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Sample records for correlation questions clinical

  1. Automated question answering for clinical comparison questions 

    E-print Network

    Leonhard, Annette Christa

    2012-06-25

    This thesis describes the development and evaluation of new automated Question Answering (QA) methods tailored to clinical comparison questions that give clinicians a rank-ordered list of MEDLINE® abstracts targeted to ...

  2. Questioning and Feedback in Athletic Training Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Levy, Linda S.; Willeford, K. Sean; Sexton, Patrick; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide clinical instructors with information and ideas on how to utilize questioning and feedback during clinical experiences. Definitions, purpose, and examples of different questioning skills are provided. Corrective and directive feedback methods are defined with purposes and examples provided of each.…

  3. A characterization of clinical questions asked by rehabilitation therapists*†

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Lorie Andrea; Bartlett, Joan C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the information needs of rehabilitation therapists (occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists) working with patients who have had strokes in order to characterize their clinical questions, defined as their formalized information needs arising in the context of everyday clinical practice. Methods: The researchers took a constructivist, interpretive approach, in which fifteen rehabilitation therapists working in various settings were recruited. Data were gathered using diaries, followed by diary-guided interviews, and thematically analyzed using template analysis. Results: Rehabilitation therapists' clinical questions were characterized as having one or more of twelve foci and containing one or more of eight possible structural elements. Conclusions: Findings demonstrate that the evidence-based practice framework currently applied for questions relating to rehabilitation is inadequate for representing rehabilitation therapists' clinical questions. A new framework that is more comprehensive and descriptive is proposed. Implications: Librarians working with students and clinicians in rehabilitation can employ knowledge of the twelve foci and the question structure for rehabilitation to guide the reference interview. Instruction on question formulation in evidence-based practice can employ the revised structure for rehabilitation, offering students and clinicians an alternative to the traditional patient, intervention, comparison, outcome (PICO) structure. Information products, including bibliographic databases and synopsis services, can tailor their interfaces according to question foci and prompt users to enter search terms corresponding to any of the eight possible elements found in rehabilitation therapists' clinical questions. PMID:24860260

  4. Automatically Extracting Information Needs from Complex Clinical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yong-gang; Cimino, James J; Ely, John; Yu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Objective Clinicians pose complex clinical questions when seeing patients, and identifying the answers to those questions in a timely manner helps improve the quality of patient care. We report here on two natural language processing models, namely, automatic topic assignment and keyword identification, that together automatically and effectively extract information needs from ad hoc clinical questions. Our study is motivated in the context of developing the larger clinical question answering system AskHERMES (Help clinicians to Extract and aRrticulate Multimedia information for answering clinical quEstionS). Design and Measurements We developed supervised machine-learning systems to automatically assign predefined general categories (e.g., etiology, procedure, and diagnosis) to a question. We also explored both supervised and unsupervised systems to automatically identify keywords that capture the main content of the question. Results We evaluated our systems on 4,654 annotated clinical questions that were collected in practice. We achieved an F1 score of 76.0% for the task of general topic classification and 58.0% for keyword extraction. Our systems have been implemented into the larger question answering system AskHERMES. Our error analyses suggested that inconsistent annotation in our training data have hurt both question analysis tasks. Conclusion Our systems, available at http://www.askhermes.org, can automatically extract information needs from both short (the number of word tokens <20) and long questions (the number of word tokens >20), and from both well-structured and ill-formed questions. We speculate that the performance of general topic classification and keyword extraction can be further improved if consistently annotated data are made available. PMID:20670693

  5. AskHERMES: An online question answering system for complex clinical questions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, YongGang; Liu, Feifan; Simpson, Pippa; Antieau, Lamont; Bennett, Andrew; Cimino, James J.; Ely, John; Yu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Clinical questions are often long and complex and take many forms. We have built a clinical question answering system named AskHERMES to perform robust semantic analysis on complex clinical questions and output question-focused extractive summaries as answers. Design This paper describes the system architecture and a preliminary evaluation of AskHERMES, which implements innovative approaches in question analysis, summarization, and answer presentation. Five types of resources were indexed in this system: MEDLINE abstracts, PubMed Central full-text articles, eMedicine documents, clinical guidelines and Wikipedia articles. Measurement We compared the AskHERMES system with Google (Google and Google Scholar) and UpToDate and asked physicians to score the three systems by ease of use, quality of answer, time spent, and overall performance. Results AskHERMES allows physicians to enter a question in a natural way with minimal query formulation and allows physicians to efficiently navigate among all the answer sentences to quickly meet their information needs. In contrast, physicians need to formulate queries to search for information in Google and UpToDate. The development of the AskHERMES system is still at an early stage, and the knowledge resource is limited compared with Google or UpToDate. Nevertheless, the evaluation results show that AskHERMES’ performance is comparable to the other systems. In particular, when answering complex clinical questions, it demonstrates the potential to outperform both Google and UpToDate systems. Conclusions AskHERMES, available at http://www.AskHERMES.org, has the potential to help physicians practice evidence-based medicine and improve the quality of patient care. PMID:21256977

  6. Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:25035125

  7. Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:25035125

  8. Republished: Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:26304986

  9. Republished: Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:26304986

  10. Hermeneutics of clinical practice: the question of textuality.

    PubMed

    Svenaeus, F

    2000-01-01

    In this article I scrutinize the question whether clinical medicine, in order to be considered a hermeneutical enterprise, must be thought of as a reading of different "texts." Three different proposals for a definition of the concept of text in medicine, suggested by other hermeneuticians, are discussed. All three proposals are shown to be unsatisfying in various ways. Instead of attempting to find a fourth definition of the concept of text suitable to a hermeneutics of medicine, I then try to show that the assumption that one needs to operate with the concept of text in order to develop a hermeneutics of medicine is false. Clinical interpretation can be shown to essentially consist in a dialogical hermeneutics, the pattern of which can be found in the philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer. This kind of hermeneutics is not a methodology of text reading, but an ontological, phenomenological hermeneutics in which understanding is a necessary feature of the being-together of human beings in the world. This being-together in and through language takes on a peculiar form in the clinical encounter, since the medical meeting is typically characterized by an asymmetrical enstrangement and has a specific goal--health for the patient--absent in other forms of hermeneutics. Central issues of Gadamer's philosophy, e.g. "fusion of horizons," are shown to fit the structure of clinical practice. PMID:10967952

  11. Correlation between Question Intonation and Focus of Interrogation--Evidence from French Dislocated Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Xiao-nan

    This study explores the relationship between question intonation patterns in French using dislocated questions and question-focus (Q- focus). A dislocated question is defined as an interrogative sentence whose sequence is interrupted by the topicalization of a constituent at the left ("Toi, tu viens?"), at the right (Tu viens, toi?"), or in the…

  12. Therapeutic Applications of Extracellular Vesicles: Clinical Promise and Open Questions

    PubMed Central

    Breakefield, Xandra O.; Leonard, Joshua N.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an updated perspective on rapidly proliferating efforts to harness extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic applications. We summarize current knowledge, emerging strategies, and open questions pertaining to clinical potential and translation. Potentially useful EVs comprise diverse products of various cell types and species. EV components may also be combined with liposomes and nanoparticles to facilitate manufacturing as well as product safety and evaluation. Potential therapeutic cargoes include RNA, proteins, and drugs. Strategic issues considered herein include choice of therapeutic agent, means of loading cargoes into EVs, promotion of EV stability, tissue targeting, and functional delivery of cargo to recipient cells. Some applications may harness natural EV properties, such as immune modulation, regeneration promotion, and pathogen suppression. These properties can be enhanced or customized to enable a wide range of therapeutic applications, including vaccination, improvement of pregnancy outcome, and treatment of autoimmune disease, cancer, and tissue injury. PMID:25292428

  13. Therapeutic applications of extracellular vesicles: clinical promise and open questions.

    PubMed

    György, Bence; Hung, Michelle E; Breakefield, Xandra O; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an updated perspective on rapidly proliferating efforts to harness extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic applications. We summarize current knowledge, emerging strategies, and open questions pertaining to clinical potential and translation. Potentially useful EVs comprise diverse products of various cell types and species. EV components may also be combined with liposomes and nanoparticles to facilitate manufacturing as well as product safety and evaluation. Potential therapeutic cargoes include RNA, proteins, and drugs. Strategic issues considered herein include choice of therapeutic agent, means of loading cargoes into EVs, promotion of EV stability, tissue targeting, and functional delivery of cargo to recipient cells. Some applications may harness natural EV properties, such as immune modulation, regeneration promotion, and pathogen suppression. These properties can be enhanced or customized to enable a wide range of therapeutic applications, including vaccination, improvement of pregnancy outcome, and treatment of autoimmune disease, cancer, and tissue injury. PMID:25292428

  14. The persistence of clinical questions across shifts on an intensive care unit: an observational pilot study.

    PubMed

    Anton, Blair; Woodson, Sue M; Twose, Claire; Roderer, Nancy K

    2014-07-01

    How do clinical questions emerge and move toward resolution in the intensive care setting over the course of 24 hours? In a 20-bed surgical intensive care unit in a large, tertiary-care teaching hospital, informationists shadowed clinicians for 2 48-hour periods to record questions, noting when they were asked and whether they were answered. Thirty-eight percent of 112 recorded questions remained unanswered. Some unanswered questions persisted across shifts, and clinicians' information-seeking behaviors changed over time. Clinical information services can be improved and integrated more fully into clinical workflows based on a fuller understanding of the life cycle of clinical inquiry. PMID:25031562

  15. The persistence of clinical questions across shifts on an intensive care unit: an observational pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Blair; Woodson, Sue M.; Twose, Claire; Roderer, Nancy K.

    2014-01-01

    How do clinical questions emerge and move toward resolution in the intensive care setting over the course of 24 hours? In a 20-bed surgical intensive care unit in a large, tertiary-care teaching hospital, informationists shadowed clinicians for 2 48-hour periods to record questions, noting when they were asked and whether they were answered. Thirty-eight percent of 112 recorded questions remained unanswered. Some unanswered questions persisted across shifts, and clinicians' information-seeking behaviors changed over time. Clinical information services can be improved and integrated more fully into clinical workflows based on a fuller understanding of the life cycle of clinical inquiry. PMID:25031562

  16. Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Haley

    2007-01-01

    A canoe trip guide for young people gets used to the never-ending flow of questions. Kids are constantly inquiring about how many kilometres have been traveled that day, how many kilometres to go that day, what is for dinner, and when the next set of moving water is coming up. With kids, the questions are endless. Questions often are used as a…

  17. Human Correlates of Provocative Questions in Pancreatic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Oliver G.; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of cell lines and of animal models of pancreatic cancer have raised a number of provocative questions about the nature and origins of human pancreatic cancer and have provided several leads into exciting new approaches for the treatment of this deadly cancer. In addition, clinicians with little or no contact with human pathology have challenged the way that pancreatic pathology is practiced, suggesting that “genetic signals” may be more accurate than today’s multi-modal approach to diagnoses. In this review we consider eight provocative issues in pancreas pathology, with an emphasis on “the evidence derived from man.” PMID:23060061

  18. A Three-Question Framework to Facilitate Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibold, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Context: Highly developed critical thinking and the ability to discriminate among many possible therapeutic interventions is a core behavior for the practicing athletic trainer. However, while athletic training students receive a great deal of clinically applicable information, many are not explicitly trained in efficient methods for channeling…

  19. Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction: Answers to Clinical Questions*

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    Cardioembolic cerebral infarction (CI) is the most severe subtype of ischaemic stroke but some clinical aspects of this condition are still unclear. This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of relevant aspects related to clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of CI. CI accounts for 14?30% of ischemic strokes; patients with CI are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of CI, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The most common disorders associated with a high risk of cardioembolism include atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Patent foramen ovale and complex atheromatosis of the aortic arch are potentially emerging sources of cardioembolic infarction. Mitral annular calcification can be a marker of complex aortic atheroma in stroke patients of unkown etiology. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. Magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial Doppler, and electrophysiological studies are useful to document the source of cardioembolism. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in which contraindications, such as falls, poor compliance, uncontrolled epilepsy or gastrointestinal bleeding are absent. Dabigatran has been shown to be non-inferior to warfarin in the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism. All significant structural defects, such as atrial septal defects, vegetations on valve or severe aortic disease should be treated. Aspirin is recommended in stroke patients with a patent foramen ovale and indications of closure should be individualized. CI is an important topic in the frontier between cardiology and vascular neurology, occurs frequently in daily practice, has a high impact for patients, and health care systems and merits an update review of current clinical issues, advances and controversies. PMID:22845816

  20. [Intercultural communication in the clinical context: a question of partnership].

    PubMed

    Vissandjée, B; Dupére, S

    2000-06-01

    This article is intended to promote reflection on the intercultural competence of nurses and other health professionals. It discusses the different types of interpretation used to communicate with patients who do not speak English or French, legal and ethical consequences, and impact on health-care quality. The authors offer recommendations for both research and clinical nursing, as well as the health-care system in general, and highlight the challenges faced by nurses in a pluralist society. The literature review reveals an inherent complexity in the use of diverse types of interpreters. Finally, the authors argue that the intricacy of the cross-cultural communication trio is intensified by a lack of adequate preparation of nurses and other health professionals and interpreters regarding cross-cultural communication. PMID:11141819

  1. Clinical correlates of olfactory hallucinations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Robyn; McGuire, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard; Catts, Stanley V

    2011-06-01

    OBJECTIVES.?Olfactory hallucinations (OHs) are underrepresented in conventional clinical instruments, infrequently researched, and poorly understood. To advance understanding of OHs, we examined their past-month prevalence and co-occurring symptoms in two datasets. DESIGN.?One dataset comprised categorical codes and was examined using homogeneity analysis and logistic regression; the other dataset comprised numeric ratings and was examined using principal components analyses and linear regression. METHOD.?The two datasets included: (1) 962 cases with Present State Examination - 9th Edition (PSE-9), codes (recoded present/absent) from the World Health Organization 10 Country (WHO-10) Study and (2) 265 cases with ratings on Scales for Assessing Positive/Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia (SAPS/SANS). Two PSE-9 items (external- and self-smells) were recoded into a single OH item to examine consistency with the SAPS/SANS dataset, which contained a single OH item. RESULTS.?Prevalence of OHs and hallucinations in other modalities differed according to the WHO-10 international centre. Across centres, OHs were present in 13% of the WHO-10 dataset, similar to the 17% prevalence rate in the SAPS/SANS dataset. Referential/control delusions and other hallucinations (particularly, somatic/tactile/gustatory hallucinations) were significant independent correlates of OHs in both datasets. OHs also co-occurred with social anxiety and depression in the WHO-10 dataset, with self-smells being particularly associated with self-depreciation. CONCLUSIONS.?Sociocultural factors may modulate the self-reporting and/or detection of OHs and hallucinations in other modalities. Referential/control delusions promote the generation and/or maintenance of OHs independent of factors shared with other hallucinations. OHs and hallucinations of taste, touch, and bodily sensation frequently co-occur. Self-smells warrant sensitive probing. PMID:21545448

  2. Clinical Considerations of Biological Correlates of Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motto, Jerome A.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews possible biochemical markers for suicide risk but notes that none has clear application for clinical work in suicide prevention. Comments on other biological aspects of suicide including genetics, plasma drug levels, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and psychoimmunology. Encourages ECT use. Cautions against hasty clinical use of other…

  3. CLINICAL CORRELATES OF INTRAVENOUS ANESTHETIC DRUG USE

    E-print Network

    Uysal, Utku

    2015-05-31

    Objective: To determine factors associated with continuous IV anesthetic drug (IVAD) use in nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). Methods: For this retrospective descriptive cohort study, we included all patients who met clinical and EEG criteria...

  4. Endotoxemia: methods of detection and clinical correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, J C

    1995-01-01

    As an assay for endotoxin, the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay has several desirable properties: sensitivity, specificity, and potential for adaptation to a quantitative format. Several modifications have been developed to enhance its potential for clinical application. The modifications that allow quantitative measurement of endotoxin and also improve its application to blood samples are described in this review. In fluids other than blood, the detection of endotoxin with the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay can be used as an aid to identify the presence of gram-negative bacteria, and the assay has established utility. With blood, however, there are a range of factors that interfere with the detection of endotoxemia and there are disparate views with respect to the diagnostic and prognostic significance of the test results. In general, the clinical significance of the finding of endotoxemia broadly parallels the frequency and importance of gram-negative sepsis in the patient groups studied and a decline in endotoxin levels accompanies clinical improvement. However, with therapies designed to reduce levels of endotoxin, or to antagonize its effects, it is unclear whether clinical improvement occurs as a consequence of changes in the levels of endotoxemia. PMID:7621402

  5. DETECTING PATHWAYS TRANSCRIPTIONALLY CORRELATED WITH CLINICAL PARAMETERS

    E-print Network

    Shamir, Ron

    with a specific clinical parameter. Our approach suits both numerical (e.g., age or tumor size) and logical age, tumor size, and metastasis-free survival. Our method is capable of detecting disease variety of approaches have been suggested for reverse engineering of mechanistic molecular networks from

  6. Workplace Correlates and Scholarly Performance of Clinical Pharmacy Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungnickel, Paul W.; Creswell, John W.

    1994-01-01

    This study sought to develop a correlate model of 3-year scholarly performance of 296 clinical pharmacy faculty. Participants were surveyed concerning refereed research, grants/books research, and nonresearch scholarship. Eight correlates, including two related to the departmental workplace, emerged as significant factors in scholarly performance.…

  7. The use of large healthcare data sets in pursuit of a clinical question.

    PubMed

    Arons, Raymond R; Taub, Leslie-Faith Morritt

    2015-05-01

    The use of large healthcare databases may be of interest to nurse practitioners who wish to answer clinical questions. This column will provide information about access to selected large healthcare databases, requirements for statistical software, and the skills required to utilize these databases. PMID:25772735

  8. Taste and smell problems: validation of questions for the clinical history.

    PubMed Central

    Gent, J. F.; Goodspeed, R. B.; Zagraniski, R. T.; Catalanotto, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    Complaints of taste and smell dysfunction unaccompanied by symptoms of neurological or nasal problems are not uncommon. However, "I can't taste" is not necessarily an accurate symptom description. Complaints tend to reflect the common confusion between taste sensations (that is, salt, sour, sweet, bitter) and flavor sensations (including taste, smell, temperature, and texture). A number of questions have been identified that help classify symptoms according to the type of dysfunction (taste, smell, or both): whether the problem is quantitative (reduced or absent sensation) or qualitative (distorted sensations); and what might have caused the dysfunction. Directed questioning can yield a clinical history that predicts chemosensory function and identifies the most likely cause of the problem. Questions were assessed by comparing the self-reports of taste and smell symptoms to the clinical evaluation of chemosensory function for 101 new patients seen in the Taste and Smell Center at the University of Connecticut Health Center in 1983. PMID:3564547

  9. What is the clinical significance of finding cells from a primary tumor at another site? — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops What is the clinical significance of finding cells from a primary

  10. Clinical decision-making augmented by simulation training: neural correlates demonstrated by functional imaging: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Goon, S. S. H.; Stamatakis, E. A.; Adapa, R. M.; Kasahara, M.; Bishop, S.; Wood, D. F.; Wheeler, D. W.; Menon, D. K.; Gupta, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigation of the neuroanatomical basis of clinical decision-making, and whether this differs when students are trained via online training or simulation training, could provide valuable insight into the means by which simulation training might be beneficial. Methods The aim of this pilot prospective parallel group cohort study was to investigate the neural correlates of clinical decision-making, and to determine if simulation as opposed to online training influences these neural correlates. Twelve third-year medical students were randomized into two groups and received simulation-based or online-based training on anaphylaxis. This was followed by functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning to detect brain activation patterns while answering multiple choice questions (MCQs) related to anaphylaxis, and unrelated non-clinical (control) questions. Performance in the MCQs, salivary cortisol levels, heart rate, and arterial pressure were also measured. Results Comparing neural responses to clinical and non-clinical questions (in all participants), significant areas of activation were seen in the ventral anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex. These areas were activated in the online group when answering action-based questions related to their training, but not in the simulation group. The simulation group tended to react more quickly and accurately to clinical MCQs than the online group, but statistical significance was not reached. Conclusions The activation areas seen could indicate increased stress when answering clinical questions compared with general non-clinical questions, and in the online group when answering action-based clinical questions. These findings suggest simulation training attenuates neural responses related to stress when making clinical decisions. PMID:24065729

  11. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  12. CLINICAL INVESTIGATION WHITE MATTER FRACTIONAL ANISOTROPY CORRELATES WITH SPEED

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    CLINICAL INVESTIGATION WHITE MATTER FRACTIONAL ANISOTROPY CORRELATES WITH SPEED OF PROCESSING medulloblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors have decreased white matter fractional anisotropy the right IFO WMFA was related to motor speed (r = 0.49, p White matter tracts, using

  13. Using existing data to address important clinical questions in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Colin R.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective With important technological advances in healthcare delivery and the internet, clinicians and scientists now have access to overwhelming number of available databases capturing patients with critical illness. Yet investigators seeking to answer important clinical or research questions with existing data have few resources that adequately describe the available sources and the strengths and limitations of each. This article reviews an approach to selecting a database to address health services and outcomes research questions in critical care, examines several databases that are commonly used for this purpose, and briefly describes some strengths and limitations of each. Data Sources Narrative review of the medical literature. Summary The available databases that collect information on critically ill patients are numerous and vary in the types of questions they can optimally answer. Selection of a data source must not only consider accessibility, but also the quality of the data contained within the database, and the extent to which it captures the necessary variables for the research question. Questions seeking causal associations (e.g. effect of treatment on mortality) usually either require secondary data that contain detailed information about demographics, laboratories, and physiology to best address non-random selection or sophisticated study design. Purely descriptive questions (e.g. incidence of respiratory failure) can often be addressed using secondary data with less detail such as administrative claims. Though each database has its own inherent limitations, all secondary analyses will be subject to the same challenges of appropriate study design and good observational research. Conclusion The literature demonstrates that secondary analyses can have significant impact on critical care practice. While selection of the optimal database for a particular question is a necessary part of high-quality analyses, it is not sufficient to guarantee an unbiased study. Thoughtful and well-constructed study design and analysis approaches remain equally important pillars of robust science. Only through responsible use of existing data will investigators ensure that their study has the greatest impact on critical care practice and outcomes. PMID:23328262

  14. Identifying Patient Information Needs about Cancer Clinical Trials Using a Question Prompt List

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard F.; Shuk, Elyse; Butow, Phyllis; Edgerson, Shawna; Tattersall, Martin H.N; Ostroff, Jamie S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Question Prompt Lists (QPLs) have demonstrated significant promise in facilitating communication in general, surgical and palliative oncology settings yet have not been tested in the oncology clinical trial setting. We aimed to develop a targeted QPL for Clinical Trials (QPL-CT) Methods Breast Lung, and Genitourinary cancer patients who either had (trial experienced) or had not (trial naive) participated in a clinical trial joined focus groups to help develop and explore the acceptability of a QPL-CT. Clinicians also participated in separated focus groups Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. We explored patients’ trial information needs and views about the utility of the QPL-CT. Results Patients focused on four trial information needs: understanding foundational information, conflict of interest issues and financial implications of trial participation. Of note, experienced patients need to personalize foundational information. Conclusion Patient information needs varied considerably and were influenced by trial experience. Patients valued the QPL –CT as an aid to gathering new trial information and ensuring that their information needs were met. Practice Implications Physicians need to carefully elicit patient information needs and tailor trial information to meet these needs. The QPL-CT, may be of great benefit during clinical trial discussions PMID:20675095

  15. How Do Students with Dyslexia Perform in Extended Matching Questions, Short Answer Questions and Observed Structured Clinical Examinations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sandra; Leinster, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    There are an increasing number of students with learning difficulties attending university, and currently much debate about the suitability and ability of students with dyslexia at both medical school and once they graduate into clinical practice. In this study we describe the performance of students with dyslexia compared to fellow students in…

  16. Clinical, Histological and Trichoscopic Correlations in Scalp Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alfredo; Fortuna, Maria Caterina; Pranteda, Giulia; Garelli, Valentina; Di Nunno, Donato; Mari, Elena; Calvieri, Stefano; Carlesimo, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Trichoscopy is the term coined for the dermoscopic imaging of scalp and hair. This diagnostic technique, simple and noninvasive, can be used as a handy bedside tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of hair and scalp disorders. It allows the recognition of morphologic structures not visible by the naked eye and provides the clinician with a range of dermoscopic findings necessary for differential diagnosis. Trichoscopy observation can be broadly grouped as interfollicular patterns and follicular patterns. Recently, a third mixed class, called the follicular plus interfollicular pattern, has been introduced. Some of these features are specific to a certain scalp disease, while others can be found in many hair disorders. Although studies suggest that the use of trichoscopy can improve clinical accuracy, further investigation is needed. This review provides update information on the trichoscopic features of the most common scalp disorders, striving to show a histopathological and clinical correlation. PMID:26160502

  17. Distinctive Clinical Correlates of Psychotic Major Depression: The CRESCEND Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Hwa-Young; Sakong, Jeong-Kyu; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this investigation was to identify distinctive clinical correlates of psychotic major depression (PMD) as compared with non-psychotic major depression (NPMD) in a large cohort of Korean patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods We recruited 966 MDD patients of age over 18 years from the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea (CRESCEND) study. Diagnoses of PMD (n=24) and NPMD (n=942) were made with the DSM-IV definitions and confirmed with SCID. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (HAMD), anxiety (HAMA), global severity (CGI-S), suicidal ideation (SSI-Beck), functioning (SOFAS), and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF). Using independent t-tests and ?2 tests, we compared clinical characteristics of patients with PMD and NPMD. A binary logistic regression model was constructed to identify factors independently associated with increased likelihood of PMD. Results PMD subjects were characterized by a higher rate of inpatient enrollment, and higher scores on many items on BPRS (somatic concern, anxiety, emotional withdrawal, guilt feelings, tension, depression, suspiciousness, hallucination, motor retardation, blunted affect and excitement) global severity (CGI-s), and suicidal ideation (SSI-Beck). The explanatory factor model revealed that high levels of tension, excitement, and suicidal ideation were associated with increased likelihood of PMD. Conclusion Our findings partly support the view that PMD has its own distinctive clinical manifestation and course, and may be considered a diagnostic entity separate from NPMD. PMID:25110501

  18. Prodromal Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Clinical, Neuropsychological and Radiological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lung Tat Andrew; Lynch, Whitney; De May, Mary; Horton, Jonathan C.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    We present longitudinal clinical, cognitive and neuroimaging data from a 63-year-old woman who enrolled in research as a normal control and evolved posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) over five year follow-up. At baseline she reported only subtle difficulty driving and performed normally on cognitive tests, but already demonstrated atrophy in left visual association cortex. With follow-up she developed insidiously progressive visuospatial and visuoperceptual deficits, correlating with progressive atrophy in bilateral visual areas. Amyloid PET was positive. This case tracks the evolution of PCA from the prodromal stage, and illustrates challenges to early diagnosis as well as the utility of imaging biomarkers. PMID:24308559

  19. Cognitive Impairment in Individuals with Insomnia: Clinical Significance and Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Fortier-Brochu, Émilie; Morin, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aims of this study were to (1) investigate the nature of cognitive impairment in individuals with insomnia, (2) document their clinical significance, (3) examine their correlates, and (4) explore differences among individuals with insomnia with and without cognitive complaints. Design: Participants underwent 3 consecutive nights of polysomnography. On the morning following the third night, they completed a battery of questionnaires and neuropsychological tests. Participants: The sample included 25 adults with primary insomnia (mean age: 44.4 ± 11.5 y, 56% women) and 16 controls (mean age: 42.8 ± 12.9 y, 50% women) matched for sex, age, and education. Intervention: N/A. Measurement and Results: Participants completed neuropsychological tests covering attention, memory, working memory, and executive functions, as well as questionnaires assessing the subjective perception of performance, depression, anxiety, fatigue, sleepiness, and hyperarousal. There were significant group differences for the attention and episodic memory domains. Clinically significant deficits were more frequent in the insomnia group. Within the insomnia group, individuals with cognitive complaints exhibited significantly poorer performance on a larger number of neuropsychological variables. All impaired aspects of performance were significantly associated with either subjective or objective sleep continuity, and some were also independently related to sleep microstructure (i.e., relative power for alpha frequencies) or selected psychological variables (i.e., beliefs or arousal). Conclusions: These findings suggest clinically significant alterations in attention and episodic memory in individuals with insomnia. Objective deficits were more pronounced and involved more aspects of performance in a subgroup of individuals with cognitive complaints. These deficits appear associated with sleep continuity, and may also be related to sleep microstructure and dysfunctional beliefs. Citation: Fortier-Brochu É, Morin CM. Cognitive impairment in individuals with insomnia: clinical significance and correlates. SLEEP 2014;37(11):1787-1798. PMID:25364074

  20. Ascitic Microbiota Composition Is Correlated with Clinical Severity in Cirrhosis with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B.; van der Gast, Christopher J.; Bruce, Kenneth D.; Marsh, Peter; Collins, Jane E.; Sutton, Julian; Wright, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Identification of pathogenic bacteria in ascites correlates with poor clinical outcomes. Ascites samples are commonly reported culture-negative, even where frank infection is indicated. Culture-independent methods have previously reported bacterial DNA in ascites, however, whether this represents viable bacterial populations has not been determined. We report the first application of 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR in conjunction with propidium monoazide sample treatment to characterise the viable bacterial composition of ascites. Twenty five cirrhotic patients undergoing paracentesis provided ascites. Samples were treated with propidium monoazide to exclude non-viable bacterial DNA. Total bacterial load was quantified by 16S rRNA Q-PCR with species identity and relative abundance determined by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Correlation of molecular microbiology data with clinical measures and diagnostic microbiology was performed. Viable bacterial signal was obtained in 84% of ascites samples, both by Q-PCR and pyrosequencing. Approximately 190,000 ribosomal pyrosequences were obtained, representing 236 species, including both gut and non gut-associated species. Substantial variation in the species detected was observed between patients. Statistically significant relationships were identified between the bacterial community similarity and clinical measures, including ascitic polymorphonuclear leukocyte count and Child-Pugh class. Viable bacteria are present in the ascites of a majority of patients with cirrhosis including those with no clinical signs of infection. Microbiota composition significantly correlates with clinical measures. Entry of bacteria into ascites is unlikely to be limited to translocation from the gut, raising fundamental questions about the processes that underlie the development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. PMID:24086392

  1. ALAT-2014 Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Clinical Practice Guidelines: questions and answers.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, María; López Varela, María Victorina; Acuña, Agustín; Schiavi, Eduardo; Rey, María Alejandra; Jardim, José; Casas, Alejandro; Tokumoto, Antonio; Torres Duque, Carlos A; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra; García, Gabriel; Stirbulov, Roberto; Camelier, Aquiles; Bergna, Miguel; Cohen, Mark; Guzmán, Santiago; Sánchez, Efraín

    2015-08-01

    ALAT-2014 COPD Clinical Practice Guidelines used clinical questions in PICO format to compile evidence related to risk factors, COPD screening, disease prognosis, treatment and exacerbations. Evidence reveals the existence of risk factors for COPD other than tobacco, as well as gender differences in disease presentation. It shows the benefit of screening in an at-risk population, and the predictive value use of multidimensional prognostic indexes. In stable COPD, similar benefits in dyspnea, pulmonary function and quality of life are achieved with LAMA or LABA long-acting bronchodilators, whereas LAMA is more effective in preventing exacerbations. Dual bronchodilator therapy has more benefits than monotherapy. LAMA and combination LABA/IC are similarly effective, but there is an increased risk of pneumonia with LABA/IC. Data on the efficacy and safety of triple therapy are scarce. Evidence supports influenza vaccination in all patients and anti-pneumococcal vaccination in patients <65years of age and/or with severe airflow limitation. Antibiotic prophylaxis may decrease exacerbation frequency in patients at risk. The use of systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics are justified in exacerbations requiring hospitalization and in some patients managed in an outpatient setting. PMID:25596991

  2. COMPASS identifies T-cell subsets correlated with clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Finak, Greg; Ushey, Kevin; Seshadri, Chetan; Hawn, Thomas R.; Frahm, Nicole; Scriba, Thomas J.; Mahomed, Hassan; Hanekom, Willem; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Robb, Merlin L.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Karasavvas, Nicos; Gilbert, Peter; DeRosa, Stephen; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Advances in flow cytometry and other single-cell technologies have enabled high-dimensional, high-throughput measurements of individual cells and allowed interrogation of cell population heterogeneity. Computational tools to take full advantage of these technologies are lacking. Here, we present COMPASS, a computational framework for unbiased polyfunctionality analysis of antigen-specific T-cell subsets. COMPASS uses a Bayesian hierarchical framework to model all observed functional cell subsets and select those most likely to exhibit antigen-specific responses. Cell-subset responses are quantified by posterior probabilities, while subject-level responses are quantified by two novel summary statistics that can be correlated directly with clinical outcome, and describe the quality of an individual’s (poly)functional response. Using three clinical datasets of cytokine production we demonstrate how COMPASS improves characterization of antigen-specific T cells and reveals novel cellular correlates of protection in the RV144 HIV vaccine efficacy trial that are missed by other methods. COMPASS is available as open-source software. PMID:26006008

  3. Coordinated Surgical Immune Signatures Contain Correlates of Clinical Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Gaudilliere, Brice; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K; Bruggner, Robert V; Nicolau, Monica; Finck, Rachel; Tingle, Martha; Silva, Julian; Ganio, Edward A; Yeh, Christine G; Maloney, William J; Huddleston, James I; Goodman, Stuart B; Davis, Mark M; Bendall, Sean C; Fantl, Wendy J; Angst, Martin S; Nolan, Garry P

    2015-01-01

    Delayed recovery from surgery causes personal suffering and substantial societal and economic costs. Whether immune mechanisms determine recovery after surgical trauma remains ill-defined. Single-cell mass cytometry was applied to serial whole blood samples from 32 patients undergoing hip replacement to comprehensively characterize the phenotypical and functional immune response to surgical trauma. The simultaneous analysis of 14,000 phosphorylation events in precisely phenotyped immune cell subsets revealed uniform signaling responses among patients, demarcating a surgical immune signature. When regressed against clinical parameters of surgical recovery, including functional impairment and pain, strong correlations were found with STAT3, CREB and NF-kB signaling responses in subsets of CD14+ monocytes (R=0.7–0.8, FDR < 0.01). These sentinel results demonstrate the capacity of mass cytometry to survey the human immune system in a relevant clinical context. The mechanistically derived immune correlates point to diagnostic signatures, and potential therapeutic targets, that could postoperatively improve patient recovery. PMID:25253674

  4. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320...with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of in vivo...with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence of safety and...

  5. Variation in Question Asking during Cancer Clinical Interactions: a Potential Source of Disparities in Access to Information

    PubMed Central

    Eggly, Susan; Harper, Felicity W.K.; Penner, Louis A.; Gleason, Marci J.; Foster, Tanina; Albrecht, Terrance L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether patient demographic characteristics and patients' companions influence variation in patient question asking during cancer clinical interactions, thus representing a potential disparity in access to information. Methods Data included 109 oncologist-patient-companion interactions video recorded at a comprehensive cancer center. Interactions were observed and analyzed using the Karmanos Information Seeking Analysis System (K-ISAS). Results Significant relationships were found between patient race/ethnicity and question asking. Black patients asked fewer questions and a smaller proportion of direct questions (relative to the total frequency of questions) than White patients. Black patients were also less likely to have companions present during the interaction, which resulted in fewer questions asked on Black patients' behalf. Conclusion Differences in question asking by Black and White patients suggest that Black patients may receive less information from their oncologists than White patients. Practice/Research Implications Patients should be encouraged to ask more questions and more direct questions and to bring a companion to the interaction to assist them in gaining information from their physician. Future research is needed to investigate ways to eliminate this potential source of disparities in access to information. PMID:20430566

  6. Clinical correlates of prescription opioid analgesic use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan V; Costello, Darce; Yonkers, Kimberly A

    2015-03-01

    A 2012 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists highlights the considerable increase in opioid addiction in recent years, yet little is known about clinical correlates of prescribed opioids among pregnant women. This study examines clinical and demographic factors associated with the use of opioid analgesics in pregnancy. Data were derived from a prospective cohort study of pregnant women. Participants were administered the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to identify depressive and anxiety disorders and data on medication use were gathered at three assessment points and classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code (ATC) classification system ATC group N02A. Participants included 2,748 English or Spanish speaking pregnant women. Six percent (n = 165) of women used opioid analgesics at any point in pregnancy. More pregnant women using opioids met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (16 vs. 8 % for non users), generalized anxiety disorder (18 vs. 9 % for non users), post-traumatic stress disorder (11 vs. 4 % for non users) and panic disorder (6 vs. 4 % for non users). Women who reported opioid use were also significantly more likely than non users to report using illicit drugs and almost three times as likely to report smoking cigarettes in the second or third trimester of pregnancy (4 and 23 %, respectively) as compared to non-opioid users (0.5 and 8 %). The use of opioids in pregnancy was associated with higher levels of psychiatric comorbidity and use of other substances as compared to non-opioid users. PMID:24951127

  7. Major Pathophysiological Correlations of Rosacea: A Complete Clinical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, Ravi Chandra; Gundamaraju, Rohit; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Manikam, Rishya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rosacea is a characteristic cutaneous disorder with a diverse clinical manifestations ranging from facial vascular hyper-reactivity to sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Many theories on pathophysiology of rosacea were proposed over the past decade, however the pathogenicity is poorly understood. Aim: To review the evidence on different pathophysiological correlations of rosacea. Methods: A literature search was conducted for studies published between 1990 to March 2014. The inclusion criteria was pathophysiology, randomized controlled trials, controlled trials on rosacea. Results: Out of 5141 articles, 14 high quality studies met all the selection criteria. Of 14 articles, 5 are randomized control trials (RCTs), 2 are controlled trial, 3 comparative trials, 2 observational trials, 1 prospective and 1 diagnostic trial. The studies were categorized into two groups: the trigger factors and sub-types & symptoms. Of 7 high quality studies, 4 provided strong evidence that immune responses causing disease triggered by external/internal factors such as sunlight, food and chemical agents, 3 trials provided significant evidence of microorganisms as causative agents. The remaining trials did not provide significant evidences on pathophysiology. Conclusion: Vasculature, chronic inflammatory responses, environmental triggers, food and chemicals ingested and microorganisms either alone or in combination are responsible for rosacea. Many promising drugs are under various phases of clinical trials and interestingly, probiotics could also possibly be used as one of the treatment option. PMID:26005373

  8. Enhancing decision making about participation in cancer clinical trials: development of a question prompt list. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This paper examines the usefulness of question prompt lists (QPLs) in aiding doctor-patient communication during discussions of clinical trials. The QPL presents patients with a menu of potential issues to discuss with a physician. Focus groups were conducted to assess the perceived utility of QPLs with trial-experienced and trial-naïve patients. All patients viewed the QPL as a valuable tool to support their decision-making regarding clinical trials.

  9. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of in vivo bioavailability data with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence of safety...

  10. How do we modify our clinical trials system to determine the optimal criteria for rapidly evaluating new cancer therapies? — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops How do we modify our clinical trials system to determine the optimal

  11. Notch1 pathway in adrenocortical carcinomas: correlations with clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Cristina L; Sbiera, Silviu; Altieri, Barbara; Steinhauer, Sonja; Wild, Vanessa; Bekteshi, Michaela; Kroiss, Matthias; Fassnacht, Martin; Allolio, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Previous SNP array analyses have revealed genomic alterations of the Notch pathway as being the most frequent abnormality in adrenocortical tumors (ACTs). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of components of Notch signaling in ACTs and to correlate them with clinical outcome. The mRNA expression of JAG1, NOTCH1, and selected target genes of NOTCH1 (HES1, HES5, and HEY2) was evaluated in 80 fresh frozen samples (28 normal adrenal glands (NAGs), 24 adenomas (ACAs), and 28 carcinomas (ACCs)) by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed in 221 tissues on paraffin slides (16 NAGs, 27 ACAs, and 178 ACCs) for JAG1, activated NOTCH1 (aNOTCH1), and HEY2. An independent ACC validation cohort (n=77) was then also investigated. HEY2 mRNA expression was higher in ACCs than it was in ACAs (P<0.05). The protein expression of all of the factors was high (H-score 2-3) in a larger proportion of ACCs as compared to ACAs and NAGs (JAG1 in 27, 15, and 10%; aNOTCH1 in 13, 8, and 0%; HEY2 in 66, 61, and 33% respectively, all P<0.001). High JAG1 expression was associated with earlier tumor stages and lower numbers of metastases in ACCs (both P=0.08) and favorably impacted overall and progression-free survival (PFS) (131 vs 30 months, hazard ratio (HR) 0.45, and 37 vs 9 months, HR 0.51, both P<0.005). This impact on overall survival (OS) was confirmed in the validation cohort. No such association was observed for aNOTCH1 or HEY2. In conclusion, different components of the Notch1 signaling pathway are overexpressed in ACCs, which suggests a role for the pathway in malignant transformation. However, JAG1 is overexpressed in a subgroup of ACCs with a better clinical outcome. PMID:25979380

  12. Hemimegalencephaly: Clinical, EEG, neuroimaging, and IMP-SPECT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Konkol, R.J.; Maister, B.H.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Iofetamine-single photon emission computed tomography (IMP-SPECT) was performed on 2 girls (5 1/2 and 6 years of age) with histories of intractable seizures, developmental delay, and unilateral hemiparesis secondary to hemimegalencephaly. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed frequent focal discharges in 1 patient, while a nearly continuous burst suppression pattern over the malformed hemisphere was recorded in the other. IMP-SPECT demonstrated a good correlation with neuroimaging studies. In spite of the different EEG patterns, which had been proposed to predict contrasting clinical outcomes, both IMP-SPECT scans disclosed a similar decrease in tracer uptake in the malformed hemisphere. These results are consistent with the pattern of decreased tracer uptake found in other interictal studies of focal seizures without cerebral malformations. In view of recent recommendations for hemispherectomy in these patients, we suggest that the IMP-SPECT scan be used to compliment EEG as a method to define the extent of abnormality which may be more relevant to long-term prognosis than EEG alone.

  13. Clinical and Statistical Correlation of Various Lumbar Pathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J. Michael; Mahfouz, Mohamed; Battaglia, Nicholas V.; Sharma, Adrija; Cheng, Joseph S.; Komistek, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Current clinical evaluations often rely on static anatomic imaging modalities for diagnosis of mechanical low back pain, which provide anatomic snapshots and a surrogate analysis of a functional disease. Three dimensional in vivo motion is available with the use of digital fluoroscopy, which was used to capture kinematic data of the lumbar spine in order to identify coefficients of motion that may assist the physician in differentiating patient pathology. 40 patients distributed among 4 classes of lumbar degeneration, from healthy to degenerative, underwent CT, MRI, and digital x-ray fluoroscopy. Each patient underwent diagnosis by a neurosurgeon. Fluoroscopy was taken as the patient performed lateral bending (LB), axial rotation (AR) and flexion-extension (FE). Patient specific models were registered with the fluoroscopy images to obtain in vivo kinematic data. Motion coefficients, CLB, CAR, CFE, were calculated as the ratio of in-plane motion to total out-of-plane motion. Range of motion (ROM) was calculated about the axis of motion for each exercise. Inter- and Intra- group statistics were examined for each coefficient and a flexible Bayesian classifier was used to differentiate patients with degeneration. The motion coefficients CLB and CFE were significantly different (p < 0.05) in 4 of 6 group comparisons. In plane motion, ROMLB, was significantly different in only 1 of 6 group comparisons. The classifier achieved 95% sensitivity and specificity using (CFE, CLB, ROMLB) as input features, and 40% specificity and 80% sensitivity using ROM variables. The new coefficients were better correlated with patient pathology than ROM measures. The coefficients suggest a relationship between pathology and measured motion which has not been reported previously. PMID:23270717

  14. Correlation between clinical presentation and urodynamic findings in women attending urogynecology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Deeksha; Anna, Gasser; Hana, Ottenschlaeger; Christian, Fuenfgeld

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Urodynamic studies objectively observe lower urinary tract function and dysfunction so that an appropriate treatment can be planned. In the present study, we tried to evaluate the role of urodynamic studies in the final diagnosis and management plan in patients attending an urogynecology clinic. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in an urogynecology clinic. 202 women were included. After detailed history, pelvic examination and introital sonography these women were subjected to urodynamic study. During the filling cystometry detrusor activity, first desire to void and bladder capacity was recorded. This was followed by urethral pressure measurements, when functional urethral length, maximum urethral closure pressure and stress urethral pressure profile was recorded. Results: Most prevalent complaint was mixed urinary incontinence (33.17%), followed by stress incontinence (31.68%) and urge incontinence (13.37%). According to the standard urodynamic definition 66.33% were normal in the population studied. None of the urodynamic parameters individually or in combination were found to be very useful for establishing a diagnosis. Conclusion: Establishment of the final diagnosis of urinary incontinence and planning of management should be based on detailed history, physical examination, bladder diaries, and careful interpretation of urodynamic data. Urodynamic study; however, doesn’t seem to be imperative to establish a diagnosis in uncomplicated cases where symptoms and signs are reliable and correlating. PMID:24672187

  15. Questioning the relationship between the ?4 susceptibility and the dynamical correlation length in a glass former.

    PubMed

    Colin, Rémy; Alsayed, Ahmed M; Gay, Cyprien; Abou, Bérengère

    2015-11-17

    Clusters of fast and slow correlated particles, identified as dynamical heterogeneities (DHs), constitute a central aspect of glassy dynamics. A key factor of the glass transition scenario is a significant increase of the cluster size ?4 as the transition is approached. In need of easy-to-compute tools to measure ?4, the dynamical susceptibility ?4 was introduced recently, and used in various experimental studies to probe DHs. Here, we investigate DHs in dense microgel suspensions using image correlation analysis, and compute both ?4 and the four-point correlation function G4. The spatial decrease of G4 provides a direct access to ?4, which is found to grow significantly with increasing volume fraction. However, this increase is not captured by ?4. We show that the assumptions that validate the connection between ?4 and ?4 are not fulfilled in our experiments. PMID:26412312

  16. About Provocative Questions — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    The provocative questions initiative has assembled a list of 24 important questions from the research community to stimulate the NCI’s research communities to use laboratory, clinical and populations sciences in especially effective and imaginative ways to answer the questions. The questions are not simple restatements of long-term goals of the National Cancer Program, which are to improve the prevention, detection, diagnosis, and treatment of all forms of cancer.

  17. Primary sleep disorders in people with epilepsy: clinical questions and answers.

    PubMed

    Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine M; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The questions facing clinicians with patients with sleep disorder and epilepsy are addressed in this article. Both adult and child epilepsy are discussed in the context of the most typical questions a clinician would have, such as "Are parasomnias more common in people with epilepsy?", "Is sleep architecture abnormal in children with epilepsy", along with outcomes of numerous questionnaire-based, case-based, and double-blind placebo studies on such aspects as sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, anxiety and fears, limb movement, nocturnal seizures, agitation, behavioral disorders, and learning disorders. PMID:25455580

  18. Endotoxaemia in septic shock: clinical and post mortem correlations.

    PubMed

    McCartney, A C; Banks, J G; Clements, G B; Sleigh, J D; Tehrani, M; Ledingham, I M

    1983-01-01

    The Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay was used as one of a series of laboratory and clinical investigations on a group of 31 patients suffering from septic shock in order to assess the clinical significance of this assay for the detection of circulating endotoxin in clinical gram-negative sepsis. Four patients with cardiogenic shock served as controls. Endotoxin was detected in the bloodstream of all patients with septic shock during the 24 h following referral and was not detected in the control patients. Eventual clinical recovery was associated with the disappearance of endotoxin from the peripheral blood. Blood cultures were unhelpful as a prognostic indicator in these critically ill patients. A quantitative assay of endotoxin in blood may allow a more precise relationship with the clinical manifestations of major sepsis. PMID:6863720

  19. Questioning the relationship between the $?$4 susceptibility and the dynamical correlation length in a glass former

    E-print Network

    Rémy Colin; Ahmed Alsayed; Cyprien Gay; Bérengère Abou

    2015-09-10

    Clusters of fast and slow correlated particles, identified as dynamical heterogeneities (DHs), con-stitute a central aspect of glassy dynamics. A key ingredient of the glass transition scenario is asignificant increase of the cluster size $\\xi$4 as the transition is approached. In need of easy-to-computetools to measure $\\xi$4 , the dynamical susceptibility $\\chi$4 was introduced recently, and used in various ex-perimental works to probe DHs. Here, we investigate DHs in dense microgel suspensions using imagecorrelation analysis, and compute both $\\chi$4 and the four-point correlation function G4 . The spatialdecrease of G4 provides a direct access to $\\xi$4 , which is found to grow significantly with increasingvolume fraction. However, this increase is not captured by $\\chi$4 . We show that the assumptions thatvalidate the connection between $\\chi$4 and $\\xi$4 are not fulfilled in our experiments.

  20. Key Questions to Ask Before Your Child Participates in a Clinical Study

    E-print Network

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    Children and Clinical Studies http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/childrenandclinicalstudies/index.php Children-866-284-4107 Disease specific Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) www.jdrf.org · (800) 533-CURE Cystic

  1. Questions to Ask When Selecting an Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Clinic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Using the ART Report Selecting a Provider Single Embryo Transfer ART Success Rates National Summary Fertility Clinic ... Section 2-Part A: Fresh Nondonor Eggs or Embryos Explanation of Figures 6–15 Section 2-Part ...

  2. Childhood Ataxia: Clinical Features, Pathogenesis, Key Unanswered Questions, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Claire N.; Hoang, Kelly D.; Lynch, David R.; Perlman, Susan L.; Maria, Bernard L.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood ataxia is characterized by impaired balance and coordination primarily due to cerebellar dysfunction. Friedreich ataxia, a form of childhood ataxia, is the most common multisystem autosomal recessive disease. Most of these patients are homozygous for the GAA repeat expansion located on the first intron of the frataxin gene on chromosome 9. Mutations in the frataxin gene impair mitochondrial function, increase reactive oxygen species, and trigger redistribution of iron in the mitochondria and cytosol. Targeted therapies for Friedreich ataxia are undergoing testing. In addition, a centralized database, patient registry, and natural history study have been launched to support clinical trials in Friedreich ataxia. The 2011 Neurobiology of Disease in Children symposium, held in conjunction with the 40th annual Child Neurology Society meeting, aimed to (1) describe clinical features surrounding Friedreich ataxia, including cardiomyopathy and genetics; (2) discuss recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of Friedreich ataxia and developments of clinical trials; (3) review new investigations of characteristic symptoms; (4) establish clinical and biochemical overlaps in neurodegenerative diseases and possible directions for future basic, translational, and clinical studies. PMID:22859693

  3. Sample Test Questions for General Clinical Trials Education Class | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to content The National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov The National Institutes of Health AccrualNetTM STRATEGIES, TOOLS AND RESOURCES TO SUPPORT ACCRUAL TO CLINICAL TRIALS User menu Register Sign In Search form Search Main menu Protocol Accrual

  4. Clinical correlates of arterial lactate levels in STEMI patients.

    PubMed

    Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2011-01-01

    Increases in blood lactate reflect decreases in systemic blood flows associated with low blood flow states characteristic of circulatory shock. Accordingly, the report by Vermeulen and colleagues documents the use of the blood lactate measurement as a prognostic indicator in settings of ST elevation myocardial infarction. That lactate value therefore identified high-risk patients as a complication, often with clinical signs of cardiogenic shock of corresponding severities. PMID:21345276

  5. Computed tomography in cases of coccidioidal meningitis, with clinical correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Shetter, A.G.; Fischer, D.W.; Flom, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    Cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans of 22 patients with coccidioidal meningitis were reviewed and their clinical course was analyzed. Abnormalities of the ventricular system or the basilar cisterns or both were present in 16 instances. Although it is not a definitive diagnostic tool, the CT scan is helpful in suggesting a diagnosis of coccidioidal meningitis and in predicting the prognosis of patients affected by the disease. 19 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Clinical Risk Prediction by Exploring High-Order Feature Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Jianying

    2014-01-01

    Clinical risk prediction is one important problem in medical informatics, and logistic regression is one of the most widely used approaches for clinical risk prediction. In many cases, the number of potential risk factors is fairly large and the actual set of factors that contribute to the risk is small. Therefore sparse logistic regression is proposed, which can not only predict the clinical risk but also identify the set of relevant risk factors. The inputs of logistic regression and sparse logistic regression are required to be in vector form. This limits the applicability of these models in the problems when the data cannot be naturally represented vectors (e.g., medical images are two-dimensional matrices). To handle the cases when the data are in the form of multi-dimensional arrays, we propose HOSLR: High-Order Sparse Logistic Regression, which can be viewed as a high order extension of sparse logistic regression. Instead of solving one classification vector as in conventional logistic regression, we solve for K classification vectors in HOSLR (K is the number of modes in the data). A block proximal descent approach is proposed to solve the problem and its convergence is guaranteed. Finally we validate the effectiveness of HOSLR on predicting the onset risk of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and heart failure. PMID:25954428

  7. Locating sex-specific evidence on clinical questions in MEDLINE: a search filter for use on OvidSP™

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Many recently published clinical studies report sex-specific data. This information may help to improve clinical decision-making for both sexes, but it is not easily accessible in MEDLINE. The aim of this project was to develop and validate a search filter that would facilitate the retrieval of studies reporting high quality sex-specific data on clinical questions. Methods A filter was developed by screening titles, abstracts and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) in a set of 80 high quality and relevant papers, 75 of which were identified through a review of clinical guidelines and five through other means. The filter, for use on OvidSP™, consists of nine command lines for searching free text words in the title, abstract and MeSH of a paper. It was able to identify 74/80 (92.5%) of the articles from which it was derived. The filter was evaluated in a set of 622 recently published original studies on Alzheimer's disease and on asthma. It was validated against a reference of 98 studies from this set, which provided high quality, clinically relevant, sex-specific evidence. Recall and precision were used as performance measures. Results The filter demonstrated 81/98 (83%) recall and 81/125 (65%) precision in retrieving relevant articles on Alzheimer's disease and on asthma. In comparison, only 30/98 (31%) recall would have been achieved if sex-specific MeSH terms only had been used. Conclusion This sex-specific search filter performs well in retrieving relevant papers, while its precision rate is good. It performs better than a search with sex-specific MeSH. The filter can be useful to anyone seeking sex-specific clinical evidence (e.g., guideline organizations, researchers, medical educators, clinicians). PMID:19366443

  8. Clinical correlation between HBV infection and concomitant bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Jin, Ronghua; Chen, Peng; Zhao, Guoxian; Li, Ning; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common in patients suffering viral hepatitis and critical for prognosis. However, any correlation between HBV and concomitant bacterial infections is not well characterized. A retrospective study was conducted from Jan 2012 to Jan 2014 on 1333 hospitalized patients infected with bacteria. Among them, 491 HBV-infected patients were co-infected with E. coli (268), S. aureus (61), P. aeruginosa (64) or K. pneumoniae (98). A group of 300 complication-free chronically HBV-infected patients were controls. We found that HBV DNA levels were elevated in patients with each of the bacterial infections (all P?correlated to the number of ineffective antimicrobials in E. coli, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae infections (P?=?0.022, 0.017 and 0.016, respectively), but not S. aureus (P?=?0.194). In conclusion, bacterial infections are associated with a high level of HBV replication, which, in turn, has a significant positive impact on bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. These correlations vary between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26634436

  9. Clinical correlation between HBV infection and concomitant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jin, Ronghua; Chen, Peng; Zhao, Guoxian; Li, Ning; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common in patients suffering viral hepatitis and critical for prognosis. However, any correlation between HBV and concomitant bacterial infections is not well characterized. A retrospective study was conducted from Jan 2012 to Jan 2014 on 1333 hospitalized patients infected with bacteria. Among them, 491 HBV-infected patients were co-infected with E. coli (268), S. aureus (61), P. aeruginosa (64) or K. pneumoniae (98). A group of 300 complication-free chronically HBV-infected patients were controls. We found that HBV DNA levels were elevated in patients with each of the bacterial infections (all P?correlated to the number of ineffective antimicrobials in E. coli, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae infections (P?=?0.022, 0.017 and 0.016, respectively), but not S. aureus (P?=?0.194). In conclusion, bacterial infections are associated with a high level of HBV replication, which, in turn, has a significant positive impact on bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. These correlations vary between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26634436

  10. question_1303305591 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    This is an outstanding and intellectually-stimulating question which introduces a new way to translate more effectively metastasis research to the clinic. It is certainly worth exploring and badly needed. because, if positive, drugs could be immediately useful to help defined populations of patients. Per points, we agree that these are limited metastasis groups; however, results could at minimum justify moving forward to full adjuvant trials. Worthy cause given the "bottleneck" we experience nowadays since drugs are mostly not tested in metastasis prevention.

  11. Clinical correlates of common corneal neovascular diseases: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Abdelfattah, Nizar Saleh; Amgad, Mohamed; Zayed, Amira A; Salem, Hamdy; Elkhanany, Ahmed E; Hussein, Heba; Abd El-Baky, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    A large subset of corneal pathologies involves the formation of new blood and lymph vessels (neovascularization), leading to compromised visual acuity. This article aims to review the clinical causes and presentations of corneal neovascularization (CNV) by examining the mechanisms behind common CNV-related corneal pathologies, with a particular focus on herpes simplex stromal keratitis, contact lenses-induced keratitis and CNV secondary to keratoplasty. Moreover, we reviewed CNV in the context of different types of corneal transplantation and keratoprosthesis, and summarized the most relevant treatments available so far. PMID:25709930

  12. "Die-back" in primary lymphedema -- lymphographic and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, N C; Wolfe, J H; Kinmonth, J B

    1982-06-01

    Both obliteration and dilatation of distal lymphatics are seen in primary lymphedema but it is only in secondary lymphedema that the lymphographic progression of the disease has been documented. In this retrospective study the same progression was found in 13 out of 20 patients had initial evidence of proximal lymphatic obstruction. In ten patients the lymphangiographic changes were associated with a clinical deterioration of the leg. These findings suggest some urgency in diagnosing those patients that may benefit from a lymph bypass procedure. PMID:7109681

  13. An Investigation of Clinical Correlates of Lewy Bodies in Autopsy-Proven Alzheimer Disease

    E-print Network

    An Investigation of Clinical Correlates of Lewy Bodies in Autopsy-Proven Alzheimer Disease Yaakov Albert, PhD Background: Studies of patients meeting clinical and pathologic criteria for Alzheimer;58:460-465 A S MANY AS one third to half of patients diagnosed as having Alzheimer disease (AD) have concomitant Lewy

  14. Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy: Design and Implementation of a First-Year Medical School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haubert, Lisa M.; Jones, Kenneth; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D.

    2009-01-01

    Medical students state the need for a clinically oriented anatomy class so to maximize their learning experience. We hypothesize that the first-year medical students, who take the Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy program, will perform better than their peers in their anatomy course, their surgical clerkships and ultimately choose surgical…

  15. Chronic widespread pain: clinical comorbidities and psychological correlates.

    PubMed

    Burri, Andrea; Ogata, Soshiro; Vehof, Jelle; Williams, Frances

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have provided consistent evidence for a genetic influence on chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the etiological structure underlying CWP by examining the covariation between CWP and psychological comorbidities and psychoaffective correlates and (2) the decomposition of the covariation into genetic and environmental components. A total of 3266 female twins (mean age 56.6 years) were subject to multivariate analyses. Using validated questionnaires to classify twins as having CWP, the prevalence of CWP was 20.8%. In the multivariate analysis, the most suitable model was the common pathway model. This model revealed 2 underlying latent variables, one common to anxiety, emotional intelligence, and emotional instability (f1) and the other common to depression and CWP (f2), the latter being highly heritable (86%). Both latent variables (f1 and f2) shared an additive genetic and a nonshared environmental factor. In addition, a second additive genetic factor loading only on f2 was found. This study reveals the structure of genetic and environmental influences of CWP and its psychoaffective correlates. The results show that the clustering of CWP and depression is due to a common, highly heritable, underlying latent trait. In addition, we found evidence that CWP, anxiety, emotional instability, and emotional intelligence are influenced by different underlying latent traits sharing the same genetic and nonshared environmental factors. This is the first study to reveal the structure and relative importance of genetic and environmental influences on complex etiological mechanisms of CWP and its correlates. PMID:25851458

  16. Creating and using real-world evidence to answer questions about clinical effectiveness.

    PubMed

    De Lusignan, Simon; Crawford, Laura; Munro, Neil

    2015-01-01

    New forms of evidence are needed to complement evidence generated from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Real-World Evidence (RWE) is a potential new form of evidence, but remains undefined.This paper sets to fill that gap by defining RWE as the output from a rigorous research process which: (1) includes a clear a priori statement of a hypothesis to be tested or research question to be answered; (2) defines the data sources that will be used and critically appraises their strengths and weaknesses; and (3) applies appropriate methods, including advanced analytics. These elements should be set out in advance of the study commencing, ideally in a published protocol.The strengths of RWE studies are that they are more inclusive than RCTs and can enable an evidence base to be developed around real-world effectiveness and to start to address the complications of managing other real-world problems such as multimorbidity. Computerised medical record systems and big data provide a rich source of data for RWE studies.However, guidance is needed to help assess the rigour of RWE studies so that the strength of recommendations based on their output can be determined. Additionally, RWE advanced analytics methods need better categorisation and validation.We predict that the core role of RCTs will shift towards assessing safety and achieving regulatory compliance. RWE studies, notwithstanding their limitations, may become established as the best vehicle to assess efficacy. PMID:26577427

  17. Ranking the Clinical and Pathological Correlates of Ventricular Expansion Mapped in 804 Alzheimer's

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    Ranking the Clinical and Pathological Correlates of Ventricular Expansion Mapped in 804 Alzheimer University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 5 UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Introduction: Alzheimer to rank correlates by effect size. Methods: 804 subjects were scanned as part of the Alzheimer's Disease

  18. Neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung: clinical, radiologic, and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Forster, B B; Müller, N L; Miller, R R; Nelems, B; Evans, K G

    1989-02-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung are characterized by differentiation toward Kulchitsky cells and are classified as Kulchitsky-cell carcinoma (KCC) I (classic carcinoid), KCC II (atypical carcinoid), and KCC III (small-cell carcinoma). The clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings in 31 patients with KCC were reviewed. KCC I lesions generally occurred in younger (56 years +/- 18) nonsmoking women, were small (1.8 cm +/- 0.7 in diameter on CT scans), and were associated with lymphadenopathy in one of ten patients. KCC II tumors were found predominantly in older (66 years +/- 12) smoking men and were larger (3.9 cm +/- 1.3 in diameter, P less than .001); four of ten patients had CT evidence of lymphadenopathy. KCC III tumors occurred in older (66 years +/- 8) smoking men and were large (4.2 cm +/- 1.0); 11 of 11 patients had massive lymphadenopathy. Clinical, radiologic, or pathologic overlap was noted in three patients. Sputum cytologic and fine-needle and bronchoscopic biopsy findings were often nondiagnostic or misleading, particularly for KCC II lesions. CT of the chest provides additional discriminating information in the preoperative diagnosis of neuroendocrine lung carcinomas. PMID:2536187

  19. Improving physical therapy students' clinical problem-solving skills: an analytical questioning model.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, D S; Brown, D S; Gardner, D L; Perritt, L J

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a model for teaching problem-solving skills to first-year physical therapy students using the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (CTA) and participant feedback. We used a pretest-posttest control group design. Subjects were 31 first-year physical therapy students divided into a Control Group (n = 15) and an Experimental Group (n = 16). Students in the Experimental Group used the problem-solving model during a four-week clerkship. No difference was found between the Experimental and Control Groups' performance on the CTA. Subjectively, students in the Experimental Group and their Clinical Instructors found the model to be an effective tool that aided students' understanding of patient assessment and treatment program planning. The need for an objective assessment tool of problem-solving models in physical therapy is discussed. PMID:2727067

  20. Serotonergic and noradrenergic function in depression: clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Fabrice; Mokrani, Marie-Claude; Bailey, Paul; Corrêa, Humberto; Crocq, Marc-Antoine; Son Diep, Thanh; Macher, Jean-Paul

    2000-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to investigate the relationships between central noradrenergic (NA) and serotonergic (5-HT) function and clinical characteristics of a major depressive episode according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. We measured growth hormone response (?GH) to clonidine (CLO) (an ?2 NA agonist), as an index of central NA function, and prolactin response (APRL) to d-fenfluramine (d-FEN) (a specific 5-HT releaser/uptake inhibitor), as an index of central 5-HT function, in 53 medication-free depressed inpatients. On the basis of their CLO and d-FEN test responses, patients were classified into 4 groups. Group 1 (blunted ?PRLd-FEN alone [11 %]) was characterized by a recent violent suicide attempt, a high degree of medical damage, and mild anxiety. Group 2 (blunted ?GHCLO alone [32%]) was characterized by an absence of a history of suicide attempt and by severe anxiety. Group 3 (combination of blunted ?GHCLO and APRLd-FEN [18%]) was characterized by a history of suicide attempts, total duration of the illness of over W years, age over 40 years, and more than 3 previous hospitalizations. Group 4 (no abnormality [39%]) had no specific clinical profile. These results suggest that, in depression, specific psychopathological features may be linked to 5-HT and/or NA dysfunction. However, our results also suggest that NA and/or 5-HT dysfunction are less likely to be the primary cause of mood disorders but are more indicative of failure of compensatory mechanisms involved in affective homeostatic processes. PMID:22033550

  1. Clinical correlates of chronotypes in young persons with mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Fares, Sarah; Hermens, Daniel F; Naismith, Sharon L; White, Django; Hickie, Ian B; Robillard, Rébecca

    2015-11-01

    While important changes in circadian rhythms take place during adolescence and young adulthood, it is unclear how circadian profiles during this period relate to emerging mental disorders. This study aimed to: (i) characterise morningness-eveningness preference in young people with primary anxiety, depression, bipolar or psychotic disorders as compared to healthy controls, and (ii) to investigate associations between morningness-eveningness preference and the severity of psychiatric symptoms. Four hundred and ninety-six males and females aged between 12 and 30 years were divided into five groups according to primary diagnosis. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale were administered by a research psychologist and participants completed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale and the Horne-Östberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (ME). ME scores were significantly lower (i.e. higher levels of "eveningness") in all patient diagnosis subgroups compared to the control group. The psychosis group had higher ME scores than the depression and anxiety groups. Compared to the control group, the anxiety, depression and bipolar subgroups had a significantly higher proportion of "moderate evening" types, with a similar trend for the psychosis group. The proportion of "extreme evening" types was significantly higher in the anxiety and depression subgroups than in the control group. Lower ME scores correlated with worse psychological distress in males from the bipolar group. Lower ME scores correlated with higher depression severity in females with depression and in males with bipolar disorder. These results suggest that young persons with various mental disorders, especially those with affective disorders, present with a stronger "eveningness" preference and higher rates of evening chronotypes than healthy controls from the same age group. Later chronotypes were generally associated with worse psychological distress and symptoms severity. These associations were modulated by sex and primary diagnosis. PMID:26375049

  2. question_1413444098 — Provocative Questions

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  1. question_1410246408 — Provocative Questions

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  4. The role of Clinical Officers in the Kenyan health system: a question of perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing interest in using non-physician clinicians in many low-income countries, little is known about the roles they play in typical health system settings. Prior research has concentrated on evaluating their technical competencies compared to those of doctors. This work explored perceptions of the roles of Kenyan non-physician clinicians (Clinical Officers (COs). Methods Qualitative methods including in-depth interviews (with COs, nurses, doctors, hospital management, and policymakers, among others), participant observation and document analysis were used. A nomothetic-idiographic framework was used to examine tensions between institutions and individuals within them. A comparative approach was used to examine institutional versus individual notions of CO roles, how these roles play out in government and faith-based hospital (FBH) settings as well as differences arising from three specific work settings for COs within hospitals. Results The main finding was the discrepancy between policy documents that outline a broad role for COs that covers both technical and managerial roles, while respondents articulated a narrow technical role that focused on patient care and management. Respondents described a variety of images of COs, ranging from ‘filter’ to ‘primary healthcare physician’, when asked about CO roles. COs argued for a defined role associated with primary healthcare, feeling constrained by their technical role. FBH settings were found to additionally clarify CO roles when compared with public hospitals. Tensions between formal prescriptions of CO roles and actual practice were reported and coalesced around lack of recognition over COs work, role conflict among specialist COs, and role ambiguity. Conclusions Even though COs are important service providers their role is not clearly understood, which has resulted in role conflict. It is suggested that their role be redefined, moving from that of ‘substitute clinician’ to professional ‘primary care clinician’, with this being supported by the health system. PMID:23866692

  5. Canine indolent and aggressive lymphoma: clinical spectrum with histologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Aresu, L; Martini, V; Rossi, F; Vignoli, M; Sampaolo, M; Aricò, A; Laganga, P; Pierini, A; Frayssinet, P; Mantovani, R; Marconato, L

    2015-12-01

    Sixty-three dogs with newly diagnosed lymphoma underwent complete staging and received the same chemotherapy. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the leading histotype (44.4%), followed by peripheral T-cell lymphoma (20.6%). Indolent lymphomas accounted for 30.2% of cases. Most dogs with aggressive B-cell lymphoma had stage IV disease. Dogs with indolent and aggressive T-cell lymphoma had more often stage V disease and were symptomatic. Liver and bone marrow were predominantly involved in B-cell and T-cell lymphoma, respectively. The clinical stage was significantly related to substage, sex and total lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Aggressive B-cell lymphomas were more likely to achieve remission. Median survival was 55?days for aggressive and indolent T-cell lymphoma, 200 and 256?days for indolent and aggressive B-cell lymphoma, respectively. The prognosis of advanced indolent lymphoma does not appear to be appreciably different from that of aggressive disease. Familiarity with the various histotypes is critical to make the correct diagnosis and drive therapy. PMID:23782432

  6. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  7. The effectiveness of low vision rehabilitation on quality of life: an evidence-based practice approach to answer clinical questions.

    PubMed

    Smallfield, Stacy; Lou, Jennie Q

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this article is to demonstrate to occupational therapy practitioners how an evidence-based approach to practice can assist them in providing high-quality client-centered care. A case scenario of a client with low vision was utilized to outline the steps of evidence-based practice to answer clinical questions. A critical appraisal of the literature regarding the effectiveness of low vision rehabilitation on quality of life was conducted. The appraisal included 5 quantitative studies and 2 literature reviews. Mixed results were found. A variety of low vision rehabilitation models exist. Informing the client of the current evidence and local services will allow the client to make educated decisions regarding their health care options. PMID:23926911

  8. [Quality requirements governing non-commercial clinical trials within the framework of clinical drug development in humans in the EU. Challenges, opportunities, and questions experienced by treatment centres].

    PubMed

    Boos, J

    2005-02-01

    Therapeutic evidence of a given drug treatment develops via "approval studies" and clinical "therapy optimisation studies". Legislation has been faced with the challenge of providing common legal guidelines regarding the requirements governing such a broad spectrum of studies, and to realize their application. Numerous definitions and regulations today provide specifics in a previously insufficiently regulated grey area. The European frame-it is hoped-facilitates international co-operation. Possibly, clearly phrased legal requirements might also improve the co-operation between the pharmaceutical industry and treatment centres to work in the interest of patients incapable of giving consent and of minors. Requirements regarding the responsibilities of the sponsor, insurance for trial subjects, double approval procedures, handling of medicinal products to be tested and others are not easily fulfilled under the existing, real-life conditions of clinical trials. It is obvious that the cost of clinical trials will soar and trial sites and sponsor institutions will have to make investments for structural adaptation. In fulfilling those requirements trials might gain in procedural quality and probably outcome quality as well. Not every study discontinued due to lack in funding will be a true loss. We are, however, faced with the real threat of losing established structures of quality control and of entering a phase of stagnation in clinical research on rare diseases and "small" questions. At present, the challenge lies in co-operating with the authorities to explore the scope of those regulations to apply them effectively and in a useful manner, so that there will be better quality and increased evidence rather than less progress. PMID:15726461

  9. question_1302559585 — Provocative Questions

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  5. A retrospective study of peanut and tree nut allergy: Sensitization and correlations with clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Clements, Stacy; Joks, Rauno

    2015-01-01

    Peanut (PN) and tree nut (TN) allergies are among the leading causes of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis and are increasing in prevalence, especially in children. Their cosensitization and concurrent clinical allergy have been understudied. This retrospective study investigated the correlation between PN and TN allergy, both in terms of in vitro sensitization (IVS) and clinical allergic manifestations. We conducted a retrospective medical record review at the Allergy Clinic at University Hospital of Brooklyn. Fourteen hundred six charts were reviewed, of which 76 (5.4%) had documented relevant clinical allergy: PN allergy but not TN allergy (n = 29) or TN allergy but not PN allergy (n = 11) or both (n = 30). Six patients with PN allergy but no TN exposure history were not included in the analysis. The majority of patients (67/76, 88.1%) had a concurrent history of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, or AD. Sensitivity of TN IVS predicting PN IVS was 38/39 (97%). Similarly, sensitivity of PN IVS predicting TN IVS was 38/42 (91%). Sensitivity of TN clinical allergy predicting PN allergy was 30/59 (51%). Sensitivity of PN clinical allergy predicting TN allergy was 30/41 (73%). The total number of organ systems involved in reported clinical reactions correlated with IVS to TN (p = 0.004) but not IVS to PN (p = 0.983). In summary, we found PN sensitization predicts TN sensitization in vitro, with lower predictability for clinical reactions. PMID:25860169

  6. A retrospective study of peanut and tree nut allergy: Sensitization and correlations with clinical manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Clements, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    Peanut (PN) and tree nut (TN) allergies are among the leading causes of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis and are increasing in prevalence, especially in children. Their cosensitization and concurrent clinical allergy have been understudied. This retrospective study investigated the correlation between PN and TN allergy, both in terms of in vitro sensitization (IVS) and clinical allergic manifestations. We conducted a retrospective medical record review at the Allergy Clinic at University Hospital of Brooklyn. Fourteen hundred six charts were reviewed, of which 76 (5.4%) had documented relevant clinical allergy: PN allergy but not TN allergy (n = 29) or TN allergy but not PN allergy (n = 11) or both (n = 30). Six patients with PN allergy but no TN exposure history were not included in the analysis. The majority of patients (67/76, 88.1%) had a concurrent history of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, or AD. Sensitivity of TN IVS predicting PN IVS was 38/39 (97%). Similarly, sensitivity of PN IVS predicting TN IVS was 38/42 (91%). Sensitivity of TN clinical allergy predicting PN allergy was 30/59 (51%). Sensitivity of PN clinical allergy predicting TN allergy was 30/41 (73%). The total number of organ systems involved in reported clinical reactions correlated with IVS to TN (p = 0.004) but not IVS to PN (p = 0.983). In summary, we found PN sensitization predicts TN sensitization in vitro, with lower predictability for clinical reactions. PMID:25860169

  7. Routine Clinical-Pathologic Correlation of Pigmented Skin Tumors Can Influence Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Lallas, Aimilios; Moscarella, Elvira; Lombardi, Mara; Raucci, Margherita; Pellacani, Giovanni; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated the benefit of integrating clinical with pathologic information, to obtain a confident diagnosis for melanocytic tumors. However, all those studies were conducted retrospectively and no data are currently available about the role of a clinical-pathologic correlation approach on a daily basis in clinical practice. Aim of the Study In our study, we evaluated the impact of a routine clinical-pathologic correlation approach for difficult skin tumors seen over 3 years in a tertiary referral center. Results Interestingly, a re-appraisal was requested for 158 out of 2015 (7.7%) excised lesions because clinical-pathologic correlation was missing. Of note, in 0.6% of them (13 out of 2045) the first histologic diagnosis was revised in the light of clinical information that assisted the Pathologist to re-evaluate the histopathologic findings that might be bland or inconspicuous per se. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrated that an integrated approach involving clinicians and pathologists allows improving management of selected patients by shifting from a simply disease-focused management (melanoma versus nevus) to a patient-centered approach. PMID:26325678

  8. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  9. Questioning the Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Goldberg, Stephanie; DiRocco, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Historical accounts of questioning used in the education process trace back to Socrates. One of the best examples of his use of questioning is found in Plato's "The Republic." Socrates used a series of strategic questions to help his student Glaucon come to understand the concept of justice. Socrates purposefully posed a series of questions to…

  10. Rage Attacks in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Phenomenology and Clinical Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Jones, Anna M.; Lack, Caleb W.; Ale, Chelsea M.; Sulkowski, Michael L.; Lewin, Adam B.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Rage attacks have been documented in youth with varied psychiatric disorders, but few data have been reported on the clinical characteristics and correlates of rage attacks among children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Participants were 86 children (ages 6-16 years) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Patients and their…

  11. Prevalence and Clinical Correlates of Deliberate Self-Harm among a Community Sample of Italian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerutti, R.; Manca, M.; Presaghi, F.; Gratz, Kim L.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the rates of deliberate self-harm (DSH) behavior among an Italian adolescent sample, as well as to explore its clinical correlates. On a sample of 234 adolescents in Italian secondary schools (Mean age = 16.47; SD = 1.7) were assessed the DSH as well as externalizing symptoms (including both conduct…

  12. Demographic and Clinical Correlates of Autism Symptom Domains and Autism Spectrum Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Embacher, Rebecca; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Constantino, John N.; Law, Paul; Findling, Robert L.; Eng, Charis

    2014-01-01

    Demographic and clinical factors may influence assessment of autism symptoms. This study evaluated these correlates and also examined whether social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior provided unique prediction of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. We analyzed data from 7352 siblings included in the Interactive…

  13. R E P O R T Gene expression correlates of clinical prostate cancer behavior

    E-print Network

    Jin, Jiashun

    R E P O R T Gene expression correlates of clinical prostate cancer behavior Dinesh Singh,1 of Miami, Miami, Florida 33176 Summary Prostate tumors are among the most heterogeneous of cancers, both differences underlie common pathological features of prostate cancer and to identify genes that might

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Helen L; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Nash, Edward F; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection.A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable.Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly.In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:26022946

  15. Suicidal Behaviors among Adolescents in Puerto Rico: Rates and Correlates in Clinical and Community Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jennifer; Ramirez, Rafael Roberto; Davies, Mark; Canino, Glorisa; Goodwin, Renee D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined rates and correlates of suicidal behavior among youth on the island of Puerto Rico. Data were drawn from two probability samples, one clinical (n = 736) and one community-based sample (n = 1,896), of youth ages 12 to 17. Consistent with previous studies in U.S. mainland adolescent populations, our results demonstrate that most…

  16. The Phenomenology and Clinical Correlates of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Sulkowski, Michael L.; Nadeau, Josh; Lewin, Adam B.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Mutch, P. Jane; Jones, Anna M.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the phenomenology and clinical correlates of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in youth with ASD (N = 102; range 7-16 years). The presence of suicidal thoughts and behavior was assessed through the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Child and Parent Versions. Children and parents completed measures of anxiety severity,…

  17. The Correlation of Learning Styles with Student Performance In Academic and Clinical Course Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, M. Jo; Trickey, Becki A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine any correlation between learning styles and performance in the academic and clinical course work of occupational therapy students at the Medical University of South Carolina. (Availability: RAM Associates LTD., P.O. Box N, Laurel, MD 20707) (SSH)

  18. Changes in the Neuropsychological Correlates of Clinical Dimensions between the Acute and Stable Phase of Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillem, F.; Ganeva, E.; Pampoulova, T.; Stip, E.; Lalonde, P.; Sasseville, M.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the neuropsychological correlates of the symptom dimensions of schizophrenia vary with the clinical state in patients followed from the acute to stable the phase of the illness. Fifteen patients were assessed for symptoms (SAPS-SANS) and undergone a complete neuropsychological assessment at two…

  19. Mental Health and Clinical Correlates in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Queer Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.; Derbyshire, Katherine; Schreiber, Liana R. N.; Lust, Katherine; Christenson, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the prevalence of mental health disorders and their clinical correlates in a university sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) students. Participants: College students at a large public university. Methods: An anonymous, voluntary survey was distributed via random e-mail generation to university students…

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A.; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L.; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R.; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L.; Nash, Edward F.; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection. A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable. Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly. In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:26022946

  1. Clinical Correlates and Repetition of Self-Harming Behaviors among Female Adolescent Victims of Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyr, Mireille; McDuff, Pierre; Wright, John; Theriault, Chantal; Cinq-Mars, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated self-harming behaviors in 149 female adolescent victims of sexual abuse, first, by determining the rates of nine types of self-mutilating behavior at intake and nine months later and, second, by investigating comorbidity of clinical correlates associated with these behaviors. The adolescents were divided into three groups…

  2. Gradient echo MRI correlates with clinical measures and allows visualization of veins within MS lesions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Lancia, Samantha; Cross, Anne H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional MRI methods do not quantify the severity of MS white matter lesions or measure pathology within normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Objective Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging (GEPCI), a fast MRI technique producing inherently co-registered images for qualitative and quantitative assessment of MS, was used to 1) correlate with disability; 2) distinguish clinical MS subtypes; 3) determine prevalence of veins co-localized within lesions in WM. Methods Thirty subjects representing RRMS, SPMS and PPMS subtypes were scanned with clinical and GEPCI protocols. Standard measures of physical disability and cognition were correlated with MR metrics. Lesions with central veins were counted for RRMS subjects. Results Tissue damage load (TDL-GEPCI) and lesion load (LL-GEPCI) derived with GEPCI correlated better with MS functional composite (MSFC) measures and most other neurologic measures than lesion load derived with FLAIR (LL-FLAIR). GEPCI correctly classified clinical subtypes in 70% subjects. A central vein could be identified in 76% of WM lesions in RRMS subjects on GEPCI T2*-SWI images. Conclusion GEPCI lesion metrics correlated better with neurologic disability than lesion load derived using FLAIR imaging, and showed promise in classifying clinical subtypes of MS. These improvements are likely attributable to the ability of GEPCI to quantify tissue damage. PMID:23836876

  3. Notes on the concept of normal values employed in clinical practice. [statistical correlation with environment effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platonova, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The question of the considerable variations in various blood parameters under the influence of changes in environmental factors is discussed. Recommendations are given that so-called normal values should be given special attention. Fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activity studies on the blood in healthy human beings revealed significant differences for individual months and even on specific days. Changes in the activity of fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis show a correlation with changes in the meteorological conditions, seasonal variations and changes in solar activity.

  4. T1- Thresholds in Black Holes Increase Clinical-Radiological Correlation in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christian; Faizy, Tobias; Sedlacik, Jan; Holst, Brigitte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Young, Kim Lea; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an established tool in diagnosing and evaluating disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While clinical-radiological correlations are limited in general, hypointense T1 lesions (also known as Black Holes (BH)) have shown some promising results. The definition of BHs is very heterogeneous and depends on subjective visual evaluation. Objective We aimed to improve clinical-radiological correlations by defining BHs using T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) thresholds to achieve best possible correlation between BH lesion volume and clinical disability. Method 40 patients with mainly relapsing-remitting MS underwent MRI including 3-dimensional fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) before and after Gadolinium (GD) injection and double inversion-contrast magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequences. BHs (BHvis) were marked by two raters on native T1-weighted (T1w)-MPRAGE, contrast-enhancing lesions (CE lesions) on T1w-MPRAGE after GD and FLAIR lesions (total-FLAIR lesions) were detected separately. BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion maps were registered to MP2RAGE images, and the mean T1-RT were calculated for all lesion ROIs. Mean T1 values of the cortex (CTX) were calculated for each patient. Subsequently, Spearman rank correlations between clinical scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite) and lesion volume were determined for different T1-RT thresholds. Results Significant differences in T1-RT were obtained between all different lesion types with highest T1 values in visually marked BHs (BHvis: 1453.3±213.4 ms, total-FLAIR lesions: 1394.33±187.38 ms, CTX: 1305.6±35.8 ms; p<0.05). Significant correlations between BHvis/total-FLAIR lesion volume and clinical disability were obtained for a wide range of T1-RT thresholds. The highest correlation for BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion masks were found at T1-RT>1500 ms (Expanded Disability Status Scale vs. lesion volume: rBHvis = 0.442 and rtotal-FLAIR = 0.497, p<0.05; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite vs. lesion volume: rBHvis = -0.53 and rtotal-FLAIR = -0.627, p<0.05). Conclusion Clinical-radiological correlations in MS patients are increased by application of T1-RT thresholds. With the short acquisition time of the MP2RAGE sequences, quantitative T1 maps could be easily established in clinical studies. PMID:26659852

  5. Correlates of Polysomnographic Sleep Changes in Cocaine Dependence: Self-administration and Clinical Outcomes*

    PubMed Central

    Angarita, Gustavo A.; Canavan, Sofija V.; Forselius, Erica; Bessette, Andrew; Morgan, Peter T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Abstinence from chronic cocaine use is associated with abnormal sleep architecture. As sleep abnormalities are associated with clinical outcome in alcohol dependence, we hypothesized a similar relationship in cocaine dependence. Methods We report data from a cocaine self-administration study (N=12) and the placebo arm of a randomized clinical trial (N=20). Self-administration participants underwent three cocaine self-administration sessions during a three-week inpatient stay. Treatment participants underwent two weeks of inpatient followed by six weeks of outpatient treatment including once-weekly cognitive behavioral therapy. Measurements included polysomnography from early and late in abstinence during the inpatient stays. Clinical outcomes included amount of cocaine self-administered, urine tests, and self-reported use and withdrawal symptoms. Results Change in slow-wave sleep from early to late abstinence (?SWS; p=0.05), late abstinence rapid eye movement sleep (REM; p=0.002), and late abstinence total sleep time (p=0.02) were negatively correlated with the amount of cocaine self-administered. Early abstinence REM was positively correlated with withdrawal symptoms (p=0.02). Late abstinence REM was positively correlated with percent negative urines and maximum consecutive number of days abstinent (both p<0.001). ?SWS was positively correlated with percent negative urines (p=0.03) and participants with increased SWS had greater percent negative urines (p=0.008) and maximum consecutive number of days abstinent (p=0.009). Conclusions Correlations between sleep deficits and amount of cocaine self-administered, clinical outcomes, and severity of withdrawal symptoms underscore the relevance of sleep in clinical outcomes in the treatment of cocaine dependence. PMID:25124303

  6. Diffusion-weighted MRI findings and clinical correlations in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Lyu, Jin-Hao; Zhang, Jia-Tang; Lou, Xin; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Ming; Yao, Yan; Tan, Qing-Che; Tian, Cheng-Lin; Huang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Lin; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and its clinical correlation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Patients who suffered from sCJD and followed up at the Department of Neurology at the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army during the period of June 1, 2007 to July 1, 2014 were reviewed. The location of the hyperintense lesions on DWI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the hyperintense lesions were correlated with symptoms and clinical course. A total of 58 sCJD patients and ten healthy controls were included. Hyperintense lesions on DWI were observed in all the patients. The patients with basal ganglia (BG) hyperintense lesions on DWI had shorter disease duration and higher incidence of myoclonus (92 versus 44 %) than those without BG hyperintense lesions. The patients with occipital cortex hyperintense lesions on DWI had shorter disease duration between symptom onset and akinetic mutism than those without these lesions. The lower of the BG ADC value the faster presence of akinetic mutism and the shorter disease duration the patients will have. The presence of BG and occipital cortex hyperintense lesions on DWI and BG ADC values is correlated with the clinical course and clinical symptoms. PMID:25860342

  7. CT densitovolumetry in children with obliterative bronchiolitis: correlation with clinical scores and pulmonary function test results*,**

    PubMed Central

    Mocelin, Helena; Bueno, Gilberto; Irion, Klaus; Marchiori, Edson; Sarria, Edgar; Watte, Guilherme; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether air trapping (expressed as the percentage of air trapping relative to total lung volume [AT%]) correlates with clinical and functional parameters in children with obliterative bronchiolitis (OB). METHODS: CT scans of 19 children with OB were post-processed for AT% quantification with the use of a fixed threshold of ?950 HU (AT%950) and of thresholds selected with the aid of density masks (AT%DM). Patients were divided into three groups by AT% severity. We examined AT% correlations with oxygen saturation (SO2) at rest, six-minute walk distance (6MWD), minimum SO2 during the six-minute walk test (6MWT_SO2), FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and clinical parameters. RESULTS: The 6MWD was longer in the patients with larger normal lung volumes (r = 0.53). We found that AT%950 showed significant correlations (before and after the exclusion of outliers, respectively) with the clinical score (r = 0.72; 0.80), FVC (r = 0.24; 0.59), FEV1 (r = ?0.58; ?0.67), and FEV1/FVC (r = ?0.53; r = ?0.62), as did AT%DM with the clinical score (r = 0.58; r = 0.63), SO2 at rest (r = ?0.40; r = ?0.61), 6MWT_SO2 (r = ?0.24; r = ?0.55), FVC (r = ?0.44; r = ?0.80), FEV1 (r = ?0.65; r = ?0.71), and FEV1/FVC (r = ?0.41; r = ?0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that AT% correlates significantly with clinical scores and pulmonary function test results in children with OB. PMID:24473764

  8. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    PubMed

    Camiciottoli, Gianna; Diciotti, Stefano; Bigazzi, Francesca; Lombardo, Simone; Bartolucci, Maurizio; Paoletti, Matteo; Mascalchi, Mario; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory-expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT) and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28) and in females (n=27). Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10) showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001). Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory-expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second), and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD are closely correlated. In patients with a predominant emphysematous phenotype, a reduced collapsibility may reflect the mechanical properties of the stiff hyperinflated emphysematous lung. The high collapsibility in patients with predominant airway disease, mild airway obstruction, and in women with this phenotype may reflect chronic airway inflammation. The lack of relationship with such symptoms as wheezing, cough, and dyspnea could indicate that intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility itself should be considered neither an abnormal feature of COPD nor a relevant clinical finding. PMID:25960647

  9. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    PubMed Central

    Camiciottoli, Gianna; Diciotti, Stefano; Bigazzi, Francesca; Lombardo, Simone; Bartolucci, Maurizio; Paoletti, Matteo; Mascalchi, Mario; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory–expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT) and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28) and in females (n=27). Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10) showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001). Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory–expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second), and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD are closely correlated. In patients with a predominant emphysematous phenotype, a reduced collapsibility may reflect the mechanical properties of the stiff hyperinflated emphysematous lung. The high collapsibility in patients with predominant airway disease, mild airway obstruction, and in women with this phenotype may reflect chronic airway inflammation. The lack of relationship with such symptoms as wheezing, cough, and dyspnea could indicate that intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility itself should be considered neither an abnormal feature of COPD nor a relevant clinical finding. PMID:25960647

  10. Questioning the Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Goldberg, Stephanie; DiRocco, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    Well-known historical accounts of questioning used in the education process trace back to Socrates. One of the best examples of his use of questioning is found in Plato's classic work "The Republic" (2003). Today, teachers still use questions as one way to help students develop productive thinking skills and to understand concepts and topics.…

  11. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  12. MR Imaging of Pregnancy Luteoma: a Case Report and Correlation with the Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Chung, Kuo-Teng; Wang, Sheng-Ru; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2005-01-01

    We report here on a 26-year-old pregnant female who developed hirsutism and virilization during her third trimester along with a significantly elevated serum testosterone level. Abdominal US and MR imaging studies were performed, and they showed unique imaging features that may suggest the diagnosis of pregnancy luteoma in the clinical context. After the delivery, the serum testosterone level continued to decrease, and it returned to normal three weeks postpartum. The follow-up imaging findings were closely correlated with the clinical presentation. PMID:15782020

  13. [The use of canonical correlation analysis for the evaluation of correlation strength between clinical and biological parameters].

    PubMed

    Brusov, O S; Koliaskina, G I; Kaleda, V G; Sekirina, T P; Kushner, S G; Vasil'eva, E F

    2010-01-01

    We studied correlations between factors of inherent immunity and the effectiveness of therapy in patients with endogenous psychosis using the method of canonical correlations. There were strong significant (canonical R>0,8; p=0,02) positive correlations between the therapeutic effectiveness of neuroleptics (haloperidol and clozapine) and values of factors of inherent immunity in the group of 34 men with schizophrenia, aged from 16 to 34 years, with the first episode of psychosis. The effectiveness of treatment was assessed by the percentage reduction of total scores on the PANSS scale or scores on PANSS subscales (positive, negative and general psychopathology) at the beginning and the end (after 60 days) of the treatment. Initial parameters of factors of inherent immunity (levels of gamma-interferon production by T-lymphocytes, proportion of phagocytosing neutrophils and monocytes, and cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes - natural killers) contributed to 67,3%, or more than two thirds, of the variance of treatment effects. The contribution of inherent immunity factors was determined mainly by their similar effects on the reduction of positive and general psychopathological symptoms, with the minimal effect on the reduction of negative symptoms. The maximum correlation was found for weighting coefficients for inherent immunity factors estimated as 0,567 for the proportion of phagocytosing neutrophils and monocytes; 0,518 - for the levels of gamma-interferon production by T-lymphocytes and 0,334 - for cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes - natural killers. The authors suggest that the reduction of activity of the cell branch of inherent immunity develops before the disease manifestation. It creates conditions for the activation of latently persistent infections (the cytomegalovirus infection, in our case) in a patient's organism, with the formation of therapeutic resistance. The method described may be widely used in clinical and biological psychiatry and neurology. PMID:20436432

  14. Correlation between clinical and MRI disease activity scores in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    MacKay, James W; Aboelmagd, Sharief; Gaffney, J Karl

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based disease activity scores (DAS) in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) are rarely employed in the normal clinical setting, whereas clinical DAS are used routinely to monitor disease activity and set thresholds for biologic treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the correlation between MR and clinical DAS in a general axSpA outpatient population and to assess the difference in MR DAS in individuals with high and low clinical DAS. This was a prospective, cross-sectional observational study. Forty participants with axSpA who presented for MR of the whole spine and sacroiliac joints as part of ongoing management were included. Completion of Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) was performed at the time of MR examination. MR images were scored by two independent observers using the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) MR DAS. There were weak, non-significant correlations between total SPARCC score and BASDAI (r?=?0.18, p?=?0.26), ASDAS using erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR) (r?=?0.31, p?=?0.07) and ASDAS using C-reactive protein level (ASDAS-CRP) (r?=?0.31, p?=?0.05). There was no significant difference in the SPARCC score of participants with high and low clinical DAS. MR DAS may provide information about disease activity not provided by the current standard of clinical DAS and may be considered as a useful adjunct in clinical practice. PMID:25894437

  15. Serologic features of primary Sjögren’s syndrome: clinical and prognostic correlation

    PubMed Central

    García-Carrasco, Mario; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Jiménez-Hernández, César; Jiménez-Hernández, Mario; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo; Riebeling, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory systemic autoimmune disease. The disease spectrum extends from sicca syndrome to systemic involvement and extraglandular manifestations, and SS may be associated with malignancies, especially non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Patients with SS present a broad spectrum of serologic features. Certain serological findings are highly correlated with specific clinical features, and can be used as prognostic markers. PMID:23525186

  16. Correlation analysis of clinical parameters with epigenetic modifications in the DUX4 promoter in FSHD.

    PubMed

    Balog, Judit; Thijssen, Peter E; de Greef, Jessica C; Shah, Bharati; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Yokomori, Kyoko; Tapscott, Stephen J; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of our study was to identify relationships between epigenetic parameters correlating with a relaxed chromatin state of the DUX4 promoter region and clinical severity as measured by a clinical severity score or muscle pathologic changes in D4Z4 contraction-dependent (FSHD1) and -independent (FSHD2) facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patients. Twenty primary fibroblast (5 control, 10 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2) and 26 primary myoblast (9 control, 12 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2) cultures originating from patients with FSHD and controls were analyzed. Histone modification levels were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We examined correlations between the chromatin compaction score (ChCS) defined by the H3K9me3:H3K4me2 ratio and an age corrected clinical severity score (CSS) or muscle pathology score (MPS). Possible relationships were investigated using linear regression analysis and significance was tested by Pearson's product-moment coefficient.   We found a significant difference of the ChCS between controls and patients with FSHD1 and between controls and patients with FSHD2. Tissue specific differences in ChCS were also observed. We also found a near-significant relationship between ChCS and the age corrected CSS in fibroblasts but not in myoblasts. Surprisingly, we found a strong correlation between the MPS of the vastus lateralis and the CSS. Our results confirm the D4Z4 chromatin relaxation previously shown to be associated with FSHD in a small number of samples. A possible relationship between clinical and epigenetic parameters could be established in patient fibroblasts, but not in myoblasts. The strong correlation between the MPS of the vastus lateralis and the CSS suggests that this muscle can be used to study for surrogate markers of overall disease severity. PMID:22522912

  17. Correlation analysis of clinical parameters with epigenetic modifications in the DUX4 promoter in FSHD

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Judit; Thijssen, Peter E.; de Greef, Jessica C.; Shah, Bharati; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.; Yokomori, Kyoko; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to identify relationships between epigenetic parameters correlating with a relaxed chromatin state of the DUX4 promoter region and clinical severity as measured by a clinical severity score or muscle pathologic changes in D4Z4 contraction-dependent (FSHD1) and –independent (FSHD2) facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patients. Twenty primary fibroblast (5 control, 10 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2) and 26 primary myoblast (9 control, 12 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2) cultures originating from patients with FSHD and controls were analyzed. Histone modification levels were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We examined correlations between the chromatin compaction score (ChCS) defined by the H3K9me3:H3K4me2 ratio and an age corrected clinical severity score (CSS) or muscle pathology score (MPS). Possible relationships were investigated using linear regression analysis and significance was tested by Pearson’s product-moment coefficient.   We found a significant difference of the ChCS between controls and patients with FSHD1 and between controls and patients with FSHD2. Tissue specific differences in ChCS were also observed. We also found a near-significant relationship between ChCS and the age corrected CSS in fibroblasts but not in myoblasts. Surprisingly, we found a strong correlation between the MPS of the vastus lateralis and the CSS. Our results confirm the D4Z4 chromatin relaxation previously shown to be associated with FSHD in a small number of samples. A possible relationship between clinical and epigenetic parameters could be established in patient fibroblasts, but not in myoblasts. The strong correlation between the MPS of the vastus lateralis and the CSS suggests that this muscle can be used to study for surrogate markers of overall disease severity. PMID:22522912

  18. Clinical laboratory parameters in osteoarthritic knee-joint effusions correlated to trace element concentrations.

    PubMed

    Krachler, M; Domej, W

    2001-02-01

    Interactions of clinical laboratory parameters with trace elements in knee-joint effusions might turn out to be potential diagnostic tool, increasing our pathophysiological understanding and knowledge on knee-joint effusions. Thus, the 11 clinical laboratory parameters, total protein, albumin, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase, uric acid, pH, rheumatoid factor, antistreptolysin, C-reactive protein, leukocyte, and erythrocyte counts were determined in 39 osteoarthritic knee-joint effusions and in corresponding sera. Additionally, concentrations of the 17 trace elements barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cesium, copper, lanthanum, lithium, magnesium, molybdenum, lead, rubidium, antimony, tin, strontium, thallium, and zinc in both effusions and corresponding sera were quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Concentrations of most laboratory parameters in synovial fluid were within the normal ranges for serum. However, concentrations of total protein and albumin in effusions were distinctly lower than in sera of healthy adults. Results for rheumatoid factor, antistreptolysin, and C-reactive protein in the effusions were below their corresponding threshold values for serum. An indicator for inflammation, the leukocyte count had a median < 6.3 G/L. The erythrocyte count (median: < 0.06 T/L) revealed a very low presence of red blood cells in the effusions. Total protein concentrations and lactate dehydrogenase activity in the effusions correlated positively with effusion copper (r = 0.61 and 0.66) and effusion zinc (r = 0.71 and 0.49). For cesium, a negative correlation in both sera (r = -0.44) and effusions (r = -0.44) with LDH activity could be established. Concentrations of rubidium, strontium, and cesium responded to albumin concentrations in sera and in effusions, establishing an inverse correlation. All other trace elements showed no or only weak associations with the clinical laboratory parameters determined. Although distinct relationships between trace element concentrations and clinical laboratory parameters in knee-joint effusions exist, the clinical relevance of these findings needs to be further elucidated. PMID:11330520

  19. Clinical Correlates of Awareness for Balance, Function, and Memory: Evidence for the Modality Specificity of Awareness

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Megan E.; Crossley, Margaret; Morgan, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Awareness in dementia is increasingly recognized not only as multifactorial, but also as domain specific. We demonstrate differential clinical correlates for awareness of daily function, awareness of memory, and the novel exploration of awareness of balance. Awareness of function was higher for participants with mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and non-aMCI) than for those with dementia (due to Alzheimer disease; AD and non-AD), whereas awareness of memory was higher for both non-aMCI and non-AD dementia patients than for those with aMCI or AD. Balance awareness did not differ based on diagnostic subgroup. Awareness of function was associated with instrumental activities of daily living and caregiver burden. In contrast, awareness of balance was associated with fall history, balance confidence, and instrumental activities of daily living. Clinical correlates of awareness of memory depended on diagnostic group: associations held with neuropsychological variables for non-AD dementia, but for patients with AD dementia, depression and instrumental activities of daily living were clinical correlates of memory awareness. Together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that awareness and dementia are not unitary and are, instead, modality specific. PMID:24551452

  20. Clinical Correlations With Lewy Body Pathology in LRRK2-Related Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Lorraine V.; Lang, Anthony E.; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Hurtig, Howard I.; Alcalay, Roy N.; Marder, Karen S.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Gaig, Carles; Tolosa, Eduardo; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Marti-Masso, Jose F.; Ferrer, Isidre; de Munain, Adolfo López; Goldman, Samuel M.; Schüle, Birgitt; Langston, J. William; Aasly, Jan O.; Giordana, Maria T.; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Puschmann, Andreas; Canesi, Margherita; Pezzoli, Gianni; De Paula, Andre Maues; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brice, Alexis; Stoessl, A. Jon; Marras, Connie

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common cause of genetic Parkinson disease (PD) known to date. The clinical features of manifesting LRRK2 mutation carriers are generally indistinguishable from those of patients with sporadic PD. However, some PD cases associated with LRRK2 mutations lack Lewy bodies (LBs), a neuropathological hallmark of PD. We investigated whether the presence or absence of LBs correlates with different clinical features in LRRK2-related PD. OBSERVATIONS We describe genetic, clinical, and neuropathological findings of 37 cases of LRRK2-related PD including 33 published and 4 unpublished cases through October 2013. Among the different mutations, the LRRK2 p.G2019S mutation was most frequently associated with LB pathology. Nonmotor features of cognitive impairment/dementia, anxiety, and orthostatic hypotension were correlated with the presence of LBs. In contrast, a primarily motor phenotype was associated with a lack of LBs. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinicopathological correlations in a series of LRRK2-related PD cases. Findings from this selected group of patients with PD demonstrated that parkinsonian motor features can occur in the absence of LBs. However, LB pathology in LRRK2-related PD may be a marker for a broader parkinsonian symptom complex including cognitive impairment. PMID:25401511

  1. Correlation between clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with temporomandibular joint internal derangement

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young-Wook; Park, Sung-Hoon; On, Sung-Woon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify which findings in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are good predicators of pain and mouth opening limitation in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement (ID). Materials and Methods Clinical examinations for pain and mouth opening limitation were conducted for suspected TMJ ID. MRI scans were taken within a week of clinical examinations. On the oblique-sagittal plane image, readings were obtained in terms of the functional aspect of disc position, degree of displacement, disc deformity, joint effusion, and osteoarthrosis. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of pain and mouth opening limitation. Results A total of 48 patients (96 TMJs) were studied, including 39 female patients and 9 male patients whose ages ranged from 10 to 65 years. The resultant data showed significant correlations between pain and the MR imaging of the degree of disc displacement (P<0.05). The probability of there being pain in moderate to significant cases was 9.69 times higher than in normal cases. No significant correlation was found between mouth opening limitation and MRI findings. Conclusion We identified a significant correlation between clinical symptoms and MRI findings of ID. The degree of anterior disc displacement may be useful for predicting pain in patients with TMJ ID. PMID:26131429

  2. Clinical Characteristics and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation of Korean Patients with Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ju Sun; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jong-Won; Sung, Duk Hyun; Kim, Byoung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motor neuron disease characterized by proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy, and fasciculation. Although SBMA is not uncommon in Korea, there is only one study reporting clinical characteristics and genotype-phenotype correlation in Korean patients. Materials and Methods In this study, age at the onset of symptoms, the score of severity assessed by impairment of activities of daily living milestones, and rate of disease progression, and their correlations with the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, as well as possible correlations among clinical characteristics, were analyzed in 40 SBMA patients. Results The median ages at onset and at diagnosis were 44.5 and 52.5 years, respectively, and median interval between onset and diagnosis and median rate of disease progression were 5.0 years and 0.23 score/year, respectively. The median number of CAG repeats in the AR gene was 44 and the number of CAG repeats showed a significant inverse correlation with the age at onset of symptoms (r=-0.407, p=0.009). In addition, patients with early symptom onset had slower rate of disease progression. Conclusion As a report with the largest and recent Korean cohort, this study demonstrates clinical features of Korean patients with SBMA and reaffirms the inverse correlation between the age at disease onset and the number of CAG repeats. Interestingly, this study shows a possibility that the rate of disease progression may be influenced by the age at onset of symptoms. PMID:26069122

  3. Answering Clinical Questions with Role Identification Yun Niu, Graeme Hirst, Gregory McArthur, and Patricia Rodriguez-Gianolli

    E-print Network

    Motivation In every aspect of patient treatment, questions arise for which a search of the publishedmedical of otherclinicians. For example:1 Q: In a child with asthma, do increased doses of inhaled cor- ticosteroids lead in the literature can help clinicians in answering questions generated in patient treatment (Gorman et al., 1994

  4. HIV/AIDS Information Needs of Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic Patients: Content Analysis of Questions Asked during Prevention Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Cain, Demetria; Knecht, Joanna; Hill, Justin

    2008-01-01

    Basic factual information about disease is the cornerstone of health promotion and disease prevention interventions. Previous studies have shown that content analysis of the questions asked of service providers can elucidate the information needs of service consumers. Questions asked by individuals at known high risk for HIV infection have not…

  5. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures.

    PubMed

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26-27, 2013, entitled "Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research" and "Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems." The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  6. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  7. Anatomic, clinical, and neuropsychological correlates of spelling errors in primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyungsub; Hurley, Robert S; Rogalski, Emily; Mesulam, M-Marsel

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluates spelling errors in the three subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA): agrammatic (PPA-G), logopenic (PPA-L), and semantic (PPA-S). Forty-one PPA patients and 36 age-matched healthy controls were administered a test of spelling. The total number of errors and types of errors in spelling to dictation of regular words, exception words and nonwords, were recorded. Error types were classified based on phonetic plausibility. In the first analysis, scores were evaluated by clinical diagnosis. Errors in spelling exception words and phonetically plausible errors were seen in PPA-S. Conversely, PPA-G was associated with errors in nonword spelling and phonetically implausible errors. In the next analysis, spelling scores were correlated to other neuropsychological language test scores. Significant correlations were found between exception word spelling and measures of naming and single word comprehension. Nonword spelling correlated with tests of grammar and repetition. Global language measures did not correlate significantly with spelling scores, however. Cortical thickness analysis based on MRI showed that atrophy in several language regions of interest were correlated with spelling errors. Atrophy in the left supramarginal gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) pars orbitalis correlated with errors in nonword spelling, while thinning in the left temporal pole and fusiform gyrus correlated with errors in exception word spelling. Additionally, phonetically implausible errors in regular word spelling correlated with thinning in the left IFG pars triangularis and pars opercularis. Together, these findings suggest two independent systems for spelling to dictation, one phonetic (phoneme to grapheme conversion), and one lexical (whole word retrieval). PMID:22579708

  8. Clinical Correlates of Apathy in Patients Recently Diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease: The ANIMO Study

    PubMed Central

    Cubo, Esther; Benito-León, Julián; Coronell, Carlos; Armesto, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Little is known about apathy in the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). We determined the clinical correlates of apathy in a large representative sample of patients recently diagnosed with PD (ANIMO study). Methods PD patients, diagnosed within 2 years of inclusion, were recruited in 102 outpatient clinics situated in 82 populations throughout Spain. Apathy was quantified using the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS). Clinical comparisons and correlations were performed using nonparametric tests. Regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical variables with apathy. Results We recruited 557 PD patients (60.3% men) with a mean age of 68.8 ± 9.7 years, and UPDRS motor score of 21.1 ± 10.8. Apathy only was diagnosed in 186 (33.4%), and apathy and depression in 215 patients (38.6%). Patients with higher comorbidity (OR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.01?1.20, p = 0.001), motor impairment (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03?1.10, p < 0.0001), and lower education (OR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.21?;3.85, p = 0.009) had higher odds of having apathy, in contrast to patients living in a rural environment (OR = 0.35, 95% CI 0.32–0.85, p = 0.01), and left predominant PD motor laterality (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.13–0.88, p = 0.01). LARS scores were significantly correlated with UPDRS motor scores (rs = 0.44, p < 0.001), predominantly with axial score (rs = 0.43, p < 0.001). Conclusions In PD, apathy is a very common and disabling nonmotor symptom separable from depression. Patients living in a rural environment, with lower comorbidity and motor impairment, higher education background, and left predominant PD motor laterality are at lower risk of suffering from apathy. PMID:22236943

  9. Clinical and Genetic Correlates of Growth Differentiation Factor-15 in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennifer E.; Mahajan, Anubha; Chen, Ming-Huei; Larson, Martin G.; McCabe, Elizabeth L.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Kempf, Tibor; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Januzzi, James; Wollert, Kai C.; Morris, Andrew P.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) is a stress-responsive cytokine produced in cardiovascular cells under conditions of inflammation and oxidative stress, and is emerging as an important prognostic marker in individuals with and without existing cardiovascular disease. Thus, we examined the clinical and genetic correlates of circulating GDF-15 levels, which have not been collectively investigated. METHODS A total of 2,991 participants of the Framingham Offspring Study free of clinically overt cardiovascular disease underwent measurement of plasma GDF-15 levels (mean age 59 years, 56% women). Clinical correlates of GDF-15 were examined in multivariable analyses. A genome-wide association study of GDF-15 levels was then conducted, including participants of the Framingham Offspring Study and the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study. RESULTS GDF-15 was positively associated with age, smoking, antihypertensive treatment, diabetes, worse kidney function, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, but it was negatively associated with total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Clinical correlates accounted for 38% of inter-individual variation in circulating GDF-15, whereas genetic factors account for up to 38% of residual variability (h2=0.38; P=2.5 × 10?11). We identified one genome-wide significant locus, which included the GDF15 gene, on chromosome 19p13.11 associated with GDF-15 concentrations (smallest P=2.74?32 for rs888663). Conditional analyses revealed two independent association signals at this locus (rs888663 and rs1054564), which were associated with altered cis-gene expression in blood cell lines. CONCLUSIONS In ambulatory individuals, both cardiometabolic risk factors and genetic factors play an important role in determining circulating GDF-15 concentrations, and contribute similarly to overall variation. PMID:22997280

  10. Clinical, radiological and molecular diagnosis correlation in serum samples from patients with osteoarticular tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Martínez-Elizondo, Olga; del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples, in the diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis (OTB) in a setting where only clinical and imaging diagnoses determine the treatment. Methods A total of 44 consecutive serum specimens were collected from clinically suspected OTB patients, based on clinical and radiological [X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography] features. They were screened by in-house nested PCR. In addition, a few specimens were examined by Gram stain, acid-fast bacilli stain, histopathology and routine bacterial culture. A total of 39 specimens were collected from patients suffering from other bone diseases of nontuberculous origin and included as negative controls. Results Of the 44 clinically suspected OTB patients, in-house nested PCR was positive in 40 (91%) cases; PCR was negative in 38 (97%) negative controls. Sensitivity and specificity of our in-house nested PCR was 90.9% and 97.4%, respectively. The PCR report was available within 48 h. It was possible to standardize serum PCR technique and in positive cases, a good correlation was observed in terms of an adequate treatment response. Conclusions Nested PCR in serum samples is a rapid, highly sensitive and specific modality for OTB detection. PCR should be performed in addition to clinical evaluation, imaging studies, acid-fast bacilli staining, culture and histopathology diagnosis, if possible. PMID:25183281

  11. question_1296837100 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    While the causal mechanisms that link excess body weight to increased risk for certain cancers are largely unknown (as noted in other questions), we pose an associated question -- what are the causal mechanisms that link excess body weight to decreased risk of certain other cancers?

  12. Histological evaluation of pulp tissue from second primary molars correlated with clinical and radiographic caries findings

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Vellore Kannan; Anwar, Khurshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Managing dental caries in young children is demanding due to the elusions present on the right diagnostic criteria for treatment. The present study evaluated the histological status of pulp tissues extracted from primary second molar with caries involvement. Histological findings are correlated with clinical and radiographic assessment. Materials and Methods: Simple experimental study was conducted on upper or lower second primary molars with occlusal (22 teeth) or proximal (22 teeth) dental caries. Selected children were below 6 years of age. Percentage of caries involvement, residual dentin thickness (RDT), radiographic assessment of interradicular and periapical areas, clinical caries depth and signs and symptoms are the parameters considered for comparing with the histological findings. The specimens were grouped based on the nature of the inflammatory process as acute or chronic. The data were analyzed by Student t-test to compare histological types of inflammation with clinical parameters. P value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Four cases revealed severe acute inflammation in coronal and relatively mild acute inflammation in radicular pulp. In the rest of the specimen coronal and radicular pulp had similar acute or chronic inflammatory changes. Histological evidence of pulpitis correlated with dental caries depth of ?80%, RDT of ?1 mm, radiographic rarefactions in the interradicular regions and symptoms of pain. Conclusion: Primary second molars with more than two-third caries involvement with symptoms of pain histologically showed inflammation of both coronal and radicular pulp tissues in all cases. PMID:24932190

  13. Correlation Between Clinical Findings of Temporomandibular Disorders and MRI Characteristics of Disc Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Sheikh, Soheyl; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Deepak; Gupta, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is a common condition that is best evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The first step in MR imaging of the TMJ is to evaluate the articular disk, or meniscus, in terms of its morphologic features and its location relative to the condyle in both closed- and open-mouth positions. Disk location is of prime importance because the presence of a displaced disk is a critical sign of TMJ dysfunction. However, disk displacement is also frequently seen in asymptomatic volunteers. It is important for the maxillofacial radiologist to detect early MR imaging signs of dysfunction, thereby avoiding the evolution of this condition to its advanced and irreversible phase which is characterized by osteoarthritic changes such as condylar flattening or osteophytes. Further the MR imaging techniques will allow a better understanding of the sources of TMJ pain and of any discrepancy between imaging findings and patient symptoms. Henceforth, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether MRI findings of various degrees of disk displacement could be correlated with the presence or absence of clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. Materials and Methods : In this clinical study, 44 patients (88 TMJs) were examined clinically and divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients with clinical signs and symptoms of TMDs either unilaterally or bilaterally and considered as study group. Group 2 consisted of 22 patients with no signs and symptoms of TMDs and considered as control group. MRI was done for both the TMJs of each patient. Displacement of the posterior band of articular disc in relation to the condyle was quantified as anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR), anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR), posterior disc displacement (PDD). Results : Disk displacement was found in 18 (81.8%) patients of 22 symptomatic subjects in Group 1 on MRI and 4 (18.1%) were diagnosed normal with no disc displacement. In Group 2, 2 (9.1%) of 22 asymptomatic patients were diagnosed with disc displacement while 20 (90.1%) were normal. Sensitivity and Specificity tests were applied in both the groups to correlate clinical findings of TMD and MRI characterstics of disc displacement and results showed Sensitivity of 90% and Specificity of 83.3%. Conclusion : Disk displacement on MRI correlated well with presence or absence of clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders with high Sensitivity and Specificity of 90% and 83.3% respectively. PMID:26464595

  14. Correlations of Salivary Biomarkers with Clinical Assessments in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shuai; Zhang, Huaibin; Mayer, Kathryn M.; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Little, Frédéric F.; Greenberg, Jonathan; Uluer, Ahmet Z.; Walt, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Monitoring clinical disease status in cystic fibrosis frequently requires invasive collection of clinical samples. Due to its noninvasive collection process and direct anatomic relationship with the lower airway, saliva shows great potential as a biological fluid for cystic fibrosis monitoring. Objectives To measure the levels of multiple protein markers in human saliva supernatants and investigate the possibility of utilizing them to provide a more quantitative measure of disease state for use in research and monitoring of patients with cystic fibrosis clinically. Methods Whole saliva samples were collected and processed from cystic fibrosis patients at two distinct time points (2010 and 2013) and measured by two separate platforms. In this cross sectional study, a convenience sample of 71 participants were recruited with samples measured by multiplexed fluorescence microarray (fiber microarray) and another 117 participant samples were measured by an automated, point-of-care, analyzer (SDReader) using a microsphere-based array via fluorescence sandwich immunoassay. For comparison, saliva from 56 and 50 healthy subjects were collected, respectively. The levels of six target proteins were quantified. Various demographic and clinical data, including spirometry, medical history, and clinicians’ assessments were also collected from patients with cystic fibrosis on the day of saliva collection. Measurements and Main Results Similar trends were observed with both platforms and compared with healthy subjects, cystic fibrosis patients had significantly elevated levels of VEGF, IP-10, IL-8, and EGF as well as lower levels of MMP-9 (P ? 0.005) using fiber microarray and significantly elevated levels of IP-10, IL-8 with lower levels of MMP-9 and IL-1? (P ? 0.02) using the SDReader. The levels of the six proteins correlated with each other significantly, and in some cases, biomarker levels could be used to differentiate between subgroups of patients with different clinical presentations. For example, IP-10 levels significantly correlated with FEV1 and disease severity (as evaluated by clinicians) with both platforms (P < 0.05). Conclusions Significant variations of the levels of six proteins in saliva supernatants, and the correlations of these levels with clinical assessments, demonstrated the potential of saliva for cystic fibrosis research and monitoring. PMID:26258476

  15. Depressive Symptoms during an Acute Schizophrenic Episode: Frequency and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia and are associated with poorer functioning, lower quality of life, and an elevated risk of suicidal behaviour. There are few studies on the occurrence and correlates of these symptoms in acutely ill patients with schizophrenia. Method. 72 acutely ill patients with schizophrenia were assessed for depression using the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). A cut-off score of ?6 on the CDSS was used to identify clinically significant depressive symptoms. The relationship between depression and illness variables, including psychotic symptom dimensions as measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia (PANSS), was examined. Results. Eleven (15.3%) patients had clinically significant depressive symptoms. These patients scored higher on the positive and general psychopathology scales of the PANSS and had higher rates of suicidal behavior and poorer functioning. The severity of depressive symptoms was positively correlated with the PANSS positive subscale and negatively correlated with the PANSS negative subscale. Discussion. These findings confirm previous reports that depressive symptoms in active schizophrenia is related to the severity of positive psychotic symptoms and is a risk factor for suicidal behaviour in these patients. PMID:26664745

  16. Improving the clinical correlation of multiple sclerosis black hole volume change by paired-scan analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Roger C; Traboulsee, Anthony; Riddehough, Andrew; Li, David K B

    2012-01-01

    The change in T 1-hypointense lesion ("black hole") volume is an important marker of pathological progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Black hole boundaries often have low contrast and are difficult to determine accurately and most (semi-)automated segmentation methods first compute the T 2-hyperintense lesions, which are a superset of the black holes and are typically more distinct, to form a search space for the T 1w lesions. Two main potential sources of measurement noise in longitudinal black hole volume computation are partial volume and variability in the T 2w lesion segmentation. A paired analysis approach is proposed herein that uses registration to equalize partial volume and lesion mask processing to combine T 2w lesion segmentations across time. The scans of 247 MS patients are used to compare a selected black hole computation method with an enhanced version incorporating paired analysis, using rank correlation to a clinical variable (MS functional composite) as the primary outcome measure. The comparison is done at nine different levels of intensity as a previous study suggests that darker black holes may yield stronger correlations. The results demonstrate that paired analysis can strongly improve longitudinal correlation (from -0.148 to -0.303 in this sample) and may produce segmentations that are more sensitive to clinically relevant changes. PMID:24179734

  17. Demographic and clinical correlates of autism symptom domains and autism spectrum diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Thomas W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Embacher, Rebecca; Hardan, Antonio Y; Constantino, John N; Law, Paul; Findling, Robert L; Eng, Charis

    2014-01-01

    Demographic and clinical factors may influence assessment of autism symptoms. This study evaluated these correlates and also examined whether social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior provided unique prediction of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. We analyzed data from 7352 siblings included in the Interactive Autism Network registry. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms were obtained using caregiver-reports on the Social Responsiveness Scale. Demographic and clinical correlates were covariates in regression models predicting social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses evaluated the incremental validity of social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior domains over and above global autism symptoms. Autism spectrum disorder diagnosis was the strongest correlate of caregiver-reported social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms. The presence of comorbid diagnoses also increased symptom levels. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms provided significant, but modest, incremental validity in predicting diagnosis beyond global autism symptoms. These findings suggest that autism spectrum disorder diagnosis is by far the largest determinant of quantitatively measured autism symptoms. Externalizing (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and internalizing (anxiety) behavior, low cognitive ability, and demographic factors may confound caregiver-report of autism symptoms, potentially necessitating a continuous norming approach to the revision of symptom measures. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms may provide incremental validity in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24104512

  18. The Depressive Experiences Questionnaire: validity and psychological correlates in a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Riley, W T; McCranie, E W

    1990-01-01

    This study sought to compare the original and revised scoring systems of the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) and to assess the construct validity of the Dependent and Self-Critical subscales of the DEQ in a clinically depressed sample. Subjects were 103 depressed inpatients who completed the DEQ, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hopelessness Scale, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ), the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS), and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The original and revised scoring systems of the DEQ evidenced good concurrent validity for each factor scale, but the revised system did not sufficiently discriminate dependent and self-critical dimensions. Using the original scoring system, self-criticism was significantly and positively related to severity of depression, whereas dependency was not, particularly for males. Factor analysis of the DEQ scales and the other scales used in this study supported the dependent and self-critical dimensions. For men, the correlation of the DEQ with the MMPI scales indicated that self-criticism was associated with psychotic symptoms, hostility/conflict, and a distress/exaggerated response set, whereas dependency did not correlate significantly with any MMPI scales. Females, however, did not exhibit a differential pattern of correlations between either the Dependency or the Self-Criticism scales and the MMPI. These findings suggest possible gender differences in the clinical characteristics of male and female dependent and self-critical depressive subtypes. PMID:2348339

  19. Hyponatremia in Peritoneal Dialysis: Epidemiology in a Single Center and Correlation with Clinical and Biochemical Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadis, Chrysostomos; Sekercioglu, Nigar; Pipili, Chrysoula; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios; Bargman, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    ? Background: Hyponatremia in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients has previously been associated with water overload and weight gain, or with malnutrition and intracellular potassium depletion. Although there is a sizable literature about transmembrane sodium and water removal in PD, there are few reports about the incidence and characteristics of hyponatremia in the clinical setting. ? Aim: We evaluated the incidence and factors associated with hyponatremia in PD patients in a single PD unit. ? Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the records of all patients (n = 198) who were treated with PD in the Home PD Unit of the University Health Network at Toronto General Hospital during 2010. We identified 166 patients who had a minimum follow-up of 60 days during 2010 and at least 2 consecutive sodium measurements at least a month apart. We examined baseline differences between patients who developed hyponatremia and those who did not, and clinical and biochemical factors that correlated with mean sodium values. In the 24 patients who developed hyponatremia, we examined paired differences between the normonatremic and hyponatremic periods. Finally, we investigated any possible correlations of change in serum sodium with clinical and biochemical characteristics before and during the hyponatremic period. ? Results: The incidence of hyponatremia was 14.5%. In multivariate analysis, serum sodium correlated significantly and independently with residual renal function (RRF: r = 0.463, p = 0.0001) and negatively with the daily volume of instilled icodextrin (r = -0.476, p = 0.0001). Residual renal function was significantly lower in patients with hyponatremia than in those with normal serum sodium (1.97 ± 2.3 mL/min vs 4.31 ± 5.01 mL/min, p = 0.033). The mean paired difference in body weight was -1.113 kg and the median difference was -0.55 kg (range: -8.5 kg to +4.2 kg). Impressively, hyponatremia was not associated with an increase in body weight in most patients who developed this complication (13 of 16 for whom comparative weights were known). Moreover, the mean paired change in serum sodium (?Na) from normonatremia to hyponatremia was, contrary to our expectations, significantly correlated with a decrease in body weight (r = 0.584, p = 0.017). The ?Na was also significantly correlated with serum potassium (r = 0.526, p = 0.008), the greatest drop in serum sodium being associated with lower serum potassium in the hyponatremic period, as predicted. ? Conclusions: Hyponatremia is seen more often than expected in a clinical setting. Serum sodium is strongly correlated with RRF, hyponatremia being associated with lower RRF. In patients who experienced hyponatremia, the fall in serum sodium was associated with a decrease, not an increase, in body weight and was correlated with serum potassium, suggesting that sodium and potassium depletion—and, by inference, malnutrition—may be important contributors in the clinical setting. PMID:23636436

  20. question_1309952087 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    This is an important question - many cancers such as multiple myeloma are characterized by genomic instability, with new cytogenetic abnormalities, deletions or mutations, and other genetic changes detected as disease progresses.

  1. Phenomenology and clinical correlates of family accommodation in pediatric anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Storch, Eric A; Salloum, Alison; Johnco, Carly; Dane, Brittney F; Crawford, Erika A; King, Morgan A; McBride, Nicole M; Lewin, Adam B

    2015-10-01

    Despite evidence documenting high prevalence of family accommodation in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder, examination in other pediatric anxiety disorders is limited. Preliminary evidence suggests that family accommodation is common amongst children with anxiety disorders; however, the impact on clinical presentation and functional impairment has not been addressed. This study assessed the nature and clinical correlates of family accommodation in pediatric anxiety, as well as validating a mechanistic model. Participants included 112 anxious youth and their parents who were administered a diagnostic clinical interview and measure of anxiety severity, as well as questionnaires assessing internalizing and externalizing symptoms, family accommodation and functional impairment. Some form of accommodation was present in all families. Family accommodation was associated with increased anxiety severity and externalizing behaviors, having a diagnosis of separation anxiety, and increased functional impairment. Family accommodation partially mediated the relationship between anxiety severity and functional impairment, as well as externalizing behaviors and functional impairment. Family accommodation is common in pediatric anxiety disorders, and is associated with more severe clinical presentations and functional impairment. These findings highlight the importance of parental involvement in treatment and the need to specifically target accommodation practices during interventions to mitigate negative outcomes in anxious youth. Further studies utilizing longitudinal data are needed to validate mechanistic models. PMID:26398305

  2. Molecular Subtypes of Uterine Leiomyosarcoma and Correlation with Clinical Outcome12

    PubMed Central

    Barlin, Joyce N.; Zhou, Qin C.; Leitao, Mario M.; Bisogna, Maria; Olvera, Narciso; Shih, Karin K.; Jacobsen, Anders; Schultz, Nikolaus; Tap, William D.; Hensley, Martee L.; Schwartz, Gary K.; Boyd, Jeff; Qin, Li-Xuan; Levine, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular etiology of uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS) is poorly understood, which accounts for the wide disparity in outcomes among women with this disease. We examined and compared the molecular profiles of ULMS and normal myometrium (NL) to identify clinically relevant molecular subtypes. Discovery cases included 29 NL and 23 ULMS specimens. RNA was hybridized to Affymetrix U133A 2.0 transcription microarrays. Differentially expressed genes and pathways were identified using standard methods. Fourteen NL and 44 ULMS independent archival samples were used for external validation. Molecular subgroups were correlated with clinical outcome. Pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes between ULMS and NL samples identified overrepresentation of cell cycle regulation, DNA repair, and genomic integrity. External validation confirmed differential expression in 31 genes (P < 4.4 × 10? 4, Bonferroni corrected), with 84% of the overexpressed genes, including CDC7, CDC20, GTSE1, CCNA2, CCNB1, and CCNB2, participating in cell cycle regulation. Unsupervised clustering of ULMS identified two clades that were reproducibly associated with progression-free (median, 4.0 vs 26.0 months; P = .02; HR, 0.33) and overall (median, 18.2 vs 77.2 months; P = .04; HR, 0.33) survival. Cell cycle genes play a key role in ULMS sarcomagenesis, providing opportunities for therapeutic targeting. Reproducible molecular subtypes associated with clinical outcome may permit individualized adjuvant treatment after clinical trial validation. PMID:25748237

  3. Clinical correlates of decreased anteroposterior metabolic gradients in positron emission tomography (PET) of schizophrenic patients

    SciTech Connect

    DeLisi, L.E.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Holcomb, H.H.; Dowling-Zimmerman, S.; Pickar, D.; Boronow, J.; Morihisa, J.M.; van Kammen, D.P.; Carpenter, W.; Kessler, R.

    1985-01-01

    The finding in schizophrenic patients of a reversal of the normal frontal to posterior pattern of brain metabolic activity with positron emission tomography (PET) is of interest, but its relevance to psychopathology is unknown. Using PET, the authors studied 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Although eight of the 21 patients and only one of the control subjects showed a relatively lower anteroposterior metabolic gradient, no clinical correlates of this finding were noted. In addition, cerebral atrophy, as determined by CAT scan, was not associated with this aberrant metabolic pattern.

  4. Oxidative Stress Correlates with Headache Symptoms in Fibromyalgia: Coenzyme Q10 Effect on Clinical Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Mario D.; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; De Miguel, Manuel; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. Methods We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ10, catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. Results We found decreased CoQ10, catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively) We also found increased level of LPO in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.001). Significant negative correlations between CoQ10 or catalase levels in BMCs and headache parameters were observed (r?=??0.59, P<0.05; r?=??0.68, P<0.05, respectively). Furthermore, LPO levels showed a significant positive correlation with HIT-6 (r?=?0.33, P<0.05). Oral CoQ10 supplementation restored biochemical parameters and induced a significant improvement in clinical and headache symptoms (P<0.001). Discussion The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM. PMID:22532869

  5. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: clinical course, phenotype-genotype correlations, and neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Horton, Laura C; Frosch, Matthew P; Vangel, Mark G; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2013-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in five, and autopsy in four cases. We identified four stages of the illness: Stage 0, gene-positive but phenotypically silent; Stage 1, no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms; Stage 2, symptoms and signs progress modestly; and Stage 3, rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r = -0.74, p = 0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p = 0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots, and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through four clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

  6. Diffuse lung uptake (DLU) on Ga-67 scintigraph: Clinical, radiologic and pathologic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, W.M.; Seo, I.S.; Vieira, J.; Zaman, M.

    1985-05-01

    Review, analysis and correlation (clinical, radiologic and pathologic) of 29 consecutive adults (16 drug addicts and/or homosexuals) with DLU on Ga-67 scintigraph were made. Diffuse increased uptake of at least 75% of both lungs was considered as DLU. WFOF cameras were used to obtain 24 to 96 hr. scintigraphs after IV injection of 3-5 mCi of Ga-67 citrate. In 26, tissue diagnosis established: pneumocystis carinii (PC) 15, miliary tuberculosis (TB) 3, sarcoidosis (SR) 3, drug-induced toxicity 2, and toxoplasmosis (TX), primary hyperparathyroidism and nonspecific lymphocytic pneumonia-one each. In two with breast and one with esophageal carcinomas, no lung tissue diagnosis was sought. Concurrent chest x-rays were negative in 16, but in 7/16, lung infiltrate was later documented. An average of 31 days elapsed before x-rays became positive in four with PC, 7 days in two with TB, and 22 days in one with TX. In 13, concurrent x-rays showed lung infiltrate, but in 6, only subtle, localized rather than diffuse infiltrate was noted. Fourteen of 29 had at least two Ga-67 studies. In 12 (7 PC, 2 TB, 3 SR) of 14 whose repeat studies showed significant to total disappearance of DLU, all did well clinically. In two whose initial studies were negative or equivocal, they became clinically worse when the repeat study showed DLU. In three others (2 PC, 1 TX) who died, their single studies recorded intense DLU. DLU on gallium scintigraph indicated a variety of pathology. In 55.2%, gallium scintigraph predated x-ray findings by a few days to weeks. In 20.3%, x-ray findings were only subtle or localized. Scintigraphic changes correlated well with the clinical courses in various diseases.

  7. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7: Clinical Course, Phenotype-Genotype Correlations, and Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Laura C.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Vangel, Mark G.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. METHODS We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in 5, and autopsy in 4 cases. RESULTS We identified 4 stages of the illness. Stage 0; gene positive but phenotypically silent. Stage 1; no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms. Stage 2; symptoms and signs progress modestly. Stage 3; rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r=-0.74, p=0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p=0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. DISCUSSION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through 4 clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

  8. Correlation of Serotype-Specific Dengue Virus Infection with Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Halsey, Eric S.; Marks, Morgan A.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Fiestas, Victor; Suarez, Luis; Vargas, Jorge; Aguayo, Nicolas; Madrid, Cesar; Vimos, Carlos; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease caused by the dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity throughout the world. Although prior research has focused on the association of specific DENV serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4) with the development of severe outcomes such as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, relatively little work has correlated other clinical manifestations with a particular DENV serotype. The goal of this study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of non-hemorrhagic clinical manifestations of DENV infection by serotype. Methodology and Principal Findings Between the years 2005–2010, individuals with febrile disease from Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Paraguay were enrolled in an outpatient passive surveillance study. Detailed information regarding clinical signs and symptoms, as well as demographic information, was collected. DENV infection was confirmed in patient sera with polyclonal antibodies in a culture-based immunofluorescence assay, and the infecting serotype was determined by serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies. Differences in the prevalence of individual and organ-system manifestations were compared across DENV serotypes. One thousand seven hundred and sixteen individuals were identified as being infected with DENV-1 (39.8%), DENV-2 (4.3%), DENV-3 (41.5%), or DENV-4 (14.4%). When all four DENV serotypes were compared with each other, individuals infected with DENV-3 had a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal manifestations, and individuals infected with DENV-4 had a higher prevalence of respiratory and cutaneous manifestations. Conclusions/Significance Specific clinical manifestations, as well as groups of clinical manifestations, are often overrepresented by an individual DENV serotype. PMID:22563516

  9. question_1413867548 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    PQ-1 Large amount of genomic data have been generated in last decade or so for various cancers. There are drugs and clinical trials data as well. Also, clinical data of patients are available in electronic medical record (EMR). Can we normalize and combine all these data to create a knowledge-base?

  10. Automatically correlating clinical findings and body locations in radiology reports using MedLEE.

    PubMed

    Sevenster, Merlijn; van Ommering, Rob; Qian, Yuechen

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a system that extracts clinical findings and body locations from radiology reports and correlates them. The system uses Medical Language Extraction and Encoding System (MedLEE) to map the reports' free text to structured semantic representations of their content. A lightweight reasoning engine extracts the clinical findings and body locations from MedLEE's semantic representation and correlates them. Our study is illustrative for research in which existing natural language processing software is embedded in a larger system. We manually created a standard reference based on a corpus of neuro and breast radiology reports. The standard reference was used to evaluate the precision and recall of the proposed system and its modules. Our results indicate that the precision of our system is considerably better than its recall (82.32-91.37% vs. 35.67-45.91%). We conducted an error analysis and discuss here the practical usability of the system given its recall and precision performance. PMID:21796490

  11. Clinical Correlates of Hwa-Byung and a Proposal for a New Anger Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviewed the studies on hwa-byung (HB), which literally means anger disorder and this is known as the culture-related chronic anger syndrome of Koreans. Based on these studies and a review of the literature on the anger syndromes of other cultures, I have proposed a new anger disorder. The rationale for this proposition is first that the clinical correlates of HB, including the epidemiological data, the etiological factors, the symptoms and the clinical course, are unique and different from those of the depressive disorders, which have been postulated to be similar to HB. Second, the symptoms of HB are characterized by pent-up anger and somatic and behavioral symptoms related to the release and suppression of anger. Third, a group of patients with only HB and who visit psychiatrists for treatment have been identified. Fourth, anger is thought to be the basic target of treatment for HB patients. Last, anger syndromes like HB have been identified, with various names, in other cultures. By reducing the cultural variation of HB and integrating the common clinical correlates of the syndromes related to anger, a new anger disorder for the mood of anger can be conceptualized, like that for other mood disorders for the corresponding pathological moods. The research diagnostic criteria for HB and the new anger disorder are also suggested. I propose that the new anger disorder to be included in the new international classification system as a member of the larger family of mood disorders. International collaborative studies are needed not only to identify such anger disorder in various cultures, but also to explore giving better treatment to these patients based on the bio-psycho-social model of anger disorder. PMID:20046356

  12. Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Depressive Symptoms: Clinical Correlates and CBT Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brown, H M; Lester, K J; Jassi, A; Heyman, I; Krebs, G

    2015-07-01

    Depression frequently co-occurs with paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet the clinical correlates and impact of depression on CBT outcomes remain unclear. The prevalence and clinical correlates of depression were examined in a paediatric specialist OCD-clinic sample (N?=?295; Mean?=?15 [7 - 18] years, 42 % female), using both dimensional (Beck Depression Inventory-youth; n?=?261) and diagnostic (Development and Wellbeing Assessment; n?=?127) measures of depression. The impact of depressive symptoms and suspected disorders on post-treatment OCD severity was examined in a sub-sample who received CBT, with or without SSRI medication (N?=?100). Fifty-one per-cent of patients reported moderately or extremely elevated depressive symptoms and 26 % (95 % CI: 18 - 34) met criteria for a suspected depressive disorder. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorders were associated with worse OCD symptom severity and global functioning prior to CBT. Individuals with depression were more likely to be female, have had a psychiatric inpatient admission and less likely to be attending school (ps?

  13. Vitamin D metabolism by alveolar immune cells in tuberculosis: correlation with calcium metabolism and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Cadranel, J L; Garabédian, M; Milleron, B; Guillozzo, H; Valeyre, D; Paillard, F; Akoun, G; Hance, A J

    1994-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the pulmonary vitamin D metabolism in tuberculosis and the calcium metabolism abnormalities and other clinical characteristics of the disease. The metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) by alveolar immune cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was evaluated in parallel to the results of calcium metabolism, 25(OH) D and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) plasma levels and other clinical parameters obtained in 14 tuberculosis patients. Whilst predominant metabolites produced by lavage cells in patients and controls were 5(E)--and 5(Z) -19-nor-10-oxo-25(OH)D3, 1,25(OH)2D3 was produced by cells from all tuberculosis patients but not by cells from controls. Calcium metabolism abnormalities were observed in only some patients, but the production of 1,25 (OH)2D3 by lavage cells was found to correlate both with 1,25(OH)2D levels (r = 0.67) and post-load urinary calcium excretion (r = 0.59). 1,25(OH)2D3 production by lavage cells was increased in patients of black origin, and those presenting with hilar adenopathy without pulmonary infiltrates, and was correlated with the number of lymphocytes recovered by lavage (r = 0.87). We conclude that 1,25(OH)2D3 production by alveolar immune cells makes a major contribution to the abnormalities in calcium metabolism seen in tuberculosis patients, and may be partly dependent on the clinical characteristics evaluated here. PMID:7925880

  14. Adjusting head circumference for covariates in autism: clinical correlates of a highly heritable continuous trait

    PubMed Central

    Chaste, Pauline; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J.; Murtha, Michael T.; Hus, Vanessa; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Yu, Timothy W.; Fombonne, Eric; Geschwind, Daniel; Grice, Dorothy E.; Ledbetter, David H.; Lord, Catherine; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa Lese; Martin, Donna M.; Morrow, Eric M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Sutcliffe, James S.; State, Matthew W.; Devlin, Bernie; Cook, Edwin H.; Kim, Soo-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Brain development follows a different trajectory in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) than in typically developing children. A proxy for neurodevelopment could be head circumference (HC), but studies assessing HC and its clinical correlates in ASD have been inconsistent. This study investigates HC and clinical correlates in the Simons Simplex Collection cohort. METHODS We used a mixed linear model to estimate effects of covariates and the deviation from the expected HC given parental HC (genetic deviation). After excluding individuals with incomplete data, 7225 individuals in 1891 families remained for analysis. We examined the relationship between HC/genetic deviation of HC and clinical parameters. RESULTS Gender, age, height, weight, genetic ancestry and ASD status were significant predictors of HC (estimate of the ASD effect=0.2cm). HC was approximately normally distributed in probands and unaffected relatives, with only a few outliers. Genetic deviation of HC was also normally distributed, consistent with a random sampling of parental genes. Whereas larger HC than expected was associated with ASD symptom severity and regression, IQ decreased with the absolute value of the genetic deviation of HC. CONCLUSIONS Measured against expected values derived from covariates of ASD subjects, statistical outliers for HC were uncommon. HC is a strongly heritable trait and population norms for HC would be far more accurate if covariates including genetic ancestry, height and age were taken into account. The association of diminishing IQ with absolute deviation from predicted HC values suggests HC could reflect subtle underlying brain development and warrants further investigation. PMID:23746936

  15. LETM1 overexpression is correlated with the clinical features and survival outcome of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Zheng, Yahui; Xuan, Chouhui; Lin, Zhenhua; Piao, Longzhen; Liu, Shuangping

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leucine zipper/EF hand-containing transmembrane-1 (LETM1) is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein that was first identified in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. However, high-level expression of LETM1 has been correlated with multiple human malignancies, suggesting roles in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. This study is aimed to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic value of LETM1 overexpression in breast cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, and immunofluorescence (IF) were performed to examine LETM1 expression in breast cancer cell line/tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Statistical analysis was applied to evaluate the correlation between LETM1 overexpression and the clinicopathological features of breast cancer. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the relationship between prognostic factors and patient survival was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard models. Results: LETM1 protein showed cytoplasmic staining pattern in breast cancer. The strongly positive rate of LETM1 protein was 61.6% (98/159) in breast cancer, which was significantly higher than in DCIS (29.7%, 11/37), hyperplasia (16.7%, 3/18) and adjacent normal breast tissues (15.9%, 7/44). High-level expression of LETM1 protein was correlated with lymph node metastasis, poor differentiation, late clinical stage, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in breast cancer. Moreover, multivariate analysis suggested that LETM1 emerged as a significant independent prognostic factor along with clinical stage of patients with breast cancer. Conclusions: LETM1 plays an important role in the progression of breast cancer. High level expression of LETM1 is an independent poor prognostic factor of breast cancer. PMID:26722481

  16. An Investigation into the Correlations between Students' Written Responses to Lecture-Tutorial Questions and their Understandings of Key Astrophysics Concepts

    E-print Network

    Eckenrode, Jeffrey W; Wallace, Colin S

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the correlations between students' understandings of introductory astronomy concepts and the correctness and coherency of their written responses to targeted Lecture-Tutorial questions. We assessed the correctness and coherency of responses from 454 college-level, general education, introductory astronomy students enrolled in courses taught in the spring of 2010, 2011, and 2012. We hypothesized that students who consistently provided responses with high levels of correctness and coherency would outperform students who did not on multiple measures of astronomy content knowledge. We compared students' correctness and coherency scores to their normalized gains on the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) and to their scores on closely-related exam items. Our analysis revealed that no significant correlations exist between students' correctness and coherency scores and their LSCI gain scores or exam item scores. However, the participant group in our study did ...

  17. question_1296796037 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    If this important question is answered we would be able to develop a highly tailored therapeutic approach for cancers. Actually, inflammatory type of the anti-tumor immune response such as IFN-g can also induce initial tumor inhibition but eventual tumor escape and progression.

  18. question_1411473029 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Gemcitabine is a widely used drug for pancreatic cancer therapy, but due to poor prognosis this drug is now in question. Cells resistance to gemcitabine activates EMT in the background, but the drug itself is a potential replication blocker and activates apoptosis, then why gemcitabine induced apoptosis activates a kind of fleeting mechanism (EMT) to get protection from apoptotic threat?

  19. question_1410159378 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Looking at cell to cell differences within a tumor bed, contributed by either DNA mutations, epigenetic or post-translational modifications (PTM) or miRNA mediated control switches or even a combination of all these, the question rise how to best design a personalized drug trial?

  20. question_1409912415 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Existing intervention clinical trials are now emerging as more and more expensive, labor-intensive and demand an exhaustive infrastructure. Thus these trials have become very difficult to execute especially in low resource settings. In view of this fact, how relevant it is to apply (similar) norms that govern clinical testing of new investigational drugs to re-purposing the existing drugs or active ingredients of traditional therapeutics extensively used in Ayurveda, Siddha and Homeopathy that already have defined safety and efficacy?

  1. Practical approaches for the treatment of chronic heart failure: Frequently asked questions, overlooked points and controversial issues in current clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Çavu?o?lu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Ekmekçi, Ahmet; Eren, Mehmet; Küçüko?lu, Mehmet Serdar; Nalbantgil, Sanem; Sar?, ?brahim; Selçuk, Timur; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Weinstein, Jean Marc; Ye?ilbursa, Dilek; Y?lmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Aydo?du, Sinan; Kutlu, Merih; Özer, Necla; ?ahin, Mahmut; Tokgözo?lu, Lale

    2015-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a progressive disorder associated with impaired quality of life, high morbidity, mortality and frequent hospitalization and affects millions of people from all around the world. Despite further improvements in HF therapy, mortality and morbidity remains to be very high. The life-long treatment, frequent hospitalization, and sophisticated and very expensive device therapies for HF also leads a substantial economic burden on the health care system. Therefore, implementation of evidence-based guideline-recommended therapy is very important to overcome its worse clinical outcomes. However, HF therapy is a long process that has many drawbacks and sometimes HF guidelines cannot answers to every question which rises in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, commonly encountered questions, overlooked points, controversial issues, management strategies in grey zone and problems arising during follow up of a HF patient in real life clinical practice have been addressed in the form of expert opinions based on the available data in the literature. PMID:26574641

  2. Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Fowler, Vance; Lower, Brian H.; Vellano, Francis P.; Alexander, Emily; Reller, L. Barth; Corey, G. Ralph; Lower, Steven

    2007-02-01

    Implanted medical devices (e.g., prosthetic heart valves, permanent pacemakers) significantly improve the quality of life for many humans. However, a common clinical observation is that such devices become colonized with potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, which are difficult to combat with host defenses or antibiotics. This study attempts to draw a correlation between the clinical outcome of patients with implanted cardiac devices and the fundamental binding forces ultimately responsible for the initiation of an S. aureus biofilm in-situ. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure forces between a fibronectin-coated probe (simulating a prosthetic implant) and 15 different strains of S. aureus isolated from either patients with infected cardiac devices (invasive population) or healthy human subjects (control population). The fibronectin-coated probe was repeatedly brought into and out of contact with a bacterium’s surface, “fishing” for a reaction with the cell’s fibronectin-binding proteins. More than 40,000 force profiles were measured on 5-10 different cells for each of the 15 clinical strains. A unique force-signature was observed for a binding event between the fibronectin-coated probe and the bacteria. When grouped by the frequency of this force-signature, there was a strong distinction (p=0.01) between the invasive and control populations of S. aureus. This discovery suggests that biofilm forming bacteria may be classified according to their “force taxonomy”, which could have a positive effect on health care as it bridges the long-standing disconnect between macroscopic, clinical investigations and nanometer-scale forces ultimately responsible for a bond between S. aureus and the surface of a prosthetic device.

  3. Guest Expert Connie Ulrich: Ethics of clinical research participation~three questions for us to discuss | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Connie Ulrich, is an Associate Professor of Bioethics and Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Connie's research is all about clinical trial participation. I hope you find her insights as useful as we have. Please review her comments below and let us know your thoughts.

  4. Correlation between Circulating Fungal Biomarkers and Clinical Outcome in Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Neofytos, Dionysios; Railkar, Radha; Mullane, Kathleen M.; Fredricks, David N.; Granwehr, Bruno; Marr, Kieren A.; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Maertens, Johan; Fox, Rebecca; Douglas, Cameron; Iannone, Robert; Kauh, Eunkyung; Shire, Norah

    2015-01-01

    Objective means are needed to predict and assess clinical response in patients treated for invasive aspergillosis (IA). We examined whether early changes in serum galactomannan (GM) and/or ?-D-glucan (BDG) can predict clinical outcomes. Patients with proven or probable IA were prospectively enrolled, and serial GM and BDG levels and GM optical density indices (GMI) were calculated twice weekly for 6 weeks following initiation of standard-of-care antifungal therapy. Changes in these biomarkers during the first 2 and 6 weeks of treatment were analyzed for associations with clinical response and survival at weeks 6 and 12. Among 47 patients with IA, 53.2% (25/47) and 65.9% (27/41) had clinical response by weeks 6 and 12, respectively. Changes in biomarkers during the first 2 weeks were associated with clinical response at 6 weeks (GMI, P = 0.03) and 12 weeks (GM+BDG composite, P = 0.05; GM, P = 0.04; GMI, P = 0.02). Changes in biomarkers during the first 6 weeks were also associated with clinical response at 6 weeks (GM, P = 0.05; GMI, P = 0.03) and 12 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.02; GM, P = 0.02; GMI, P = 0.01). Overall survival rates at 6 weeks and 12 weeks were 87.2% (41/47) and 79.1% (34/43), respectively. Decreasing biomarkers in the first 2 weeks were associated with survival at 6 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.03; BDG, P = 0.01; GM, P = 0.03) and at 12 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.01; BDG, P = 0.03; GM, P = 0.01; GMI, P = 0.007). Similar correlations occurred for biomarkers measured over 6 weeks. Patients with negative baseline GMI and/or persistently negative GMI during the first 2 weeks were more likely to have CR and survival. These results suggest that changes of biomarkers may be informative to predict and/or assess response to therapy and survival in patients treated for IA. PMID:26107507

  5. Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online Pose a Question Workshops 10-9-2010 PQ

  6. Clinical, Functional and Health-Related Quality of Life Correlates of Clinically Significant Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Christelle; Ranque, Brigitte; Baubet, Thierry; Bérezné, Alice; Mestre-Stanislas, Caroline; Rannou, François; Papelard, Agathe; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Revel, Michel; Moro, Marie-Rose; Guillevin, Loïc; Poiraudeau, Serge; Mouthon, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify clinical, functional and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) correlates of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods Three-hundred-and-eighty-one patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology and/or the Leroy and Medsger criteria for SSc were assessed for visceral involvement, disability and HRQoL (assessed by SF-36). Clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD) (defined cut-off?8). Results 9.2% the patients had limited SSc, 50.5% limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc), and 40.3% diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc). Overall, 40.4% and 58.8% of the patients had clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety, respectively. Compared to patients without clinically significant symptoms of depression, patients with clinically significant symptoms of depression had poorer health status, HRQoL mental and physical component, and greater global disability, hand disability and aesthetic impairment. Compared to patients without clinically significant symptoms of anxiety, patients with clinically significant symptoms of anxiety had poorer SF-36 mental and physical component scores. On multivariable analysis, excluding mental component score of SF-36, variables independently associated with clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety were global disability and physical component of SF-36, plus female gender for clinically significant symptoms of anxiety only. Remarkably, patients with and without clinically significant psychiatric symptoms were comparable for all disease-related clinical features assessed. Conclusion High levels of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression are observed among SSc patients. Clinically significant psychiatric symptoms are rather associated with increased disability and altered HRQoL, than with disease-specific organ manifestations. PMID:24587375

  7. Episodic ataxia type 1: clinical characterization, quality of life and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Tracey D; Cha, Yoon-Hee; Hahn, Angelika F; Barohn, Richard; Salajegheh, Mohammed K; Griggs, Robert C; Bundy, Brian N; Jen, Joanna C; Baloh, Robert W; Hanna, Michael G

    2014-04-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is considered a rare neuronal ion channel disorder characterized by brief attacks of unsteadiness and dizziness with persistent myokymia. To characterize the natural history, develop outcome measures for future clinical trials, and correlate genotype with phenotype, we undertook an international, prospective, cross-sectional study. Thirty-nine individuals (51% male) were enrolled: median age 37 years (range 15-65 years). We identified 10 different pathogenic point mutations in KCNA1 that accounted for the genetic basis of 85% of the cohort. Participants with KCNA1 mutations were more likely to have a positive family history. Analysis of the total cohort showed that the first episode of ataxia occurred before age 20 in all but one patient, with an average age of onset of 7.9 years. Physical exertion, emotional stress and environmental temperature were the most common triggers for attacks. Attack frequency ranged from daily to monthly, even with the same KCNA1 genotype. Average attack duration was in the order of minutes. Ten participants (26%) developed permanent cerebellar signs, which were related to disease duration. The average Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score (SARA, a standardized measure of cerebellar dysfunction on clinical examination, scores range from 0-40) was an average of 3.15 for all participants (range 0-14), but was only 2 in those with isolated episodic ataxia compared with 7.7 in those with progressive cerebellar ataxia in addition to episodic ataxia. Thirty-seven participants completed the SF-36, a quality of life survey; all eight domain norm-based average scores (mean=50) were below normal with mental health being the lowest (41.3) in those with mutation positive episodic ataxia type 1. Scores on SF-36 correlated negatively with attack frequency. Of the 39 participants in the study, 33 harboured mutations in KCNA1 whereas the remaining six had no mutation identified. Episodic ataxia type 1 phenocopies have not been described previously and we report their clinical features, which appear to be different to those with a KCNA1 mutation. This large prospective study of both genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 1 and episodic ataxia type 1 phenocopies provides detailed baseline characteristics of these disorders and their impact on participants. We found that attacks had a significant effect on quality of life. Unlike previous studies, we found that a significant number of individuals with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 1 (21%) had accumulated persistent cerebellar symptoms and signs. These data will enable the development of outcome measures for clinical trials of treatment. PMID:24578548

  8. The correlation between clinical laboratory data and telomeric status of male patients with metabolic disorders and no clinical history of vascular events.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Toyoki; Oyama, Jun-ichi; Higuchi, Yoshihiro; Koyanagi, Masamichi; Sasaki, Makoto; Arima, Takahiro; Mimori, Koshi; Makino, Naoki

    2011-03-01

    The telomere length and subtelomeric methylated status of peripheral blood leukocytes has been reported to be correlated with many kinds of pathophysiological conditions. However, the correlation between the telomeric parameters and clinical laboratory data in metabolic disorders is not well known. This study investigated the correlation between the telomere length and subtelomeric methylated status in peripheral leukocytes and the laboratory data of male outpatients with combined metabolic disorders and no clinical history of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event were assessed, to find good clinical laboratory markers reflecting the biological aging. The laboratory data were collected in 26 Japanese male outpatients with diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia, and no history of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event, and the telomeric parameters in their peripheral leukocytes were determined by Southern blot with methylation-sensitive and insensitive isoschizomers. Any correlations between the laboratory data and the telomeric parameters were assessed. The patients showed a significant negative correlation among the bilirubin and creatine phosphokinase with the aging-associate change of the telomeric and subtelomeric parameters. Lowered serum bilirubin and creatinine phosphokinase level correlated to genomic aging represented by telomere attrition of patients with metabolic disorders. PMID:20670100

  9. question_1410236555 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    This is a great question. Gene-based targeting has contributed significantly to decrease mortality. Despite the unexplored black box of molecular mechanisms, these drugs were highly effective as first line of therapy. However over time, a percentage of patients were either non-responders or developed resistance. Our deep knowledge of molecular mechanisms has helped redesign some of the drugs, or established diagnostic tests to stratify patients that would benefit from such drugs.

  10. question_1332002134 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Sequencing of natural human tumors is teaching us invaluable lessons. It is becoming clear that the new dogmas created in the post genome era are being questioned. The previously suspected genetic heterogeneity of tumors is now proven on the sequence level. The extreme genetic heterogeneity of individual tumors and the existence of multiple tumors (not metastases) pose fundamental doubt on the prevailing dogma of targeted drug(s) and personalized treatments.

  11. Injury to the Preterm Brain and Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, Unanswered Questions, and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Michael A.; Kostova, Felina V.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Johnston, Michael V.; Brunstrom, Jan E.; Hagberg, Henrik; Maria, Bernard L.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy will affect nearly 10% of the 60,000 very-low-birth-weight infants born in the United States in the next year, and an even greater percentage will display some form of permanent neurological impairment resulting from injury to the preterm brain. The 2008 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 37th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to define current knowledge and to develop specific aims for future clinical, translational, and fundamental science. A complex interplay of both destructive and developmental forces is responsible for injury to the preterm brain. Advances in imaging and histology have implicated a variety of cell types, though pre-oligodendrocyte injury remains the focus. Research into different mechanisms of injury is facilitating new neuroprotective and rehabilitative interventions. A cooperative effort is necessary to translate basic research findings into clinically effective therapies and better care for these children. PMID:19745084

  12. Clinical correlates of parametric digit-symbol substitution test in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Amaresha, Anekal C; Danivas, Vijay; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Kalmady, Sunil V; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2014-08-01

    Processing speed deficit, ascertained by digit-symbol substitution test (DSST), is considered as a fundamental impairment in schizophrenia. Clinical correlates of processing speed abnormalities, especially using the parametric version of DSST is yet to be evaluated comprehensively. In this study, we examined schizophrenia patients (N=66) and demographically matched healthy controls (N=72) using computer-administered parametric DSST (pDSST) with fixed (pDSSTF) as well as random (pDSSTR) conditions and analysed the relationship between pDSST performance and clinical symptoms. Psychopathology was assessed using Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS)/Negative Symptoms (SANS) with good inter-rater reliability. In comparison with healthy controls, patients demonstrated significantly lesser number of correct responses (CN) in pDSSTF (t=8.0; p<0.001) and pDSSTR (t=7.8; p<0.001) as well as significantly prolonged reaction time in pDSSTF (t=7.1; p<0.001) and pDSSTR (t=7.0; p<0.001). The difference in CN between pDSSTF and pDSSTR [?CN] was significantly lesser in patients than healthy controls (t=2.61; p=0.01). The pDSST reaction time had significant positive correlation with negative syndrome scores as well as bizarre behaviour score. Significantly greater processing speed deficits in pDSST suggest potential relational memory/visual scanning abnormalities in schizophrenia. Furthermore, pDSST deficits demonstrated a significant association with the psychopathology, especially with the various negative symptoms and bizarre behaviour. PMID:25042951

  13. Computed Tomography Appearance of Early Radiation Injury to the Lung: Correlation With Clinical and Dosimetric Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Peter; Welsh, Anne

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To systematically assess the spectrum of radiologic changes in the lung after radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the cases of 146 patients treated with radical radiotherapy at our institution. All patients had computed tomography (CT) scans performed 3 months after completion of therapy. Radiographic appearances were categorized using a standard grading system. The association of these abnormalities with pretreatment factors and clinical radiation pneumonitis (RP) was investigated. Results: New intrapulmonary abnormalities were seen in 92 patients (63%). These were ground-glass opacity in 16 (11%), patchy consolidation in 19 (13%), and diffuse consolidation in 57 (39%). Twenty-five patients (17%) developed clinical symptoms of RP. Although 80% of the patients with RP had areas of consolidation seen on the posttreatment CT scan, the majority (74%) of patients with such radiographic changes were asymptomatic. For patients with lung infiltrates, the minimum isodose encompassing the volume of radiologic abnormality was usually {>=}27 Gy. Traditional dose-volume metrics, pulmonary function tests, and the coadministration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) were all strongly correlated with the presence of radiologic injury on univariate analysis (p {<=} 0.002). There was also an inverse correlation between prior smoking history and CT scan changes (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, dosimetric parameters and the use of ACE-I retained significance (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that there is substantial interindividual variation in lung radiosensitivity. ACE-I prevented the radiologic changes seen after high-dose radiation therapy, and their role as radioprotectants warrants further investigation.

  14. A Study of Correlation Between Clinical and Histopathological Findings of Erythroderma in North Bengal Population

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sabyasachi; Ghosh, Swarup; Mandal, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Erythroderma is a reaction pattern characterized by erythema and desquamation of 90% or more body surface area along with some metabolic alterations. Materials and Methods: Here we studied 32 patients of erythroderma at of North Bengal Medical College for a period of 1 year to find the etiology, clinical features and histological changes. Detailed history was taken from all the patients followed by relevant biochemical investigations and histological examination. To correlate the clinical and histopathological findings chi square test was used. Results: Male preponderance was present and most of them were in the 4th or 5th decade. Etiologically the patients were divided into secondary erythroderma developing over pre-existing dermatoses, and idiopathic erythroderma. Secondary erythroderma (n = 24) cases outnumbered the idiopathic cases (n = 8). Among the pre-existing dermatoses, psoriasis was found to be the most common etiologic agent. Apart from erythema the other common presenting features were scaling and itching. Histopathological categorization was possible in 59.3% cases, rest of the cases showed non-specific dermatitis. The most common histopathologic diagnosis was psoriasis (21.8% of cases). Conclusions: Our study of clinicopathological correlation of erythroderma patients among north bengal population corroborates with most of the previous studies done in other areas. As ours is a cross-sectional study in a undefined population so we could not determine the true incidence of erythroderma in north bengal population. We might have missed lymphoma as a cause of erythroderma in idiopathic cases due to lack of long follow-up, so we understand that further studies over a defined population with long follow-up is needed to determine the true incidence and causes of idiopathic erythroderma. PMID:26677266

  15. Autonomic dysfunction in patients with advanced cancer; prevalence, clinical correlates and challenges in assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The results of a small number of studies of autonomic function in patients with advanced cancer suggest that autonomic dysfunction (AD) is common. In other disease-specific groups this is associated with decreased survival, falls and symptoms such as postural hypotension, nausea, early satiety and fatigue. The contribution of AD to symptoms in advanced cancer is unknown. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study designed to identify the risk factors for falls in patients with advanced cancer. Ambulant adult patients admitted consecutively to palliative care services were invited to participate. Participants underwent an assessment at baseline which included standard clinical tests of autonomic function, assessment of symptom severity, muscle strength, anthropometric measurements, walking speed, medication use, comorbidities and demographics. Information regarding survival was recorded ten months following cessation of recruitment. The clinical correlates of AD, defined as definite or severe dysfunction using Ewing's classification, were examined by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Survival analysis was conducted using Kaplan-Meier plots and the log rank test. Results Of 185 patients recruited, 45% were unable to complete all of the clinical tests of autonomic function. Non-completion was associated with scoring high on clinical indicators of frailty. It was possible to accurately classify 138/185 (74.6%) of participants as having either definite or severe versus normal, early or atypical AD: 110 (80%) had definite/severe AD. In logistic regression analysis, age (OR = 1.07 [95% CI; 1.03-1.1] P = 0.001) and increased severity of fatigue (OR = 1.26 [95% CI; 1.05-1.5] p = 0.016) were associated with having definite/severe AD. In analysis adjusted for age, median survival of participants with definite/severe AD was shorter than in those with normal/early/atypical classification (?2 = 4.3, p = 0.038). Conclusions Autonomic dysfunction is highly prevalent in patients with advanced cancer and is associated with increased severity of fatigue and reduced survival. Due to frailty, up to 45% of participants were unable to complete standard clinical tests of autonomic function. In order to further investigate the impact of AD and the therapeutic potential of treatment of AD in patients with advanced cancer, the validity of alternative novel methods of assessing autonomic function must be appraised. PMID:22379978

  16. Provocative Questions feedback — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online Pose a Question Workshops 10-9-2010 PQ

  17. Prevalence and Correlates of Substance Use Among South African Primary Care Clinic Patients

    PubMed Central

    WARD, CATHERINE L.; MERTENS, JENNIFER R.; FLISHER, ALAN J.; BRESICK, GRAHAM F.; STERLING, STACY A.; LITTLE, FRANCESCA; WEISNER, CONSTANCE M.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to assess prevalence and correlates of hazardous use of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs in a primary care population in Cape Town, South Africa. Stratified random sampling was used to select 14 of the 49 clinics in the public health sector in Cape Town, and every “nth” patient, with those ages 18–25 oversampled (N = 2,618). Data were collected from December 2003 through 2004, using the World Health Organization Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test. Hazardous use of tobacco was most common, followed by alcohol and then other drugs. Hazardous tobacco use was associated with the 18–25 years age group, no religious involvement, high school completion, and higher stress. Hazardous alcohol use was associated with male gender, younger men, no religious involvement, employment, some high school education, and higher stress. Hazardous use of other drugs was associated with Colored (mixed) race (particularly among men), no religious involvement, employment, and stress. For all substances, women, particularly Black women, had the lowest rates of hazardous use. Although the study is cross-sectional, it does identify groups that may be at high risk of substance misuse and for whom intervention is urgent. Because prevalence of substance use is high in this population, routine screening should be introduced in primary care clinics. PMID:18696375

  18. Evaluation of correlation between dose and clinical outcomes in subcutaneous immunoglobulin replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Belohradsky, B H; Berger, M; Borte, M; Hagan, J; Jolles, S; Wasserman, R L; Baggish, J S; Saunders, R; Grimbacher, B

    2012-01-01

    The importance of serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G concentration in IgG replacement therapy for primary immunodeficiency diseases is established in certain settings. Generally, IgG is infused via the intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG) route. For IVIG infusion, published data demonstrate that higher IgG doses and trough levels provide patients with improved protection from infection. The same conclusions are not yet accepted for SCIG; data from two recent Phase III studies and a recent post-hoc analysis, however, suggest the same correlation between higher SCIG dose and serum IgG concentration and decreased incidence of infection seen with IVIG. Other measures of clinical efficacy have not been considered similarly. Thus, combined analyses of these and other published SCIG studies were performed; a full comparison of the 13 studies was, however, limited by non-standardized definitions and reporting. Despite these limitations, our analyses indicate that certain clinical outcomes improve at higher SCIG doses and associated higher serum IgG concentrations, and suggest that there might be opportunity to improve patient outcomes via SCIG dose adjustment. PMID:22774992

  19. Correlation between Clinical Characteristics and Chest Computed Tomography Findings of Pulmonary Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yabe, Masami; Baba, Emiri; Okuda, Keitaro; Fujimoto, Shota; Katagi, Hiroaki; Takagi, Masamichi; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to review HIV-negative patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis to analyze the correlations between clinical characteristics and chest computed tomography (CT) findings. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed medical records of 16 HIV-negative patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis diagnosed at our institution, and clinical characteristics of the patients with nodules or masses without ground-glass attenuation (GGA)/consolidation type were compared with those of patients with inclusive GGA or consolidation type. Results. Host status was immunocompromised (81.2%) in most of the patients, and 6 (37.5%) were asymptomatic. The most frequent radiologic abnormalities on chest CT scans were one or more nodules (87.5%), GGA (37.5%), and consolidations (18.8%). Most lesions were located in the lower lung. Levels of hemoglobin and platelets were significantly lower in patients with inclusive GGA or consolidation type. Although the differences were not significant, patients with inclusive GGA or consolidation type tended to have a C-reactive protein level of ?1.0?mg/dL. Conclusion. If a patient with anemia and thrombocytopenia shows GGA or consolidation in the lung, pulmonary cryptococcosis should be given careful consideration. PMID:25767722

  20. Sexual Dysfunction in Men Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment: Clinical History and Psychobiological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Manfredini, Matteo; Somaini, Lorenzo; Maremmani, Icro; Leonardi, Claudio; Donnini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A variety of studies evidenced a relationship between drug use disorders and sexual dysfunction. In particular, heroin and opioid agonist medications to treat heroin dependence have been found to be associated with erectile dysfunction and reduced libido. Controversial findings also indicate the possibility of factors other than the pharmacological effects of opioid drugs concurring to sexual dysfunction. With the present study, we investigated the link between sexual dysfunction and long-term exposure to opioid receptor stimulation (heroin dependence, methadone maintenance treatment, methadone dosage), the potentially related hormonal changes reflecting hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis function and prolactin (PRL) pituitary release, the role of adverse childhood experiences in the clinical history and the concomitant symptoms of comorbid mental health disorders in contributing to sexual problems. Forty male patients participating in a long-term methadone treatment program were included in the present study and compared with 40 healthy control subjects who never used drugs nor abused alcohol. All patients and controls were submitted to the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX), Child Experiences of Care and Abuse-Questionnaire (CECA-Q) and the Symptom Check List-90 Scale. A blood sample for testosterone and PRL assays was collected. Methadone dosages were recorded among heroin-dependent patients on maintenance treatment. Methadone patients scored significantly higher than controls on the 5-item rating ASEX scale, on CECA-Q and on Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL 90) scale. Testosterone plasma levels were significantly lower and PRL levels significantly higher in methadone patients with respect to the healthy control group. ASEX scores reflecting sexual dysfunction were directly and significantly correlated with CECA-Q neglect scores and SCL 90 psychiatric symptoms total score. The linear regression model, when applied only to addicted patients, showed that methadone dosages were not significantly correlated with sexual dysfunction scores except for 'erectile dysfunction', for which an inverse association was evidenced. Testosterone values showed a significant inverse correlation with ASEX sexual dysfunction scores, CECA-Q neglect scores and psychiatric symptom at SCL 90 among methadone patients. PRL levels were directly and significantly correlated with sexual dysfunction scores, psychiatric symptoms at SCL 90 and CECA-Q neglect scores. Both testosterone and PRL did not correlate with methadone dosages. The present findings appear to support the view of childhood adversities and comorbid psychiatric symptoms contributing to sexual dysfunction and related hormonal changes among methadone patients, challenging the assumption that attributes sexual problems entirely to the direct pharmacological effects of opioid agonist medications. PMID:26595117

  1. Preschool anxiety disorders: comprehensive assessment of clinical, demographic, temperamental, familial, and life stress correlates.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Lea R; Tolep, Marissa R; Bufferd, Sara J; Olino, Thomas M; Dyson, Margaret; Traditi, Jennifer; Rose, Suzanne; Carlson, Gabrielle A; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-01-01

    This study examined correlates of preschoolers' anxiety disorders using a comprehensive, multimethod design. Participants included a community sample of 541 three-year-old children, of whom 106 (19.6%) met criteria for at least 1 anxiety disorder. Child and parental psychopathology and life stress were assessed with clinical interviews. Child temperament and parenting behavior were assessed with laboratory observations. Mothers and fathers reported on their parenting styles. Compared to preschoolers with no anxiety disorder, preschoolers with an anxiety disorder were more likely to meet criteria for comorbid depressive and oppositional defiant disorders and to exhibit greater temperamental behavioral inhibition and lower positive affectivity, and more sleep problems. Children with anxiety disorders also experienced more stressful life events in the previous 6 months, and their mothers had a higher rate of current anxiety disorders. Compared to children with other anxiety disorders, children with only specific phobia exhibited a somewhat different pattern of associations than children with other anxiety disorders. Overall, the findings suggest that many of the correlates observed in older youth with anxiety disorders are also observed in preschoolers. PMID:23368788

  2. Complement Effectors of Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Fluid Correlate with Clinical Measures of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Laura A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Perkins, Amy M.; Shah, Tushar A.; Krishna, Neel K.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2015-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), lung damage is mediated by a cycle of obstruction, infection, and inflammation. Here we explored complement inflammatory effectors in CF lung fluid. In this study soluble fractions (sols) from sputum samples of 15 CF patients were assayed for complement effectors and analyzed with clinical measurements. The pro-inflammatory peptide C5a was increased 4.8-fold (P = 0.04) in CF sols compared with controls. Incubation of CF sols with P. aeruginosa or S. aureus increased C5a concentration 2.3-fold (P = 0.02). A peptide inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) completely blocked the increase in C5a concentration from P. aeruginosa in CF sol in vitro (P = 0.001). C5a concentration in CF sol correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI) percentile in children (r = -0.77, P = 0.04). C3a, which has anti-inflammatory effects, correlated positively with FEV1% predicted (rs = 0.63, P = 0.02). These results suggest that complement effectors may significantly impact inflammation in CF lung fluid. PMID:26642048

  3. Differences in correlates of condom use between young adults and adults attending sexually transmitted infection clinics.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Amanda R; Blood, Emily A; Crosby, Richard A; Shrier, Lydia A

    2015-07-01

    Despite developmental differences between young adults and adults, studies of condom use have not typically considered young adults as a distinct age group. This study sought to examine how condom use and its correlates differed between high-risk young adults and adults. Sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic patients (n?=?763) reported STI history, contraception, negative condom attitudes, fear of partner reaction to condom use and risky behaviours. Past 3-month condom use was examined as unprotected vaginal sex (UVS) acts, proportional condom use and consistent condom use. Regression models tested associations of age group and potential correlates with each condom use outcome. Interaction models tested whether associations differed by age group. Proportional condom use was greater in young adults than adults (mean 0.55 vs. 0.47); UVS and consistent condom use were similar between age groups. Young adults with a recent STI reported less condom use, whereas for older adults, a distant STI was associated with less condom use, compared to others in their age groups. Negative condom attitudes were more strongly linked to UVS acts for younger versus older adults. STI prevention efforts for younger adults may be improved by intensifying counselling about condom use immediately following STI diagnosis and targeting negative condom attitudes. PMID:25070945

  4. Electroencephalographic coherence analysis in multiple sclerosis: correlation with clinical, neuropsychological, and MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Leocani, L.; Locatelli, T.; Martinelli, V.; Rovaris, M.; Falautano, M.; Filippi, M.; Magnani, G.; Comi, G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To explore functional corticocortical connections in multiple sclerosis by means of coherence of the EEG, and to evaluate their correlations with the degree of cognitive impairment and with brain lesion load assessed by MRI.?METHODS—EEG coherence was studied from 28 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis. Ten minutes of resting EEG were recorded with 20 scalp electrodes, with binaural reference. FFT power and coherence were calculated in artifact free epochs of 1 second and compared with values from 22 control subjects of comparable age and sex distribution. Patients also underwent MRI (n=27) and neuropsychological examination (n=21).?RESULTS—Compared with controls, patients with multiple sclerosis showed increased ? power in the frontotemporal-central regions (p<0.005). ? Band coherence was decreased between homologous areas (p<0.02). ? Band coherence was decreased both in the local and long distance connections (p<0.0005). These findings were most striking both in patients with high MRI subcortical lesion load and in patients with cognitive involvement. A significant correlation was found between interhemispheric ? (p=0.02) and ? (p=0.017) and anteroposterior ? (p=0.013) coherence and subcortical MRI lesion load, but not with exclusively periventricular lesion load.?CONCLUSIONS—These findings support the hypothesis that cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is mostly dependent on involvement of corticocortical connections related to demyelination and/or axonal loss within the white matter immediately underlying the cortex.?? PMID:10896692

  5. Physiological knock-knee in preschool children: prevalence, correlating factors, gait analysis, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Lin, C J; Lin, S C; Huang, W; Ho, C S; Chou, Y L

    1999-01-01

    Physiological knock-knee (PKK) was categorized by measuring intermalleolar distance (IMD), a clinically simple method, to evaluate the prevalence and correlating factors in 305 preschool children. The prevalence in this cross-sectional study was relatively high, and it was age related (p = 0.002; 64, 44, and 34% for ages 3-4, 4-5, and 5-6 years, respectively). The following factors were correlated with PKK: use of walking chair early (p = 0.0001), independently walked late (p = 0.0005), dependently walked longer (p = 0.0001), concurrence with flatfoot (p = 0.001), and angular deformity (toe in/out, p = 0.03). Gait analysis, with spatiotemporal, kinematics, and kinetics parameters, was performed to evaluate the ambulatory significance. Preschool children with PKK have a shorter stride length (p = 0.02) and a slower walking speed (p = 0.004). Dynamic hyperextension of the knee is noted for 8 degrees during the whole gait cycle (p < 0.05). We conclude that PKK is a variable that should be considered in the development of mature gait for preschool children. PMID:10488869

  6. question_1412835592 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Now we are aware about intratumoral genomic heterogeneity and its clonal nature within the tumor. These mutations may have distinct downstream functions based on its intra-genomic interactions. Therefore, in order to directly correlate genomic makeup of cells with its functions within the tumor, I am curious if we can devise methods to monitor in vivo functional heterogeneity among tumor cells.

  7. Answering relevant research questions via careful observation of clinical practice: a fresh look at the old way forward.

    PubMed

    Matino, D; Iorio, A

    2014-09-01

    Although many aspects of inhibitor development have been elucidated, the role of switching FVIII product concentrate in the risk of inhibitors development in previously treated patients is still under discussion. To provide their contribution, Aznar et al [9] transparently showed the numerous different brands used over time and the number of patients treated with one or another class of concentrates in their center. This way of inclusively reporting data as generated in routine clinical practice would need to be adopted more broadly among hemophilia treater and scientists. Strength and limitations of the approach are discussed. PMID:25154445

  8. Lost in Translation: Assessing Effectiveness of Focus Group Questioning Techniques to Develop Improved Translation of Terminology Used in HIV Prevention Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Natasha; Ramirez, Catalina B.; Friedland, Barbara; Nnko, Soori

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Achieving participant comprehension has proven to be one of the most difficult, practical, and ethical challenges of HIV prevention clinical trials. It becomes even more challenging when local languages do not have equivalent scientific and technical vocabularies, rendering communication of scientific concepts in translated documents extremely difficult. Even when bilingual lexicons are developed, there is no guarantee that participants understand the terminology as translated. Methods We conducted twelve focus groups with women of reproductive age in Mwanza, Tanzania to explore the effectiveness of four questioning techniques for: (1) assessing participants' familiarity with existing technical terms and concepts, (2) generating a list of acceptable technical and non-technical terms, (3) testing our definitions of technical terms, and (4) verifying participants' preferences for terms. Focus groups were transcribed, translated, and qualitatively analyzed. Results and Discussion A translation process that uses all four questioning techniques in a step-wise approach is an effective way to establish a baseline understanding of participants' familiarity with research terms, to develop and test translatable definitions, and to identify participants' preferred terminology for international HIV clinical research. This may help to ensure that important concepts are not “lost in translation.” The results emphasize the importance of using a variety of techniques depending on the level of participant familiarity with research concepts, the existence of colloquial or technical terms in the target language, and the inherent complexity of the terms. PMID:24040075

  9. Judgments of Omitted BE and DO in Questions as Extended Finiteness Clinical Markers of SLI to Fifteen Years: A Study of Growth and Asymptote

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Mabel L; Hoffman, Lesa; Wexler, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Clinical grammar markers are needed for children with SLI older than 8 years. This study followed children studied earlier on sentences with omitted finiteness to determine if affected children continue to perform at low levels and to examine possible predictors of low performance. This is the first longitudinal report of grammaticality judgments of questions. Method Three groups of children participated: 20 SLI, 20 age controls and 18 language-matched controls, followed from ages 6–15 years. An experimental grammaticality judgment task was administered with BE copula/auxiliary and DO auxiliary in Wh- and Yes/No questions for 9 times of measurement. Predictors were indices of vocabulary, nonverbal intelligence, and maternal education. Results Growth curve analyses show that the affected group performed below the younger controls at each time of measurement, for each variable. Growth analyses show linear and quadratic effects for both groups across variables, with the exception of BE acquisition which was flat for both groups. The control children reached ceiling levels; the affected children reached a lower asymptote. Conclusions The results suggest an on-going maturational lag in finiteness marking for affected children with promise as a clinical marker for language impairment in school-aged and adolescent children and probably adults as well. PMID:19786705

  10. question_1408193863 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has shown the usefulness of fasting or dietary interventions as potential cancer preventive and therapeutic approach. Fasting itself is known to suppress many cancer cells growth and increases chemo-sensitivity. Likewise, ketogenic diets are also known to suppress cancer cells growth. The potential of such kind of approaches has motivated many clinicians and researchers to carry out experimental and clinical studies at different parts of the world.

  11. Baseline OCT Measurements in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, Part II: Correlations and Relationship to Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The accepted method to evaluate and monitor papilledema, Frisén grading, uses an ordinal approach based on descriptive features. Part I showed that spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in a clinical trial setting provides reliable measurement of the effects of papilledema on the optic nerve head (ONH) and peripapillary retina, particularly if a 3-D segmentation method is used for analysis.1 We evaluated how OCT parameters are interrelated and how they correlate with vision and other clinical features in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) patients. Methods. A total of 126 subjects in the IIH Treatment Trial (IIHTT) OCT substudy had Cirrus SD-OCT optic disc and macula scans analyzed by using a 3-D segmentation algorithm to derive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, total retinal thickness (TRT), retinal ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCL+IPL) thickness, and ONH volume. The SD-OCT parameter values were correlated with high- and low-contrast acuity, perimetric mean deviation, Frisén grading, and IIH features. Results. At study entry, the average RNFL thickness, TRT, and ONH volume showed significant strong correlations (r ? 0.90) with each other. The same OCT parameters showed a strong (r > 0.76) correlation with Frisén grade and a mild (r > 0.24), but significant, correlation with lumbar puncture opening pressure. For all eyes at baseline, neither visual acuity (high or low contrast) nor mean deviation correlated with any OCT measure of swelling or GCL+IPL thickness. Conclusions. In newly diagnosed IIH, OCT demonstrated alterations of the peripapillary retina and ONH correlate with Frisén grading of papilledema. At presentation, OCT measures of papilledema, in patients with newly diagnosed IIH and mild vision loss, do not correlate with clinical features or visual dysfunction. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:25370513

  12. question_1309956298 — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Cell culture, the propagation of cells in artificial environment conducive to growth, has become one of the major tools in life sciences. Human cells grown in laboratory, subjected to various (single or multiple) perturbations, are serving well in elucidating physico-biochemical mechanisms of response in investigations of physiology and biochemistry. In addition, cell strains and cell lines have extensively been used to identify molecular markers of disease, and recent advances in cell culture have facilitated propagating stem cells for clinical and research purposes.

  13. Lymphocytic lymphoma of intermediate differentiation. Morphologic and immunophenotypic spectrum and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Lardelli, P; Bookman, M A; Sundeen, J; Longo, D L; Jaffe, E S

    1990-08-01

    All cases of lymphocytic lymphoma of intermediate differentiation (IDL) referred to the National Cancer Institute were reviewed in order to define the histopathologic spectrum of the disease and to investigate morphologic and immunophenotypic features with potential prognostic relevance. Thirty-three cases were classified as IDL according to histologic criteria. Immunophenotypic analysis was performed in 27 cases, and clinical records were available for 22 patients. The median age was 58 years, and the male-to-female ratio, 3.4:1. All patients presented with stage III or IV disease, and five had extranodal presentations. Median survival was 56.3 months, with only three patients having a prolonged relapse-free survival (greater than 2 years). Morphologically, 14 cases were diffuse or only vaguely nodular; 18 cases showed a mantle zone pattern with naked germinal centers. There was a trend toward prolonged median survival for patients with the mantle zone (77.4 months, p = 0.098). The neoplastic population was composed of irregular or cleaved small lymphoid cells with a mitotic rate ranging from 5 to 62 per 20 high-power fields (hpf). A histologically distinctive variant with blastic cytologic features was identified (seven cases). The blastic variant was associated with a higher mitotic index (51.3 versus 19.0) and shortened survival (24.9 months). In contrast to the histologic progression often observed in follicular lymphomas, in no case was transformation to a large-cell or small noncleaved lymphoma observed. All cases had a mature B-cell phenotype demonstrating monoclonal Ig and B-cell surface antigens. Seventy-eight percent were CD5 positive; three of six CD5-negative cases presented in mucosal-associated extranodal sites. CD10 and CD25 were expressed in 52% and 44%, respectively, but did not show clinical correlations. The proliferative rate measured by Ki-67 positivity correlated with the mitotic index, but neither of these parameters had a statistically significant influence on survival. PMID:2198813

  14. Clinical correlates of enlarged prostate size in subjects with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Corona, Giovanni; Gacci, Mauro; Maseroli, Elisa; Rastrelli, Giulia; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra; Forti, Gianni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Digito-rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate provides useful information on the state of prostate growth and on the presence of suspected peripheral nodules. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biochemical correlates of finding an enlarged prostate size at DRE in subjects with sexual dysfunction (SD). A consecutive series of 2379 patients was retrospectively studied. The analysis was focused on a subset of subjects (n = 1823; mean age 54.7 ± 11.4) selected for being free from overt prostatic diseases. Several parameters were investigated. After adjusting for confounders, the presence of an enlarged prostate size at DRE was associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (HR = 1.346 (1.129-1.759); P = 0.030), type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR = 1.489 (1.120-1.980); P = 0.006), increased LDL cholesterol (>100 mg dl-1 ; HR = 1.354 (1.018-1.801); P = 0.037) and increased mean blood pressure (BP) values (HR = 1.017 (1.007-1.027) for each mmHg increment; P = 0.001). Accordingly, enlarged prostate size was also associated with a higher risk of arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED), as well as with other andrological conditions, such as varicocele and premature ejaculation (PE). PSA levels were significantly higher in subjects with enlarged prostate size when compared to the rest of the sample (HR = 3.318 (2.304; 4.799) for each log unit increment in PSA levels; P < 0.0001). Arteriogenic ED, according to different criteria, was also associated with increased PSA levels. In conclusion, our data support the need to examine prostate size either by clinical (DRE) or biochemical (PSA) inspection in subjects with SD, in order to have insights into the nature of the SD and the metabolic and cardiovascular (CV) background of the patient. PMID:24830688

  15. Clinical correlates of enlarged prostate size in subjects with sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Gacci, Mauro; Maseroli, Elisa; Rastrelli, Giulia; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra; Forti, Gianni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Digito-rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate provides useful information on the state of prostate growth and on the presence of suspected peripheral nodules. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biochemical correlates of finding an enlarged prostate size at DRE in subjects with sexual dysfunction (SD). A consecutive series of 2379 patients was retrospectively studied. The analysis was focused on a subset of subjects (n = 1823; mean age 54.7 ± 11.4) selected for being free from overt prostatic diseases. Several parameters were investigated. After adjusting for confounders, the presence of an enlarged prostate size at DRE was associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (HR = 1.346 (1.129–1.759); P = 0.030), type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR = 1.489 (1.120–1.980); P = 0.006), increased LDL cholesterol (>100 mg dl?1; HR = 1.354 (1.018–1.801); P = 0.037) and increased mean blood pressure (BP) values (HR = 1.017 (1.007–1.027) for each mmHg increment; P = 0.001). Accordingly, enlarged prostate size was also associated with a higher risk of arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED), as well as with other andrological conditions, such as varicocele and premature ejaculation (PE). PSA levels were significantly higher in subjects with enlarged prostate size when compared to the rest of the sample (HR = 3.318 (2.304; 4.799) for each log unit increment in PSA levels; P < 0.0001). Arteriogenic ED, according to different criteria, was also associated with increased PSA levels. In conclusion, our data support the need to examine prostate size either by clinical (DRE) or biochemical (PSA) inspection in subjects with SD, in order to have insights into the nature of the SD and the metabolic and cardiovascular (CV) background of the patient. PMID:24830688

  16. Correlation Between ED Symptoms and Clinical Outcomes in the Patient with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Kristin; Crago, Elizabeth; Kuo, Chien-Wen J.; Horowitz, Michael; Sherwood, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating neurologic insult often presenting to the emergency department as a headache. Recognition and prompt treatment are important to good outcomes. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the presentation of aSAH patients to the emergency department and determine whether presentation predicts length of stay or death. Methods This is a retrospective review of data gathered from 2 existing studies. Data from patients diagnosed with acute aSAH were reviewed for symptoms, clinical presentation, history, demographics, and laboratory results. Statistical analysis was completed by use of ?2 and regression analysis. Results This sample of 193 adult aSAH patients confirmed headache as well as meningeal signs as the most frequent symptom on presentation to the emergency department, and this was cited as the most common reason for seeking medical treatment. Symptom presentation did not appear to affect length of stay; however, survival analysis showed that patients who presented with a Hunt and Hess grade greater than 3 along with bradycardia were 15.6 times more likely to die within the first month of aSAH. Discussion Although aSAH presentation remains the same, this analysis did find a correlation between poor clinical grade and bradycardia to be a significant predictor of death at 30 days. Additional study may help to determine whether any intervention could lessen this effect. Although patient diagnosis and referral from the community emergency department to a tertiary center were relatively quick, there was a wide window of time between patient recognition of symptoms and seeking medical treatment. PMID:22578393

  17. Clinical Correlates of Mass Effect in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Park, Hayne Cho; Ryu, Hyunjin; Kim, Kiwon; Kim, Hyo Sang; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Yu, Su Jong; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cheong, Hae Il; Lee, Kyubeck; Park, Jong Hoon; Pei, York; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-01-01

    Mass effect from polycystic kidney and liver enlargement can result in significant clinical complications and symptoms in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In this single-center study, we examined the correlation of height-adjusted total liver volume (htTLV) and total kidney volume (htTKV) by CT imaging with hepatic complications (n = 461) and abdominal symptoms (n = 253) in patients with ADPKD. “Mass-effect” complications were assessed by review of medical records and abdominal symptoms, by a standardized research questionnaire. Overall, 91.8% of patients had 4 or more liver cysts on CT scans. Polycystic liver disease (PLD) was classified as none or mild (htTLV < 1,600 mL/m); moderate (1,600 ? htTLV <3,200 mL/m); and severe (htTLV ? 3,200 mL/m). The prevalence of moderate and severe PLD in our patient cohort was 11.7% (n = 54/461) and 4.8% (n = 22/461), respectively, with a female predominance in both the moderate (61.1%) and severe (95.5%) PLD groups. Pressure-related complications such as leg edema (20.4%), ascites (16.6%), and hernia (3.6%) were common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 6-fold increased risk (compared to no or mild PLD) for these complications in multivariate analysis. Similarly, abdominal symptoms including back pain (58.8%), flank pain (53.1%), abdominal fullness (46.5%), and dyspnea/chest-discomfort (44.3%) were very common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 5-fold increased risk for these symptoms. Moderate to severe PLD is a common and clinically important problem in ~16% of patients with ADPKD who may benefit from referral to specialized centers for further management. PMID:26641645

  18. HLA-associated clinical progression correlates with epitope reversion rates in early human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Duda, A; Lee-Turner, L; Fox, J; Robinson, N; Dustan, S; Kaye, S; Fryer, H; Carrington, M; McClure, M; McLean, A R; Fidler, S; Weber, J; Phillips, R E; Frater, A J

    2009-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can evade immunity shortly after transmission to a new host but the clinical significance of this early viral adaptation in HIV infection is not clear. We present an analysis of sequence variation from a longitudinal cohort study of HIV adaptation in 189 acute seroconverters followed for up to 3 years. We measured the rates of variation within well-defined epitopes to determine associations with the HLA-linked hazard of disease progression. We found early reversion across both the gag and pol genes, with a 10-fold faster rate of escape in gag (2.2 versus 0.27 forward mutations/1,000 amino acid sites). For most epitopes (23/34), variation in the HLA-matched and HLA-unmatched controls was similar. For a minority of epitopes (8/34, and generally associated with HLA class I alleles that confer clinical benefit), new variants appeared early and consistently over the first 3 years of infection. Reversion occurred early at a rate which was HLA-dependent and correlated with the HLA class 1-associated relative hazard of disease progression and death (P = 0.0008), reinforcing the association between strong cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses, viral fitness, and disease status. These data provide a comprehensive overview of viral adaptation in the first 3 years of infection. Our findings of HLA-dependent reversion suggest that costs are borne by some escape variants which may benefit the host, a finding contrary to a simple immune evasion paradigm. These epitopes, which are both strongly and frequently recognized, and for which escape involves a high cost to the virus, have the potential to optimize vaccine design. PMID:19019964

  19. ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs expressions correlate to adverse clinical outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M.A.; Arora, Arvind; Moseley, Paul; Coveney, Clare; Perry, Christina; Johnson, Kerstie; Kent, Christopher; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and rad3 related (ATR) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic sub-unit (DNA-PKcs) play critical roles in DNA damage response (DDR) by linking DNA damage sensing to DDR effectors that regulate cell cycle progression and DNA repair. Our objective was to evaluate if ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs expressions could predict response to therapy and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancers. Methods We investigated ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs expressions in ovarian epithelial cancers [protein expression (n = 194 patients), mRNA expression (n = 156 patients)] and correlated to clinicopathological outcomes as well as expression of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1), cell division cycle-45 (CDC45), cyclin-dependent kinase 1(CDK1) and Ki-67 in tumours. Results High ATM protein expression was associated with serous cystadenocarcinomas (p = 0.021) and platinum resistance (p = 0.017). High DNA-PKcs protein expression was associated with serous cystadenocarcinomas (p = 0.006) and advanced stage tumours (p = 0.018). High ATM protein (p = 0.001), high ATM mRNA (p = 0.018), high DNA-PKcs protein (p = 0.002), high DNA-PKcs mRNA (p = 0.044) and high ATR protein (p = 0.001) expressions are correlated with poor ovarian cancer specific survival (OCSS). In multivariate Cox model, high DNA-PKcs (p = 0.006) and high ATR (p = 0.043) protein expressions remain independently associated with poor OCSS. Conclusions ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs expressions may have prognostic and predictive significances in epithelial ovarian cancer. General significance The data presented here provides evidence that ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs involved in DDR are not only promising biomarkers but are also rational targets for personalized therapy in ovarian cancer.

  20. Snail1 expression in colorectal cancer and its correlation with clinical and pathological parameters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Snail1 is a transcription regulator of E-cadherin. The loss of E-cadherin seems to be a crucial step in the process of Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT initiates invasion and proliferation in many tumours. Overexpression of Snail1 is known to be associated with poor outcome in several solid tumours. The aim of this study was to analyse its expression profile and prognostic significance in colorectal cancer. Methods Tissue microarrays (TMA) containing paraffin-embedded primary colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples from 251 patients were used in this study. The expression of Snail1 and E-cadherin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in different tumour compartments, corresponding lymph node metastases and normal colonic mucosa. Intensity of staining was classified according to the Remmele score (standardized scoring system) as well as the semiquantitative score established by Blechschmidt et al. Results Snail1 expression was observed in 76% of the CRC. Loss of E-cadherin was noted in 87% of the CRC. Snail1 positive tumours were significantly correlated with Snail1 positive lymph node metastases (p=0.03). There was no significant correlation between loss of E-cadherin and Snail1 expression, or between N-stage or grading and Snail1 expression. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis identified no prognostic impact of Snail1 expression on overall survival. Conclusion Snail1 expression was detectable in most of the CRC but showed no significant association with E-cadherin loss, clinical pathological characteristics or overall survival. The observed loss of E-cadherin could be explained by effects of other important EMT pathways, such as the Wnt-signalling cascade. PMID:23522088

  1. Clinical and socio-behavioral correlates of tooth loss: a study of older adults in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Irene A; Åstrøm, Anne N; Strand, Gunhild V; Masalu, Joyce R

    2006-01-01

    Background Focusing 50 year olds and above, this study assessed the frequency, extent and correlates of tooth loss due to various reasons. Frequency and correlates of posterior occluding support was also investigated. Method A cross-sectional household survey was conducted in Pwani region and in Dar es Salaam in 2004/2005. One thousand and thirty-one subjects, mean age 62.9 years participated in a clinical examination and completed interviews. Results The prevalence of tooth loss due to any reason was 83.5 %, due to caries 63.4% and due to other reasons than caries, 32.5%. A total of 74.9% had reduced number of posterior occluding units. Compared to subjects having less than 5 teeth lost due to caries, those with 5 or more lost teeth were more likely to be females, having decayed teeth, confirming dental attendance and to be among the least poor residents. Compared to subjects who had lost less than 5 teeth due to reasons other than caries, those who had lost 5 or more teeth were more likely to be of higher age, having mobile teeth, being males, being very poor and to disconfirm dental attendance when having problems. Predictors of prevalence of tooth loss (1 or more lost tooth) due to various reasons and reduced number of occluding units followed similar patterns of relationships. Conclusion The results are consistent with prevalence and extent of tooth loss due to caries and due to reasons other than caries being differently related to disease- and socio- behavioral risk indicators. Caries was the principle cause of tooth loss and molar teeth were the teeth most commonly lost. PMID:16536880

  2. Comparison of Adherence Monitoring Tools and Correlation to Virologic Failure in a Pediatric HIV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Intasan, Jintana; Vonthanak, Saphonn; Kosalaraksa, Pope; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Ngampiyaskul, Chaiwat; Wongsawat, Jurai; Luesomboon, Wicharn; Apornpong, Tanakorn; Kerr, Stephen; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Puthanakit, Thanyawee

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is no consensus on a gold standard for monitoring adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared different adherence monitoring tools in predicting virologic failure as part of a clinical trial. HIV-infected Thai and Cambodian children aged 1–12 years (N=207) were randomized to immediate-ART or deferred-ART until CD4% <15%. Virologic failure (VF) was defined as HIV-RNA >1000 copies/mL after ?6 months of ART. Adherence monitoring tools were: (1) announced pill count, (2) PACTG adherence questionnaire (form completed by caregivers), and (3) child self-report (self-reporting from children or caregivers to direct questioning by investigators during the clinic visit) of any missed doses in the last 3 days and in the period since the last visit. The Kappa statistic was used to describe agreement between each tool. The median age at ART initiation was 7 years with median CD4% 17% and HIV-RNA 5.0?log10copies/mL and 92% received zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine. Over 144 weeks, 13% had VF. Mean adherence by announced pill count before VF in VF children was 92% compared to 98% in children without VF (p=0.03). Kappa statistics indicated slight to fair agreement between tools. In multivariate analysis adjusting for gender, treatment arm ethnicity and caregiver education, significant predictors of VF were poor adherence by announced pill count (OR 4.56; 95%CI 1.78–11.69), reporting any barrier to adherence in the PACTG adherence questionnaire (OR 7.08; 95%CI 2.42–20.73), and reporting a missed dose in the 24 weeks since the last HIV-RNA assessment (OR 8.64; 95%CI 1.96–38.04). In conclusion, we recommend the child self-report of any missed doses since last visit for use in HIV research and in routine care settings, because it is easy and quick to administer and a strong association with development of VF. PMID:24901463

  3. A comparison of A? amyloid pathology staging systems and correlation with clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Boluda, Susana; Toledo, Jon B.; Irwin, David J.; Raible, Kevin M.; Byrne, Matt D.; Lee, Edward B.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Current neuropathological Alzheimer's disease (AD) criteria from the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) incorporate two staging systems for A? pathology, namely the Thal A? phase (TAP) and the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) methods. The goal of this study was to compare and contrast results obtained with these two different staging systems for A? pathology since this is critical for future correlations of A? amyloid imaging data with A? neuropathology data based on immunohistochemical detection of A? deposits. A total of 123 cases, divided into 82 training and 41 validation cases, with a diagnosis of either unremarkable adult brain (normal) or AD and CERAD scores ranging from none to frequent were included. There was no clear and consistent relationship between CERAD and the TAP A? scores with the exception of scores for the highest plaque burdens (i.e., CERAD C3 and TAP A3) in the cases studied here. However, we developed an algorithm that relates CERAD scores to TAP scores with high agreement (94 % in training and 98 % in the validation set). In addition, TAP scores were a better predictor of dementia (sensitivity of 94 % specifcity 87.7 %) than CERAD scores (sensitivity of 57 % specifcity 100 %). Yet, further research is needed to define strategies to relate CERAD and TAP A? plaque scores to compare their utility and for determining the clinical associations of these different amyloid staging systems with aging and AD. PMID:24916271

  4. Serology of Lupus Erythematosus: Correlation between Immunopathological Features and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Drosera, Massimo; Parodi, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the aberrant production of a broad and heterogenous group of autoantibodies. Even though the presence of autoantibodies in SLE has been known, for more than 60 years, still nowadays a great effort is being made to understand the pathogenetic, diagnostic, and prognostic meaning of such autoantibodies. Antibodies to ds-DNA are useful for the diagnosis of SLE, to monitor the disease activity, and correlate with renal and central nervous involvements. Anti-Sm antibodies are highly specific for SLE. Anti-nucleosome antibodies are an excellent marker for SLE and good predictors of flares in quiescent lupus. Anti-histone antibodies characterize drug-induced lupus, while anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies are associated with neonatal lupus erythematosus and photosensitivity. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies play a role in neuropsychiatric lupus, but their association with clinical manifestations is still unclear. Anti-phospholipid antibodies are associated with the anti-phospholipid syndrome, cerebral vascular disease, and neuropsychiatric lupus. Anti-C1q antibodies amplify glomerular injury, and the elevation of their titers may predict renal flares. Anti-RNP antibodies are a marker of Sharp's syndrome but can be found in SLE as well. Anti-PCNA antibodies are present in 5–10% of SLE patients especially those with arthritis and hypocomplementemia. PMID:24649358

  5. CXCL10 haplotypes and multiple sclerosis: association and correlation with clinical course.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, D; Scalabrini, D; Fenoglio, C; Comi, C; De Riz, M; Venturelli, E; Lovati, C; Mariani, C; Monaco, F; Bresolin, N; Scarpini, E

    2007-02-01

    CXCL10 (interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10) levels are increased in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with symptomatic attacks of inflammatory demyelination, supporting a role for this molecule in MS pathogenesis. Two hundred and twenty-six patients with MS and 235 controls were genotyped for G --> C and T --> C single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in exon 4 of CXCL10 gene. Haplotypes were tested for association and correlated with clinical variables. The two SNPs studied were in complete linkage disequilibrium. None of the determined haplotypes was associated with MS. However, carriers of the GGTT haplotype (defined as wild type, according to the sequence in National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database) had a significantly lower progression index than non-carriers (P = 0.016). Furthermore, amongst patients who had an initial relapsing remitting (RR) course of the disease, the time between onset and second episode was significantly longer in GGTT carriers (P = 0.021). Considering secondary progressive (SP)-MS patients, the time between the initial RR form and the subsequent worsening to SP was longer in this group (P = 0.08). Therefore, the GGTT haplotype of the CXCL10 gene is not a susceptibility factor for the development of MS, but is probably to influence the course of MS, possibly contributing to slow down the progression of the disease. PMID:17250724

  6. Correlation between CAG Repeat Length and Clinical Features in Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Patrícia; Gaspar, Claudia; DeStefano, Anita L.; Silveira, Isabel; Coutinho, Paula; Radvany, João; Dawson, David M.; Sudarsky, Lewis; Guimarães, João; Loureiro, Jose E. L.; Nezarati, Marjan M.; Corwin, Lee I.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Rooke, Karen; Rosenberg, Roger; MacLeod, Patrick; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Sequeiros, Jorge; Rouleau, Guy A.

    1995-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is associated with the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in a novel gene on 14q32.1. We confirmed the presence of this expansion in 156 MJD patients from 33 families of different geographic origins: 15 Portuguese Azorean, 2 Brazilian, and 16 North American of Portuguese Azorean descent. Normal chromosomes contain between 12 and 37 CAG repeats in the MJD gene, whereas MJD gene carriers have alleles within the expanded range of 62–84 CAG units. The distribution of expanded alleles and the gap between normal and expanded allele sizes is either inconsistent with a premutation hypothesis or most (if not all) of the alleles we studied descend from a common ancestor. There is a strong correlation between the expanded repeat size and the age at onset of the disease as well as the clinical presentation. There is mild instability of the CAG tract length with transmission of the expanded alleles; both increase and decrease in size between parents and progeny occur, with larger variations in male than in female transmissions. Together, these effects can partly explain the variability of age at onset and of phenotypic features in MJD; however, other modifying factors must exist. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:7611296

  7. Intraligamentous ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate Ligament: MR findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Do-Dai, D.D.; Youngberg, R.A.; Lanchbury, F.D.; Pitcher, J.D. Jr.; Garver, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlation of intraligamentous cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are presented. Three cases of intraligamentous cysts of the ACL were identified out of 681 knee MRI examinations over a 2-year period. Arthroscopy and postoperative MRI were performed in all three patients, each of whom experienced knee pain with extreme flexion and extension. In all three cases the intraligamentous cyst was homogeneously hypointense on T1-weighted imaging and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging relative to the ACL. Two of the three ACL cysts required a 70{degrees} scope for adequate visualization and establishment of posteromedial and posterolateral portals for arthroscopic treatment. One cyst could not be visualized arthroscopically and probing of the ACL from the anterior portal resulted in drainage of the cyst. No patient had presence of ACL cyst on follow-up MRI or recurrence of symptoms at a mean of 24 months. Intraligamentous cyst of ACL is a rare cause of knee pain. It should be suspected in patients having chronic pain with extremes of motion. Magnetic resonance findings are diagnostic and help to guide arthroscopy. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Mutational patterns in the breast cancer mitochondrial genome, with clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    LaFramboise, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The presence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in human cancer has long been recognized, but their functional significance has remained obscure. Debate persists as to whether the mutations help drive the tumor, or are bystander events. Here, we analyze next-generation mtDNA sequence data from 99 breast cancer patients. High depth coverage enables detection of even low-level heteroplasmic variants, and data from matched normal tissue allow us to distinguish between shifts in heteroplasmy and acquired mutations. Somatic mtDNA mutations are found in 73 (73.7%) of patient tumors, and dramatic shifts from the initial germline allele proportions are observed for many heteroplasmies. Clustering of somatic mutations in promoter and replication regions, and also in genes coding for electron transport chain complex I, suggest selection for mutations affecting critical mitochondrial processes. Furthermore, statistical tests for Darwinian selection reveal evidence for positive and relaxed negative selection for somatic missense mutations. We also observe a dramatic decrease in per-cell mtDNA content in tumor tissues, as well as a surprising positive correlation between somatic mtDNA mutational burden and patient survival. Taken together, our results support the view that somatic mtDNA mutations are not solely bystander events, but have significance in cancer from both biological and clinical perspectives. We also anticipate that the catalog of heteroplasmies and somatic mutations presented here will serve as a reference for future studies of cancer mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24442641

  9. Emotional Lability in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Clinical Correlates and Familial Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobanski, Esther; Banaschewski, Tobias; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Chen, Wai; Franke, Barbara; Holtmann, Martin; Krumm, Bertram; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Stringaris, Argyris; Taylor, Eric; Anney, Richard; Ebstein, Richard P.; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence, severity and clinical correlates of emotional lability (EL) in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and to examine factors contributing to EL and familiality of EL in youth with ADHD. Methods: One thousand, one hundred and eighty-six children with ADHD…

  10. Clinical and pathological correlates of severity classifications in trigger fingers based on computer-aided image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment of trigger finger so far has heavily relied on clinicians’ evaluations for the severity of patients’ symptoms and the functionality of affected fingers. However, there is still a lack of pathological evidence supporting the criteria of clinical evaluations. This study’s aim was to correlate clinical classification and pathological changes for trigger finger based on the tissue abnormality observed from microscopic images. Methods Tissue samples were acquired, and microscopic images were randomly selected and then graded by three pathologists and two physicians, respectively. Moreover, the acquired images were automatically analyzed to derive two quantitative parameters, the size ratio of the abnormal tissue region and the number ratio of the abnormal nuclei, which can reflect tissue abnormality caused by trigger finger. A self-developed image analysis system was used to avoid human subjectivity during the quantification process. Finally, correlations between the quantitative image parameters, pathological grading, and clinical severity classification were assessed. Results One-way ANOVA tests revealed significant correlations between the image quantification and pathological grading as well as between the image quantification and clinical severity classification. The Cohen’s kappa coefficient test also depicted good consistency between pathological grading and clinical severity classification. Conclusions The criteria of clinical classification were found to be highly associated with the pathological changes of affected tissues. The correlations serve as explicit evidence supporting clinicians in making a treatment strategy of trigger finger. In addition, our proposed computer-aided image analysis system was considered to be a promising and objective approach to determining trigger finger severity at the microscopic level. PMID:25055721

  11. The Correlations of the Radiological Parameters of Hip Dysplasia and Proximal Femoral Deformity in Clinically Normal Hips of a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Min

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to answer the following two questions: 1) Do the radiological parameters of dysplasia have significant correlations between themselves or with the parameters of the proximal femoral deformity and vice versa? 2) Do the physical parameters have a significant correlation with the radiological parameters of hip dysplasia and proximal femoral deformity? Methods Four hundred and twenty eight consecutive patients with no clinical evidence of hip osteoarthritis and who underwent pelvic radiography in the supine position for hip contusion or a routine health check were analyzed for the relationships between the center-edge (CE) angle, acetabular depth, acetabular angle, the head-neck ratio and the neck-shaft angle as well as the relationships of the above-mentioned variables with age, gender, body height and the body mass index. Results The CE angle, acetabular depth and acetabular angle showed a strong correlation with each other. The neck-shaft angle and the head-neck ratio showed no correlation with each other or with the CE angle, acetabular depth and acetabular angle. Age was positively associated with the CE angle, and inversely associated with the acetabular depth or acetabular angle. Male gender was significantly associated with the increased neck-shaft angle, and inversely associated with the head-neck ratio. Conclusions The radiological parameters of hip dysplasia are all strongly, if not perfectly, inter-correlated. Age was associated with the radiological parameters of hip dysplasia whereas gender was associated with the radiological parameters of a proximal femoral deformity. PMID:21629472

  12. Disease quantification in dermatology: in vivo near-infrared spectroscopy measures correlate strongly with the clinical assessment of psoriasis severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2013-03-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very useful in quantifying disease severity, they require an extensive clinical experience and carry a risk of subjectivity. We explore the opportunity to use in vivo near-infrared (NIR) spectra as an objective and noninvasive method for local disease severity assessment in 31 psoriasis patients in whom selected plaques were scored clinically. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was used to analyze and predict the severity scores on the NIR spectra of psoriatic and uninvolved skin. The correlation between predicted and clinically assigned scores was R=0.94 (RMSE=0.96), suggesting that in vivo NIR provides accurate clinical quantification of psoriatic plaques. Hence, NIR may be a practical solution to clinical severity assessment of psoriasis, providing a continuous, linear, numerical value of severity.

  13. Stereomicroscopic study of the human tooth caries: clinical and morphological correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oancea, Roxana; Vasile, Liliana; Marchese, Cristian; Sava-Rosianu, Ruxandra

    2012-06-01

    Objectives: Stereomicroscopy allows a three-dimensional study of the images and of laterality at superior quality in comparison with other methods. Those advantages are given by the large examination fields and the wide work distances. The adding of the clinical and morphological data at the results gathered with stereomicroscopy and the stereo micrometry is useful in order to appreciate the deepness and the widening of the carious process, and the necessity to reconsider the therapeutically strategy. Materials and methods: During 2009-2011 the study material was represented by 10 surgically removed impacted third molars, and by 20 premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes, with closed and macroscopically apparently integer surfaces. 13 premolars with different degrees of carious affectation and periodontal lesions, which were surgically extracted without trauma, were also selected. The in situ measurements at the occlusal site were realized through the utilization of a fluorescent laser device - DIAGNOdent. The basic principles in stereomicroscopy stood at the base of the obliquely and circularly coaxial illumination techniques, one with optical alignment adjustment of the optical microscope and mechanical adjustment for the optimal illumination and micrometry. The Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom has been used to study the samples in stereomicroscopy and through polarized light it. Results: The DiagnoDent measured the following data: out of 43 apparently healthy teeth, 18 presented values between 2 and 13 (D1), 13 showed values between 14 and 24 (D2), 12 measured values over 24 (D3). After the histological examination in stereomicroscopy and in the polarized light: 25 teeth were healthy, 10 presented caries extended in dental enamel and 8 presented dentinal caries. Stereomicroscopy has allowed the morphological study, the color absorption, the appreciation of the lesions' deepness and substance loss that is very useful in grading the progression of the carious lesion. Conclusions: The stereomicroscopic study correlated with clinical and morphological data allowed to appreciate the extent of tissue involved in the carious process, but also the understanding of the enamel, dentine and cement matrix demineralization process, in proximity with the morpho-embryological markings of the human tooth structure.

  14. ["Simulated walking" in the duplex evaluation of the venous system. The clinical and instrumental correlations].

    PubMed

    Vettorello, G F; Gasbarro, V; Mascoli, F; Navarra, G; Occhionorelli, S; Rubbini, M; Cerreta, G; Pozza, E; Donini, I

    1994-12-01

    The goals of non-invasive duplex vascular diagnosis of the venous system of the lower limbs are: 1) To make evaluation of the venous system during deambulation feasible under physiological, pathological and post-surgical or elastocompressive conditions. Moreover, any such evaluation must be achieved using a standardized, easy, highly reproducibly method which is inexpensive and utilizes the diagnostic instruments available. 2) To achieve detailed, selective localization of the valvular and parietal dysfunctions at the basis of any reflux pathology. 3) To identify and quantify venous flux and reflux during deambulation. The present work gives the results achieved over the period of one year after a new method simulating deambulation (Walk System 1 patented) was set up for several utilizations, principally correlated to the use of conventional duplex scanning in studying the venous system. The main purpose of the Walk System 1 is step simulation to uncover the location and extent of venous disease. This application test of: a pneumatic pump which compresses the calf to 100-120 mmHg in 0.3 sec thus simulating muscolar pumping during deambulation; standard 40 mmHg compression of the foot in order to rule out any hemodynamic involvement of the foot pump venous system. We can use this pump in the hemodynamic component, a part, during the step simulation, with synchronism with calf pump in TVP prophylaxis or in vascular therapy; an easy-to-use application software able to quickly pulsed Doppler data of flux and reflux by means of the flux and reflux orthodynamic indices or with measures in ml/sec. The study was performed on 80 lower limbs in normal subjects in order to define the normality range and in 380 lower pathologic limbs. The study has yielded a clinical-instrumental correlation between the hemodynamic data observed during inflation-deflation of the calf cuff, positioning the pulsed Doppler sample volume in the saphenous vein in the saphenous-femoral ostium zone and the underlying venous morphology. The results have made it possible to determine physiological S-F reflux and to establish 4 pathological classes of orthodynamic S-F reflux, each class corresponding to a specific range in the orthodynamic reflux index (class 0 = 0 < RI < 0.25; class 1 = 0.25 < RI < 2; class 2 = 2 < RI < 3.5; class 3 = 3.5 < RI < 6; class 4 = RI > 5) and to a particular morphological conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7753424

  15. Paraoxonase-1 Enzyme Activity Assay for Clinical Samples: Validation and Correlation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Garelnabi, Mahdi; Younis, Abdelmoneim

    2015-01-01

    Background Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) enzyme is reported in various types of tissues and linked to numerous pathophysiological disorders. It is a potential biomarker in many pathological conditions such as cardiovascular diseases. Material/Methods We conducted several small-scale studies to evaluate PON1 performance as affected by sample types, storage, and interferences. We also carried out short-term studies to compare the performance of the widely used PON1 assay to the similar commercially available PON1 kit assay method; sample size for the method comparison was N=40, and the number varied for other validation experiments. Results Our studies using various types of anticoagulants show that samples collected in tubes with NaF, citrate, EDTA, clot activator, and sodium heparin have increased PON1 levels that are 49%, 24.5%, 19.8%, 11.4%, and 8%, respectively, higher compared to serum samples collected in plain tubes. However, samples collected in lithium heparin tubes demonstrated 10.4% lower PON1 levels compared to serum collected in plain tubes. Biological interference such as hemolysis has little effect on PON1 levels; however, samples spiked with lipids have shown 13% lower PON 1 levels. Our studies comparing the PON1 method commonly available for PON1 assay and a similar non-ELISA commercially available PON1 kit method showed a weak Spearman correlation coefficient of R2=0.40 for the range of 104.9–245.6 U/L. Conclusions The current study provides new validation data on enzyme PON1 performance. While no appreciable change was seen with storage, samples type affects the enzyme performance. Our results should encourage additional clinical studies to investigate other aspects of factors known to affect PON1 enzyme function and performance. PMID:25814092

  16. Demographic and clinical correlates of sexual dysfunction among Nigerian male outpatients on conventional antipsychotic medications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In psychotic disorders, early intervention with antipsychotic medications increases the likelihood of favourable long-term course. However, the pharmacologic management especially with conventional antipsychotic medications is complicated by a high rate of adverse effects including sexual dysfunction. This study aims to determine the demographic and clinical factors associated with sexual dysfunction among male psychiatric outpatients on conventional antipsychotic medications in South-western Nigeria. Methods Two hundred and seventy five consecutive male outpatients with psychotic disorders on conventional antipsychotic medications were interviewed. Data was collected on demographic characteristics, illness-related and medication-related variables. Illness severity was assessed with the Brief psychiatric rating scale. The International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire was used to assess for sexual dysfunctions. Results A total of 111 (40.4%) respondents had one or more forms of sexual dysfunction. Sexual desire dysfunction was present in 47 (17.1%) of respondents, erectile dysfunction in 95 (34.5%), orgasmic dysfunctions in 51 (18.5%), intercourse dissatisfaction in 72 (26.2%) and overall dissatisfaction in 64 (23.3%). Sexual dysfunction was significantly associated with employment status, age, marital status, haloperidol use, medication dosage, and presence of psychopathology. Unemployment was the only significant independent correlate of sexual dysfunction, with unemployed respondents twice more likely to have sexual dysfunction compared with those employed (Wald?=?3.865, Odds Ratio?=?2.033, 95% confidence interval?=?1.002 - 4.124, p?=?0.049). Conclusions The high prevalence of sexual dysfunction found in this study suggests a need among clinicians for increased awareness and recognition of the sexual side effects in patients taking conventional antipsychotic medications. This knowledge should guide conventional antipsychotic medication prescription in the at-risk population to improve treatment adherence. PMID:22676295

  17. Benign meningiomas (WHO Grade I) with atypical histological features: correlation of histopathological features with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marciscano, Ariel E; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Niemierko, Andrzej; Larvie, Mykol; Curry, William T; Barker, Fred G; Martuza, Robert L; McGuone, Declan; Oh, Kevin S; Loeffler, Jay S; Shih, Helen A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I (benign) meningiomas with atypical features may behave more aggressively than similarly graded tumors without atypical features. Here, the prognostic significance of atypical features in benign meningiomas was determined. METHODS Data from patients diagnosed with WHO Grade I benign meningiomas per the 2007 WHO criteria and who underwent surgery between 2002 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were stratified by the absence or presence of 1 to 2 atypical features with review of the clinical and histological factors. RESULTS A total of 148 patients met the inclusion criteria (n = 77 with atypia; n = 71 without atypia). The median follow-up duration after pathological diagnosis was 37.5 months. Thirty patients had progression/recurrence (P/R) after initial treatment, and 22 (73%) of 30 patients with P/R had 1-2 atypical features. The presence of atypical features was significantly associated with P/R (p = 0.03) and independent of the MIB-1 labeling index. The 1-year and 5-year actuarial rates of P/R were 9.6% versus 1.4% and 30.8% versus 13.8% fortumors with and without atypical features, respectively. Higher Simpson grade resection (II-IV vs I) was associated with the increased risk of P/R (p < 0.001). Stratification of patients into low-risk (Simpson Grade I), intermediate-risk (Simpson Grade II-IV with no atypical features), and high-risk groups (Simpson Grade II-IV with atypical features) was significantly correlated with increased risk of P/R (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Patients with benign meningiomas with atypical features and those undergoing Simpson Grade II-IV resection are at significantly increased risk of P/R. Patients with these features may benefit from the consideration of additional surgery and/or radiation therapy. PMID:26274991

  18. Erythropoietin in the General Population: Reference Ranges and Clinical, Biochemical and Genetic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Grote Beverborg, Niels; Verweij, Niek; Klip, IJsbrand T.; van der Wal, Haye H.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Although erythropoietin has been used for decades in the treatment of anemia, data regarding endogenous levels in the general population are scarce. Therefore, we determined erythropoietin reference ranges and its clinical, biochemical and genetic associations in the general population. Methods We used data from 6,777 subjects enrolled in the Prevention of REnal and Vascular ENd-stage Disease (PREVEND) study. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained in the morning from all participants from 2001–2003. Serum erythropoietin concentrations were measured using a fully automated chemiluminescent enzyme-labeled immunometric assay. A genome-wide association study was performed to identify genetic determinants. Results Mean age (± SD) was 53 ± 12 years and 50% were female. Median (IQR) erythropoietin concentrations were 7.6 (5.8–9.9) IU/L in men and 7.9 (6.0–10.6) IU/L in women. A strong positive correlation was found between erythropoietin and waist circumference, glucose and systolic blood pressure (all P < 0.05). In subjects with normal renal function there was a strong exponential relation between hemoglobin and erythropoietin, whereas in renal impairment (eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73m²) this relation was linear (men) or absent (women) (P < 0.001 for interaction). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the HBS1L-MYB locus were shown to be related to erythropoietin levels (P < 9x10-21), more significantly than other erythrocyte parameters. Conclusion We provide age-specific reference ranges for endogenous serum erythropoietin. Erythropoietin levels are positively associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome, except cholesterol. We show that even mild renal failure blunts erythropoietin production and propose the HBS1L-MYB locus as a regulator of erythropoietin. PMID:25915923

  19. Dental anxiety--an epidemiological study on its clinical correlation and effects on oral health.

    PubMed

    Eitner, S; Wichmann, M; Paulsen, A; Holst, S

    2006-08-01

    Pronounced dental anxiety could lead to avoidance strategies to evade dental visits. The aim of the present epidemiological study was to investigate the prevalence and related oral disease patterns of dental anxiety in young adult male soldiers. Therefore, the intensity and frequency of dental anxiety are presented and the correlation with oral clinical findings are evaluated. Three hundred seventy-four soldiers who underwent a compulsory dental check-up were randomly assigned to this study. Psychological parameters were collected based on a protocol integrating the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and the Gatchell Fear Scale (GaFS). Patient-based measures included D3,4MF-scores for dental status and the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Need (CPITN) for periodontal status. Thirty-two individuals (8.6%) showed DAS-scores of 13 or 14 (anxious), while 4.6% had a DAS-score > or = 15 (highly anxious/phobic). Highest DAS-values were measured among patients' aged 19-29 (n = 262). DMFS-values of anxious and less anxious patients showed only minor differences. However, anxious patients had significantly more carious lesions (P < 0.001). CPITN periodontal values showed no significant differences between both groups. 89.2% of less anxious individuals and 79.6% of anxious patients went for regular dental check-ups. Thus, every tenth patient was considered to have high dental anxiety. Anxiety results in avoidance behaviour, which can only be discovered upon compulsory examinations and which is associated with higher caries morbidity and need for oral rehabilitation. As anxiety has a direct influence on oral health, it should be detected and accounted for in a treatment concept integrating dental and cognitive-behavioural therapeutic approaches. PMID:16856956

  20. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Kamath, Sunil; Wong, Kenneth; Malvar, Jemily; Sposto, Richard; Goodarzian, Fariba; Freyer, David R.; Keens, Thomas G.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

  1. Oxidative stress parameters and their correlation with clinical, metabolic and polysomnographic parameters in severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Asker, Selvi; Asker, Muntecep; Sarikaya, Eren; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Aslan, Mehmet; Demir, Halit

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of oxidative stress markers, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in severe OSAS and to investigate any correlation between oxidative stress markers and clinical, metabolic and polysomnographic parameters. A total of 30 patients with severe OSAS and 30 healthy controls were included in this cross-sectional, clinical study. Demographic data, polysomnographic, biochemical and clinical indices as well as serum levels of CAT, MDA and GPX were measured and compared in OSAS and control groups. Furthermore, OSAS patients with and without pulmonary hypertension (PHT) were evaluated in terms of levels of CAT, MDA and GPX. Patients with severe OSAS exhibited significantly lower serum levels of CAT (P<0.001) and GPX (P<0.001). Serum MDA levels were remarkably higher in OSAS group (P<0.001). Correlation analysis revealed that levels of CAT and GPX were correlated with apnea-hypopnea index and there was a correlation between serum levels of MDA and CRP. Severe OSAS patients with and without PHT did not reveal any differences for CAT (P=0.789), MDA (P=0.805) and GPX levels (P=0.281). Our results have shown that oxidative stress markers significantly changed in patients with severe OSAS. This information is noteworthy because documentation of the role of oxidative stress in OSAS may have important implications regarding diagnosis, monitoring, treatment and prognosis. PMID:26379962

  2. Clinical-Pathologic Correlation Between Transperineal Mapping Biopsies of the Prostate and Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Prostatectomy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, E. David; Rove, Kyle O.; Barqawi, Al B.; Maroni, Paul D.; Werahera, Priya N.; Baer, Craig A.; Koul, Hari K.; Rove, Cory A.; Lucia, M. Scott; La Rosa, Francisco G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extended transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies (TRUSB) of the prostate may not accurately convey true morphometric information and Gleason score (GS) of prostate cancer (PCa) and the clinical use of template-guided (5-mm grid) transperineal mapping biopsies (TPMBs) remains controversial. Methods We correlated the clinical-pathologic results of 1,403 TPMB cores obtained from 25 men diagnosed with PCa with 64 cancer lesions found in their corresponding radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens. Special computer models of three-dimensional, whole-mounted radical prostatectomy (3D-WMRP) specimens were generated and used as gold standard to determine tumor morphometric data. Between-sample rates of upgrade and downgrade (highest GS and a novel cumulative GS) and upstage and downstage (laterality) were determined. Lesions ? 0.5 cm3 or GS ? 7 were considered clinically significant. Results From 64 separate 3D-WMRP lesions, 25 had significant volume (mean 1.13 cm3) and 39 were insignificant (mean 0.09 cm3) (P < 0.0001); 18/64 lesions were missed by TPMB, but only one was clinically significant with GS-8 (0.02 cm3). When comparing the cumulative GS of TPMB versus RP, 72% (n = 18) had identical scores, 12% (n = 3) were upgraded, and only 16% (n = 4) were downgraded. Laterality of TPMB and RP was strongly correlated, 80% same laterality, 4% were up-staged, and 16% down-staged. Conclusions Our clinical-pathology correlation showed very high accuracy of TPMB with a 5-mm grid template to detect clinically significant PCa lesions as compared with 3D-WMRP, providing physicians and patients with a reliable assessment of grade and stage of disease and the opportunity to choose the most appropriate therapeutic options. PMID:23169245

  3. Absence of correlation between utrophin localization and quantity and the clinical severity in Duchenne/Becker dystrophies

    SciTech Connect

    Vainzof, M.; Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Man, N.; Zatz, M.

    1995-09-25

    While present in the surface membrane of embryonic muscle fibers, in adult normal muscle fibers, utrophin is restricted to the motor endplate and cells of blood vessel walls. However, the observation that utrophin is maintained in the extrajunctional plasma membrane in Duchenne (DMD) and in mdx muscle fibers has led to the suggestion that excess utrophin might compensate for dystrophin deficiency in the Xp21 muscular dystrophies. In order to detect an inverse correlation of utrophin presence and clinical severity, we have assessed utrophin distribution and quantity in DMD and Becker (BMD) patients of different ages and stages of clinical severity. All patients showed a positive discontinuous immunolabeling of utrophin on the sarcolemma, staining equally small and large muscle fibers, indicating that immature characteristics are maintained in such fibers. On Western blot, utrophin bands with concentrations 2- to 10-fold greater than in normal controls were detected in all DMD/BMD patients. However, no negative correlation was found between the amount of utrophin and the severity of clinical course, implying that the detectable utrophin levels in these patients did not compensate for dystrophin deficiency. In a DMD patient with growth hormone (GH) deficiency and a BMD-like clinical course, utrophin levels were comparable to the other typical DMD cases, which reinforces the hypothesis that the observed increase in utrophin is apparently not responsible for a milder clinical course in some patients with Xp21 muscular dystrophies. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder and its clinical correlates in a VA primary care behavioral health clinic.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Megan M; Zhang, Jinxin; Phillips, Katharine A

    2015-07-30

    We examined the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in a Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care behavioral health clinic. Of 100 Veterans, 11% (95% CI = 6.3-18.6%) had current BDD and 12% (95% CI = 7.0-19.8%) had lifetime BDD. However, only 8.3% of these Veterans had been diagnosed with BDD. BDD was significantly associated with a substantially elevated rate of suicide attempts, major depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This severe disorder appears to be underdiagnosed in VA settings. PMID:25935375

  5. Four Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hark-Weber, Amara G., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The author is pleased to introduce a new section in "TAJ," Four Questions. The structure is simple: four questions are asked to teaching artists working in various media and locations. The questions are always the same, but because each teaching artist's approach is unique, their answers will provide an insight into particular methodologies that…

  6. Myocardial uptake of indium-111-labeled antimyosin in acute subendocardial infarction: Clinical, histochemical, and autoradiographic correlation of myocardial necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, R.C.; McSherry, B.A.; Leppo, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Indium-111-labeled antimyosin has been utilized in the diagnosis and localization of acute transmural myocardial infarction. The present report describes a patient who presented with a massive subendocardial infarction. Two days after the injection of antimyosin, the patient's clinical status markedly deteriorated and he expired. Postmortem examination demonstrated severe three-vessel coronary artery disease with extensive myocyte death in the endocardium. Autoradiography and histochemical staining of the prosected heart demonstrated high correlation for myocardial necrosis and corresponded to clinical evidence for diffuse subendocardial infarction.

  7. Clinical correlates of complicated grief among individuals with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Stefano; Gesi, Camilla; Abelli, Marianna; Cardini, Alessandra; Lari, Lisa; Felice, Francesca; Di Stefano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Gianfranco; Bovenzi, Francesco; Bertoli, Daniele; Borelli, Lucia; Michi, Paola; Oligeri, Claudia; Balbarini, Alberto; Manicavasagar, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed at exploring bereavement and complicated grief (CG) symptoms among subjects without a history of coronary heart disease (CHD) at the time of a first acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to evaluate the relationship of CG symptoms and ACS. Method Overall, 149 subjects with ACS (namely, acute myocardial infarct with or without ST-segment elevation or unstable angina), with no previous history of CHD, admitted to three cardiac intensive care units were included and evaluated by the Structured Clinical Interview for Complicated Grief (SCI-CG), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF-36). Results Of the total sample of 149 subjects with ACS, 118 (79.2%) met criteria for DSM-5 persistent complex bereavement disorder. Among these, subjects who lost a partner, child, or sibling were older (P=0.008), less likely to be working (P=0.032), and more likely to be suffering from hypertension (P=0.021), returned higher scores on the SCI-CG (P=0.001) and developed the index ACS more frequently between 12 and 48 months after the death than those who lost a parent or another relative (P?0.0001). The occurrence of ACS 12–48 months (P=0.019) after the loss was positively correlated with SCI-CG scores. An inverse relationship with SCI-CG scores was observed for patients who experienced ACS more than 48 months after the loss (P=0.005). The SCI-CG scores significantly predicted lower scores on the “general health” domain of MOS-SF-36 (P=0.030), as well as lower scores on “emotional well-being” domain (P=0.010). Conclusion A great proportion of subjects with ACS report the loss of a loved one. Among these, the loss of a close relative and the severity of CG symptoms are associated with poorer health status. Our data corroborate previous data indicating a strong relationship between CG symptoms and severe cardiac problems. PMID:26504390

  8. Examining the Clinical Correlates of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Youth by Ascertainment Source

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Gagan; Faraone, Stephen V.; Wozniak, Janet; Petty, Carter; Fried, Ronna; Galdo, Maribel; Furtak, Stephannie L.; McDermott, Katie; Epstien, Cecily; Walker, Rosemary; Caron, Ashley; Feinberg, Leah; Biederman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether presentation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and associated patterns of psychiatric comorbidity and dysfunction vary by referral source. ASD youth referred to a specialized ambulatory program for ASD (N = 143) were compared to ASD youth referred to a general child psychiatry clinic (N = 217). More ASD clinic youth met criteria…

  9. Empirical Correlates and Expanded Interpretation of the MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (Cynicism)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Paul B.; Kelso, Kristy M.; McCord, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The recent release of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) has received much attention from the clinical psychology community. Particular concerns have focused on Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (RC3; Cynicism). This article briefly reviews the major criticisms and responses regarding the restructuring of…

  10. Proposed Provocative Questions — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    View all of the questions that have been submitted and see how they have been evaluated by peers. Submit your own evaluation of a submitted question, or leave a comment about a question (commenting requires log in or creation of your own PQ account).

  11. How well do whole exome sequencing results correlate with medical findings? A study of 89 Mayo Clinic Biobank samples

    PubMed Central

    Middha, Sumit; Lindor, Noralane M.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Olson, Janet E.; Johnson, Kiley J.; Wieben, Eric D.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Cerhan, James R.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) is increasingly being used for diagnosis without adequate information on predictive characteristics of reportable variants typically found on any given individual and correlation with clinical phenotype. In this study, we performed WES on 89 deceased individuals (mean age at death 74 years, range 28–93) from the Mayo Clinic Biobank. Significant clinical diagnoses were abstracted from electronic medical record via chart review. Variants [Single Nucleotide Variant (SNV) and insertion/deletion] were filtered based on quality (accuracy >99%, read-depth >20, alternate-allele read-depth >5, minor-allele-frequency <0.1) and available HGMD/OMIM phenotype information. Variants were defined as Tier-1 (nonsense, splice or frame-shifting) and Tier-2 (missense, predicted-damaging) and evaluated in 56 ACMG-reportable genes, 57 cancer-predisposition genes, along with examining overall genotype–phenotype correlations. Following variant filtering, 7046 total variants were identified (~79/person, 644 Tier-1, 6402 Tier-2), 161 among 56 ACMG-reportable genes (~1.8/person, 13 Tier-1, 148 Tier-2), and 115 among 57 cancer-predisposition genes (~1.3/person, 3 Tier-1, 112 Tier-2). The number of variants across 57 cancer-predisposition genes did not differentiate individuals with/without invasive cancer history (P > 0.19). Evaluating genotype–phenotype correlations across the exome, 202(3%) of 7046 filtered variants had some evidence for phenotypic correlation in medical records, while 3710(53%) variants had no phenotypic correlation. The phenotype associated with the remaining 44% could not be assessed from a typical medical record review. These data highlight significant continued challenges in the ability to extract medically meaningful predictive results from WES. PMID:26257771

  12. Are there characteristics of cancers, especially early cancers, that can be used to match therapeutic strategies more accurately with clinical risk? — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Are there characteristics of cancers, especially early cancers, that

  13. Contact the Office of Admissions with any questions at proginfo@ohsu.edu or 503-494-7725. Pg. 1 Clinical Questionnaire

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    /OHSU College of Pharmacy, and local neighborhood clinics and community agencies. Join the ICAN clinical group Clinical Questionnaire Post AAS CC Transition to Portland Campus Post AAS PDX Clinical Options Essay Response: Students are asked to identify their interest in one of the following clinical opportunities

  14. Correlation of serum ibuprofen concentration with clinical signs of toxicity in three canine exposures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, T W; Costin, C; Link, K; Heule, M; Murphy, M J

    1991-10-01

    The clinical signs and serum concentrations of ibuprofen are reported for 3 canine exposures. No adverse clinical signs or abnormal laboratory parameters were observed when serum ibuprofen concentrations were less than 31 micrograms/mL. Melena and 38 mg blood urea nitrogen/dL (normal 7-26 mg/dL) were present in an animal with a serum ibuprofen of 138 micrograms/mL. PMID:1746143

  15. HLA-B51 subtypes in Turkish patients with Behçet's disease and their correlation with clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Demirseren, D D; Ceylan, G G; Akoglu, G; Emre, S; Erten, S; Arman, A; Metin, A

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic inflammatory disease believed to be triggered by microbial or environmental factors on a genetic platform. Clinically, it may have an impact on many body systems, including the mucocutaneous, ocular, articular, vascular, and neurological systems. In this study, we aimed to determine the HLA-B51 subtypes and their correlations with the clinical findings of BD. Fifty-one patients with BD and 44 gender- and age-matched healthy subjects were included in this study. The HLA-B51 subtypes of all participants were determined, and the correlations of the clinical manifestations of the disease with the HLA-B51 subtypes were analyzed. HLA-B51 positivity was found to be significantly higher in the patient group (P < 0.001, RR = 15.20), which had significantly more frequent HLA-B5101, HLA-B5102(01), HLA-B5109, and HLA-B5122 subtypes than the healthy subjects (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, considering the correlation between the genetic makeup and clinical findings, the HLA-B5109 subtype was found to be less frequent in patients with papulopustular skin lesions (P = 0.042). The frequency of HLA-B5103 was significantly higher in patients with central nervous system involvement (P = 0.015). There may be a relationship between HLA-B5102(01), HLA-B5109, and HLA-B5122 in addition to HLA-B51 and HLA-B5101(01) in Turkish patients with BD. The HLA-B5109 subtype can be protective against papulopustular lesion development; however, the HLA-B5103 subtype may pose a risk for neuro-Behçet development in BD. PMID:25062414

  16. Correlations between the Hand Test Pathology score and Personality Assessment Inventory scales for pain clinic patients.

    PubMed

    George, J M; Wagner, E E

    1995-06-01

    Pearson correlations between the Hand Test Pathology (PATH) score and Personality Assessment Inventory scales produced a cluster of relationships characteristic of an antisocial orientation. Likewise, PATH significantly differentiated between a "P" (Pathology) group flagged by a high Negative Impression score on the inventory, and an "N" (Normal) group of 100 pain patients. It was suggested that the interpretive simplicity of Hand Test scores renders the scores amenable to further correlational studies involving the inventory. PMID:7478899

  17. Curiosity Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelsen, Jane; DeLorenzo, Chip

    2010-01-01

    Have you ever found yourself lecturing a child, with the best of intentions, in an attempt to help him or her learn a lesson or process a situation in a manner that you feel will be productive? Curiosity questions, which the authors also call What and How questions, help children process an experience, event, or natural consequence so that they…

  18. Essential Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    The secret to teaching may be as simple as asking students good questions--and then giving them the opportunity to find the answers. The author shares how he uses essential questions that set the class off on an inquiry. Rather than consuming information that he distributes and then repeating it on a test, students carry out their own…

  19. Correlation between the Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels with Laboratory Variables in the Clinical Severity of Sickle Cell Anemia in Congolese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mikobi, Tite Minga; Lukusa Tshilobo, Prosper; Aloni, Michel Ntetani; Mvumbi Lelo, Georges; Akilimali, Pierre Zalagile; Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean Jacques; Race, Valérie; Matthijs, Gert; Mbuyi Mwamba, Jean Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background Sickle cell anemia is an inflammatory disease and is characterized by chronic hemolysis. We sought to evaluate the association of lactate dehydrogenase levels with specific clinical phenotypes and laboratory variables in patients with sickle cell anemia. Methods The present cross-sectional study was conducted in Sickle Cell Centre of Yolo in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo. Two hundred and eleven patients with Sickle Cell Anemia in steady state were recruited. Seventy-four participants with normal Hb (Hb-AA) were selected as a control group. Results The average rates of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cells tended to be significantly lower in subjects with Hb-SS (p<0.001). The average rates of white blood cells, platelets, reticulocytes and serum LDH were significantly higher in subjects with Hb-SS (p<0.001). The average rates of Hb, HbF, hematocrit and red blood cells of Hb-SS patients with asymptomatic clinical phenotype were significantly higher than those of the two other phenotypes. However, the average rates of white blood cells, platelets, reticulocytes, and LDH of Hb-SS patients with the severe clinical phenotype are higher than those of two other clinical phenotypes. Significant correlations were observed between Hb and white blood cell in severe clinical phenotype (r3 = -0.37 *) between Hb and red blood cells in the three phenotypes (r1 = 0.69 * r2 * = 0.69, r3 = 0.83 *), and finally between Hb and reticulocytes in the asymptomatic clinical phenotype and severe clinical phenotype (r1 = -0.50 * r3 = 0.45 *). A significant increase in LDH was observed in patients with leg ulcer, cholelithiasis and aseptic necrosis of the femoral head. Conclusion The increase in serum LDH is accompanied by changes in hematological parameters. In our midst, serum LDH may be considered as an indicator of the severity of the disease. PMID:25946088

  20. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  1. Children Who Question Their Heterosexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, Priscilla R.; Egan, Susan K.; Perry, David G.

    2004-01-01

    Many gay, lesbian, and bisexual adults report a period of childhood sexual questioning--an uneasy questioning of their heterosexuality brought on by same-sex attractions and motivating same-sex sexual exploration. This article evaluates hypotheses about the correlates, causes, and consequences of childhood sexual questioning. Participants were 182…

  2. Evaluation of Humoral Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Antigens for Correlation with Clinical Status and Effective Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Mamiko; Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Ohta, Ken; Inoue, Manabu; Niki, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Kozo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kitada, Seigo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Suzuki, Koichi; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Although tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available vaccine. However, BCG has limited applications, and a more effective vaccine is needed. Cellular mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be the most important immune response for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the recent failure of a clinical trial for a booster BCG vaccine and increasing evidence of antibody-mediated immunity prompted us to evaluate humoral immunity to Mtb-specific antigens. Using Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assays, we observed less correlation of both CMI and IgG titers with patient clinical status, including serum concentration of C reactive protein. However, IgA titers against Mtb were significantly correlated with clinical status, suggesting that specific IgA antibodies protect against Mtb proliferation. In addition, in some cases, IgA antibody titers were significantly associated with the serum concentration of total albumin, which supports the idea that humoral immunity can be influenced by the nutritional status. Based on these observations, we propose that the induction of humoral immunity should be included as an option in TB vaccine development strategies. PMID:26568961

  3. The quantification of dynamic FET PET imaging and correlation with the clinical outcome in patients with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Frank; Ehmer, Julia; Piroth, Marc D; Eble, Michael J; Coenen, Heinz H; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Schaefer, Wolfgang M; Buell, Ulrich; Boy, Christian

    2009-09-21

    The PET tracer O-(2-[18F]Fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) has been shown to be valuable for different roles in the management of brain tumours. The aim of this study was to evaluate several quantitative measures of dynamic FET PET imaging in patients with resected glioblastoma. We evaluated dynamic FET PET in nine patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma. Following FET PET, all subjects had radiation and chemotherapy. Tumour ROIs were defined by a threshold-based region-growing algorithm. We compared several standard measures of tumour uptake and uptake kinetics: SUV, SUV/background, distribution volume ratio (DVR), weighted frame differences and compartment model parameters. These measures were correlated with disease-free and overall survival, and analysed for statistical significance. We found that several measures allowed robust quantification. SUV and distribution volume did not correlate with clinical outcome. Measures that are based on a background region (SUV/BG, Logan-DVR) highly correlated with disease-free survival (r = -0.95, p < 0.0001), but not overall survival. Some advanced measures also showed a prognostic value but no improvement over the simpler methods. We conclude that FET PET probably has a prognostic value in patients with resected glioblastoma. The ratio of SUV to background may provide a simple and valuable predictive measure of the clinical outcome. Further studies are needed to confirm these explorative results. PMID:19717889

  4. The quantification of dynamic FET PET imaging and correlation with the clinical outcome in patients with glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Frank; Ehmer, Julia; Piroth, Marc D.; Eble, Michael J.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Schaefer, Wolfgang M.; Buell, Ulrich; Boy, Christian

    2009-09-01

    The PET tracer O-(2-[18F]Fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) has been shown to be valuable for different roles in the management of brain tumours. The aim of this study was to evaluate several quantitative measures of dynamic FET PET imaging in patients with resected glioblastoma. We evaluated dynamic FET PET in nine patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma. Following FET PET, all subjects had radiation and chemotherapy. Tumour ROIs were defined by a threshold-based region-growing algorithm. We compared several standard measures of tumour uptake and uptake kinetics: SUV, SUV/background, distribution volume ratio (DVR), weighted frame differences and compartment model parameters. These measures were correlated with disease-free and overall survival, and analysed for statistical significance. We found that several measures allowed robust quantification. SUV and distribution volume did not correlate with clinical outcome. Measures that are based on a background region (SUV/BG, Logan-DVR) highly correlated with disease-free survival (r = -0.95, p < 0.0001), but not overall survival. Some advanced measures also showed a prognostic value but no improvement over the simpler methods. We conclude that FET PET probably has a prognostic value in patients with resected glioblastoma. The ratio of SUV to background may provide a simple and valuable predictive measure of the clinical outcome. Further studies are needed to confirm these explorative results.

  5. Imaging of athletic pubalgia and core muscle injuries: clinical and therapeutic correlations.

    PubMed

    Palisch, Andrew; Zoga, Adam C; Meyers, William C

    2013-07-01

    Athletes frequently injure their hips and core muscles. Accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of groin pain in the athlete can be tricky, frequently posing vexing problem for trainers and physicians. Clinical presentations of the various hip problems overlap with respect to history and physical examination. This article reviews clinical presentations and magnetic resonance imaging findings specific to the various causes of groin pain in the athlete. The focus is on the core muscle injuries (athletic pubalgia or "sports hernia"). The goal is to raise awareness about the variety of injuries that occur and therapeutic options. PMID:23773876

  6. Clinical and Cognitive Correlates of Depressive Symptoms among Youth with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peris, Tara S.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Asarnow, Joan R.; Langley, Audra; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    Depression is the most common comorbidity among adults with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), yet little is known about depressive symptoms in childhood OCD. This study examined clinical and cognitive variables associated with depressive symptomatology in 71 youths (62% male, M age = 12.7 years) with primary OCD. Youths presented with a range…

  7. Annual Research Review: Attachment Disorders in Early Childhood--Clinical Presentation, Causes, Correlates, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Gleason, Mary Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background: Though noted in the clinical literature for more than 50 years, attachment disorders have been studied systematically only recently. In part because of the ubiquity of attachments in humans, determining when aberrant behavior is best explained as an attachment disorder as opposed to insecure attachment has led to some confusion. In…

  8. A Comparative Study of Clinical Correlates in Schizophrenia with Onset in Childhood, Adolescence and Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Parthasarathy; Malhotra, Savita; Malhotra, Anil; Gupta, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare disorder. Comparative data on the effect of differential age of onset on clinical profile in schizophrenia are very few. Method: Subjects with COS (n = 15), adolescence onset schizophrenia (AdOS, n = 20) and adulthood onset schizophrenia (AOS, n = 20) were compared on socio-demographic,…

  9. Null ABCA3 in humans: large homozygous ABCA3 deletion, correlation to clinical-pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Paola; Ferrari, Maurizio; Presi, Silvia; Ventura, Luisa; Vergani, Barbara; Lucchini, Valeria; Cogo, Paola E; Carnielli, Virgilio P; Somaschini, Marco; Tagliabue, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    A study was undertaken to analyze the clinical presentation, pulmonary function, and pathological features in two female siblings with neonatal pulmonary surfactant metabolism dysfunction, type 3 (MIM 610921). The clinical records of the siblings were examined; the genes encoding surfactant protein B (SFTPB), surfactant protein C (SFTPC), and ATP-binding cassette transporter 3 protein (ABCA3) were analyzed with direct sequencing and Southern blotting. The infants were homozygous for a 5,983 bp deletion in ABCA3 including exons 2-5 as well as the start AUG codon and a putative Golgi exit signal motif. Dense abnormalities of lamellar bodies at electron microscopy and absence of ABCA3 at immunohistochemical staining were in agreement with the presence of two null alleles. In addition, an increased lipid synthesis suggested a compensatory mechanism. The clinical course in the two sisters was influenced by different environmental factors like the time needed for molecular confirmation, the ventilatory assistance adopted, the occurrence of infections. A less aggressive clinical approach did not improve the course of the disease; the prognosis was always poor. Development of a fast molecular test, able to detect also structural variants, is needed. PMID:24420869

  10. A prospective study validating a clinical scoring system and demonstrating phenotypical-genotypical correlations in Silver-Russell syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Salah; Salem, Jennifer; Thibaud, Nathalie; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Lieber, Eli; Netchine, Irène; Harbison, Madeleine D

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple clinical scoring systems have been proposed for Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). Here we aimed to test a clinical scoring system for SRS and to analyse the correlation between (epi)genotype and phenotype. Subjects and methods Sixty-nine patients were examined by two physicians. Clinical scores were generated for all patients, with a new, six-item scoring system: (1) small for gestational age, birth length and/or weight ??2SDS, (2) postnatal growth retardation (height ??2SDS), (3) relative macrocephaly at birth, (4) body asymmetry, (5) feeding difficulties and/or body mass index (BMI) ??2SDS in toddlers; (6) protruding forehead at the age of 1–3?years. Subjects were considered to have likely SRS if they met at least four of these six criteria. Molecular investigations were performed blind to the clinical data. Results The 69 patients were classified into two groups (Likely-SRS (n=60), Unlikely-SRS (n=9)). Forty-six Likely-SRS patients (76.7%) displayed either 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation (n=35; 58.3%) or maternal UPD of chromosome 7 (mUPD7) (n=11; 18.3%). Eight Unlikely-SRS patients had neither ICR1 hypomethylation nor mUPD7, whereas one patient had mUPD7. The clinical score and molecular results yielded four groups that differed significantly overall and for individual scoring system factors. Further molecular screening led identifying chromosomal abnormalities in Likely-SRS-double-negative and Unlikely-SRS groups. Four Likely-SRS-double negative patients carried a DLK1/GTL2 IG-DMR hypomethylation, a mUPD16; a mUPD20 and a de novo 1q21 microdeletion. Conclusions This new scoring system is very sensitive (98%) for the detection of patients with SRS with demonstrated molecular abnormalities. Given its clinical and molecular heterogeneity, SRS could be considered as a spectrum. PMID:25951829

  11. Correlation of findings in clinical and high resolution ultrasonography examinations of the painful shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Kyburz, Diego; Ciurea, Adrian; Dubs, Beat; Toniolo, Martin; Bisig, Samuel Pascal; Tamborrini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Objective High resolution ultrasonography is a non-painful and non-invasive imaging technique which is useful for the assessment of shoulder pain causes, as clinical examination often does not allow an exact diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the findings of clinical examination and high resolution ultrasonography in patients presenting with painful shoulder. Methods Non-interventional observational study of 100 adult patients suffering from unilateral shoulder pain. Exclusion criteria were shoulder fractures, prior shoulder joint surgery and shoulder injections in the past month. The physicians performing the most common clinical shoulder examinations were blinded to the results of the high resolution ultrasonography and vice versa. Results In order to detect pathology of the m. supraspinatus tendon, the Hawkins and Kennedy impingement test showed the highest sensitivity (0.86) whereas the Jobe supraspinatus test showed the highest specificity (0.55). To identify m. subscapularis tendon pathology the Gerber lift off test showed a sensitivity of 1, whereas the belly press test showed the higher specificity (0.72). The infraspinatus test showed a high sensitivity (0.90) and specificity (0.74). All AC tests (painful arc IIa, AC joint tendernessb, cross body adduction stress testc) showed high specificities (a0.96, b0.99, c0.96). Evaluating the long biceps tendon, the palm up test showed the highest sensitivity (0.47) and the Yergason test the highest specificity (0.88). Conclusion Knowledge of sensitivity and specificity of various clinical tests is important for the interpretation of clinical examination test results. High resolution ultrasonography is needed in most cases to establish a clear diagnosis.

  12. The inflammatory phenotype of the fibrous plate is distinct from the liver and correlates with clinical outcome in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Arva, Nicoleta C; Russo, Pierre A; Erlichman, Jessi; Hancock, Wayne W; Haber, Barbara A; Bhatti, Tricia R

    2015-03-01

    Biliary atresia is an inflammatory cholangiopathy of still undetermined etiology. Correlations between histologic findings and clinical outcome in this disease have largely been based on evaluation of liver parenchyma. This study aimed to characterize the pattern of inflammation within the biliary remnant and identify associations between the type and degree of inflammation and clinical outcome as reflected by the transplant-free interval. The inflammation within the fibrous plates and livers of 41 patients with biliary atresia was characterized using immunohistochemical markers and the cell populations were digitally quantified. The type and quantity of cells within the infiltrate were then correlated with length of time from Kasai portoenterostomy until transplant. Histologic and immunohistochemical features of the biliary remnant allowed stratification of patients into "inflammatory plate" and "fibrotic plate" groups. Overall there was no significant difference in transplant-free interval between the two cohorts; however, there was a trend towards a longer time to transplant among patients in the "fibrotic plate" group. In addition, the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate in the fibrous plate was distinctly different from that present in the liver and only the characteristics of the inflammation in the fibrous plate, in particular the number of Foxp3+ T regulatory lymphocytes correlated with clinical outcome. The results of this study support the view of the extra-hepatic biliary tree as the primary site of injury in BA with the changes seen in the liver as secondary manifestations of outflow obstruction. The association between specific inflammatory cell subtypes within the fibrous plate and the length of transplant-free interval also supports the role of the immune system in the initial process of bile duct damage in biliary atresia. PMID:25624184

  13. Composing questions

    E-print Network

    Kotek, Hadas

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation motivates a new syntax and semantics for simplex and multiple wh-questions, concentrating on English and German data. The proposed theory combines Cable's (2007; 2010) Q-based syntax for wh-movement and ...

  14. Correlation between fibroscan, liver biopsy, and clinical liver function in patients with hepatitis C virus infection after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, R; Ramírez, E; Fernandez, I; Martin, A; Romero, M; Romero, E; Dominguez-Gil, B; Hernandez, A; Morales, E; Andres, A; Castellano, G; Morales, J M

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most important liver disease (LD) after renal transplantation. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis and follow-up of LD. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the correlation between values of Fibroscan (EchoSens, Paris, France), a new noninvasive method to assess liver fibrosis, liver biopsy, and clinical data among HCV-positive renal transplant patients. Twenty-four HCV/RNA-positive patients with a previous liver biopsy were selected to undergo Fibroscan (transient elastography) and a clinical evaluation of liver function. Fibroscan values were expressed in kilopascals (kPa). As 2 patients were eliminated due to obesity or ascites, we analyzed 22 patients. Thirteen patients (59%) with fibrosis F0-F1 (METAVIR score) by biopsy and normal liver function showed a mean Fibroscan score of 5.2 kPa (range, 2.3-6.8 kPa). Three patients (13.6%) exhibited F2 by biopsy and normal liver function with a mean Fibroscan score of 8.2 kPa (range, 7.3-8.9 kPa). Three patients (13.6%) with F3 by biopsy and abnormal liver function showed a high mean Fibroscan score of 10.9 kPa (range, 10.5-11.6 kPa). The last 3 patients (13.6%) with F4 (cirrhosis) by biopsy and abnormal clinical data showed the highest mean Fibroscan value of 14.2 kPa (range, 8.9-18 kPa). In conclusion, among renal transplant patients with HCV the values of Fibroscan seem to correlate with the degree of fibrosis by biopsy and with clinical liver function. Therefore, Fibroscan may be useful to follow patients with LD. However, these results should be analyzed with caution due to the small number of cases and retrospective nature of the study. PMID:19715940

  15. Neuropsychological Profiles Correlated with Clinical and Behavioral Impairments in a Sample of Brazilian Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rizzutti, Sueli; Schuch, Viviane; Augusto, Bruno Muszkat; Coimbra, Caio Colturato; Pereira, João Pedro Cabrera; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that implies several-step process, and there is no single test to diagnose both ADHD and associated comorbidities, such as oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD), anxiety disorder, depression, and certain types of learning disabilities. The purpose of the present study was to examine correlations between behavioral and clinical symptoms by administering an extensive neuropsychological battery to a sample of children and adolescents from a developing country. The sample was divided into three groups: non-ADHD, ADHD-non-comorbid, and ADHD?+?comorbidity. A full neuropsychological battery and clinical assessment found that 105 children met DSM-5 criteria, of whom 46.6% had the predominantly inattentive presentation, 37.3% had combined presentation, and 16% were predominantly hyperactive/impulsive presentation. The internal correlation between neuropsychological tests did not reach statistical significance in the comparison between ADHD and non-ADHD cases (p?Clinical ADHD cases, including both?+?comorbidity and non-comorbid groups, performed substantially worse on continuous performance test (CPT), working memory. Comparing ADHD-non-comorbid and ADHD?+?comorbidity groups, the latter did significantly worse on inhibitory control, time processing, and the level of perseveration response on CPT indexes, as well as on working memory performance and child behavior checklist (CBCL) tests particularly the CBCL-deficient emotional self-regulation test in the ADHD?+?comorbidity group. Children diagnosed as ODD or with conduct disorder showed close correlations between clinical CBCL profiles and externalized symptoms. Our findings suggest that ADHD?+?comorbidity and ADHD non-comorbid cases may be differentiated by a number of neuropsychological measures, such as processing speed, inhibitory control, and working memory, that may reflect different levels of involvement of the hot and cool executive domains, which are more impaired in cases of severe symptomatic-externalized behavior and emotional regulation problems. Therefore, profiles based on clinical and behavioral findings can help clinicians select better strategies for detecting neuropsychological impairment in Brazilian children with ADHD. PMID:26635638

  16. The cortisol awakening response in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is blunted and correlates with clinical status and depressive mood.

    PubMed

    Roozendaal, Benno; Kim, Sungchul; Wolf, Oliver T; Kim, Min Soo; Sung, Kang-Keyng; Lee, Sangkwan

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease of the motor system, has an enormous impact on the patient's emotional and physical well-being. As previous findings indicated that particularly the rise in cortisol levels immediately after awakening, i.e., the cortisol awakening response (CAR), is associated with indices of physical and emotional well-being, we compared the CAR of 29 admitted ALS patients with that of 12 age-matched caregiver controls. Saliva samples for cortisol measurement were collected immediately, 15, 30 and 45 min after awakening. The severity of ALS progression was quantified using the ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS) and manual muscle test (MMT). Depressive mood status in ALS patients was determined with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Salivary cortisol levels of ALS patients did not differ from those of caregiver controls at awakening, 15 min or 45 min after awakening, but were significantly lower at 30 min after awakening. Area under the curve analysis confirmed that the CAR was significantly smaller in ALS patients than in caregiver controls. A smaller CAR in ALS patients was significantly correlated to poorer clinical status, as assessed with both the ALSFRS and MMT rating instruments. Further, a smaller CAR significantly correlated with a more severe depressive mood status. No correlations were observed between total cortisol output during the first 45 min post-awakening and clinical or depressive status. In conclusion, our findings indicate that ALS patients show a blunted CAR, correlated with disease and depression severity. PMID:21616601

  17. Hemophilus influenzae pneumonia in the adult: radiographic appearance with clinical correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlberg, J.; Haggar, A.M.; Saravolatz, L.; Beute, G.H.; Popovich, J.

    1984-04-01

    Hemophilus influenzae septicemia is an important cause of life-threatening pneumonia in an immunocompromised patient. Eleven cases proved by blood culture were analyzed. Multilobar involvement with lobar or segmental consolidation pleural effusion were common radiographic findings, but there were no signs of lobar expansion, bulging fissures, or cavitation. In general, predisposing factors such as alcoholism and chemotherapy place patients at risk. Radiographic response to therapy is variable but often lags behind clinical improvement.

  18. Correlations between Clinical Features and Mortality in Patients with Vibrio vulnificus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Xu, Lichen; Dong, Huihui; Hu, Jianhua; Gao, Hainv; Yang, Meifang; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Xiaoming; Fan, Jun; Ma, Weihang

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a common gram-negative bacterium, which might cause morbidity and mortality in patients following consumption of seafood or exposure to seawater in Southeast China. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data of patients with laboratory confirmed V. vulnificus infection. Twenty one patients were divided into a survival group and a non-surviving (or death) group according to their clinical outcome. Clinical data and measurements were statistically analyzed. Four patients (19.05%) died and five patients gave positive cultures from bile fluid, and 16 other patients gave positive culture from blood or blisters. Ten patients (47.62%) had an underlying liver disease and marine-related events were found in sixteen patients (76.2%). Patients with heavy drinking habits might be at increased mortality (p = 0.028). Clinical manifestations of cellulitis (47.6%), septic shock (42.9%) and multiple organ failure (28.6%) were statistically significant when comparing survivors and non-survivors (p = 0.035, p = 0.021 and p = 0.003, respectively). The laboratory results, including hemoglobin < 9.0 g/L (p = 0.012), platelets < 2.0×109 /L, prothrombin time activity (PTA) <20%, decreased serum creatinine and increased urea nitrogen were statistically significant (p = 0.012, p = 0.003, p = 0.028 and p = 0.028, respectively). Patients may be at a higher risk of mortality under situations where they have a history of habitual heavy alcoholic drink consumption (p = 0.028, OR = 22.5, 95%CI 1.5–335.3), accompanied with cellulitis, shock, multiple organ failure, and laboratory examinations that are complicated by decreased platelets, hemoglobin and significantly prolonged prothrombin time (PT). PMID:26274504

  19. Clinical-physiologic correlates of Alzheimer's disease and frontal lobe dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Reed, B.R.; Seab, J.P.; Kramer, J.H.; Budinger, T.F. )

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with degenerative dementia underwent clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the blood flow tracer ({sup 123}I)-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine. Five of these patients were clinically and psychologically different from the others, demonstrating predominant behavioral disturbances with relative preservation of memory function. These five patients, who were felt to have a frontal lobe dementia (FLD), showed SPECT perfusion patterns which differed from the remaining 25 patients, who were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease (AD), and from 16 healthy control subjects. The FLD patients showed diminished perfusion in orbitofrontal, dorsolateral frontal, and temporal cortex relative to controls, while the AD patients showed lower perfusion in temporal and parietal cortex than controls. The FLD patients also showed hypoperfusion in both frontal cortical regions relative to AD patients. The pattern of performance on neuropsychological testing paralleled these differences in regional perfusion. These results suggest that clinical evaluation and physiological imaging may enable the differentiation of groups of degenerative dementia patients during life.

  20. Correlation between TLR9 Expression and Cytokine Secretion in the Clinical Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Hui; Zeng, Qinghua; Liang, Yumei; Xiao, Changjuan; Xie, Shuoshan; Xu, Xiangyu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between TLR9 and cytokine secretion in SLE diagnosis and treatment. A total of 66 cases (39 SLE and 27 healthy donors) were enrolled in this study. The CD20+ labeled B cells were isolated from SLE patients. TLR9 mRNA expression from SLE tissues and B cells was detected using RT-PCR. The cytokine secretion in B cells were measured using ELISA. Correlation between TLR9 expression and cytokines secretion was analyzed using gene silencing method. Compared with the controls, TLR9 expression was significantly high in SLE patients tissues, as well as in B cells. Expressions of IL-6 and ds-DNA antibody were high in SLE patients serum and were positively correlated with TLR9 level in SLE patients (IL-6, R2 = 0.768; ds-DNA antibody, R2 = 0.730). The IL-6 and ds-DNA expression were significantly decreased by silencing TLR9 compared to the controls. Moreover, silencing TLR9 significantly decreased cytokines secretion including IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1r?, as well as the pathway-associated protein expression, including ICOS and Foxp3. The successful application of TLR9 silencing method in human SLE B cells may loan theatrical basis for the possibility of TLR9 genetic therapy in SLE diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26457008

  1. Ileostomy obstruction by ingested apricot stone with clinical-radiological-pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    George, A J; Fallaize, R C; Bennett, J; Shabbir, J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with stomas often present with bowel obstruction, often secondary to adhesions. This case describes the presentation, investigation and management of a 62-year-old woman with an end ileostomy, who presented to hospital with acute abdominal pain and subacute bowel obstruction. Further questioning revealed the recent ingestion of an apricot stone and this was identified by multimodality imaging as the cause of the luminal obstruction in the distal ileum, just proximal to the stoma. After a failed period of conservative management, examination under anaesthesia was performed and digital extraction attempted, but this was unsuccessful. Rather than surgical stoma revision, endoscopic removal was achieved. The patient improved and was discharged the following day. However, her small bowel obstruction relapsed within 48?h. She was readmitted and underwent stoma revision with no further problems. PMID:26374775

  2. Neuropathologic correlates of hippocampal atrophy in the elderly: a clinical, pathologic, postmortem MRI study.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Robert J; Bennett, David A; Schneider, Julie A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The volume of the hippocampus measured with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the neuropathologic basis of structural MRI changes in the hippocampus in the elderly has not been directly assessed. Postmortem MRI of the aging human brain, combined with histopathology, could be an important tool to address this issue. Therefore, this study combined postmortem MRI and histopathology in 100 elderly subjects from the Rush Memory and Aging Project and the Religious Orders Study. First, to validate the information contained in postmortem MRI data, we tested the hypothesis that postmortem hippocampal volume is smaller in subjects with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease compared to subjects with mild or no cognitive impairment, as observed in antemortem imaging studies. Subsequently, the relations of postmortem hippocampal volume to AD pathology, Lewy bodies, amyloid angiopathy, gross infarcts, microscopic infarcts, and hippocampal sclerosis were examined. It was demonstrated that hippocampal volume was smaller in persons with a clinical diagnosis of AD compared to those with no cognitive impairment (P = 2.6 × 10(-7)) or mild cognitive impairment (P = 9.6 × 10(-7)). Additionally, hippocampal volume was related to multiple cognitive abilities assessed proximate to death, with its strongest association with episodic memory. Among all pathologies investigated, the most significant factors related to lower hippocampal volume were shown to be AD pathology (P = 0.0018) and hippocampal sclerosis (P = 4.2 × 10(-7)). Shape analysis allowed for visualization of the hippocampal regions most associated with volume loss for each of these two pathologies. Overall, this investigation confirmed the relation of hippocampal volume measured postmortem to clinical diagnosis of AD and measures of cognition, and concluded that both AD pathology and hippocampal sclerosis affect hippocampal volume in old age, though the impacts of each pathology on the shape of the hippocampus may differ. PMID:22043314

  3. Correlation of somatic mutations and clinical outcome in melanoma patients treated with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Melissa A.; Zhao, Fengmin; Letrero, Richard; D’Andrea, Kurt; Rimm, David L.; Kirkwood, John M.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Lee, Sandra J.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Sorafenib is an inhibitor of VEGFR, PDGFR, and RAF kinases, amongst others. We assessed the association of somatic mutations with clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic melanoma treated on E2603, comparing treatment with carboplatin, paclitaxel +/? sorafenib (CP vs. CPS). Experimental Design Pre-treatment tumor samples from 179 unique individuals enrolled on E2603 were analyzed. Genotyping was performed using a custom iPlex panel interrogating 74 mutations in 13 genes. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher’s exact test, logistic regression, and Cox’s proportional-hazards models. Progression free survival and overall survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Results BRAF and NRAS mutations were found at frequencies consistent with other metastatic melanoma cohorts. BRAF-mutant melanoma was associated with worse performance status, increased number of disease sites, and younger age at diagnosis; NRAS-mutant melanoma was associated with better performance status, fewer sites of disease, and female gender. BRAF and NRAS mutations were not significantly predictive of response or survival when treated with CPS vs. CP. However, patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma trended towards a worse response and PFS on CP than those with BRAF-mutant or WT/WT melanoma, an association that was reversed for this group on the CPS arm. Conclusions This study of somatic mutations in melanoma is the last prospectively collected phase III clinical trial population prior to the era of BRAF targeted therapy. A trend towards improved clinical response in patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma treated with CPS was observed, possibly due to sorafenib’s effect on CRAF. PMID:24714776

  4. Madura foot: two case reports, review of the literature, and new developments with clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    White, Eric A; Patel, Dakshesh B; Forrester, Deborah M; Gottsegen, Christopher J; O'Rourke, Emily; Holtom, Paul; Charlton, Timothy; Matcuk, George R

    2014-04-01

    "Madura foot" or pedal mycetoma is a rare destructive infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues of the foot, progressing to involve muscle and bone. The infection can be caused by both bacteria and fungi. Infection typically follows traumatic implantation of bacteria or fungal spores, which are present in soil or on plant material. Clinically, this entity can be difficult to diagnose and can have an indolent and progressive course. Early diagnosis is important to prevent patient morbidity and mortality. We present two cases of pedal mycetoma, review the literature, review new developments in diagnosis, and discuss magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of this unusual entity. PMID:24150831

  5. Abdominal Ultrasound With Scintigraphic and Clinical Correlates in Infants With Sickle Cell Anemia: Baseline Data From the BABY HUG Trial

    PubMed Central

    McCarville, M. Beth; Luo, Zhaoyu; Huang, Xiangke; Rees, Renee C.; Rogers, Zora R.; Miller, Scott T.; Thompson, Bruce; Kalpatthi, Ram; Wang, Winfred C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to perform and evaluate baseline abdominal ultrasound in infants with sickle cell anemia who participated in the BABY HUG multiinstitutional randomized placebo-controlled trial of hydroxyurea therapy and to examine the potential relationships among ultrasound results and clinical, nuclear medicine, and laboratory data. SUBJECTS AND METHODS After local institutional review board approval and with informed guardian consent, 116 girls and 87 boys (age range, 7.5–18 months) with sickle cell anemia underwent standardized abdominal sonography at 14 institutions. Imaging was centrally reviewed by one radiologist who assessed and measured the spleen, kidneys, gallbladder, and common bile duct. Baseline physical assessment of spleen size, serum alanine aminotransferase and bilirubin levels, 99mTc sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans, and 99mTc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid clearance glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) were obtained. Analysis of variance and the Student test were performed to compare sonographic findings to published results in healthy children and to clinical and laboratory findings. RESULTS The mean (± SD) spleen volume (108 ± 47 mL) was significantly greater than published normal control values (30 ± 14 mL; p < 0.0001). There was no correlation between spleen volume and function assessed by liver-spleen scan. The mean GFR (125 ± 34 mL/min/1.73 m2) was elevated compared with control GFRs (92 ± 18 mL/min/1.73 m2). Renal volumes (right kidney, 29 ± 8 mL; left kidney, 31 ± 9 mL) were significantly greater than control volumes (right kidney, 27 ± 3 mL; left kidney, 27 ± 3 mL; p < 0.0001) and were positively correlated with GFR (p = 0.0009). Five percent of patients had sonographic biliary abnormalities (sludge, n = 6; dilated common bile duct, n = 2; and cholelithiasis and thickened gallbladder wall, n = 1 each). There was no correlation between biliary sonographic findings and laboratory results. CONCLUSION In infants with sickle cell anemia, sonographic spleen volume does not reflect function, but increased renal volume correlates with GFR and is consistent with hyperfiltration. Sonographic biliary abnormalities can occur early in life, while remaining clinically silent. PMID:21606305

  6. Positive and negative schizotypy in a student sample: neurocognitive and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Dinn, Wayne M; Harris, Catherine L; Aycicegi, Ayse; Greene, Paul; Andover, Margaret S

    2002-07-01

    Positive and negative schizotypy may represent discrete factors or dimensions. To determine if distinct neurocognitive profiles are associated with these dimensions or factors, we classified university students on the basis of positive and negative schizotypal symptoms and conducted separate analyses. Following prior work in the neuropsychiatric literature, we predicted that subtle prefrontal deficits would be selectively associated with negative schizotypal personality features in a nonclinical student sample. We also investigated the relationship between positive/negative schizotypy and associated clinical states or personality dimensions including antisocial personality disorder, obsessive-compulsive personality traits, generalized and social anxiety, empathy, and impulsivity. Classification of subjects into positive and negative schizotypy groups revealed distinct neurocognitive and clinical profiles. We observed a positive relation between measures of temporolimbic dysfunction, impulsivity, antisocial behavior, and positive schizotypal phenomena. Negative schizotypy was associated with subtle performance deficits on measures of frontal executive function, increased social anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive phenomena. Findings are consistent with the contention that positive and negative schizotypy represent discrete factors. PMID:12084431

  7. Toxoplasma encephalitis in Haitian adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinical-pathologic-CT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.J.D.; Chan, J.C.; Hensley, G.T.; Hoffman, T.A.; Moskowitz, L.B.; Lippmann, S.

    1983-05-01

    The clinical data, histologic findings, and computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in eight adult Haitians with toxoplasma encephalitis were analyzed retrospectively. Diagnosis was established by identification of Toxoplasma gondii on autopsy in five and brain biopsy in three specimens and subsequently confirmed by the immunoperoxidase method. All these patiens, six of whom had been in the United States for 24 months or less, had severe idiopathic immunodeficiency syndrome. All were lymphopenic and six were on treatment for tuberculosis when the toxoplasma encephalitis developed. All patients were studied with CT when they developed an altered mental status and fever associated with seizures and/or focal neurologic deficits. Scans before treatment showed multiple intraparenchymal lesions in seven and a single lesion in the thalamus in one. Ring and/or nodular enhancement of the lesions was found in six and hypodense areas in two. Progressions of abnormalities occurred on serial studies. These CT findings that were best shown on axial and coronal thin-section double-dose contrast studies were useful but not diagnostically pathognomonic. In patients with similar clinical presentation CT is recommended to identify focal areas of involvement and to guide brain biopsy or excision so that prompt medical thereapy of this often lethal infection can be instituted.

  8. Phenotype/genotype correlations in Gaucher disease type 1: Clinical and therapeutic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Sibille, A.; Eng, C.M.; Kim, S.J.; Pastores, G. ); Grabowski, G.A. Univ. of Cincinnati, OH )

    1993-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disease and the most prevalent genetic disease among Ashkenazi Jews. Gaucher disease type 1 is characterized by marked variability of the phenotype and by the absence of neuronopathic involvement. To test the hypothesis that this phenotypic variability was due to genetic compounds of several different mutant alleles, 161 symptomatic patients with Gaucher disease type 1 (> 90% Ashkenazi Jewish) were analyzed for clinical involvement, and their genotypes were determined. Qualitative and quantitative measures of disease involvement included age at onset of the disease manifestations, hepatic and splenic volumes, age at splenectomy, and severity of bony disease. High statistically significant differences (P < .005) were found in each clinical parameter in patients with the N370S/N370S genotype compared with those patients with the N370S/84GG, N370S/L444P, and N370/ genotypes. The symptomatic N370S homozygotes had onset of their disease two to three decades later than patients with the other genotypes. In addition, patients with the latter genotypes have much more severely involved livers, spleens, and bones and had a higher incidence of splenectomy at an earlier age. These predictive genotype analyses provide the basis for genetic care delivery and therapeutic recommendations in patients affected with Gaucher disease type 1. 38 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Endemic chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in Sri Lanka: Correlation of pathology with clinical stages

    PubMed Central

    Wijetunge, S.; Ratnatunga, N. V. I.; Abeysekera, T. D. J.; Wazil, A. W. M.; Selvarajah, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDU) is endemic among the rural farming communities in several localities in and around the North Central region of Sri Lanka. This is an interstitial type renal disease and typically has an insidious onset and slow progression. This study was conducted to identify the pathological features in the different clinical stages of CKDU. This is a retrospective study of 251 renal biopsies identified to have a primary interstitial disease from regions endemic for CKDU. Pathological features were assessed and graded in relation to the clinical stage. The mean age of those affected by endemic CKDU was 37.3 ± 12.5 years and the male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The predominant feature of stage I disease was mild and moderate interstitial fibrosis; most did not have interstitial inflammation. The typical stage II disease had moderate interstitial fibrosis with or without mild interstitial inflammation. Stage III disease had moderate and severe interstitial fibrosis, moderate interstitial inflammation, tubular atrophy and some glomerulosclerosis. Stage IV disease typically had severe interstitial fibrosis and inflammation, tubular atrophy and glomerulosclerosis. The mean age of patients with stage I disease (27 ± 10.8 years) was significantly lower than those of the other stages. About 79.2%, 55%, 49.1% and 50% in stage I, II, III and IV disease respectively were asymptomatic at the time of biopsy.

  10. Clinical profile and genetic correlation of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia: A study from a tertiary care centre in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Pulai, Debabrata; Guin, Deb Shankar; Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B; Ganguly, Goutam; Joardar, Anindita; Roy, Sarnava; Biswas, Atanu; Pandit, Alak; Roy, Arijit; Senapati, Asit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Progressive cerebellar ataxia inherited by autosomal dominant transmission is known as Spino Cerebellar Ataxia (SCA). Aims and Objectives: To look for various clinical profile and molecular genetics of patients with SCAs and their phenotype-genotype correlation of patients with SCAs. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Bangur Institute of Neurosciences, Kolkata from June 2010 to April 2013. We selected patients from the neurogenetic clinic of our institute and performed genetic test for SCA 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12. The diagnosis was based on suggestive clinical features and positive genetic study, done by polymerase chain reaction. Results: 83 patients were tested for trineucleotide repeats and turned out 45 positive for the mentioned SCAs. We found 13(28.9%) SCA-1, 18(40%) SCA-2, 7(15.6%) SCA-3, 6(13.3) SCA-6 and 1(2.2%) SCA-12 patients. Half of the remaining 38 patients had positive family history. The mean age of onset were 38.46 years in SCA-1, 29.55 years in SCA-2, 38.43 years in SCA-3, 47.33 years in SCA-6. Slow saccades were observed in 7(53.8%) SCA-1, 17(94.4%) SCA-2, 4(57.1%) SCA-3, 3(50%) SCA-6 patients. Hyporeflexia was noticed in 5(27.8%) SCA-2 patients. Pyramidal tract involvement was found in 8(61.5%) SCA-1, 4(22.2%) SCA-2, 4(57.1%) SCA-3 and 1(16.7%) SCA-6 patients. Conclusion: Our study showed SCA-2 is the most common variety of SCA and genotypic-phenotypic correlation was observed in SCA-1,2,6 and 12 patients. PMID:25506158

  11. Expression profile of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in premenopausal Mexican women with breast cancer: clinical and immunohistochemical correlates.

    PubMed

    Loredo-Pozos, Gloria; Chiquete, Erwin; Oceguera-Villanueva, Antonio; Panduro, Arturo; Siller-López, Fernando; Ramos-Márquez, Martha E

    2009-01-01

    Low BRCA1 gene expression is associated with increased invasiveness and influences the response of breast carcinoma (BC) to chemotherapeutics. However, expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes has not been completely characterized in premenopausal BC. We analyzed the clinical and immunohistochemical correlates of BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression in young BC women. We studied 62 women (mean age 38.8 years) who developed BC before the age of 45 years. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mRNA expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and that of HER-2 and p53 proteins by immunohistochemistry. Body mass index (BMI) > or = 27 (52%) and a declared family history of BC (26%) were the main risk factors. Ductal infiltrative adenocarcinoma was found in 86% of the cases (tumor size >5 cm in 48%). Disease stages I-IV occurred in 2, 40, 55, and 3%, respectively (73% implicating lymph nodes). Women aged < or = 35 years (24%) had more family history of cervical cancer, stage III/IV disease, HER-2 positivity, and lower BRCA1 expression than older women (P < 0.05). BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression correlated in healthy, but not in tumor tissues (TT). Neither BRCA1 nor BRCA2 expression was associated with tumor histology, differentiation, nodal metastasis or p53 and HER-2 expression. After multivariate analysis, only disease stage explained BRCA1 mRNA levels in the lowest quartile. Premenopausal BC has aggressive clinical and molecular characteristics. Low BRCA1 mRNA expression is associated mainly with younger ages and advanced clinical stage of premenopausal BC. BRCA2 expression is not associated with disease severity in young BC women. PMID:19012002

  12. Correlation of Clinical Neuromusculoskeletal and Central Somatosensory Performance: Variability in Controls and Patients With Severe and Mild Focal Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Byl, Nancy N.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Merzenich, Michael M.; Roberts, Tim; McKenzie, Alison

    2002-01-01

    Focal hand dystonia (FHd) is a recalcitrant, disabling movement disorder, characterized by involuntary co-contractions of agonists and antagonists, that can develop in patients who overuse or misuse their hands. The aim of this study was to document clinical neuromusculoskeletal performance and somatosensory responses (magnetoencephalography) in healthy controls and in FHd subjects with mild versus severe hand dystonia. The performance of healthy subjects (n = 17) was significantly better than that of FHd subjects (n = 17) on all clinical parameters. Those with mild dystonia (n = 10) demonstrated better musculoskeletal skills, task-specific motor performance, and sensory discrimination, but the performance of sensory and fine motor tasks was slower than that of patients with severe dystonia. In terms of somatosensory evoked field responses (SEFs), FHd subjects demonstrated a significant difference in the location of the hand representation on the x and y axes, lower amplitude of SEFs integrated across latency, and a higher ratio of mean SEF amplitude to latency than the controls. Bilaterally,. those with FHd (mild and severe) lacked progressive sequencing of the digits from inferior to superior. On the affected digits, subjects with severe dystonia had a significantly higher ratio of SEF amplitude to latency and a significantly smaller mean volume of the cortical hand representation than those with mild dystonia. Severity of dystonia positively correlated with the ratio of SEF mean amplitude to latency (0.9029 affected, 0.8477 unaffected; p<0.01). The results of the present study strengthen the evidence that patients with FHd demonstrate signs of somatosensory degradation of the hand that correlates with clinical sensorimotor dysfunction, with characteristics of the dedifferentiation varying by the severity of hand dystonia. If these findings represent aberrant learning, then effective rehabilitation must incorporate the principles of neuroplasticity. Training must be individualized to each patient to rebalance the sensorimotor feedback loop and to restore normal fine motor control. PMID:12757370

  13. Is decreased ventricular volume a correlate of positive clinical outcome following shunt placement in cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus?

    PubMed

    Meier, U; Paris, S; Gräwe, A; Stockheim, D; Hajdukova, A; Mutze, S

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that in patients with communicating hydrocephalus or normal pressure hydrocephalus, ventricular volume decreases following implantation of differential pressure valved shunts. Hydrostatic valves (Miethke dual-switch valves) were implanted in 60 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients at Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin between September 1997 and September 2001. One year postoperatively, these patients underwent CT scan, and their ventricular size was ascertained using the Evans index. Although 77% of these patients showed no postoperative change in ventricular volume, 65% nonetheless showed good to excellent clinical improvement, 13% satisfactory improvement and 22% no improvement. A moderate reduction in ventricular size was observed in 17% of the patients in our cohort. 40% of these patients showed good to excellent clinical improvement, 20% satisfactory improvement, and 40% unsatisfactory improvement. A marked reduction in ventricular size was observed in 6% of our patients. Of these latter patients, 50% showed good to excellent outcomes, while 50% had unsatisfactory outcomes. The favorable outcomes following implantation of a hydrostatic shunt in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus did not correlate with decreased ventricular volume one year after operation. Better clinical outcomes were observed in patients with little or no alteration in ventricular size than in patients with a marked decrease in ventricular size. Postoperative change in ventricular volume should be assessed differently for patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus than in patients with hypertensive hydrocephalus. PMID:14753501

  14. Clinical Correlates of Autosomal Chromosomal Abnormalities in an Electronic Medical Record–Linked Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Jouni, Hayan; Shameer, Khader; Asmann, Yan W.; Hazin, Ribhi; de Andrade, Mariza

    2013-01-01

    Although mosaic autosomal chromosomal abnormalities are being increasingly detected as part of high-density genotyping studies, the clinical correlates are unclear. From an electronic medical record (EMR)–based genome-wide association study (GWAS) of peripheral arterial disease, log-R-ratio and B-allele-frequency data were used to identify mosaic autosomal chromosomal abnormalities including copy number variation and loss of heterozygosity. The EMRs of patients with chromosomal abnormalities and those without chromosomal abnormalities were reviewed to compare clinical characteristics. Among 3336 study participants, 0.75% (n = 25, mean age = 74.8 ± 10.7 years, 64% men) had abnormal intensity plots indicative of autosomal chromosomal abnormalities. A hematologic malignancy was present in 8 patients (32%), of whom 4 also had a solid organ malignancy while 2 patients had a solid organ malignancy only. In 50 age- and sex-matched participants without chromosomal abnormalities, there was a lower rate of hematologic malignancies (2% vs 32%, P < .001) but not solid organ malignancies (20% vs 24%, P = .69). We also report the clinical characteristics of each patient with the observed chromosomal abnormalities. Interestingly, among 5 patients with 20q deletions, 4 had a myeloproliferative disorder while all 3 men in this group had prostate cancer. In summary, in a GWAS of 3336 adults, 0.75% had autosomal chromosomal abnormalities and nearly a third of them had hematologic malignancies. A potential novel association between 20q deletions, myeloproliferative disorders, and prostate cancer was also noted. PMID:26425586

  15. Sclerosis in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws and its correlation with the clinical stages: study of 43 cases.

    PubMed

    Bagan, J V; Cibrian, R M; Lopez, J; Leopoldo-Rodado, M; Carbonell, E; Bagán, L; Utrilla, J; Scully, C

    2015-03-01

    We analysed the degree of sclerosis in the different stages of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) and studied the relation between the grade of sclerosis, the clinical symptoms, and the depth of lucency. We compared 43 patients with mandibular BRONJ with a control group of 40 cases with no bony lesions. The presence of sclerotic bone, cortical irregularities, radiolucency, fragmentation or sequestration, periostitis, and narrowing of the mandibular canal were studied from computed tomographic (CT) scans using the program ImageJ 1.47v (National Institute of Health, Bethesda, USA) to measure the radiolucency, width of the cortices, and degree of sclerosis. Patients with BRONJ had more severe sclerosis than controls (p<0.01). There was also a significant difference among the different stages of BRONJ, with the highest values found in stage III (p=0.02). The degree of sclerosis differed according to sex, type of bisphosphonate, and the clinical characteristics such as pain, or suppuration, but not significantly so (p>0.05). We conclude that the degree of sclerosis increases with the clinical stage of BRONJ, and is correlated with the depth of lucency. PMID:25560326

  16. Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niklas, Martin; Abdollahi, Amir; Akselrod, Mark S.; Debus, Jürgen; Jäkel, Oliver; and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u{sup ?1}, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 ?m and ?1.72 ?m in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 ?m. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions.

  17. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

  18. Questor's Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Dock, Michelle Nichols; Eldridge, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Questor is a curious little bird whose four broad questions are helpful to anyone interested in making art or understanding the art of others. He was designed as a character in an online video for children, "Building on a River: Questor's Tale." The video is narrated by Questor, who relates the 2000 year history of architecture along the Salt…

  19. Correlation of Real Time PCR Cycle Threshold Cut-Off with Bordetella pertussis Clinical Severity

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Shelly; Deeks, Shelley L.; Marchand-Austin, Alex; Rilkoff, Heather; Dang, Vica; Walton, Ryan; Hashim, Ahmed; Farrell, David; Crowcroft, Natasha S.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis testing performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is interpreted based on a cycle threshold (Ct) value. At Public Health Ontario Laboratories (PHOL), a Ct value <36 is reported as positive, and Ct values ?36 and <40 are reported as indeterminate. PHOL reported indeterminate results to physicians and public health units until May 2012, after which these results were only reported to physicians. We investigated the association between Ct value and disease symptom and severity to examine the significance of indeterminate results clinically, epidemiologically and for public health reporting. B. pertussis positive and indeterminate RT-PCR results were linked to pertussis cases reported in the provincial Integrated Public Health Information System (iPHIS), using deterministic linkage. Patients with positive RT-PCR results had a lower median age of 10.8 years compared to 12.0 years for patients with indeterminate results (p = 0.24). Hospitalized patients had significantly lower Ct values than non-hospitalized patients (median Ct values of 20.7 vs. 31.6, p<0.001). The proportion of patients reporting the most indicative symptoms of pertussis did not differ between patients with positive vs. indeterminate RT-PCR results. Taking the most indicative symptoms of pertussis as the gold-standard, the positive predictive value of the RT-PCR test was 68.1%. RT-PCR test results should be interpreted in the context of the clinical symptoms, age, vaccination status, prevalence, and other factors. Further information on interpretation of indeterminate RT-PCR results may be needed, and the utility of reporting to public health practitioners should be re-evaluated. PMID:26186564

  20. A study of the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and its correlation with severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Vengadakrishnan, K.; Koushik, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with wide clinical variation and its incidence is increasing. Acute pancreatitis may vary in severity, from mild self-limiting pancreatic inflammation to pancreatic necrosis with life-threatening sequelae. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Aim and objectives The present study was aimed to assess the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and to assess the efficacy of various severity indices in predicting the outcome of patients. Methodology This was a prospective study done in Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital from April 2012–September 2014. All patients with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Along with routine lab parameters, serum amylase, lipase, lipid profile, calcium, CRP, LDH, CT abdomen, CXR and 2D Echo was done for all patients. Results A total of 110 patients were analysed. 50 patients required Intensive care, among them 9 patients (18%) died. 20 patients (18.2%) had MODS, 15 patients (13.6%) had pleural effusion, 9 patients (8.2%) had pseudocyst, 2 patients(1.8%) had hypotension, 2 patients(1.8%) had ARDS and 2 patients(1.8%) had DKA. In relation to various severity indices, high score of CRP, LDH and CT severity index was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. 15 patients (13.6%) underwent open necrosectomy surgery, 3 patients (2.7%) underwent laparoscopic necrosectomy and 7 patients (6.4%) were tried step up approach but could not avoid surgery. Step up approach and surgery did not have a significant reduction in the mortality. Conclusion Initial assessment of severity by CRP, LDH and lipase could be reliable indicators of outcome in acute pancreatitis PMID:26715920

  1. Learn about Clinical Studies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Studies Glossary of Common Site Terms Learn About Clinical Studies Contents What Is a Clinical Study? Clinical ... for Participation Questions to Ask What Is a Clinical Study? A clinical study involves research using human ...

  2. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: clinical course, genetic mutations and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-08-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients. PMID:25337067

  3. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Clinical Course, Genetic Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients. PMID:25337067

  4. Cerebellar metabolic involvement and its correlations with clinical parameters in vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Marco; Micarelli, Alessandro; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Di Pietro, Barbara; Öberg, Johanna; Schillaci, Orazio; Pagani, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Although vestibular neuritis (VN) cortical models are described in the literature, there is lack of knowledge regarding the exclusive cerebellar involvement. The aim of the present study was to analyze, by [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computer tomography, regional cerebellar FDG uptake in eight right-handed VN patients (five females; three males; mean age 48 ± 7 years) during the first few days (PET0) and after 1 month (PET1) since symptoms onset. At both phases, patients underwent otoneurological examination and filled in a battery of validated questionnaires. Twenty-six cerebellar volumes of interest (VOI) were identified by the automated anatomical labeling library and normalized to thalamus FDG-PET uptake. Mean intensity within VOIs was calculated in both phases and processed by within-subjects ANOVA. A significantly lower (p < 0.005) FDG uptake distribution was found in bilateral lobules III, VI and X and in vermis 1-2, 3, 6 and 10 at PET0 as compared to PET1 and a significant higher FDG uptake distribution was found in right crus I in the same comparison. Significant (p < 0.05) positive correlations were found between Anxiety and Bucket test scores, and normalized metabolism in right crus I (at PET0) and vermis 10 (at PET1), respectively. A negative correlation was found at PET0 between slow-phase velocity scores and normalized metabolism in right lobule X. These data show relevant changes in the pattern of cerebellar metabolism that might unravel additional central aspects of early and late VN associated to bilateral cortical responses to sensory conflict during the acute VN-related controversial inflow. PMID:25082627

  5. Prediction scores do not correlate with clinically adjudicated categories of pulmonary embolism in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Katsios, CM; Donadini, M; Meade, M; Mehta, S; Hall, R; Granton, J; Kutsiogiannis, J; Dodek, P; Heels-Ansdell, D; McIntyre, L; Vlahakis, N; Muscedere, J; Friedrich, J; Fowler, R; Skrobik, Y; Albert, M; Cox, M; Klinger, J; Nates, J; Bersten, A; Doig, C; Zytaruk, N; Crowther, M; Cook, DJ

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prediction scores for pretest probability of pulmonary embolism (PE) validated in outpatient settings are occasionally used in the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation of Geneva and Wells scores with adjudicated categories of PE in ICU patients. METHODS: In a randomized trial of thromboprophylaxis, patients with suspected PE were adjudicated as possible, probable or definite PE. Data were then retrospectively abstracted for the Geneva Diagnostic PE score, Wells, Modified Wells and Simplified Wells Diagnostic scores. The chance-corrected agreement between adjudicated categories and each score was calculated. ANOVA was used to compare values across the three adjudicated PE categories. RESULTS: Among 70 patients with suspected PE, agreement was poor between adjudicated categories and Geneva pretest probabilities (kappa 0.01 [95% CI ?0.0643 to 0.0941]) or Wells pretest probabilities (kappa ?0.03 [95% CI ?0.1462 to 0.0914]). Among four possible, 16 probable and 50 definite PEs, there were no significant differences in Geneva scores (possible = 4.0, probable = 4.7, definite = 4.5; P=0.90), Wells scores (possible = 2.8, probable = 4.9, definite = 4.1; P=0.37), Modified Wells (possible = 2.0, probable = 3.4, definite = 2.9; P=0.34) or Simplified Wells (possible = 1.8, probable = 2.8, definite = 2.4; P=0.30). CONCLUSIONS: Pretest probability scores developed outside the ICU do not correlate with adjudicated PE categories in critically ill patients. Research is needed to develop prediction scores for this population. PMID:24083302

  6. Combined common peroneal and tibial nerve injury after knee dislocation: one injury or two? An MRI-clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chandan G; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT Knee dislocations are often accompanied by stretch injuries to the common peroneal nerve (CPN). A small subset of these injuries also affect the tibial nerve. The mechanism of this combined pattern could be a single longitudinal stretch injury of the CPN extending to the sciatic bifurcation (and tibial division) or separate injuries of both the CPN and tibial nerve, either at the level of the tibiofemoral joint or distally at the soleal sling and fibular neck. The authors reviewed cases involving patients with knee dislocations with CPN and tibial nerve injuries to determine the localization of the combined injury and correlation between degree of MRI appearance and clinical severity of nerve injury. METHODS Three groups of cases were reviewed. Group 1 consisted of knee dislocations with clinical evidence of nerve injury (n = 28, including 19 cases of complete CPN injury); Group 2 consisted of knee dislocations without clinical evidence of nerve injury (n = 19); and Group 3 consisted of cases of minor knee trauma but without knee dislocation (n = 14). All patients had an MRI study of the knee performed within 3 months of injury. MRI appearance of tibial and common peroneal nerve injury was scored by 2 independent radiologists in 3 zones (Zone I, sciatic bifurcation; Zone II, knee joint; and Zone III, soleal sling and fibular neck) on a severity scale of 1-4. Injury signal was scored as diffuse or focal for each nerve in each of the 3 zones. A clinical score was also calculated based on Medical Research Council scores for strength in the tibial and peroneal nerve distributions, combined with electrophysiological data, when available, and correlated with the MRI injury score. RESULTS Nearly all of the nerve segments visualized in Groups 1 and 2 demonstrated some degree of injury on MRI (95%), compared with 12% of nerve segments in Group 3. MRI nerve injury scores were significantly more severe in Group 1 relative to Group 2 (2.06 vs 1.24, p < 0.001) and Group 2 relative to Group 3 (1.24 vs 0.13, p < 0.001). In both groups of patients with knee dislocations (Groups 1 and 2), the MRI nerve injury score was significantly higher for CPN than tibial nerve (2.72 vs 1.40 for Group 1, p < 0.001; 1.39 vs 1.09 for Group 2, p < 0.05). The clinical injury score had a significantly strong correlation with the MRI injury score for the CPN (r = 0.75, p < 0.001), but not for the tibial nerve (r = 0.07, p = 0.83). CONCLUSIONS MRI is highly sensitive in detecting subclinical nerve injury. In knee dislocation, clinical tibial nerve injury is always associated with simultaneous CPN injury, but tibial nerve function is never worse than peroneal nerve function. The point of maximum injury can occur in any of 3 zones. PMID:26323826

  7. Correlations Between the EGFR Mutation Status and Clinicopathological Features of Clinical Stage I Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Isaka, Tetsuya; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Masashi; Furumoto, Hideyuki; Nishii, Teppei; Katayama, Kayoko; Yamada, Kouzo; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Advanced lung cancers with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions (Ex19s) and EGFR exon 21 L858R point mutations (Ex21s) exhibit different clinical behavior. However, these differences are unclear in resectable primary lung tumors. The clinicopathological features of 88 (20.9%) Ex19, 124 (29.4%) Ex21, and 198 (46.9%) EGFR wild-type (Wt) clinical stage I primary adenocarcinomas resected between January 1, 2012 and October 31, 2014 were compared by using Chi-square tests, residual error analysis, analysis of variance, and Tukey tests. Ex21 lesions occurred more frequently in women and never-smokers and had a higher tumor disappearance rate (TDR: 59.6% vs 43.9%; P?

  8. Clinical Correlates of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) in an Outpatient Sample of Adolescents.

    PubMed

    García-Nieto, Rebeca; Carballo, Juan J; Díaz de Neira Hernando, Mónica; de León-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-García, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents is a major public health concern. The first goal of our study was to describe the characteristics and functions of NSSI and NSSI thoughts in an adolescent outpatient sample. The second goal was to examine which clinical factors discriminate between these two groups of patients. A group of 267 subjects was recruited from the Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatric Services, Jiménez Díaz Foundation (Madrid, Spain) from November 2011 to October 2012. All participants were administered the Spanish version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI). A total of 21.7% of patients reported having engaged in NSSI at least once in their lifetime. The most strongly endorsed function for NSSI was automatic negative reinforcement. In comparison with patients in the NSSI Thoughts group and the control group, patients in the NSSI group scored higher in Internalization of Anger and in all the scales comprising the Children's Depression Inventory. Our findings on the prevalence and functions of NSSI are consistent with the literature. NSSI was mainly performed for emotion regulation purposes; specifically, NSSI seems to be used to cope with anger and depression. In addition, internalization of anger might play a significant role in the maintenance of this behavior. PMID:25257184

  9. Hepatic artery flow improvement after portacaval shunt: a single hemodynamic clinical correlate.

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, A R; Moreno, A H; Panke, W F; Nealon, T F

    1976-01-01

    We have documented a highly significant increment in hepatic arterial flow following a portacaval shunt in patients with cirrhosis of the liver and portal hypertension. In contrast with other hemodynamic variables, the increment in arterial flow was directly related to morbidity, hospital mortality, and long term survival. Patients with increments smaller than 100 ml/min had the worst clinical results. They accounted for all of the hospital mortality, the largest incidence of encephalopathy, and the worst long term cumulative survival rates. The extent of the increment was not related directly to the type of shunt but, rather, to some intrinsic capability of the cirrhotic liver to increase its arterial flow in response to the relief of sinusoidal hypertension produced by the shunt. This capablilty appears related to the degree of entrapment of the hepatic arterioles by the fibrous tissues of cirrhosis. This encasement of arterioles should change the elastic properties of the hepatic arterial bed and we propose to measure these properties by determining the characteristic input impedance of the arterial bed. PMID:962397

  10. Romidepsin in peripheral and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: mechanistic implications from clinical and correlative data.

    PubMed

    Bates, Susan E; Eisch, Robin; Ling, Alexander; Rosing, Douglas; Turner, Maria; Pittaluga, Stefania; Prince, H Miles; Kirschbaum, Mark H; Allen, Steven L; Zain, Jasmine; Geskin, Larisa J; Joske, David; Popplewell, Leslie; Cowen, Edward W; Jaffe, Elaine S; Nichols, Jean; Kennedy, Sally; Steinberg, Seth M; Liewehr, David J; Showe, Louise C; Steakley, Caryn; Wright, John; Fojo, Tito; Litman, Thomas; Piekarz, Richard L

    2015-07-01

    Romidepsin is an epigenetic agent approved for the treatment of patients with cutaneous or peripheral T-cell lymphoma (CTCL and PTCL). Here we report data in all patients treated on the National Cancer Institute 1312 trial, demonstrating long-term disease control and the ability to retreat patients relapsing off-therapy. In all, 84 patients with CTCL and 47 with PTCL were enrolled. Responses occurred early, were clinically meaningful and of very long duration in some cases. Notably, patients with PTCL receiving romidepsin as third-line therapy or later had a comparable response rate (32%) of similar duration as the total population (38%). Eight patients had treatment breaks of 3.5 months to 10 years; in four of six patients, re-initiation of treatment led to clear benefit. Safety data show slightly greater haematological and constitutional toxicity in PTCL. cDNA microarray studies show unique individual gene expression profiles, minimal overlap between patients, and both induction and repression of gene expression that reversed within 24 h. These data argue against cell death occurring as a result of an epigenetics-mediated gene induction programme. Together this work supports the safety and activity of romidepsin in T-cell lymphoma, but suggests a complex mechanism of action. PMID:25891346

  11. Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech: Clinical Features and Acoustic and Neurologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Edythe A.; Clark, Heather; Machulda, Mary; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study summarizes 2 illustrative cases of a neurodegenerative speech disorder, primary progressive apraxia of speech (AOS), as a vehicle for providing an overview of the disorder and an approach to describing and quantifying its perceptual features and some of its temporal acoustic attributes. Method Two individuals with primary progressive AOS underwent speech-language and neurologic evaluations on 2 occasions, ranging from 2.0 to 7.5 years postonset. Performance on several tests, tasks, and rating scales, as well as several acoustic measures, were compared over time within and between cases. Acoustic measures were compared with performance of control speakers. Results Both patients initially presented with AOS as the only or predominant sign of disease and without aphasia or dysarthria. The presenting features and temporal progression were captured in an AOS Rating Scale, an Articulation Error Score, and temporal acoustic measures of utterance duration, syllable rates per second, rates of speechlike alternating motion and sequential motion, and a pairwise variability index measure. Conclusions AOS can be the predominant manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. Clinical ratings of its attributes and acoustic measures of some of its temporal characteristics can support its diagnosis and help quantify its salient characteristics and progression over time. PMID:25654422

  12. Infections with VIM-1 Metallo-?-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacter cloacae and Their Correlation with Clinical Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Marco; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Perilli, Mariagrazia; Forcella, Chiara; Giordano, Alessandra; Cafiso, Viviana; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Stefani, Stefania; Venditti, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the incidence and clinical significance of metallo-?-lactamases among Enterobacter strains isolated from patients with nosocomial infections. We prospectively collected data on patients with Enterobacter infection during a 13-month period. All of the strains were investigated for antibiotic susceptibility, the presence and expression of metallo-?-lactamases, and clonality. Of 29 infections (11 involving the urinary tract, 7 pneumonias, 3 skin/soft tissue infections, 3 intra-abdominal infections, 3 bacteremias, and 2 other infections), 7 (24%) were caused by Enterobacter cloacae strains harboring a blaVIM-1 gene associated or not with a blaSHV12 gene. Infections caused by VIM-1-producing strains were more frequently associated with a recent prior hospitalization (P = 0.006), cirrhosis (P = 0.03), relapse of infection (P < 0.001), and more prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy (P = 0.01) than were other infections. All of the isolates were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem and had blaVIM-1 preceded by a weak P1 promoter and inactivated P2 promoters. Most VIM-1-producing Enterobacter isolates belonged to a main clone, but four different clones were found. Multiclonal VIM-1-producing E. cloacae infections are difficult to diagnose due to an apparent susceptibility to various beta-lactams, including carbapenems, and are associated with a high relapse rate and a more prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy. PMID:19741074

  13. [Correlation analysis of clinical medication of ectopic pregnancy based on hospital information system data].

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liao, Xing; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo-Yue

    2014-09-01

    To analyze the reality of ectopic pregnancy patients' clinical medication, find out the association rules of chemical medicine and traditional Chinese medicine, HIS data from 15 grade III-A general hospitals were collected, descriptive statistic methods and association rules were used in analysis of the data. The results showed that the most commonly used western medicine types were antibiotics,hemostatic medicine and killing embryo medicine. The most commonly used traditional Chinese medicine types were heat clearing and detoxicating drugs, promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis drugs, tonifying Qi and blood drugs. The common combinations of western medicine and Chinese medicine were heat clearing and detoxicating drug add antibiotics, heat clearing and detoxicating drug add hemostatic medicine, promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis drug add antibiotics, tonifying Qi and blood drug add antibiotics. In conclusion, the medicine types of ectopic pregnancy were concentrated. For conbined treatment of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine, heat clearing and detoxicating, tonic righting, promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis treatment were often used on the basis of anti-inflammatory, killing embryo and hemostasis. PMID:25532382

  14. Correlation between the expression of DNA topoisomerases I and IIalpha and clinical parameters in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L V; Rudolph, P; Shilov, Y M; Gieseler, F; Alm, P; Tareeva, I E; Proppe, D

    2001-11-01

    Multiple factors interact during the evolution of renal diseases. In the present study, we examined the expression of DNA topoisomerases type I and IIalpha, which reflect gene transcription and DNA replication, respectively. Enzyme content was assessed by immunohistochemistry using two specific monoclonal antibodies, C21 and Ki-S4, on 81 archival punch-biopsy specimens from patients with renal diseases, including minimal change disease (MCD; n = 10), focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS; n = 6), mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN; n = 11), membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN; n = 10), mesangial capillary glomerulonephritis (MCGN; n = 7), rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN; n = 12), lupus nephritis (LN; n = 15), and tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN; n = 10). Both enzymes were strongly expressed in diseases tending to rapid progression, notably RPGN and LN, whereas MCD and MGN showed low protein levels in both the glomerular and tubular compartments. Moreover, topoisomerase expression was significantly associated with the density of monocytogenic infiltrates (monitored by means of the monoclonal antibody Ki-M1p), such pathogenesis-associated factors as antinuclear antibodies and paranuclear antineutrophilic antibodies, and serum immunoglobulin levels. There also was a positive correlation with serum creatinine levels and an inverse association with proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome. We conclude that the expression of DNA topoisomerases may be linked to pathogenetic mechanisms and may provide prognostic information. Because of their comparatively low nephrotoxicity, topoisomerase inhibitors might prove to be useful therapeutic agents in the treatment of renal diseases. PMID:11684556

  15. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccines and monkeypox virus challenge: proteomic assessment and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Townsend, M B; Keckler, M S; Patel, N; Davies, D H; Felgner, P; Damon, I K; Karem, K L

    2013-01-01

    Despite the eradication of smallpox, orthopoxviruses (OPV) remain public health concerns. Efforts to develop new therapeutics and vaccines for smallpox continue through their evaluation in animal models despite limited understanding of the specific correlates of protective immunity. Recent monkeypox virus challenge studies have established the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) as a model of human systemic OPV infections. In this study, we assess the induction of humoral immunity in humans and prairie dogs receiving Dryvax, Acam2000, or Imvamune vaccine and characterize the proteomic profile of immune recognition using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), neutralization assays, and protein microarrays. We confirm anticipated similarities of antigenic protein targets of smallpox vaccine-induced responses in humans and prairie dogs and identify several differences. Subsequent monkeypox virus intranasal infection of vaccinated prairie dogs resulted in a significant boost in humoral immunity characterized by a shift in reactivity of increased intensity to a broader range of OPV proteins. This work provides evidence of similarities between the vaccine responses in prairie dogs and humans that enhance the value of the prairie dog model system as an OPV vaccination model and offers novel findings that form a framework for examining the humoral immune response induced by systemic orthopoxvirus infection. PMID:23135728

  16. Humoral Immunity to Smallpox Vaccines and Monkeypox Virus Challenge: Proteomic Assessment and Clinical Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Keckler, M. S.; Patel, N.; Davies, D. H.; Felgner, P.; Damon, I. K.; Karem, K. L.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the eradication of smallpox, orthopoxviruses (OPV) remain public health concerns. Efforts to develop new therapeutics and vaccines for smallpox continue through their evaluation in animal models despite limited understanding of the specific correlates of protective immunity. Recent monkeypox virus challenge studies have established the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) as a model of human systemic OPV infections. In this study, we assess the induction of humoral immunity in humans and prairie dogs receiving Dryvax, Acam2000, or Imvamune vaccine and characterize the proteomic profile of immune recognition using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), neutralization assays, and protein microarrays. We confirm anticipated similarities of antigenic protein targets of smallpox vaccine-induced responses in humans and prairie dogs and identify several differences. Subsequent monkeypox virus intranasal infection of vaccinated prairie dogs resulted in a significant boost in humoral immunity characterized by a shift in reactivity of increased intensity to a broader range of OPV proteins. This work provides evidence of similarities between the vaccine responses in prairie dogs and humans that enhance the value of the prairie dog model system as an OPV vaccination model and offers novel findings that form a framework for examining the humoral immune response induced by systemic orthopoxvirus infection. PMID:23135728

  17. Correlation of clinical and angiographic findings in brain ischemia with regional cerebral blood flow measured by the xenon inhalation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, I.; Little, J.R.; Furlan, A.J.; Weinstein, M.

    1982-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients with brain ischemia underwent cerebral angiography and measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after /sup 133/Xe inhalation. A fast compartment flow rate and an initial slope index were computed for each detector and for each hemisphere. The clinical presentation, angiographic findings, and rCBF results were then examined for significant correlations. Patients with hemispheric infarction most frequently showed bilateral diffusely decreased rCBF. In patients with transient ischemic attacks, no specific pattern emerged. Patients with unilateral internal carotid artery occlusion frequently hd bilateral diffusely decreased rCBF. Patients with severe internal carotid artery stenosis were more likely to show decreased rCBF than were patients with mild or moderate stenosis. The initial slope index seemed to be a more sensitive indicator of brain ischemia than the fast compartment flow rate. The possible pathophysiological significance and relationship to patient management of the various rCBF patterns are discussed.

  18. Inflamed temporal artery: histologic findings in 354 biopsies, with clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Alberto; Muratore, Francesco; Boiardi, Luigi; Restuccia, Giovanna; Pipitone, Nicolò; Pazzola, Giulia; Tagliavini, Elena; Ragazzi, Moira; Rossi, Giulio; Salvarani, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed 888 temporal artery biopsies (TAB) performed in 871 patients in a single institution from January 1986 to December 2013. Forty-four biopsies (4.9%) were inadequate, 490 (55.2%) were devoid of inflammation and were considered negative, and 354 (39.9%) showed inflammation and were considered positive. On the basis of the localization of the inflammation, positive TABs were further classified into 4 categories: small vessel vasculitis (SVV), in which inflammation was limited to small periadventitial vessels devoid of muscular coat, with sparing of the temporal artery (32 cases, 9% of the positive biopsies); vasa vasorum vasculitis (VVV), in which inflammation was limited to the adventitial vasa vasorum (23 cases, 6.5% of the positive biopsies); inflammation limited to adventitia (ILA), in which inflammation extended from a strictly perivascular localization to the surrounding adventitia, without medial involvement (25 cases, 7% of the positive biopsies); and transmural inflammation (TMI), in which inflammation crossed the external elastic lamina and extended to the media (274 cases, 77.5% of the positive biopsies). In TMI, inflammation was generally more prominent between media and adventitia and mostly consisted of T lymphocytes and macrophages, with occasionally a significant number of plasma cells. Numerous eosinophils or neutrophils (with or without leucocytoclasia and suppurative necrosis), fibrinoid necrosis (limited to small branches of the temporal artery), and acute thrombosis were unusual, being present in 8%, 1.8%, 0.7%, and 9.5% of our biopsies with TMI, respectively. Giant cells, laminar necrosis, and calcifications prevailed along the internal elastic lamina and were present in 74.8%, 25.2%, and 20% of the biopsies with TMI, respectively. Among the 322 patients with positive TAB on whom we obtained clinical information, 317 had giant cell arteritis and 5 had a different disease: 3 (with SVV at histology) had ANCA-associated vasculitis, 1 (with SVV with amyloid deposits) had primary systemic amyloidosis, and 1 (with TMI limited to a small branch) had polyarteritis nodosa. In none of these cases the biopsy showed fibrinoid necrosis or significant numbers of eosinophils or neutrophils. Considering the 317 patients with giant cell arteritis, those with SVV and VVV compared with those with TMI had a significantly lower frequency of cranial manifestation (including headache, jaw claudication, and abnormalities of temporal arteries), lower serum levels of acute-phase reactants, and a reduced frequency of prednisone therapy at the time of TAB, of the "halo sign" at color duplex sonography of temporal arteries, and of systemic symptoms (for VVV). Polymyalgia rheumatica and blindness were equally represented in all patients groups, whereas there was a higher frequency of male sex and peripheral arthritis in patients with SVV. Patients with ILA were more similar to those with TMI, having a lower frequency of headache, of abnormalities of temporal arteries, and of a positive "halo sign" at color duplex sonography of temporal arteries. In conclusion, the histologic spectrum of inflammatory lesions that can be found in TAB is broad, and the differences have clinical implications. PMID:25216320

  19. Increased percentages of autoantibodies in immunoglobulin A-deficient children do not correlate with clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Gulez, Nesrin; Karaca, Neslihan Edeer; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil

    2009-01-01

    IgA deficiency (IgAD) is frequently associated with autoimmune phenomena. The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency of 22 different autoantibodies in 60 patients with IgAD and to examine the physical and other laboratory findings of the suspected cases for autoimmune diseases. The evaluated autoantibodies were Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) profile (autoantibodies against RNP/Sm, SS-A, Ro-52, SS-B, Scl-70, Pm-Scl, Jo-1, centromere B, PCNA, dsDNA, nucleosomes, histones, ribozomal P-protein, AMA-M2), anti-cardiolipin IgG and IgM, anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-thyroglobulin (anti-T) and anti-thyroid microsomal antigen (anti-M) and direct cooms test. Forty-one healthy children were included as a control group. ANA titers < or = 1:80 were accepted as normal and titers > or = 1:80 are accepted as positive. In ANA screening, 14 patients showed positivity in different titres. Seven of them were equal to or below 1:80. The other seven patients (11.6%) had positive ANA titers (>1:160) whereas three of them had anti-dsDNA, anti-histon and anti-centromer antibodies. These patients did not have any clinical and laboratory signs of autoimmune diseases. ANA positivity was found higher in IgA deficient children (p < 0.05) compared to controls. RF and pANCA were found positive during follow-up of two different selective IgAD patients. IgG and IgM antibodies against cardiolipin, direct coombs, anti-T and anti-M tests were not found positive in any subjects. In conclusion, increased frequency of autoantibodies in IgAD patients may often be observed. However, the detection of autoantibodies do not show or predict whether this patient will develop an autoimmune disease. PMID:19127458

  20. Characterization of variant patterns of nodular lymphocyte predominant hodgkin lymphoma with immunohistologic and clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bair, Eric; Tibshirani, Robert; Warnke, Roger A

    2003-10-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) has traditionally been recognized as having two morphologic patterns, nodular and diffuse, and the current WHO definition of NLPHL requires at least a partial nodular pattern. Variant patterns have not been well documented. We analyzed retrospectively the morphologic and immunophenotypic patterns of NLPHL from 118 patients (total of 137 biopsy samples). Histology plus antibodies directed against CD20, CD3, and CD21 were used to evaluate the immunoarchitecture. We identified six distinct immunoarchitectural patterns in our cases of NLPHL: "classic" (B-cell-rich) nodular, serpiginous/interconnected nodular, nodular with prominent extranodular L&H cells, T-cell-rich nodular, diffuse with a T-cell-rich background (T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma [TCRBCL]-like), and a (diffuse) B-cell-rich pattern. Small germinal centers within neoplastic nodules were found in approximately 15% of cases, a finding not previously emphasized in NLPHL. Prominent sclerosis was identified in approximately 20% of cases and was frequently seen in recurrent disease. Clinical follow-up was obtained on 56 patients, including 26 patients who had not had recurrence of disease and 30 patients who had recurrence. The follow-up period was 5 months to 16 years (median 2.5 years). The presence of a diffuse (TCRBCL-like) pattern was significantly more common in patients with recurrent disease than those without recurrence. Furthermore, the presence of a diffuse pattern (TCRBCL-like) was shown to be an independent predictor of recurrent disease (P = 0.00324). In addition, there is a tendency for progression to an increasingly more diffuse pattern over time. Analysis of sequential biopsies from patients with recurrent disease suggests that the presence of prominent extranodular L&H cells might represent early evolution to a diffuse (TCRBCL-like) pattern. We also report three patients who presented initially with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and later developed NLPHL. PMID:14508396

  1. Prevalence and clinical correlates of co-occurring insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms in depression

    PubMed Central

    Soehner, Adriane M.; Kaplan, Katherine A.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to examine the prevalence and consequences of co-occurring insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms in depressed adults drawn from a representative sample of the U.S. population. Method Data from 687 National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R) respondents meeting criteria for a major depressive episode (MDE) in the past year were included. Respondents completed clinical interviews that assessed 12-month DSM-IV disorders, impairment, mental health treatment, and depressive symptom severity. Outcomes were compared between respondents who experienced insomnia symptoms-only (N=404), hypersomnia symptoms-only (N=44), both insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms (N=184) and no sleep problems (N=55) during an MDE. Results Insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms co-occurred in 27.7% of respondents with past-year MDEs, most frequently in bipolar spectrum disorders and major depressive disorder with dysthymia. Similar to the insomnia-only group, respondents with co-occurring sleep disturbances had more severe depression, and higher rates of past-year impulse control disorders and suicide planning. Similar to the hypersomnia-only group, respondents with co-occurring sleep disturbances had higher rates of past-year drug use disorders and suicide attempts. Compared to the insomnia-only and no sleep problem groups, respondents with both sleep disturbances were more frequently in mental health treatment, seeing a general practitioner, and taking antidepressants. Limitations The NCS-R is cross-sectional and did not evaluate sleep disorder diagnoses. Conclusions Co-occurring insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms were associated with a more severe MDE. Further research is warranted to more fully understand the joint presentation of insomnia and hypersomnia in depression. PMID:24953480

  2. Cross-sectional correlation of single-item health literacy screening questions with established measures of health literacy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Quinzanos, Itziar; Hirsh, Joel M; Bright, Christina; Caplan, Liron

    2015-09-01

    Research suggests that health literacy (HL) is associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients' functional status. Single-item health literacy screening (SILS) questionnaires may establish patients' HL; however, the wording of SILS may be misinterpreted by RA patients as a query regarding physical limitations. Despite this threat to validity, multiple publications have employed the SILSs as a measure of health literacy. We assessed the construct validity of two SILS's versions by correlating scores with standardized HL measures. English-speaking adult RA patients at a hospital serving low-income patients were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Subjects completed two SILS versions, as well as two longer HL measurement tools [short test of functional health literacy in adults (s-TOFHLA) and the rapid estimate of adult literacy in medicine (REALM)]. Spearman correlation was used to compare these tools. The study enrolled 110 subjects. There was a good correlation between the two SILS versions (r = 0.705). The correlation of SILS2 and REALM or s-TOFHLA was less robust. The distribution of scores within each SILS2 category demonstrated substantial variation. The SILS2 has construct validity in the assessment of HL in patients with RA, though its correlation with traditional methods of assessing HL is weak. PMID:25744280

  3. Ivy Sign on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images in Moyamoya Disease: Correlation with Clinical Severity and Old Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Ji Hwa; Ahn, Sung Jun; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leptomeningeal collateral, in moyamoya disease (MMD), appears as an ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. There has been little investigation into the relationship between presentation of ivy signs and old brain lesions. We aimed to evaluate clinical significance of ivy signs and whether they correlate with old brain lesions and the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with MMD. Materials and Methods FLAIR images of 83 patients were reviewed. Each cerebral hemisphere was divided into 4 regions and each region was scored based on the prominence of the ivy sign. Total ivy score (TIS) was defined as the sum of the scores from the eight regions and dominant hemispheric ivy sign (DHI) was determined by comparing the ivy scores from each hemisphere. According to the degree of ischemic symptoms, patients were classified into four subgroups: 1) nonspecific symptoms without motor weakness, 2) single transient ischemic attack (TIA), 3) recurrent TIA, or 4) complete stroke. Results TIS was significantly different as follows: 4.86±2.55 in patients with nonspecific symptoms, 5.89±3.10 in patients with single TIA, 9.60±3.98 in patients with recurrent TIA and 8.37±3.39 in patients with complete stroke (p=0.003). TIS associated with old lesions was significantly higher than those not associated with old lesions (9.35±4.22 vs. 7.49±3.37, p=0.032). We found a significant correlation between DHI and motor symptoms (p=0.001). Conclusion Because TIS has a strong tendency with severity of ischemic motor symptom and the presence of old lesions, the ivy sign may be useful in predicting severity of disease progression. PMID:26256975

  4. Correlation of pretreatment drug induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells with patient survival and clinical response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was performed to determine if a chemotherapy-induced apoptosis assay (MiCK) could predict the best therapy for patients with ovarian cancer. Methods A prospective, multi-institutional and blinded trial of the assay was conducted in 104 evaluable ovarian cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. The MiCK assay was performed prior to therapy, but treating physicians were not told of the results and selected treatment only on clinical criteria. Outcomes (response, time to relapse, and survival) were compared to the drug-induced apoptosis observed in the assay. Results Overall survival in primary therapy, chemotherapy naïve patients with Stage III or IV disease was longer if patients received a chemotherapy which was best in the MiCK assay, compared to shorter survival in patients who received a chemotherapy that was not the best. (p?

  5. Amplified fragment length polymorphism of Streptococcus suis strains correlates with their profile of virulence-associated genes and clinical background.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Thomas; Baums, Christoph G; Strommenger, Birgit; Beyerbach, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) typing was applied to 116 Streptococcus suis isolates with different clinical backgrounds (invasive/pneumonia/carrier/human) and with known profiles of virulence-associated genes (cps1, -2, -7 and -9, as well as mrp, epf and sly). A dendrogram was generated that allowed identification of two clusters (A and C) with different subclusters (A1, A2, C1 and C2) and two heterogeneous groups of strains (B and D). For comparison, three strains from each AFLP subcluster and group were subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. The closest relationship and lowest diversity were found for patterns clustering within AFLP subcluster A1, which corresponded with sequence type (ST) complex 1. Strains within subcluster A1 were mainly invasive cps1 and mrp+ epf+ (or epf*) sly+ cps2+ strains of porcine or human origin. A new finding of this study was the clustering of invasive mrp* cps9 isolates within subcluster A2. MLST analysis suggested that A2 correlates with a single ST complex (ST87). In contrast to A1 and A2, subclusters C1 and C2 contained mainly pneumonia isolates of genotype cps7 or cps2 and epf- sly-. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that AFLP allows identification of clusters of S. suis strains with clinical relevance. PMID:17172524

  6. Aggressive Behavior Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Prevalence and Correlates in a Large Clinical Sample

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Alison Presmanes; Zuckerman, Katharine E.; Hagen, Arlene D.; Kriz, Daniel J.; Duvall, Susanne W.; van Santen, Jan; Nigg, Joel; Fair, Damien; Fombonne, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior problems (ABP) are frequent yet poorly understood in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and are likely to co-vary significantly with comorbid problems. We examined the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of ABP in a clinical sample of children with ASD (N = 400; 2–16.9 years). We also investigated whether children with ABP experience more intensive medical interventions, greater impairments in behavioral functioning, and more severe comorbid problems than children with ASD who do not have ABP. One in four children with ASD had Child Behavior Checklist scores on the Aggressive Behavior scale in the clinical range (T-scores ? 70). Sociodemographic factors (age, gender, parent education, race, ethnicity) were unrelated to ABP status. The presence of ABP was significantly associated with increased use of psychotropic drugs and melatonin, lower cognitive functioning, lower ASD severity, and greater comorbid sleep, internalizing, and attention problems. In multivariate models, sleep, internalizing, and attention problems were most strongly associated with ABP. These comorbid problems may hold promise as targets for treatment to decrease aggressive behavior and proactively identify high-risk profiles for prevention. PMID:25221619

  7. Clinical and cognitive correlates of employment among patients with schizophrenia: a cross-sectional study in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gainful employment is one major area of functioning which is becoming an important goal in psychiatric rehabilitation of patients with schizophrenia. Studies in western countries are pointing to evidence that certain sociodemographic and clinical factors may contribute to employment outcomes in this group of people. However, the area is still largely unexplored in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to examine the sociodemographic, clinical and cognitive correlates of employment status among patients with Schizophrenia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. All participants who fulfilled the requirements of the study according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled. Study instruments included a demographic data questionnaire, Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), Trail Making Tests, Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) and Digit Span. Bivariate analyses were done using chi-square for categorical data and t-test for continuous data and multiple logistic regression analysis was done to identify predictors of employment status. Results A total of 95 participants who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were enrolled into the study. Among the sociodemographic, clinical and cognitive variables studied marital status, educational level, mean scores of negative symptoms, Digit Span and RAVLT and Trail Making Tests were found to show significant association with employment status on bivariate analyses. However, when entered into a logistic regression model, only cognitive variables ie. Trail A and B, Digit Span and RAVLT were significant predictors of employment status. Conclusions The results from this study support the role of cognitive function, particularly, attention, working memory and executive functioning on attaining and maintaining employment in persons with schizophrenia as measured by the RAVLT, Digit Span and Trail Making Tests. These findings may act as preliminary evidence suggesting the importance of integrating cognitive rehabilitation in the psychosocial rehabilitation program for patients with schizophrenia in Malaysia. PMID:21624111

  8. The expression of Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein-2 in astrocytoma: Correlation between pathological grade and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, GELEI; TANG, ZHI; YUAN, XIANRUI; YUAN, JIAN; ZHAO, JIE; ZHANG, ZHIPING; HE, ZHENGWEN; LIU, JINGPING

    2015-01-01

    Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein-2 (WISP-2) is a member of the CCN family, which is critical for the control of cell morphology, motion, adhesion and other processes involved in tumorigenesis. The expression pattern and clinical significance of WISP-2 in astrocytomas remains unclear. In this study, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to systematically investigate the expression of WISP-2 in 47 astrocytoma tissues of different pathological grades and 10 normal brain tissues. The mRNA expression levels of WISP-2 in the astrocytoma tissues were observed to be significantly higher than those in the normal brain tissues. Furthermore, the upregulation of WISP-2 was found to be associated with astrocytomas of higher pathological grades. Subsequently, 154 astrocytoma and 15 normal brain tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and similar results were obtained. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were used to determine the correlations between WISP-2 expression and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The results indicated that the expression of WISP-2 was found to negatively correlate with patient PFS and OS. These results demonstrated that the WISP-2 protein is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of human astrocytomas and may serve as a malignant biomarker of this disease. PMID:25435966

  9. Developing cross-correlation as a method for microvessel imaging using clinical intravascular optical coherence tomography systems

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Shiju; Adnan, Asif; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin; Adlam, David

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) imaging systems have limited in-vivo flow imaging capability because of non-uniform catheter rotation and inadequate A-line scan density. Thus any flow-localisation method that seeks to identify sites of variation within the OCT image data-sets, whether that is in amplitude or phase, produces non-representative correlation (or variance) maps. In this study, both mean and the variation within a set of cross-correlation maps, for static OCT imaging was used to differentiate flow from nonflow regions. Variation was quantified by use of standard deviation. The advantage of this approach is its ability to image flow, even in the presence of motion artifacts. The ability of this technique to suppress noise and capture flow maps was demonstrated by imaging microflow in an ex-vivo porcine coronary artery model, by nailfold capillary imaging and in-vivo microvessel imaging from within the human coronary sinus. PMID:25798295

  10. Correlation of Skin Changes with Hormonal Changes in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Gowri, B Vijaya; Chandravathi, PL; Sindhu, PS; Naidu, K Shanthi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogenous collection of signs and symptoms that when gathered, form a spectrum of disorder with disturbance of reproductive, endocrine and metabolic functions. Aim: The aim of this study is to correlate the skin manifestations with hormonal changes and to know the incidence and prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with PCOS. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with PCOS were examined during 1 year time period from May 2008 P to May 2009. Detailed clinical history was taken from each patient. PCOS was diagnosed on the basis of ultrasonography. Hormonal assays included fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, dehydroepiandrostenedione, prolactin, free testosterone, fasting lipid profile and sex hormone binding globulin. The results obtained were statistically correlated. Results: In our study, the prevalence of cutaneous manifestations was 90%. Of all the cutaneous manifestations acne was seen in highest percentage (67.5%), followed by hirsutism (62.5%), seborrhea (52.5%), androgenetic alopecia (AGA) (30%), acanthosis nigricans (22.5%) and acrochordons (10%). Fasting insulin levels was the most common hormonal abnormality seen in both acne and hirsutism, whereas AGA was associated with high testosterone levels. Conclusion: The prevalence of cutaneous manifestations in PCOS was 90%. Hirsutism, acne, seborrhea, acanthosis nigricans and acrochordons were associated with increased levels of fasting insulin, whereas AGA showed higher levels of serum testosterone. PMID:26288423

  11. A Network-Based Target Overlap Score for Characterizing Drug Combinations: High Correlation with Cancer Clinical Trial Results

    PubMed Central

    Ligeti, Balázs; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Vera, Roberto; Gy?rffy, Balázs; Pongor, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Drug combinations are highly efficient in systemic treatment of complex multigene diseases such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis and hypertension. Most currently used combinations were found in empirical ways, which limits the speed of discovery for new and more effective combinations. Therefore, there is a substantial need for efficient and fast computational methods. Here, we present a principle that is based on the assumption that perturbations generated by multiple pharmaceutical agents propagate through an interaction network and can cause unexpected amplification at targets not immediately affected by the original drugs. In order to capture this phenomenon, we introduce a novel Target Overlap Score (TOS) that is defined for two pharmaceutical agents as the number of jointly perturbed targets divided by the number of all targets potentially affected by the two agents. We show that this measure is correlated with the known effects of beneficial and deleterious drug combinations taken from the DCDB, TTD and Drugs.com databases. We demonstrate the utility of TOS by correlating the score to the outcome of recent clinical trials evaluating trastuzumab, an effective anticancer agent utilized in combination with anthracycline- and taxane- based systemic chemotherapy in HER2-receptor (erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2) positive breast cancer. PMID:26047322

  12. Preliminary study of family accommodation in youth with autism spectrum disorders and anxiety: Incidence, clinical correlates, and behavioral treatment response.

    PubMed

    Storch, Eric A; Zavrou, Sophia; Collier, Amanda B; Ung, Danielle; Arnold, Elysse B; Mutch, P Jane; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K

    2015-08-01

    Anxiety symptoms are common in youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and directly associated with symptom severity and functional impairment. Family accommodation occurs frequently among individuals with obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders; to date, no data exist on the nature and correlates of family accommodation in youth with ASD and anxiety, as well as its relationship to cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome. Forty children with ASD and a comorbid anxiety disorder participated. Clinicians administered measures of ASD and anxiety disorder caseness, anxiety symptom severity, and family accommodation; parents completed questionnaires assessing social responsiveness, internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and functional impairment. A subsample of youth (n = 24) completed a course of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Family accommodation was common and positively correlated with anxiety symptom severity, but not functional impairment, general internalizing symptoms, externalizing behavior, or social responsiveness. Family accommodation decreased following cognitive-behavioral therapy with decreases in family accommodation being associated with decreases in anxiety levels. Treatment responders reported lower family accommodation frequency and lower parent impact relative to non-responders. Clinical implications of this study in assessing and psychotherapeutically treating youth with ASD and comorbid anxiety are discussed. PMID:26188615

  13. A morphometric study of Reye's syndrome. Correlation of reduced mitochondrial numbers and increased mitochondrial size with clinical manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, C. C.; Gartside, P. S.; Heubi, J. E.; Saalfeld, K.; Snyder, J.

    1987-01-01

    Morphometric analysis of liver ultrastructure in 14 children with Reye's syndrome (RS) of varying morphologic severity was compared with that of 6 children with normal livers. Results showed reduced numbers of enlarged mitochondria in RS. Multivariant analysis identified correlations between increased mitochondrial size, decreased mitochondrial number, and severity of neurologic disease (stage). A disproportionate increase in mitochondrial area and perimeter in the RS cases with the most depressed mitochondrial number distinguished the 4 children with residual neurologic damage or death. Serum salicylate concentrations were negatively correlated with severity of morphologic alteration. Two cases of non-RS salicylate toxicity showed normal or near-normal mitochondrial size and number. In fatty liver from an autopsy specimen from a child, a child with carnitine deficiency, and a child on therapy for dermatomyositis, mitochondrial numbers were also normal. Decreased mitochondrial numbers are characteristic of RS and imply a pathophysiologic mechanism, possibly related to impaired mitochondrial replication. Synergism with other forms of mitochondrial injury, such as salicylates, hypoglycemia, or shock may influence clinical severity, progression, and outcome. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2823614

  14. IL-7 and SCF Levels Inversely Correlate with T Cell Reconstitution and Clinical Outcomes after Cord Blood Transplantation in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Politikos, Ioannis; Kim, Haesook T.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Li, Lequn; Brown, Julia; Antin, Joseph H.; Cutler, Corey; Ballen, Karen; Ritz, Jerome; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of thymopoiesis is critical for immune reconstitution after HSCT. IL-7 and SCF are two major thymotropic cytokines. We investigated whether the kinetics of circulating levels of these cytokines might provide insight into the prolonged immunodeficiency after double umbilical cord blood transplantation (dUCBT) in adults. We examined plasma levels of IL-7 and SCF, T-cell receptor rearrangement excision circle (TREC) levels and T cell subsets in 60 adult patients undergoing dUCBT. Median levels of IL-7 increased by more than 3-fold at 4 weeks and remained elevated through 100 days after dUCBT. SCF showed a less than 2-fold increase and more protracted elevation than IL-7. IL-7 levels inversely correlated with the reconstitution of various T cell subsets but not with TRECs. SCF levels inversely correlated with reconstitution of CD4+T cells, especially the naïve CD4+CD45RA+ subset, and with TRECs suggesting that SCF but not IL-7 had an effect on thymic regeneration. In Cox models, elevated levels of IL-7 and SCF were associated with higher non-relapse mortality (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01) and worse overall survival (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001). Elevated IL-7 but not SCF was also associated with development of GvHD (p = 0.03). Thus, IL-7 and SCF are elevated for a prolonged period after dUCBT and persistently high levels of these cytokines may correlate with worse clinical outcomes. PMID:26177551

  15. Questions Submitted Online — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Sequencing of natural human tumors is teaching us invaluable lessons. It is becoming clear that the new dogmas created in the post genome era are being questioned. The previously suspected genetic heterogeneity of tumors is now proven on the sequence level. The extreme genetic heterogeneity of individual tumors and the existence of multiple tumors (not metastases) pose fundamental doubt on the prevailing dogma of targeted drug(s) and personalized treatments.

  16. Judgments of Omitted BE and DO in Questions as Extended Finiteness Clinical Markers of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) to 15 Years

    E-print Network

    Rice, Mabel L.

    Purpose: Clinical grammar markers are needed for children with SLI older than 8 years. This study followed children who were previously studied on sentences with omitted finiteness to determine if affected children continue ...

  17. What Does It Mean to Question?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berci, Margaret E.; Griffith, Bryant

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is two fold: first, to tease out the meaning inherent in the correlativity of the question and answer process and second, to suggest a philosophical answer to the question "What does it mean to question?" in the context of teacher education. To that end, we want to claim that R.G. Collingwood's "Logic of Question and…

  18. Correlation between Central Memory T Cell Expression and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production with Clinical Presentation of Multibacillary Leprosy Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Esquenazi, Danuza; Alvim, Iris Maria Peixoto; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; de Oliveira, Eliane Barbosa; Moreira, Lilian de Oliveira; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Nery, Jose Augusto da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the efficacy of multidrug therapy, surviving Mycobacterium leprae causes relapse in some leprosy patients, and these patients present signs and symptoms of disease after healing. This study focused on the cellular immune response in relapsed multibacillary patients but also included non-relapsed multibacillary cured individuals, newly diagnosed and untreated multibacillary patients, paucibacillary patients just before the beginning of treatment, and voluntary healthy individuals for comparative analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Inhibition of CD86 expression in the blood-derived monocytes and dendritic cells of relapsed multibacillary patients, either ex vivo or after M. leprae antigen stimulation was observed by flow cytometry. In addition, no significant changes in Interferon-gamma (IFN-?) expression were observed in 5-day culture supernatants of relapsed patients in response to M. leprae, neither before nor after treatment, as measured by ELISA. However, these patients demonstrated a significant increase in central memory CD4+ and CD8+ M. leprae-specific T cells, as assessed by multiparametric flow cytometry. The increase in frequency of central memory T cells in relapsed patients strongly correlated with the bacillary index and the number of skin lesions observed in these subjects. Moreover, cytokine multiplex analysis demonstrated significant antigen-specific production of Interlukin-1beta (IL-1b), IL-6, and Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) in the relapsed group with extremely low IL-10 production, which resulted in a high TNF/IL-10 ratio. Conclusions/Significance Inhibition of CD86 expression may function to reduce effector T cell responses against the M. leprae antigen. Furthermore, the predominance of central memory T cells in association with the high TNF/IL-10 ratio and no observed IFN-? production may be related to the pathogenesis of relapse in multibacillary leprosy. Therefore, our findings may be a direct result of the clinical presentation, including a number of skin lesions and bacterial load, of relapsed patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study correlating immune response parameters with the clinical presentation of relapsed multibacillary patients. PMID:25992795

  19. Judgments of Omitted BE and DO in Questions as Extended Finiteness Clinical Markers of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) to 15 Years: A Study of Growth and Asymptote

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mabel L.; Hoffman, Lesa; Wexler, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical grammar markers are needed for children with SLI older than 8 years. This study followed children who were previously studied on sentences with omitted finiteness to determine if affected children continue to perform at low levels and to examine possible predictors of low performance. This is the first longitudinal report of…

  20. Two questions for Kounis syndrome: can we use magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and does ST elevation correlates with troponin levels?

    PubMed

    Akoz, Ayhan; Bayramoglu, Atif; Uzkeser, Mustafa; Kantarci, Mecit; Aksakal, Enbiya; Emet, Mucahit

    2012-11-01

    Kounis syndrome (KS) is an acute coronary vasospasm after exposure to an allergen due to mast cell degranulation and existing mediators. Various drugs, conditions, and environmental exposures can cause KS. We presented 2 cases, 1 of whom had taken an antiflu drug (containing paracetamol, pseudoephedrine, and dextromethorphan). His electrocardiogram (ECG) showed inferior ST elevations (2 mm) with normal cardiac biomarkers. His cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed hypokinesis and myocardial hibernation on apical septum and on the left ventricle. The second patient took a pill of naproxen sodium. The ECG showed 1-mm ST elevation in leads DII, V5, and V6. His troponin was markedly elevated. These cases showed that there seems to be no correlation with ECG and troponin levels in KS. In addition, for patients in whom KS type 1 is expected without troponin elevation, noninvasive cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study seems to be appropriate for the diagnosis of KS. PMID:22386343

  1. Clinical correlates of obsessive-compulsive symptom dimensions in at-risk mental states and psychotic disorders at early stages.

    PubMed

    Mariné, Rosa; Creus, Marta; Solé, Montse; Cabezas, Ángel; Algora, Maria José; Moreno, Irene; Izquierdo, Eduard; Stojanovic-Pérez, Alexander; Labad, Javier

    2015-08-30

    We studied the clinical correlates of obsessive-compulsive symptom dimensions in 109 individuals with early psychosis (31 At-Risk Mental States [ARMS], 78 psychotic disorders with <3 years of illness) and 59 healthy subjects. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms were assessed by the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory - Revised. We also assessed the severity of psychotic symptoms, depressive symptoms and functioning. ARMS and psychotic disorder patients reported more obsessive-compulsive symptoms than did healthy subjects. The ARMS individuals also reported more overall and checking obsessive-compulsive symptoms compared with the PD patients. Different types of obsessive-compulsive symptoms were related with depressive symptoms in both diagnostic groups. However, a different pattern was observed in the relationship between obsessive-compulsive dimensions and functioning by diagnosis (better functioning in ARMS; poorer functioning in psychotic disorders). Our study suggests that obsessive-compulsive symptoms are present in the early stages of psychotic illness, as well as in individuals at risk for psychosis. Future prospective studies are needed to elucidate how obsessive-compulsive symptoms in ARMS may influence the prognosis in terms of global functioning and the risk of psychosis transition. PMID:26144581

  2. Serum immunoglobulin free light-chain measurement in primary amyloidosis: prognostic value and correlations with clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Dispenzieri, Angela; Katzmann, Jerry A.; Larson, Dirk R.; Colby, Colin L.; Lacy, Martha Q.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Buadi, Francis K.; Leung, Nelson; Zeldenrust, Steve R.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Clark, Raynell J.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Gertz, Morie A.

    2010-01-01

    Immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) are the precursors of amyloid fibrils in primary amyloidosis (AL). We studied the relationship between FLC levels and clinical features in 730 patients with newly diagnosed AL. The plasma cell clone was ? in 72% patients, and ? in 28% patients. ?-AL had more GI tract and liver involvement, where as renal involvement was more with ?-AL. While the overall survival (OS) was similar for ? and ?-AL, the median OS for those without an identifiable serum heavy chain was significantly shorter (12.6 vs 29.9 months; P = .02). The OS was shorter among those with a higher dFLC (involved FLC?uninvolved FLC; ? > 29.4 mg/dL or ? > 18.2 mg/dL using median for cutoff); 10.9 vs 37.1 months; P < .001. In multivariate analysis, dFLC was independent of other prognostic factors. The type of light chain impacts the spectrum of organ involvement and the FLC burden correlates with survival in AL. PMID:20798235

  3. Expression of TNFR2 by regulatory T cells in peripheral blood is correlated with clinical pathology of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fan; Du, Ruijuan; Wei, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Yu, Jinpu; Wang, Changli; Zhan, Zhongli; Ding, Tingting; Ren, Xiubao; Chen, Xin; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a major cellular mediator of cancer immune evasion. The expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (TNFR2) on Tregs is reported to identify the maximally suppressive Treg population in both mice and human. We therefore investigated the phenotype and function of TNFR2(+) Tregs present in the peripheral blood (PB) of 43 lung cancer patients. Further, the association of TNFR2 expression on Tregs with clinicopathological factors was analyzed. The results showed that in the PB of lung cancer patients, Tregs expressed markedly higher levels of TNFR2 than conventional T cells (Tconvs). Expression of TNFR2 appeared to correlate better than CD25(+) and CD127(-) with FoxP3 expression. PB TNFR2(+) Tregs in lung cancer patients were more proliferative and expressed higher levels of the immunosuppressive molecule CTLA-4, and consequently more potently suppressed IFN? production by cocultured CD8 CTLs. More importantly, higher TNFR2 expression levels on Tregs were associated with lymphatic invasion, distant metastasis and more advanced clinical stage of lung cancer patients. Therefore, our study suggests that TNFR2(+) Tregs play a role in promoting tumor progressive metastasis and expression of TNFR2 by PB Tregs may prove to be a useful prognostic marker in lung cancer patients. PMID:26280204

  4. Correlation between Reversal of DNA Methylation and Clinical Symptoms in Psoriatic Epidermis Following Narrow-Band UVB Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolian; Nylander, Elisabet; Coates, Philip J; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Karin

    2015-08-01

    Epigenetic modifications by DNA methylation are associated with a wide range of diseases. Previous studies in psoriasis have concentrated on epigenetic changes in immune cells or in total skin biopsies that include stromal-associated changes. In order to improve our understanding of the role of DNA methylation in psoriasis, we sought to obtain a comprehensive DNA methylation signature specific for the epidermal component of psoriasis and to analyze methylation changes during therapy. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of epidermal cells from 12 patients undergoing narrow-band UVB phototherapy and 12 corresponding healthy controls revealed a distinct DNA methylation pattern in psoriasis compared with controls. A total of 3,665 methylation variable positions (MVPs) were identified with an overall hypomethylation in psoriasis patient samples. DNA methylation pattern was reversed at the end of phototherapy in patients showing excellent clinical improvement. Only 7% of phototherapy-affected MVPs (150 out of 2,108) correlate with nearby gene expression. Enrichment of MVPs in enhancers indicates tissue-specific modulation of the transcriptional regulatory machinery in psoriasis. Our study identified key epigenetic events associated with psoriasis pathogenesis and helps understand the dynamic DNA methylation landscape in the human genome. PMID:25830654

  5. Correlation between Reversal of DNA Methylation and Clinical Symptoms in Psoriatic Epidermis Following Narrow-Band UVB Phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaolian; Nylander, Elisabet; Coates, Philip J; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications by DNA methylation are associated with a wide range of diseases. Previous studies in psoriasis have concentrated on epigenetic changes in immune cells or in total skin biopsies that include stromal-associated changes. In order to improve our understanding of the role of DNA methylation in psoriasis, we sought to obtain a comprehensive DNA methylation signature specific for the epidermal component of psoriasis and to analyze methylation changes during therapy. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of epidermal cells from 12 patients undergoing narrow-band UVB phototherapy and 12 corresponding healthy controls revealed a distinct DNA methylation pattern in psoriasis compared with controls. A total of 3,665 methylation variable positions (MVPs) were identified with an overall hypomethylation in psoriasis patient samples. DNA methylation pattern was reversed at the end of phototherapy in patients showing excellent clinical improvement. Only 7% of phototherapy-affected MVPs (150 out of 2,108) correlate with nearby gene expression. Enrichment of MVPs in enhancers indicates tissue-specific modulation of the transcriptional regulatory machinery in psoriasis. Our study identified key epigenetic events associated with psoriasis pathogenesis and helps understand the dynamic DNA methylation landscape in the human genome. PMID:25830654

  6. Mutation spectrum of RB1 gene in unilateral retinoblastoma cases from Tunisia and correlations with clinical features.

    PubMed

    Ayari-Jeridi, Hajer; Moran, Kimberly; Chebbi, Amel; Bouguila, Hédi; Abbes, Imen; Charradi, Khaoula; Benammar-Elgaaïed, Amel; Ganguly, Arupa

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma, an embryonic neoplasm of retinal origin, is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in children. Somatic inactivation of both alleles of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene in a retinal progenitor cell through diverse mechanisms including genetic and epigenetic modifications, is the crucial event in initiation of tumorigenesis in most cases of isolated unilateral retinoblastoma. We analyzed DNA from tumor tissue and from peripheral blood to determine the RB1 mutation status and seek correlations with clinical features of 37 unrelated cases of Tunisian origin with sporadic retinoblastoma. All cases were unilateral except one who presented with bilateral disease, in whom no germline coding sequence alteration was identified. A multi-step mutation scanning protocol identified bi-allelic inactivation of RB1 gene in 30 (81%) of the samples tested. A total of 7 novel mutations were identified. There were three tumors without any detectable mutation while a subset contained multiple mutations in RB1 gene. The latter group included tumors collected after treatment with chemotherapy. There were seven individuals with germline mutations and all presented with advanced stage of tumor. There was no difference in age of onset of RB based on the germline mutation status. Thus 20% of the individuals with sporadic unilateral RB in this series carried germline mutations and indicate the importance of genetic testing all children with sporadic retinoblastoma. These findings help to characterize the spectrum of mutations present in the Tunisian population and can improve genetic diagnosis of retinoblastoma. PMID:25602518

  7. Child behaviour checklist emotional dysregulation profiles in youth with disruptive behaviour disorders: clinical correlates and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Muratori, Pietro; Manfredi, Azzurra; Pisano, Simone; Milone, Annarita

    2015-01-30

    Two Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) profiles were correlated to poor self-regulation, Deficient Emotional Self-Regulation (DESR) (elevation between 1 and 2 Standard Deviations (SD) in Anxiety/Depression, Aggression, Attention subscales), and Dysregulation Profile (DP) (elevation of 2 Standard Deviations or more). We explored youths with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Conduct Disorder (CD) whether these profiles are associated with specific clinical features. The sample included 57 patients with DESR profile and 41 with DP profile, ages 9 to 15 years, all assigned to a non-pharmacological Multimodal Treatment Program. No differences resulted between groups in demographic features, diagnosis ratio, and comorbidities with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Bipolar Disorder (BD), and Anxiety Disorder. The DP group was associated with higher scores in Withdrawn, Social Problem, Thought, Rule Breaking, and Somatic CBCL subscales, and higher scores in Narcissism and Impulsivity (but not Callous-Unemotional (CU)), according to the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD). After treatment, patients with DESR improved their personality traits (Narcissistic and Callous-Unemotional, but not Impulsivity), while changes in CBCL scales were modest. Patients with DP improved scales of Attention, Aggression, Anxiety-Depression, Rule Breaking, Withdrawal, Social Problem and Thought, while personality features did not change. These results suggest diagnostic implications of CBCL profiles, and indications for targeted treatment strategies. PMID:25480545

  8. Lexical and sub-lexical reading skills and their correlation to clinical symptoms in young Chinese patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiuju; Wang, Pengfei; Xia, Zhichao; Liu, Jin; Quan, Wenxiang; Tian, Ju; Wydell, Taeko N; Dong, Wentian

    2015-12-30

    Patients with schizophrenia often experience severe reading deficits such as oral reading and reading comprehension deficits. However, it is not known whether different types of lexical or sub-lexical components in reading are also impaired. In order to address this issue, the present study had 22 young Chinese patients with schizophrenia and 22 young Chinese normal controls undergo a battery of reading tests, which specifically measures lexical and sub-lexical components of reading in Chinese. The schizophrenic group further underwent Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) in order to ascertain the severity of patients' clinical symptoms. The results showed that compared to the controls, (1) the schizophrenic patients performed significantly poorly in orthographic processing, orthography-phonology mapping, and orthography-semantic mapping tests and further that (2) their performances in orthographic processing, and orthography-semantic mapping skill tests negatively correlated with the BPRS score. Note however that their ability to access their mental lexicon was intact. There is thus a clear need for studies with a larger sample-size and neurobiological measures which would lead to our better understanding of the behavioral as well as the neural relationships between schizophrenic patients, and their reading processing impairments, thus developing effective reading intervention programs for the schizophrenic patients. PMID:26611156

  9. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients??=??80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of???0.93 (p??=??0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of???0.95 (p??=??0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of???0.85 (p??=??0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  10. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients??=??80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of??-0.93 (p??=??0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of??-0.95 (p??=??0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of??-0.85 (p??=??0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely. PMID:26540441

  11. Origins of task-specific sensory-independent organization in the visual and auditory brain: neuroscience evidence, open questions and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Heimler, Benedetta; Striem-Amit, Ella; Amedi, Amir

    2015-12-01

    Evidence of task-specific sensory-independent (TSSI) plasticity from blind and deaf populations has led to a better understanding of brain organization. However, the principles determining the origins of this plasticity remain unclear. We review recent data suggesting that a combination of the connectivity bias and sensitivity to task-distinctive features might account for TSSI plasticity in the sensory cortices as a whole, from the higher-order occipital/temporal cortices to the primary sensory cortices. We discuss current theories and evidence, open questions and related predictions. Finally, given the rapid progress in visual and auditory restoration techniques, we address the crucial need to develop effective rehabilitation approaches for sensory recovery. PMID:26469211

  12. Use of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Ventilation Imaging to Correlate Lung Dose and Function With Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, Houston, Texas ; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao, Zhongxing; Guerrero, Thomas; Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, Houston, Texas ; Martel, Mary K.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based ventilation is an emerging imaging modality that can be used in the thoracic treatment planning process. The clinical benefit of using ventilation images in radiation treatment plans remains to be tested. The purpose of the current work was to test the potential benefit of using ventilation in treatment planning by evaluating whether dose to highly ventilated regions of the lung resulted in increased incidence of clinical toxicity. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment 4DCT data were used to compute pretreatment ventilation images for 96 lung cancer patients. Ventilation images were calculated using 4DCT data, deformable image registration, and a density-change based algorithm. Dose–volume and ventilation-based dose function metrics were computed for each patient. The ability of the dose–volume and ventilation-based dose–function metrics to predict for severe (grade 3+) radiation pneumonitis was assessed using logistic regression analysis, area under the curve (AUC) metrics, and bootstrap methods. Results: A specific patient example is presented that demonstrates how incorporating ventilation-based functional information can help separate patients with and without toxicity. The logistic regression significance values were all lower for the dose–function metrics (range P=.093-.250) than for their dose–volume equivalents (range, P=.331-.580). The AUC values were all greater for the dose–function metrics (range, 0.569-0.620) than for their dose–volume equivalents (range, 0.500-0.544). Bootstrap results revealed an improvement in model fit using dose–function metrics compared to dose–volume metrics that approached significance (range, P=.118-.155). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study that attempts to correlate lung dose and 4DCT ventilation-based function to thoracic toxicity after radiation therapy. Although the results were not significant at the .05 level, our data suggests that incorporating ventilation-based functional imaging can improve prediction for radiation pneumonitis. We present an important first step toward validating the use of 4DCT-based ventilation imaging in thoracic treatment planning.

  13. The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faught, I. Charie

    2012-01-01

    While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes…

  14. Correlation of Oxacillinase Gene Carriage With the Genetic Fingerprints of Imipenem-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Zanganeh, Zahra; Eftekhar, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has resulted in the treatment failure of related infections and an increase in patient mortality. The presence of class D ?-lactamases (oxacillinases) in this organism is an important mechanism underlying resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. Objectives: The aim of this work was to investigate the correlation between oxacillinase gene carriage and genetic fingerprints in imipenem-resistant burn and non-burn isolates of A. baumannii. Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight A. baumannii isolates were collected from October 2011 to April 2012, which included 28 burn isolates from Shahid Motahari Hospital and 30 non-burn isolates from Imam Hossein Hospital. The minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC) of imipenem were measured by the broth microdilution method. The presence of oxacillinase genes (OXA-23-, OXA-24-, OXA-51-, and OXA-58-like genes) was shown using type-specific primers and PCR. Genetic profiles were generated by RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Results: OXA-23 was observed in 81% of the isolates and its distribution was similar within the two groups. The presence of OXA-51 was shown in 58.6% of the isolates, of which most were burn isolates (67.6%). OXA-24 was present in 20.7% of the isolates, all belonging to the burn group; OXA-58 was not observed in any of the isolates. RAPD-PCR fingerprints revealed two clusters at a similarity level of 70% (A, B). At a similarity level of 85%, nine different groups were observed for burn and non-bun isolates. Conclusions: Our results showed that blaOXA-23 was the most prevalent gene, followed by blaOXA-51, among the burn and non-burn clinical isolates of A. baumannii. BlaOXA-24-like genes were detected at a lower level and were only found among the burn isolates, which also showed higher heterogeneity compared to the non-burn group. PMID:26495112

  15. Loss of heterozygosity and its correlation with clinical outcome and Epstein-Barr virus infection in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shao, J Y; Huang, X M; Yu, X J; Huang, L X; Wu, Q L; Xia, J C; Wang, H Y; Feng, Q S; Ren, Z F; Ernberg, I; Hu, L F; Zeng, Y X

    2001-01-01

    Sixty-one human nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC) were examined by allelotype analysis for the purposes of detecting potential association between loss of heterozygosity (LOH), clinicopathological parameters and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. LOH was performed using 257 polymorphic markers on 22 chromosomes. High frequency LOH (> or = 60%) was observed on 12 chromosome arms including 1p, 2p, 2q, 3p, 3q, 5q, 9p. 9q, 11q, 13q, 14q and 17q, with the highest LOH frequency of 91% on 3p. Seventy-three loci presented LOH frequency > or = 30%; most of these loci clustered on 1p36 p34, 2p25-p24, 3p14-p21, 3p24-p26, 5q11-q14, 5q31-q33, 9p21-p23, 9q33-q34, 11q23-q25, 13q12 q14, 13q31-q33, 14q13-q11, 14q32 and 19q13. On 1p36-p34, 2p25-p24, 5q13-q11, 5q31-q33 and 19q13 are reported for the first time. LOH was correlated with specific clinicopathological parameters including tumor T-stage, N-stage, TNM-stage, tumor differentiation and serum antibody titers of IgA against virus capsid antigens (VCA) and early antigen (EA) of EBV in NPC (LOH frequency > or = 30%). Significantly high LOH frequency was observed on 9p21 (56%) and 19q13 (50%) in NPC with stage T3+T4, while significantly higher LOH frequency was observed on 12p11 (65%) in NPC with stage T1 + T2. Significantly higher LOHfrequency on 19q13 was also observed in NPC with advanced TNM-stage (III+IV). High fractional allelic loss (FAL) value and high antibody titers of EBV IgA/VCA and/or IgA/EA were significantly correlated with T3 + T4-stage, distant lymph node metastasis and advanced TNM-stage of NPC. We also found that NPC patients with high titers of IgA/VCA and IgA/EA showed high LOH frequency on 16q (48%) and 19q13 (48%). These results suggest that LOH on 9p21, l6q and 19q13 may be responsible for the aggressiveness and progression of NPC; there may be an interaction between allelic loss and EBV infection in the etiology of NPC. High frequency of LOH on 4q21 and 14q11-q12 were alsofound to be correlated with WHO type III NPC histopathology, suggesting that LOH on these regions may cause poor NPC differentiation. Our data also may be useful for the development of a NPC molecular staging system, a system which may augment the use of clinical pathological features in the diagnosis and prognosis of this disease. PMID:11712805

  16. An Analysis of Correlation between Demand and Need for Orthodontic Treatment among Patients in Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University Dental College Clinic, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Sam, George; Seehan, Saad; Al-Shayea, Meshari

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study is to determine whether there is any correlation between demand and need for orthodontic treatment among patients in Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University (SAU) Dental College Clinic. This study also provides a baseline data on the demand and need for orthodontic treatment among a Saudi population, which is important for planning public orthodontic dental services in the Kingdom. Materials and Methods: An epidemiological descriptive survey was conducted using two sets of questionnaire in the orthodontic clinic of Prince SAU, Al-Kharj among Saudi subjects with angle’s Class I, Class II, and Class III malocclusions, between the ages of 10 and 30 years for a period of 6 months with purposive sampling method. Results: Using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient a significant correlation (0.482) was observed in male and female patients respectively with orthodontic demand (2) and treatment need (1) at 0.05 level of significance. A significant correlation (0.326) was observed for the study subjects (both males and females) with orthodontic demand (4) and treatment need (1) at 0.05 level of significance. A significant correlation (0.325) was observed in male patients with orthodontic demand (4) and treatment need (5) at 0.05 level of significance. Conclusions: Patients with the higher orthodontic demand required high treatment needs and vice versa.

  17. Finn, Olivera — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online question_1296831143 Finn, Olivera Pose

  18. Saha, Bratin — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online question_1295038176 Saha, Bratin Pose

  19. Pagel, Mark — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online question_1297191134 Pagel, Mark Pose a

  20. Griguer, Corinne — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online question_1295994802 Griguer, Corinne Pose

  1. Hecht, Toby — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online question_1296761243 Hecht, Toby Pose a

  2. Lerman, Michael — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online question_1302545047 Lerman, Michael Pose

  3. Shridhar, Krithiga — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Questions Submitted Online Pose a Question Workshops 10-9-2010 PQ

  4. Measuring executive function in control subjects and TBI patients with question completion time (QCT)

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Yund, E. William; Wyma, John M.; Ruff, Ron; Herron, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Questionnaire completion is a complex task that places demands on cognitive functions subserving reading, introspective memory, decision-making, and motor control. Although computerized questionnaires and surveys are used with increasing frequency in clinical practice, few studies have examined question completion time (QCT), the time required to complete each question. Here, we analyzed QCTs in 172 control subjects and 31 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who completed two computerized questionnaires, the 17-question Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist (PCL) and the 25-question Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ). In control subjects, robust correlations were found between self-paced QCTs on the PCL and CFQ (r = 0.82). QCTs on individual questions correlated strongly with the number of words in the question, indicating the critical role of reading speed. QCTs increased significantly with age, and were reduced in females and in subjects with increased education and computer experience. QCT z-scores, corrected for age, education, computer use, and sex, correlated more strongly with each other than with the results of other cognitive tests. Patients with a history of severe TBI showed significantly delayed QCTs, but QCTs fell within the normal range in patients with a history of mild TBI. When questionnaires are used to gather relevant patient information, simultaneous QCT measures provide reliable and clinically sensitive measures of processing speed and executive function. PMID:26042021

  5. Why "Who Is the Client?" Is the Wrong Ethical Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Mary Alice

    2014-01-01

    The familiar question "Who is the client?" elicits a singular answer. This may be appropriate as a clinical question, and it is sometimes necessary as a legal question or reimbursement question, but on ethical questions, the National Association of School Psychologists Ethics Code requires school psychologists to "think plural"…

  6. A comparative study of alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation in dystroglycanopathies suggests that the hypoglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan does not consistently correlate with clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Torelli, Silvia; Feng, Lucy; Kim, Jihee; Godfrey, Caroline; Clement, Emma; Mein, Rachael; Abbs, Stephen; Brown, Susan C; Campbell, Kevin P; Kröger, Stephan; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Quinlivan, Ros; Roper, Helen; Childs, Anne M; Kinali, Maria; Sewry, Caroline A; Muntoni, Francesco

    2009-10-01

    Hypoglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan underpins a subgroup of muscular dystrophies ranging from congenital onset of weakness, severe brain malformations and death in the perinatal period to mild weakness in adulthood without brain involvement. Mutations in six genes have been identified in a proportion of patients. POMT1, POMT2 and POMGnT1 encode for glycosyltransferases involved in the mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan but the function of fukutin, FKRP and LARGE is less clear. The pathological hallmark is reduced immunolabeling of skeletal muscle with antibodies recognizing glycosylated epitopes on alpha-dystroglycan. If the common pathway of these conditions is the hypoglycosyation of alpha-dystroglycan, one would expect a correlation between clinical severity and the extent of hypoglycosylation. By studying 24 patients with mutations in these genes, we found a good correlation between reduced alpha-dystroglycan staining and clinical course in patients with mutations in POMT1, POMT2 and POMGnT1. However, this was not always the case in patients with defects in fukutin and FKRP, as we identified patients with mild limb-girdle phenotypes without brain involvement with profound depletion of alpha-dystroglycan. These data indicate that it is not always possible to correlate clinical course and alpha-dystroglycan labeling and suggest that there might be differences in alpha-dystroglycan processing in these disorders. PMID:18691338

  7. Expression of p27 and PTEN and clinical characteristics in early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlation with recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun-Quan; Liang, Zhen; Wu, Meng; Sun, Yu-Man; Liu, Hong-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumor of otolaryngeal region. At present, effective treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma still depends on surgery and radiotherapy. In recent years, application of CO2 laser resection in the treatment of stage T1 glottic carcinoma can remove the tumor completely and reduce the injury of laryngeal tissues. But recurrence still happened in some postoperative patients. Here, we selected 131 patients to compare the therapeutic effects of CO2 laser resection and traditional split laryngeal surgery on the early laryngeal cancer, examined the expression of p27 and PTEN by immunohistochemistry in early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma tissues in correlation to clinical outcome. After two years follow-up 14/85 (16.5%) of CO2 laser treatment group presented with local recurrence (recurrent group), while that of split laryngeal surgery group was 6/46 (13.0%). There was no statistical significance in recurrence rate between the two groups (P > 0.05). 10 of all the 111 (9.0%) non-recurrent patients did not follow the doctor’s advice to quit smoking after the operation, while 12 in the 20 (60.0%) recurrent patients did not; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The positive rates of p27 were 80.2% (105/131) and 43.5% (57/131), and that of PTEN were 83.2% (109/131) and 48.9% (64/131) in the cancer adjacent tissues (negative surgical margin tissues) and in laryngeal carcinoma tissues, respectively (P < 0.001). The expression rates of p27 and PTEN in laryngeal carcinoma tissues of the recurrent group were 20.0% (4/20), 10.0% (2/20) and that in non recurrent group were 47.7% (53/111) and 55.9% (62/111), respectively, with a significant difference (P < 0.001). In addition, the expression of p27 and PTEN in tumor resected marginal tissues of the recurrence group was 50.0% (10/20), 40.0% (8/20) and that in non recurrence group was 85.6% (95/111) and 91.0% (101/111), respectively; the difference was also statistically significant between both groups (P < 0.001). In conclusion, there is no statistically significant difference in tumor recurrence rate between CO2 laser surgery and traditional split laryngeal surgery. Postoperative recurrence is closely related to resume smoking. The recurrence rate of p27 and/or PTEN-negative patients was higher than that of the positive ones,that should be followed up closely after treatment. PMID:26191286

  8. Correlation between Epidurographic Contrast Flow Patterns and Clinical Effectiveness in Chronic Lumbar Discogenic Radicular Pain Treated with Epidural Steroid Injections Via Different Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saru; Kaur, Sukhdeep; Singh, Kulvinder; Aujla, Kuljeet

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural steroid injections are an accepted procedure for the conservative management of chronic backache caused by lumbar disc pathology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the epidurographic findings for the midline, transforaminal and parasagittal approaches in lumbar epidural steroid injections, and correlating them with the clinical improvement. Methods Sixty chronic lower back pain patients with unilateral radiculitis from a herniated/degenerated disc were enrolled. After screening the patients according to the exclusion criteria and randomly allocating them to 3 groups of 20 patients, fluoroscopic contrast enhanced epidural steroids were injected via midline (group 1), transforaminal (group 2) and parasagittal interlaminar (group 3) approaches at the level of the pathology. The fluoroscopic patterns of the three groups were studied and correlated with the clinical improvement measured by the VAS over the next 3 months; any incidences of complications were recorded. Results The transforaminal group presented better results in terms of VAS reduction than the midline and parasagittal approach groups (P < 0.05). The epidurography showed a better ventral spread for both the transforaminal (P < 0.001) and the paramedian approaches (P < 0.05), as compared to the midline approach. The nerve root filling was greater in the transforaminal group (P < 0.001) than in the other two groups. The ventral spread of the contrast agent was associated with improvement in the VAS score and this difference was statistically significant in group 1 (P < 0.05), and highly significant in groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001). In all the groups, any complications observed were transient and minor. Conclusions The midline and paramedian approaches are technically easier and statistically comparable, but clinically less efficacious than the transforaminal approach. The incidence of ventral spread and nerve root delineation show a definite correlation with clinical improvement. However, an longer follow-up period is advisable for a better evaluation of the actual outcom. PMID:25317285

  9. Pulmonary hypertension in non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: Correlation with clinical parameters, liver iron concentration, and non-transferrin-bound iron.

    PubMed

    Inthawong, Kunrada; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Silvilairat, Suchaya; Tantiworawit, Adisak; Phrommintikul, Arintaya; Choeyprasert, Worawut; Natesirinilkul, Rungrote; Siwasomboon, Chate; Visrutaratna, Pannee; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Sanguansermsri, Torpong

    2015-12-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension is a major cardiac complication in non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT). Several clinical and laboratory parameters, including iron overload, have been shown to have a positive correlation with the incidence of pulmonary hypertension. Non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) is a form of free-plasma iron that is a good indicator of iron overload. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with NTDT and to investigate its correlation with the clinical parameters, liver iron concentration (LIC) and NTBI. Methods Patients with NTDT were evaluated using echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging for cardiac T2* and LIC. Pulmonary hypertension was de?ned as peak tricuspid regurgitation velocity ?2.9 m/s measured using trans-thoracic echocardiography. Clinical parameters and the status of iron overload as determined by LIC, serum ferritin, and NTBI level were evaluated for their association with pulmonary hypertension. Results Of 76 NTDT patients, mean age 23.7 ± 8.5 years, seven patients (9.2%) had pulmonary hypertension. Previous splenectomy (71.4 vs. 24.6%, P-value 0.019), higher cumulative red blood cell (RBC) transfusions (received ?10 RBC transfusions 85.7 vs. 33.3%, P-value 0.011), higher nucleated RBCs (353 ± 287 vs. 63 ± 160/100 white blood cells, P-value <0.001), and a high NTBI level (5.7 ± 3.0 vs. 3.3 ± 2.8 µmol/l, P-value 0.034) were associated with pulmonary hypertension. There was no significant correlation between LIC or serum ferritin and pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion Pulmonary hypertension in NTDT is common, and is associated with splenectomy and its related factors. NTBI level shows a significant correlation with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25964094

  10. Do clinicians use more question marks?

    PubMed Central

    Otte, Willem M; van’t Klooster, Maryse A; van Diessen, Eric; Leijten, Frans SS; Sander, Josemir W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the use of question marks in titles of published studies. Design and setting Literature review. Participants All Pubmed publications between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2013 with an available abstract. Papers were classified as being clinical when the search terms clin*, med* or patient* were found anywhere in the paper’s title, abstract or the journal’s name. Other papers were considered controls. As a verification, clinical journals were compared to non-clinical journals in two different approaches. Also, 50 highest impact journals were explored for publisher group dependent differences. Main outcome measure Total number of question marks in titles. Results A total of 368,362 papers were classified as clinical and 596,889 as controls. Clinical papers had question marks in 3.9% (95% confidence interval 3.8–4.0%) of titles and other papers in 2.3% (confidence interval 2.3–2.3%; p?clinical journals compared to non-clinical journals. Different percentages between four publisher groups were found (p?question marks in titles of clinical papers than in other papers. This could suggest that clinicians often have a question-driven approach to research and scientists in more fundamental research a hypothesis-driven approach. An alternative explanation is that clinicians like catchy titles. Publishing groups might have pro- and anti-question mark policies. PMID:26085937

  11. The competency question.

    PubMed

    Ruthemeyer, M

    2000-01-01

    JCAHO mandates "processes that are designed to ensure that the competency of all staff members is assessed, maintained, demonstrated, and improved on an ongoing basis." However, it is difficult to collect aggregate data regarding staff competency patterns and trends. How many facilities have the time or energy to collect aggregate data, let alone statistically analyze it for patterns and trends? Not many in today's environment. I saw the need to create a test to evaluate staff competency at my facility, but soon realized I would have no way of knowing if the results were good or bad. The only way to judge the results would be to have a standardized test that was used by multiple facilities. As president of the Houston X-ray Quality Society, I brought the topic up at a meeting in 1995, and a committee was set up to work on the test. The result is two competency tests--one for staff radiographers and one for mammographers--which are currently used by 35 to 40 facilities, with approximately 1,000 technologists taking the test each year. The tests include practical questions that reflect the knowledge required to perform daily exams. Each test has five sections that assess different areas of competency. The scoring system allows technologists to fail one or more individual sections but still pass the test overall. Twenty to 30 percent of the questions are new each year. That gives us the ability to look for improvement on previous year's questions, and at the same time, avoid producing a static and ineffective test. There are 60 questions on the staff radiographer test and 65 questions on the mammographer test, which also includes clinical images. Facilities must sign an agreement that states that they cannot use the test as a disciplinary tool in the employee's evaluation, or in any other way against the technologist. As a profession, radiology administration not only has regulatory requirements to evaluate competency, but also a moral duty to insure that patients receive the best possible care. We should not cover up or ignore the blemishes that we all know exist. Instead, we should take them on, as professional and personal challenges to improve the competency of our staff. PMID:11151318

  12. Hashimoto encephalopathy: A study of the clinical profile, radiological and electrophysiological correlation in a Tertiary Care Center in South India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pattanagere Manjunatha Suryanarayana; Javali, Mahendra; Mahale, Rohan; Madhusudhan, Byadarahalli Kempegowda; Majeed, Anas Abdul; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is a poorly understood and often misdiagnosed entity with variable clinical spectrum. There are many uncertainties that still remain about this condition and the pathological significance of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody. Objective: To characterize the clinical, laboratory and radiologic findings in patients with HE. Design: Retrospective analysis of clinical features and diagnostic test data. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical features, laboratory, radiologic, electroencephalography (EEG) findings associated with HE and therapeutic outcome. Results: Thirteen consecutive patients were identified as having HE. The median age at onset was 48.5 years (range, 19–62 years). There was a female preponderance (76.9%). Clinical manifestations were cognitive impairment and behavioral changes in 10 (76.9%), sleep disturbance in 9 (69.2%), seizures in 6 (46.1%), headache in 4 (30.8%), psychosis or paranoia in 5 (38.5%), transient symptoms in 6 (46.1%), myoclonus in 4 (30.8%), ataxia or gait disorder in 4 (30.8%). The most frequent laboratory abnormalities were increased TPO (n = 13) in all cases, increased thyroid stimulating hormone levels (n = 6), and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n = 5). The cerebrospinal fluid protein level was elevated in 8 of 9 patients (88.8%). Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities were present in 2 patients (15.4%). EEG changes were seen in 7 patients (53.8%). All but two patients showed significant therapeutic benefit with steroids. Conclusions: HE has a wide range of clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings. All patients with an unexplained encephalopathy should be screened for this condition as treatment response is excellent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest single center clinical series of HE from the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26167010

  13. A comprehensive review of auditory verbal hallucinations: lifetime prevalence, correlates and mechanisms in healthy and clinical individuals

    PubMed Central

    de Leede-Smith, Saskia; Barkus, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, the prevalence of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) have been documented across the lifespan in varied contexts, and with a range of potential long-term outcomes. Initially the emphasis focused on whether AVHs conferred risk for psychosis. However, recent research has identified significant differences in the presentation and outcomes of AVH in patients compared to those in non-clinical populations. For this reason, it has been suggested that auditory hallucinations are an entity by themselves and not necessarily indicative of transition along the psychosis continuum. This review will examine the presentation of auditory hallucinations across the life span, as well as in various clinical groups. The stages described include childhood, adolescence, adult non-clinical populations, hypnagogic/hypnopompic experiences, high schizotypal traits, schizophrenia, substance induced AVH, AVH in epilepsy, and AVH in the elderly. In children, need for care depends upon whether the child associates the voice with negative beliefs, appraisals and other symptoms of psychosis. This theme appears to carry right through to healthy voice hearers in adulthood, in which a negative impact of the voice usually only exists if the individual has negative experiences as a result of their voice(s). This includes features of the voices such as the negative content, frequency, and emotional valence as well as anxiety and depression, independently or caused by voices presence. It seems possible that the mechanisms which maintain AVH in non-clinical populations are different from those which are behind AVH presentations in psychotic illness. For example, the existence of maladaptive coping strategies in patient populations is one significant difference between clinical and non-clinical groups which is associated with a need for care. Whether or not these mechanisms start out the same and have differential trajectories is not yet evidenced. Future research needs to focus on the comparison of underlying factors and mechanisms that lead to the onset of AVH in both patient and non-clinical populations. PMID:23882203

  14. Preliminary in vivo positional analysis of a posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens by optical coherence tomography and its correlation with clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J.; Piñero, David P.; Blanes-Mompó, Francisco J.; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa; Cerviño, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To analyze by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography the anatomical relationship of a specific type of posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) implanted in cases of high to moderate myopia with the adjacent intraocular structures and to correlate it with clinical outcomes. Methods Prospective observational case series including 18 eyes with high to moderate myopia (spherical equivalent between ?5.88 and ?15.75 D) of 9 patients (age range, 29–49 years) undergoing bilateral Phakic Refractive Lens (PRL, Zeiss) implantation. Postoperative visual acuity, refraction, contrast sensitivity (CS), and ocular higher order aberrations (HOA) were evaluated. Furthermore, the in vivo position of the PRL was analyzed by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (3D OCT-1000, Topcon). Central (CENV), temporal (TEMV) and nasal vault (NASV) were measured. Correlation of these anatomical parameters with clinical data was also investigated. Mean follow-up was 47 ± 25 months. Results A statistically significant visual and refractive improvement (p < 0.01) was found postoperatively. Mean postoperative CENV, NASV, and TEMV were 157.88 ± 69.93 ?m, 168.29 ± 65.02 ?m, and 188.59 ± 55.99 ?m, respectively. Significant difference was found between NASV and TEMV (p = 0.01). No significant correlations were found between ocular aberrometric and anatomical parameters (p ? 0.12). CENV, NASV and TEMV correlated significantly with 6-cycles per degree (cpd) photopic CS as well as with 18-cpd low mesopic CS (r ? 0.57, p ? 0.04). Furthermore, NASV also correlated significantly with preoperative anterior chamber depth (r = ?0.65, p = 0.01). Conclusions This posterior chamber pIOL shows a trend to nasal position, with potential impact on refractive and visual outcomes, particularly in eyes with deep anterior chambers.

  15. Mapping ventricular expansion and its clinical correlates in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment using multi-atlas fluid image alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yi-Yu; Lepore, Natasha; Avedissian, Christina; Madsen, Sarah K.; Hua, Xue; Jack, Clifford R., Jr.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-02-01

    We developed an automated analysis pipeline to analyze 3D changes in ventricular morphology; it provides a highly sensitive quantitative marker of Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression for MRI studies. In the ADNI image database, we created expert delineations of the ventricles, as parametric surface meshes, in 6 brain MRI scans. These 6 images and their embedded surfaces were fluidly registered to MRI scans of 80 AD patients, 80 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 80 healthy controls. Surface averaging within subjects greatly reduced segmentation error. Surface-based statistical maps revealed powerful correlations between surface morphology at baseline and (1) diagnosis, (2) cognitive performance (MMSE scores), (3) depression, and (4) predicted future decline, over a 1 year interval, in 3 standard clinical scores (MMSE, global and sum-of-boxes CDR). We used a false discovery rate method (FDR) method based on cumulative probability plots to find that 40 subjects were sufficient to discriminate AD from normal groups. 60 and 119 subjects, respectively, were required to correlate ventricular enlargement with MMSE and clinical depression. Surface-based FDR, along with multi-atlas fluid registration to reduce segmentation error, will allow researchers to (1) estimate sample sizes with adequate power to detect groups differences, and (2) compare the power of mapping methods head-to-head, optimizing cost-effectiveness for future clinical trials.

  16. Clinical and Physiological Correlates of Irritability in Depression: Results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, Floor E. A.; Booij, Linda; Van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Penninx, Brenda W. H. J.; Van der Does, A. J. Willem

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Irritable and nonirritable depressed patients differ on demographic and clinical characteristics. We investigated whether this extends to psychological and physiological measures. Method. We compared irritable and nonirritable unipolar depressed patients on symptomatology, personality, and (psycho)physiological measures (cortisol, cholesterol, and heart rate variability). Symptomatology was reassessed after one year, and we also compared depressed patients who were irritable or non-irritable at both time points (Irr++ versus Irr??). Results. Almost half (46%; N = 420) of the sample was classified as irritable. These patients scored higher on depression severity, anxiety, hypomanic symptoms, and psychological variables. No differences were observed on physiological markers after correction for depression severity. The same pattern was found when comparing Irr++ and Irr?? groups. Conclusion. Irritable and non-irritable depressed patients differ on clinical and psychological variables, but not on the currently investigated physiological markers. The clinical relevance of the distinction and the significance of the hypomanic symptoms remain to be demonstrated. PMID:22110910

  17. Frequently Asked Questions about Clinical Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicine Working Group New Horizons and Research Patient Management Policy and Ethics Issues Quick Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic ...

  18. Rural Health Clinics Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for quality improvement is to conduct an annual program evaluation to include volume and type, and review both ... place, this will meet the requirement for annual program evaluation. For more information about quality improvement for RHCs, ...

  19. Beware Answers with Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humble, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Answers to mathematical problems come in all forms and most come with a variety of questions. Students often forget to ask questions once they have found an answer. This paper suggests that students would always benefit by questioning answers.

  20. The Relationship between Trait, Expressive, and Familial Correlates of Emotion Regulation in a Clinical Sample of Anxious Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosper, Sarah E.; May, Jill Ehrenreich

    2011-01-01

    Although emotion and its regulation have been linked to children's general psychopathology, it has only recently been studied in relation to childhood anxiety disorders. In this study, the authors examine the relationship between various inputs of emotion regulation and anxiety in a clinical sample of youth. Participants (N = 112) were…

  1. Correlation between clinical severity of central nervous system (CNS) lupus and findings on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of the brain; preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, I.E.; Zeit, R.M.; Von Feldt, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosis (SLE) commonly causes significant neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study was to review the brain SPECT studies of SLE patients with clinical evidence of CNS involvement and determine whether there is a correlation between the findings on SPECT images and the clinical manifestations of this serious phase of the disease. We enrolled 19 SLE patients and 12 normal controls in this study. The level of each patient`s disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), an established method of scoring disease severity which is heavily weighted toward neuropsychiatric symptomatology, for 15 of the 19 SLE patients. The SLEDAI was calculated within a 10 day window of the date when the SPECT scan was obtained. SPECT scans were performed 30 minutes following the intravenous administration of 99mTc-HMPAO. Results are discussed.

  2. Overweight and Obesity: Prevalence and Correlates in a Large Clinical Sample of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Katharine E.; Hill, Alison P.; Guion, Kimberly; Voltolina, Lisa; Fombonne, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) and childhood obesity (OBY) are rising public health concerns. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of overweight (OWT) and OBY in a sample of 376 Oregon children with ASD, and to assess correlates of OWT and OBY in this sample. We used descriptive statistics, bivariate, and focused multivariate analyses to…

  3. ISI values and interhemispheric differences in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease; correlations with clinical and angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mosmans, P.C.; Veering, M.M.; Jonkman, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Xenon 133 inhalation CBF studies of one hundred patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the territory of the carotid artery were compared in an attempt to gain more insight into the collateral capacity, especially in those with a stenosis or occlusion of one of the major arteries. Asymmetry of the ISI values for the two hemispheres was expressed as a ratio. High ratios (greater ISI asymmetries) were found for patients with an occlusion of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery, especially--but not exclusively--those with the more severe clinical symptoms. It also appeared that even when the patient is in a good clinical condition, an elevated ratio reflects insufficiency of the collateral supply to the affected side. The ISI values for individual patients seem to be less useful, partly due to the variable age dependency of this flow parameter.

  4. Changes in skin-test reactivity do not correlate with clinical efficacy of H1-blockers in seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Czarlewski, W; Cougnard, J; Danzig, M; Michel, F B

    1998-06-01

    New-generation H1-blockers may possess antiallergic properties, and their effect may differ, depending on the target organ. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was carried out during the pollen season to compare the clinical effect on nasal and conjunctival symptoms of astemizole (10 mg o.d.) and loratadine (10 mg o.d.) with their effect on skin-test reactivity to allergen and histamine. Thirty-eight patients (12-56 years of age) were studied. Nasal and ocular symptoms were recorded daily from days 4 to 7. Skin prick tests with serial concentrations of allergens and one concentration of histamine were carried out before and at the end of the 7-day treatment period. Parallel-line bioassay, analysis of variance, and covariance were used to analyze skin test data. Loratadine and astemizole significantly decreased symptoms from baseline (P < 0.004 and P < 0.006). Skin-test reactivity to allergen and histamine was more profoundly decreased by astemizole than loratadine. The histamine covariant was more important in the allergen effect of astemizole than in that of loratadine. Two H1-blockers having the same clinical effect on nasal and ocular symptoms during the pollen season have totally different effects on skin-test reactivity. Skin-test reactivity to allergen or histamine is not predictive of the clinical efficacy of H1-blockers during seasonal allergic rhinitis. PMID:9689339

  5. Who Asks the Questions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hervey, Sheena

    2006-01-01

    From a very young age, children actively strive to make sense of their world through constant questioning. The ability to ask questions comes naturally for young children, but such natural inclination does not continue because it teachers who ask most of the questions. Sheena Hervey suggests that teaching students how to pose questions is a…

  6. Any Questions, Please?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollio, Howard R.

    1989-01-01

    This pamphlet discusses the use of questioning in the college classroom and its contribution to learning. Starting with a brief examination of the ways children question, discussions cover: (1) the effects of linguistic and socio-linguistic characteristics in questioning; (2) questions in psychotherapy, law, and opinion polling; (3) classroom…

  7. Posing Einstein's Question: Questioning Einstein's Pose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topper, David; Vincent, Dwight E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the events surrounding a famous picture of Albert Einstein in which he poses near a blackboard containing a tensor form of his 10 field equations for pure gravity with a question mark after it. Speculates as to the content of Einstein's lecture and the questions he might have had about the equation. (Contains over 30 references.) (WRM)

  8. Test-retest reliability, feasibility and clinical correlates of the Eurofit test battery in people with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Vancampfort, Davy; Sienaert, Pascal; Wyckaert, Sabine; De Hert, Marc; Stubbs, Brendon; Rosenbaum, Simon; Buys, Roselien; Probst, Michel

    2015-08-30

    The physical health of people with bipolar disorder is poorer in comparison to the general population, with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Due to the established beneficial effects, there is growing interest in the promotion of physical activity and in particular the accurate measurement of physical fitness in this population. Currently, no existing measures of physical fitness used in the general population have been tested for validity and reliability among people with bipolar disorder. Therefore, we examined the reproducibility, feasibility and correlates of the Eurofit test battery in people with bipolar disorder. From 24 men (43.0±13.0 years) and 22 women (43.9±10.2 years) with bipolar disorder two trials of the Eurofit test, administered within three days, were analyzed. All Eurofit items showed good reproducibility with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.71 for the whole body balance test to 0.98 for the handgrip force test. Significant correlations with Eurofit test items were found with age, illness duration, body mass index, smoking behavior, mean daily lithium dosage, and depressive and lifetime hypomanic symptoms. The current study demonstrates that the Eurofit test can be recommended for evaluating the physical fitness of inpatients with bipolar disorder. PMID:26165959

  9. Inter-individual differences in CpG methylation at D4Z4 correlate with clinical variability in FSHD1 and FSHD2.

    PubMed

    Lemmers, Richard J L F; Goeman, Jelle J; van der Vliet, Patrick J; van Nieuwenhuizen, Merlijn P; Balog, Judit; Vos-Versteeg, Marianne; Camano, Pilar; Ramos Arroyo, Maria Antonia; Jerico, Ivonne; Rogers, Mark T; Miller, Daniel G; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Lopez de Munain Arregui, Adolfo; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Padberg, George W; Sacconi, Sabrina; Tawil, Rabi; Tapscott, Stephen J; Bakker, Bert; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2015-02-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD: MIM#158900) is a common myopathy with marked but largely unexplained clinical inter- and intra-familial variability. It is caused by contractions of the D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4 to 1-10 units (FSHD1), or by mutations in the D4Z4-binding chromatin modifier SMCHD1 (FSHD2). Both situations lead to a partial opening of the D4Z4 chromatin structure and transcription of D4Z4-encoded polyadenylated DUX4 mRNA in muscle. We measured D4Z4 CpG methylation in control, FSHD1 and FSHD2 individuals and found a significant correlation with the D4Z4 repeat array size. After correction for repeat array size, we show that the variability in clinical severity in FSHD1 and FSHD2 individuals is dependent on individual differences in susceptibility to D4Z4 hypomethylation. In FSHD1, for individuals with D4Z4 repeat arrays of 1-6 units, the clinical severity mainly depends on the size of the D4Z4 repeat. However, in individuals with arrays of 7-10 units, the clinical severity also depends on other factors that regulate D4Z4 methylation because affected individuals, but not non-penetrant mutation carriers, have a greater reduction of D4Z4 CpG methylation than can be expected based on the size of the pathogenic D4Z4 repeat array. In FSHD2, this epigenetic susceptibility depends on the nature of the SMCHD1 mutation in combination with D4Z4 repeat array size with dominant negative mutations being more deleterious than haploinsufficiency mutations. Our study thus identifies an epigenetic basis for the striking variability in onset and disease progression that is considered a clinical hallmark of FSHD. PMID:25256356

  10. Psychosocial and treatment correlates of opiate free success in a clinical review of a naltrexone implant program

    PubMed Central

    Reece, AS

    2007-01-01

    Background There is on-going controversy in relation to the efficacy of naltrexone used for the treatment of heroin addiction, and the important covariates of that success. We were also interested to review our experience with two depot forms of implantable naltrexone. Methods A retrospective review of patients' charts was undertaken, patients were recalled by telephone and by letter, and urine drug screen samples were collected. Opiate free success (OFS) was the parameter of interest. Three groups were defined. The first two were treated in the previous 12 months and comprised "implant" and "tablet" patients. A third group was "historical" comprising those treated orally in the preceding 12 months. Results There were 102, 113 and 161 patients in each group respectively. Groups were matched for age, sex, and dose of heroin used, but not financial status or social support. The overall follow-up rate was 82%. The Kaplan Meier 12 month OFS were 82%, 58% and 52% respectively. 12 post-treatment variables were independently associated with treatment retention. In a Cox proportional hazard multivariate model social support, the number of detoxification episodes, post-treatment employment, the use of multiple implant episodes and spiritual belief were significantly related to OFS. Conclusion Consistent with the voluminous international literature clinically useful retention rates can be achieved with naltrexone, which may be improved by implants and particularly serial implants, repeat detoxification, meticulous clinical follow-up, and social support. As depot formulations of naltrexone become increasingly available such results can guide their clinical deployment, improve treatment outcomes, and enlarge the policy options for an exciting non-addictive pharmacotherapy for opiate addiction. PMID:18036213

  11. Correlation of hypothetical virulence traits of two Streptococcus uberis strains with the clinical manifestation of bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Riccardo; McNeilly, Tom N; Sipka, Anja; Zadoks, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus uberis is a common cause of clinical and subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle. Several virulence mechanisms have been proposed to contribute to the species' ability to cause disease. Here, virulence characteristics were compared between S. uberis strains FSL Z1-048, which consistently caused clinical mastitis in a challenge model, and FSL Z1-124, which consistently failed to cause disease in the same model, to ascertain whether in vitro virulence characteristics were related to clinical outcome. Macrophages derived from bovine blood monocytes failed to kill FSL Z1-048 whilst reducing survival of FSL Z1-124 by 42.5%. Conversely, blood derived polymorphonuclear cells caused more reduction (67.1 vs. 44.2%, respectively) in the survival of FSL Z1-048 than in survival of FSL Z1-124. After 3 h of coincubation with bovine mammary epithelial cell line BME-UV1, 1000-fold higher adherence was observed for FSL Z1-048 compared to FSL Z1-124, despite presence of a frame shift mutation in the sua gene of FSL Z1-048 that resulted in predicted truncation of the S. uberis Adhesion Molecule (SUAM) protein. In contrast, FSL Z1-124 showed higher ability than FSL Z1-048 to invade BME-UV1 cells. Finally, observed biofilm formation by FSL Z1-124 was significantly greater than for FSL Z1-048. In summary, for several hypothetical virulence characteristics, virulence phenotype in vitro did not match disease phenotype in vivo. Evasion of macrophage killing and adhesion to mammary epithelial cells were the only in vitro traits associated with virulence in vivo, making them attractive targets for further research into pathogenesis and control of S. uberis mastitis. PMID:26497306

  12. Dimensions of Delusions in Major Depression: Socio-demographic and Clinical Correlates in an Unipolar-Bipolar Sample

    PubMed Central

    Zaninotto, Leonardo; Souery, Daniel; Calati, Raffaella; Camardese, Giovanni; Janiri, Luigi; Montgomery, Stuart; Kasper, Siegfried; Zohar, Joseph; De Ronchi, Diana; Mendlewicz, Julien; Serretti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study aims at exploring associations between a continuous measure of distorted thought contents and a set of demographic and clinical features in a sample of unipolar/bipolar depressed patients. Methods Our sample included 1,833 depressed subjects. Severity of mood symptoms was assessed by the 21 items Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The continuous outcome measure was represented by a delusion (DEL) factor, extracted from HAM-D items and including items: 2 (“Feelings of guilt”), 15 (“Hypochondriasis”), and 20 (“Paranoid symptoms”). Each socio-demographic and clinical variable was tested by a generalized linear model test, having depressive severity (HAM-D score–DEL score) as the covariate. Results A family history of major depressive disorder (MDD; p=0.0006), a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, type I ( p=0.0003), a comorbid general anxiety disorder (p<0.0001), and a higher number of manic episodes during lifetime (p<0.0001), were all associated to higher DEL scores. Conversely, an older age at onset (p<0.0001) and a longer duration of hospitalization for depression over lifetime (p=0.0003) had a negative impact over DEL scores. On secondary analyses, only the presence of psychotic features (p<0.0001) and depressive severity (p<0.0001) were found to be independently associated to higher DEL scores. Conclusion The retrospective design and a non validated continuous measure for distorted thought contents were the main limitations of our study. Excluding the presence of psychotic features and depressive severity, no socio-demographic or clinical variable was found to be associated to our continuous measure of distorted thinking in depression. PMID:25912537

  13. CCAT2, a novel long non-coding RNA in breast cancer: expression study and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Redis, Roxana S; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Look, Maxime P; Tudoran, Oana; Ivan, Cristina; Spizzo, Riccardo; Zhang, Xinna; de Weerd, Vanja; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Ling, Hui; Buiga, Rares; Pop, Victor; Irimie, Alexandru; Fodde, Riccardo; Bedrosian, Isabella; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Calin, George A

    2013-10-01

    The clinical outcome of BC patients receiving the same treatment is known to vary considerably and thus, there is a compelling need to identify novel biomarkers that can select the patients that would benefit most from a given therapy and can predict the clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of CCAT2, a novel long ncRNA recently characterized by our group and overlapping SNP rs6983267, in BC patients. We first evaluated by RT-qPCR and ISH the expression of CCAT2 in normal breast tissue and BC tissue and further analyzed CCAT2 expression in an independent set of 997 primary BC with regard to clinical, histological, pathological and other biological factors. Also, we explored the possibility of CCAT2 adding to the prognostic value of multivariate models that already included the traditional prognostic factors. Finally, we identified in in vitro models the impact of CCAT2 expression and SNP rs6983267 genotype on cell migration and chemoresistance. Our results revealed that although overexpressed in BCs in two out of three sets of patients, and having the highest expression in lymph node negative (LNN) disease, CCAT2 expression levels are informative solely for a subgroup of BC patients, namely for patients with LNP disease that have received adjuvant CMF chemotherapy. For this subgroup high levels of CCAT2 suggest the patients will not benefit from CMF containing adjuvant chemotherapy (shorter MFS and OS). Additionally, we found that CCAT2 upregulates cell migration and downregulates chemosensitivity to 5'FU in a rs6983267-independent manner. PMID:24077681

  14. Genotype and clinical care correlations in craniosynostosis: findings from a cohort of 630 Australian and New Zealand patients.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, T; Elakis, G; Cox, T C; Moon, D J; Venselaar, H; Turner, A M; Le, T; Hackett, E; Haan, E; Colley, A; Mowat, D; Worgan, L; Kirk, E P; Sachdev, R; Thompson, E; Gabbett, M; McGaughran, J; Gibson, K; Gattas, M; Freckmann, M-L; Dixon, J; Hoefsloot, L; Field, M; Hackett, A; Kamien, B; Edwards, M; Adès, L C; Collins, F A; Wilson, M J; Savarirayan, R; Tan, T Y; Amor, D J; McGillivray, G; White, S M; Glass, I A; David, D J; Anderson, P J; Gianoutsos, M; Buckley, M F

    2013-11-01

    Craniosynostosis is one of the most common craniofacial disorders encountered in clinical genetics practice, with an overall incidence of 1 in 2,500. Between 30% and 70% of syndromic craniosynostoses are caused by mutations in hotspots in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) genes or in the TWIST1 gene with the difference in detection rates likely to be related to different study populations within craniofacial centers. Here we present results from molecular testing of an Australia and New Zealand cohort of 630 individuals with a diagnosis of craniosynostosis. Data were obtained by Sanger sequencing of FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3 hotspot exons and the TWIST1 gene, as well as copy number detection of TWIST1. Of the 630 probands, there were 231 who had one of 80 distinct mutations (36%). Among the 80 mutations, 17 novel sequence variants were detected in three of the four genes screened. In addition to the proband cohort there were 96 individuals who underwent predictive or prenatal testing as part of family studies. Dysmorphic features consistent with the known FGFR1-3/TWIST1-associated syndromes were predictive for mutation detection. We also show a statistically significant association between splice site mutations in FGFR2 and a clinical diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome, more severe clinical phenotypes associated with FGFR2 exon 10 versus exon 8 mutations, and more frequent surgical procedures in the presence of a pathogenic mutation. Targeting gene hot spot areas for mutation analysis is a useful strategy to maximize the success of molecular diagnosis for individuals with craniosynostosis. PMID:24127277

  15. Correlation between histologic staging, hepatitis C virus genotypes and clinical features in HCV chronic hepatitis: evidence of a new pattern.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, L; Macchia, S; Morandi, L; Leoncini, S; Pession, A; Dal Monte, P R; Foschini, M P

    2003-07-01

    Genome heterogeneity may be related to the wide variability of clinical and pathological features in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related chronic liver disease. This paper addresses the possible association between HCV subtypes and clinical and histological features of chronically infected patients. Sixty-eight consecutive liver biopsies of chronic hepatitis constituted the basis of the study. HCV genotyping was performed on frozen tissue. Grading of necroinflammatory activity and staging of fibrosis were histologically assessed. Serologic HCV-RNA and liver function were assessed at the same time. All information was compared with clinical data including age, sex, HCV serology, and probable data and route of infection. Two cases were excluded as inadequate tissue was available. Five cases were negative to HCV-RNA in both serum and tissue. In 61 cases HCV RNA was present at the same time in serum and liver tissue. Forty-four patients were men (72%) and 17 (28%) were women. Two peaks of age were observed: 1 in the 4th decade of life, the 2nd in the 7th. The 2 groups had different HCV genotypes. Patients with genotypes 1b (mean age 50.7 years), 2c (mean age 61.3 years), and a subgroup of coinfections (mean age 60 years) were older than patients with genotypes 1a (mean age 35.5 years), 3 (mean age 36 years), and a subgroup of coinfections (mean age 33 years). Patients with genotypes 1b, 2, or 2c and a subgroup of coinfections more frequently had a history of blood transfusion and or surgical intervention dating up to 49 years previously. Patients with HCV 1a, 3, and a subgroup of coinfections frequently admitted a period of intravenous drug abuse. Patients with advanced liver disease, i.e., severe fibrosis and cirrhosis, showed the same 2 peaks of incidence: in the 4th and 7th decades of life, the first group mainly comprising patients with HCV types 1a and 3, the second, patients with HCV types 1b and 2c. Both these groups shared a clinical history of a long-standing infection. Two profiles of patients emerged. The largest group was composed of elderly patients, infected by HCV genotypes 1b or 2c, with a history of blood transfusion and/or surgery, presenting an advanced stage of liver disease (namely, severe fibrosis or cirrhosis). The second group was composed of younger patients, mainly in the 4th decade of life, infected by HCV types 3 or 1a, often presenting with chronic hepatitis in the stage of severe fibrosis or cirrhosis. The latter could be the profile of HCV infection in the near future. PMID:12894351

  16. Ultrasound in newborns and children suffering from non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: imaging with clinical and surgical correlation.

    PubMed

    di Giacomo, Vincenza; Trinci, Margherita; van der Byl, Giulia; Catania, Vincenzo Davide; Calisti, Alessandro; Miele, Vittorio

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review ultrasonographic appearance of the most common causes of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients and to understand the applications and limitations of this technique giving a practical approach showing different clinical cases. A pictorial review of cases was made presenting the most common causes of neonatal and pediatric non-traumatic acute abdominal pain; sonographic features are discussed. Ultrasound in conjunction with Color Doppler imaging is a valuable tool in the evaluation of neonatal and pediatric non-traumatic acute abdominal pain; causes of acute abdomen in children could vary depending on the ages of the children. PMID:26550064

  17. Clinical correlations of grey matter reductions in the caudate nucleus of adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Luis Guillermo Almeida; Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina; De La Torre, Lázaro Barajas; Alcántara, Hugo Prado; García, Reyna Beatriz Martínez; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio; Acosta, David Ávila

    2010-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have shown decreased caudate volumes in individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, most of these studies have been carried out in male children. Very little research has been done in adults, and the results obtained in children are difficult to extrapolate to adults. We sought to compare the volume of the caudate of adults with ADHD with that of healthy controls; we also compared these volumes between men and women. Methods We performed an MRI scan on 20 adults with ADHD (10 men and 10 women) aged 25–35 years and 20 healthy controls matched by age and sex. We used voxel-based morphometry with the DARTEL algorithm for image analyses. We used the specifically designed Friederichsen, Almeida, Serrano, Cortes Test (FASCT) to measure the severity of ADHD; both the self-reported (FASCT-SR) and the observer (FASCT-O) versions were used. Results The statistical parametric map showed a smaller region with low grey matter volume and a smaller concentration of grey matter in this region of the right caudate in ADHD patients than in health controls, both in the entire sample and within each sex. There was a significant correlation between the volume of this region of the caudate with the number of DSM IV-TR criteria, as well as with the total scores and most of the factors of the FASCT-SR and FASCT-O scales. A separate correlation analysis by sex gave similar results. Limitations The study design was cross-sectional. Conclusion The region of the right caudate with low grey matter volume was smaller in adults with ADHD in both sexes and was correlated with ADHD severity. PMID:20569650

  18. Correlation between ferrous ammonium sulfate concentration, sensitivity and stability of Fricke gel dosimeters exposed to clinical X-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Brai, Maria; Gagliardo, Cesare; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Tranchina, Luigi; Abbate, Boris; Collura, Giorgio; Gallias, Kostantinos; Caputo, Vittorio; Lo Casto, Antonio; Midiri, Massimo; D'Errico, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    This work describes the characterization of various Fricke-Agarose-Xylenol gels (FXG) dosimeters using NMR relaxometry and MRI analysis. Using X-rays from a clinical linear accelerator (LINAC), the gels were irradiated in the dose range from 0 Gy to 20 Gy. The photon sensitivity of the FXGs was measured in terms of NMR relaxation rates; its dependence on radiation dose was determined as a function of ferrous ammonium sulfate contents (from 0.5 mM to 5 mM). Furthermore, the stability of the NMR signal was monitored over several days after irradiation. These measurements were aided by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans which allowed three-dimensional (3D) dose mapping. In order to maximize the MRI response, a systematic study was performed to optimize acquisition sequences and parameters. In particular, we analyzed the dependence of MRI signal on the repetition time (TR) and on the inversion time (TI) using inversion recovery sequences. The results are reported and discussed from the point of view of the dosimeter use in clinical radiotherapy. This work highlights that the optimization of additive content inside gel matrix is fundamental for optimizing photon sensitivity of these detectors.

  19. Vitamin D Levels and Sociodemographic and Clinical Correlates in Individuals With Serious Mental Illness Admitted to an Acute Psychiatry Unit

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Purushottam B.; Turturro, Carolyn L.; Mittal, Dinesh; Messias, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in psychiatric inpatients with serious mental illness. Associated clinical and sociodemographic factors are also explored. Method Data were collected using a retrospective review of medical records. Eligible subjects were individuals aged ? 18 years who were consecutively newly admitted to an adult inpatient teaching unit of a state psychiatric hospital from July 2012 through August 2013. The main outcome measure was prevalence rate of vitamin D deficiency in the target population. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as a level < 20 ng/mL. Psychiatric diagnoses were established using DSM-IV-TR criteria. Results Of 85 subjects, approximately two-thirds (67%) had a vitamin D level < 20 ng/mL. The mean vitamin D level was 18.4 ng/mL. Among the sociodemographic and clinical factors analyzed, only total serum protein (odds ratio = 0.33; CI, 0.12–0.88; P < .05) was associated with vitamin D deficiency. Conclusions The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency with all the attendant physical and mental health burdens in vulnerable populations such as individuals with serious mental illness requires further large research studies. In the meantime, it seems prudent to institute routine screening for vitamin D deficiency in individuals with mental illness, especially those who are hospitalized. PMID:26445692

  20. The correlation of in vivo and ex vivo tissue dielectric properties to validate electromagnetic breast imaging: initial clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Halter, Ryan J; Zhou, Tian; Meaney, Paul M; Hartov, Alex; Barth, Richard J; Rosenkranz, Kari M; Wells, Wendy A; Kogel, Christine A; Borsic, Andrea; Rizzo, Elizabeth J; Paulsen, Keith D

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) breast imaging provides low-cost, safe and potentially a more specific modality for cancer detection than conventional imaging systems. A primary difficulty in validating these EM imaging modalities is that the true dielectric property values of the particular breast being imaged are not readily available on an individual subject basis. Here, we describe our initial experience in seeking to correlate tomographic EM imaging studies with discrete point spectroscopy measurements of the dielectric properties of breast tissue. The protocol we have developed involves measurement of in vivo tissue properties during partial and full mastectomy procedures in the operating room (OR) followed by ex vivo tissue property recordings in the same locations in the excised tissue specimens in the pathology laboratory immediately after resection. We have successfully applied all of the elements of this validation protocol in a series of six women with cancer diagnoses. Conductivity and permittivity gauged from ex vivo samples over the frequency range 100 Hz–8.5 GHz are found to be similar to those reported in the literature. A decrease in both conductivity and permittivity is observed when these properties are gauged from ex vivo samples instead of in vivo. We present these results in addition to a case study demonstrating how discrete point spectroscopy measurements of the tissue can be correlated and used to validate EM imaging studies. PMID:19491436

  1. Multimodality thoracic imaging of juvenile systemic sclerosis: emphasis on clinical correlation and high-resolution CT of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Valeur, Natalie S; Stevens, Anne M; Ferguson, Mark R; Effmann, Eric L; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. Juvenile systemic sclerosis is a rare multisystem autoimmune disorder characterized by vasculopathy and multiorgan fibrosis. Cardiopulmonary complications are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Although pulmonary fibrosis is the complication that is most common and well described, cardiovascular and esophageal involvement may also be observed. In this article, common thoracic findings in juvenile systemic sclerosis will be discussed. We will focus on chest CT, including CT findings of pulmonary fibrosis and associated grading methods, as well as cardiac MRI and esophageal imaging. CONCLUSION. Radiologists play a pivotal role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of pediatric patients with systemic sclerosis. Treatment decisions and prognostic assessment are directly related to imaging findings along with clinical evaluation. PMID:25615765

  2. Correlation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism 35-Kb Upstream of HLA-C and Clinical Profile of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Marwoto; Lismana, Umi Hani’ Vismayanti; Suradi; Reviono; Harsini

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The SNP HLA-C-35 kb (rs9264942) may contribute to the host immune defense mechanism by affecting the cell surface expression pattern of HLA-C and antigen presentation to CD8+ cytotoxic cells. Thus, this SNP may contribute to intracellular multidrug-resistant (MDR)-tuberculosis (TB) infection. Aim To examine the association between the SNP HLA-C-35 kb (rs9264942) and the clinical profile of MDR-TB infection. Settings and Design MDR-TB-positive patients were followed from May 2012 to December 2013 to observe the progression of MDR-TB infection. Non-TB individuals and non-MDR-TB individuals were also recruited as controls. Materials and Methods The patients’ HLA-C-35 kb (rs9264942) status was determined by PCR. Results The C allele was slightly more frequent in the MDR-TB patients than in the non-MDR TB patients (OR= 1.28; 95% CI: 0.701 – 2.328). The C allele was found to be more frequent in the MDR-TB patients exhibiting pulmonary fibrosis (OR= 2.13; 95% CI: 0.606 – 7.480) or pulmonary infiltrates (OR= 3.17; 95% CI: 0.690 – 14.598) and among the MDR-TB patients who were classified as underweight (OR= 8.00; 95% CI: 1.261 – 50.770). The CC genotype was associated with the treatment after failure of category II group (OR= 4.17; 95% CI: 1.301 – 13.346). Conclusion: The C allele SNP HLA-C-35 kb (rs9264942) may contribute to the clinical profile in MDR-TB infection. PMID:26500904

  3. Overweight and Obesity: Prevalence and Correlates in a Large Clinical Sample of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Katharine E.; Hill, Alison P.; Guion, Kimberly; Voltolina, Lisa; Fombonne, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) and childhood obesity (OBY) are rising public health concerns. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of overweight (OWT) and OBY in a sample of 376 Oregon children with ASD, and to assess correlates of OWT and OBY in this sample. We used descriptive statistics, bivariate, and focused multivariate analyses to determine whether socio-demographic characteristics, ASD symptoms, ASD cognitive and adaptive functioning, behavioral problems, and treatments for ASD were associated with OWT and OBY in ASD. Overall 18.1 % of children met criteria for OWT and 17.0 % met criteria for OBY. OBY was associated with sleep difficulties, melatonin use, and affective problems. Interventions that consider unique needs of children with ASD may hold promise for improving weight status among children with ASD. PMID:24488158

  4. Chia, David — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops Are there definable properties of non-malignant lesions that predict

  5. Schneider, Thomas — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Community Dialog US Workshops Questions from Workshops How can we harness new technologies to inhibit traditionally “undruggable”

  6. Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Receiving Radio-Chemotherapy: A Novel Clinical-Pathologic Score Correlates With Global Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Berardi, Rossana; Mantello, Giovanna; Scartozzi, Mario; Del Prete, Stefano; Luppi, Gabriele; Martinelli, Roberto; Fumagalli, Marco; Grillo-Ruggieri, Filippo; Bearzi, Italo; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Marmorale, Cristina; Cascinu, Stefano

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the importance of downstaging of locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant treatment. Methods and Materials: The study included all consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) in different Italian centers from June 1996 to December 2003. A novel score was used, calculated as the sum of numbers obtained by giving a negative or positive point, respectively, to each degree of increase or decrease in clinical to pathologic T and N status. Results: A total of 317 patients were eligible for analysis. Neoadjuvant treatments performed were as follows: radiotherapy alone in 75 of 317 patients (23.7%), radiotherapy plus chemotherapy in 242 of 317 patients (76.3%). Worse disease-free survival was observed in patients with a lower score (Score 1 = -3 to +3 vs. Score 2 = +4 to +7; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results suggest that a novel score, calculated from preoperative and pathologic tumor and lymph node status, could represent an important parameter to predict outcome in patients receiving neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. The score could be useful to select patients for adjuvant chemotherapy after neoadjuvant treatment and surgery.

  7. Correlations between Drug Resistance of Beijing/W Lineage Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Sublineages: A 2009–2013 Prospective Study in Xinjiang Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-hua; Ma, Ai-guo; Han, Xiu-xia; Gu, Xiao-ming; Fu, Li-ping; Li, Peng-gang; Li, Fen-yu; Wang, Qiu-zhen; Liang, Hui; Katar, Abudu; Wang, Li-jie

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Xinjiang is higher than in other regions of China, and Beijing/W lineage Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the dominant strain of MTB in Xinjiang. However, information on multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB, particularly the correlation between MDR and the Beijing/W lineage and the correlation between drug resistance and the Beijing/W sublineage strains, is limited. Material/Methods We conducted a prospective study to describe the prevalence of MDR/XDR TB, Beijing/W lineage and sublineage strains in Xinjiang in China from 2009 to 2013. All MTB underwent drug susceptibility testing to the first- and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. The Beijing/W lineages and sublineages were detected by large-sequence polymorphisms with polymerase chain reaction. Results A total of 410 clinical isolates were identified. The overall percentage of MDR and XDR cases in Xinjiang was 13.2% (54/410) and 13.0% (7/54), respectively. Overall, 9.8% (14/143) of the Beijing lineage MTB were MDR patients, and 15.6% (40/257) of the Non-Beijing lineage MTB were MDR patients. In the 143 Beijing MTB lineages, 11.2% isolates were in sublineage 105, 15.4% isolates were in sublineage 207, 69.2% isolates were in sublineage 181, and 4.2% isolates were in sublineage 150. None of the isolates were detected in sublineage 142. Significant differences between the Beijing/W and non-Beijing/W strains were observed regarding INH and EMB resistance, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of the MDR TB in Xinjiang remains high and imposes challenges for TB control. Four Beijing/W sublineage isolates were observed in Xinjiang. There was no correlation between MDR and the Beijing/W lineage and no correlation between drug resistance and the Beijing/W sublineage strains. Surveillance of the clinical isolates of MTB is recommended to strengthen the identification of MDR/XDR TB and sublineages of the Beijing/W strains. PMID:25950148

  8. Making Questions Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Dan; Santana, Luz; Minigan, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Getting students to ask questions can feel like pulling teeth. How can teachers transform that feeling and create classrooms that come alive with questions? The authors, developers of the question formulation technique, suggest two simple changes: First, teachers need to give students both a structure and the opportunity to practice generating…

  9. Listening and Questioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroutunian-Gordon, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    In the article that follows, I take up a debate that has arisen over the past three years concerning the following issue: Does every act of listening involve the listener in questioning? I argue that the answer to the questions is yes. I give background on the question and then consider one instance of listening that may suggest no role for…

  10. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Acceptable answers are provided for two chemistry questions. The first question is related to the prediction of the appearance of non-first-order proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The second question is related to extraterrestrial kinetic theory of gases. (JN)

  11. Improving Student Question Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Cecily; Zachary, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This paper analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the natural…

  12. Community Dialog — Provocative Questions

    Cancer.gov

    View all of the questions that have been submitted and see how they have been evaluated by peers. Submit your own evaluation of a submitted question, or leave a comment about a question (commenting requires log in or creation of your own PQ account).

  13. Questions for Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Nora Cate; Dykema, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We begin with a look back at the field to identify themes of recent research that we expect to continue to occupy researchers in the future. As part of this overview, we characterize the themes and topics examined in research about measurement and survey questions published in Public Opinion Quarterly in the past decade. We then characterize the field more broadly by highlighting topics that we expect to continue or to grow in importance, including the relationship between survey questions and the total survey error perspective, cognitive versus interactional approaches, interviewing practices, mode and technology, visual aspects of question design, and culture. Considering avenues for future research, we advocate for a decision-oriented framework for thinking about survey questions and their characteristics. The approach we propose distinguishes among various aspects of question characteristics, including question topic, question type and response dimension, conceptualization and operationalization of the target object, question structure, question form, response categories, question implementation, and question wording. Thinking about question characteristics more systematically would allow study designs to take into account relationships among these characteristics and identify gaps in current knowledge. PMID:24970951

  14. Correlation of clinical features and genetic profiles of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2015-12-01

    STIM1 overexpression has been observed in a portion of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and associated with cancer cell invasion and migration. To characterize the distinctive expression profiles associated with stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) overexpression/low-expression between CRC subtypes, and further assess the divergence transcription regulation impact of STIM1 between colon (COADs) and rectum (READs) adenocarcinomas in order to depict the role of SOCE pathway in CRCs, we have conducted a comprehensive phenome-transcriptome-interactome analysis to clarify underlying molecular differences of COADs/READs contributed by STIM1. Results demonstrated that a number of novel STIM1-associated signatures have been identified in COADs but not READs. Specifically, the presence of STIM1 overexpression in COADs, which represented a disturbance of the SOCE pathway, was associated with cell migration and cell motility properties. We identified 11 prognostic mRNA/miRNA predictors associated with the overall survival of COAD patients, suggesting the correlation of STIM1-associated features to clinicopathological outcomes. These findings enhance our understanding on differences between CRC subtypes in panoramic view, and suggested STIM1 as a promising therapeutic biomarker in COADs. PMID:26543234

  15. Questions about questions: new views on an old prejudice.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Paulo L R; Pinheiro, Ricardo T; Silva, Ricardo A

    2003-08-01

    The belief that good analysts do not ask, and do not answer, questions is a still-living strange recommendation, transmitted throughout psychoanalytic generations. The authors have extensively reviewed electronic databases and technical texts. They found that interrogative acts are largely omitted from technical considerations, generating a prejudice that does not consider questions as proper psychoanalytic tools, and they discuss possible foundations for this belief. The authors believe that the few authors that have touched on this issue have done so in a non-systematic and frequently incomplete form. Linguistic philosophy presents questions as speech acts: actions that are able to alter the equilibrium of dialogical discourses. This view permits psychoanalysts to understand the potentiality of questions to introduce psychic change because they can, simultaneously, interfere in the self, in the other and in the intersubjective relationship. An internal state of curiosity is described as a component of the mind of the analyst. Based on the argument of the ubiquity of the state of curiosity of the analyst, the authors carried out a set of technical propositions, regarding, on the one hand, when questions are not to be introduced (for instance, in the presence of free associations) and, on the other hand, when they would be useful as expanding factors of the preconscious-conscious system. Considering psychoanalyses as experiences of curiosity, they emphasize that both the internal state of curiosity of the analyst, and the eventual verbal questions put to the patient are potentially positive factors for psychic change. The authors present several clinical vignettes. PMID:13678493

  16. NOTE Thyroid volume measurement in external beam radiotherapy patients using CT imaging: correlation with clinical and anthropometric characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, C.; Garsi, J. P.; Rubino, C.; Pouzoulet, F.; Bidault, F.; Chavaudra, J.; Bridier, A.; Ricard, M.; Ferreira, I.; Lefkopoulos, D.; de Vathaire, F.; Diallo, I.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to define criteria for accurate representation of the thyroid in human models used to represent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) patients and evaluate the relationship between the volume of this organ and clinical and anthropometric characteristics. From CT images, we segmented the thyroid gland and calculated its volume for a population of 188 EBRT patients of both sexes, with ages ranging from 1 to 89 years. To evaluate uncertainties linked to measured volumes, experimental studies on the Livermore anthropomorphic phantom were performed. For our population of EBRT patients, we observed that in children, thyroid volume increased rapidly with age, from about 3 cm3 at 2 years to about 16 cm3 at 20. In adults, the mean thyroid gland volume was 23.5 ± 9 cm3 for males and 17.5 ± 8 cm3 for females. According to anthropometric parameters, the best fit for children was obtained by modeling the log of thyroid volume as a linear function of body surface area (BSA) (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.04) and for adults, as a linear function of BSA (p < 0.0001) and gender (p = 0.01). This work enabled us to demonstrate that BSA was the best indicator of thyroid volume for both males and females. These results should be taken into account when modeling the volume of the thyroid in human models used to represent EBRT patients for dosimetry in retrospective studies of the relationship between the estimated dose to the thyroid and long-term follow-up data on EBRT patients.

  17. Molecular interactions of plant oil components with stratum corneum lipids correlate with clinical measures of skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Mack Correa, Mary Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Saad, Peter; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-derived oils consisting of triglycerides and small amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) are commonly used in skincare regimens. FFAs are known to disrupt skin barrier function. The objective of this study was to mechanistically study the effects of FFAs, triglycerides and their mixtures on skin barrier function. The effects of oleic acid (OA), glyceryl trioleate (GT) and OA/GT mixtures on skin barrier were assessed in vivo through measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and fluorescein dye penetration before and after a single application. OA's effects on stratum corneum (SC) lipid order in vivo were measured with infrared spectroscopy through application of perdeuterated OA (OA-d34 ). Studies of the interaction of OA and GT with skin lipids included imaging the distribution of OA-d34 and GT ex vivo with IR microspectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis of mixtures in aqueous monolayers. The oil mixtures increased both TEWL and fluorescein penetration 24 h after a single application in an OA dose-dependent manner, with the highest increase from treatment with pure OA. OA-d34 penetrated into skin and disordered SC lipids. Furthermore, the ex vivo IR imaging studies showed that OA-d34 permeated to the dermal/epidermal junction while GT remained in the SC. The monolayer experiments showed preferential interspecies interactions between OA and SC lipids, while the mixing between GT and SC lipids was not thermodynamically preferred. The FFA component of plant oils may disrupt skin barrier function. The affinity between plant oil components and SC lipids likely determines the extent of their penetration and clinically measurable effects on skin barrier functions. PMID:24372651

  18. Molecular interactions of plant oil components with stratum corneum lipids correlate with clinical measures of skin barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Mack Correa, Mary Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Saad, Peter; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-derived oils consisting of triglycerides and small amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) are commonly used in skincare regimens. FFAs are known to disrupt skin barrier function. The objective of this study was to mechanistically study the effects of FFAs, triglycerides and their mixtures on skin barrier function. The effects of oleic acid (OA), glyceryl trioleate (GT) and OA/GT mixtures on skin barrier were assessed in vivo through measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and fluorescein dye penetration before and after a single application. OA's effects on stratum corneum (SC) lipid order in vivo were measured with infrared spectroscopy through application of perdeuterated OA (OA-d34). Studies of the interaction of OA and GT with skin lipids included imaging the distribution of OA-d34 and GT ex vivo with IR microspectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis of mixtures in aqueous monolayers. The oil mixtures increased both TEWL and fluorescein penetration 24 h after a single application in an OA dose-dependent manner, with the highest increase from treatment with pure OA. OA-d34 penetrated into skin and disordered SC lipids. Furthermore, the ex vivo IR imaging studies showed that OA-d34 permeated to the dermal/epidermal junction while GT remained in the SC. The monolayer experiments showed preferential interspecies interactions between OA and SC lipids, while the mixing between GT and SC lipids was not thermodynamically preferred. The FFA component of plant oils may disrupt skin barrier function. The affinity between plant oil components and SC lipids likely determines the extent of their penetration and clinically measurable effects on skin barrier functions. PMID:24372651

  19. Prevalence and clinical correlates of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy at Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Teklu, Sisay; Gaym, Asheber

    2006-01-01

    A one-year longitudinal study was conducted at Tikur Anbessa central referral Hospital to assess the prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), to see the socio-demographic and clinical parameters and pregnancy outcome of pregnancies afflicted by these complications. Out of 3424 deliveries conducted during the study period, 183 (5.3%) mothers were found to have one form of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, 85.2% were cases of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH),the majority (78.2%) were severe pre eclampsia and eclampsia; the remaining 14.8% had pregnancy aggravated hypertension (PAH) or chronic hypertension. Preterm delivery rate was 48.6% for all cases of HDP. Intervention rate was high with 44.3% induction of labor and 44.3% caesarian section, which is much higher than the over all intervention rate in the hospital's obstetric population during the studied period. Prenatal mortality rate (PNMR), case fatality rate (CFR) and intra uterine growth restriction (IUGR) were 300/1000 deliveries, 27/1000 deliveries and 41.6% respectively in mothers with HDP. Severe hypertension, high urine protein and high uric acid level were found to be associated with higher CFR, and poor prenatal outcome. The study provides base line data on HDP in a hospital obstetric population in Ethiopia. Important peculiar findings in this study were a very high rate of severe disease, PNMR and CFR compared to other institutional studies. There is a need to conduct nation wide multi center study on HDP in order to have national base line data on this important pregnancy complication. PMID:17447359

  20. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Kenneth B.; Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Soulos, Pamela R.; Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Herrin, Jeph; Health Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, Illinois ; Yu, James B.; Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Long, Jessica B.; Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Dostaler, Edward; and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy.