenosis. This group identified CAVD as an actively regulated disease process in need of further study. As a result, the Alliance of Investigators on CAVD was formed to coordinate and promote CAVD research, with the goals of identifying individuals at risk, developing new therapeutic approaches, and improving diagnostic methods. The group is composed of cardiologists, geneticists, imaging specialists, and basic science researchers. This report reviews the current status of CAVD research and treatment strategies with identification of areas in need of additional investigation for optimal management of this patient population. PMID:25189570

  7. Reverse U aortotomy (Kırali incision) for aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kırali, Kaan

    2016-06-01

    The presence of patent vein grafts on the proximal aorta may cause technical difficulties during reoperations for aortic valve replacement after previous coronary artery bypass surgery. A 65-year-old man underwent reoperation for aortic valve replacement two years after his first open heart surgery (valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aorta-right coronary artery saphenous vein graft). The aortotomy incision was started approximately 2 cm above the proximal anastomosis and continued down at both sides until the prosthetic graft. The reverse U aortotomy prevents unnecessary and risky manipulations of proximal anastomoses, provides perfect exposure, and can be used securely during reoperative aortic valve surgery. PMID:25759482

  8. Enlargement of the aortic annulus during aortic valve replacement: a review.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Uberto; Celiento, Michele; Milano, Aldo D

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of aortic valve replacement (AVR) is to obtain relief from the fixed left ventricular (LV) obstruction by replacing the aortic valve with a prosthesis, either mechanical or biological, of adequate size. Most currently available prostheses provide satisfactory hemodynamic performance, but small-sized prostheses may be associated with high transvalvular gradients and suboptimal effective orifice area that result in prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM), and thus are far from ideal for use in young, active patients. The avoidance of PPM is advisable as it has been repeatedly associated with increased mortality, decreased exercise tolerance and an impaired regression of LV hypertrophy after AVR for severe aortic stenosis. Enlargement of the aortic annulus (EAA) has proved to be a valuable method to prevent PPM in the presence of a diminutive aortic root. This review outlines the various techniques described for EAA, presenting technical details, long-term results and major procedure-related complications, and discussing the current role of EAA in patients requiring AVR. PMID:24779326

  9. In vitro models of aortic valve calcification: solidifying a system.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Meghan A; Merryman, W David

    2015-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) affects 25% of people over 65, and the late-stage stenotic state can only be treated with total valve replacement, requiring 85,000 surgeries annually in the US alone (University of Maryland Medical Center, 2013, http://umm.edu/programs/services/heart-center-programs/cardiothoracic-surgery/valve-surgery/facts). As CAVD is an age-related disease, many of the affected patients are unable to undergo the open-chest surgery that is its only current cure. This challenge motivates the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in calcification, with the eventual goal of alternative preventative and therapeutic strategies. There is no sufficient animal model of CAVD, so we turn to potential in vitro models. In general, in vitro models have the advantages of shortened experiment time and better control over multiple variables compared to in vivo models. As with all models, the hypothesis being tested dictates the most important characteristics of the in vivo physiology to recapitulate. Here, we collate the relevant pieces of designing and evaluating aortic valve calcification so that investigators can more effectively draw significant conclusions from their results. PMID:25249188

  10. Which patients benefit from stentless aortic valve replacement?

    PubMed

    Gulbins, Helmut; Reichenspurner, Hermann

    2009-12-01

    This review article analyzes the literature to answer the question of whether stentless aortic bioprostheses possess proven advantages compared with stented bioprosthesis, and which patients might benefit from stentless valve implantation. For this purpose, the United States National Library of Medicine's PubMed and MEDLINE databases were searched for articles dealing with results of stentless aortic bioprostheses or studies comparing stented and stentless prostheses. Key word searches used were as follows: stentless aortic prostheses, stented aortic prosthesis, hemodynamic, hemodynamic performance, degeneration, durability, technique, and long-term follow-up. The analysis focused on stentless prostheses with a clinical experience for more than 5 years. Only a few randomized studies were found. Stentless prostheses were found to be advantageous in patients with severe impaired left ventricular function or a small aortic annulus (ie, evidence of grade II), but no specific advantages could be determined for the majority of patients. The durability results were mixed: the Toronto SPV (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN) showed an increase in degeneration after 10 years of follow-up, whereas the Freestyle porcine stentless prostheses (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) still showed excellent results after this period. PMID:19932303

  11. Impact of severe left ventricular dysfunction on mid-term mortality in elderly patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Giuseppe; Presbitero, Patrizia; Pagnotta, Paolo; Sonia Petronio, Anna; Brambilla, Nedy; De Marco, Federico; Fiorina, Claudia; Giannini, Cristina; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Klugmann, Silvio; Rossi, Marco L; Ettori, Federica; Bedogni, Francesco; Testa, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether patients with reduced left ventricular function present worse outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of baseline severe impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) on mortality after TAVI. Methods Six-hundred-forty-nine patients with aortic stenosis underwent TAVI with the CoreValve system (92.8%) or the Edwards SAPIEN valve system (7.2%). Baseline LVEF was measured by the echocardiographic Simpson method. The impact of LVEF ≤ 30% on mortality was assessed by Cox regression. Results Patients with LVEF ≤ 30% (n = 63), as compared to those with LVEF > 30% (n = 586), had a higher prevalence of NHYA class > 2 (P < 0.001) and presented with a higher Euroscore (P < 0.001). Procedural success was similar in both groups (98.4% vs. 97.2%, P = 1). After a median follow-up of 436 days (25th–75th percentile, 357–737 days), all-cause mortality [23.8% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.87, hazard ratios (HR): 0.96, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.56–1.63] and cardiac mortality (19.1% vs. 17.6%, P = 0.89, HR: 1.04, 95% CI: 0.57–1.90) were similar in patients with LVEF ≤ 30% as compared to those with LVEF > 30%. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was not significantly different between the two groups (11.1% vs. 6.3%, P = 0.14, HR: 1.81, 95% CI: 0.81–4.06). Patients with LVEF ≤ 30% had a trend toward higher risk of 30-day cardiac mortality (11.1% vs. 5.3%; P = 0.06, HR: 2.16, 95% CI: 0.95–4.90), which disappeared after multivariable adjustment (P = 0.22). Conclusions Baseline severe impairment of LVEF is not a predictor of increased short-term and mid-term mortality after TAVI. Selected patients with severe impairment of left ventricular function should not be denied TAVI. PMID:27403137

  12. State-of-the-art aortic imaging: Part II - applications in transcatheter aortic valve replacement and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Schoenhagen, Paul; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Vosshenrich, Rolf; Karmonik, Christof; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Partovi, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) as well as thoracic and abdominal endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR and EVAR) rely on accurate pre- and postprocedural imaging. This review article discusses the application of imaging, including preprocedural assessment and measurements as well as postprocedural imaging of complications. Furthermore, the exciting perspective of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on cross-sectional imaging is presented. TAVR is a minimally invasive alternative for treatment of aortic valve stenosis in patients with high age and multiple comorbidities who cannot undergo traditional open surgical repair. Given the lack of direct visualization during the procedure, pre- and peri-procedural imaging forms an essential part of the intervention. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for preprocedural planning. Routine postprocedural follow-up is performed by echocardiography to confirm treatment success and detect complications. EVAR and TEVAR are minimally invasive alternatives to open surgical repair of aortic pathologies. CTA constitutes the preferred imaging modality for both preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up including detection of endoleaks. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent alternative to CT for postoperative follow-up, and is especially beneficial for younger patients given the lack of radiation. Ultrasound is applied in screening and postoperative follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms, but cross-sectional imaging is required once abnormalities are detected. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be as sensitive as CTA in detecting endoleaks. PMID:24429327

  13. A Simple Device for Morphofunctional Evaluation During Aortic Valve-Sparing Surgery.

    PubMed

    Leone, Alessandro; Bruno, Piergiorgio; Cammertoni, Federico; Massetti, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Valve-sparing operations for the treatment of aortic root disease with a structurally normal aortic valve are increasingly performed as they avoid prosthesis-related complications. Short- and long-term results are critically dependent on perfect intraoperative restoration of valve anatomy and function. Residual aortic regurgitation is the main cause of early failure, and it is the most common motive for reoperation. However, intraoperative morphofunctional valve assessment requires expertise, and only transesophageal echocardiography can provide reliable information. We describe a simple, economic, reproducible hydrostatic test to intraoperatively evaluate valve competency under direct visualization. PMID:26140788

  14. Replacement of a Björk-Shiley Delrin Aortic Valve Still Functioning after 25 Years

    PubMed Central

    Badak, M. Ismail; Ozkisacik, Erdem Ali; Boga, Mehmet; Gurcun, Ugur; Discigil, Berent

    2004-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who had undergone implantation of a Björk-Shiley Delrin valve in the aortic position 25 years earlier and who now presented with severe mitral stenosis. The patient underwent mitral valve replacement and aortic valve re-replacement. We review the justification for prophylactic replacement of Björk-Shiley Delrin heart valves. PMID:15562853

  15. Long-term follow-up of unusual ball-valve aortic substitute.

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B; Isch, J H; Jolly, W W

    1978-08-01

    On March 19, 1962, prior to the availability of Starr-Edwards ball-valve prostheses for aortic substitution, a mitral valve turned upside down was implanted for marked calcific aortic stenosis. It worked well and the patient was in good health for 15 years. Late annular calcification and loosening of sutures with marked perivalvular regurgitation made valve replacement necessary 16 years after operation. The original valve was perfectly preserved. PMID:682654

  16. Apicoaortic conduit and cerebral perfusion in mixed aortic valve disease: a computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fragomeni, Gionata; Rossi, Michele; Condemi, Francesca; Mazzitelli, Rosario; Serraino, Giuseppe Filiberto; Renzulli, Attilio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The revival of the apicoaortic conduit has attracted new interest in this alternative treatment for severe aortic stenosis unsuitable for conventional valve replacement. However, doubts still exist about the perfusion of the epiaortic vessels after apicoaortic conduit implantation, especially when severe aortic stenosis is associated with aortic valve insufficiency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the perfusion of the epiaortic vessels (innominate artery, left carodit artery and left subclavian artery) in cases of mixed aortic valve disease before and after apicoaortic conduit implantation. METHODS Starting from the data of a real patient with severe aortic stenosis and mild aortic insufficiency who underwent apicoaortic conduit implantation, we created a computational model where severe aortic valve stenosis was associated with different grades of aortic insufficiency (mild, medium and moderate). RESULTS A total of six combinations were analysed. In all simulations, the more severe the concomitant aortic insufficiency, the more the flow through the epiaortic vessels was diminished. After apicoaortic conduit implantation, there was an absolute augmentation of the median output in each epiaortic vessel compared with the same combination of mixed aortic valve disease before implantation. Interestingly, retrograde flow from the conduit in the descending aorta was minimal and did not contribute to the improved output of the epiaortic vessels. CONCLUSIONS The computational analysis suggested a protective effect, rather than steal phenomenon, of the apicoaortic conduit towards the cerebral perfusion, even in cases of mixed aortic valve disease. PMID:23962852

  17. Feature identification for image-guided transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Rajchl, Martin; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Chu, Michael W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive alternative to open-heart surgery, and is critically dependent on imaging for accurate placement of the new valve. Augmented image-guidance for TAVI can be provided by registering together intra-operative transesophageal echo (TEE) ultrasound and a model derived from pre-operative CT. Automatic contour delineation on TEE images of the aortic root is required for real-time registration. This study develops an algorithm to automatically extract contours on simultaneous cross-plane short-axis and long-axis (XPlane) TEE views, and register these features to a 3D pre-operative model. A continuous max-flow approach is used to segment the aortic root, followed by analysis of curvature to select appropriate contours for use in registration. Results demonstrate a mean contour boundary distance error of 1.3 and 2.8mm for the short and long-axis views respectively, and a mean target registration error of 5.9mm. Real-time image guidance has the potential to increase accuracy and reduce complications in TAVI.

  18. Current Clinical Evidence on Rapid Deployment Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Glenn R.; Shrestha, Malakh Lal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the Western world. It is caused primarily by age-related degeneration and progressive calcification typically detected in patients 65 years and older. In patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure, the average survival rate is only 2 years without appropriate treatment. Approximately one half of all patients die within the first 2 to 3 years of symptom onset. In addition, the age of the patients presenting for aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increased along with the demographic changes. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) database shows that the number of patients older than 80 years has increased from 12% to 24% during the past 20 years. At the same time, the percentage of candidates requiring AVR as well as concomitant coronary bypass surgery has increased from 5% to 25%. Surgical AVR continues to be the criterion standard for treatment of aortic stenosis, improving survival and quality of life. Recent advances in prosthetic valve technology, such as transcatheter AVR, have expanded the indication for AVR to the extreme high-risk population, and the most recent surgical innovation, rapid deployment AVR, provides an additional tool to the surgeons’ armamentarium. PMID:26918310

  19. Including aortic valve morphology in computational fluid dynamics simulations: initial findings and application to aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Wendell, David C; Samyn, Margaret M; Cava, Joseph R; Ellwein, Laura M; Krolikowski, Mary M; Gandy, Kimberly L; Pelech, Andrew N; Shadden, Shawn C; LaDisa, John F

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations quantifying thoracic aortic flow patterns have not included disturbances from the aortic valve (AoV). 80% of patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) which may cause adverse flow patterns contributing to morbidity. Our objectives were to develop a method to account for the AoV in CFD simulations, and quantify its impact on local hemodynamics. The method developed facilitates segmentation of the AoV, spatiotemporal interpolation of segments, and anatomic positioning of segments at the CFD model inlet. The AoV was included in CFD model examples of a normal (tricuspid AoV) and a post-surgical CoA patient (BAV). Velocity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results were compared to equivalent simulations using a plug inlet profile. The plug inlet greatly underestimated TKE for both examples. TAWSS differences extended throughout the thoracic aorta for the CoA BAV, but were limited to the arch for the normal example. OSI differences existed mainly in the ascending aorta for both cases. The impact of AoV can now be included with CFD simulations to identify regions of deleterious hemodynamics thereby advancing simulations of the thoracic aorta one step closer to reality. PMID:22917990

  20. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garot, Jerome; Neylon, Antoinette; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS). Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74), which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure. PMID:27610250

  1. In vitro Models of Aortic Valve Calcification: Solidifying a System

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Meghan A.; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) affects 25% of people over 65, and the late-stage stenotic state can only be treated with total valve replacement, requiring 85,000 surgeries annually in the US alone [1]. As CAVD is an age-related disease, many of the affected patients are unable to undergo the open-chest surgery that is its only current cure. This challenge motivates the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in calcification, with the eventual goal of alternative preventative and therapeutic strategies. There is no sufficient animal model of CAVD, so we turn to potential in vitro models. In general, in vitro models have the advantages of shortened experiment time and better control over multiple variables compared to in vivo models. As with all models, the hypothesis being tested dictates the most important characteristics of the in vivo physiology to recapitulate. Here, we collate the relevant pieces of designing and evaluating aortic valve calcification so that investigators can more effectively draw significant conclusions from their results. PMID:25249188

  2. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Andrew K; Garot, Jerome; Neylon, Antoinette; Spaziano, Marco; Sawaya, Fadi J; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS). Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74), which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure. PMID:27610250

  3. Histopathology of aortic complications in bicuspid aortic valve versus Marfan syndrome: relevance for therapy?

    PubMed

    Grewal, Nimrat; Franken, Romy; Mulder, Barbara J M; Goumans, Marie-José; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Jongbloed, Monique R M; DeRuiter, Marco C; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Poelmann, Robert E; Groot, Adriana C Gittenberger-de

    2016-05-01

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are more prone to develop aortic dilation and dissection compared to persons with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). To elucidate potential common and distinct pathways of clinical relevance, we compared the histopathological substrates of aortopathy. Ascending aortic wall biopsies were divided in five groups: BAV (n = 36) and TAV (n = 23) without and with dilation and non-dilated MFS (n = 8). General histologic features, apoptosis, the expression of markers for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) maturation, markers predictive for ascending aortic dilation in BAV, and expression of fibrillin-1 were investigated. Both MFS and BAV showed an altered distribution and decreased fibrillin-1 expression in the aorta and a significantly lower level of differentiated VSMC markers. Interestingly, markers predictive for aortic dilation in BAV were not expressed in the MFS aorta. The aorta in MFS was similar to the aorta in dilated TAV with regard to the presence of medial degeneration and apoptosis, while other markers for degeneration and aging like inflammation and progerin expression were low in MFS, comparable to BAV. Both MFS and BAV aortas have immature VSMCs, while MFS and TAV patients have a similar increased rate of medial degeneration. However, the mechanism leading to apoptosis is expected to be different, being fibrillin-1 mutation induced increased angiotensin-receptor-pathway signaling in MFS and cardiovascular aging and increased progerin in TAV. Our findings could explain why angiotensin inhibition is successful in MFS and less effective in TAV and BAV patients. PMID:26129868

  4. Myocardial injury associated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Keun; Liebetrau, Christoph; van Linden, Arnaud; Blumenstein, Johannes; Gaede, Luise; Hamm, Christian W; Walther, Thomas; Möllmann, Helge

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an important treatment option for elderly patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis whose risk is too high or prohibitive for conventional surgery. Despite notable progress during the past decade, continuous efforts directed at further improvement of procedural safety and performance are required, especially considering expanding indications for interventional treatment options among lower-risk populations. One issue that needs to be addressed is myocardial damage, which can frequently be observed after TAVI and has been linked to worse prognosis. Yet, knowledge concerning the underlying mechanisms and clinical impact remains scarce, and further investigation in this field is warranted. In this review, we provide a contemporary summary of the types of myocardial injury associated with TAVI, including access-related injury, mechanical trauma and ischemia, the role of myocardial biomarkers, and the impact on left ventricular function, with emphasis on potential mechanisms and clinical implications. PMID:26670909

  5. International Expert Consensus on Sutureless and Rapid Deployment Valves in Aortic Valve Replacement Using Minimally Invasive Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Glauber, Mattia; Moten, Simon C.; Quaini, Eugenio; Solinas, Marco; Folliguet, Thierry A.; Meuris, Bart; Miceli, Antonio; Oberwalder, Peter J.; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Teoh, Kevin H. T.; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Borger, Michael A.; Bouchard, Denis; Bouchot, Olivier; Clark, Stephen C.; Dapunt, Otto E.; Ferrarini, Matteo; Fischlein, Theodor J. M.; Laufer, Guenther; Mignosa, Carmelo; Millner, Russell; Noirhomme, Philippe; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Ruyra-Baliarda, Xavier; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Suri, Rakesh M.; Troise, Giovanni; Gersak, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Objective To define the benefit of sutureless and rapid deployment valves in current minimally invasive approaches in isolated aortic valve replacement. Methods A panel of 28 international experts with expertise in both minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and rapid deployment valves was constituted. After thorough literature review, the experts rated evidence-based recommendations in a modified Delphi approach. Results No guideline could be retrieved. Thirty-three clinical trials and 9 systematic reviews could be identified for detailed text analysis to obtain a total of 24 recommendations. After rating by the experts 12, final recommendations were identified: preoperative computed tomographic scan as well as intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography are highly recommended. Suitable annular sizes are 19 to 27 mm. There is a contraindication for bicuspid valves only for type 0 and for annular abscess or destruction due to infective endocarditis. The use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves reduces extracorporeal circulation and aortic cross-clamp time and leads to less early complications as prolonged ventilation, blood transfusion, atrial fibrillation, pleural effusions, paravalvular leakages and aortic regurgitation, and renal replacement therapy, respectively. These clinical outcomes result in reduced intensive care unit and hospital stay and reduced costs. The use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves will lead to a higher adoption rate of minimally invasive approaches in aortic valve replacement. Respect should be taken to a necessary short learning curve for both sutureless and minimally invasive programs. Conclusions Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement together with minimally invasive approaches offers an attractive option in aortic valve placement for patients requiring biological valve replacement. PMID:27540996

  6. Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Transaortic Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Dellis, Sophia L; Akujuo, Adanna C; Bennett, Edward V; Britton, Lewis W

    2016-07-01

    We sought to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting and transcatheter aortic valve replacement in two patients with porcelain aortas and lesions that could not be optimally treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients with aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease who are too high-risk for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting due to comorbidities and porcelain aorta, and who do not have the appropriate anatomy for percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered for concomitant transcatheter aortic valve replacement and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12762 (J Card Surg 2016;31:435-438). PMID:27196956

  7. Echocardiographic and electron beam tomographic assessment of stenosis in patients with aortic valve disease: gradient versus valve area

    PubMed Central

    Piers, L.H.; Dikkers, R.; Tio, R.A.; van den Berg, M.P.; Willems, T.P.; Oudkerk, M.; Zijlstra, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is routinely used to evaluate aortic valve stenosis. However, it does not give reliable results in every patient. There is growing interest in electron-beam tomography (EBT) as a noninvasive cardiac imaging technique. The usefulness of EBT to evaluate aortic stenosis has yet to be evaluated. Aim To compare EBT with TTE in assessing severity of aortic stenosis. Methods In total 47 patients (18 females, 29 males) underwent a contrast-enhanced EBT scan and TTE within 6±20 days. The calcium score of the aortic valve was determined and the aortic valve area (AVA) was measured by planimetry. A complete TTE study, during which the peak pressure gradient across the aortic valve was measured, was performed in all patients by an experienced sonographer. Results There was a significant correlation between AVA assessed by EBT and peak pressure gradient (r=-0.38, p=0.009). The calcium score of the aortic valve assessed by EBT correlated with peak pressure gradient (r=0.48, p=0.001). Conclusion EBT is a useful noninvasive method to evaluate the severity of aortic stenosis. It holds the possibility of assessing the AVA as well as quantification of the degree of calcification. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696558

  8. Exophytic Atheroma Mimicking Papillary Fibroelastoma Adjacent to the Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Cho, Tomoki; Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Yasuda, Shota; Izubuchi, Ryo; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-09-01

    Follow-up echocardiography in a 69-year-old man with alcoholic cardiomyopathy showed a mass above the aortic valve near the left coronary ostium. Transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomography suggested a papillary fibroelastoma with a high risk of embolism. At operation we found an exophytic atheroma adjacent to the left coronary artery orifice. The atheroma was removed, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. We describe this very rare case of an exophytic atheroma mimicking a papillary fibroelastoma situated at the left coronary orifice. PMID:26354633

  9. Combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in an adult with Scheie's disease.

    PubMed

    Butman, S M; Karl, L; Copeland, J G

    1989-07-01

    Mitral, aortic, and coronary arterial disease have been described in the various mucopolysaccharidoses. We report the first successful combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in an adult female patient with severe aortic and mitral stenosis due to Scheie's syndrome, a mucopolysaccharide storage disease. Both annulae were of sufficient integrity for good prosthetic placement, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:2500310

  10. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication. PMID:26355692

  11. A Quadricuspid Aortic Valve as Seen by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, James; Liotta, Robert; Hood, Maureen; Bustamante, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of a 35-year-old active duty male with a rare quadricuspid aortic valve identified via transthoracic echocardiography following the detection of an incidental grade I/VI diastolic murmur. Further characterization of the anatomical findings and aortic valve flow dynamics were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Accurate assessment of the various valve morphologies is essential, as it guides surgical treatment options to correct the defect. Our case highlights the complimentary role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in defining the anatomy and functional consequences of a quadricuspid aortic valve. PMID:27612379

  12. Quadricuspid aortic valve by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shamruz Khan Akerem; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Araoz, Philip A

    2011-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac entity. The recognition of QAV has clinical significance as it causes aortic valve dysfunction, commonly aortic regurgitation, and is often associated with other congenital cardiac abnormalities. We showed the important role played by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in detecting QAV and review the available literature to explain its incidence, diagnosis, classifications, embryology, correlation between morphology of the QAV and its function, associated conditions, and management. PMID:21926862

  13. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  14. Biaxial Creep Resistance and Structural Remodeling of the Aortic and Mitral Valves in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Moeller, Andrew D; Lee, J Michael; Wells, Sarah M

    2015-08-01

    Pregnancy produces rapid, dramatic volume-overload changes to the maternal circulation. This paper examines pregnancy-induced structural-mechanical changes in bovine aortic and mitral heart valve leaflets. Valve leaflets were harvested from non-pregnant heifers and pregnant cows. Dimensions, biaxial extensibility and creep resistance were assessed and related to changes in the collagen network: histological leaflet and anatomic layer thicknesses plus collagen crimp, and biochemical collagen content. Collagen stability and crosslinking were assessed thermomechanically. Pregnancy altered both aortic and mitral valve leaflets. Both valves demonstrated biphasic changes in leaflet stretch, decreasing in early pregnancy and recovering by late pregnancy. Creep in leaflets from both valves was minimal and decreased even further with pregnancy in the mitral valve. There were valve-specific changes in preconditioning areal extension with pregnancy: increasing in the aortic valve and decreasing in the mitral valve. Leaflet area increased dramatically (84% aortic, 56% mitral), with thickening mainly in the fibrosa, accompanied by increases in collagen content (8% aortic, 16% mitral): together suggesting synthesis of new collagen. Collagen crimp was almost completely lost in pregnancy, with the denaturation temperature decreased by approximately 2 °C. Mature and total crosslinking increased, curiously without a significant increase in immature crosslinking. Mature aortic and mitral heart valve leaflets in the maternal cardiovascular system remodel substantially and similarly-despite their different embryological origins. PMID:25564325

  15. Clinical comparison of St. Jude and porcine aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Douglas, P S; Hirshfeld, J W; Edie, R N; Harken, A H; Stephenson, L W; Edmunds, L H

    1985-09-01

    One hundred eighty-seven consecutive patients who had aortic valve replacement with either a St. Jude or porcine heterograft prosthesis were studied prospectively. The two groups were similar with respect to 67 clinical and operative factors, which allowed comparison of valve performance as an independent variable. Total follow-up was 6162 patient-months (mean 32 months, range 23 to 62, 99% complete). There were no statistical differences in symptomatic improvement or mortality by life-table analysis. Valve-related complications expressed as percent per patient-year included: reoperation, 0.6 St. Jude and 1.2 porcine; endocarditis, 1.1 and 0.9; regurgitant murmur, 3.4 and 2.7; hemolysis, 2.8 and 0.0; thromboembolism, 2.8 and 1.5 (all not significant); and hemorrhage, 7.9 and 2.4 (p less than .005). Anticoagulant-related bleeding was the only significant difference between the two valves in morbidity and mortality 32 to 34 months after operation. PMID:4028357

  16. The power of disruptive technological innovation: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Berlin, David B; Davidson, Michael J; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a "new," generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity. PMID:25545639

  17. Risk profile and outcomes of aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Sujatha; Iqbal, Aamer; Khan, Yusra; Hutter, Jonathan; Pike, Katie; Rogers, Chris; Turner, Mark; Townsend, Mandie; Baumbach, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the patient characteristics, relationship between the Logistic EuroSCORE (LES) and the observed outcomes in octogenarians who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). METHODS: Two hundred and seventy three octogenarians underwent AVR between 1996 and 2008 at Bristol Royal Infirmary. Demographics, acute outcomes, length of hospital stay and mortality were obtained. The LES was calculated to characterize the predicted operative risk. Two groups were defined: LES ≥ 15 (n = 80) and LES < 15 (n = 193). RESULTS: In patients with LES ≥ 15, 30 d mortality was 14% (95% CI: 7%-23%) compared with 4% (95% CI: 2%-8%) in the LES < 15 group (P < 0.007). Despite the increase in number of operations from 1996 to 2008, the average LES did not change. Only 5% of patients had prior bypass surgery. The LES identified a low risk quartile of patients with a very low mortality (4%, n = 8, P < 0.007) at 30 d. The overall surgical results for octogenarians were excellent. The low risk group had an excellent outcome and the high risk group had a poor outcome after surgical AVR. CONCLUSION: It may be better treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:22125671

  18. Role of Glutaraldehyde in Calcification of Porcine Aortic Valve Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kookmin M.; Herrera, Guillermo A.; Battarbee, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde-treated porcine aortic valve xenografts frequently fail due to calcification. Calcification in the prostheses begins intracellularly. In a previous study, various types of cell injury to canine valvular fibroblasts, including glutaraldehyde treatment, led to calcification. An influx of extracellular Ca2+ into the phosphate-rich cytosol was theorized to be the mechanism of calcification. To test the Ca2+ influx theory, cytosolic Ca2+ and Pi concentrations were assessed in glutaraldehyde-treated porcine aortic valve fibroblasts, and their relationship to a subsequent calcification was studied. Glutaraldehyde caused an immediate and sustained massive cytosolic Ca2+ increase that was dose dependent and a several-fold increase in Pi. Calcification of cells followed within a week. The earliest calcification was observed in blebs formed on glutaraldehyde-treated cells. Live control cells or cells fixed with glutaraldehyde in Ca2+-free solution did not calcify under the same conditions. Concomitant increases in Ca2+ and Pi in glutaraldehyde-treated cells appear to underlie the mechanism of calcification, and the presence of extracellular Ca2+ during glutaraldehyde fixation promotes calcification. PMID:10079262

  19. Elevated transaortic valvular gradients after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement: an intraoperative dilemma.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, Michael; Portillo, Juan; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Otey, Andrew; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2015-03-01

    High transaortic valvular gradients, after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement, require prompt intraoperative diagnosis and appropriate management. The presence of high transaortic valvular gradients after cardiopulmonary bypass, in this setting, can be secondary to the following conditions: prosthesis dysfunction, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, supravalvular obstruction, prosthesis-patient mismatch, hyperkinetic left ventricle from administration of inotropes, left ventricular intracavitary gradients, pressure recovery phenomenon, and increased transvalvular blood flow resulting from hyperdynamic circulation or anemia. Transesophageal echocardiography is an extremely useful tool for timely diagnosis and treatment of this complication. We describe a case of a critically ill patient with endocarditis and acute lung injury, who presented for combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement. Transesophageal echocardiographic assessment, post-cardiopulmonary bypass, revealed high transaortic valvular gradients due to encroachment of the mitral prosthesis strut on the left ventricular outflow tract, which was compounded by a small, hypertrophied, and hyperkinetic left ventricle. Discontinuation of inotropic support, administration of fluids, phenylephrine, and esmolol led to resolution of the high gradients and prevented further surgery. PMID:25549635

  20. Simultaneous transapical aortic and mitral valve-in-valve implantation for double prostheses dysfunction: case report and technical insights.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Augusto; Zucchetta, Fabio; Gerosa, Gino

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter "Valve-in-Valve" implantation (ViV) has shown promising results in high-risk patients suffering from structural valve deterioration (SVD) of a previously implanted heart valve bioprosthesis. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with a history of three previous cardiac operations on the aortic and mitral valve. At the time of admission she was severely symptomatic due to a simultaneous SVD of a 23 mm aortic and of a 29 mm mitral St. Jude Biocor bioprosthesis. Because of the history of several cardiac operations and to her comorbidities, the patient was considered with an extremely high surgical risk profile and was therefore scheduled for double concomitant mitral and aortic ViV. Through a trans-apical approach, the patient underwent 23 and 29 mm Edwards Sapien XT implantation in the aortic and mitral bioprosthesis, respectively. The procedure was uneventful as well as the following hospital stay. At 6-months follow-up the patient is in NYHA class I. Echocardiography shows that the aortic bioprosthesis has no leak and the mean gradient is 20 mm Hg while the mitral valve has mild leak and maximum and mean gradients are 21 and 10 mm Hg, respectively. The three main technical aspects that should be carefully considered in double concomitant ViV are: sequence of valve deployment (whether to implant the mitral or the aortic valve first), choice of access and valve sizing. In conclusion, double simultaneous trans-apical mitral and aortic ViV is technically feasible. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24677811

  1. Assessment of the influence of the compliant aortic root on aortic valve mechanics by means of a geometrical model.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, A; Di Martino, E; Gamba, A; Procopio, A M; Fumero, R

    1997-12-01

    In recent years several researchers have suggested that the changes in the geometry and angular dimensions of the aortic root which occur during the cardiac cycle are functional to the optimisation of aortic valve function, both in terms of diminishing leaflet stresses and of fluid-dynamic behaviour. The paper presents an analytical parametric model of the aortic valve which includes the aortic root movement. The indexes used to evaluate the valve behaviour are the circumferential membrane stress and the stress at the free edge of the leaflet, the index of bending strain, the bending of the leaflet at the line attachment in the radial and circumferential directions and the shape of the conduit formed by the leaflets during systole. In order to evaluate the role of geometric changes in valve performance, two control cases were considered, with different reference geometric configuration, where the movement of the aortic root was ignored. The results obtained appear consistent with physiological data, especially with regard to the late diastolic phase and the early ejection phase, and put in evidence the role of the aortic root movement in the improvement of valve behaviour. PMID:9450254

  2. Aortic Valve Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Published Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Sancho, Elena; Abello, David; Bashir, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that aortic valve disease is surgically managed with aortic valve replacement (AVR) using different available prostheses. The long-term survival, durability of the valve, and freedom from reoperation after AVR are well established in published literature. Over the past two decades, aortic valve repair (AVr) has evolved into an accepted surgical option for patients with aortic valve disease. We review and analyze the published literature on AVr. Methods: A systematic review of the current literature was performed through three electronic databases from inception to August 2013 to identify all relevant studies relating to aortic valve repair. Articles selected were chosen by two reviewers. Articles were excluded if they contained a pediatric population or if the patient number was less than 50. Results: Twenty-four studies conformed to the inclusion criteria for inclusion in the systematic review. In total, 4986 patients underwent aortic valve repair. 7 studies represented bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) repair, 5 studies represented cusp prolapse, and 3 studies represented valve repair with root dilation or aneurysm. Overall weighted in-hospital mortality for all studies was low (1.46% ± 1.21). Preoperative aortic insufficiency (AI) ≥ 2+ did not correlate to reoperation for valve failure (Pearson's Rs 0.2705, P = 0.2585). AI at discharge was reported in 9 studies with a mean AI ≥ 2+ in 6.1% of patients. Weighted average percentage for valve reoperation following BAV repair was 10.23% ± 3.2. Weighted average reoperation following cusp prolapse repair was 3.83 ± 1.96. Weighted average reoperation in aortic valve sparing procedures with root replacement was 4.25% ± 2.46. Although there are limitations and complications of prosthetic valves, especially for younger individuals, there is ample published literature that confers strong evidence for AVR. On the contrary, aortic valve repair may be a useful option for selected patients

  3. Valve morphology effect in aortic coarctation flow using realistic silicon models and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrufo, Oscar; Solis-Najera, Sergio; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Kesharvarz-Motamed, Zahra; Rodriguez, Alfredo O.; Garcia, Julio

    2014-11-01

    Aortic valve morphology and phenotype may alter the aortic wall structure and its normal flow hemodynamics. However, the relationship between altered flow patterns and progression of wall pathology is often not fully understood in patients with aortic coartation and needs larger experimental work. In this study, we introduced a compatible experimental setup with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a realistic aortic coarctation (AoCo) silicon model which can replicate physiological flow conditions (pressure, flow-wave, and systemic load). We evaluated the aortic valve hemodynamics of a normal tricuspid valve and a stenotic bicuspid valve using valve effective orifice area (EOA), peak and mean transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG). AoCo severity was assessed by the AoCo pressure gradient. For the tricuspid valve we obtained an EOA = 1.89 cm2, a peak TPG = 10 mmHg, and a mean TPG = 5 mmHg. For the bicuspid valve we obtained an EOA = 1.03 cm2, a peak TPG = 37 mmHg and a mean TPG = 13 mmHg. Furthermore, AoCo with tricuspid valve led to a peak AoCo pressure gradient (PG) = 11 mmHg and a mean PG = 5 mmHg. AoCo with bicuspid valve led to a peak PG = 6 mmHg and a mean PG = 3 mmHg. Aortic flow reattachment was more evident in presence of bicuspid valve and helical flow was present in all cases. This study showed that silicon prototyping in combination with MRI velocity measurements could successfully be used to assess hemodynamic effects of aortic valve morphology in aortic coarctation flow.

  4. [Aortic Valve Replacement after Balloon Valvuloplasty for Aortic Valve Stenosis in a Dialysis Patient with Cardiogenic Shock;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Masanori; Hirotani, Takashi; Ohtsubo, Satoshi; Saito, Sumikatsu; Takeuchi, Shigeyuki; Hasegawa, Tasuku; Endo, Ayaka; Yamasaki, Yu; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2015-06-01

    A 67-year-old man on chronic hemodialysis was admitted with worsening congestive heart failure due to critical aortic stenosis. Echocardiography showed severe aortic stenosis with a valve area of 0.67 cm2 and an ejection fraction of 0.31. Cardiac catheterization revealed severe pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary artery pressures of 62/32 mmHg. In the middle of cardiac catheterization, the systolic pressure declined to 60 mmHg due to cardiogenic shock. Dopamine hydrochloride and dobutamine hydrochloride infusions were necessary to maintain a systolic pressure greater than 80 mmHg. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty was urgently performed. The patient's symptoms rapidly resolved except for angina on exertion. One month later, elective aortic valve replacement was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the he was discharged on the 60th postoperative day. A follow-up echocardiogram 6 months postoperatively revealed normal prosthetic valve function and an ejection fraction of 0.6. PMID:26066880

  5. Reversed L-type Upper Partial Sternotomy in Aortic Valve Replacement: an Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Karic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent cause among aortic valve stenotic changes. Mini Sternotomy Aortic Valve Replacement is a replacement of aortic valve through upper partial sternotomy. Aim: The aim of this approach is to improve postoperative convalescence by leaving pleural spaces closed and do not compromise respiratory function, to decrease bleeding, and reduce post op ventilation time and ICU stay. All these advantages decrease cost during hospital stay by reducing ICU stay, respiration time, bleeding and using blood products, pain killers and shortening hospital stay. Esthetic effect is also considerable result of this method. Case report: This case report presents an initial experience with Reversed L-Type Upper Partial Sternotomy in Aortic Valve Replacement. The goal is to demonstrate that minimally invasive advanced cardiac surgery procedures can be performed in our country. PMID:27594754

  6. Changing strategy for aortic stenosis with coronary artery disease by transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2013-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is combined with aortic stenosis (AS) in 40-50 % of patients with typical angina. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has changed the guideline for AS in patients with high comorbidity. At the same time more than 60 % of isolated CABG has been performed without cardiopulmonary bypass in Japan. CABG is recommended and should be considered in patients with primary indication for AVR and luminal stenosis >70 % in major coronary arteries and the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) by guidelines. AVR is indicated for severe AS undergoing CABG. It is generally accepted to perform AVR for moderate AS at the time of CABG by valve guidelines. However, prophylactic AVR for moderate AS associated with CABG may increase the early operative risk and expose the patients to postoperative long-term valve related complications. AVR after previous CABG poses potential risk for mortality and morbidity. The presence of patent ITA is a significant risk of its injury and difficulty of myocardial protection during aortic cross-clamping. Therefore, at present, for severe AS previous CABG with patent ITA should be one of the definite indications of TAVI. Rationale of TAVI in patients with severe AS and CAD has not been clearly delineated. The safety of TAVI irrespective of the extent and anatomy of CAD is still controversial. PCI is not appropriate before TAVI in high-risk patients with CAD. In the near future hybrid TAVI will be realistic considering least operative mortality and morbidity in high-risk patients. PMID:23546769

  7. Potential drug targets for calcific aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Elena; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and, given its association with age, the prevalence of CAVD is expected to continue to rise as global life expectancy increases. No drug strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. Given that valve replacement is the only available clinical option, patients often cope with a deteriorating quality of life until diminished valve function demands intervention. The recognition that CAVD results from active cellular mechanisms suggests that the underlying pathways might be targeted to treat the condition. However, no such therapeutic strategy has been successfully developed to date. One hope was that drugs already used to treat vascular complications might also improve CAVD outcomes, but the mechanisms of CAVD progression and the desired therapeutic outcomes are often different from those of vascular diseases. We, therefore, discuss the benchmarks that must be met by a CAVD treatment approach, and highlight advances in the understanding of CAVD mechanisms to identify potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24445487

  8. Retrograde Transcatheter Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak through a Mechanical Aortic Valve Prosthesis: 2 Successful Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daxin; Pan, Wenzhi; Guan, Lihua; Qian, Juying

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis has been considered a contraindication to retrograde percutaneous closure of mitral paravalvular leaks, because passing a catheter through the mechanical aortic valve can affect the function of a mechanical valve and thereby lead to severe hemodynamic deterioration. We report what we believe are the first 2 cases of retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis without transseptal or transapical puncture. Our experience shows that retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks in this manner can be an optional approach for transcatheter closure of such leaks, especially when a transapical or transseptal puncture approach is not feasible. This technique might also be applied to other transcatheter procedures in which there is a need to pass a catheter through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. PMID:27127428

  9. Drivers of healthcare costs associated with the episode of care for surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Li, Lindsay; Braga, Vevien; Pazhaniappan, Nandhaa; Pardhan, Anar M; Lian, Dana; Leeksma, Aric; Peterson, Ben; Cohen, Eric A; Forsey, Anne; Kingsbury, Kori J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is generally more expensive than surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) due to the high cost of the device. Our objective was to understand the patient and procedural drivers of cumulative healthcare costs during the index hospitalisation for these procedures. Design All patients undergoing TAVI, isolated SAVR or combined SAVR+coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada were identified during the fiscal year 2012–2013. Data were obtained from a prospective registry. Cumulative healthcare costs during the episode of care were determined using microcosting. To identify drivers of healthcare costs, multivariable hierarchical generalised linear models with a logarithmic link and γ distribution were developed for TAVI, SAVR and SAVR+CABG separately. Results Our cohort consisted of 1310 patients with aortic stenosis, of whom 585 underwent isolated SAVR, 518 had SAVR+CABG and 207 underwent TAVI. The median costs for the index hospitalisation for isolated SAVR were $21 811 (IQR $18 148–$30 498), while those for SAVR+CABG were $27 256 (IQR $21 741–$39 000), compared with $42 742 (IQR $37 295–$56 196) for TAVI. For SAVR, the major patient-level drivers of costs were age >75 years, renal dysfunction and active endocarditis. For TAVI, chronic lung disease was a major patient-level driver. Procedural drivers of cost for TAVI included a non-transfemoral approach. A prolonged intensive care unit stay was associated with increased costs for all procedures. Conclusions We found wide variation in healthcare costs for SAVR compared with TAVI, with different patient-level drivers as well as potentially modifiable procedural factors. These highlight areas of further study to optimise healthcare delivery. PMID:27621832

  10. Markov model for selection of aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation (without replacement) in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Gada, Hemal; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Svensson, Lars G; Marwick, Thomas H

    2012-05-01

    Comparisons between transcatheter aortic valve implantation without replacement (TAVI) and tissue aortic valve replacement (AVR) in clinical trials might not reflect the outcomes in standard clinical practice. This could have important implications for the relative cost-effectiveness of these alternatives for management of severe aortic stenosis in high-risk patients for whom surgery is an option. The mean and variance of risks, transition probabilities, utilities, and cost of TAVI, AVR, and medical management derived from observational studies were entered into a Markov model that examined the progression of patients between relevant health states. The outcomes and cost were derived from 10,000 simulations. Sensitivity analyses were based on variations in the likelihood of mortality, stroke, and other commonly observed outcomes. Both TAVI and AVR were cost-effective compared to medical management. In the reference case (age 80 years, the perioperative TAVI and AVR mortality was 6.9% vs 9.8%, and annual mortality was 21% vs 24%), the utility of TAVI was greater than that of AVR (1.78 vs 1.72 quality-adjusted life years) and the lifetime cost of TAVI exceeded that of AVR ($59,503 vs $56,339). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $52,773/quality-adjusted life years. Threshold analyses showed that variation in the probabilities of perioperative and annual mortality after AVR and after TAVI and annual stroke after TAVI were important determinants of the favored strategy. Sensitivity analyses defined the thresholds at which TAVI or AVR was the preferred strategy with regard to health outcomes and cost. In conclusion, TAVI satisfies current metrics of cost-effectiveness relative to AVR and might provide net health benefits at acceptable cost for selected high-risk patients among whom AVR is the current procedure of choice. PMID:22335853

  11. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  12. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  13. Decreased platelet function in aortic valve stenosis: high shear platelet activation then inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. R.; Etherington, M. D.; Brant, J.; Watkins, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To elucidate the mechanism of the bleeding tendency observed in patients with aortic valve stenosis. DESIGN--A prospective study of high and low shear platelet function tests in vitro in normal controls compared with that in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis with a mean (SD) systolic gradient by Doppler of 75 (18) mm Hg before and at least 4 months after aortic valve replacement. SETTING--District general hospital. RESULTS--The patients showed reduced retention in the high shear platelet function tests. (a) Platelet retention in the filter test was 53.6 (12.6)% in patients with aortic valve stenosis and 84.8 (9.6)% in the controls (P < 0.001). (b) Retention in the glass bead column test was 49.8 (19.2) in the patients and 87.4 (8.7) in the controls (P < 0.001). (c) The standard bleeding time was longer in the patients (P < 0.06). Results of the high shear tests (a, b, and c) after aortic valve replacement were within the normal range. The platelet count was low but within the normal range before surgery and increased postoperatively (P < 0.01). There were no differences in the results of standard clotting tests, plasma and intraplatelet von Willebrand's factor, or in 15 platelet aggregation tests using five agonists between patients with aortic valve stenosis and controls. CONCLUSIONS--The high shear haemodynamics of aortic valve stenosis modify platelet function in vivo predisposing to a bleeding tendency. This abnormality of platelet function is detectable only in vitro using high shear tests. The abnormal function is reversed by aortic valve replacement. High shear forces in vitro activate and then inactivate platelets. By the same mechanisms aortic valve stenosis seems to lead to high shear damage in vivo, resulting in a clinically important bleeding tendency in some patients. PMID:8541170

  14. Experimental validation of the fluid-structure interaction simulation of a bioprosthetic aortic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Kemp, I; Dellimore, K; Rodriguez, R; Scheffer, C; Blaine, D; Weich, H; Doubell, A

    2013-09-01

    Experiments performed on a 19 mm diameter bioprosthetic valve were used to successfully validate the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation of an aortic valve at 72 bpm. The FSI simulation was initialized via a novel approach utilizing a Doppler sonogram of the experimentally tested valve. Using this approach very close quantitative agreement (≤12.5%) between the numerical predictions and experimental values for several key valve performance parameters, including the peak systolic transvalvular pressure gradient, rapid valve opening time and rapid valve closing time, was obtained. The predicted valve leaflet kinematics during opening and closing were also in good agreement with the experimental measurements. PMID:23907849

  15. TAVI in a Patient with Single Coronary Artery: The Choice of Self-Expandable Valve may be Reasonable

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Hüseyin; Gönençer, Jale Zeynep; Karabay, Özalp; Erdal, Abidin Cenk; Kaya, Dayimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Single coronary artery is a rare congenital coronary artery anomaly with the incidence of approximately 0.03%–0.05%. Its coexistence with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is even rarer. Patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have a risk of coronary obstruction (1%) which will be more lethal when the origin of the coronary artery is single. Case Report: An 81 year-old female was referred to our institution for severe AS. Her coronary angiography revealed a single coronary artery originating from right sinus of valsalva. Since the patient had a high risk for aortic valve surgery, the cardiac team decided to perform transfemoral TAVI with a self-expandable valve. Conclusion: We presented a successful case of TAVI with Medtronic CoreValve (Medtronic; Minnesota, USA) in a patient with single coronary artery after discussing the base of our strategy for preferring self-expandable valve. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of CoreValve implantation in such a patient in the literature. We suggest that the self-expandable valve may be the first choice in these patients because of its recapturable design. PMID:27308083

  16. A fibrous band associated with the non-coronary aortic valve cusp in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ajithdoss, Dharani K; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M; Edwards, John F

    2011-06-01

    A fibrous band connecting the middle of the free edge (nodulus Arantii) of the non-coronary aortic valve cusp to the ascending aorta just above the level of the non-coronary sinus of Valsalva was observed in an asymptomatic, 11-year-old, male Border Collie. The fibrous band was unrelated to the cause of the death in this dog. Such fibrous bands are usually reported in humans with congenital bicuspid aortic valves. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a fibrous band in the aortic valve in a domestic animal. PMID:21641896

  17. [Surgical aortic valve replacement for acute Streptococcus viridans endocarditis with simultaneous moderate hemophilia A].

    PubMed

    Krawietz, W; Loracher, C; Struck, E; Schlimok, G; Falk, H

    1988-07-01

    This is a report of a 25-year-old patient with known aortic valve stenosis since early youth and hemophilia A, showing recurrent joint bleeding. Acute Streptococcus endocarditis induced aortic valve insufficiency resulting in cardiac failure. Aortic valve replacement was performed after substitution of factor VIII, during which intra- and postoperative bleeding was prolonged by pericardial adhesions. Heparin was administered during cardiopulmonary-bypass as usual, but usual postoperative cumarin therapy was not initiated due to prolonged PTT time. One year postoperatively, the patient was in an excellent condition and fully rehabilitated. PMID:3145652

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a young heart transplant recipient crossing the traditional boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Terp, Kim Allan; Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Andersen, Henning Rud; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established therapeutic alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in high-risk or inoperable patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Hitherto, TAVI is not recommended in young and low-intermediate risk patients. However, TAVI may also serve as an alternative to SAVR in selected young patients, e.g., patients who have previously undergone multiple cardiac surgery procedures. We report a case of trans-femoral TAVI in a 25-year-old heart transplant (HTx) recipient with prior surgery for congenital heart disease. PMID:27621906

  19. Perceval S Valve Solution for Degenerated Freestyle Root in the Presence of Chronic Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Lio, Antonio; Miceli, Antonio; Ferrarini, Matteo; Glauber, Mattia

    2016-06-01

    Aortic root replacement with porcine xenograft is a valuable treatment option in acute aortic dissection, but conduits are often prone to degeneration. Reoperation is still associated with high operative mortality, and it usually requires root removal and repetition of the Bentall procedure, or a less radical option limited to valve replacement. We describe two cases of Freestyle root degeneration in patients with chronic aortic dissection, in whom we performed a valve-in-valve procedure with the Perceval S prosthesis (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy). PMID:27211946

  20. A simple technique to rule out occlusion of right coronary artery after aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Angel L; El-Diasty, Mohammad M; Martínez, Amparo; Alvarez, Julian; García-Bengochea, José B

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical occlusion of the right coronary artery during aortic valve surgery is an infrequent but serious complication. Early recognition and expeditious management are important to reduce mortality. We developed a safe, quick, and easy technique to assess right coronary artery flow after aortic valve surgery. Direct intraoperative right coronary artery flow was measured by placing a transit-time flowmeter probe around the right coronary artery. We were able to promptly detect severe right coronary artery insufficiency in patients with acute unexpected right ventricular failure after aortic valve replacement. PMID:22115253

  1. An experimental study of apico-aortic valved conduit (AAVC) for surgical treatment of aortic stenosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Hidehiro; Inoue, Tomoki; Hoshi, Katsuichiro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Shimizu, Miki; Tanaka, Ryou; Takashima, Kazuaki; Mori, Yuichi; Noishiki, Yasuharu; Yamane, Yoshihisa

    2005-04-01

    A new valved conduit was developed using a canine aortic valve. The bioprosthetic valve was fixed with glutaraldehyde and epoxy compound (Denacol-EX313/810). A vascular graft composed of ultra-fine polyester fiber (10 mm in diameter, 200 mm in length) was used. Four dogs underwent apico-aortic valved conduit (AAVC) implantation and aortic banding (bypass group, BG), while another 4 dogs underwent aortic banding without AAVC implantation (control group, CG). Cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were performed for assessment of hemodynamics 2 weeks and 6 months after surgery. Left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and the left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient differed significantly (P<0.01) between the BG and CG dogs. Left ventricular angiocardiography showed patency of the valved conduit in all the BG dogs. Echocardiography was performed before and 2, 4 and 6 months after surgery, and showed that while pressure overload caused concentric myocardial hypertrophy in the CG dogs, the left ventricle dilated eccentrically in the BG dogs. Furthermore, relief of left ventricular pressure overload by AAVC was maintained. PMID:15876784

  2. A Case of Severe Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis: Valve Repair With Tricuspidization in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Tokue, Masahide; Hara, Hidehiko; Sahara, Naohiko; Yamazaki, Kenji; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Takahashi, Kei; Ozaki, Shigeyuki; Sugi, Kaoru; Nakamura, Masato

    2015-10-01

    A 33-year-old male was referred to our institute with acute heart failure. The patient was found to have a unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) and severe aortic stenosis. He had been followed at a local university hospital during childhood. However, he stopped visiting the outpatient clinic after becoming an adult. His condition subsequently worsened, and he ultimately presented to our hospital with cardiogenic shock. In Japan, some adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients continue to be followed by pediatric cardiologists, though the patterns of practice are variable. This report describes the case of a patient who became lost to follow-up in early adulthood. We thus focus on this ACHD case as an example of the effects of inadequate communication among doctors and the need to establish better ACHD management protocols for treating this patient population. PMID:26467883

  3. The Anesthetic Management of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Fabio; Baldassarri, Rubia

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of patients with a high risk for surgery because of advanced age and associated comorbidities that significantly increase the perioperative risk successfully undergo transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). TAVI is commonly performed under general or local anesthesia or local anesthesia plus mild sedation to achieve a conscious sedation. The anesthetic regimen generally depends on the patient's clinical profile and the procedural technical characteristics, but the center's experience and internal organization likely play an important role in anesthetic decision making. The large variation in anesthetic management among various centers and countries likely depends on the different composition of the operating team and institutional organization. Therefore, a tight interaction among the various members of the TAVI team, including the cardiac anesthetist, provides the proper anesthetic management using the chosen procedural technique. PMID:26403787

  4. Embolic Protection Devices in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Steinvil, Arie; Benson, Richard T; Waksman, Ron

    2016-03-01

    The initially reported periprocedural neurological events rates associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement raised concerns that ultimately led to the development and to the clinical research of novel embolic protection devices. Although the reduction of clinical stroke is a desired goal, the current research design of embolic protection devices focuses on surrogate markers of the clinical disease, primarily on silent central nervous system lesions observed in postprocedural diffuse-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive function testing. As the mere presence of particulate debris in brain matter may not correlate with the extent of brain injury, cognitive function, or quality of life, the clinical significance of embolic protection devices has yet to be determined, and interpretation of study results with regard to real-life clinical use should be viewed accordingly. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the updated ongoing clinical research on embolic protection devices and present its major caveats. PMID:26951618

  5. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics does not promote remodeling in porcine aortic wall concavity

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Samantha K; Moore, Alison N; Sucosky, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of type-I left-right bicuspid aortic valve (LR-BAV) hemodynamic stresses in the remodeling of the thoracic ascending aorta (AA) concavity, in the absence of underlying genetic or structural defects. METHODS: Transient wall shear stress (WSS) profiles in the concavity of tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) and LR-BAV AAs were obtained computationally. Tissue specimens excised from the concavity of normal (non-dilated) porcine AAs were subjected for 48 h to those stress environments using a shear stress bioreactor. Tissue remodeling was characterized in terms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity via immunostaining and gelatin zymography. RESULTS: Immunostaining semi-quantification results indicated no significant difference in MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression between the tissue groups exposed to TAV and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.80 and P = 0.19, respectively). Zymography densitometry revealed no difference in MMP-2 activity (total activity, active form and latent form) between the groups subjected to TAV AA and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.08, P = 0.15 and P = 0.59, respectively). CONCLUSION: The hemodynamic stress environment present in the concavity of type-I LR-BAV AA does not cause any significant change in proteolytic enzyme expression and activity as compared to that present in the TAV AA. PMID:26839660

  6. Periprocedural considerations of transcatheter aortic valve implantation for anesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Ata Hassani; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is rapidly gaining popularity as a viable option in the management of patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and high risk for open surgical intervention. TAVR soon expanding its indications from "high-risk" group of patients to those with "intermediate-risk". As an anesthesiologist; understanding the procedure and the challenges inherent to it is of utmost importance, in order to implement optimal care for this generally frail population undergoing a rather novel procedure. Cardiac anesthesiologists generally play a pivotal role in the perioperative care of the patients, and therefore they should be fully familiar with the circumstances occurring surrounding the procedure. Along with increasing experience and technical developments for TAVR, the procedure time becomes shorter. Due to this improvement in the procedure time, more and more anesthesiologists feel comfortable in using monitored anesthesia care with moderate sedation for patients undergoing TAVR. A number of complications could arise during the procedure needing rapid diagnoses and occasionally conversion to general anesthesia. This review focuses on the periprocedural anesthetic considerations for TAVR. PMID:27489596

  7. Impact of Aortic Valve Calcification, as Measured by MDCT, on Survival in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Capoulade, Romain; Malouf, Joseph; Aggarval, Shivani; Araoz, Phillip A.; Michelena, Hector I.; Cueff, Caroline; Larose, Eric; Miller, Jordan D.; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aortic valve calcification (AVC) load measures lesion severity in aortic stenosis (AS) and is useful for diagnostic purposes. Whether AVC predicts survival after diagnosis, independent of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic AS characteristics, has not been studied. OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the impact of AVC load, absolute and relative to aortic annulus size (AVCdensity), on overall mortality in patients with AS under conservative treatment and without regard to treatment. METHODS In 3 academic centers, we enrolled 794 patients (mean age, 73 ± 12 years; 274 women) diagnosed with AS by Doppler echocardiography who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) within the same episode of care. Absolute AVC load and AVCdensity (ratio of absolute AVC to cross-sectional area of aortic annulus) were measured, and severe AVC was separately defined in men and women. RESULTS During follow-up, there were 440 aortic valve implantations (AVIs) and 194 deaths (115 under medical treatment). Univariate analysis showed strong association of absolute AVC and AVCdensity with survival (both, p < 0.0001) with a spline curve analysis pattern of threshold and plateau of risk. After adjustment for age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, symptoms, AS severity on hemodynamic assessment, and LV ejection fraction, severe absolute AVC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 2.92; p = 0.03) or severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.37 to 4.37; p = 0.002) independently predicted mortality under medical treatment, with additive model predictive value (all, p ≤ 0.04) and a net reclassification index of 12.5% (p = 0.04). Severe absolute AVC (adjusted HR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.62; p = 0.01) and severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.40 to 3.52; p = 0.001) also independently predicted overall mortality, even with adjustment for time-dependent AVI. CONCLUSIONS This large-scale, multicenter outcomes study of

  8. Pregnancy outcome and follow-up cardiac outcome in women with aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Trinder, Johanna; Caputo, Massimo; Curtis, Stephanie L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the maternal, fetal and cardiac outcomes in women who have undergone aortic valve replacement. Method Retrospective observational study of all women with aortic valve replacement, who underwent a pregnancy (1998–2012). Maternal-, fetal- and valve-related cardiac outcomes were assessed. Results Thirty-two pregnancies in 16 women with aortic valve replacement (nine bioprosthetic, six Ross and 17 mechanical) were evaluated. There were no adverse maternal events in the bioprosthetic and Ross groups but three in the mechanical group. Fetal loss rate was highest in the mechanical valve pregnancies (53%). One woman in the bioprosthetic group needed valve re-operation, and one woman in the mechanical valve group died. There was no difference in the change of Vmax over the follow-up between the valves (p = 0.25). Conclusions There was no difference in deterioration between aortic valve replacements during and after pregnancy. The highest risk of maternal and fetal complications occurred in the mechanical valve group.

  9. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. )

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  10. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic valve prolapse; Aortic regurgitation ... Any condition that prevents the aortic valve from closing completely can cause this problem. When the valve doesn't close all the way, a small amount of blood comes ...

  11. Radionuclide angiography in evaluation of left ventricular function following aortic valve replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1981-05-01

    Congestive heart failure in patients surviving aortic valve replacement has been associated with a high late mortality. To determine whether myocardial dysfunction in these patients occurred preoperatively, perioperatively, or during the early postoperative period, 19 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using cardioplegia and hypothermia were studied by multiple-gated cardiac blood pool imaging. The resting ejection fractions for 8 patients with aortic stenosis did not show significant changes following operation. The 11 patients with aortic insufficiency has resting preoperative values of 58 +/- 15%, which fell to 38 +/- 18% immediately postoperatively (p less than 0.01), with the late values being 51 +/- 16%. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed deterioration of regional wall motion immediately after operation, which persisted in 3 during the late evaluation. The occurrence of new perioperative regional wall motion abnormalities and persistent perioperative depression in left ventricular function in some patients suggest the need for further improvement in myocardial protection during cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic valve replacement.

  12. Side-Specific Endothelial-Dependent Regulation of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jennifer; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Chen, Si; Sarang, Zubair; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Chester, Adrian H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial endothelial cells maintain vascular homeostasis and vessel tone in part through the secretion of nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we determined how aortic valve endothelial cells (VEC) regulate aortic valve interstitial cell (VIC) phenotype and matrix calcification through NO. Using an anchored in vitro collagen hydrogel culture system, we demonstrate that three-dimensionally cultured porcine VIC do not calcify in osteogenic medium unless under mechanical stress. Co-culture with porcine VEC, however, significantly attenuated VIC calcification through inhibition of myofibroblastic activation, osteogenic differentiation, and calcium deposition. Incubation with the NO donor DETA-NO inhibited VIC osteogenic differentiation and matrix calcification, whereas incubation with the NO blocker l-NAME augmented calcification even in 3D VIC–VEC co-culture. Aortic VEC, but not VIC, expressed endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in both porcine and human valves, which was reduced in osteogenic medium. eNOS expression was reduced in calcified human aortic valves in a side-specific manner. Porcine leaflets exposed to the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ increased osteocalcin and α-smooth muscle actin expression. Finally, side-specific shear stress applied to porcine aortic valve leaflet endothelial surfaces increased cGMP production in VEC. Valve endothelial-derived NO is a natural inhibitor of the early phases of valve calcification and therefore may be an important regulator of valve homeostasis and pathology. PMID:23499458

  13. [Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis with aorto-left atrium fistula; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Junji; Naraoka, Shuichi; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Satomi

    2013-12-01

    An 83-year-old man had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR)[CEP Magna 21 mm] and coronary aortic bypass grafting (CABG)[left internal thoracic artery (LITA)-left anterier descending artery( LAD)] 2 years ago in our hospital. He was admitted for fever of unknown origin and developed a stroke to another hospital. The echocardiography and computerized tomography showed an abscessaround the aortic prosthetic valve. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) was diagnosed, and he was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment. Three days after admission, acute heart failure developed that led to an emergency operation. When the ascending aorta was dissected, an aorto-left atrium fistula and vegetation were recognized. Aortic valve replacement and patch plasty of the aorto-left atrium fistula were performed successfully. This case was diagnosed as PVE with aorto-left atrium fistula, which is quite a rare complication of PVE. PMID:24322361

  14. Perioperative conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Patel, Prakash A; Gutsche, Jacob T; Sophocles, Aris; Anwaruddin, Saif; Szeto, Wilson Y; Augoustides, John G T

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are common and important. The risk factors and outcome effects of atrial fibrillation after TAVR recently have been appreciated. The paucity of clinical trials has resulted in the absence of clinical guidelines for the management of this important arrhythmia in this high-risk patient population. Given this evidence gap and clinical necessity, it is likely that clinical trials in the near future will be designed and implemented to address these issues. Prompt recognition and proper management of atrioventricular block remain essential in the management of patients undergoing TAVR, because heart block of all types is common and may require permanent pacemaker implantation. The current evidence base has described the incidence, risk factors, and current outcomes of this conduction disturbance in detail. As the practice of TAVR evolves and novel valve prostheses are developed, a focus on minimizing damage to the cardiac conductive system remains paramount. It remains to be seen how the next generation of TAVR prostheses will affect the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of associated conduction disturbances. PMID:24103715

  15. Transaortic transcatheter aortic valve replacement through a right minithoracotomy with the balloon-expandable Sapien 3 valve.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Enrico; Muller, Olivier; Demertzis, Stefanos; Moccetti, Marco; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Eeckhout, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Transaortic transcatheter aortic valve replacement performed through a right anterolateral minithoracotomy at the second intercostal space is a safe and standardized minimally invasive procedure carrying important clinical advantages for the patient, in particular, no damage to the ventricular apex, preservation of the diseased peripheral arteries and no cross of the aortic arch with the delivery system, meaning a lower risk of calcium dislodgement and neurological complications. Using the third-generation, balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien™ 3 transcatheter heart valve and the Certitude™ delivery system, the transaortic procedure is easily performed under fluoroscopic and echocardiographic guidance. Compared with the transapical procedure, the transaortic technique requires an inversely mounted stent valve and follows the standard guidelines for valve positioning and deployment under rapid pacing. The transaortic approach through a right anterolateral minithoracotomy at the second intercostal space combines the positive aspects of both transfemoral and transapical valve replacements without the risks of either procedure (left ventricular, coronary and peripheral vascular injuries). PMID:27401072

  16. Use of the Rigid Table Mount System During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Direct Aortic Approach.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Ikki; Abe, Kohei; Hiraiwa, Nobuhiko; Nakaoka, Mikihiko; Mitsuhashi, Hirotsugu; Komiyama, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Although the direct aortic approach is one option in performing transcatheter aortic valve replacement, it is essential to keep a sheath manually in the same position during the procedure. Holding the sheath by hand is not ideal because of the relatively high dose of radiation to the person who holds the sheath. We here describe a unique way to keep the sheath firm with a table mount system. PMID:27549564

  17. Premature Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Degeneration Associated with Allergy to Galactose-Alpha-1,3-Galactose.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert B; Frischtak, Helena L; Kron, Irving L; Ghanta, Ravi K

    2016-07-01

    We present the cases of two patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves who developed an allergy to alpha-gal. Each had premature degeneration of their bioprosthesis and demonstrated rapidly increasing transvalvular gradients after development of their allergy. Each underwent successful replacement with a mechanical aortic valve within 1-2 years of symptom onset. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12764 (J Card Surg 2016;31:446-448). PMID:27238083

  18. Chronic Otitis Media Resulting in Aortic Valve Replacement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Guler, Adem; Sahin, Mehmet Ali; Gurkan Yesil, Fahri; Yildizoglu, Uzeyir; Demirkol, Sait; Arslan, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve is known to be the most common congenital cardiac malformation, with an approximate incidence rate of 1-2% in the general population. Most patients are unaware of the disease until the onset of infective endocarditis, which is a life-threatening complication that may affect a heart valve or other cardiac structures at the site of endothelial damage. A 22-year-old man presented to our internal medicine clinic with a complaint of acute onset dyspnea and fatigue. His body temperature was 38 (°)C. A diastolic murmur was detected at the right sternal border. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography revealed severe aortic insufficiency, and two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography showed that the aortic valve was bicuspid. There was also a flail lesion extending the left ventricular outflow tract, resulting in pathological coaptation and severe aortic insufficiency. The patient was referred to our cardiovascular department for surgery. We herein present this case of a bicuspid aortic valve complicated by infective endocarditis due to the underlying disease of chronic otitis media related to a rare pathogen: Alloiococcus otitidis. The patient underwent a successful aortic valve replacement surgery due to aortic insufficiency following infective endocarditis. He was discharged on the 16(th) postoperative day in good condition. PMID:26110009

  19. How to Perform Transcaval Access and Closure for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Robert J.; Babaliaros, Vasilis C.; Greenbaum, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous trans-catheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  20. How to perform transcaval access and closure for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Robert J; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Greenbaum, Adam B

    2015-12-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  1. Form Follows Function: Advances in Trilayered Structure Replication for Aortic Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Simionescu, Dan T.; Chen, Joseph; Jaeggli, Michael; Wang, Bo; Liao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering the aortic heart valve is a challenging endeavor because of the particular hemodynamic and biologic conditions present in the native aortic heart valve. The backbone of an ideal valve substitute should be a scaffold that is strong enough to withstand billions of repetitive bending, flexing and stretching cycles, while also being slowly degradable to allow for remodeling. In this review we highlight three overlooked aspects that might influence the long term durability of tissue engineered valves: replication of the native valve trilayered histoarchitecture, duplication of the three-dimensional shape of the valve and cell integration efforts focused on getting the right number and type of cells to the right place within the valve structure and driving them towards homeostatic maintenance of the valve matrix. We propose that the trilayered structure in the native aortic valve that includes a middle spongiosa layer cushioning the motions of the two external fibrous layers should be our template for creation of novel scaffolds with improved mechanical durability. Furthermore, since cells adapt to micro-loads within the valve structure, we believe that interstitial cell remodeling of the valvular matrix will depend on the accurate replication of the structures and loads, resulting in successful regeneration of the valve tissue and extended durability. PMID:23355946

  2. iTRAQ proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix remodeling in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Rojas, Tatiana; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Calvo, Enrique; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis Fernando; Rivera, Miguel; Padial, Luis R.; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Cuesta, Fernando de la; Barderas, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. The aortic valve is a thin, complex, layered connective tissue with compartmentalized extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by specialized cell types, which directs blood flow in one direction through the heart. There is evidence suggesting remodeling of such ECM during aortic stenosis development. Thus, a better characterization of the role of ECM proteins in this disease would increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Aortic valve samples were collected from 18 patients which underwent aortic valve replacement (50% males, mean age of 74 years) and 18 normal control valves were obtained from necropsies (40% males, mean age of 69 years). The proteome of the samples was analyzed by 2D-LC MS/MS iTRAQ methodology. The results showed an altered expression of 13 ECM proteins of which 3 (biglycan, periostin, prolargin) were validated by Western blotting and/or SRM analyses. These findings are substantiated by our previous results demonstrating differential ECM protein expression. The present study has demonstrated a differential ECM protein pattern in individuals with AS, therefore supporting previous evidence of a dynamic ECM remodeling in human aortic valves during AS development. PMID:26620461

  3. Emergency aortic valve replacement and Caesarian section in a primigravida with severe aortic stenosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kochhar, Puneet K; Zutshi, V; Shamsunder, S; Batra, S; Ghosh, P

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Congenital bicuspid aortic valve with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a rare condition (3–6% of patients with congenital heart disease). Pregnancy in these patients carries a high risk of maternal and fetal mortality. With advancing gestational age, these women may develop cardiac failure due to increased cardiorespiratory requirements. When medical therapy proves insufficient, cardiac surgery becomes mandatory to save the patient's life. Balloon valvuloplasty is only palliative treatment, the duration of benefit being only 6 months. Valve replacement is thus recommended. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery with valve replacement has been reported to carry a lower risk of maternal mortality (1.5–13%) but a very high fetal risk (16–40%). This paper reports the case of a 30-year-old primigravida with severe AS with bicuspid aortic valve and pulmonary congestion clinically uncontrolled, in whom CPB surgery and aortic valve replacement was performed as an emergency procedure, along with a lower segment Caesarian section. Conclusion The outcome of unrelieved severe symptomatic AS in pregnancy is poor. Multidisciplinary management is important to avoid deterioration in cardiac performance in parturients with severe AS. CPB during pregnancy carries a high risk to the fetus. Therefore, open heart surgery during pregnancy should be advised only in extreme emergencies (ie, heart failure refractory to conventional therapy).

  4. Should the freehand allograft be abandoned as a reliable alternative for aortic valve replacement?

    PubMed

    Jones, E L; Shah, V B; Shanewise, J S; Martin, T D; Martin, R P; Coto, J A; Broniec, R; Shen, Y

    1995-06-01

    Cryopreserved aortic allografts were used for aortic valve replacement in 80 patients between 1986 and 1994 (infracoronary in 46 and complete root replacement in 34). Hospital mortality was 6.3% (5/80) with all deaths occurring in the infracoronary group. Three of five deaths were in patients with endocarditis and valve ring abscess. Left ventricular-aortic mean pressure gradients across the allograft valves were significantly lower for root replacement patients (mean, 9.0 +/- 6.9 mm Hg versus 18.1 +/- 8.7 mm Hg for infracoronary patients) (p = 0.0001). No patient having root allograft replacement had early echocardiographic aortic insufficiency greater than grade 1 versus 28% of those having infracoronary implantations. Late aortic insufficiency of grade 2 or greater was seen in 46% of patients having infracoronary implantation versus 17% of patients having root implantation. Nine patients had explantation of an aortic allograft (eight infracoronary and one root). Reasons for explantation were as follows: endocarditis (three infracoronary, one root), technical (three infracoronary), undiagnosed idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (1 patient), and prolapsing infracoronary leaflet (1 patient). Actuarial freedom from grade 3 and 4 aortic insufficiency or explantation was 77% at 7 years for infracoronary implantations. We conclude that the infracoronary aortic allograft has an unacceptable frequency of late insufficiency and its use in this position should be abandoned. The substantial incidence of late endocarditis in the infracoronary (free-hand) aortic allograft was surprising.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7771817

  5. 3D bioprinting of heterogeneous aortic valve conduits with alginate/gelatin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A; Kang, Kevin H; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2013-05-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4 ± 3.4% for SMC and 83.2 ± 4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  6. Comparison of David V valve-sparing root replacement and bioprosthetic valve conduit for aortic root aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    DeNino, Walter F.; Toole, John Matthew; Rowley, Christopher; Stroud, Martha R.; Ikonomidis, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an attractive option for the management of aortic root aneurysms with a normal native aortic valve. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with a modification of the David V VSRR and compared it with stented pericardial bioprosthetic valve conduit (BVC) root replacement in an age-matched cohort of older patients. Methods A total of 48 VSRRs were performed at our institution, excluding those on bicuspid aortic valves. We compared these cases with 15 aortic root replacements performed using a BVC during the same period. Subgroup analysis was performed comparing 16 VSRR cases and 15 age-matched BVC cases. Results The greatest disparity between the VSRR and BVC groups was age (53 vs 69 years, respectively; P < .0005). The matched patients were similar in terms of baseline demographics and differed only in concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (2 VSRR vs 7 BVC patients; P = .036). None of the VSRR and 3 of the BVC procedures were performed for associated dissection (P = .101). Postoperative aortic insufficiency grade was significantly different between the 2 groups (P = .004). The cardiopulmonary bypass, crossclamp, and circulatory arrest times were not different between the VSRR and BVC groups (174 vs 187 minutes, P = .205; 128 vs 133 minutes, P = .376; and 10 vs 13 minutes, respectively; P = .175). No differences were found between the 2 groups with respect to postoperative complications. One postoperative death occurred in the BVC group and none in the VSRR group. The postoperative length of stay and aortic valve gradients were less in the VSRR group (6 vs 8 days, P = .038; 6 vs 11.4 mm Hg, P = .001). The intensive care unit length of stay was significantly less in the VSRR group (54 vs 110 hours, P = .001). Conclusions VSRR is an effective alternative to the BVC for aortic root aneurysm. PMID:25173127

  7. Stroke after Aortic Valve Surgery: Results from a Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Messé, Steven R.; Acker, Michael A.; Kasner, Scott E.; Fanning, Molly; Giovannetti, Tania; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Bilello, Michel; Szeto, Wilson Y.; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Hargrove, W. Clark; Mohler, Emile R.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence and impact of clinical stroke and silent radiographic cerebral infarction complicating open surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) are poorly characterized. Methods and Results We performed a prospective cohort study of subjects ≥ 65 years of age undergoing AVR for calcific aortic stenosis. Subjects were evaluated by neurologists pre-operatively and post-operatively, and underwent post-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Over a 4 year period, 196 subjects were enrolled at 2 sites. Mean age = 75.8 ± 6.2 years, 36% female, 6% non-white. Clinical strokes were detected in 17%, Transient Ischemic Attack in 2%, and in-hospital mortality was 5%. The frequency of stroke in the Society for Thoracic Surgery (STS) database in this cohort was 7%. Most strokes were mild; the median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was 3 (interquartile range 1 – 9). Clinical stroke was associated with increased length of stay, median 12 vs 10 days, p = 0.02. Moderate or severe stroke (NIHSS ≥10) occurred in 8 (4%) and was strongly associated with in-hospital mortality, 38% vs 4%, p = 0.005. Of the 109 stroke-free subjects with post-operative MRI, silent infarct was identified in 59 (54%). Silent infarct was not associated with in-hospital mortality or increased length of stay. Conclusions Clinical stroke after AVR was more common than previously reported, more than double for this same cohort in the STS database, and silent cerebral infarctions were detected in over half of patients undergoing AVR. Clinical stroke complicating AVR is associated with increased length of stay and mortality. PMID:24690611

  8. Platelet reactivity in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Orvin, Katia; Eisen, Alon; Perl, Leor; Zemer-Wassercug, Noa; Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Lev, Eli I; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-07-01

    Thromboembolic events, primarily stroke, might complicate transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) procedures in 3-5 % of cases. Thus, it is common to administer aspirin and clopidogrel pharmacotherapy for 3-6 months following TAVI in order to prevent those events. The biologic response to the dual anti platelet treatment (DAPT) is heterogeneous, e.g. low response, known as high on treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) may be associated with adverse thromboembolic events. Little is known about the prevalence of HTPR among patients undergoing TAVI. To assess the variability in response and rates of residual platelet reactivity in patients undergoing TAVI. We examined platelet reactivity in response to clopidogrel and aspirin in 40 consecutive patients (mean age 81.7 ± 6.5 years, 66.7 % women) who underwent successful TAVI using the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and the multiple electrode aggregometry assay (Multiplate analyzer) in response to adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid respectively, at different time points before and following TAVI. Before TAVI, the majority of patients were on antiplatelet therapy (68.5 % aspirin, 12.5 % clopidogrel, 12.5 % DAPT). Following the procedure all patients were on DAPT or clopidogrel and warfarin. Among analyzed patients, 41 % had HTPR for clopidogrel and 12.5 % for aspirin at baseline, which did not significantly change 1-month following the procedure (p = 0.81 and p  = 0.33, respectively). In conclusion, patients undergoing TAVI for severe aortic stenosis and treated with DAPT have high rates of residual platelet reactivity during the peri-procedural period and up to 1-month thereafter. These findings may have clinical implications for the anti-platelet management of TAVI patients. PMID:26695072

  9. Sedation or general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Mayr, N Patrick; Michel, Jonathan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Tassani, Peter; Martin, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is nowadays a routine therapy for elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and high perioperative risk. With growing experience, further development of the devices, and the expansion to "intermediate-risk" patients, there is increasing interest in performing this procedure under conscious sedation (TAVI-S) rather than the previously favoured approach of general anesthesia (TAVI-GA). The proposed benefits of TAVI-S include; reduced procedure time, shorter intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, reduced need for intraprocedural vasopressor support, and the potential to perform the procedure without the direct presence of an anesthetist for cost-saving reasons. To date, no randomized trial data exists. We reviewed 13 non-randomized studies/registries reporting data from 6,718 patients undergoing TAVI (3,227 performed under sedation). Patient selection, study methods, and endpoints have differed considerably between published studies. Reported rates of in-hospital and longer-term mortality are similar for both groups. Up to 17% of patients undergoing TAVI-S require conversion to general anesthesia during the procedure, primarily due to vascular complications, and urgent intubation is frequently associated with hemodynamic instability. Procedure related factors, including hypotension, may compound preexisting age-specific renal impairment and enhance the risk of acute kidney injury. Hypotonia of the hypopharyngeal muscles in elderly patients, intraprocedural hypercarbia, and certain anesthetic drugs, may increase the aspiration risk in sedated patients. General anesthesia and conscious sedation have both been used successfully to treat patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI with similar reported short and long-term mortality outcomes. The authors believe that the significant incidence of complications and unplanned conversion to general anesthesia during TAVI-S mandates the start-to-finish presence

  10. [Reverse myocardial remodeling in patients with aortic valve disease and mitral insufficiency in early postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Belov, Iu V; Katkov, A I; Seslavinskaia, T V; Vinokurov, I A; Salagaev, G I

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of patients with aortic valve disease and concomitant mitral insufficiency remains debatable. We analyzed early postoperative results of surgical treatment of 80 patients depending on type of surgery. All patients were divided into three groups: the 1st - aortic valve replacement in patients without mitral valve dysfunction (control group) (n=44); the 2nd - isolated aortic valve replacement in patients with concomitant mitral regurgitation degree 2-3 (n=18), the 3rd - simultaneous aortic and mitral valve replacement (n=18). Combined valve replacement was associated with more intraoperative blood loss (852.78±442.08 ml) compared with aortic valve replacement (658.7±374.09 ml), p<0.05. In patients with mitral regurgitation greater hematocrit decrease was observed (22.13±3.6% in group 2 and 21.4±4.48 in group 3) in comparison with control group (24.17±3.72% in group 1), p<0.05. Incidence of postoperative complications did not differ in all groups. Mortality rate was 6.8% in group 1 and 11.1% in group 3, there were no deaths in group 2. Both valves correction provided faster myocardial remodeling. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume decreased on 50 ml in group 3, on 33.67 ml in group 2 and on 50.73 ml in group 1 (p<0.05). Pulmonary pressure decreased on 20 mm Hg in group 3, on 13 mm Hg - in group 2 and on 12.57 mm Hg - in group 1, p<0.05. In groups 1 and 3 pulmonary pressure became normal after operation, in group 2 signs of pulmonary hypertension were observed (pressure - 35.3 mm Hg). Analysis of the results showed that simultaneous mitral and aortic valves replacement initiates normalization of intracardiac hemodynamics in early postoperative period. PMID:26081181

  11. Modified Lipoprotein-Derived Lipid Particles Accumulate in Human Stenotic Aortic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Lehti, Satu; Käkelä, Reijo; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Kummu, Outi; Helske-Suihko, Satu; Kupari, Markku; Werkkala, Kalervo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Öörni, Katariina

    2013-01-01

    In aortic stenosis plasma lipoprotein-derived lipids accumulate in aortic valves. Here, we first compared the lipid compositions of stenotic aortic valves and atherosclerotic plaque cores. Both pathological tissues were found to be enriched in cholesteryl linoleate, a marker of extracellularly accumulated lipoproteins. In addition, a large proportion of the phospholipids were found to contain arachidonic acid, the common precursor of a number of proinflammatory lipid mediators. Next, we isolated and characterized extracellular lipid particles from human stenotic and non-stenotic control valves, and compared them to plasma lipoproteins from the same subjects. The extracellular valvular lipid particles were isolated from 15 stenotic and 14 non-stenotic aortic valves. Significantly more apoB-100-containing lipid particles were found in the stenotic than in the non-stenotic valves. The majority of the lipid particles isolated from the non-stenotic valves had sizes (23±6.2 nm in diameter) similar to those of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) (22±1.5 nm), while the lipid particles from stenotic valves were not of uniform size, their sizes ranging from 18 to more than 500 nm. The lipid particles showed signs of oxidative modifications, and when compared to isolated plasma LDL particles, the lipid particles isolated from the stenotic valves had a higher sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine –ratio, and also higher contents of lysophosphatidylcholine and unesterified cholesterol. The findings of the present study reveal, for the first time, that in stenotic human aortic valves, infiltrated plasma lipoproteins have undergone oxidative and lipolytic modifications, and become fused and aggregated. The generated large lipid particles may contribute to the pathogenesis of human aortic stenosis. PMID:23762432

  12. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Procedural Rescue Strategy for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Cardiac Complications.

    PubMed

    Banjac, Igor; Petrovic, Marija; Akay, Mehmet H; Janowiak, Lisa M; Radovancevic, Rajko; Nathan, Sriram; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor D

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications during or after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are associated with extremely high mortality, but extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be used as procedural rescue option to improve outcomes when patients experience respiratory or cardiac arrest. From 2012 to 2014, 230 patients underwent TAVR and 10 patients (4.3%) required emergent venous-arterial ECMO support. Mean age was 83 years, median Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score was 15, and mean aortic gradient was 45 mm Hg. Median left ventricular ejection fraction was 35%. Access for most ECMOs was femoral; two patients required central arterial and femoral venous access. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated in response to hemodynamic collapse due to perforation of left ventricle (n = 2), aortic root rupture (n = 1), moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency (n = 1), left main impingement (n = 1), valve embolization (n = 1), severe hypotension and cardiac arrest after prolonged rapid pacing sequence (n = 1), ventricular fibrillation (n = 2), and ventricular tachycardia (n = 1). Median time of ECMO support was 87 minutes. There were three hospital deaths. Post-TAVR mean aortic gradient was 8 mm Hg and median hospital stay was 19 days. Additional procedures included valve-in-valve placement (n = 1), percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 1), surgical LV repair (n = 2), surgical valve replacement (n = 1), aortic root rupture repair, and coronary bypass grafting (n = 1). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is rescue therapy for hemodynamic instable patients who develop TAVR-related cardiac complications. PMID:26309098

  13. Infective endocarditis in bicuspid aortic valve: atrioventricular block as sign of perivalvular abscess.

    PubMed

    Bacchion, Francesco; Cukon, Sonja; Rizzoli, Giulio; Gerosa, Gino; Daliento, Luciano; Thiene, Gaetano; Basso, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    A 46-year-old man presenting with fever, peripheral edema, and chest pain was admitted to the emergency department. Electrocardiogram showed sinus tachycardia and first-degree atrioventricular block. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed infective endocarditis in bicuspid aortic valve, complicated with severe aortic regurgitation, ring abscess, and sinus-of-Valsalva aneurysm extending to mitroaortic fibrous continuity. The patient, who was unaware of his bicuspid aortic valve condition, reported having undergone an orthodontic procedure complicated with dental abscess 1 month prior, which was treated with combined clavulanate-amoxicillin antibiotic therapy. Blood cultures were positive for Bacteroides fragilis resistant to metronidazole. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was undertaken, with rapid resolution of fever. He eventually underwent successful aortic homograft implantation and mitral valve repair with residual first-degree atrioventricular block. PMID:17637435

  14. Baseline platelet indices and bleeding after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Huczek, Zenon; Kochman, Janusz; Kowara, Michal Krzysztof; Wilimski, Radoslaw; Scislo, Piotr; Scibisz, Anna; Rymuza, Bartosz; Andrzejewska, Renata; Stanecka, Paulina; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Bleeding complications are frequent and independently predict mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). It has been demonstrated that certain platelet parameters are indicative of platelet reactivity. We sought to determine the possible correlation between simple platelet indices and bleeding complications in patients undergoing TAVI. Platelet indices--platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width and plateletcrit--were measured in 110 consecutive patients on the day preceding TAVI. In-hospital bleeding events after TAVI were assessed according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 classification as any bleeding, major and life-threatening bleeding (MLTB) and need for transfusion. By receiver-operating characteristic analysis, only MPV was able to distinguish between patients with and without any bleeding [area under the curve (AUC) 0.629, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.531-0.719, P = 0.0342], MLTB (AUC 0.730, 95% CI 0.637-0.811, P = 0.0004) and need for transfusion (AUC 0.660, 95% CI 0.563-0.747, P = 0.0045). By multivariate logistic regression, high MPV (>10.6) and low platelet distribution width (<14.8) were associated with increased risk of any bleeding [odds ratio (OR) 4.08, 95% CI 1.66-10.07, P = 0.0022; and OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.41-10.36, P = 0.0084, respectively] and MLTB (OR 10.76, 95% CI 3.05-38, P = 0.0002; and OR 8.46, 95% CI 1.69-42.17, P = 0.0092, respectively). Additionally, high MPV independently correlated with the need for transfusion (OR 4.11, 95% CI 1.71-9.86, P = 0.0016). Larger and less heterogenic platelets may be associated with increased risk of short-term bleeding complications after TAVI. PMID:25811449

  15. INTERLAYER MICROMECHANICS OF THE AORTIC HEART VALVE LEAFLET

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Rachel M.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    While the mechanical behaviors of the fibrosa and ventricularis layers of the aortic valve (AV) leaflet are understood, little information exists on their mechanical interactions mediated by the GAG-rich central spongiosa layer. Parametric simulations of the interlayer interactions of the AV leaflets in flexure utilized a tri-layered finite element (FE) model of circumferentially oriented tissue sections to investigate inter-layer sliding hypothesized to occur. Simulation results indicated that the leaflet tissue functions as a tightly bonded structure when the spongiosa effective modulus was at least 25% that of the fibrosa and ventricularis layers. Novel studies that directly measured transmural strain in flexure of AV leaflet tissue specimens validated these findings. Interestingly, a smooth transmural strain distribution indicated that the layers of the leaflet indeed act as a bonded unit, consistent with our previous observations (Stella and Sacks, 2007) of a large number of transverse collagen fibers interconnecting the fibrosa and ventricularis layers. Additionally, when the tri-layered FE model was refined to match the transmural deformations, a layer-specific bimodular material model (resulting in four total moduli) accurately matched the transmural strain and moment-curvature relations simultaneously. Collectively, these results provide evidence, contrary to previous assumptions, that the valve layers function as a bonded structure in the low-strain flexure deformation mode. Most likely, this results directly from the transverse collagen fibers that bind the layers together to disable physical sliding and maintain layer residual stresses. Further, the spongiosa may function as a general dampening layer while the AV leaflets deforms as a homogenous structure despite its heterogeneous architecture. PMID:24292631

  16. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ping; Liu, Jialiang; Tao, Jun; Liu, Jianyang; Yang, Yanqi; Yang, Songran

    2015-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a pathogen of zoonosis often associated with occupational exposure. Although Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection has high mortality, the heart valves in humans are rarely involved. The clinical data of a case of a 65-year-old male with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis was summarized retrospectively and analyzed with a literature review. Based on a literature review and our experience, cases of E. rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis are extremely rare and surgical treatment for this condition is useful and recommended. PMID:25785050

  17. Acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: incidence, predictors and impact on mortality.

    PubMed

    Elhmidi, Yacine; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Krane, Markus; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Lange, Rüdiger; Piazza, Nicolo

    2014-02-01

    There is a paucity of data describing acute kidney injury (AKI) following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and its impact on mortality remains unknown. We therefore evaluate the incidence, predictors and impact of AKI following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. We searched MEDLINE for studies from 2008 to 2013, evaluating AKI after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. All studies were compared according to the incidence, predictors and impact of AKI following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. AKI was diagnosed according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium definition using the RIFLE criteria. Thirteen studies with more than 1900 patients were included. AKI occurred in 8.3-57% of the patients. The following factors were associated with AKI: blood transfusion; transapical access; preoperative creatinine concentration; peripheral vascular disease; hypertension; and procedural bleeding events. The 30-day mortality rate in patients with AKI ranged from 13.3% to 44.4% and was 2-6-fold higher than in patients without AKI. The amount of contrast agent used was not associated with the occurrence of AKI. AKI is a common complication, with an incidence of 8.3-57% following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Patients with AKI had higher 30-day and late mortality rates. However, AKI was related to the amount of contrast volume used in only one study. PMID:24556191

  18. Functional annulus remodelling using a prosthetic ring in tricuspid aortic valve repair: mid-term results†

    PubMed Central

    Fattouch, Khalil; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Murana, Giacomo; Nasso, Giuseppe; Guccione, Francesco; Dioguardi, Pietro; Salardino, Massimo; Bianco, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The functional aortic valve annulus (FAVA) is a complex unit with proximal (aorto-ventricular junction) and distal (sinotubular junction) components. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the total FAVA remodelling, using a prosthetic ring, on mid-term clinical and echocardiographic results after aortic valve repair. METHODS Since February 2003, 250 patients with tricuspid aortic valve insufficiency (AI) underwent aortic valve repair. FAVA dilatation was treated by prosthetic ring in 52 patients, by isolated subcommissural plasty in 62, by subcommissural plasty plus ascending aortic replacement in 57 and by David's reimplantation procedure in 79. Survival rate and freedom from recurrent AI greater than or equal to moderate were evaluated by Kaplan–Meier. RESULTS Overall late survival was 90.4%. Late cardiac-related deaths occurred in 15 patients. At follow-up, 36 (16%) patients had recurrent AI greater than or equal to moderate because of cusp reprolapse and/or FAVA redilatation. Freedom from recurrent AI was significantly higher for patients who underwent David's procedure or FAVA remodelling by prosthetic ring than those who underwent isolated subcommissural plasty (P < 0.01) or subcommissural plasty plus ascending aortic replacement (P = 0.02). There was no statistical difference between David's procedure and prosthetic ring annuloplasty (P = 0.26). CONCLUSION FAVA remodelling using a prosthetic ring is a safe procedure in aortic valve repair surgery thanks to long-term annulus stabilization and it is a pliable alternative to David's procedure in selected patients. This technique may be used in all patients with slight root dilatation to avoid aggressive root reimplantation. We also recommended total FAVA annuloplasty in all patients who underwent aortic valve repair to improve long-term repair results. PMID:24065345

  19. Design of a cyclic pressure bioreactor for the ex vivo study of aortic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Schipke, Kimberly J; To, S D Filip; Warnock, James N

    2011-01-01

    The aortic valve, located between the left ventricle and the aorta, allows for unidirectional blood flow, preventing backflow into the ventricle. Aortic valve leaflets are composed of interstitial cells suspended within an extracellular matrix (ECM) and are lined with an endothelial cell monolayer. The valve withstands a harsh, dynamic environment and is constantly exposed to shear, flexion, tension, and compression. Research has shown calcific lesions in diseased valves occur in areas of high mechanical stress as a result of endothelial disruption or interstitial matrix damage(1-3). Hence, it is not surprising that epidemiological studies have shown high blood pressure to be a leading risk factor in the onset of aortic valve disease(4). The only treatment option currently available for valve disease is surgical replacement of the diseased valve with a bioprosthetic or mechanical valve(5). Improved understanding of valve biology in response to physical stresses would help elucidate the mechanisms of valve pathogenesis. In turn, this could help in the development of non-invasive therapies such as pharmaceutical intervention or prevention. Several bioreactors have been previously developed to study the mechanobiology of native or engineered heart valves(6-9). Pulsatile bioreactors have also been developed to study a range of tissues including cartilage(10), bone(11) and bladder(12). The aim of this work was to develop a cyclic pressure system that could be used to elucidate the biological response of aortic valve leaflets to increased pressure loads. The system consisted of an acrylic chamber in which to place samples and produce cyclic pressure, viton diaphragm solenoid valves to control the timing of the pressure cycle, and a computer to control electrical devices. The pressure was monitored using a pressure transducer, and the signal was conditioned using a load cell conditioner. A LabVIEW program regulated the pressure using an analog device to pump compressed

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infective Endocarditis Following Aortic Valve Implantation: A Note of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Dapás, Juan Ignacio; Rivero, Cynthia; Burgos, Pablo; Vila, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) in patients with prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a rare complication of this relatively novel procedure and current guidelines do not include specific recommendations for its treatment. We report a case of PVE due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after TAVI that required SAVR, with successful outcome. PVE usually occurs during the first year after TAVI and entails a high mortality risk because patients eligible for this min-imally invasive procedure are fragile (i.e. advanced age and/or severe comorbidities). Additionally, clinical presentation may be atypical or subtle and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) may not be conclusive, which delays diagnosis and treatment worsening the prognosis. This case highlights that open SAVR might be ultimately indicated as part of treatment for TAVI-PVE despite a high-risk surgery score. PMID:27014375

  1. Approach to the patient with bicuspid aortic valve and ascending aorta aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, José T; Shin, David D; Rajamannan, Nalini M

    2006-12-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease is a common congenital heart valve abnormality accounting for a large number of valve replacements in the United States. Although still incompletely understood, the natural history of BAV disease is severe aortic stenosis and associated ascending aortic dilatation. In addition to the increased risk of endocarditis, aortic dissection and severe aortic valve dysfunction are responsible for most fatal complications. Thus, early and precise recognition of this condition is mandatory. The new American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association recommendations highlight the role of MRI and CT as complimentary tools to echocardiography for the diagnosis and surveillance of the morphology of the aortic valve and ascending aorta. Moreover, better understanding of the cellular mechanisms, including inflammation, bone formation, atherosclerotic-like processes, and aortic wall abnormalities, as well as the heritability and genetic predisposition for the disease, will define the potential for targeted medical therapies in the future. Currently, the treatment of this condition is primarily surgical. Although combined valve and ascending aorta replacement has been the most common surgical approach in the past, the increased cumulative risk of thrombotic and embolic events among these young patients has led to more conservative approaches. Several valve-sparing approaches with comparable mid-term results compared with the classic procedures have recently been reported. However, longer follow-up studies will be helpful to better define the advantages of these new surgical options. After a quick overview of the natural history of the BAV, this article provides an updated approximation of the current knowledge of the pathophysiology as well as the recommendations for the management and treatment of this disease. PMID:17078910

  2. CT and MR imaging of the aortic valve: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christopher J; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Araoz, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    Valvular disease is estimated to account for as many as 20% of cardiac surgical procedures performed in the United States. It may be congenital in origin or secondary to another disease process. One congenital anomaly, bicuspid aortic valve, is associated with increased incidence of stenosis, regurgitation, endocarditis, and aneurysmal dilatation of the aorta. A bicuspid valve has two cusps instead of the normal three; resultant fusion or poor excursion of the valve leaflets may lead to aortic stenosis, the presence of which is signaled by dephasing jets on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Surgery is generally recommended for patients with severe stenosis who are symptomatic or who have significant ventricular dysfunction; transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an emerging therapeutic option for patients who are not eligible for surgical treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is an essential component of preoperative planning for TAVI; it is used to determine the aortic root dimensions, severity of peripheral vascular disease, and status of the coronary arteries. Aortic regurgitation, which is caused by incompetent closure of the aortic valve, likewise leads to the appearance of jets on MR images. The severity of regurgitation is graded on the basis of valvular morphologic parameters; qualitative assessment of dephasing jets at Doppler ultrasonography; or measurements of the regurgitant fraction, volume, and orifice area. Mild regurgitation is managed conservatively, whereas severe or symptomatic regurgitation usually leads to valve replacement surgery, especially in the presence of substantial left ventricular enlargement or dysfunction. Bacterial endocarditis, although less common than aortic stenosis and regurgitation, is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Electrocardiographically gated CT reliably demonstrates infectious vegetations and benign excrescences of 1 cm or more on the valve surface, allowing the assessment of any embolic

  3. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Patrick; Erkilet, Gülsüm; Veulemans, Verena; Kröpil, Patric; Schurgers, Leon; Zeus, Tobias; Heiss, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating microparticles (MPs) derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC) as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC) by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc) levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation. Results Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs), endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs) and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation. Conclusion In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification. PMID:27010400

  4. Redo aortic valve surgery versus transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation for failing surgical bioprosthetic valves: consecutive patients in a single-center setting

    PubMed Central

    Wottke, Michael; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Krane, Markus; Piazza, Nicolo; Lange, Ruediger; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to a considerable rise in bioprosthetic as opposed to mechanical valve implantations, an increase of patients presenting with failing bioprosthetic surgical valves in need of a reoperation is to be expected. Redo surgery may pose a high-risk procedure. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an innovative, less-invasive treatment alternative for these patients. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the outcome of consecutive patients after a valve-in-valve TAVI [transcatheter aortic valve-in-surgical aortic valve (TAV-in-SAV)] as compared to a standard reoperation [surgical aortic valve redo-operation (SAV-in-SAV)] has not yet been performed. The goal of this study was to compare postoperative outcomes after TAV-in-SAV and SAV-in-SAV in a single center setting. Methods All SAV-in-SAV and TAV-in-SAV patients from January 2001 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with previous mechanical or transcatheter valves, active endocarditis and concomitant cardiac procedures were excluded. Patient characteristics, preoperative data, post-procedural complications, and 30-day mortality were collected from a designated database. Mean values ± SD were calculated for all continuous variables. Counts and percentages were calculated for categorical variables. The Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to compare categorical variables. Continuous variables were compared using the t-test for independent samples. A 2-sided P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 102 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 50 patients (49%) underwent a transcatheter valve-in-valve procedure, while 52 patients (51%) underwent redo-surgery. Patients in the TAV-in-SAV group were significantly older, had a higher mean logistic EuroSCORE and exhibited a lower mean left ventricular ejection fraction than patients in the SAV-in-SAV group (78.1±6.7 vs. 66.2±13.1, P<0.001; 27.4±18.7 vs. 14.4±10, P<0.001; and 49.8±13

  5. Percutaneous endoscopic transapical aortic valve implantation: three experimental transcatheter models.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W A; Falk, Volkmar; Mohr, Friedrich W; Walther, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    We sought to demonstrate the feasibility of an endoscopic approach to transapical aortic valve implantation (AVI), avoiding the morbidity of a thoracotomy incision. Using an experimental pig model, we performed three different approaches to transapical AVI, using a standard minithoracotomy (n=4), a robotic approach using the da Vinci telemanipulator (n=4) and an endoscopic approach using a port and camera access (n=4). The feasibility of the different techniques, exposure of the left ventricular apex, postoperative blood loss and total operative time were evaluated. Left ventricular apical exposure, 'purse-string' suture control and 33-F introducer access were successfully performed and confirmed videoscopically, fluoroscopically and at a post mortem in all 12 animals. The haemodynamics were stable in all animals. Mean intraoperative and postoperative (two-hour) blood losses were 88 and 65 ml with minithoracotomy, and 228 and 138 ml with the robotic and 130 and 43 ml with the endoscopic technique (P=0.26, P=0.14, respectively). There was no significant change in perioperative haematocrit (P=0.53). The mean total operative times were 1.4, 3.9 and 1.1 h (P=0.06), respectively. Percutaneous endoscopic and robotic transapical AVI are both feasible and can be performed in a timely manner with reasonable perioperative blood loss. Future research will focus on identifying optimal candidates for surgery based upon preoperative thoracic imaging. PMID:21700598

  6. First Human Case of Retrograde Transcatheter Implantation of an Aortic Valve Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, David; Condado, José A.; Besso, José; Vélez, Manuel; Burger, Bruno; Bibbo, Salvatore; Cedeno, Douglas; Acquatella, Harry; Mejia, Carlos; Induni, Eduardo; Fish, R. David

    2005-01-01

    The transcatheter route is an emerging approach to treating valvular disease in high-risk patients. The 1st clinical antegrade transcatheter placement of an aortic valve prosthesis was reported in 2002. We describe the first retrograde transcatheter implantation of a new aortic valve prosthesis, in a 62-year-old man with inoperable calcific aortic stenosis and multiple severe comorbidities. Via the right femoral artery, a Cook introducer was advanced into the abdominal aorta. The aortic valve was crossed with a straight wire, and a pigtail catheter was advanced into the left ventricle to obtain pressure-gradient and anatomic measurements. An 18-mm valvuloplasty balloon was then used to predilate the aortic valve. Initial attempts to position the prosthetic valve caused a transient cardiac arrest. Implantation was achieved by superimposing the right coronary angiogram onto fluoroscopic landmarks in the same radiographic plane. A balloon-expandable frame was used to deliver the valve. After device implantation, the transvalvular gradient was <5 mmHg. The cardiac output increased from 1 to 5 L/min, and urine production increased to 200 mL/h. The patient was extubated on the 2nd postimplant day. Twelve hours later, he had to be reintubated because of respiratory distress and high pulmonary pressures. His condition deteriorated, and he died of biventricular failure and refractory hypotension on day 5. Despite the severe hypotension, valve function was satisfactory on echo-Doppler evaluation. In our patient, retrograde transcatheter implantation of a prosthetic aortic valve yielded excellent hemodynamic results and paved the way for further use of this technique in selected high-risk patients. PMID:16392228

  7. Genetically alike Syrian hamsters display both bifoliate and trifoliate aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Sans-Coma, Valentín; Carmen Fernández, M; Fernández, Borja; Durán, Ana C; Anderson, Robert H; Arqué, Josep M

    2012-01-01

    The bifoliate, or bicuspid, aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac anomaly in man. It is a heritable defect, but its mode of inheritance remains unclear. Previous studies in Syrian hamsters showed that BAVs with fusion of the right and left coronary leaflets are expressions of a trait, the variation of which takes the form of a phenotypic continuum. It ranges from a trifoliate valve with no fusion of the coronary leaflets to a bifoliate root devoid of any raphe. The intermediate stages are represented by trifoliate valves with fusion of the coronary aortic leaflets, and bifoliate valves with raphes. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether the distinct morphological variants rely on a common genotype, or on different genotypes. We examined the aortic valves from 1 849 Syrian hamsters belonging to a family subjected to systematic inbreeding by full-sib mating. The incidence of the different trifoliate aortic valve (TAV) and bifoliate aortic valve (BAV) morphological variants widely varied in the successive inbred generations. TAVs with extensive fusion of the leaflets, and BAVs, accounted for five-sixths of the patterns found in Syrian hamsters considered to be genetically alike or virtually isogenic, with the probability of homozygosity being 0.999 or higher. The remaining one-sixth hamsters had aortic valves with a tricuspid design, but in most cases the right and left coronary leaflets were slightly fused. Results of crosses between genetically alike hamsters, with the probability of homozygosity being 0.989 or higher, revealed no significant association between the valvar phenotypes in the parents and their offspring. Our findings are consistent with the notion that the BAVs of the Syrian hamster are expressions of a quantitative trait subject to polygenic inheritance. They suggest that the genotype of the virtually isogenic animals produced by systematic inbreeding greatly predisposes to the development of anomalous valves, be they

  8. Relapsing tricuspid valve endocarditis by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 11 years: tricuspid valve replacement with an aortic valve homograft.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seok; Chang, Hyoung Woo; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Dong Ki; Kim, Eui-Chong; Kim, Ki-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Eleven years ago, a 27-year-old non-drug abuser woman was admitted to the hospital due to a burn injury. During the treatment, she was diagnosed with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). She underwent tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) using a bioprosthetic valve, followed by 6 weeks of meropenem antibiotic therapy. Ten years later, she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis caused by MDR P. aeruginosa. She underwent redo-TVR with a bioprosthetic valve and was treated with colistin and ciprofloxacin. Ten months later, she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis with MDR P. aeruginosa as a pathogen. She underwent a second redo-TVR with a tissue valve and was treated with colistin. Two months later, her fever recurred and she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis caused by MDR P. aeruginosa. She eventually underwent a third redo-TVR using an aortic valve homograft and was discharged from the hospital after additional 6 weeks' of antibiotic therapy. All the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from each event of infective endocarditis were analyzed by repetitive deoxyribonucleic acid sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strain typing to determine the correlation of isolates. All of the pathogens in 11 years were similar enough to be classified as the same strain, and this is the first case report of TVR using an aortic valve homograft to treat relapsing endocarditis. PMID:26051245

  9. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of Aortic Valve Annular Shape in Children With Bicuspid Aortic Valves and/or Aortic Coarctation Compared With Controls.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Christen R; Sugeng, Lissa; Abraham, Sharon; Li, Fangyong; Weismann, Constance G

    2015-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital cardiac abnormality, occurring in 1% to 2% of the general population. Adults with degenerative aortic valve (AV) disease have been shown to have an elliptical shaped AV annulus. The goal of this study was to investigate the shape of the aortic annulus in children with BAV, coarctation of the aorta (CoA) with or without BAV, and normal controls with trileaflet AVs using 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). We reviewed echocardiograms of children with isolated BAV (n = 40), CoA (n = 26), and controls (n = 40) that included 3DE of the AV. Eccentricity index (EI) was defined as the ratio between the smaller and larger annular dimension. ΔD was defined as the difference between the larger and smaller annular dimension. Patients with BAV had an eccentric AV annulus compared with controls (BAV EI 0.85 ± 0.05 and control EI 0.96 ± 0.03; p <0.001). Subjects with CoA also had a more eccentric annulus than controls regardless of AV morphology (CoA 0.84 ± 0.06; p <0.001). EI was not associated with somatic growth parameters or gender. Among all patients with BAV, AV dysfunction was associated with fusion of the right and noncoronary (R-N) cusps (p <0.001), but there was no association between valve dysfunction and EI. ΔD was higher in both the BAV and CoA groups compared with the control group (BAV 3.4 ± 1.9 mm, CoA 2.8 ± 1.8 mm, and control 0.6 ± 0.4 mm; p <0.001 each). Although there was no significant correlation of ΔD with age in the control group during childhood, ΔD increased with age in the BAV and CoA groups. In conclusion, children with BAV and/or CoA have an elliptical shaped AV annulus by 3DE, which is independent of age, gender, or body surface area. AV annular eccentricity may lead to inaccurate measurement of AV annular size if measured by 2DE alone. Considering AV annular eccentricity when balloon sizing the annulus before valvuloplasty may help improve interventional results in some

  10. Subclinical Hypothyroidism Might Increase the Risk of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation after Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Comendador, Jose; Marcos-Vidal, Jose Miguel; Gualis, Javier; Martin, Carlos Esteban; Martin, Elio; Otero, Javier; Castaño, Mario

    2016-08-01

    Background To evaluate the influence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) on the development of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery with extracorporeal circulation. Methods A prospective study in a tertiary hospital between July 2005 and December 2013 in which all patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with no other valve surgery were consecutively included. Patients who were in preoperative sinus rhythm were selected and they underwent thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone determination in the month before surgery. Postoperative AF was defined as the development of AF during hospital admittance. Descriptive analysis and binary logistic regression were performed for the target variable. Results A total of 467 patients were studied, with 35 cases of SCH. The incidence of postoperative AF was 57% in the group with SCH versus 30.3% (p = 0.001) in the group without hypothyroidism, without significant differences in other postoperative complications. In the logistic regression analysis, the independent predictors of postoperative AF were SCH, age, and aortic clamping time. SCH multiplies the odds ratio of postoperative AF by 3.14 (95% confidence interval: 1.24-7.96). Conclusion SCH behaves like a risk factor for the development of postoperative AF in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with extracorporeal circulation. Other studies are needed to determine whether preoperative T4 replacement therapy and/or more aggressive AF prophylaxis can prevent this complication in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. PMID:26121379

  11. Incidence and Impact of Patient-Prosthesis Mismatch in Isolated Aortic Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Kacani, Andi; Dibra, Laureta; Petrela, Elizana; Beca, Vera; Refatllari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The mains topics of this work are the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch and the influence in the early results of isolated aortic valve surgery. METHODS: In 193 patients isolated aortic valve surgery was performed. The study population was divided in three subgroups: 20 patients with severe, 131 patients with moderate and 42 patients without patient-prosthesis mismatch. The indexed effective orifice area was used to define the subgroups. Operative mortality and perioperative complications were considered the indicators of the early results of aortic valve surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of severe and moderate patient-prosthesis mismatch was respectively 10.3% and 67.8%. Hospital mortality and perioperative complications were: mortality 5% vs. 3.1% vs. 2.4% (p = 0.855), low cardiac output 5% vs. 6.9% vs. 4.8% (p = 0.861); pulmonary complications 5% vs. 3.1 vs. 0.0% (p = 0.430); exploration for bleeding 5% vs. 0.8% vs. 2.4% (p = 0.319); atrial fibrillation 30% vs. 19.8% vs. 11.9% (p = 0.225); wound infection 5% vs. 0.8% vs. 0.00% (p = 0.165), respectively for the group with severe, moderate and without patient-prosthesis mismatch. CONCLUSIONS: Patient-prosthesis mismatch is a common occurrence in aortic valve surgery. This phenomenon does not affect the early results of aortic valve surgery.

  12. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  13. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  14. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  15. Transcatheter valve implantation can alter fluid flow fields in aortic sinuses and ascending aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valves (TAVs) are valve replacements used to treat aortic stenosis. Currently, these have been used in elderly patients at high-risk for open-heart procedures. Since these devices are implanted under fluoroscopic guidance, the implantation position of the valve can vary with respect to the native aortic valve annulus. The current study characterizes the altered hemodynamics in the aortic sinus and ascending aorta under different implantation (high and low) and cardiac output (2.5 and 5.0 L/min) conditions. Two commonly used TAV designs are studied using 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). 200 phase locked images are obtained at every 25ms in the cardiac cycle, and the resulting vector fields are ensemble averaged. High implantation of the TAV with respect to the annulus causes weaker sinus washout and weaker sinus vortex formation. Additionally, the longer TAV leaflets can also result in a weaker sinus vortex. The level of turbulent fluctuations in the ascending aorta did not appear to be affected by axial positioning of the valve, but varied with cardiac output. The results of this study indicates that TAV positioning is important to be considered clinically, since this can affect coronary perfusion and potential flow stagnation near the valve.

  16. Replacement of the aortic valve with a bioprosthesis at the time of continuous flow ventricular assist device implantation for preexisting aortic valve dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles; Mountis, Maria; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation has become a mainstay of therapy for advanced heart failure patients who are either ineligible for, or awaiting, cardiac transplantation. Controversy remains over the optimal therapeutic strategy for preexisting aortic valvular dysfunction in these patients at the time of LVAD implant. In patients with moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, surgical approaches are center specific and range from variable leaflet closure techniques to concomitant aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a bioprosthesis. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed our outcomes in patients who underwent simultaneous AVR and LVAD implantation secondary to antecedent aortic valve pathology. Between January 2004 and June 2010, 144 patients underwent LVAD implantation at a single institution. Of these, 7 patients (4.8%) required concomitant AVR. Five of the 7 patients (71%) survived to hospital discharge and suffered no adverse events in the perioperative period. One-year survival for the discharged patients was 80%, and no prosthetic valve-related adverse events were observed in long-term follow-up. Given our experience, we conclude that bioprosthetic AVR is a plausible alternative for end-stage heart failure patients at the time of LVAD implantation. PMID:26424939

  17. Suboptimal geometrical implantation of biological aortic valves provokes functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Kuehnel, Ralf-Uwe; Wendt, Max O; Jainski, Ute; Hartrumpf, Martin; Pohl, Manfred; Albes, Johannes M

    2010-06-01

    Endovascular valves have become a valid option for patients not qualifying for conventional surgery. Biological valves mounted in a stent are currently used. After implantation, however, geometrical distortion of the valve can occur. We tested whether biological valves suitable for transcatheter implantation exhibit hemodynamic deficits after deployment in a distorted position. Two types of valves [bovine pericardium (BP) and porcine cusps], of 21 and 23 mm diameter, respectively were investigated. Mean transvalvular gradient (TVG), effective orifice area (EOA), and regurgitation fraction (REG) were measured prior to and after the 20% distortion of the original diameter. All valves exhibited an increase of TVG and reduction of EOA whereas REG increased only in BP valves after distortion. The 21 mm valves demonstrated a more pronounced alteration than the 23 mm valves. Even moderately distorted implantation of a biological valve results in a marked functional alteration. The susceptibility of pericardial valves is higher than that of porcine valves probably owing to better coaptation properties of native cusps even under deformed conditions when compared to valves constructed with pericardium. Care should therefore be taken during implantation of endovascular valves in order to avoid fixed hemodynamic deficits. Native valves may preferably be used as they demonstrate a more robust behavior regarding suboptimal implantation. PMID:20233809

  18. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement: the Leipzig experience

    PubMed Central

    Merk, Denis R.; Etz, Christian D.; Seeburger, Joerg; Schroeter, Thomas; Oberbach, Andreas; Uhlemann, Madlen; Hoellriegel, Robert; Haensig, Martin; Leontyev, Sergey; Garbade, Jens; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive techniques are progressively challenging traditional approaches in cardiothoracic surgery. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (AVR) has become a routine procedure at our institution. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all patients undergoing minimally invasive isolated AVR between January 2003 and March 2014, at our institution. Mean follow-up was 4.7±4.3 years (range: 0-18 years) and was 99.8% complete. Results There were 1,714 patients who received an isolated minimally invasive AVR. The mean (± SD) patient age was 65±12.8 years, ejection fraction 60%±12% and log EuroSCORE 5.3%±5.1%. Mean cross-clamp time was 58±18 minutes and mean cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time was 82.9±26.7 minutes. Thirty-day survival was 97.8%±0.4%, and 69.4%±1.7% at 10-years. The multivariate analysis revealed age at surgery [P=0.016; odds ratio (OR), 1.1], length of surgery time (P=0.002; OR, 1.01), female gender (P=0.023; OR, 3.54), preoperative myocardial infarction (MI) (P=0.006; OR, 7.87), preoperative stroke (P=0.001; OR, 13.76) and preoperative liver failure (P=0.015; OR, 10.28) as independent risk factors for mortality. Cox-regression analysis revealed the following predictors for long term mortality: age over 75 years (P<0.001; OR, 3.5), preoperative dialysis (P<0.01; OR, 2.14), ejection fraction less than 30% (P=0.003; OR, 3.28) and urgent or emergency operation (P<0.001; OR, 2.3). Conclusions Minimally invasive AVR can be performed safely and effectively with very few perioperative complications. The early and long-term outcomes in these patients are acceptable. PMID:25694976

  19. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Podder, Subrata; Kumar, Ajay; Mahajan, Sachin; Saha, Pradip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS) causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS) with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score. PMID:25566720

  20. Echocardiographic Imaging of Procedural Complications During Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca T.; Kodali, Susheel; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Leon, Martin B.; Kapadia, Samir; Gopal, Deepika; Lerakis, Stamatios; Lindman, Brian R.; Wang, Zuyue; Webb, John; Thourani, Vinod H.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a balloon-expandable valve is an accepted alternative to surgical replacement for severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis in high risk or inoperable patients. Intraprocedural transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) offers real-time imaging guidance throughout the procedure and allows for rapid and accurate assessment of complications and procedural results. The value of intraprocedural TEE for TAVR will likely increase in the future as this procedure is performed in lower surgical risk patients, who also have lower risk for general anesthesia, but a greater expectation of optimal results with lower morbidity and mortality. This imaging compendium from the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trials is intended to be a comprehensive compilation of intraprocedural complications imaged by intraprocedural TEE and diagnostic tools to anticipate and/or prevent their occurrence. PMID:25772835

  1. Design and Physical Characterization of a Synchronous Multivalve Aortic Valve Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Durst, Christopher A.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    For many tissues, cyclic mechanical stimulation is considered necessary to maintain the normal morphology in vitro. The aim of this study was to design and evaluate a simple bioreactor system capable of medium-term (more than 2 weeks) culture of native and engineered aortic valves. The system consists of three pistons in separate cylindrical chambers that are simultaneously driven through the culture medium by a crank and cam assembly. The faces of these pistons have unidirectional valves mounted in opposing orientations that permit flow from one side of the face to the other. A custom designed stent was employed to secure either native or engineered trileaflet valves to the pistons. Computational fluid dynamics and finite element modeling was used to assist selection of materials and components in the system. Finally, sterility testing using base culture medium was performed to verify the ability of the system to retain sterile conditions. The current design permits the cyclic opening and closing of three aortic valves, however this device can be modified to accommodate up to 12 valves simultaneously. This new bioreactor system has applications not only for development of tissue-engineered valves, but for also studying disease models in the aortic valve. PMID:19953323

  2. [Bioprosthesis degeneration in the aortic and mitral valve position. Results and problems from the cardiosurgical viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Antretter, H; Cottogni, M; Falbesoner, C; Furtwängler, W; Mair, P; Falk, M; Hutter, J

    1993-01-01

    38 patients (20 men, 18 women) underwent reoperation between July 1989 to September 1992 because of degeneration of bioprosthetic valves implanted in aortic or/and mitral position. Retrospective analysis revealed a mean implantation time of 116.5 +/- 31.5 months for the bioprostheses (median 116). At reoperation 63.2% of them had a single valve replacement, 36.8% a more complex cardiac procedure (double or triple valve replacement, valve replacement and coronary bypass grafting). 50% (n = 9) of the reoperation cohort were symptomatic (NYHA III), 16 (42.1%) were serious symptomatic (NYHA IV). All deaths were NYHA IV preoperatively. Early mortality was 18.4% (n = 7). Mean age at the time of first operation was 51 +/- 10.7, mean age at reoperation was 60.5 +/- 10.6. There was a significantly longer aortic clamp time (AKT, p = 0.0005) and bypass time (BPT, p = 0.0000) compared to first operation, also a significantly longer BPT of the deads confronted with the survivors (p = 0.0075). Bioprosthetic valves in mitral position were significantly longer implanted (p = 0.0416) than in aortic position. But there was no difference in implantation time of commercially available Carpentier-Edwards- or Ionescu-Shiley grafts. At reoperation we changed more than 95% of the degenerated valves to mechanical devices--corresponding to international tendencies. We discuss the early tissue degeneration of bioprosthetic valves and their increasing problem during reoperation. PMID:8212714

  3. [10 years of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: an overview of the clinical applicability and findings].

    PubMed

    de Ronde-Tillmans, Marjo J A G; Lenzen, Mattie J; Abawi, Masieh; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M D A; Zijlstra, Felix; De Jaegere, Peter P T

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a common heart valve disorder in adults. Its prevalence increases with age and is therefore especially seen in older patients. Thirty to forty per cent of patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis are not referred for surgical valve replacement because of high age, their medical history or comorbidities. In 2002, the first transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was carried out in an inoperable patient. Since 2012, TAVI has been included in international guidelines for heart valve diseases as a treatment strategy in symptomatic patients at a high risk of complications and a life expectancy of more than one year. Decision-making about which treatment is preferable takes a multidisciplinary approach. Important complications of TAVI are bleeding, renal function disorder, stroke, conduction abnormalities, valve insufficiency and death. TAVI procedures are carried out in the Netherlands only in cardiac centres in which specific expertise is present in the areas of structural cardiovascular disease. Scientific research is important for further developments and improvements. PMID:25308222

  4. Determination of oxidation state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Masztafiak, J.; Lis, G. J.; Gajda, M.; Jasek, E.; Czubek, U.; Bolechała, F.; Borca, C.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate changes in chemical state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves X-ray absorption spectroscopy was applied. Since Fe is suspected to play detrimental role in aortic valve stenosis pathogenesis the oxidation state of this element has been determined. The experimental material consisted of 10 μm sections of valves excised during routine surgery and from autopsies. The experiment was performed at the MicroXAS beamline of the SLS synchrotron facility in Villigen (Switzerland). The Fe K-edge XANES spectra obtained from tissue samples were carefully analyzed and compared with the spectra of reference compounds containing iron in various chemical structures. The analysis of absorption edge position and shape of the spectra revealed that both chemical forms of iron are presented in valve tissue but Fe3+ is the predominant form. Small shift of the absorption edge toward higher energy in the spectra from stenotic valve samples indicates higher content of the Fe3+ form in pathological tissue. Such a phenomenon suggests the role of Fenton reaction and reactive oxygen species in the etiology of aortic valve stenosis. The comparison of pre-edge regions of XANES spectra for control and stenotic valve tissue confirmed no differences in local symmetry or spin state of iron in analyzed samples.

  5. Left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus: relation to aortic valve anomalies and endocardial fibroelastosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharland, G K; Chita, S K; Fagg, N L; Anderson, R H; Tynan, M; Cook, A C; Allan, L D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between a characteristic form of left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus and abnormalities of the aortic valve and endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle. DESIGN--A retrospective study to examine the correlation between echocardiographic findings in the fetus and postnatal or necropsy findings. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre for fetal echocardiography. PATIENTS--Thirty fetuses showing a characteristic echocardiographic picture of left ventricular dysfunction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The relation between the prenatal echocardiographic features and the postnatal and necropsy findings. RESULTS--At presentation the size of the left ventricular cavity was normal or enlarged in all cases. The measurements of the orifice of the aortic root and mitral valve were either normal or small for the gestational age. The echocardiographic diagnosis made at presentation was critical aortic stenosis in all cases. At necropsy or postnatal examination the aortic valve was dysplastic and stenotic in 15 cases and the left ventricle had become hypoplastic in one of these. Aortic atresia was present in seven patients, three of whom had a hypoplastic left ventricle. In six patients the aortic valve was bicuspid although not obstructive. One of these patients had hypoplasia of the aortic arch and one had a hypoplastic left ventricle but in the remaining four patients endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle was the only abnormality found. No follow up information was available in two. Of 26 patients for whom there was postmortem information, 24 had evidence of some degree of endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle. Sequential observations showed that five cases developed into the hypoplastic left heart syndrome. CONCLUSIONS--This type of left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus is the result of an overlap of diseases, including primary left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis, critical aortic stenosis, and the hypoplastic

  6. A case in which biventricular assist device support was required after aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Yozu, Ryohei; Shin, Hankei; Tsutsumi, Kozi; Enoki, Chiharu; Iino, Yoshimi; Matayoshi, Toru; Morita, Masanori

    2003-01-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old man with severe aortic regurgitation. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve, but was unable to be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Intraoperative coronary angiography revealed stenosis of the right coronary orifice, so an intra-aortic balloon pump was inserted and coronary artery bypass grafting to the right coronary artery was conducted; however, weaning from CPB again failed. Left ventricular assist using a Gyro centrifugal pump was performed between the left atrium and left femoral artery, along with right ventricular assist using a Nikkiso centrifugal pump between the right atrium and pulmonary artery. Flow rates averaged from 2.0 to 2.8 l/min for the left-side ventricular assist device (VAD) and 2.1-3.8 l/min for the right-side VAD. The bypass rate reached approximately 70% at maximum. No thromboembolic events were documented during VAD support. The patient underwent explantation of VADs on postoperative day 4. No thrombus was identified on the bioprosthetic aortic valve by transesophageal echocardiography. The left-side pump displayed no thrombus, while the right-side pump had a small thrombus at the shaft. The patient was discharged from the hospital and was alive as of 2 year postoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, no clinical study has yet compared the antithrombotic properties of two centrifugal pumps in one patient where mechanical support was performed for the same duration and flow rate. PMID:14598107

  7. Aortic and Mitral Valve Involvement in Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome VI: Surgical Implications in the Enzyme Replacement Therapy Era.

    PubMed

    Torre, Salvatore; Scarpelli, Mauro; Salviati, Alessandro; Buffone, Ebba; Faggian, Giuseppe; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2016-07-01

    Open-heart operations in patients with mucopolysaccharidoses are exceedingly rare and pose distinct clinical challenges. Few reports exist of valve replacement in type VI mucopolysaccharidosis, mostly entailing combined mitral and aortic valve replacement. Here reported is the case of a young woman with mitral and aortic valve disease, in whom the surgical procedure was confined to the aortic valve. The rationale behind this strategy, particularly in light of the benefits offered by specific enzyme replacement therapy of type VI mucopolysaccharidosis, is discussed. PMID:27343522

  8. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta and aortic valve following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Charles, K P; Davidson, K G; Miller, H; Caves, P K

    1977-02-01

    Traumatic rupture of the aorta at the level of the isthmus is a well-recognized injury following blunt chest trauma. By contrast, rupture of the ascending aorta and of the aortic valve in a road traffic accident is rare and does not appear to have been previously reported. The occurrence of such an injury in a 56-year-old man involved in a road traffic accident is reported. The diagnosis was made preoperatively following aortography and successful surgical correction involved aortic valve replacement with resection and grafting of the damaged area of the ascending aorta. The probable mechanisms involved in the production of this unusual injury are discussed. PMID:834060

  9. Bivalirudin anticoagulation for minimal invasive transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a patient with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Andreas; Ensminger, Stephan; Vlachojannis, Marios; Birschmann, Ingvild

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of lupus anticoagulant is associated with the hazard of developing an antiphospholipid syndrome, a severe prothrombotic condition which may particularly occur after major surgical trauma. This disease requires certain considerations regarding surgical strategy and anticoagulation management. We describe the perioperative management of a patient scheduled for elective aortic valve replacement and diagnosed for having antiphospholipid antibodies. The procedure was successfully performed using a minimally invasive approach via transapical aortic valve replacement and anticoagulation with the nonreversible short-acting direct thrombin Inhibitor bivalirudin. PMID:27555195

  10. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  11. [Acute Leaflet Arrest in St. Jude Medical Regent Mechanical Aortic Valve;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Morishima, Yuji; Arakaki, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with combined valvular disease and atrial fibrillation, and was admitted for surgery. We performed double valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty and maze operation. At the operation, a 19 mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve was implanted with non-everting mattress sutures at the aortic supra-annular position after mitral valve replacement. Although pulling down of the prosthesis into the aortic annulus was easy, the leaflets were unable to open at all in a movability test. After removing several stitches on the mitral side of the hinges, the subvalvular tissue was seen bulging into the hinge, hindering the free movement. The prosthesis was removed and replaced with a 17 mm Regent valve by the same technique. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. We suggest it is necessary to pay special attention to the structural characteristics of the prosthesis. PMID:26066878

  12. Percutaneous Aortic Balloon Valvuloplasty and Intracardiac Adrenaline in Electromechanical Dissociation as Bridge to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaara, Jawad; Meier, Pascal; Ellenberger, Christophe; Gasche, Yvan; Bendjelid, Karim; Noble, Stephane; Roffi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This report describes an emergent balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) procedure performed under cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a 79-year-old man with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (mean gradient 78 mm Hg, valve area 0.71 cm2, and left ventricular ejection fraction 40%) awaiting surgery and who was admitted for heart failure rapidly evolving to cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Decision was made to perform emergent BAV. After crossing the valve with a 6 French catheter, the patient developed an electromechanical dissociation confirmed at transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac arrest. Manual chest compressions were initiated along with the application of high doses of intravenous adrenaline, and BAV was performed under ongoing resuscitation. Despite BAV, transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no cardiac activity. At this point, it was decided to advance a pigtail catheter over the wire already in place in the left ventricle and to inject intracardiac adrenaline (1 mg, followed by 5 mg). Left ventricular contraction progressively resumed and, in the absence of aortic regurgitation, an intraaortic balloon pump was inserted. The patient could be weaned from intraaortic balloon pump and vasopressors on day 1, extubated on day 6, and recovered from multiorgan failure. In the absence of neurologic deficits, he underwent uneventful transcatheter aortic valve implantation on day 12 and was discharged to a cardiac rehabilitation program on day 30. At 3-month follow-up, he reported dyspnea NYHA class II as the only symptom. This case shows that severe aortic stenosis leading to electromechanical dissociation may be treated by emergent BAV and intracardiac administration of high-dose adrenaline. Intracardiac adrenaline may be considered in case of refractory electromechanical dissociation occurring in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. PMID:26131825

  13. Thrombembolic occlusion of crural arteries following transcatheter aortic valve implantation--successful endovascular recanalization using a thrombus aspiration device.

    PubMed

    Malyar, Nasser M; Kaleschke, Gerrit; Reinecke, Holger

    2012-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an increasingly used alternative to conventional surgical valve replacement in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) and high operative risk. We here describe a case of a TAVI performed in local anesthesia causing intraprocedural thromboembolic occlusion of non-stenotic crural arteries and its immediate successful therapeutic management by means of endovascular recanalization using a thrombus aspiration device. PMID:22565625

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with bicuspid aortic stenosis and a borderline-sized annulus.

    PubMed

    Colkesen, Yucel; Baykan, Oytun; Dagdelen, Sinan; Cayli, Murat

    2015-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is currently considered an exclusion criterion for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The risk of adverse aortic events such as incomplete sealing, severe paravalvular regurgitation or dislocation due to elliptic shape and asymmetric calcifications in annulus are higher in TAVI. In this case report, we detailed a case of successful trans-femoral TAVI in a 51-year old male with BAV and its management without in-hospital and 30-day complications. The challenge in this case was the patient's anatomy with a 27-mm annulus for balloon expandable device. The applied strategy was balloon sizing and overdilating the 29-mm stented valve with additional volume that obviated re-ballooning. Trans-femoral TAVI was performed uneventfully under fluoroscopic and transoesophageal echocardiography guidance. A multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) evaluation at 1 month did not show device dislodgement or any other complications. Evidence for evaluation post-TAVI is not sufficient in BAV. We believe patients with BAV should undergo a comprehensive assessment after TAVI including MDCT evaluation. PMID:26265070

  15. On the bending properties of porcine mitral, tricuspid, aortic, and pulmonary valve leaflets.

    PubMed

    Brazile, Bryn; Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; Bertucci, Robbin; Prabhu, Raj; Patnaik, Sourav S; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew; Brinkman-Ferguson, Erin; Williams, Lakiesha N; Liao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The atrioventricular valve leaflets (mitral and tricuspid) are different from the semilunar valve leaflets (aortic and pulmonary) in layered structure, ultrastructural constitution and organization, and leaflet thickness. These differences warrant a comparative look at the bending properties of the four types of leaflets. We found that the moment-curvature relationships in atrioventricular valves were stiffer than in semilunar valves, and the moment-curvature relationships of the left-side valve leaflets were stiffer than their morphological analog of the right side. These trends were supported by the moment-curvature curves and the flexural rigidity analysis (EI value decreased from mitral, tricuspid, aortic, to pulmonary leaflets). However, after taking away the geometric effect (moment of inertia I), the instantaneous effective bending modulus E showed a reversed trend. The overall trend of flexural rigidity (EI: mitral > tricuspid > aortic > pulmonary) might be correlated with the thickness variations among the four types of leaflets (thickness: mitral > tricuspid > aortic > pulmonary). The overall trend of the instantaneous effective bending modulus (E: mitral < tricuspid < aortic < pulmonary) might be correlated to the layered fibrous ultrastructures of the four types of leaflets, of which the fibers in mitral and tricuspid leaflets were less aligned, and the fibers in aortic and pulmonary leaflets were highly aligned. We also found that, for all types of leaflets, moment-curvature relationships are stiffer in against-curvature (AC) bending than in with-curvature bending (WC), which implies that leaflets tend to flex toward their natural curvature and comply with blood flow. Lastly, we observed that the leaflets were stiffer in circumferential bending compared with radial bending, likely reflecting the physiological motion of the leaflets, i.e., more bending moment and movement were experienced in radial direction than circumferential direction. PMID:25955006

  16. Frailty Status and Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Huded, Chetan P; Huded, Jill M; Friedman, Julie L; Benck, Lillian R; Lindquist, Lee A; Holly, Thomas A; Sweis, Ranya N; Ricciardi, Mark J; Malaisrie, S Chris; Davidson, Charles J; Flaherty, James D

    2016-06-15

    Frailty is a syndrome of older adults associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We aimed to assess the impact of frailty status on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We reviewed all 191 patients who underwent a modified Fried frailty assessment before TAVI between February 2012 and September 2015 at a single academic medical center, and we assessed the impact of preoperative frailty status on morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization after TAVI. Frailty, pre-frailty, and nonfrailty were present in 33% (n = 64), 37% (n = 70), and 30% (n = 57) of patients, respectively. Slowness (75% vs 54%, p = 0.003) and low physical activity (55% vs 31%, p = 0.001) were more common in women than men. With increasing frailty status, the proportion of women increased (35% nonfrail, 44% pre-frail, and 66% frail, p = 0.002) and stature decreased (1.68 ± 0.11 m nonfrail, 1.66 ± 0.11 m pre-frail, 1.62 ± 0.12 m frail, p = 0.028). There was no difference in post-TAVI 30-day mortality, stroke, major vascular injury, major or life-threatening bleeding, respiratory failure, mean hospital length of stay, 30-day hospital re-admission, or overall survival between groups. The rate of discharge to a rehabilitation facility increased with increasing frailty status (14% nonfrail, 22% pre-frail, and 39% frail, p = 0.005). Frailty was independently associated with discharge to a rehabilitation facility (odds ratio 4.80, 95% confidence interval 1.66 to 13.85, p = 0.004). In conclusion, the safety of TAVI is not affected by frailty status, but patients with frailty are less likely to be discharged directly home after TAVI. PMID:27156828

  17. Combined venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for the treatment of acute aortic prosthesis dysfunction in a high-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Pontillo, Daniele; Musumeci, Francesco; Luzi, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with acute bioprosthesis dysfunction in cardiogenic shock, in whom hemodynamic support was provided by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and successfully treated by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:27402446

  18. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  19. Valve Sparing Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Marfan Syndrome Enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Howard K.; Preiss, Liliana R.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kroner, Barbara; Devereux, Richard B.; Roman, Mary J.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Asch, Federico M.; Milewski, Rita K.; Bavaria, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The long-term outcomes of aortic valve sparing (AVS) root replacement in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients remain uncertain. We sought to determine the utilization and outcomes of AVS root replacement in MFS patients enrolled in the Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Methods At the time of this analysis, 788 patients with MFS were enrolled in the GenTAC Registry, of whom 288 have undergone aortic root replacement. Patients who have undergone AVS procedures were compared to those who have undergone aortic valve replacing (AVR) procedures. Results AVS root replacement was performed in 43.5% of MFS patients and the frequency of AVS increased over the past 5 years. AVS patients were younger at the time of surgery (31.0 vs. 36.3 years, p=0.006) and more likely to have had elective rather than emergency surgery compared to AVR patients. AVR patients were more likely to have had aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dissection as a primary indication for surgery. After mean follow-up of 6.2 (SD=3.6) years, none of the 87 AVS patients have required reoperation; in contrast, after mean follow up of 10.5 (SD=7.6) years, 11.5% of AVR patients have required aortic root reoperation. Aortic valve function has been durable with 95.8% of AVS patients with aortic insufficiency graded as mild or less. Conclusions AVS root replacement is performed commonly in the MFS population. The durability of the aortic repair and aortic valve function have been excellent to date. These results justify the continued use of the procedure in the elective setting. The GenTAC Registry will be a useful resource to assess the long-term durability of AVS root replacement in the future. PMID:25296451

  20. The structure and material composition of ossified aortic valves identified using a set of scientific methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, Antonín; Šmíd, Michal; Havelcová, Martina; Coufalová, Lucie; Kučková, Štěpánka; Velčovská, Martina; Hynek, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis has become a common and dangerous disease in recent decades. This disease leads to the mineralization of aortic valves, their gradual thickening and loss of functionality. We studied the detailed assessment of the proportion and composition of inorganic and organic components in the ossified aortic valve, using a set of analytical methods applied in science: polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The sample valves showed the occurrence of phosphorus and calcium in the form of phosphate and calcium carbonate, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxy-fluorapatite, with varying content of inorganic components from 65 to 90 wt%, and with phased development of degenerative disability. The outer layers of the plaque contained an organic component with peptide bonds, fatty acids, proteins and cholesterol. The results show a correlation between the formation of fluorapatite in aortic valves and in other parts of the human bodies, associated with the formation of bones.

  1. Septicemia and Aortic Valve Endocarditis due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a Homeless Man

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of bacterial endocarditis due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a homeless man with no animal exposure. His course was complicated by an allergic reaction to ampicillin, urinary bladder infection, respiratory failure, and acute kidney injury. He recovered completely after aortic valve replacement and a 6-week course of intravenous ceftriaxone. PMID:23662222

  2. Distribution of Mitral Annular and Aortic Valve Calcium as Assessed by Unenhanced Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Koshkelashvili, Nikoloz; Codolosa, Jose N; Goykhman, Igor; Romero-Corral, Abel; Pressman, Gregg S

    2015-12-15

    Aging is associated with calcium deposits in various cardiovascular structures, but patterns of calcium deposition, if any, are unknown. In search of such patterns, we performed quantitative assessment of mitral annular calcium (MAC) and aortic valve calcium (AVC) in a broad clinical sample. Templates were created from gated computed tomography (CT) scans depicting the aortic valve cusps and mitral annular segments in relation to surrounding structures. These were then applied to CT reconstructions from ungated, clinically indicated CT scans of 318 subjects, aged ≥65 years. Calcium location was assigned using the templates and quantified by the Agatston method. Mean age was 76 ± 7.3 years; 48% were men and 58% were white. Whites had higher prevalence (p = 0.03) and density of AVC than blacks (p = 0.02), and a trend toward increased MAC (p = 0.06). Prevalence of AVC was similar between men and women, but AVC scores were higher in men (p = 0.008); this difference was entirely accounted for by whites. Within the aortic valve, the left cusp was more frequently calcified than the others. MAC was most common in the posterior mitral annulus, especially its middle (P2) segment. For the anterior mitral annulus, the medial (A3) segment calcified most often. In conclusion, AVC is more common in whites than blacks, and more intense in men, but only in whites. Furthermore, calcium deposits in the mitral annulus and aortic valve favor certain locations. PMID:26517948

  3. Calcium Resection to Relieve Left Main Coronary Obstruction in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gilbert H L; Ahmad, Hasan; Cohen, Martin; Undemir, Cenap; Lansman, Steven L

    2016-05-01

    Coronary obstruction during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a rare yet life-threatening complication. Emergent resection of the obstructing calcium is a quick and simple method to restore coronary perfusion in TAVR over emergency CABG. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12752 (J Card Surg 2016;31:315-317). PMID:27075945

  4. Computational analysis of an aortic valve jet with Lagrangian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Astorino, Matteo; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2010-03-01

    Important progress has been achieved in recent years in simulating the fluid-structure interaction around cardiac valves. An important step in making these computational tools useful to clinical practice is the development of postprocessing techniques to extract clinically relevant information from these simulations. This work focuses on flow through the aortic valve and illustrates how the computation of Lagrangian coherent structures can be used to improve insight into the transport mechanics of the flow downstream of the valve, toward the goal of aiding clinical decision making and the understanding of pathophysiology.

  5. Quantification of biomechanical interaction of transcatheter aortic valve stent deployed in porcine and ovine hearts.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Joseph; Sirois, Eric; Sun, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Success of the deployment and function in transcatheter aortic valve replacement is heavily reliant on the tissue-stent interaction. The present study quantified important tissue-stent contact variables of self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve stents when deployed into ovine and porcine aortic roots, such as the stent radial expansion force, stent pullout force, the annulus deformation response and the coefficient of friction on the tissue-stent contact interface. Braided Nitinol stents were developed, tested to determine stent crimped diameter vs. stent radial force from a stent crimp experiment, and deployed in vitro to quantify stent pullout, aortic annulus deformation, and the coefficient of friction between the stent and the aortic tissue from an aortic root-stent interaction experiment. The results indicated that when crimped at body temperature from 26 mm to 19, 21 and 23 mm stent radial forces were approximately 30-40% higher than those crimped at room temperature. Coefficients of friction leveled to approximately 0.10 ± 0.01 as stent wire diameter increased and annulus size decreased from 23 to 19 mm. Regardless of aortic annulus size and species tested, it appeared that a minimum of about 2.5 mm in annular dilatation, caused by about 60 N of radial force from stent expansion, was needed to anchor the stent against a pullout into the left ventricle. The study of the contact biomechanics in animal aortic tissues may help us better understand characteristics of tissue-stent interactions and quantify the baseline responses of non-calcified aortic tissues. PMID:23161165

  6. Preferential short cut or alternative route: the transaxillary access for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Deuschl, Florian; Conradi, Lenard; Lubos, Edith; Schirmer, Johannes; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Blankenberg, Stefan; Treede, Hendrik; Schäfer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has gained widespread acceptance as a treatment option for patients at high risk for conventional aortic valve replacement. The most commonly used access site for TAVI is the common femoral artery. Yet, in a significant number of patients the transfemoral access is not suitable due to peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremity. In these cases the transaxillary approach can serve as an alternative implantation route. By considering the anatomical requirements and providing an adequate endovascular “safety-net” during the procedure the transaxillary TAVI approach results in excellent procedural and clinical outcome. However, whether the transaxillary access for TAVI is superior to other non-transfemoral approaches (e.g., transapical or direct aortic) needs to be studied in the future in a prospective randomized trial. PMID:26543600

  7. Aortic root infection in a prosthetic valve demonstrated by gallium-67 citrate SPECT.

    PubMed

    Thomson, L E J; Goodman, M P; Naqvi, T Z; Feldman, R; Buchbinder, N A; Waxman, A; D'Agnolo, A

    2005-04-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with 6 weeks of worsening low back pain, fever, sweating, and weight loss with known severe lumbosacral osteoarthritis. His history included CABG in 1992, porcine aortic valve replacement, and permanent pacemaker implantation in 2002. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not demonstrate a cause for the symptoms. Blood cultures grew penicillin-sensitive enterococcus and he was referred for evaluation of possible osteodiskitis or epidural abscess. Gallium planar imaging demonstrated increased activity in the lumbar spine, suspicious for the presence of infection, and activity was noted in the mid mediastinum as well. SPECT clearly showed increased Ga-67 activity in the region of the aortic root, suspicious for infection. A perivalvular aortic root abscess was subsequently demonstrated by transesophageal echo. This case illustrates the value of Ga-67 chest SPECT in patients with prosthetic valves for detection of endocarditis. PMID:15764887

  8. Diastolic Aorto–Right-Atrial Fistulation in Aortic and Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Lukas; Starck, Christoph; Falk, Volkmar; Sündermann, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background Aorto–right-atrial fistula in native valve endocarditis is very rare. Case Description A 45-year-old woman was referred with an endocarditis with a perforated right cusp of the aortic valve with at least moderate insufficiency and an affected tricuspid annulus with vegetations. In addition to this, an aorto-cavitary fistula from the aortic sinus to the right atrium with a holodiastolic left–right shunt had been detected. Streptococci viridans were found as underlying pathogen. Complete replacement of the aortic root and resection of the fistula were performed with good result. Conclusion Endocarditis with fistula formation is rare and has to be treated aggressively. PMID:25798353

  9. The influence of leaflet skin friction and stiffness on the performance of bioprosthetic aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Dellimore, K; Kemp, I; Scheffer, C; Weich, H; Doubell, A

    2013-12-01

    Leaflet skin friction and stiffness were found to have a significant influence on the systolic performance of a 19 mm diameter bioprosthetic aortic valve based on fluid-structure interaction simulations at a heart rate of 72 bpm. Four different leaflet skin friction coefficients (0.0, 9.2 × 10(-4), 4.8 × 10(-2) and 4.8 × 10(-1)) were simulated along with three different leaflet elastic moduli (3.0 × 10(6), 3.5 × 10(6), 4.0 × 10(6) N m(-2)). Higher leaflet skin friction was found to increase the magnitude of the systolic transvalvular pressure gradient and the peak velocity through the valve, as well as decrease the valve orifice area. The results for the leaflet opening and closing kinematics also showed that higher leaflet skin friction combined with higher leaflet stiffness produces longer rapid valve opening, closing and ejection times, as well as smaller valve orifice areas. These results are consistent with clinical findings for calcified aortic valves and suggest that valve performance under stenotic conditions is strongly influenced by the combined effect of increasing leaflet stiffness and surface roughness caused by calcification. PMID:24264225

  10. Standardized endpoint definitions for transcatheter aortic valve implantation clinical trials: a consensus report from the Valve Academic Research Consortium†

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Martin B.; Piazza, Nicolo; Nikolsky, Eugenia; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Mack, Michael; Mehran, Roxana; Miller, Craig; Morel, Marie-angèle; Petersen, John; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Takkenberg, Johanna J.M.; Vahanian, Alec; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Vranckx, Pascal; Webb, John G.; Windecker, Stephan; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To propose standardized consensus definitions for important clinical endpoints in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), investigations in an effort to improve the quality of clinical research and to enable meaningful comparisons between clinical trials. To make these consensus definitions accessible to all stakeholders in TAVI clinical research through a peer reviewed publication, on behalf of the public health. Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation may provide a worthwhile less invasive treatment in many patients with severe aortic stenosis and since its introduction to the medical community in 2002, there has been an explosive growth in procedures. The integration of TAVI into daily clinical practice should be guided by academic activities, which requires a harmonized and structured process for data collection, interpretation, and reporting during well-conducted clinical trials. Methods and results The Valve Academic Research Consortium established an independent collaboration between Academic Research organizations and specialty societies (cardiology and cardiac surgery) in the USA and Europe. Two meetings, in San Francisco, California (September 2009) and in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (December 2009), including key physician experts, and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and device manufacturers, were focused on creating consistent endpoint definitions and consensus recommendations for implementation in TAVI clinical research programs. Important considerations in developing endpoint definitions included (i) respect for the historical legacy of surgical valve guidelines; (ii) identification of pathophysiological mechanisms associated with clinical events; (iii) emphasis on clinical relevance. Consensus criteria were developed for the following endpoints: mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, bleeding, acute kidney injury, vascular complications, and prosthetic valve performance. Composite

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance for the assessment of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Before trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), assessment of cardiac function and accurate measurement of the aortic root are key to determine the correct size and type of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to compare cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) for the assessment of aortic valve measurements and left ventricular function in high-risk elderly patients submitted to TAVI. Methods Consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis and contraindications for surgical aortic valve replacement were screened from April 2009 to January 2011 and imaged with TTE and CMR. Results Patients who underwent both TTE and CMR (n = 49) had a mean age of 80.8 ± 4.8 years and a mean logistic EuroSCORE of 14.9 ± 9.3%. There was a good correlation between TTE and CMR in terms of annulus size (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.001), left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) diameter (R2 = 0.62, p < 0.001) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (R2 = 0.47, p < 0.001) and a moderate correlation in terms of aortic valve area (AVA) (R2 = 0.24, p < 0.001). CMR generally tended to report larger values than TTE for all measurements. The Bland-Altman test indicated that the 95% limits of agreement between TTE and CMR ranged from -5.6 mm to + 1.0 mm for annulus size, from -0.45 mm to + 0.25 mm for LVOT, from -0.45 mm2 to + 0.25 mm2 for AVA and from -29.2% to 13.2% for LVEF. Conclusions In elderly patients candidates to TAVI, CMR represents a viable complement to transthoracic echocardiography. PMID:22202669

  12. Experimental validation of Doppler echocardiographic measurement of volume flow through the stenotic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Otto, C M; Pearlman, A S; Gardner, C L; Enomoto, D M; Togo, T; Tsuboi, H; Ivey, T D

    1988-08-01

    In aortic stenosis, evaluation of aortic valve area by the continuity equation assumes that the volume of flow through the stenotic valve can be measured accurately in the left ventricular outflow tract. To test the accuracy of Doppler volume-flow measurement proximal to a stenotic valve, we developed an open-chest canine model in which the native leaflets were sutured together to create variable degrees of acute aortic stenosis. Left ventricular and aortic pressures were measured with micromanometer-tipped catheters. Volume flow was controlled and varied by directing systemic venous return through a calibrated roller pump and back to the right atrium. Because transaortic volume flow will not equal roller pump output when there is coexisting aortic insufficiency (present in 67% of studies), transaortic flow was measured by electromagnetic flowmeter with the flow probe placed around the proximal descending thoracic aorta, just beyond the ligated arch vessels. In 12 adult, mongrel dogs (mean weight, 25 kg), the mean transaortic pressure gradient ranged from 2 to 74 mm Hg, and transaortic volume flow ranged from 0.9 to 3.2 l/min. In four dogs, electromagnetic flow that was measured distal to the valve was accurate compared with volume flow determined by timed collection of total aortic flow into a graduated cylinder (n = 24, r = 0.97, electromagnetic flow = 0.87 Direct +0.13 l/min). In eight subsequent dogs, electromagnetic flow was compared with transaortic cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography in the left ventricular outflow tract as circular cross-sectional area [pi(D/2)2] x left ventricular outflow tract velocity-time integral x heart rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2969311

  13. Comparison of tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics under steady flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Clara; Ward, James; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), a congenital valvular defect consisting of two leaflets instead of three, is associated with a high prevalence of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). CAVD also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) but its progression in the BAV is more severe and rapid. Although hemodynamic abnormalities are increasingly considered potential pathogenic contributor, the native BAV hemodynamics remain largely unknown. Therefore, this study aims at comparing experimentally the hemodynamic environments in TAV and BAV anatomies. Particle-image velocimetry was used to characterize the flow downstream of a native TAV and a model BAV mounted in a left-heart simulator and subjected to three steady flow rates characterizing different phases of the cardiac cycle. While the TAV developed a jet aligned along the valve axis, the BAV was shown to develop a skewed systolic jet with skewness decreasing with increasing flow rate. Measurement of the transvalvular pressure revealed a valvular resistance up to 50% larger in the BAV than in the TAV. The increase in velocity between the TAV and BAV leads to an increase in shear stress downstream of the valve. This study reveals strong hemodynamic abnormalities in the BAV, which may contribute to CAVD pathogenesis.

  14. Fortune or misfortune: asymptomatic, delayed presentation of complete dehiscence of mechanical aortic valve conduit and pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyung Taek; Derose, Joseph; Taub, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Complete dehiscence of a composite aortic valve graft with pseudoaneurysm formation is a rare complication following aortic root replacement. This complication often takes place in the setting of acute graft infection and accompanies symptoms of heart failure, valve insufficiency or sepsis. We present a delayed, asymptomatic presentation of this complication in a young man with distant history of aortic root replacement and medically treated prosthetic valve endocarditis a year postoperatively. He had been non-adherent to warfarin over 10 years, but otherwise maintained a healthy life. After being lost to follow-up, he re-presented 12 years after the initial operation with new-onset seizures. Echocardiogram revealed complete dehiscence of a composite valved conduit at the proximal anastomosis site with a resultant large pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent an urgent re-operation with resection of the pseudoaneurysm and insertion of a tissue valved conduit. He had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery and promised close follow-up on discharge. PMID:27530875

  15. An in vitro evaluation of the impact of eccentric deployment on transcatheter aortic valve hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Paul S; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; McNamara, Laoise M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-06-01

    Patients with aortic stenosis present with calcium deposits on the native aortic valve, which can result in non-concentric expansion of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) stents. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether eccentric deployment of TAVRs lead to turbulent blood flow and blood cell damage. Particle Image Velocimetry was used to quantitatively characterize fluid velocity fields, shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy downstream of TAVRs deployed in circular and eccentric orifices representative of deployed TAVRs in vivo. Effective orifice area (EOA) and mean transvalvular pressure gradient (TVG) values did not differ substantially in circular and eccentric deployed valves, with only a minor decrease in EOA observed in the eccentric valve (2.0 cm(2) for circular, 1.9 cm(2) for eccentric). Eccentric deployed TAVR lead to asymmetric systolic jet formation, with increased shear stresses (circular = 97 N/m(2) vs. eccentric = 119 N/m(2)) and regions of turbulence intensity (circular = 180 N/m(2) vs. eccentric = 230 N/m(2)) downstream that was not present in the circular deployed TAVR. The results of this study indicate that eccentric deployment of TAVRs can lead to altered flow characteristics and may potentially increase the hemolytic potential of the valve, which were not captured through hemodynamic evaluation alone. PMID:24719050

  16. Survey Reported Participation in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Survival After Mitral or Aortic Valve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pack, Quinn R; Lahr, Brian D; Squires, Ray W; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Greason, Kevin L; Michelena, Hector I; Goel, Kashish; Thomas, Randal J

    2016-06-15

    We sought to measure the impact of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on mortality in patients with mitral or aortic heart valve surgery (HVS) and nonobstructive coronary artery disease. We surveyed all patients (or a close family member if the patient was deceased) who had HVS without coronary artery bypass in 2006 through 2010 at the Mayo Clinic to assess if they attended CR after their HVS. We performed a propensity-adjusted landmark analysis to test the association between CR attendance and long-term all-cause mortality conditional on surviving the first year after HVS. Survey response rate was 40% (573/1,420), with responders more likely to be older, have longer hospitalizations, and have more aortic valve disease. A total of 547 patients (59% aortic surgery, ejection fraction 64%) with valid survey responses and 1-year follow-up were included in the propensity analysis, of whom 296 (54%) attended CR. There were 100 deaths during a median follow-up of 5.8 years. For all patients, the propensity-adjusted model suggested no impact of CR on mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.62). When stratified by procedure, results suggested a potentially favorable, but nonsignificant, effect in patients with mitral valve surgery (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.15 to 1.56), but not in patients with aortic valve surgery (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.64.) In conclusion, we found no survival advantage for patients with normal preoperative ejection fraction who attended CR after surgical "correction" of their severe aortic or mitral valve disease. PMID:27138188

  17. A Combined Proteomic and Transcriptomic Approach Shows Diverging Molecular Mechanisms in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Development in Patients with Tricuspid- And Bicuspid Aortic Valve*

    PubMed Central

    Kjellqvist, Sanela; Maleki, Shohreh; Olsson, Therese; Chwastyniak, Maggy; Branca, Rui Miguel Mamede; Lehtiö, Janne; Pinet, Florence; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eriksson, Per

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a pathological local dilatation of the aorta, potentially leading to aortic rupture or dissection. The disease is a common complication of patients with bicuspid aortic valve, a congenital disorder present in 1–2% of the population. Using two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis proteomics followed by mRNA expression, and alternative splicing analysis of the identified proteins, differences in dilated and nondilated aorta tissues between 44 patients with bicuspid and tricuspid valves was examined. The pattern of protein expression was successfully validated with LC-MS/MS. A multivariate analysis of protein expression data revealed diverging protein expression fingerprints in patients with tricuspid compared with the patients with bicuspid aortic valves. From 302 protein spots included in the analysis, 69 and 38 spots were differentially expressed between dilated and nondilated aorta specifically in patients with tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valve, respectively. 92 protein spots were differentially expressed between dilated and nondilated aorta in both phenotypes. Similarly, mRNA expression together with alternative splicing analysis of the identified proteins also showed diverging fingerprints in the two patient groups. Differential splicing was abundant but the expression levels of differentially spliced mRNA transcripts were low compared with the wild type transcript and there was no correlation between splicing and the number of spots. Therefore, the different spots are likely to represent post-translational modifications. The identification of differentially expressed proteins suggests that dilatation in patients with a tricuspid aortic valve involves inflammatory processes whereas aortic aneurysm in patients with BAV may be the consequence of impaired repair capacity. The results imply that aortic aneurysm formation in patients with bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves involve different biological pathways

  18. Recurrent angina from chronic coronary obstruction following transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kabach, Mohamad; Alrifai, Abdulah; Furlan, Stefanie; Alahdab, Fares

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease often coexist. Coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be challenging in patients with prior transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Depending on the type and position of the implanted valve, the procedure can be challenging or even unfeasible due to interference of diagnostic catheters and valve parts. The correct positioning of the TAVI prosthesis during TAVI was identified as an important factor with regard to the feasibility of subsequent CA or PCI. TAVI has been also associated with vascular, cerebrovascular and conduction complication. One is rare but life-threatening complication, coronary ostial obstruction. Coronary ostial obstruction can develop, especially if a safety check of more than 10 mm of coronary ostial height is not taken into consideration during TAVI. This complication can cause recurrent episodes of angina and can severely worsen the patient's cardiac systolic function. PMID:27390671

  19. Recurrent angina from chronic coronary obstruction following transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kabach, Mohamad; Alrifai, Abdulah; Furlan, Stefanie; Alahdab, Fares

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease often coexist. Coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be challenging in patients with prior transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Depending on the type and position of the implanted valve, the procedure can be challenging or even unfeasible due to interference of diagnostic catheters and valve parts. The correct positioning of the TAVI prosthesis during TAVI was identified as an important factor with regard to the feasibility of subsequent CA or PCI. TAVI has been also associated with vascular, cerebrovascular and conduction complication. One is rare but life-threatening complication, coronary ostial obstruction. Coronary ostial obstruction can develop, especially if a safety check of more than 10 mm of coronary ostial height is not taken into consideration during TAVI. This complication can cause recurrent episodes of angina and can severely worsen the patient's cardiac systolic function. PMID:27390671

  20. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease: Part 1-Molecular Pathogenetic Aspects, Hemodynamics, and Adaptive Feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valvular stenosis (AVS), produced by calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) causing reduced cusp opening, afflicts mostly older persons eventually requiring valve replacement. CAVD had been considered "degenerative," but newer investigations implicate active mechanisms similar to atherogenesis-genetic predisposition and signaling pathways, lipoprotein deposits, chronic inflammation, and calcification/osteogenesis. Consequently, CAVD may eventually be controlled/reversed by lifestyle and pharmacogenomics remedies. Its management should be comprehensive, embracing not only the valve but also the left ventricle and the arterial system with their interdependent morphomechanics/hemodynamics, which underlie the ensuing diastolic and systolic LV dysfunction. Compared to even a couple of decades ago, we now have an increased appreciation of genomic and cytomolecular pathogenetic mechanisms underlying CAVD. Future pluridisciplinary studies will characterize better and more completely its pathobiology, evolution, and overall dynamics, encompassing intricate feedback processes involving specific signaling molecules and gene network cascades. They will herald more effective, personalized medicine treatments of CAVD/AVS. PMID:26891845

  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Assisted with Microcatheter: A New Method to Avoid Coronary Artery Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Chu, Guo-Jun; Wang, Fei-Yu; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Qin, Yong-Wen; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lack of fluoroscopic landmarks can make valve deployment more difficult in patients with absent aortic valve (AV) calcification. The goal of this article was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of transcatheter implantation of a valved stent into the AV position of a goat, assisted with a microcatheter which provides accurate positioning of coronary artery ostia to help valved stent deployment. Methods: The subjects were 10 healthy goats in this study. A microcatheter was introduced into the distal site of right coronary artery (RCA) through femoral artery sheath. A minimal thoracic surgery approach was used to access the apex of the heart. The apex of the left ventricle was punctured; a delivery catheter equipped with the valved stent was introduced over a stiff guidewire into the aorta arch. We could accurately locate the RCA ostia through the microcatheter placed in the RCA under fluoroscopy. After correct valve position was confirmed, the valved stent was implanted after rapid inflation of the balloon. The immediate outcome of the function of the valved stents was evaluated after implantation. Results: All ten devices were successfully implanted into the AV position of the goats. Immediate observation after the procedure showed that the valved stents were in the desired position after implantation by angiography, echocardiogram. No obstruction of coronary artery ostia occurred, and no moderate to severe aortic regurgitation was observed. Conclusions: When the procedure of transcatheter implantation of a balloon-expandable valved stent into the AV position of goats is assisted with microcatheter positioning coronary artery ostia, the success rate of operation can be increased in those with noncalcified AV. PMID:25758265

  2. Survival after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis with low transvalvular gradients and severe left ventricular dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, Jeremy J.; Lauer, Michael S.; Bashir, Mohammad; Afridi, Imran; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Stewart, William J.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.; Asher, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess whether aortic valve replacement (AVR) among patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a low transvalvular gradient (TVG) is associated with improved survival. BACKGROUND: The optimal management of patients with severe AS with severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG remains controversial. METHODS: Between 1990 and 1998, we evaluated 68 patients who underwent AVR at our institution (AVR group) and 89 patients who did not undergo AVR (control group), with an aortic valve area < or = 0.75 cm(2), LV ejection fraction < or = 35% and mean gradient < or = 30 mm Hg. Using propensity analysis, survival was compared between a cohort of 39 patients in the AVR group and 56 patients in the control group. RESULTS: Despite well-matched baseline characteristics among propensity-matched patients, the one- and four-year survival rates were markedly improved in patients in the AVR group (82% and 78%), as compared with patients in the control group (41% and 15%; p < 0.0001). By multivariable analysis, the main predictor of improved survival was AVR (adjusted risk ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.39; p < 0.0001). The only other predictors of mortality were age and the serum creatinine level. CONCLUSIONS: Among select patients with severe AS, severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG, AVR was associated with significantly improved survival.

  3. Minimally invasive valve sparing aortic root replacement (David procedure) is safe

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Heike; Umminger, Julia; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Beckmann, Erik; Haverich, Axel; Martens, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Even though minimally invasive cardiac surgery may reduce morbidity, this approach is not routinely performed for aortic root replacements. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the safety and feasibility of valve sparing aortic root replacement via an upper mini-sternotomy up to the 3rd intercostal space. Methods Between April 2011 and March 2014, 26 patients (22 males, age 47.6±13 years) underwent elective minimally invasive aortic valve sparing root replacement (David procedure, group A). Twelve patients underwent additional leaflet repair. Concomitant procedures were: four proximal aortic arch replacements and one coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to the proximal right coronary artery (RCA). During the same time period, 14 patients (ten males, age 64.2±9.5 years) underwent elective David procedure via median full sternotomy (group B). Concomitant procedures included six proximal aortic arch replacements. Although the patient cohorts were small, the results of these two groups were compared. Results In group A, there were no intra-operative conversions to full sternotomy. The aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) times were 115.6±30.3 and 175.8±41.9 min, respectively. One patient was re-opened (via same access) due to post-operative bleeding. The post-operative ventilation time and hospital stay were 0.5±0.3 and 10.4±6.8 days, respectively. There was no 30-day mortality. The patient questionnaire showed that the convalescence time was approximately two weeks. In group B: the cross-clamp and CPB times were 114.1±19.9 and 163.0±24.5 min, respectively. One patient was re-opened (7.1%) due to post-operative bleeding. The post-operative ventilation time and hospital stay were 0.6±0.7 and 14.2±16.7 days, respectively. There was no 30-day mortality. Conclusions Minimally invasive valve sparing aortic root replacement can be safely performed in selected patients. The results are comparable to those operated via a full

  4. Tricuspid Aortic Valve with Partial Commissural Fusion: Preliminary Report of an Apparently Common Cause of Aortic Ejection Sounds with Potential for Serious Sequelae, Illustrated by Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bedynek, Julius L.; Galioto, Frank M.; Leon, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    We report the cases of 2 patients whose tricuspid aortic valves were found to have partial commissural fusion. Both patients experienced complications that were probably related to this abnormality: bacterial endocarditis in 1 instance and a lacunar stroke in the other. In order to illustrate the similarity of physical findings, we also describe the case of a 3rd patient, who had a typical bicuspid aortic valve. Tricuspid aortic valve with partial commissural fusion has been described in autopsy series and has been predicted to cause an ejection sound, but we could find no previously published description of this lesion in living patients. We wish to alert others to the possible presence of aortic commissural fusion, to its potential for serious and likely preventable sequelae, and to the ability of carefully performed transthoracic high-resolution digital echocardiography to demonstrate this condition when its characteristics are found on physical examination. PMID:10928509

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation options for treating severe aortic stenosis in the elderly: the nurse's role in postoperative monitoring and treatment.

    PubMed

    Panos, Angela M; George, Elisabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Severe calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is a progressive cardiac disease that predominantly affects elderly adults. The hallmark symptoms of AS include exertional dyspnea, angina, and syncope. Adults of advanced age do not usually seek treatment for symptoms until their quality of life is greatly diminished. The 2 standard treatments for severe AS are open aortic valve replacement and percutaneous valvuloplasty. As adults age, their comorbid medical conditions often make them too high of a surgical risk for traditional aortic valve replacement, and percutaneous valvuloplasty, although less invasive, often produces only temporary relief of AS symptoms. To provide severe AS patients with alternative less risky treatment options in their later years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices were developed. Through this overview of the disease progression of AS and the different TAVI devices and the insertion procedures, a better understanding of the initial postoperative nursing care associated with postoperative TAVI patient management will be achieved. PMID:24496250

  6. Hydrodynamic characteristics of porcine aortic valves cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and polyepoxy compounds.

    PubMed

    Soda, Aiko; Tanaka, Ryou; Saida, Yuuto; Takashima, Kazuaki; Hirayama, Tomohiro; Umezu, Mitsuo; Yamane, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    Porcine aortic valve (AoF) tissues cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and epoxy compounds were reported to have high anticalcification properties, but their hydrodynamic characteristics have not been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hydrodynamic differences between porcine AoFs, cross-linked with concomitant use of an epoxy compound and glutaraldehyde, at different fixation periods. The valves were mounted on a pulsatile flow circulation mimicking a left heart. The left atrial and left ventricular pressures and mitral and aortic flows were measured at every 0.002 seconds, and the hydrodynamic factor of the valves mounted on the mitral position was estimated. Effective orifice area and the regurgitation volume, which are used as indicators of valve efficiency, failed to detect significant differences due to glutaraldehyde fixation time. In addition, the pressure gradient across the bioprosthetic valve and the variation of mitral flow also had no significant differences. The flow circuit model of the present study was mimicking of a left heart. The evaluation of the mitral valvular function with different glutaraldehyde fixation times was accomplished by relating the pressure with the flow, and by estimating the time lag between valve motion and transvalvular flow. PMID:19092670

  7. Use of Circular Foldable Nitinol Blades for Resecting Calcified Aortic Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Florian; Wendt, Daniel; Stühle, Sebastian; Kawa, Emilia; Wendt, Hermann; Müller, Wiebke; Thielmann, Matthias; Kipfmüller, Brigitte; Vogel, Bernd; Jakob, Heinz

    2009-08-01

    The use of percutaneous aortic valve implantation is limited, as the native calcified valve is left in situ. A new device has been developed for resecting calcified aortic valves, using collapsible nickel-titanium blades: laser-cut T-structures of Nitinol sheet-material (Ni51Ti49 at.%) have been grinded on a high-speed milling cutter to produce cutting edges which have been given the shape of half-circles afterwards. These have been connected to each other and to struts by using rivets which also serve as articulating axes for the cutting ring. The blades are folded around these axes and retreated into a tube to be inserted in the heart through the calcified valve leaflets. Once released, the cutting edges regain their ring-shape. By combining rotation of the ring with a translating movement against a second ring of slightly greater diameter on the instrument, a punching process is created which cuts the calcified valve leaflets and leaves a circular annulus, where a prosthesis can be fixed. In vitro cutting of artificially calcified valves ( n = 6) resulted in a resection time of t = 22 ± 6.29 s with a maximum turning moment of M = 2.4 ± 1.27 Nm, proving the function and the feasibility of the concept.

  8. Discrete subaortic stenosis. Operative age and gradient as predictors of late aortic valve incompetence.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, G; Tiso, E; Mazzucco, A; Daliento, L; Rubino, M; Tursi, V; Fracasso, A

    1993-07-01

    Between January 1969 and May 1990, 100 patients were operated on for discrete subaortic stenosis. Three patients died in the perioperative period. Patients with intrinsic lesions, prosthetic replacement, or extensive operative remodeling of the aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. The 67 remaining patients had a median follow-up of 62 months. Preoperatively, 8 patients had aortic valve competence, 51 had mild incompetence, and 8 patients moderate aortic valve incompetence. At follow-up mild incompetence persisted in 27 and moderate incompetence in 6 patients. In 1 patient it worsened from no incompetence to mild and in another patient from mild to moderate. The probability of aortic incompetence at follow-up was significantly and simultaneously related (multivariate ordinal logistic model) to (1) older age at operation (logarithm of months, p = 0.007), (2) higher preoperative gradient (third power of milligrams of mercury, p = 0.0004), (3) preoperative cardiomegaly (p = 0.04), and (4) surgical myectomy (p = 0.002). There was an interaction between age and gradient (p = 0.03). Two nomograms are proposed as a generalizable aid to decision making. The data support the policy of early repair of subaortic stenosis. PMID:8321008

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, doxycycline and progression of calcific aortic valve disease in hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Joon; Razavian, Mahmoud; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Ye, Yunpeng; Golestani, Reza; Toczek, Jakub; Zhang, Jiasheng; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common cause of aortic stenosis. Currently, there is no non-invasive medical therapy for CAVD. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are upregulated in CAVD and play a role in its pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the effect of doxycycline, a nonselective MMP inhibitor on CAVD progression in the mouse. Apolipoprotein (apo)E(-/-) mice (n = 20) were fed a Western diet (WD) to induce CAVD. After 3 months, half of the animals was treated with doxycycline, while the others continued WD alone. After 6 months, we evaluated the effect of doxycycline on CAVD progression by echocardiography, MMP-targeted micro single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT), and tissue analysis. Despite therapeutic blood levels, doxycycline had no significant effect on MMP activation, aortic valve leaflet separation or flow velocity. This lack of effect on in vivo images was confirmed on tissue analysis which showed a similar level of aortic valve gelatinase activity, and inflammation between the two groups of animals. In conclusion, doxycycline (100 mg/kg/day) had no effect on CAVD progression in apoE(-/-) mice with early disease. Studies with more potent and specific inhibitors are needed to establish any potential role of MMP inhibition in CAVD development and progression. PMID:27619752

  10. Fluid Dynamics of Coarctation of the Aorta and Effect of Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Garcia, Julio; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-01-01

    Up to 80% of patients with coarctation of the aorta (COA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). Patients with COA and BAV have elevated risks of aortic complications despite successful surgical repair. The development of such complications involves the interplay between the mechanical forces applied on the artery and the biological processes occurring at the cellular level. The focus of this study is on hemodynamic modifications induced in the aorta in the presence of a COA and a BAV. For this purpose, numerical investigations and magnetic resonance imaging measurements were conducted with different configurations: (1) normal: normal aorta and normal aortic valve; (2) isolated COA: aorta with COA (75% reduction by area) and normal aortic valve; (3) complex COA: aorta with the same severity of COA (75% reduction by area) and BAV. The results show that the coexistence of COA and BAV significantly alters blood flow in the aorta with a significant increase in the maximal velocity, secondary flow, pressure loss, time-averaged wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index downstream of the COA. These findings can contribute to a better understanding of why patients with complex COA have adverse outcome even following a successful surgery. PMID:24015239

  11. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  12. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav; Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  13. Programmed Speed Reduction Enables Aortic Valve Opening and Increased Pulsatility in the LVAD-Assisted Heart.

    PubMed

    Tolpen, Sam; Janmaat, Jochem; Reider, Claudine; Kallel, Faouzi; Farrar, David; May-Newman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve opening (AVO) during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support aids in preventing valve fusion, incompetence, and thrombosis. The programmed low speed algorithm (PLSA) allows AVO intermittently by reducing continuous motor speed during a dwell time. AVO and hemodynamics in the LVAD-assisted heart were measured using a HeartMate II (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) LVAD with a PLSA controller in a mock circulatory loop. Left ventricle and aortic pressures, LVAD, and total aortic flow were measured during pre-LVAD, non-PLSA and PLSA combinations of cardiac function, and LVAD speed. The low cardiac setting corresponded to a pre-LVAD cardiac output of 2.8 L/min, stroke volume of 40 ml, and ejection fraction of 22%; the medium setting produced values of 3.5 L/min, 50 ml, and 28%, respectively. Results show that the PLSA controller set at 10 krpm, dropping to 7 krpm for dwell time of 6 s, adequately produced AVO for all tested cardiac functions with only minimal changes in cardiac output. However, AVO frequency was independent of opening area and systolic duration, which both decreased with increasing LVAD support. Furthermore, aortic pulsatility index quadrupled in the aortic root and doubled in the distal aorta during PLSA conditions, providing evidence that AVO and blood mixing are enabled by PLSA control at the appropriate speed. PMID:25961849

  14. Left ventricular function in patients with ventricular arrhythmias and aortic valve disease

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1983-02-01

    Forty patients having aortic valve replacement were evaluated preoperatively for ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular ejection fraction. Arrhythmias were classified as complex or simple using the Lown criteria on the 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram; ejection fractions were determined by radionuclide gated blood pool analysis and contrast angiography. The ejection fractions determined by radionuclide angiography were 59.1 +/- 13.1% for 26 patients with simple or no ventricular arrhythmias, and 43.9 +/- 20.3% for 14 patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (p less than 0.01). Ejection fractions determined by angiography, available for 31 patients, were also lower in patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (61.1 +/- 16.3% versus 51.4 +/- 13.4%; p less than 0.05). Seven of 9 patients showing conduction abnormalities on the electrocardiogram had complex ventricular arrhythmias. Eight of 20 patients with aortic stenosis had complex ventricular arrhythmias, while 2 of 13 patients with aortic insufficiency had such arrhythmias. It is concluded that decreased left ventricular ejection fraction, intraventricular conduction abnormalities, and aortic stenosis are associated with an increased frequency of complex ventricular arrhythmias in patients with aortic valve disease.

  15. Ascending aortic aneurysm in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve, positive history of systemic autoimmune diseases and common genetic factors: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Foffa, Ilenia; Festa, Pier Luigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Mazzone, Annamaria; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and specific systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with cardiovascular manifestation, including aortic aneurysm. We reported a case of 64 year-old patient with BAV and a history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and who developed ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm. The patient presented also the homozygosity for genetic variants of MMP9, ACE, MTHFR and PAI-1 genes. Gene-environmental interactions may represent an additional pathogenetic dimension in the still challenging management of the abnormalities of the aortic wall, including dilatation, aneurysm and dissection. PMID:19580662

  16. Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in aortic valve stenosis: links with inflammation and calcification.

    PubMed

    Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2015-08-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) increasingly afflicts our aging population. However, the pathobiology of the disease is still poorly understood and there is no effective pharmacotherapy for treating those at risk for clinical progression. The progression of AS involves complex inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes that resemble to some extent atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that several coagulation proteins and its inhibitors, including tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin, factor XIII, von Willebrand factor, display increased expression within aortic stenotic valves, predominantly on macrophages and myofibroblasts around calcified areas. Systemic impaired fibrinolysis, along with increased plasma and valvular expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, has also been observed in patients with AS in association with the severity of the disease. There is an extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in stenotic valve tissue which contributes to the calcification and mineralisation of the aortic valve leaflets. This review summarises the available data on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS with the emphasis on their interactions with inflammation and calcification. PMID:25809537

  17. Delirium after transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the femoral or apical route.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Katznelson, R; Horlick, E; Osten, M; Styra, R; Cusimano, R J; Carroll, J; Djaiani, G

    2016-08-01

    We thought that delirium might be less frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the femoral artery compared with via the cardiac apex. We reviewed 210 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation between January 2009 and October 2014. The proportion (95% CI) of patients who suffered delirium in the 3 days after valve implantation were: 10 (3-16%) in 105 patients who had transfemoral implantation; and 35 (25-45%) in 105 patients who had transapical implantation, p = 0.0001. The variables that independently associated with postoperative delirium were age, male sex and the transapical approach. The median (IQR [range]) hospital stay was 7 (5-13 [2-41]) days and 10 (7-15 [2-64]) days, respectively, p = 0.004. Future trials should focus on different peri-operative management strategies to reduce delirium rates after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, particularly in older men having implantations via the cardiac apex. PMID:27353560

  18. A New Cone-Shaped Aortic Valve Prosthesis for Orthotopic Position: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan; Peregrin, Jan H.; Pulda, Zdenek; Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Roesch, Josef

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate a newly designed cone-shaped aortic valve prosthesis (CAVP) for one-step transcatheter placement in an orthotopic position. The study was conducted in 15 swine using either the transcarotid (11 animals) or the transfemoral (4 animals) artery approach. A 12- or 13-Fr sheath was inserted via arterial cutdown. The CAVP was deployed under fluoroscopic control and its struts, by design, induced significant native valve insufficiency. CAVP function was evaluated by aortography and aortic pressure curve tracing. In 11 of 15 swine the CAVP was properly deployed and functioned well throughout the scheduled period of 2-3 h. In three swine the CAVPs were placed lower than intended, however, they were functional even in the left ventricular outflow tract position. One swine expired due to inadvertent low CAVP placement that caused both aortic regurgitation and immobilization of the anterior mitral valve leaflet by the valve struts. We conclude that this design of CAVP is relatively easy to deploy, works well throughout a short time period (2-3 h), and, moreover, seems to be reliable even in a lower-than-orthotopic position (e.g., infra-annulary space). Longer-term studies are needed for its further evaluation.

  19. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  20. First-in-man full percutaneous transfemoral valve-in-valve implantations using Edwards SAPIEN 3 prostheses to treat a patient with degenerated mitral and aortic bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    Nejjari, Mohammed; Himbert, Dominique; Brochet, Eric; Attias, David

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 64-year old man presenting with pulmonary oedema due to the degeneration of mitral and aortic bioprostheses. Baseline transthoracic and 3D transoesophageal echocardiography showed severe stenotic degeneration of the mitral bioprosthesis (Carpentier-Edwards bioprosthesis n°31), severe intraprosthetic aortic regurgitation (Perimount bioprosthesis n°27), left ventricular dilatation, decreased left ventricular ejection fraction at 50% and pulmonary hypertension. Because of severe comorbidities, the patient was denied redo surgery by the Heart Team (logistic EuroSCORE 2: 23, 85%). Transcatheter transfemoral mitral valve-in-valve implantation was first performed using a 29-mm SAPIEN 3 valve. Two weeks later, aortic valve-in-valve implantation was performed with the same approach using a 26-mm SAPIEN 3 valve. Four months later, the patient remained asymptomatic with good haemodynamic results for both prostheses. This case report illustrates that valve-in-valve implantations using a full percutaneous transfemoral approach may be a valuable alternative to conventional surgery in high-risk patients presenting with concomitant mitral and aortic bioprosthesis dysfunction. PMID:27241048

  1. Aortic Valve Cyclic Stretch Causes Increased Remodeling Activity and Enhanced Serotonin Receptor Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Kartik; Bakay, Marina A.; Connolly, Jeanne M.; Zhang, Xuemei; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Levy, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased serotonin(5HT) receptor(5HTR) signaling has been associated with cardiac valvulopathy. Prior cell culture studies of 5HTR signaling in heart valve interstitial cells have provided mechanistic insights concerning only static conditions. We investigated the hypothesis that aortic valve biomechanics participate in the regulation of both 5HTR expression and inter-related extracellular matrix remodeling events. Methods The effects of cyclic-stretch on aortic valve 5HTR, expression, signaling and extracellular matrix remodeling were investigated using a tensile stretch bioreactor in studies which also compared the effects of adding 5HT and/or the 5HT-transporter inhibitor, Fluoxetine. Results Cyclic-stretch alone increased both proliferation and collagen in porcine aortic valve cusp samples. However, with cyclic-stretch, unlike static conditions, 5HT plus Fluoxetine caused the greatest increase in proliferation (p<0.0001), and also caused significant increases in collagen(p<0.0001) and glycosaminoglycans (p<0.0001). DNA microarray data demonstrated upregulation of 5HTR2A and 5HTR2B (>4.5 fold) for cyclic-stretch versus static (p<0.001), while expression of the 5HT transporter was not changed significantly. Extracellular matrix genes (eg. Collagen Types I,II,III, and proteoglycans) were also upregulated by cyclic-stretch. Conclusions Porcine aortic valve cusp samples subjected to cyclic stretch upregulate 5HTR2A and 2B, and also initiate remodeling activity characterized by increased proliferation and collagen production. Importantly, enhanced 5HTR responsiveness, due to increased 5HTR2A and 2B expression, results in a significantly greater response in remodeling endpoints (proliferation, collagen and GAG production) to 5HT in the presence of 5HT transporter blockade. PMID:21718840

  2. [Aortic valve surgery in a patient with cold agglutinin disease; effectiveness of continuous retrograde cardioplegia].

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Yasuko; Takagi, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Takeo; Yasuda, Naomi; Nakajima, Tomohiro; Tachibana, Kazutoshi; Higami, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    A 76-year-old female was hospitalized because of congestive heart failure and anemia. A thorough examination led to a diagnosis of severe aortic stenosis and cold agglutinin disease. The critical temperature for hemagglutination was 27 °C, which caused particular problems with regard to the myocardial protection temperature during surgery. Aortic valve replacement was performed safely by increasing the normal myocardial protection temperature from 15 °C to 32 °C and using 3 times the normal volume of cardioplagic fluid. As a result of strict perioperative thermal management, the operation was completed without any complications. PMID:23445641

  3. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa Riestra, Adriana; Rubio Caballero, José Amador; Freites Estévez, Alfonso; Alonso Belló, Javier; Botas Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27134443

  4. Blood flow characteristics in the ascending aorta after TAVI compared to surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Löbe, Ulrike; Barker, Alex J; Gelsinger, Carmen; Butter, Christian; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian

    2016-03-01

    Ascending aortic blood flow characteristics are altered after aortic valve surgery, but the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Abnormal flow may be associated with aortic and cardiac remodeling. We analyzed blood flow characteristics in the ascending aorta after TAVI in comparison to conventional stented aortic bioprostheses (AVR) and healthy subjects using time-resolved three-dimensional flow-sensitive cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow MRI). Seventeen patients with TAVI (Edwards Sapien XT), 12 with AVR and 9 healthy controls underwent 4D-flow MRI of the ascending aorta. Target parameters were: severity of vortical and helical flow pattern (semiquantitative grading from 0 = none to 3 = severe) and the local distribution of systolic wall shear stress (WSSsystole). AVR revealed significantly more extensive vortical and helical flow pattern than TAVI (p = 0.042 and p = 0.002) and controls (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001). TAVI showed significantly more extensive vortical flow than controls (p < 0.001). Both TAVI and AVR revealed marked blood flow eccentricity (64.7 and 66.7 %, respectively), whereas controls showed central blood flow (88.9 %). TAVI and AVR exhibited an asymmetric distribution of WSSsystole in the mid-ascending aorta with local maxima at the right anterior aortic wall and local minima at the left posterior wall. In contrast, controls showed a symmetric distribution of WSSsystole along the aortic circumference. Blood flow was significantly altered in the ascending aorta after TAVI and AVR. Changes were similar regarding WSSsystole distribution, while TAVI resulted in less helical and vortical blood flow. PMID:26493195

  5. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Maqsood M.; Choi, Charles H.; Konda, Subbareddy

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose. PMID:25552810

  6. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Choi, Charles H; Konda, Subbareddy; Shake, Jay G

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose. PMID:25552810

  7. Increased systolic load causes adverse remodeling of fetal aortic and mitral valves.

    PubMed

    Tibayan, Frederick A; Louey, Samantha; Jonker, Sonnet; Espinoza, Herbert; Chattergoon, Natasha; You, Fanglei; Thornburg, Kent L; Giraud, George

    2015-12-15

    While abnormal hemodynamic forces alter fetal myocardial growth, little is known about whether such insults affect fetal cardiac valve development. We hypothesized that chronically elevated systolic load would detrimentally alter fetal valve growth. Chronically instrumented fetal sheep received either a continuous infusion of adult sheep plasma to increase fetal blood pressure, or a lactated Ringer's infusion as a volume control beginning on day 126 ± 4 of gestation. After 8 days, mean arterial pressure was higher in the plasma infusion group (63.0 mmHg vs. 41.8 mmHg, P < 0.05). Mitral annular septal-lateral diameter (11.9 mm vs. 9.1 mm, P < 0.05), anterior leaflet length (7.7 mm vs. 6.4 mm, P < 0.05), and posterior leaflet length (P2; 4.0 mm vs. 3.0 mm, P < 0.05) were greater in the elevated load group. mRNA levels of Notch-1, TGF-β2, Wnt-2b, BMP-1, and versican were suppressed in aortic and mitral valve leaflets; elastin and α1 type I collagen mRNA levels were suppressed in the aortic valves only. We conclude that sustained elevated arterial pressure load on the fetal heart valve leads to anatomic remodeling and, surprisingly, suppression of signaling and extracellular matrix genes that are important to valve development. These novel findings have important implications on the developmental origins of valve disease and may have long-term consequences on valve function and durability. PMID:26354842

  8. [Isolated Pulmonary Valve Endocarditis in a Patient with Aortic Regurgitation and Patent Foramen Ovale;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Doi, Toshio; Gyoten, Takayuki; Sakata, Kimimasa; Nagura, Saori; Yamashita, Akio; Fukahara, Kazuaki; Kotoh, Keiju; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis is an extremely rare clinical condition. Here, we report a case of pulmonary valve endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An 84-year-old man with a history of aortic regurgitation and patent foramen ovale was admitted to our hospital due to fever of unknown origin for 4 weeks' duration. MRSA was detected in his blood cultures. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a mobile vegetation attached to the pulmonary valve, moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, and patent foramen ovale with left-to-right shunt. After 30-days' treatment with vancomycin, gentamicin and rifampicin, he defervesced and blood cultures became negative. At surgery, a large vegetation was still attached to the pulmonary valve, but the leaflets remained with minimum damage. Aortic valve replacement, direct closure of the patent foramen ovale, and simple resection of the vegetation were performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:27365067

  9. Late outcome analysis of the Braile Biomédica® pericardial valve in the aortic position

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Lisandro Gonçalves; Veronese, Elinthon Tavares; Santiago, José Augusto Duncan; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aortic valve replacement with Braile bovine pericardial prosthesis has been routinely done at the Heart Institute of the Universidade de São Paulo Medical School since 2006. The objective of this study is to analyze the results of Braile Biomédica® aortic bioprosthesis in patients with aortic valve disease. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients with aortic valve disease submitted to aortic valve replacement with Braile Biomédica® bovine pericardial prosthesis, between 2006 and 2010. Mean age was 59.41±16.34 years and 67.3% were male. Before surgery, 73.4% of patients were in NYHA functional class III or IV. Results Hospital mortality was 8.16% (16 patients). Linearized rates of mortality, endocarditis, reintervention, and structural dysfunction were 1.065%, 0.91%, 0.68% and 0.075% patients/year, respectively. Actuarial survival was 90.59±2.56% in 88 months. Freedom from reintervention, endocarditis and structural dysfunction was respectively 91.38±2.79%, 89.84±2.92% and 98.57±0.72% in 88 months. Conclusion The Braile Biomédica® pericardial aortic valve prosthesis demonstrated actuarial survival and durability similar to that described in the literature, but further follow up is required to assess the incidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis and structural dysfunction in the future. PMID:25372903

  10. The influence of the aortic valve angle on the hemodynamic features of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Since the first observation of a helical flow pattern in aortic blood flow, the existence of helical blood flow has been found to be associated with various pathological conditions such as bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, and aortic dilatation. However, an understanding of the development of helical blood flow and its clinical implications are still lacking. In our present study, we hypothesized that the direction and angle of aortic inflow can influence helical flow patterns and related hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta. Therefore, we investigated the hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta and various aortic inflow angles using patient-specific vascular phantoms that were generated using a 3D printer and time-resolved, 3D, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). The results show that the rotational direction and strength of helical blood flow in the thoracic aorta largely vary according to the inflow direction of the aorta, and a higher helical velocity results in higher wall shear stress distributions. In addition, right-handed rotational flow conditions with higher rotational velocities imply a larger total kinetic energy than left-handed rotational flow conditions with lower rotational velocities. PMID:27561388

  11. MRI evaluation prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): When to acquire and how to interpret.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Hobbs, Susan K; Ling, Fred S; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Knight, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is increasingly being used in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery. ECG-gated CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in the preoperative planning for these devices. As the number of patients undergoing these procedures increases, a subset of patients is being recognized who have contraindications to iodinated contrast medium, either due to a prior severe allergic type reaction or poor renal function. Another subgroup of patients with low flow and low gradient aortic stenosis is being recognized that are usually assessed for severity of aortic stenosis by stress echocardiography. There are contraindications to stress echocardiography and some of these patients may not be able to undergo this test. Non-contrast MRI can be a useful emerging modality for evaluating these patients. In this article, we discuss the emerging indications of non-contrast MRI in preoperative assessment for TAVI and describe the commonly used MRI sequences. A comparison of the most important measurements obtained for TAVI assessment on CTA and MRI from same subjects is included. Teaching Points • MRI can be used for preoperative assessment of aortic annulus. • MRI is an alternate to CTA when iodinated contrast is contraindicated. • Measurements obtained by non-contrast MRI are similar to contrast enhanced CTA. • MRI can be used to assess severity of aortic stenosis. PMID:26911969

  12. Localization and tracking of aortic valve prosthesis in 2D fluoroscopic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karar, M.; Chalopin, C.; Merk, D. R.; Jacobs, S.; Walther, T.; Burgert, O.; Falk, V.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a new method for localization and tracking of the aortic valve prosthesis (AVP) in 2D fluoroscopic image sequences to assist the surgeon to reach the safe zone of implantation during transapical aortic valve implantation. The proposed method includes four main steps: First, the fluoroscopic images are preprocessed using a morphological reconstruction and an adaptive Wiener filter to enhance the AVP edges. Second, a target window, defined by a user on the first image of the sequences which includes the AVP, is tracked in all images using a template matching algorithm. In a third step the corners of the AVP are extracted based on the AVP dimensions and orientation in the target window. Finally, the AVP model is generated in the fluoroscopic image sequences. Although the proposed method is not yet validated intraoperatively, it has been applied to different fluoroscopic image sequences with promising results.

  13. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  14. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  15. Numerical characterization of hemodynamics conditions near aortic valve after implantation of Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Quaini, Annalisa; Canić, Suncica; Paniagua, David

    2011-07-01

    Left Ventricular Assist Devices (LVADs) are implantable mechanical pumps that temporarily aid the function of the left ventricle. The use of LVADs has been associated with thrombus formation next to the aortic valve and close to the anastomosis region, especially in patients in which the native cardiac function is negligible and the aortic valve remains closed. Stagnation points and recirculation zones have been implicated as the main fluid dynamics factors contributing to thrombus formation. The purpose of the present study was to develop and use computer simulations based on a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver to study flow conditions corresponding to different strategies in LVAD ascending aortic anastomosis providing a scenario with the lowest likelihood of thrombus formation. A novel FSI algorithm was developed to deal with the presence of multiple structures corresponding to different elastic properties of the native aorta and of the LVAD cannula. A sensitivity analysis of different variables was performed to assess their impact of flow conditions potentially leading to thrombus formation. It was found that the location of the anastomosis closest to the aortic valve (within 4 cm away from the valve) and at the angle of 30 minimizes the likelihood of thrombus formation. Furthermore, it was shown that the rigidity of the dacron anastomosis cannula plays almost no role in generating pathological conditions downstream from the anastomosis. Additionally, the flow analysis presented in this manuscript indicates that compliance of the cardiovascular tissue acts as a natural inhibitor of pathological flow conditions conducive to thrombus formation and should not be neglected in computer simulations. PMID:21675811

  16. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Blyme, Adam; Asferg, Camilla; Nielsen, Olav W; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Wachtell, Kristian; Olsen, Michael H

    2016-06-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9-4.9] to 1.8 [0.8-5.4] mg/l, p < 0.001) and not receiving AVR (1.90 [0.90-4.10] to 1.3 [0.6-2.9] mg/l, p < 0.001). In Cox-regression analyses, hsCRP1 predicted later AVR (HR = 1.17, p < 0.001) independently of hsCRP0 (HR = 0.96, p = 0.33), aortic valve area (AVA) and other risk factors. A higher rate of AVR was observed in the group with high hsCRP0 and an increase during the first year (AVRhighCRP0CRP1inc = 47.3% versus AVRhighCRP0CRP1dec = 27.5%, p < 0.01). The prognostic benefit of a 1-year reduction in hsCRP was larger in patients with high versus low hsCRP0 eliminating the difference in incidence of AVR between high versus low hsCRP0 (AVRhighCRP0CRP1dec = 27.5% versus AVRlowCRP0CRP1dec = 25.8%, p = 0.66) in patients with reduced hsCRP during the first year. Conclusions High hsCRP1 or an increase in hsCRP during the first year of follow-up predicted later AVR independently of AVA, age, gender and other risk factors, although no significant improvement in C-statistics was observed. PMID:26911132

  17. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. Results All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Conclusion Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV. PMID:27390538

  18. [The effect of prosthesis-patient mismatchon early myocardial remodeling after aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Belov, Iu V; Katkov, A I; Seslavinskaia, T V; Vinokurov, I A; Salagaev, G I

    2015-01-01

    The reductionofan effective orifice area is associated with the development of the phenomenon of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of PPM on the immediate results of surgical treatment in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The study included 50 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement. All patients were divided into 2 groups: with PPM (27 patients) and without it (23 patients). Immediate postoperative results were not statistically different. Analysis of echocardiographic data showed worse results in patients with PPM. It was marked reduction of LV EDV on 23.43 ± 8.93 ml in the group without PPM and on 16.5 ± 1.76 ml in patients with PPM (p<0.05). Also it was noted a greater decrease of pulmonary artery pressure (16.56 ± 12.94 mm Hg) compared with the group with PPM (8.44 ± 7.38 mm Hg), p<0.05. The presence of PPM in patients after aortic valve replacement leads to a slower reverse remodeling of the myocardium. PMID:26031944

  19. Combined elective percutaneous coronary intervention and transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pasic, Miralem; Dreysse, Stephan; Unbehaun, Axel; Buz, Semih; Drews, Thorsten; Klein, Christoph; D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Hetzer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    There is no established strategy of how and when to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Simultaneous, single-stage treatment of both pathologies is a possible solution. We report our initial results of simultaneously performed transapical TAVI and elective percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Between April 2008 and July 2011, a total of 419 patients underwent transapical TAVI. Combined elective PCI and TAVI were performed in 46 (11%) patients. Only the most significant coronary lesion or lesions were treated. Technical success of the combined approach was 100%. The mean count of implanted stents per patient was 1.6 ± 1.0 (range, 1–5 stents). The 30-day mortality rates in the PCI and TAVI group was 4.3%. Survival at 12, 24 and 36 months of the PCI and TAVI group 87.1 ± 5.5, 69.7 ± 10.3 and 69.7 ± 10.3%, respectively. The results showed that the single-stage approach with combined elective PCI and TAVI is feasible and safe. It has become our primary choice for treatment of high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and CAD. PMID:22232234

  20. Influence of osteoclasts and osteoprotegerin on the mode of calcific degeneration of aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Lis, Grzegorz J; Czubek, Urszula; Jasek-Gajda, Ewa; Łoboda, Agnieszka; Dulak, Józef; Nessler, Jadwiga; Kapelak, Bogusław; Sadowski, Jerzy; Litwin, Jan A

    2016-03-22

    INTRODUCTION    Calcific aortic valve disease is associated with inflammation and calcification, thus the osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) and its ligand (RANKL) system involved in osteoclastogenesis and inflammation may play a significant role in valve degeneration. OBJECTIVES    The aim of this study was to assess whether circulating OPG, sRANKL, and other bone metabolism markers can predict the presence of osteoclasts in stenotic valves and to evaluate their impact on the mode of degeneration. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study involved 60 patients with aortic stenosis who underwent valve replacement surgery and subsequently were divided into 2 groups: osteoclastic (n = 12) and nonosteoclastic (n = 48), according to the presence or absence of intravalvular osteoclasts. Before the surgery, we measured serum levels of OPG, sRANKL, osteocalcin, osteopontin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 1β, and IL-6. Immunohistochemistry and morphometry were used to determine the extent of valve calcification, lipid accumulation, neovascularization, and the number and phenotype of macrophages. RESULTS    Compared with the nonosteoclastic group, patients with intravalvular osteoclasts had lower levels of OPG (P = 0.0006) and TNF-α (P = 0.02) and less frequently had diabetes (P = 0.04). Their valves showed higher incidence of ossification (P = 0.002), higher total (P = 0.008) and M2 macrophage counts (P = 0.0002), increased neovascularization (P = 0.003), and lower accumulation of lipids (P = 0.04). They also showed a negative correlation between valve calcification and age (r = -0.79, P = 0.002), which was not observed in patients without osteoclasts. In a multivariate analysis, low circulating OPG levels and the absence of diabetes were predictors of intravalvular osteoclastic differentiation. CONCLUSIONS    The presence of osteoclasts in stenotic valves associated with low circulating OPG levels and an

  1. Total ellipse of the heart valve: the impact of eccentric stent distortion on the regional dynamic deformation of pericardial tissue leaflets of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Paul S; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P; McNamara, Laoise M

    2015-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacements (TAVRs) are a percutaneous alternative to surgical aortic valve replacements and are used to treat patients with aortic valve stenosis. This minimally invasive procedure relies on expansion of the TAVR stent to radially displace calcified aortic valve leaflets against the aortic root wall. However, these calcium deposits can impede the expansion of the device causing distortion of the valve stent and pericardial tissue leaflets. The objective of this study was to elucidate the impact of eccentric TAVR stent distortion on the dynamic deformation of the tissue leaflets of the prosthesis in vitro. Dual-camera stereophotogrammetry was used to measure the regional variation in strain in a leaflet of a TAVR deployed in nominal circular and eccentric (eccentricity index = 28%) orifices, representative of deployed TAVRs in vivo. It was observed that (i) eccentric stent distortion caused incorrect coaptation of the leaflets at peak diastole resulting in a 'peel-back' leaflet geometry that was not present in the circular valve and (ii) adverse bending of the leaflet, arising in the eccentric valve at peak diastole, caused significantly higher commissure strains compared with the circular valve in both normotensive and hypertensive pressure conditions (normotension: eccentric = 13.76 ± 2.04% versus circular = 11.77 ± 1.61%, p = 0.0014, hypertension: eccentric = 15.07 ± 1.13% versus circular = 13.56 ± 0.87%, p = 0.0042). This study reveals that eccentric distortion of a TAVR stent can have a considerable impact on dynamic leaflet deformation, inducing deleterious bending of the leaflet and increasing commissures strains, which might expedite leaflet structural failure compared to leaflets in a circular deployed valve. PMID:26674192

  2. Utility of cardiac computed tomography for evaluation of pannus in mechanical aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Suh, Young Joo; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Sak; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2015-08-01

    The clinical significance of pannus detected on computed tomography (CT) has not yet been investigated. The purposes of this study were to investigate the clinical significance of pannus detected on cardiac CT in patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with mechanical valves, and to determine predictors for pannus severity. A total of 92 patients who underwent cardiac CT and TTE and who had undergone mechanical AVR were included. The geometric orifice area (GOA), the presence of limitation of motion (LOM) and pannus were evaluated on CT. The GOA, presence of LOM, and presence and severity of pannus were compared with echocardiographic parameters. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors for pannus severity. The GOA on CT positively correlated with effective orifice area on TTE (r = 0.733, P < 0.0001). Pannus was found in 77.2% and LOM in 14.0%. With increasing pannus severity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient (PG) was significantly higher (P < 0.0001). Patients with elevated PG showed a smaller GOA, a higher incidence of pannus, more severe pannus and LOM than patients with normal PG (P < 0.05). Small valve size (≤19 mm), Carbomedics valve, rheumatic etiology, and young age at AVR (<48.8 years) were independent predictors of moderate to severe pannus (P < 0.05). Cardiac CT is helpful in the evaluation of pannus formation in patients with mechanical aortic valves. Moderate to severe pannus formation frequently occurred in patients with small mechanical valve size, Carbomedics valves, rheumatic heart disease and young age at AVR. PMID:25990093

  3. Simulation of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a patient-specific finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, F; Conti, M; Morganti, S; Reali, A

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, heart valve failure has been treated adopting open-heart surgical techniques and cardiopulmonary bypass. However, over the last decade, minimally invasive procedures have been developed to avoid high risks associated with conventional open-chest valve replacement techniques. Such a recent and innovative procedure represents an optimal field for conducting investigations through virtual computer-based simulations: in fact, nowadays, computational engineering is widely used to unravel many problems in the biomedical field of cardiovascular mechanics and specifically, minimally invasive procedures. In this study, we investigate a balloon-expandable valve and we propose a novel simulation strategy to reproduce its implantation using computational tools. Focusing on the Edwards SAPIEN valve in particular, we simulate both stent crimping and deployment through balloon inflation. The developed procedure enabled us to obtain the entire prosthetic device virtually implanted in a patient-specific aortic root created by processing medical images; hence, it allows evaluation of postoperative prosthesis performance depending on different factors (e.g. device size and prosthesis placement site). Notably, prosthesis positioning in two different cases (distal and proximal) has been examined in terms of coaptation area, average stress on valve leaflets as well as impact on the aortic root wall. The coaptation area is significantly affected by the positioning strategy (- 24%, moving from the proximal to distal) as well as the stress distribution on both the leaflets (+13.5%, from proximal to distal) and the aortic wall (- 22%, from proximal to distal). No remarkable variations of the stress state on the stent struts have been obtained in the two investigated cases. PMID:23402555

  4. Aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement in ankylosing spondylitis: report of three surgical cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kawasuji, M; Hetzer, R; Oelert, H; Stauch, G; Borst, H G

    1982-10-01

    Out of 887 consecutive patients who underwent aortic valve replacement between January 1976 and December 1981 at Hannover Medical School Hospital, 3 patients had severe aortic valve insufficiency associated with ankylosing spondylitis (Morbus Bechterew). One of them had huge aneurysmatic dilatation of the ascending aorta and successfully underwent replacement of the ascending aorta by a vascular prosthesis. Microscopical examination of the resected aortic wall showed characteristic findings of aortitis in ankylosing spondylitis. The 3 patients are in good clinical condition at 5 and 6 months, and 2 1/2 years, respectively, after uneventful surgery. It is concluded that aortic valve replacement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis can be performed feasibly and clinical results have been satisfactory. The risk of aneurysmatic dilatation of the ascending aorta resulting from aortitis associated with ankylosing spondylitis is emphasized. PMID:6183782

  5. Mid-term results of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves in elder patients with small aortic annuli: comparison with 19-mm bioprosthetic valves.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Hideki; Ikebuchi, Masahiko; Sano, Toshikazu; Tai, Ryuta; Horio, Naohiro; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the mid-term outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) between 17-mm mechanical heart valves (MV) and 19-mm bioprosthetic valves (BV) in elderly patients with small aortic annuli. Between 2000 and 2011, 127 consecutive patients (mean age 79 years; 87 % female) underwent AVR for aortic valve stenosis with a small aortic annulus. 19-mm BV (n = 67) was implanted. When the 19-mm BV did not fit the annulus, 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic mechanical valve (n = 60) was used instead of an aortic root-enlargement procedure. The follow-up rate was 94.0 % in the BV group, and 98.5 % in the MV group. No significant differences in survival rate and valve-related complications were found between the 2 groups. In-hospital mortality rates were 1.5 % (n = 1) in the BV group and 5.0 % (n = 3) in the MV group. Late mortality rates were 3.9 % per patient-years (p-y; n = 8) in the BV group, and 6.0 % per p-y (n = 10) in the MV group. Five-year Kaplan-Meier survival rates were 62 % in the BV group, and 72 % in the MV group (log-rank P = 0.280). Freedom from major adverse valve-related stroke and cerebral bleeding events was 92.5 and 98.5 % in the BV group, and 94.7 and 100 % in the MV group. AVR using 17-mm MV in elder patients with small aortic annuli provided equivalent mid-term clinical results to that with 19-mm BV. PMID:24878870

  6. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth; Kuang, Shao-Qing; Regalado, Ellen; Guo, Dongchuan; Milewicz, Dianna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD) are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs) contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD). We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves) were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort) and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort) from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb) or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions) and 17q25.1 (three duplications). The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32%) than in the FTAAD (23%) or STAAD (17%) cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:27092555

  7. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart valve - aortic regurgitation; Valvular disease - aortic regurgitation; AI - aortic insufficiency ... BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  8. Technical Approach Determines Inflammatory Response after Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Erdoes, Gabor; Lippuner, Christoph; Kocsis, Istvan; Schiff, Marcel; Stucki, Monika; Carrel, Thierry; Windecker, Stephan; Eberle, Balthasar; Stueber, Frank; Book, Malte

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the periprocedural inflammatory response in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with different technical approaches. Material and Methods Patients were prospectively allocated to one of the following treatments: SAVR using conventional extracorporeal circulation (CECC, n = 47) or minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC, n = 15), or TAVI using either transapical (TA, n = 15) or transfemoral (TF, n = 24) access. Exclusion criteria included infection, pre-procedural immunosuppressive or antibiotic drug therapy and emergency indications. We investigated interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), white blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and soluble L-selectin (sCD62L) levels before the procedure and at 4, 24, and 48 h after aortic valve replacement. Data are presented for group interaction (p-values for inter-group comparison) as determined by the Greenhouse-Geisser correction. Results SAVR on CECC was associated with the highest levels of IL-8 and hs-CRP (p<0.017, and 0.007, respectively). SAVR on MECC showed the highest descent in levels of HLA-DR and sCD62L (both p<0.001) in the perioperative period. TA-TAVI showed increased intraprocedural concentration and the highest peak of IL-6 (p = 0.017). Significantly smaller changes in the inflammatory markers were observed in TF-TAVI. Conclusion Surgical and interventional approaches to aortic valve replacement result in inflammatory modulation which differs according to the invasiveness of the procedure. As expected, extracorporeal circulation is associated with the most marked pro-inflammatory activation, whereas TF-TAVI emerges as the approach with the most attenuated inflammatory response. Factors such as the pre-treatment patient condition and the extent of myocardial injury also significantly affect inflammatory biomarker patterns

  9. Different techniques for aortic valve repair and the associated root reconstruction – prospective long-term follow-up of the first 100 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gocol, Radosław; Malinowski, Marcin; Hudziak, Damian; Duraj, Piotr; Frackiewicz, Joanna; Kargul, Tomasz; Deja, Marek A.; Woś, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The advantages of aortic valve and aortic root reconstructive surgery include the provision of natural postoperative valve hemodynamics and the avoidance of prosthetic valve-related complications. A systematic approach based on functional classification of aortic regurgitation allows standardization and reproducibility. Its potential applicability, however, is limited by the relative lack of long-term follow-up data. Aim To achieve the long term results of aortic valve and root repair in prospectively recruited group of 100 patients operated on during first seven years. Material and methods Between the years 2003 and 2013, 225 consecutive patients (175 male, 50 female, mean age 51.3 years) with severe aortic regurgitation and aortic root enlargement underwent aortic valve repair or sparing surgery. The first 100 patients operated between 2003 and 2009 were prospectively enrolled in the study in order to achieve a 105-month follow-up. They underwent aortic valve repair and associated aortic root reconstruction. This prospective study is aimed at assessing the major endpoints of overall survival and freedom from reoperation. Additionally, log-rank testing for the risk factors associated with overall mortality, reoperation, and aortic valve repair failure was performed. Results Among 225 patients, early mortality occurred in the case of 5 patients (2.2%), while 6 (2.5%) patients experienced early valve failure. In a prospective analysis performed on the first 100 patients, long-term results achieved with Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a survival rate of 93% and freedom from reoperation at the level of 91.3%. The risk factors for overall mortality included NYHA class, creatinine level, and perioperative root replacement as reimplantation. Redo operation was associated with bicuspid aortic valve and perioperative leaflet resection with pericardial patch repair. Conclusions One hundred and five month follow-up data from this prospectively analyzed cohort of

  10. Involvement of Immune Cell Network in Aortic Valve Stenosis: Communication between Valvular Interstitial Cells and Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a heart disease prevalent in the elderly characterized by valvular calcification, fibrosis, and inflammation, but its exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Previously, aortic valve stenosis was thought to be caused by chronic passive and degenerative changes associated with aging. However, recent studies have demonstrated that atherosclerotic processes and inflammation can induce valvular calcification and bone deposition, leading to valvular stenosis. In particular, the most abundant cell type in cardiac valves, valvular interstitial cells, can differentiate into myofibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells, leading to valvular calcification and stenosis. Differentiation of valvular interstitial cells can be trigged by inflammatory stimuli from several immune cell types, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, and mast cells. This review indicates that crosstalk between immune cells and valvular interstitial cells plays an important role in the development of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:26937229

  11. Transcriptional and phenotypic changes in aorta and aortic valve with aging and MnSOD deficiency in mice

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Carolyn M.; Hagler, Michael; Zhang, Bin; Oehler, Elise A.; Arghami, Arman

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize changes in antioxidant and age-related gene expression in aorta and aortic valve with aging, and test the hypothesis that increased mitochondrial oxidative stress accelerates age-related endothelial and aortic valve dysfunction. Wild-type (MnSOD+/+) and manganese SOD heterozygous haploinsufficient (MnSOD+/−) mice were studied at 3 and 18 mo of age. In aorta from wild-type mice, antioxidant expression was preserved, although there were age-associated increases in Nox2 expression. Haploinsufficiency of MnSOD did not alter antioxidant expression in aorta, but increased expression of Nox2. When compared with that of aorta, age-associated reductions in antioxidant expression were larger in aortic valves from wild-type and MnSOD haploinsufficient mice, although Nox2 expression was unchanged. Similarly, sirtuin expression was relatively well-preserved in aorta from both genotypes, whereas expression of SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT6 were significantly reduced in the aortic valve. Expression of p16ink4a, a marker of cellular senescence, was profoundly increased in both aorta and aortic valve from MnSOD+/+ and MnSOD+/− mice. Functionally, we observed comparable age-associated reductions in endothelial function in aorta from both MnSOD+/+ and MnSOD+/− mice. Interestingly, inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin or gp91ds-tat improved endothelial function in MnSOD+/+ mice but significantly impaired endothelial function in MnSOD+/− mice at both ages. Aortic valve function was not impaired by aging or MnSOD haploinsufficiency. Changes in antioxidant and sirtuin gene expression with aging differ dramatically between aorta and aortic valve. Furthermore, although MnSOD does not result in overt cardiovascular dysfunction with aging, compensatory transcriptional responses to MnSOD deficiency appear to be tissue specific. PMID:23997094

  12. Application of finite element analysis to the design of tissue leaflets for a percutaneous aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Smuts, A N; Blaine, D C; Scheffer, C; Weich, H; Doubell, A F; Dellimore, K H

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous Aortic Valve (PAV) replacement is an attractive alternative to open heart surgery, especially for patients considered to be poor surgical candidates. Despite this, PAV replacement still has its limitations and associated risks. Bioprosthetic heart valves still have poor long-term durability due to calcification and mechanical failure. In addition, the implantation procedure often presents novel challenges, including damage to the expandable stents and bioprosthetic leaflets. In this study, a simplified version of Fung's elastic constitutive model for skin, developed by Sun and Sacks, was implemented using finite element analysis (FEA) and applied to the modelling of bovine and kangaroo pericardium. The FEA implementation was validated by simulating biaxial tests and by comparing the results with experimental data. Concepts for different PAV geometries were developed by incorporating valve design and performance parameters, along with stent constraints. The influence of effects such as different leaflet material, material orientation and abnormal valve dilation on the valve function was investigated. The stress distribution across the valve leaflet was also examined to determine the appropriate fibre direction for the leaflet. The simulated attachment forces were compared with suture tearing tests performed on the pericardium to evaluate suture density. It is concluded that kangaroo pericardium is suitable for PAV applications, and superior to bovine pericardium, due to its lower thickness and greater extensibility. PMID:21094482

  13. Red cell distribution width in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hellhammer, Katharina; Zeus, Tobias; Verde, Pablo E; Veulemanns, Verena; Kahlstadt, Lisa; Wolff, Georg; Erkens, Ralf; Westenfeld, Ralf; Navarese, Eliano P; Merx, Marc W; Rassaf, Tienush; Kelm, Malte

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of red blood cell distribution width on outcome in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS: In a retrospective single center cohort study we determined the impact of baseline red cell distribution width (RDW) and anemia on outcome in 376 patients with aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI. All patients were discussed in the institutional heart team and declined for surgical aortic valve replacement due to high operative risk. Collected data included patient characteristics, imaging findings, periprocedural in hospital data, laboratory results and follow up data. Blood samples for hematology and biochemistry analysis were taken from every patient before and at fixed intervals up to 72 h after TAVI including blood count and creatinine. Descriptive statistics were used for patient’s characteristics. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used for time to event outcomes. A recursive partitioning regression and classification was used to investigate the association between potential risk factors and outcome variables. RESULTS: Mean age in our study population was 81 ± 6.1 years. Anemia was prevalent in 63.6% (n = 239) of our patients. Age and creatinine were identified as risk factors for anemia. In our study population, anemia per se did influence 30-d mortality but did not predict longterm mortality. In contrast, a RDW > 14% showed to be highly predictable for a reduced short- and longterm survival in patients with aortic valve disease after TAVI procedure. CONCLUSION: Age and kidney function determine the degree of anemia. The anisocytosis of red blood cells in anemic patients supplements prognostic information in addition to that derived from the WHO-based definition of anemia. PMID:26981217

  14. Transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate risk patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Jones, Wesley; Bahekar, Amol; Caughey, Melissa; Ramm, Cassandra J.; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Yeung, Michael; Vavalle, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been approved in patients with high or prohibited surgical risk for surgery for treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Prospective studies examining the benefits of TAVR in intermediate risk patients are ongoing. Other smaller studies including lower risk patients have been conducted, but further meta-analysis of these studies is required to draw more broad comparisons. Methods A Medline search was conducted using standard methodology to search for clinical trials and observational studies including intermediate risk patients. We limited our meta-analysis to studies matching patient populations by propensity scores or randomization and examined clinical outcomes between TAVR and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Results Analysis of the TAVR and SAVR cohorts revealed no significant differences in the outcomes of 30-day [OR (95% CI): 0.85 (0.57, 1.26)] or 1-year mortality [OR (95% CI): 0.96 (0.75, 1.23)]. A trend towards benefit with TAVR was noted in terms of neurological events and myocardial infarction (MI) without statistical significance. A statistically significant decrease in risk of post-procedural acute renal failure in the TAVR group [OR (95% CI): 0.52 (0.27, 0.99)] was observed, but so was a significantly higher rate of pacemaker implantations for the TAVR group [OR (95% CI): 6.51 (3.23, 13.12)]. Conclusions We conclude that in intermediate risk patients undergoing aortic valve replacement, the risk of mortality, neurological outcomes, and MI do not appear to be significantly different between TAVR and SAVR. However, there appears to be a significant reduction in risk of acute renal failure at the expense of an increased risk of requiring a permanent pacemaker in low and intermediate risk patients undergoing TAVR compared to SAVR. PMID:27280087

  15. Impaired Collagen Biosynthesis and Cross‐linking in Aorta of Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wågsäter, Dick; Paloschi, Valentina; Hanemaaijer, Roeland; Hultenby, Kjell; Bank, Ruud A.; Franco‐Cereceda, Anders; Lindeman, Jan H. N.; Eriksson, Per

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) have an increased risk of developing ascending aortic aneurysm. In the present study, collagen homeostasis in nondilated and dilated aorta segments from patients with BAV was studied, with normal and dilated aortas from tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) patients as reference. Methods and Results Ascending aortas from 56 patients were used for biochemical and morphological analyses of collagen. mRNA expression was analyzed in 109 patients. Collagen turnover rates were similar in nondilated and dilated aortas of BAV patients, showing that aneurysmal formation in BAV is, in contrast to TAV, not associated with an increased collagen turnover. However, BAV in general was associated with an increased aortic collagen turnover compared with nondilated aortas of TAV patients. Importantly, the ratio of hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) to lysyl pyridinoline (LP), 2 distinct forms of collagen cross‐linking, was lower in dilated aortas from patients with BAV, which suggests that BAV is associated with a defect in the posttranslational collagen modification. This suggests a deficiency at the level of lysyl hydroxylase (PLOD1), which was confirmed by mRNA and protein analyses that showed reduced PLOD1 expression but normal lysyl oxidase expression in dilated aortas from patients with BAV. This suggests that impaired collagen cross‐linking in BAV patients may be attributed to changes in the expression and/or activity of PLOD1. Conclusions Our results demonstrate an impaired biosynthesis and posttranslational modification of collagen in aortas of patients with BAV, which may explain the increased aortic aneurysm formation in BAV patients. PMID:23525417

  16. Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Without Balloon Predilation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yan-Biao; Meng, Yang; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Li, Yi-Jian; Xiong, Tian-Yuan; Cao, Jia-Yu; Xu, Yuan-Ning; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Mao

    2016-05-15

    Evidence regarding the safety and feasibility of transcatheter aortic valve implantation without balloon predilation (BP) is scarce. A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and major conference proceedings was performed from January 2002 to July 2015. There were 18 studies incorporating 2,443 patients included in the present study. No differences were observed in the baseline characteristics between patients without BP (no-BP) and with BP. Compared with BP, no-BP had a shorter procedure time (no-BP vs BP, 124.2 vs 138.8 minutes, p = 0.008), used less-contrast medium (no-BP vs BP, 126.3 vs 156.3 ml, p = 0.0005) and had a higher success rate (odds ratio [OR] 2.24, 95% CI 1.40 to -3.58). In addition, no-BP was associated with lower incidences of permanent pacemaker implantation (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.3 to 0.67), grade 2 or greater paravalvular leakage (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.83), and stroke (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.32 to 1.0). Furthermore, no-BP was associated with a 0.6-fold decreased risk for 30-day all-cause mortality (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.92). However, the difference in the risk for permanent pacemaker implantation, grade 2, or higher aortic regurgitation, stroke was noted to be significant only in the subgroup of the CoreValve-dominating studies. In conclusion, no-BP before transcatheter aortic valve implantation was not only safe and feasible but was also associated with fewer complications and short-term mortality in selected patients especially using self-expandable valve. PMID:27026641

  17. Comparison of Inhospital Outcomes of Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Hospitals With and Without Availability of a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Program (from a Nationally Representative Database).

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas; Badheka, Apurva O; Patel, Samir V; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Thakkar, Badal; Patel, Nilay; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nish; Patel, Achint; Savani, Chirag; Ghatak, Abhijit; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Jhamnani, Sunny; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Chothani, Ankit; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Bhatt, Parth; Dave, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Mohamad, Tamam; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Forrest, John K; Mangi, Abeel

    2015-10-15

    We hypothesized that the availability of a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) program in hospitals impacts the overall management of patients with aortic valve disease and hence may also improve postprocedural outcomes of conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). The aim of the present study was to compare the inhospital outcomes of SAVR in centers with versus without availability of a TAVI program in an unrestricted large nationwide patient population >50 years of age. SAVRs performed on patients aged >50 years were identified from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) for the years 2011 and 2012 using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. SAVR cases were divided into 2 categories: those performed at hospitals with a TAVI program (SAVR-TAVI) and those without (SAVR-non-TAVI). A total of 9,674 SAVR procedures were identified: 4,526 (46.79%) in the SAVR-TAVI group and 5,148 (53.21%) in SAVR-non-TAVI group. The mean age of the study population was 70.2 ± 0.1 years with majority (53%) of the patients aged >70 years. The mean Charlson's co-morbidity score for patients in SAVR-TAVI group was greater (greater percentage of patients were aged >80 years, had hypertension, congestive heart failure, renal failure, and peripheral arterial disease) than that of patients in SAVR-non-TAVI group (1.6 vs 1.4, p <0.001). The propensity score matching analysis showed a statistically significant lower inhospital mortality (1.25% vs 1.72%, p = 0.001) and complications rate (35.6% vs 37.3%, p = 0.004) in SAVR-TAVI group compared to SAVR-non-TAVI group. The mean length of hospital stay was similar in the 2 groups the cost of hospitalization was higher in the SAVR-TAVI group ($43,894 ± 483 vs $41,032 ± 473, p <0.0001). Having a TAVI program was a significant predictor of reduced mortality and complications rate after SAVR in multivariate analysis. In conclusion, this largest direct

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: First Applications and Short Term Outcomes in Our Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Mehmet; Ince, Ilker; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Dogan, Nazim; Colak, Abdurrahim; Sevimli, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the first applications and short term outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in our clinic, which is a new technology for the patients with high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Materials and Methods: Between January 2010 and December 2012, twenty five patients (16 males, 9 females; mean age 74.04±8.86 years) diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis, who were at high risk for surgery (EuroSCORE II: 5.58±4.20) and underwent TAVI in our clinic, were evaluated. The demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, anaesthetic management, complications during pre- and post-operative periods and the mortality rate in the first 30 days and six months were recorded. Results: Edwards SAPIEN Valve prostheses were implanted by transfemoral approach (percutaneously in 10 patients and surgically in 15 patients) in all patients. The TAVI procedure was performed under general anaesthesia. The success rate of the TAVI procedure was 100%. Three patients had limited dissection of the femoral artery; however, intervention was not needed due to good distal perfusion rate. Permanent pacemaker was implanted to four patients because of long-term atrioventricular blockage. After the procedure, all patients were transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and all patients were extubated in the ICU. The mean mechanical ventilation duration (minutes) was 166.20±39.32, the mean critical care unit stay (day) was 5.64±2.99 and the mean hospital stay (day) was 11.92±5.54. Acute renal failure was observed in one patient and stroke was observed in two patients on the first postoperative day. The mortality rate in the first 30 days and 6 months was found to be 4% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a great option for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for SAVR. In our institute, procedural success and short term outcomes for patients

  19. Functional Heart Valve Scaffolds Obtained by Complete Decellularization of Porcine Aortic Roots in a Novel Differential Pressure Gradient Perfusion System.

    PubMed

    Sierad, Leslie Neil; Shaw, Eliza Laine; Bina, Alexander; Brazile, Bryn; Rierson, Nicholas; Patnaik, Sourav S; Kennamer, Allison; Odum, Rebekah; Cotoi, Ovidiu; Terezia, Preda; Branzaniuc, Klara; Smallwood, Harrison; Deac, Radu; Egyed, Imre; Pavai, Zoltan; Szanto, Annamaria; Harceaga, Lucian; Suciu, Horatiu; Raicea, Victor; Olah, Peter; Simionescu, Agneta; Liao, Jun; Movileanu, Ionela; Harpa, Marius; Simionescu, Dan Teodor

    2015-12-01

    There is a great need for living valve replacements for patients of all ages. Such constructs could be built by tissue engineering, with perspective of the unique structure and biology of the aortic root. The aortic valve root is composed of several different tissues, and careful structural and functional consideration has to be given to each segment and component. Previous work has shown that immersion techniques are inadequate for whole-root decellularization, with the aortic wall segment being particularly resistant to decellularization. The aim of this study was to develop a differential pressure gradient perfusion system capable of being rigorous enough to decellularize the aortic root wall while gentle enough to preserve the integrity of the cusps. Fresh porcine aortic roots have been subjected to various regimens of perfusion decellularization using detergents and enzymes and results compared to immersion decellularized roots. Success criteria for evaluation of each root segment (cusp, muscle, sinus, wall) for decellularization completeness, tissue integrity, and valve functionality were defined using complementary methods of cell analysis (histology with nuclear and matrix stains and DNA analysis), biomechanics (biaxial and bending tests), and physiologic heart valve bioreactor testing (with advanced image analysis of open-close cycles and geometric orifice area measurement). Fully acellular porcine roots treated with the optimized method exhibited preserved macroscopic structures and microscopic matrix components, which translated into conserved anisotropic mechanical properties, including bending and excellent valve functionality when tested in aortic flow and pressure conditions. This study highlighted the importance of (1) adapting decellularization methods to specific target tissues, (2) combining several methods of cell analysis compared to relying solely on histology, (3) developing relevant valve-specific mechanical tests, and (4) in vitro testing

  20. Opening of Aortic Valve During Exercise Is Key to Preventing Development of Aortic Insufficiency During Ventricular Assist Device Treatment.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Hatano, Masaru; Ono, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Although we previously demonstrated that opening of the native aortic valve (AV) at rest prevents development of aortic insufficiency (AI) during continuous-flow (CF) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support, the clinical impact of native AV opening during exercise remained unknown. We enrolled 37 patients with a closed native AV at rest 3 months after CF LVAD implantation and followed them from 2006 to 2014. Seven patients (19%) who achieved opening of the native AV during cardiopulmonary exercise testing at 3 months (opening AV group) had higher exercise tolerability and improved left ventricular contractility during exercise compared with those with a closed native AV (closed AV group) (p < 0.05 for all). The opening group experienced no AI at 6 months and had a higher readmission-free rate because of cardiovascular events compared with the closed group during the 2 years study period (100% vs. 56%, p = 0.005). Among those with a closed AV, use of the centrifugal pump was a significant predictor of AI-free status (p < 0.05; odds ratio, 5.400). In conclusion, opening of the native AV during exercise and centrifugal pump use were key to preventing the development of AI. Aggressive cardiac rehabilitation may have a prophylactic impact on development of AI during CF LVAD treatment. PMID:25955152

  1. Lagrangian coherent structures and turbulence characteristics downstream of prosthetic aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tullio, Marco D.

    2015-11-01

    The flowfield through prosthetic heart valves is investigated by means of direct numerical simulations, considering the fully coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two different aortic valve models are modeled: a bileaflet mechanical and a biological one. In order to reveal fluid flow structures and to better understand the transport mechanics, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are used. LCS are distinguished material surfaces that can be identified as boundaries to regions with dynamically distinct behavior, and are revealed as hypersurfaces that locally maximize the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. Post-processing the flow simulation data, first FTLE fields are calculated integrating dense meshes of Lagrangian particles backward in time, and then attracting LCS are extracted. A three-jet configuration is distinctive of bi-leaflet mechanical valves, with higher turbulent shear stresses immediately distal to the valve leaflets, while a jet-like flow emerges from the central orifice of bio-prosthetic valves, with high turbulent shear stresses occurring at the edge of the jet. Details of the numerical methodology along with a thorough analysis of the different flow structures developing during the cardiac cycle for the two configurations will be provided.

  2. Mitral and aortic valve sclerosis/calcification and carotid atherosclerosis: results from 1065 patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Faggiano, Pompilio; Amado, Alexandra E; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Bonapace, Stefano; Franceschini, Lorenzo; Dini, Frank L; Ghio, Stefano; Agricola, Eustachio; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2014-11-01

    This study assesses whether aortic valve sclerosis (AVS) and mitral annulus calcification (MAC) are associated with carotid artery atherosclerosis, independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 1065 patients underwent both echocardiography and carotid artery ultrasound scanning. AVS and MAC were defined as focal areas of increased echogenicity and thickening of the aortic leaflets or mitral valve annulus. Carotid artery atherosclerosis was defined as presence/absence of any atherosclerotic plaque or presence/absence of plaque >50 %. Of 1065 patients (65 ± 9 years; 38 % female) who comprised the study population, 642 (60 %) had at least one atherosclerotic plaque. AVS, but not mitral valve sclerosis; was associated with the presence of carotid atherosclerosis (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.9; P = 0.005) and the degree of carotid atherosclerosis (OR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.2-3.9; P = 0.01) in a multivariate model including age, gender, previous ischemic heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, diabetes, family cardiovascular history, left ventricular size, mass, and ejection fraction, and left atrial size. AVS is a significant predictor of carotid atherosclerosis, independently of other cardiovascular clinical and echocardiographic risk factors. PMID:24196525

  3. Comparison between three types of stented pericardial aortic valves (Trivalve trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic valve stenosis is one of the most common heart diseases in older patients. Nowadays, surgical aortic valve replacement is the ‘gold standard’ treatment for this pathology and the most implanted prostheses are biological ones. The three most implanted bovine bioprostheses are the Trifecta valve (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN, USA), the Mitroflow valve (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy), and the Carpentier-Edwards Magna Ease valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA). We propose a randomized trial to objectively assess the hemodynamic performances of these bioprostheses. Methods and design First, we will measure the aortic annulus diameter using CT-scan, echocardiography and by direct sizing in the operating room after native aortic valve resection. The accuracy of information, in terms of size and spatial dimensions of each bioprosthesis provided by manufacturers, will be checked. Their hemodynamic performances will be assessed postoperatively at the seventh day and the sixth month after surgery. Discussion This prospective controlled randomized trial aims to verify and compare the hemodynamic performances and the sizing of these three bioprostheses. The data obtained may help surgeons to choose the best suitable bioprosthesis according to each patient’s morphological characteristics. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01522352 PMID:24299218

  4. Combination of a Giant Dissected Ascending Aortic Aneurysm with Multiple Fistulae into the Cardiac Chambers Caused by Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The combination of a dissected ascending aortic aneurysm (AA) with multiple fistulae to the periaortic root structures is a life-threatening complication that occurs rarely after infective endocarditis of the prosthetic aortic valve. Many risk factors are potentially associated with this complication, including aortic diameter, connective tissue disease of the aortic wall, hypertension and infection. We report a rare case of dissected ascending AA with fistulae to the left atrium and pulmonary artery and a paravalvular leak in a 47-year-old woman with a history of an aortic valve replacement. The patient had presented to the Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, in January 2015 with clinical features of heart failure. After initially being treated for congestive heart failure, she underwent open-heart surgery via a classic Bentall procedure and double fistula closure. She was discharged 23 days after the operation in good condition. A six-month follow-up showed normal functioning of the composite conduit prosthetic valve and no fistulae recurrence. PMID:26909200

  5. Regenerative Potential of Low-Concentration SDS-Decellularized Porcine Aortic Valved Conduits In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua Gutierrez, José Rodolfo; Berry, Helen; Korossis, Sotirios; Mirsadraee, Saeed; Lopes, Sergio Veiga; da Costa, Francisco; Kearney, John; Watterson, Kevin; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the functional biocompatibility of low-concentration SDS-decellularized porcine aortic roots in vivo. A previously developed process was modified for 9- and 15-mm-diameter aortic roots to facilitate implantation into the porcine abdominal aorta (n=3) and juvenile sheep right ventricular outflow tract (n=7), respectively. Native allogeneic aortic roots were used as controls. Acellular porcine roots explanted from pigs at weeks were largely repopulated with stromal cells of appropriate phenotype, and there was evidence that macrophages were involved in the regenerative process. Native allogeneic roots were subject to a classic allograft rejection response. Acellular porcine roots explanted from sheep at 6 months showed evidence of appropriate cellular repopulation, again with evidence of a role for macrophages in the regenerative process. There was some degree of calcification of two of the explanted acellular roots, likely due to incomplete removal of DNA before implantation. Native allogeneic ovine roots were subject to a classic allograft rejection response involving T cells, which resulted in overtly calcified and damaged tissues. The study highlighted (1) the importance of removal of DNA from acellular porcine valved roots to avoid calcification and (2) a role for macrophages in the regeneration of low-concentration SDS-decellularized aortic roots, as has been reported for other acellular biological extracellular matrix scaffolds. PMID:25156153

  6. Regenerative potential of low-concentration SDS-decellularized porcine aortic valved conduits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Paniagua Gutierrez, José Rodolfo; Berry, Helen; Korossis, Sotirios; Mirsadraee, Saeed; Lopes, Sergio Veiga; da Costa, Francisco; Kearney, John; Watterson, Kevin; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the functional biocompatibility of low-concentration SDS-decellularized porcine aortic roots in vivo. A previously developed process was modified for 9- and 15-mm-diameter aortic roots to facilitate implantation into the porcine abdominal aorta (n=3) and juvenile sheep right ventricular outflow tract (n=7), respectively. Native allogeneic aortic roots were used as controls. Acellular porcine roots explanted from pigs at weeks were largely repopulated with stromal cells of appropriate phenotype, and there was evidence that macrophages were involved in the regenerative process. Native allogeneic roots were subject to a classic allograft rejection response. Acellular porcine roots explanted from sheep at 6 months showed evidence of appropriate cellular repopulation, again with evidence of a role for macrophages in the regenerative process. There was some degree of calcification of two of the explanted acellular roots, likely due to incomplete removal of DNA before implantation. Native allogeneic ovine roots were subject to a classic allograft rejection response involving T cells, which resulted in overtly calcified and damaged tissues. The study highlighted (1) the importance of removal of DNA from acellular porcine valved roots to avoid calcification and (2) a role for macrophages in the regeneration of low-concentration SDS-decellularized aortic roots, as has been reported for other acellular biological extracellular matrix scaffolds. PMID:25156153

  7. Is Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation of Living Tissue-Engineered Valves Feasible? An In Vitro Evaluation Utilizing a Decellularized and Reseeded Biohybrid Valve.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Fabian; Lee, Jang-Sun; Akra, Bassil; Hollweck, Trixi; Wintermantel, Erich; Hagl, Christian; Thierfelder, Nikolaus

    2016-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a fast-growing, exciting field of invasive therapy. During the last years many innovations significantly improved this technique. However, the prostheses are still associated with drawbacks. The aim of this study was to create cell-seeded biohybrid aortic valves (BAVs) as an ideal implant by combination of assets of biological and artificial materials. Furthermore, the influence of TAVI procedure on tissue-engineered BAV was investigated. BAV (n=6) were designed with decellularized homograft cusps and polyurethane walls. They were seeded with fibroblasts and endothelial cells isolated from saphenous veins. Consecutively, BAV were conditioned under low pulsatile flow (500 mL/min) for 5 days in a specialized bioreactor. After conditioning, TAVI-simulation was performed. The procedure was concluded with re-perfusion of the BAV for 2 days at an increased pulsatile flow (1100 mL/min). Functionality was assessed by video-documentation. Samples were taken after each processing step and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunohistochemical staining (IHC), and Live/Dead-assays. The designed BAV were fully functioning and displayed physiologic behavior. After cell seeding, static cultivation and first conditioning, confluent cell layers were observed in SEM. Additionally, IHC indicated the presence of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. A significant construction of extracellular matrix was detected after the conditioning phase. However, a large number of lethal cells were observed after crimping by Live/Dead staining. Analysis revealed that the cells while still being present directly after crimping were removed in subsequent perfusion. Extensive regions of damaged cell-layers were detected by SEM-analysis substantiating these findings. Furthermore, increased ICAM expression was detected after re-perfusion as manifestation of inflammatory reaction. The approach to generate biohybrid valves is promising. However

  8. Infective endocarditis of the aortic valve in a Border collie dog with patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takuma; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Ito, Tetsuro; Kanai, Eiichi; Fujii, Yoko

    2015-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) in dogs with cardiac shunts has not been reported previously. However, we encountered a dog with concurrent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and IE. The dog was a 1-year-old, 13.9-kg female Border collie and presented with anorexia, weight loss, pyrexia (40.4 °C) and lameness. A continuous murmur with maximal intensity over the left heart base (Levine 5/6) was detected on auscultation. Echocardiography revealed a PDA and severe aortic stenosis (AS) caused by aortic-valve vegetative lesions. Corynebacterium spp. and Bacillus subtilis were isolated from blood cultures. The dog responded to aggressive antibiotic therapy, and the PDA was subsequently surgically corrected. After a series of treatments, the dog showed long-term improvement in clinical status. PMID:25391395

  9. Infective endocarditis of the aortic valve in a Border collie dog with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Takuma; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; ITO, Tetsuro; KANAI, Eiichi; FUJII, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) in dogs with cardiac shunts has not been reported previously. However, we encountered a dog with concurrent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and IE. The dog was a 1-year-old, 13.9-kg female Border collie and presented with anorexia, weight loss, pyrexia (40.4°C) and lameness. A continuous murmur with maximal intensity over the left heart base (Levine 5/6) was detected on auscultation. Echocardiography revealed a PDA and severe aortic stenosis (AS) caused by aortic-valve vegetative lesions. Corynebacterium spp. and Bacillus subtilis were isolated from blood cultures. The dog responded to aggressive antibiotic therapy, and the PDA was subsequently surgically corrected. After a series of treatments, the dog showed long-term improvement in clinical status. PMID:25391395

  10. Acquired Aorto-Right Ventricular Fistula following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Muhammad Tariq; Islam, Ashequl M; Ayub, Samia

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) techniques are rapidly evolving, and results of published trials suggest that TAVR is emerging as the standard of care in certain patient subsets and a viable alternative to surgery in others. As TAVR is a relatively new procedure and continues to gain its acceptance, rare procedural complications will continue to appear. Our case is about an 89-year-old male with extensive past medical history who presented with progressive exertional dyspnea and angina secondary to severe aortic stenosis. Patient got TAVR and his postoperative course was complicated by complete heart block, aorto-RV fistula, and ventricular septal defect (VSD) formation as a complication of TAVR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of aorto-RV fistula following TAVR as a procedural complication but the first one to show three complications all together in one patient. PMID:25883809

  11. Recent Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Novel Devices and Potential Shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Blumenstein, J.; Liebetrau, C.; Linden, A. Van; Moellmann, H.; Walther, T.; Kempfert, J.

    2013-01-01

    During the past years transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved to a standard technique for the treatment of high risk patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. Worldwide the number of TAVI procedures is increasing exponentially. In this context both the transapical antegrade (TA) and the transfemoral retrograde (TF) approach are predominantly used and can be considered as safe and reproducible access sites for TAVI interventions. As a new technology TAVI is in a constant progress regarding the development of new devices. While in the first years only the Edwards SAPIEN™ and the Medtronic CoreValve™ prostheses were commercial available, recently additional devices obtained CE-mark approval and others have entered initial clinical trials. In addition to enhance the treatment options in general, the main driving factor to further develop new device iterations is to solve the drawbacks of the current TAVI systems: paravalvular leaks, occurrence of AV-blocks and the lack of full repositionability. PMID:24313644

  12. Left ventricular reverse remodeling after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In patients with severe aortic stenosis, left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with increased myocardial stiffness and dysfunction linked to cardiac morbidity and mortality. We aimed at systematically investigating the degree of left ventricular mass regression and changes in left ventricular function six months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area (LVMi), end diastolic volume indexed to body surface area (LVEDVi), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and stroke volume (SV) were investigated by CMR before and six months after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis and contraindications for surgical aortic valve replacement. Results Twenty-sevent patients had paired CMR at baseline and at 6-month follow-up (N=27), with a mean age of 80.7±5.2 years. LVMi decreased from 84.5±25.2 g/m2 at baseline to 69.4±18.4 g/m2 at six months follow-up (P<0.001). LVEDVi (87.2±30.1 ml /m2vs 86.4±22.3 ml/m2; P=0.84), LVEF (61.5±14.5% vs 65.1±7.2%, P=0.08) and SV (89.2±22 ml vs 94.7±26.5 ml; P=0.25) did not change significantly. Conclusions Based on CMR, significant left ventricular reverse remodeling occurs six months after TAVI. PMID:23692630

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a patient with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Weich, Hellmuth; Ackermann, Christelle; Viljoen, Hofmeyr; van Wyk, Jacques; Mabin, Thomas; Doubell, Anton F

    2011-12-01

    We describe the first case of implantation of a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in a patient with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery, coursing in between the aorta and pulmonary truncus to the right. After assessment of the risk of compression of the anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left coronary sinus (ARCA), the procedure was performed without complication. A brief discussion of the pathophysiology of ARCA is provided and the implications for TAVI as well as our recommendations are offered. PMID:22114037

  14. Nursing leadership of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation Heart Team: Supporting innovation, excellence, and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lauck, Sandra B; McGladrey, Janis; Lawlor, Cindy; Webb, John G

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is an innovative and resource-intensive treatment of valvular heart disease. Growing evidence and excellent outcomes are contributing to increased patient demand. The Heart Team is foundational to TAVI programs to manage the complexities of case selection and other aspects of care. The competencies and expertise of nurses are well suited to provide administrative and clinical leadership within the TAVI Heart Team to promote efficient, effective, and sustainable program development. The contributions of nursing administrative and clinical leaders exemplify the leadership roles that nurses can assume in healthcare innovation. PMID:27060802

  15. Coronary artery bypass grafting associated to aortic valve replacement in the elderly: survival and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia is often associated to aortic valve stenosis in the elderly. Aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on survival and quality of life of CABG associated to aortic valve replacement in the septuagenarians and octogenarians. Between January 1991 and January 2010, 520 patients ageing > 70 years underwent aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis in two Institutions. They were divided into 2 groups: Group A included 406 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement; Group B 114 patients receiving aortic valve replacement and CABG. A comparative analysis of long-term survival and quality of life (SF-36 test) was performed. Mean age was 74.2 ± 3.6 years (74.3 ± 3.6 in Group A, 74 ± 3.3 in Group B; p = 0.33). Hospital mortality was 9.5% (46 patients). Twenty-nine (7.8%) in Group A and 17 in Group B (15.2%)(p = 0.019). Actuarial survival was 88.5% ± 0.015 at 1 year, 81.9% ± 0.02 at 5 years, 76.6% ± 0.032 at 10 and 57.3 ± 0.1 at 15 years. Ten-year survival was 77% ± 0.034 in Group A and 77.8% ± 0.045 in Group B (p = 0.2). Multivariate analysis did not reveal associated CABG as a predictor of long term mortality. The scores obtained in the SF-36 test were similar in the two groups and significantly higher than those of the general population matched for country, age and sex (p < 0.001 in all domains). Associated CABG determines a significant increase of hospital mortality in the elderly undergoing aortic valve replacement. Survivors did not show differences in long-term outcome and quality of life according to the presence of associated CABG. PMID:22309837

  16. Concomitant Aortic Valve Procedures in Patients Undergoing Implantation of Continuous-Flow LVADs: An INTERMACS Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jason O.; Naftel, David C.; Myers, Susan L.; Prasad, Sunil; Mertz, Gail D.; Itoh, Akinobu; Pagani, Francis D.; Kirklin, James K.; Silvestry, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Management of existing aortic insufficiency (AI) and mechanical aortic valves in patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation remains controversial. Surgical options to address these issues include closure, repair or replacement of the valve. Methods Continuous flow LVAD/BiVAD patients entered into the INTERMACS database between June 2006 to December 2012 were included (n=5,344). Outcomes were compared between patients who underwent aortic valve (AV) closure (n=125), repair (n=95) and replacement (n=85). Results Among patients that underwent an aortic valve procedure, actuarial survival was significantly reduced for AV closures (63.2%) compared to AV repairs (76.8%) and replacements (71.8%, p=0.0003). Differences were greater between groups when only INTERMACS level 1-2 patients were analyzed (p=0.003). After multivariate adjustment, aortic valve closure remained a significant risk factor for mortality (HR=1.87, 95% CI=1.39-2.53, p<0.0001). At six to twelve months postoperatively, moderate to severe AI developed in 19%, 5%, 9% and 10% of patients with available echocardiography who underwent repair, closure, replacement and no intervention, respectively (p<0.0001). Competing outcomes demonstrate that at 1-year fewer patients with aortic valve closures were transplanted compared to patients with repairs/replacements (14% vs. 19%). No differences were observed between groups with respect to cause of death, re-hospitalization, right heart failure or stroke. Conclusions AV closure was associated with increased mortality when compared to repair or replacement in patients with AI that underwent LVAD insertion. The reasons for this association require further investigation. This is the largest study to date to examine concomitant AV procedures in patients undergoing LVAD insertion. PMID:25511747

  17. Topography of aortic heart valves. [applied to the development of a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The cooperative effort towards the development of a tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valve is described. The photogrammetric studies were conducted on silicone rubber molds. Information on data acquisition and data reduction phases is given, and certain accuracy aspects of the project are explained. The various outputs which are discussed include digital models, profiles, and contour maps.

  18. In-vitro Measurements of the Synoptic Velocity Generated by a Prosthetic Aortic Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellings, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a precise means of evaluating the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic aortic and mitral valves. Particle Image Velocimetry is used to measure the in-plane velocity components in selected planes of the flow, from which the turbulent shear stress is derived. The experimental facility used in this study is made of plexiglas tube, and has a circular cross section with a diameter that matches that of the valve. To ensure optical access the test fluid used matches the refractive index of plexiglas and the test section incorporates a square housing filled with the same fluid. The fluid used in this experiment is a mixture of glycerol, water and sodium iodide. Pulsatile flow is achieved by means of a pump and monitored in real time by means of an electronic flowmeter. Dynamic similarity is ensured in these experiments as the viscosity of the fluid mixture closely approximates that of blood.

  19. Aortic valve replacement for a patient with anomalous left coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Masaki; Futagami, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery (LCA) from the right sinus of Valsalva (RSOV) is an uncommon but clinically important feature. A 75-year-old man with progressive nocturnal dyspnea was diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis and moderate regurgitation. Preoperative computed tomographic scan revealed that the LCA originated from the RSOV separate from the right coronary artery and coursed into the ventricular septum. Because he did not experience any episodes of cardiac ischemia, isolated aortic valve replacement was performed using a 23-mm stented bioprosthesis without concomitant coronary revascularization. The postoperative course was free from coronary ischemia. PMID:22618986

  20. [Neuroendovascular Treatment for Cerebral Embolism in a Patient just after Aortic Valve Replacement;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Motoyuki; Nishizawa, Junichiro; Heima, Daisuke; Takatoku, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Yasuzumi; Miyake, Hidenori

    2015-12-01

    A 67-year-old woman suffered from severe aortic stenosis and atrial fibrillation, and underwent aortic valve replacement with a St. Jude Medical Regent 23-mm valve and pulmonary vein isolation using an AtriCure Isolator Synergy.At 6 days after the operation, she experienced sudden onset of atrial fibrillation, left side paralysis, and dysarthria. Right internal carotid artery embolism was diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging, and we promptly performed neuroendovascular therapy with a Solitaire FR. Neuroendovascular treatment succeeded, and her neurological function was restored to near-normal. Her post-treatment course was uneventful, and she is currently well without neurological dysfunction. PMID:26759947

  1. Acute left main occlusion secondary to embolisation from an aortic valve prosthesis: successful treatment with embolectomy and percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Isuru; Yiannikas, John; Brieger, David

    2011-06-16

    Acute occlusive embolus of the left main coronary artery is a rare and usually catastrophic occurrence. We present a case report of a 59 year old with an aortic valve prosthesis presenting in cardiogenic shock following cessation of warfarin therapy. Angiography demonstrated an acute left main occlusion secondary to emboli from the aortic valve prosthesis. Successful embolectomy was performed by clot aspiration followed by percutaneous coronary angioplasty and stenting. Patient had excellent recovery of myocardial function post procedure and remained well at 6 month follow-up. PMID:19535160

  2. Imaging Analysis of Collagen Fiber Networks in Cusps of Porcine Aortic Valves: Effect of their Local Distribution and Alignment on Valve Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Mega, Mor; Marom, Gil; Halevi, Rotem; Hamdan, Ashraf; Bluestein, Danny; Haj-Ali, Rami

    2015-01-01

    The cusps of native Aortic Valve (AV) are composed of collagen bundles embedded in soft tissue, creating a heterogenic tissue with asymmetric alignment in each cusp. This study compares native collagen fiber networks (CFNs) with a goal to better understand their influence on stress distribution and valve kinematics. Images of CFNs from five porcine tricuspid AVs are analyzed and fluid-structure interaction models are generated based on them. Although the valves had similar overall kinematics, the CFNs had distinctive influence on local mechanics. The regions with dilute CFN are more prone to damage since they are subjected to higher stress magnitudes. PMID:26406926

  3. Imaging analysis of collagen fiber networks in cusps of porcine aortic valves: effect of their local distribution and alignment on valve functionality.

    PubMed

    Mega, Mor; Marom, Gil; Halevi, Rotem; Hamdan, Ashraf; Bluestein, Danny; Haj-Ali, Rami

    2016-07-01

    The cusps of native aortic valve (AV) are composed of collagen bundles embedded in soft tissue, creating a heterogenic tissue with asymmetric alignment in each cusp. This study compares native collagen fiber networks (CFNs) with a goal to better understand their influence on stress distribution and valve kinematics. Images of CFNs from five porcine tricuspid AVs are analyzed and fluid-structure interaction models are generated based on them. Although the valves had similar overall kinematics, the CFNs had distinctive influence on local mechanics. The regions with dilute CFN are more prone to damage since they are subjected to higher stress magnitudes. PMID:26406926

  4. Long-Term Outcomes of Homografts in the Aortic Valve and Root Position: A 20-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2016-01-01

    Background The advantages of using a homograft in valve replacement surgery are the excellent hemodynamic profile, low risk of thromboembolism, and low risk of prosthetic valve infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of homograft implantation in the aortic valve position. Methods This is a retrospective study of 33 patients (>20 years old) who underwent aortic valve replacement or root replacement with homografts between April 1995 and May 2015. Valves were collected within 24 hours from explanted hearts of heart transplant recipients (<60 years) and organ donors who were not suitable for heart transplantation. The median follow-up duration was 35.6 months (range, 0 to 168 months). Results Aortic homografts were used in all patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 9.1%. The 1- and 5-year survival rates were 80.0%±7.3% and 60.8%±10.1%, respectively. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year freedom from reoperation rates were 92.3%±5.2%, 68.9%±10.2%, and 50.3%±13.6%, respectively. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year freedom from significant aortic dysfunction rates were 91.7%±8.0%, 41.7%±14.2%, and 25.0%±12.5%, respectively. Conclusion Homografts had the advantages of a good hemodynamic profile and low risk of thromboembolic events, and with good outcomes in cases of aortitis. PMID:27525234

  5. TAVI or No TAVI: identifying patients unlikely to benefit from transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Iung, Bernard; Cohen, David J; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2016-07-21

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has spawned the evolution of novel catheter-based therapies for a variety of cardiovascular conditions. Newer device iterations are delivering lower peri- and early post-procedural complication rates in patients with aortic stenosis, who were otherwise deemed too high risk for conventional surgical valve replacement. Yet beyond the post-procedural period, a considerable portion of current TAVI recipients fail to derive a benefit from TAVI, either dying or displaying a lack of clinical and functional improvement. Considerable interest now lies in better identifying factors likely to predict futility post-TAVI. Implicit in this are the critical roles of frailty, disability, and a multimorbidity patient assessment. In this review, we outline the roles that a variety of medical comorbidities play in determining futile post-TAVI outcomes, including the critical role of frailty underlying the identification of patients unlikely to benefit from TAVI. We discuss various TAVI risk scores, and further propose that by combining such scores along with frailty parameters and the presence of specific organ failure, a more accurate and holistic assessment of potential TAVI-related futility could be achieved. PMID:26819226

  6. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p < 0.05) compared to those without AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078–1.168, p < 0.01), diabetes (OR 2.587, 95% CI 1.323–5.130, p < 0.01), and %abdominal VAT (OR 1.032, 95% CI 1.003–1.065, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489–0.7697, p < 0.01). Conclusion. We determined that predominance of VAT is associated with AVC. PMID:26904670

  7. Association of Aortic Valve Sclerosis with Previous Coronary Artery Disease and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Marmelo, Filipe Carvalho; Mateus, Sónia Matilde Fonseca; Pereira, Alexandre José Marques

    2014-01-01

    Background Aortic valve sclerosis (AVS) is characterized by increased thickness, calcification and stiffness of the aortic leaflets without fusion of the commissures. Several studies show an association between AVS and presence of coronary artery disease. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the association between presence of AVS with occurrence of previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. Methods The sample was composed of 2,493 individuals who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between August 2011 and December 2012. The mean age of the cohort was 67.5 ± 15.9 years, and 50.7% were female. Results The most frequent clinical indication for Doppler echocardiography was the presence of stroke (28.8%), and the most common risk factor was hypertension (60.8%). The most prevalent pathological findings on Doppler echocardiography were mitral valve sclerosis (37.1%) and AVS (36.7%). There was a statistically significant association between AVS with hypertension (p < 0.001), myocardial infarction (p = 0.007), diabetes (p = 0.006) and compromised left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Patients with AVS have higher prevalences of hypertension, stroke, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes and compromised left ventricular systolic function when compared with patients without AVS. We conclude that there is an association between presence of AVS with previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. PMID:25229357

  8. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures – predictors and management

    PubMed Central

    Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients’ state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His’ bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach. PMID:27625682

  9. Simultaneous aortic valve replacement and pectus excavatum correction in a 76-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigemitsu; Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Nakamura, Katsuhiko; Kashikie, Hideyuki; Akaiwa, Keiichi; Watanabe, Koichi; Hara, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old man was admitted to our department to undergo surgical treatment for aortic valve regurgitation. On physical examination, a bowl-shaped concavity was noted. Chest computed tomography revealed left-sided heart displacement by severe pectus excavatum with a Haller index of 6.40. Considering the postoperative cardiopulmonary complications that may result from mechanical compression due to uncorrected sternal deformities, we decided to perform a simultaneous aortic valve replacement and pectus excavatum correction. The operation time was long (570 min) and involved a high-volume transfusion due to excessive bleeding caused by resection of the deformed costal cartilages and sternal osteotomy under the use of heparin. The endotracheal tube was removed on the fifth postoperative day, but reintubation was required because of hypercapnea and difficulty in sputum discharge. With the aid of tube feeding for nutritional management, his cardiopulmonary function gradually ameliorated and his general condition improved. Consequently, he was weaned from mechanical ventilation on the 14th postoperative day. The patient is doing well 1 year after surgery. We report on the surgical management for pectus excavatum in adult patients. PMID:24088909

  10. Quadricuspid aortic valve and a ventricular septal defect in a horse

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) and ventricular septal defect (VSD) are congenital heart defects and have been described in both human and veterinary medical literature. Case presentation A 5-year-old half-bred bay stallion was referred for surgical castration. Cardiac murmurs were heard on the presurgical clinical examination and the cardiac examination revealed subcutaneous oedema, tachycardia with a precodrial thrill and a grade 5/6 pansystolic murmur, which was heard on auscultation of the right and left side of the chest. Examination of the B-mode echocardiograms revealed the presence of a QAV (one small cusp, two equal-sized cusps, and one large cusp) and VSD in the membranous portion of the intraventricular septum. These two congenital cardiac defects were accompanied by mild aortic valve regurgitation and severe tricuspid regurgitation. Despite the presence of these cardiac defects, the horse underwent surgical castration under general anesthesia. Surgery, anaesthesia and recovery from anaesthesia were uneventful. The gelding was euthanasied after 17 months because of a progressive loss of body weight, weakness and recumbency. Conclusion A QAV in combination with VSD in a horse is an interesting finding, because to the best of our knowledge, this has not been previously described in equine literature. PMID:24981768

  11. Dielectric characterization of collagen, elastin, and aortic valves in the low temperature range.

    PubMed

    Samouillan, V; Lamure, A; Maurel, E; Dandurand, J; Lacabanne, C; Spina, M

    2000-01-01

    The low temperature dielectric relaxation of porcine aortic valves and its main macromolecular proteins. i.e. elastin and collagen, have been investigated in the dry state and at low levels of hydration by thermally stimulated currents spectrometry, with an equivalent frequency of 10(-3) Hz. Two secondary relaxation modes, labeled gamma and beta with increasing temperature, are found for the three materials. Since the gamma-mode is independent upon hydration while the beta-mode is strongly plasticized by water, these relaxation modes have been attributed to localized motions of the polypeptidic chains containing apolar and polar residues, respectively. The deconvolution of the beta-mode by fractional polarization gives the experimental distribution of the dielectric relaxation times of the three materials, and allows us to deduce the activation parameters of each elementary process. These analyses shows the existence of compensation phenomena between the activation parameters, implying cooperative mechanisms. The occurrence of these phenomena with their characteristic parameters are used to specify the origin of the localized relaxation modes in collagen and elastin, and to assign the specific role of each protein in the aortic valves. PMID:10981675

  12. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures - predictors and management.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients' state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His' bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach. PMID:27625682

  13. Biomedical Impact in Implantable Devices-The Transcatheter Aortic Valve as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Alexandros; Saatsakis, George

    2015-09-01

    Objective: To update of the scientific community about the biomedical engineering involvement in the implantable devices chain. Moreover the transcatheter Aortic Valve (TAV) replacement, in the field of cardiac surgery, will be analyzed as an example of contemporary implantable technology. Methods: A detailed literature review regarding biomedical engineers participating in the implantable medical product chain, starting from the design of the product till the final implantation technique. Results: The scientific role of biomedical engineers has clearly been established. Certain parts of the product chain are implemented almost exclusively by experienced biomedical engineers such as the transcatheter aortic valve device. The successful professional should have a multidisciplinary knowledge, including medicine, in order to pursue the challenges for such intuitive technology. This clearly indicates that biomedical engineers are among the most appropriate scientists to accomplish such tasks. Conclusions: The biomedical engineering involvement in medical implantable devices has been widely accepted by the scientific community, worldwide. Its important contribution, starting from the design and extended to the development, clinical trials, scientific support, education of other scientists (surgeons, cardiologists, technicians etc.), and even to sales, makes biomedical engineers a valuable player in the scientific arena. Notably, the sector of implantable devices is constantly raising, as emerging technologies continuously set up new targets.

  14. Comparative survival after transapical, direct aortic, and subclavian transcatheter aortic valve implantation (data from the UK TAVI registry).

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Georg M; Baxter, Paul D; Malkin, Christopher J; Scott, D Julian A; Moat, Neil E; Hildick-Smith, David; Cunningham, David; MacCarthy, Philip A; Trivedi, Uday; de Belder, Mark A; Ludman, Peter F; Blackman, Daniel J

    2015-11-15

    Many patients have iliofemoral vessel anatomy unsuitable for conventional transfemoral (TF) transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Safe and practical alternatives to the TF approach are, therefore, needed. This study compared outcomes of alternative nonfemoral routes, transapical (TA), direct aortic (DA), and subclavian (SC), with standard femoral access. In this retrospective study, data from 3,962 patients in the UK TAVI registry were analyzed. All patients who received TAVI through a femoral, subclavian, TA, or DA approach were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome measure was survival up to 2 years. Median Logistic EuroSCORE was similar for SC, DA, and TA but significantly lower in the TF cohort (22.1% vs 20.3% vs 21.2% vs 17.0%, respectively, p <0.0001). Estimated 1-year survival rate was similar for TF (84.6 ± 0.7%) and SC (80.5 ± 3%, p = 0.27) but significantly worse for TA (74.7 ± 1.6%, p <0.001) and DA (75.2 ± 3.3%, p <0.001). A Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze survival up to 2 years. Survival in the SC group was not significantly different from the TF group (hazard ratio [HR] 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88 to 1.70, p = 0.24). In contrast, survival in the TA (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.43 to 2.11; p <0.001) and DA (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.14; p <0.01) cohorts was significantly reduced compared with TF. In conclusion, TA and DA TAVI were associated with similar survival, both significantly worse than with the TF route. In contrast, subclavian access was not significantly different from TF and may represent the safest nonfemoral access route for TAVI. PMID:26409640

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza, André Luiz Silveira; Salgado, Constantino González; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Lima, Luciana Cristina Lima Correia; de Mattos, Nelson Durval Ferreira Gomes; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Fagundes, Francisco Eduardo Sampaio; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Carvalho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87) underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3%) had aortic stenosis, one (0.7%) had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9%) had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%). The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%). The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036) were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013) and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009) were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality. PMID:27192383

  16. Electric analog model of the aortic valve for calculation of continuous beat-to-beat aortic flow using a pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Graen, M D; Ewert, D L; Glower, J S; Gray, L A; Koenig, S C

    1999-01-01

    The objective was to develop a technique for calculating continuous, beat-to-beat aortic flow (AoF) using only left ventricular pressure (LVP) and aortic pressure (AoP). An electric analog model of the aortic valve was developed that includes resistance (R), inertance (L), and compliance (C) parameters, and resulting second order differential equations were derived. Aortic flow, AoP, and LVP recorded in eight subjects during a 5 day period and during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were used to validate the model. Resistance, L, and C were estimated using a least-squares fit to the measured AoF on day 0 and during 0 mm Hg LBNP. For days 1-4, AoF was calculated using measured values of AoP and LVP and the R, L, and C values from day 0. Similarly, for LBNP, AoF was calculated using measured values of AoP and LVP, and the R, L, and C values from 0 mm Hg LBNP. The calculated and measured AoF were compared. Differences in cardiac output between the calculated and measured flows were less than 13.1+/-17% across days and under minor altered physiologic conditions (LBNP). Waveform morphology for the calculated AoF also agreed well with the measured AoF. Spectral analysis showed differences in magnitude and phase between measured and calculated aortic flow for the first five harmonics across days, less than 20+/-6% and 25+/-14 degrees, respectively. Preliminary evaluation indicates that our model works well for calculating flow through a biologic valve using LVP and AoP. We speculate that it may perform better for a mechanical valve, and if so it may be possible to develop an instrumented mechanical valve capable of continuous LVP, AOP, and AoF measurements. PMID:10360724

  17. Myocardial protection during aortic valve replacement. Cardiac metabolism and enzyme release following hypothermic cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, V; Kaijser, L; Bendz, R; Sylvén, C; Olin, C

    1980-01-01

    Cardiac metabolism following hypothermic potassium cardioplegia was studied in 23 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement. All had normal coronary arteries. Cardioplegia was induced by infusing 700-1 000 ml of cold Ringer's acetate containing 20 mekv K+ selectively into the left coronary artery. Simultaneous blood samples were taken from the radial artery, a central vein and from the coronary sinus before and after cardioplegia. The PO2, O2-saturation and content, PCO2, pH, lactate, glucose, potassium, myoglobin, total creatine kinase (CK), its isoenzyme CK-MB, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) were assessed. Before bypass lactate was extracted by the heart. During the initial 10 to 20 min after cardioplegia there was a marked release of lactate in the coronary sinus. Myoglobin concentration and CK-MB serum activity peaked during the first 4 hours after the release of the aortic cross-clamping. In order to determine the best indicator of myocardial damage after cardioplegia, duration of extracorporeal circulation (ECC-time), aortic occlusion time (AOT), mean myocardial temperature (MMT) and the product of AOT and MMT, referred to as time-temperature area (TTA), were related to possible indicators of myocardial injury, such as enzyme and myoglobin release. The TTA was the best way of expressing the degree of exposure of the heart to ischaemia. The CK-MB to peak area (CK-MB max area) was the best indicator of the degree of ischaemic injury sustained by the heart during operation. PMID:7375890

  18. Quality of Care for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Development of Canadian Cardiovascular Society Quality Indicators.

    PubMed

    Asgar, Anita W; Lauck, Sandra; Ko, Dennis; Alqoofi, Faisal; Cohen, Eric; Forsey, Anne; Lambert, Laurie J; Oakes, Garth H; Pelletier, Marc; Webb, John G

    2016-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a relatively new procedure to treat aortic stenosis in patients at high surgical risk, and it is becoming increasingly available in Canada. Variation exists in the clinical care, program coordination, evaluation, and funding across provinces and centres. As a part of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) quality initiative, the TAVI Quality Indicator (QI) Working Group was established in 2014 to develop a set of indicators to measure quality of care for Canadians undergoing TAVI for aortic stenosis. The TAVI QI Working Group is composed of expert clinical and government agency representatives. The group developed consensus agreements for the selection of the first iteration of measurable structure, process, and outcome indicators reflective of the quality of care for patients undergoing TAVI. The objectives of the project are to develop quality indicators with the eventual goal of standardizing TAVI quality reports across Canada and to support local and national quality assurance, as well as engage multiple stakeholders to build a national strategy for the evaluation of quality of care. PMID:26948037

  19. Transition to palliative care when transcatheter aortic valve implantation is not an option: opportunities and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lauck, Sandra B.; Gibson, Jennifer A.; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Carroll, Sandra L.; Achtem, Leslie; Kimel, Gil; Nordquist, Cindy; Cheung, Anson; Boone, Robert H.; Ye, Jian; Wood, David A.; Webb, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the recommended treatment for most patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk. However, TAVI may be clinically futile for patients who have multiple comorbidities and excessive frailty. This group benefits from transition to palliative care to maximize quality of life, improve symptoms, and ensure continuity of health services. We discuss the clinical determination of utility and futility, explore the current evidence guiding the integration of palliative care in procedure-focused cardiac programs, and outline recommendations for TAVI programs. Recent findings The determination of futility of treatment in elderly patients with aortic stenosis is challenging. There is a paucity of research available to guide best practices when TAVI is not an option. Opportunities exist to build on the evidence gained in the management of end of life and heart failure. TAVI programs and primary care providers can facilitate improved communication and processes of care to provide decision support and transition to palliative care. Summary The increased availability of transcatheter options for the management of valvular heart disease will increase the assessment of people with life-limiting conditions for whom treatment may not be an option. It is pivotal to bridge cardiac innovation and palliation to optimize patient outcomes. PMID:26716394

  20. Optimal thromboprophylaxis following bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement: still a matter of debate?

    PubMed Central

    Mydin, Muhammad I.; Dimitrakakis, Georgios; Younis, Jenan; Nowell, Justin; Athanasiou, Thanos; Kourliouros, Antonios

    2012-01-01

    Optimal thromboprophylaxis following bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains controversial. The main objective, which is the effective prevention of central nervous or peripheral embolic events, especially in the early postoperative period, will have to be weighed against the haemorrhagic risk that is associated with the utilization of different antithrombotic regimes. Most governing bodies in cardiovascular medicine have issued recommendations on thromboprophylaxis after the surgical implantation of aortic bioprostheses. However, the level of evidence to support these recommendations remains low, largely due to the inherent limitations of conducting appropriately randomized and adequately powered clinical research in this area. It is apparent from the recent surveys and large registries that there is a great variability in antithrombotic practice at an institutional or individual-clinician level reflecting this controversy and the lack of robust evidence. While organizational, financial or conceptual limitations could hinder the conduct and availability of conclusive research on optimal thromboprophylaxis after aortic bioprosthesis, it is imperative that all evidence is presented in a systematic way in order to assist the decision-making for the modern clinician. In this review, we provide an outline of the current recommendations for thromboprophylaxis, followed by a comprehensive and analytical presentation of all comparative studies examining anticoagulation vs. antiplatelet therapy after bioprosthetic AVR. PMID:22493097

  1. Arterial Wave Reflection and Aortic Valve Calcification in an Elderly Community-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sera, Fusako; Russo, Cesare; Iwata, Shinichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aortic valve calcification (AVC) without stenosis is common in the elderly, is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and may progress to aortic valve stenosis. Arterial stiffness and pulse wave reflection are important components of proximal aortic hemodynamics, but their relationship with AVC is not established. Methods To investigate the relationship of arterial wave reflection and stiffness with AVC, pulse wave analysis and AVC evaluation by echocardiography were performed in 867 participants from the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study. Participants were divided into 4 categories based on the severity and extent of AVC: 1) none or mild focal AVC; 2) mild diffuse AVC; 3) moderate-severe focal AVC; and 4) moderate-severe diffuse AVC. Central blood pressures and pulse pressure, total arterial compliance, augmentation index, and time to wave reflection were assessed using applanation tonometry. Results Indicators of arterial stiffness and wave reflection were significantly associated with AVC severity, except for central systolic and diastolic pressures and time to reflection. After adjustment for pertinent covariates (age, sex, race/ethnicity, and eGFR), only augmentation pressure (P = .02) and augmentation index (P = .002) were associated with the severity of AVC. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that augmentation pressure (odds ratio per mmHg = 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.27; P = .02) and augmentation index (odds ratio per percentage point = 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–1.13; P = .02) were associated with an increase risk of moderate-severe diffuse AVC, even when central blood pressure value was included in the same model. Conclusions Arterial wave reflection is associated with AVC severity, independent of blood pressure values. Increased contribution of wave reflection to central blood pressure could be involved in the process leading to AVC. PMID:25600036

  2. Reducing Patient Radiation Dose With Image Noise Reduction Technology in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Procedures.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Michael; Hauptmann, Karl Eugen

    2016-03-01

    X-ray radiation exposure is of great concern for patients undergoing structural heart interventions. In addition, a larger group of medical staff is required and exposed to radiation compared with percutaneous coronary interventions. This study aimed at quantifying radiation dose reduction with implementation of specific image noise reduction technology (NRT) in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures. We retrospectively analyzed 104 consecutive patients with TAVI procedures, 52 patients before and 52 after optimization of x-ray radiation chain, and implementation of NRT. Patients with 1-step TAVI and complex coronary intervention, or complex TAVI procedures, were excluded. Before the procedure, all patients received a multislice computed tomography scan, which was used to size aortic annulus, select the optimal implantation plane, valve type and size, and guide valve implantation using a software tool. Air kerma and kerma-area product were compared in both groups to determine patient radiation dose reduction. Baseline parameters, co-morbidity, or procedural data were comparable between groups. Mean kerma-area product was significantly lower (p <0.001) in the NRT group compared with the standard group (60 ± 39 vs 203 ± 106 Gy × cm(2), p <0.001), which corresponds to a reduction of 70%. Mean air kerma was reduced by 64% (494 ± 360 vs 1,355 ± 657 mGy, p <0.001). In conclusion, using optimized x-ray chain combined with specific image noise reduction technology has the potential to significantly reduce by 2/3 radiation dose in standard TAVI procedures without worsening image quality or prolonging procedure time. PMID:26742472

  3. Annular sizing using real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography-guided trans-catheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Alejandro; Hamid, Tahir; Kanaganayagam, Gajen; Karunaratne, Devinda; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as an alternative therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are unfit for the surgical aortic valve replacements. Pre and periprocedural imaging for the TAVR procedure is the key to procedural success. Currently transesophageal echocardiography (TOE), including real-time three-dimensional (RT-3D) imaging TOE, has been used for peri-interventional monitoring and guidance for TAVR. We describe our initial experience with real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography (RT-3DICE), imaging technology for the use in the TAVR procedure. Methods We used RT-3DICE using an ACUSON SC2000 2.0v (Siemens Medical Solution), and a 10F AcuNav V catheter (Siemens-Acuson, Inc, Mountain View, California, USA) in addition to preoperative multislice CT (MSCT) in total of five patients undergoing TAVR procedure. Results Aortic annulus and sinus of valsalva diameters were measured using RT-3DICE. Aortic valve measurements obtained using RT-3DICE are comparable to those obtained using MSCT with no significant difference in our patients. Conclusions This small study of five patients shows the safe use of RT-3DICE in TAVR Procedure and may help the procedures performed under local anaesthesia without the need for TOE. PMID:27158522

  4. Impact of obesity on long-term survival after aortic valve replacement with a small prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biao; Yang, Hongyang; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiquan; Zhu, Wenjie; Cao, Guangqing; Wu, Shuming

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Although many studies have evaluated the impact of obesity on various medical treatments, it is not known whether obesity is related to late mortality with implantation of small aortic prostheses. This study evaluated the effect of obesity on the late survival of patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) with implantation of a small aortic prosthesis (size ≤21 mm). METHODS From January 1998 to December 2008, 307 patients in our institution who underwent primary AVR with smaller prostheses survived 30 days after surgery. Patients were categorized as normal weight if body mass index (BMI) was <24 kg/m2, overweight if BMI 24–27.9 kg/m2 and obese if BMI ≥28 kg/m2. Data of the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), effective orifice area index (EOAI) and left ventricular mass index of the patients were collected at the third month, sixth month, first year, third year, fifth year and eighth year after operation. RESULTS By multivariable analysis, obesity was a significant independent factor of late mortality (hazard ratio: 1.62; P = 0.01). The obese and overweight groups of patients exhibited lower survival (P < 0.001) and a higher proportion in NYHA Class III/IV (P < 0.01) compared with the normal group. A lower EOAI and higher left ventricular mass index were found in the obese and overweight groups, but we saw no significant variance in LVEF among the three groups. CONCLUSIONS Obesity is associated with increased late mortality of patients after AVR with implantation of small aortic prosthesis. Obesity or/and overweight may also affect the NYHA classification, even in the longer term. EOAI should be improved where possible, as it may reduce late mortality and improve quality of life in obese or overweight patients. PMID:23529754

  5. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    PubMed

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. PMID:27239021

  6. Percutaneous transfemoral closure of a pseudoaneurysm at the left ventricular apical access site for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Beaver, Thomas M; Fudge, James C

    2015-02-01

    This case report illustrates a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm that developed at the transapical access site for transcatheter aortic valve implantation and was successfully excluded percutaneously through a femoral approach using an Amplatzer muscular VSD occluder (St. Jude Medical). We also discuss various currently available devices and technical pearls for percutaneous closure of left ventricular pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25661768

  7. Balloon valvuloplasty in rheumatic aortic valve stenosis: immediate and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Ramasamy, Chandramohan; Saktheeshwaran, Maheshkumar; Selvaraj, Raja; Satheesh, Santhosh; Jayaraman, Balachander

    2015-01-01

    To study the immediate and long-term results of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in a large cohort of patients with rheumatic valvular aortic stenosis. Single tertiary care center retrospective data analysis of immediate and long-term outcomes in patients following BAV from 2000 to 2008. Ninety-two patients with rheumatic aortic stenosis (AS) were studied who underwent BAV. Mean age of patients was 21.7 years (95 % CI 14.3-28.9) with mean follow-up period of 5.7 years (±SD 1.3). Intervention resulted in successful BAV (more than 50 % reduction in baseline gradient) in 79 (85.9 %) subjects (Group A) and partially successful BPV (<50 % reduction in baseline gradient) in 8 (8.7 %) subjects (Group B). BAV failed in 5 (5.4 %) subjects (Group C). Concomitant balloon mitral valvuloplasty was done in 23/92 cases. Mean left ventricular systolic pressure decreased from 165.6 (95 % CI 142.7-196.3) to 110.9 mmHg (95 % CI 92.1-129.6), (P < 0.001) and mean aortic valve (AV) gradient from 50.7 (95 % CI 35.12-66.22) to 27.2 mmHg (95 % CI 25.83-31.23), (P < 0.001). The mean change in ejection fraction and mean AV gradient were significantly different between success (Groups A and B) and failure groups (P < 0.001). Different grades of aortic regurgitation were noted in 32 (34.78 %) patients post BAV (severe regurgitation in 2.18 %). Anova post hoc analysis showed sustained gradient reductions at 1- and 5-year follow-up (P > 0.05). The need for surgery was much lower in Group A (2.5 %) compared to Group B (50 %) and C (100 %). BAV is an effective treatment strategy in dominant AS in multi valvular rheumatic disease situations. Combined aortic and mitral valvuloplasty was performed in one-fourth of study patients. PMID:25069960

  8. Prevalence of De Novo Aortic Valve Insufficiency in Patients After HeartWare VAD Implantation with an Intermittent Low-Speed Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Diyar; Westenfeld, Ralf; Maxhera, Bujar; Keymel, Stefanie; Sherif, Ahmed; Sadat, Najla; Petrov, GeorGI; Albert, Alexander; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2016-01-01

    De novo aortic valve insufficiency (AI) is a frequent occurrence in patients supported with left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The European version of the HeartWare LVAD has intermittent low-speed software (lavare cycle) to facilitate intermittent aortic valve opening. We examined aortic valve opening status and prevalence of AI in patients supported with HeartWare LVAD and activated lavare cycle. HeartWare LVAD patients were prospectively monitored using serial echocardiograms at different time points after the LVAD implantation. Inclusion criteria were patients with no > mild AI and/or no aortic valve surgery at the time of LVAD implantation and at least 60 days of support. Three of 37 patients had aortic valve surgery and were excluded from the analysis. A total of 34 patients with mean age of 57 ± 12 years met the inclusion criteria. After median support duration of 408 days (77-1250 days), eight patients had trace/mild AI (24%) and one patient developed moderate AI (3%). An average pump flow, speed, and mean arterial pressure of 4.4 ± 0.6 L/min, 2,585 ± 147 rpm, and 88 ± 11 mmHg were documented, respectively. Aortic valve opening was persistently seen in 22 patients (65%). Aortic valve opening is frequent, and the development of > mild AI seems to be rare in patients supported with HeartWare LVAD. PMID:27195744

  9. Aortic Valve Damage for the Study of Left-Sided, Native Valve Infective Endocarditis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis affects approximately 100,000 individuals in the USA. Medical advances have contributed to the rise of the disease, and no new therapies have emerged in the last 50 years to control the surge of this life-threatening infection. The rabbit vascular physiology and immune response mechanisms are similar to humans. Hence, the rabbit model of infective endocarditis is an excellent research tool with which to address many questions regarding development of endocarditis, for the testing of new therapies, and for the study of the molecular mechanisms used by infectious agents to cause disease. This chapter describes the surgical procedure required to study infective endocarditis in damaged native valves, therefore closely mimicking human disease. PMID:26676038

  10. Pump Speed Waveform Analysis to Detect Aortic Valve Opening in Patients on Ventricular Assist Device Support.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Christopher; Lim, Choon Pin; Schima, Heinrich; Macdonald, Peter; Moscato, Francesco; Muthiah, Kavitha; Granegger, Marcus

    2015-08-01

    As the aortic valve (AV) opens, the pump pressure head remains constant, which is reflected as a "notch/plateau" in pump pressure and flow signals. However, instantaneous flow estimation may be influenced by friction and is particularly difficult in axial pumps. Therefore, a new method to determine the duration of AV opening based on the area under the curve (AUC) of the power spectral density analysis of pump speed signal was developed. Data from patients implanted with HeartWare HVAD left ventricular assist device were studied at different pump speeds, with simultaneous transthoracic echocardiography in two cohorts. In the first group, pump data of 15 patients were used to investigate the ability to discriminate between an open and closed AV. In the second cohort of a further 13 patients, the duration of AV opening was measured from digitized M-mode images, and the relationship between the AV opening time and the new method assessed. In 14 of the initial 15 patients, AV status could be discriminated using only one threshold for all patients. In the second cohort, gradual speed reduction resulted in aortic valve opening in 12 of the 13 patients. The correlation between AV opening duration and AUC was 0.96 ± 0.03. Regression analysis indicated a linear relationship in each of the patients with a small error between the fit and the measured opening time (root mean square error = 11.0 ± 7.6 ms). However, the slopes (69.0 ± 52.8) and intercepts (-31.4 ± 78.0) varied widely between patients. The sensitivity and specificity for the new method using AUC threshold of 0.95 for aortic valve closure was 95% and 91%, respectively. The newly developed method to detect AV opening not only provides information on the AV status during LVAD support (open/closed) but also gives insight into the duration of AV opening. Because the slope of the relationship varies from patient to patient, initial training and adaptation of the method to each patient seems to

  11. Numerical simulation of patient-specific left ventricular model with both mitral and aortic valves by FSI approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Zhong, Liang; Wang, Xi-Kun; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Tan, Ru San; Allen, John Carson; Tan, Soon Keat; Kim, Sangho; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2014-02-01

    Intraventricular flow is important in understanding left ventricular function; however, relevant numerical simulations are limited, especially when heart valve function is taken into account. In this study, intraventricular flow in a patient-specific left ventricle has been modelled in two-dimension (2D) with both mitral and aortic valves integrated. The arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach was employed to handle the large mesh deformation induced by the beating ventricular wall and moving leaflets. Ventricular wall deformation was predefined based on MRI data, while leaflet dynamics were predicted numerically by fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Comparisons of simulation results with in vitro and in vivo measurements reported in the literature demonstrated that numerical method in combination with MRI was able to predict qualitatively the patient-specific intraventricular flow. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to simulate patient-specific ventricular flow taking into account both mitral and aortic valves. PMID:24332277

  12. [Ross operation using "contegra" conduit in a 5 year old girl with severe aortic valve insufficiency in Kawasaki disease coexisting with infective endocarditis--a case report].

    PubMed

    Piaszczyński, Maciej; Pawelec-Wojtalik, Małgorzata; Orzeszko-Spaczyńska, Anna; Wojtalik, Michał; Siwińska, Aldona; Mrówczyński, Wojciech

    2005-07-01

    A case of a 5-year-old girl with severe dysfunction of aortic valve in Kawasaki disease coexisting with endocarditis, is described. The role of Ross operation in the treatment of this condition is discussed. The 18-months follow-up showed good function of aortic valve and "Contegra" conduit (bovine jugular vein), but long-term follow-up of patients with "Contegra" conduit remains unknown. In conclusion, a Ross operation using "Contegra" conduit in pulmonary position could be effective method in the treatment of dysfunction of aortic valve in Kawasaki disease coexisting with endocarditis in children. PMID:16136434

  13. En bloc aortic and mitral valve replacement and left ventricular outflow tract enlargement using a combined transaortic and trans-septal atrial approach.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammed; Windsor, Jimmy; Ricci, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Aortic and mitral valve replacement with division and reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body has been described in clinical situations involving infective endocarditis, extensive annular calcifications and diminutive valve annuli. Herein, we describe a combined transaortic and trans-septal approach with division of the inter-valvular fibrosa for combined aortic and mitral valve replacement. The reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body, atrial walls and aortic root was carried out using a 'three-patch' technique with bovine pericardium. PMID:26409564

  14. Data on the circulating levels of endothelial microparticles are elevated in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and are related to aortic dilation.

    PubMed

    Alegret, Josep M; Martínez-Micaelo, Neus; Aragonès, Gerard; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl

    2016-09-01

    The data included here support the research article "Circulating endothelial microparticles are elevated in bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease and related to aortic dilation" (Alegret et al., 2016 [1]) where circulating levels of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM(+)) endothelial microparticles (EMPs) were identified as a biological variable related to aortic dilation in patients with BAV disease. The data presented in this article are composed by four tables and one figure containing the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of the patients (Alegret et al., 2016 [1]) included in this study, and summarize the results of multivariate linear analyses. Furthermore, is also included a figure showing a representative flow cytometry dot plots and histograms used in PECAM(+) EMPs quantification is also included. PMID:27453924

  15. Modification of the Secretion Pattern of Proteases, Inflammatory Mediators, and Extracellular Matrix Proteins by Human Aortic Valve is Key in Severe Aortic Stenosis*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Martín-Rojas, Tatiana; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Calvo, Enrique; Gil-Dones, Felix; Dardé, Veronica M.; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F.; Padial, Luis R.; Lopez, Juan-Antonio; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in cardiovascular medicine is to identify candidate biomarker proteins. Secretome analysis is particularly relevant in this search as it focuses on a subset of proteins released by a cell or tissue under certain conditions. The sample can be considered as a plasma subproteome and it provides a more direct approximation to the in vivo situation. Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. Using a proteomic analysis of the secretome from aortic stenosis valves we could identify candidate markers related to this pathology, which may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, we have designed a method to validate the origin of secreted proteins, demonstrating their synthesis and release by the tissue and ruling out blood origin. The nLC-MS/MS analysis showed the labeling of 61 proteins, 82% of which incorporated the label in only one group. Western blot and selective reaction monitoring differential analysis, revealed a notable role of the extracellular matrix. Variation in particular proteins such as PEDF, cystatin and clusterin emphasizes the link between aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis. In particular, certain proteins variation in secretome levels correlates well, not only with label incorporation trend (only labeled in aortic stenosis group) but, more importantly, with alterations found in plasma from an independent cohort of samples, pointing to specific candidate markers to follow up in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:23704777

  16. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wypasek, Ewa; Potaczek, Daniel P.; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96) vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90) mg/L, p < 0.001) and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01) compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression. PMID:26473826

  17. Clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: from learning curve to proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, Mattia; Pesarini, Gabriele; Zivelonghi, Carlo; Piccoli, Anna; Geremia, Giulia; Ariotti, Sara; Rossi, Andrea; Gambaro, Alessia; Gottin, Leonardo; Faggian, Giuseppe; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Objective The use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is growing rapidly in countries with a predominantly elderly population, posing a huge challenge to healthcare systems worldwide. The increment of human and economic resource consumption imposes a careful monitoring of clinical outcomes and cost-benefit balance, and this article is aimed at analysing clinical outcomes related to the TAVI learning curve. Methods Outcomes of 177 consecutive transfemoral TAVI procedures performed in 5 years by a single team were analysed by the Cumulative Sum of failures method (CUSUM) according to the clinical events comprised in the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) safety end point and the VARC-2 definition of device success. Margins for events acceptance were extrapolated from landmark trials that tested both balloon or self-expandable percutaneous valves. Results 30-day and 1-year survival rates were 97.2% and 89.9%, respectively. Achievement of the primary end point (number of cases needed to provide the acceptable margin of the composite end point of any death, stroke, myocardial infarction, life-threatening bleeding, major vascular complications, stage 2–3 acute kidney injury and valve-related dysfunction requiring a repeat procedure) required the performance of 54 cases, while the learning curve to achieve ‘device success’ identified 32 cases to reach the expected proficiency. In this experience, the baseline clinical risk as assessed by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score determined the long-term survival rather than the adverse events related to the learning curve. Conclusions A relatively large number of cases are required to achieve clinical outcomes comparable to those reported in high-volume centres and controlled trials. According to our national workload standards, this represents more than 2 years of continuous activity. PMID:27621826

  18. Phantom study of an ultrasound guidance system for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    McLeod, A Jonathan; Currie, Maria E; Moore, John T; Bainbridge, Daniel; Kiaii, Bob B; Chu, Michael W A; Peters, Terry M

    2016-06-01

    A guidance system using transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic tracking is presented which avoids the use of nephrotoxic contrast agents and ionizing radiation required for traditional fluoroscopically guided procedures. The aortic valve is identified in tracked biplane transesophageal echocardiography and used to guide stent deployment in a mixed reality environment. Additionally, a transapical delivery tool with intracardiac echocardiography capable of monitoring stent deployment was created. This system resulted in a deployment depth error of 3.4mm in a phantom. This was further improved to 2.3mm with the custom-made delivery tool. In comparison, the variability in deployment depth for traditional fluoroscopic guidance was estimated at 3.4mm. PMID:25595049

  19. Catheter tracking via online learning for dynamic motion compensation in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic overlay of 3D models onto 2D X-ray images has important applications in image guided interventions. In this paper, we present a novel catheter tracking for motion compensation in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI). To address such challenges as catheter shape and appearance changes, occlusions, and distractions from cluttered backgrounds, we present an adaptive linear discriminant learning method to build a measurement model online to distinguish catheters from background. An analytic solution is developed to effectively and efficiently update the discriminant model and to minimize the classification errors between the tracking object and backgrounds. The online learned discriminant model is further combined with an offline learned detector and robust template matching in a Bayesian tracking framework. Quantitative evaluations demonstrate the advantages of this method over current state-of-the-art tracking methods in tracking catheters for clinical applications. PMID:23286027

  20. Correlation analysis between serum lipoprotein (a) and the incidence of aortic valve sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ning; Zhang, Guogang; Li, Xiaogang; Zhou, Liping

    2015-01-01

    This clinical trial explores the correlation between serum lipoprotein and the severity of aortic valve sclerosis in patients diagnosed with aortic valve sclerosis (AVS). A total of 1260 subjects diagnosed with AVS were enrolled in this study between May 2005 and June 2013 and divided into the young-aged (30-59 years, n=217), middle-aged (60-74 years, n=561) and elderly groups (75-93 years, n=482). In each group, patients were sub-grouped into AVS and healthy controls according to angiography findings. Parameters including triglyceride (TG), serum total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), free fatty acid (FFA), lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], apolipoprotein A1 (ApoAl) and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) were accurately measured. Correlation between these parameters and the severity of AVS was statistically evaluated. In the middle-aged and elderly groups, serum Lp(a), TC and LDL-C were significantly higher in patients with AVS compared with healthy counterparts (both P<0.05). In the elderly group, serum HDL-C in AVS patients was significantly lower than healthy subjects (P<0.05). In the young-aged group, serum Lp(a) and ApoB were significantly increased compared with healthy counterparts (both P<0.05). Gemini score in the elderly group was significantly higher than the other groups (both P<0.01). No statistical significance was observed in Lp(a) levels among groups I, II and III. The number of coronary stenosis in group III was significantly increased than those in groups I and II (P<0.01). Lp(a), LDL-C and aging act as independent risk factors of AVS and promote the incidence and progress of AVS. PMID:26770570

  1. Arterial and Aortic Valve Calcification Abolished by Elastolytic Cathepsin S Deficiency in Chronic Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Elena; Aikawa, Masanori; Libby, Peter; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Rusanescu, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Kohler, Rainer H.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinical studies have demonstrated that 50% of individuals with chronic renal disease (CRD) die of cardiovascular causes, including advanced calcific arterial and valvular disease; however, the mechanisms of accelerated calcification in CRD remain obscure, and no therapies can prevent disease progression. We recently demonstrated in vivo that inflammation triggers cardiovascular calcification. In vitro evidence also indicates that elastin degradation products may promote osteogenesis. Here, we used genetically modified mice and molecular imaging to test the hypothesis in vivo that cathepsin S (catS), a potent elastolytic proteinase, accelerates calcification in atherosclerotic mice with CRD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein-deficient (apoE−/−)/catS+/+ (n = 24) and apoE−/−/catS−/− (n = 24) mice were assigned to CRD and control groups. CRD mice had significantly higher serum phosphate, creatinine, and cystatin C levels than those without CRD. To visualize catS activity and osteogenesis in vivo, we coadministered catS-activatable and calcification-targeted molecular imaging agents 10 weeks after nephrectomy. Imaging coregistered increased catS and osteogenic activities in the CRD apoE−/−/catS+/+ cohort, whereas CRD apoE−/−/catS−/− mice exhibited less calcification. Quantitative histology demonstrated greater catS-associated elastin fragmentation and calcification in CRD apoE−/−/catS+/+ than CRD apoE−/−/catS−/− aortas and aortic valves. Notably, catS deletion did not cause compensatory increases in RNA levels of other elastolytic cathepsins or matrix metalloproteinases. Elastin peptide and recombinant catS significantly increased calcification in smooth muscle cells in vitro, a process further amplified in phosphate-enriched culture medium. Conclusions The present study provides direct in vivo evidence that catS-induced elastolysis accelerates arterial and aortic valve calcification in CRD

  2. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: X-ray tube imaging performance

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, John A.; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray∕MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation. PMID:19472613

  3. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: x-ray tube imaging performance.

    PubMed

    Bracken, John A; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-04-01

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation. PMID:19472613

  4. [Reducing the risk of vascular complications during percutaneous aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Stratiev, V; Guyon, P; Teiger, E; Collet, J-P

    2012-08-01

    The percutaneous aortic valve replacement (TAVI) is the most recent and promising procedure in the area of interventional cardiology with a rapidly growing number of interventions worldwide. The transfemoral approach being less invasive, it has become the predominant access for the device delivery. The prevention of vascular complications by an optimal risk stratification using appropriate imaging techniques (vascular CT scan and angiography), optimised techniques for femoral puncture (active control of the arterial punction, crossover...) and skilled teams for peripheral angioplasty and percutaneous arterial closure devices (Prostar) has become mandatory given the fragile target population for TAVI. Vascular complications remain indeed one of the most frequent complication although the trend toward reduced sheeths size led to significant reduction This is mandatory regarding the needed size of the vascular arterial access - itself with constant improvement by minimising the initial 24 French with mandatory real chirurgical closure to the actual 18-19 French and soon 16 French. The improvement of the implanted devices is due to the recent evidence of the promising future of this technique and the important technological effort realised by the industry not only on the implanted aortic prosthesis but also on their delivering catheters. PMID:22497766

  5. Non-invasive determination of transcatheter pressure gradient in stenotic aortic valves: an analytical model.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Motamed, Pouyan K; Maftoon, Nima

    2015-03-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS), in which the opening of the aortic valve is narrowed, is the most common valvular heart disease. Cardiac catheterization is considered the reference standard for definitive evaluation of AS severity, based on instantaneous systolic value of transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG). However, using invasive cardiac catheterization might carry high risks knowing that undergoing multiple cardiac catheterizations for follow-up in patients with AS is common. The objective of this study was to suggest an analytical description of the AS that estimates TPG without a need for high risk invasive data collection. For this purpose, Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the elastic-deformation equation was solved analytically. The estimated TPG resulted from the suggested analytical description was validated against published in vivo and in vitro measurement data. Very good concordances were found between TPG obtained from the analytical formulation and in vivo (maximum root mean square error: 3.8 mmHg) and in vitro (maximum root mean square error: 9.4 mmHg). The analytical description can be integrated to non-invasive imaging modalities to estimate AS severity as an alternative to cardiac catheterization to help preventing its risks in patients with AS. PMID:25682932

  6. New-Onset Left Bundle Branch Block Induced by Transcutaneous Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Massoullié, Grégoire; Bordachar, Pierre; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Souteyrand, Géraud; Jean, Frédéric; Combaret, Nicolas; Vorilhon, Charles; Clerfond, Guillaume; Farhat, Mehdi; Ritter, Philippe; Citron, Bernard; Lusson, Jean-R; Motreff, Pascal; Ploux, Sylvain; Eschalier, Romain

    2016-03-01

    New-onset left bundle branch block (LBBB) is a specific concern of transcutaneous aortic valve implantation (TAVI) given its estimated incidence ranging from 5% to 65%. This high rate of occurrence is dependent on the type of device used (size and shape), implantation methods, and patient co-morbidities. The appearance of an LBBB after TAVI reflects a very proximal lesion of the left bundle branch as it exits the bundle of His. At times transient, its persistence can lead to permanent pacemaker implantation in 15% to 20% of cases, most often for high-degree atrioventricular block. The management of LBBB after TAVI is currently not defined by international societies resulting in individual centers developing their own management strategy. The potential consequences of LBBB are dysrhythmias (atrioventricular block, syncope, and sudden death) and functional (heart failure) complications. Prompt postprocedural recognition and management (permanent pacemaker implantation) of patients prevents the occurrence of potential complications and may constitute the preferred approach in this frail and elderly population despite additional costs and complications of cardiac pacing. Moreover, the expansion of future indications for TAVI necessitates better identification of the predictive factors for the development of LBBB. Indeed, long-term right ventricular pacing may potentially increase the risk of developing heart failure in this population. In conclusion, it is thus imperative to not only develop new aortic prostheses with a less-deleterious impact on the conduction system but also to prescribe appropriate pacing modes in this frail population. PMID:26742470

  7. Triglycidylamine Crosslinking of Porcine Aortic Valve Cusps or Bovine Pericardium Results in Improved Biocompatibility, Biomechanics, and Calcification Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Jeanne M.; Alferiev, Ivan; Clark-Gruel, Jocelyn N.; Eidelman, Naomi; Sacks, Michael; Palmatory, Elizabeth; Kronsteiner, Allyson; DeFelice, Suzanne; Xu, Jie; Ohri, Rachit; Narula, Navneet; Vyavahare, Narendra; Levy, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated a novel polyepoxide crosslinker that was hypothesized to confer both material stabilization and calcification resistance when used to prepare bioprosthetic heart valves. Triglycidylamine (TGA) was synthesized via reacting epichlorhydrin and NH3. TGA was used to crosslink porcine aortic cusps, bovine pericardium, and type I collagen. Control materials were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde (Glut). TGA-pretreated materials had shrink temperatures comparable to Glut fixation. However, TGA crosslinking conferred significantly greater collagenase resistance than Glut pretreatment, and significantly improved biomechanical compliance. Sheep aortic valve interstitial cells grown on TGA-pretreated collagen did not calcify, whereas sheep aortic valve interstitial cells grown on control substrates calcified extensively. Rat subdermal implants (porcine aortic cusps/bovine pericardium) pretreated with TGA demonstrated significantly less calcification than Glut pretreated implants. Investigations of extracellular matrix proteins associated with calcification, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9, tenascin-C, and osteopontin, revealed that MMP-9 and tenascin-C demonstrated reduced expression both in vitro and in vivo with TGA crosslinking compared to controls, whereas osteopontin and MMP-2 expression were not affected. TGA pretreatment of heterograft biomaterials results in improved stability compared to Glut, confers biomechanical properties superior to Glut crosslinking, and demonstrates significant calcification resistance. PMID:15631995

  8. Early- and mid-term outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Data from a single-center registry

    PubMed Central

    Bagienski, Maciej; Dziewierz, Artur; Rzeszutko, Lukasz; Sorysz, Danuta; Trebacz, Jaroslaw; Sobczynski, Robert; Tomala, Marek; Stapor, Maciej; Gackowski, Andrzej; Dudek, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive treatment option for elderly, high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) than aortic valve replacement. More importantly, TAVI improves survival and quality of life as compared to medical treatment in inoperable patients. Aim To assess early- and mid-term clinical outcomes after TAVI. Material and methods All consecutive high-risk patients with severe symptomatic AS undergoing TAVI from November 2008 to August 2014 were enrolled. The clinical and procedural characteristics, as well as clinical outcomes including mortality during 12-month follow-up, were assessed. Results A total of 101 consecutive patients underwent TAVI for native aortic valve stenosis (100%). Patients were elderly, with a median age of 81.0 (76.0–84.0) years, 60.4% were female and 83.2% presented with NYHA III/IV. Median baseline EuroSCORE I and STS scores were 14.0 (10.0–22.5)% and 12.0 (5.0–24.0)%, respectively. The main periprocedural and in-hospital complications were minor vascular complications, bleeding requiring blood transfusions, and the need for a permanent pacemaker. In-hospital, 30-day, 6-month and 12-month mortality rates were 6.9%, 10.9%, 15.8% and 17.8%, respectively. Conclusions A mortality rate of < 20% after 12 months seems acceptable given the high-risk population enrolled. PMID:27279871

  9. Comparison of Results of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Versus Without Active Cancer.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken; Hioki, Hirofumi; Kawashima, Hideyuki; Nara, Yugo; Kataoka, Akihisa; Shirai, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Araki, Motoharu; Takagi, Kensuke; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Yamamoto, Masanori; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2016-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate postprocedural and midterm outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with aortic stenosis and active cancer. From October 2013 to August 2015, a total of 749 patients undergoing TAVI using the Edwards Sapien XT prosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) were prospectively included in the OCEAN-TAVI registry from 8 Japanese centers. A total of 47 patients (44.7% men; median age 83 years) had active cancer. The transfemoral approach was implemented in 85.1% of patients in the cancer group and 78.1% in the noncancer group (p = 0.22). The occurrence of major vascular complication (4.3% vs 7.5%, p = 0.24), life-threatening bleeding (2.1% vs 7.1%, p = 0.15), and major bleeding (8.5% vs 13%, p = 0.38) was similar between the cancer and noncancer groups. No significant differences were observed regarding device success (100% vs 96.2%, p = 0.17) or 30-day survival (95.7% vs 97.3%, p = 0.38). No difference in midterm survival was found between the patients with cancer and without cancer (log-rank, p = 0.42), regardless of advanced or limited cancer (log-rank, p = 0.68). In a multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, cancer metastasis was one of the most significant predictors of late mortality (hazard ratio 4.73, 95% CI 1.12 to 20.0; p = 0.035). In conclusion, patients with cancer with severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVI had similar acute outcomes and midterm survival rates compared with patients without cancer. Cancer metastasis was associated with increased mortality after TAVI. PMID:27324159

  10. Incidence, Causes, and Impact of In-Hospital Infections After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Conte, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso B; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Cuadrado, Ana; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Salinas, Pablo; Gonzalo, Nieves; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Higueras, Javier; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Perez-Vizcayno, Maria Jose; Vilacosta, Isidre; Escaned, Javier; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In-hospital infections (IHI) are one of the most common and serious problems after invasive procedures. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an increasingly used alternative to surgery in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, origin, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of IHI after TAVI. A total of 303 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI were included and followed during a median time of 21 months. We examined the occurrence, types, origin, and timing of infections during hospital stay as well as short- and long-term clinical outcomes according to the occurrence of IHI. A total of 51 patients (17%; 62 infectious episodes) experienced IHI after TAVI. Respiratory and urinary tract infections were the most frequent type of infections (44% and 34%, respectively), followed by surgical site infection (8%) and bloodstream infection (5%). Positive cultures were obtained in 74% of the samples, of which 65% were gram-negative bacilli. Modifiable factors such as bleeding (p = 0.005) and length of coronary care unit stay (p <0.001) were independently associated with an increased infection risk. Patients with IHI had a longer hospital stay (14 vs 6 days, p <0.001), an increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.23) and readmission rate (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.14) during the follow-up. In conclusion, IHI is a frequent complication after TAVI with a significant impact on short- and long-term clinical outcomes. The most important risk factors associated with the development of this complication were modifiable periprocedural aspects. These results underline the importance to implement specific preventive strategies to reduce in-hospital-acquired infections after TAVI. PMID:27296559

  11. Removal of alpha-Gal epitopes from porcine aortic valve and pericardium using recombinant human alpha galactosidase A.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongsik; Kim, Woong-Han; Choi, Sun-Young; Kim, Yong-Jin

    2009-12-01

    It has been reported that the immune response due to alpha-Gal epitopes is an important factor in tissue valve failure. The elimination of the interaction between the natural anti-Gal antibodies and alpha-gal epitopes on the xenografts is a prerequisite to the success of xenografts in humans. Previously, we reported that the green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase could remove all alpha-Gal epitopes from cell surface of porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue, but it has limitations on cost effectiveness. In this study we wanted to know whether the recently produced recombinant human alpha-galactosidase A has the same effective enzymatic activity as green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase in removing alpha-Gal epitopes from the same tissues. After treating fresh porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue with recombinant alpha-galactosidase A, each sample was stained with Griffonia simplicifolia type I isolectin B4 indirect immunoperoxidase avidin-biotin technique. We then examined whether the alpha-Gal epitopes were reduced or abolished in each consecutive concentration of recombinant alpha-galactosidase A by comparing the degree of the Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 staining. As a result, the recombinant alpha-galactosidase A could remove cell surface alpha-Gals on porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue as effectively as green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase. PMID:19949670

  12. Challenges after the first decade of transcatheter aortic valve replacement: focus on vascular complications, stroke, and paravalvular leak.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Christopher; Sophocles, Aris; Ramakrishna, Harish; Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Patel, Prakash A; Augoustides, John G T

    2013-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is entering its second decade. Three major clinical challenges have emerged from the first decade of experience: vascular complications, stroke, and paravalvular leak (PVL). Major vascular complications remain common and independently predict major bleeding, transfusion, renal failure, and mortality. Although women are more prone to vascular complications, overall they have better survival than men. Further predictors of major vascular complications include heavily diseased femoral arteries and operator experience. Strategies to minimize vascular complications include a multimodal approach and sleeker delivery systems. Although cerebral embolism is very common during TAVR, it mostly is asymptomatic. Major stroke independently predicts prolonged recovery and increased mortality. Identified stroke predictors include functional disability, previous stroke, a transapical approach, and atrial fibrillation. Embolic protection devices are in development to mitigate the risk of embolic stroke after TAVR. PVL is common and significantly decreases survival. Undersizing of the valve prosthesis can be minimized with 3-dimensional imaging by computed tomography or echocardiography to describe the elliptic aortic annulus accurately. The formal grading of PVL severity in TAVR is based on its percentage of the circumferential extent of the aortic valve annulus. Further emerging management strategies for PVL include a repositionable valve prosthesis and transcatheter plugging. The first decade of TAVR has ushered in a new paradigm for the multidisciplinary management of valvular heart disease. The second decade likely will build on this wave of initial success with further significant innovations. PMID:23141627

  13. Streptococcus agalactiae infective endocarditis complicated by large vegetations at aortic valve cusps along with intracoronary extension: An autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Ro, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae infective endocarditis is a rare condition with high mortality owing to complications of large vegetations and systemic emboli. A 49-year-old man was found dead in his house. He had a history of hepatic cirrhosis and had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 2years previously. He had presented with a high fever 10days before his death. An autopsy revealed 50mL of purulent pericardial effusion, and S. agalactiae was detected from the culture of this pericardial effusion. Two slender rope-like vegetations were present at the right aortic valve cusp and noncoronary aortic valve cusp. The vegetation at the right aortic valve cusp extended into the right coronary artery. The right coronary artery was broadly occluded by white rod-like material. The mitral valves were also affected, and the posterior papillary muscle was ruptured. Myocardial infarction was not observed. Systemic microscopic Gram-positive bacterial masses were observed in several organs. The death was attributed to acute myocardial ischemia caused by occlusive intracoronary extension of the vegetation at the proximal right coronary artery. PMID:26926519

  14. Immediate and Intermediate Outcome After Transapical Versus Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Biancari, Fausto; Rosato, Stefano; D'Errigo, Paola; Ranucci, Marco; Onorati, Francesco; Barbanti, Marco; Santini, Francesco; Tamburino, Corrado; Santoro, Gennaro; Grossi, Claudio; Covello, Remo Daniel; Ventura, Martina; Fusco, Danilo; Seccareccia, Fulvia

    2016-01-15

    A few studies recently reported controversial results with transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TF-TAVR) versus transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TA-TAVR), often without adequate adjusted analysis for baseline differences. Data on patients who underwent TF-TAVR and TA-TAVR from the Observational Study of Effectiveness of avR-tavI procedures for severe Aortic stenosis Treatment study were analyzed with propensity score 1-to-1 matching. From a cohort of 1,654 patients (1,419 patients underwent TF-TAVR and 235 patients underwent TA-TAVR), propensity score matching resulted in 199 pairs of patients with similar operative risk (EuroSCORE II: TF-TAVR 8.1 ± 7.1% vs TA-TAVR, 8.4 ± 7.3%, p = 0.713). Thirty-day mortality was 8.0% after TA-TAVR and 4.0% after TF-TAVR (p = 0.102). Postoperative rates of stroke (TA-TAVR, 2.0% vs TF-TAVR 1.0%, p = 0.414), cardiac tamponade (TA-TAVR, 4.1% vs TF-TAVR 1.5%, p = 0.131), permanent pacemaker implantation (TA-TAVR, 8.7% vs TF-TAVR 13.3%, p = 0.414), and infection (TA-TAVR, 6.7% vs TF-TAVR 3.6%, p = 0.180) were similar in the study groups but with an overall trend in favor of TF-TAVR. Higher rates of major vascular damage (7.2% vs 1.0%, p = 0.003) and moderate-to-severe paravalvular regurgitation (7.8% vs 5.2%, p = 0.008) were observed after TF-TAVR. On the contrary, TA-TAVR was associated with higher rates of red blood cell transfusion (50.0% vs 30.4%, p = 0.0002) and acute kidney injury (stages 1 to 3: 44.4% vs 21.9%, p <0.0001) compared with TF-TAVR. Three-year survival rate was 69.1% after TF-TAVR and 57.0% after TA-TAVR (p = 0.006), whereas freedom from major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events was 61.9% after TF-TAVR and 50.4% after TA-TAVR (p = 0.011). In conclusion, TF-TAVR seems to be associated with significantly higher early and intermediate survival compared with TA-TAVR. The transfemoral approach, whenever feasible, should be considered the route of choice for TAVR. PMID

  15. Observed change in peak oxygen consumption after aortic valve replacement and its predictors

    PubMed Central

    Le, Van Doan Tuyet; Jensen, Gunnar Vagn Hagemann; Kjøller-Hansen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the change in peak oxygen consumption (pVO2) and determine its outcome predictors after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS). Methods Patients with AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction who were referred for single AVR had cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to and 9 months post-AVR. Predictors of outcome for pVO2 were determined by multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses. A significant change in pVO2 was defined as a relative change that was more than twice the coefficient of repeatability by test–retest (>10%). Results The pre-AVR characteristics of the 37 study patients included the following: median age (range) 72 (46–83) years, aortic valve area index (AVAI) 0.41 (SD 0.11) cm2/m2, mean gradient (MG) 49.1 (SD 15.3) mm Hg and New York Heart Association (NYHA)≥II 27 (73%). Pre-AVR and post-AVR mean pVO2 was 18.5 and 18.4 mL/kg/m2 (87% of the predicted), respectively, but the change from pre-AVR was heterogeneous. The relative change in pVO2 was positively associated with the preoperative MG (β=0.50, p=0.001) and negatively associated with brain natriuretic peptide > upper level of normal according to age and gender (β=−0.40, p=0.009). A relative increase in pVO2 exceeding 10% was found in 9 (24%), predicted by lower pre-AVR AVAI (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.82, p=0.027) and lower peak O2 pulse (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.88 to 0.99, p=0.045). Decreases in pVO2 exceeding 10% were found in 11 (30%) and predicted by lower MG (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99, p=0.033). Conclusions Change in pVO2 was heterogeneous. Predictors of favourable and unfavourable outcomes for pVO2 were identified. PMID:27252876

  16. A gender based analysis of predictors of all cause death after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Federico; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Salizzoni, Stefano; Presbitero, Patrizia; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Tamburino, Corrado; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Bedogni, Francesco; Nijhoff, Freek; Gasparetto, Valeria; Napodano, Massimo; Ferrante, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marco Luciano; Stella, Pieter; Brambilla, Nedy; Barbanti, Marco; Giordana, Francesca; Grasso, Costanza; Biondi Zoccai, Giuseppe; Moretti, Claudio; D'Amico, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Marra, Sebastiano

    2014-10-15

    The impact of gender-related pathophysiologic features of severe aortic stenosis on transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) outcomes remains to be determined, as does the consistency of predictors of mortality between the genders. All consecutive patients who underwent TAVI at 6 institutions were enrolled in this study and stratified according to gender. Midterm all-cause mortality was the primary end point, with events at 30 days and at midterm as secondary end points. All events were adjudicated according to Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. Eight hundred thirty-six patients were enrolled, 464 (55.5%) of whom were female. At midterm follow-up (median 365 days, interquartile range 100 to 516) women had similar rates of all-cause mortality compared with men (18.1% vs 22.6%, p = 0.11) and similar incidence of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. Gender did not affect mortality also on multivariate analysis. Among clinical and procedural features, glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (hazard ratio [HR] 2.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36 to 4.79) and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure >50 mm Hg (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.26 to 4.02) independently predicted mortality in women, while insulin-treated diabetes (HR 3.45, 95% CI 1.47 to 8.09), previous stroke (HR 3.42, 95% CI 1.43 to 8.18), and an ejection fraction <30% (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.41 to 10.37) were related to mortality in men. Postprocedural aortic regurgitation was independently related to midterm mortality in the 2 groups (HR 11.19, 95% CI 3.3 to 37.9). In conclusion, women and men had the same life expectancy after TAVI, but different predictors of adverse events stratified by gender were demonstrated. These findings underline the importance of a gender-tailored clinical risk assessment in TAVI patients. PMID:25159239

  17. Atorvastatin Attenuates Bone Loss and Aortic Valve Atheroma in LDLR Mice.

    PubMed

    Rajamannan, Nalini M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and osteoporosis are the leading causes of mortality and morbidity. The objective of this study was to test this hypothesis in experimental hypercholesterolemia to determine whether statins play a protective role in this process. LDLR(-/-) mice (n = 60) were allocated to the following groups: group I (n = 20), normal diet; group II (n = 20), 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol diet (w/w), and group III (n = 20), 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol diet + atorvastatin for 48 weeks. Examination of aortic valves (AVA) and femurs for atherosclerosis and calcification markers included micro-CT, special stains, and calcein incorporation. The cholesterol diet induced bone formation in calcified AVA and an increase in macrophage infiltration. Hyperlipidemic bones expressed an increase in osteoclast cells and a decrease in bone formation. Atorvastatin reduced atherosclerosis and bone mineralization in AVA and increased mineralization within femur bones (p < 0.05). Atherosclerosis is present in hyperlipidemic bones and valves as characterized by macrophage and osteoclast infiltration, and it is attenuated by atorvastatin, which may have implications for therapy in the future. PMID:25997922

  18. Computational 3D fluid-structure interaction for the aortic valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Chen, Ye; Sun, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems. A typical example is the heart valves. Accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still lacking. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-dynamics solver, both in-house programs, specifically for three-dimensional simulations. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-dynamics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We have performed several benchmarking cases to validate the FSI solver. Application to the native aortic valve will be demonstrated. Supported by the NSF grant (CBET-1066962).

  19. Biological Niches within Human Calcified Aortic Valves: Towards Understanding of the Pathological Biomineralization Process

    PubMed Central

    Cottignoli, Valentina; Relucenti, Michela; Agrosì, Giovanna; Cavarretta, Elena; Familiari, Giuseppe; Salvador, Loris; Maras, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances, mineralization site, its microarchitecture, and composition in calcific heart valve remain poorly understood. A multiscale investigation, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), from micrometre up to nanometre, was conducted on human severely calcified aortic and mitral valves, to provide new insights into calcification process. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial relationship existing between bioapatite crystals, their local growing microenvironment, and the presence of a hierarchical architecture. Here we detected the presence of bioapatite crystals in two different mineralization sites that suggest the action of two different growth processes: a pathological crystallization process that occurs in biological niches and is ascribed to a purely physicochemical process and a matrix-mediated mineralized process in which the extracellular matrix acts as the template for a site-directed nanocrystals nucleation. Different shapes of bioapatite crystallization were observed at micrometer scale in each microenvironment but at the nanoscale level crystals appear to be made up by the same subunits. PMID:26509159

  20. Image-based mechanical analysis of stent deformation: concept and exemplary implementation for aortic valve stents.

    PubMed

    Gessat, Michael; Hopf, Raoul; Pollok, Thomas; Russ, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Sündermann, Simon Harald; Hirsch, Sven; Mazza, Edoardo; Székely, Gábor; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    An approach for extracting the radial force load on an implanted stent from medical images is proposed. To exemplify the approach, a system is presented which computes a radial force estimation from computer tomography images acquired from patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The deformed shape of the implanted valve prosthesis' Nitinol frame is extracted from the images. A set of displacement vectors is computed that parameterizes the observed deformation. An iterative relaxation algorithm is employed to adapt the information extracted from the images to a finite-element model of the stent, and the radial components of the interaction forces between the stent and the tissue are extracted. For the evaluation of the method, tests were run using the clinical data from 21 patients. Stent modeling and extraction of the radial forces were successful in 18 cases. Synthetic test cases were generated, in addition, for assessing the sensitivity to the measurement errors. In a sensitivity analysis, the geometric error of the stent reconstruction was below 0.3 mm, which is below the image resolution. The distribution of the radial forces was qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable. An uncertainty remains in the quantitative evaluation of the radial forces due to the uncertainty in defining a radial direc