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1

A characterization of clinical questions asked by rehabilitation therapists*†  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study explored the information needs of rehabilitation therapists (occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists) working with patients who have had strokes in order to characterize their clinical questions, defined as their formalized information needs arising in the context of everyday clinical practice. Methods: The researchers took a constructivist, interpretive approach, in which fifteen rehabilitation therapists working in various settings were recruited. Data were gathered using diaries, followed by diary-guided interviews, and thematically analyzed using template analysis. Results: Rehabilitation therapists' clinical questions were characterized as having one or more of twelve foci and containing one or more of eight possible structural elements. Conclusions: Findings demonstrate that the evidence-based practice framework currently applied for questions relating to rehabilitation is inadequate for representing rehabilitation therapists' clinical questions. A new framework that is more comprehensive and descriptive is proposed. Implications: Librarians working with students and clinicians in rehabilitation can employ knowledge of the twelve foci and the question structure for rehabilitation to guide the reference interview. Instruction on question formulation in evidence-based practice can employ the revised structure for rehabilitation, offering students and clinicians an alternative to the traditional patient, intervention, comparison, outcome (PICO) structure. Information products, including bibliographic databases and synopsis services, can tailor their interfaces according to question foci and prompt users to enter search terms corresponding to any of the eight possible elements found in rehabilitation therapists' clinical questions. PMID:24860260

Kloda, Lorie Andrea; Bartlett, Joan C

2014-01-01

2

Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:25035125

Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

2015-01-01

3

Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice.  

PubMed

Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:25035125

Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

2015-01-01

4

Questions to Ask When Selecting an Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Clinic  

MedlinePLUS

... Questions to Ask When Selecting an Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Clinic These questions will help you learn ... a member of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART)? If not, what is the clinic’s affiliation ...

5

Therapeutic applications of extracellular vesicles: clinical promise and open questions.  

PubMed

This review provides an updated perspective on rapidly proliferating efforts to harness extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic applications. We summarize current knowledge, emerging strategies, and open questions pertaining to clinical potential and translation. Potentially useful EVs comprise diverse products of various cell types and species. EV components may also be combined with liposomes and nanoparticles to facilitate manufacturing as well as product safety and evaluation. Potential therapeutic cargoes include RNA, proteins, and drugs. Strategic issues considered herein include choice of therapeutic agent, means of loading cargoes into EVs, promotion of EV stability, tissue targeting, and functional delivery of cargo to recipient cells. Some applications may harness natural EV properties, such as immune modulation, regeneration promotion, and pathogen suppression. These properties can be enhanced or customized to enable a wide range of therapeutic applications, including vaccination, improvement of pregnancy outcome, and treatment of autoimmune disease, cancer, and tissue injury. PMID:25292428

György, Bence; Hung, Michelle E; Breakefield, Xandra O; Leonard, Joshua N

2015-01-01

6

Clinical questions raised by providers in the care of older adults: a prospective observational study  

PubMed Central

Objective To characterise clinical questions raised by providers in the care of complex older adults in order to guide the design of interventions that can help providers answer these questions. Materials and methods To elicit clinical questions, we observed and audio recorded outpatient visits at three healthcare organisations. At the end of each appointment, providers were asked to identify clinical questions raised in the visit. Providers rated their questions based on their urgency, importance to the patient's care and difficulty in finding a useful answer to. Transcripts of the audio recordings were analysed to identify ageing-specific factors that may have contributed to the nature of the questions. Results We observed 36 patient visits with 10 providers at the three study sites. Providers raised 70 clinical questions (median of 2 clinical questions per patient seen; range 0–12), pursued 50 (71%) and successfully answered 34 (68%) of the questions they pursued. Overall, 36 (51%) of providers’ questions were not answered. Over one-third of the questions were about treatment alternatives and adverse effects. All but two clinical questions were motivated either directly or indirectly by issues related to ageing, such as the normal physiological changes of ageing and diseases with higher prevalence in the elderly. Conclusions The frequency of clinical questions was higher than in previous studies conducted in general primary care patient populations. Clinical questions were predominantly influenced by ageing-related issues. We propose a series of recommendations that may be used to guide the design of solutions to help providers answer their clinical questions in the care of older adults. PMID:24996915

Del Fiol, Guilherme; Weber, Alice I; Brunker, Cherie P; Weir, Charlene R

2014-01-01

7

Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Clinical Questions  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE This article addresses questions that radiologists frequently ask when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting MRI perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23971482

Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David S.; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

2013-01-01

8

Dementia prevention: shared questions for research and clinical management.  

PubMed

The emergence of advanced genetic technologies raises many challenges for dementia care and the conduct of related social, behavioural and clinical research. Genetic tests are already used to identify possible participants in dementia prevention trials. These tests are unlike any other in clinical medicine as they have the capacity to predict disease onset after intervals of many years with implications for other family members. Genetic counselling professionals support services in paediatrics, cancer diagnosis and some adult-onset diseases. Their capacity cannot meet the needs for pre- and post-test support of the many "at-risk" families living with late onset dementia. Most dementias are common, complex conditions in which multiple genetic and environmental factors play important and potentially modifiable roles. Large scale prevention studies are needed to test the effectiveness of interventions. Some economy of effort will be achieved by the preferential inclusion of "at-risk" families. Many such families are in contact with dementia care services and will be motivated to participate in prevention studies. However, practice standards and consensus-based guidelines do not yet exist. Support services are not available on a scale sufficient to prevent harm when risk is poorly communicated causing unnecessary psychological morbidity in unaffected family members. There is a pressing need for research to inform the development of study guidelines and to identify how services are strengthened to support these families during and after their participation in trials. Discourse analysis provides a useful method to collect and analyse data of this type and supports the conclusions of this review. PMID:24378185

Robertson, Maggie; Brown, Eleanor; Whalley, Lawrence

2014-02-01

9

Who Benefits from Peer Conversation? Examining Correlations of Clicker Question Correctness and Course Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We implemented peer instruction in an introductory level conceptual physics course for nonscience majors on the basis of the success others reported with this method. We expected to see that learning from peer conversation, as evidenced by answering conceptual questions correctly following discussion, would correlate with course grade, but we did…

Morgan, Jeffrey T.; Wakefield, Cynthia

2012-01-01

10

Clinical Considerations of Biological Correlates of Suicide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews possible biochemical markers for suicide risk but notes that none has clear application for clinical work in suicide prevention. Comments on other biological aspects of suicide including genetics, plasma drug levels, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and psychoimmunology. Encourages ECT use. Cautions against hasty clinical use of other…

Motto, Jerome A.

1986-01-01

11

Should essays and other ¿open-ended¿-type questions retain a place in written summative assessment in clinical medicine?  

PubMed

BackgroundWritten assessments fall into two classes: constructed-response or open-ended questions, such as the essay and number of variants of the short-answer question, and selected-response or closed-ended questions; typically in the form of multiple-choice. It is widely believed that constructed response written questions test higher order cognitive processes in a manner that multiple-choice questions cannot, and consequently have higher validity.DiscussionAn extensive review of the literature suggests that in summative assessment neither premise is evidence-based. Well-structured open-ended and multiple-choice questions appear equivalent in their ability to assess higher cognitive functions, and performance in multiple-choice assessments may correlate more highly than the open-ended format with competence demonstrated in clinical practice following graduation. Studies of construct validity suggest that both formats measure essentially the same dimension, at least in mathematics, the physical sciences, biology and medicine. The persistence of the open-ended format in summative assessment may be due to the intuitive appeal of the belief that synthesising an answer to an open-ended question must be both more cognitively taxing and similar to actual experience than is selecting a correct response. I suggest that cognitive-constructivist learning theory would predict that a well-constructed context-rich multiple-choice item represents a complex problem-solving exercise which activates a sequence of cognitive processes which closely parallel those required in clinical practice, hence explaining the high validity of the multiple-choice format.SummaryThe evidence does not support the proposition that the open-ended assessment format is superior to the multiple-choice format, at least in exit-level summative assessment, in terms of either its ability to test higher-order cognitive functioning or its validity. This is explicable using a theory of mental models to the quality of learning, which might predict that the multiple-choice format might have higher validity, a statement for which some empiric support exists. Given the superior reliability and cost-effectiveness of the multiple-choice format consideration should be given to phasing out open-ended format questions in summative assessment. Whether the same applies to non-exit-level assessment and formative assessment is a question which remains to be answered; particularly in terms of the educational effect of testing, an area which deserves intensive study. PMID:25431359

Hift, Richard J

2014-11-28

12

Endotoxemia: methods of detection and clinical correlates.  

PubMed Central

As an assay for endotoxin, the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay has several desirable properties: sensitivity, specificity, and potential for adaptation to a quantitative format. Several modifications have been developed to enhance its potential for clinical application. The modifications that allow quantitative measurement of endotoxin and also improve its application to blood samples are described in this review. In fluids other than blood, the detection of endotoxin with the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay can be used as an aid to identify the presence of gram-negative bacteria, and the assay has established utility. With blood, however, there are a range of factors that interfere with the detection of endotoxemia and there are disparate views with respect to the diagnostic and prognostic significance of the test results. In general, the clinical significance of the finding of endotoxemia broadly parallels the frequency and importance of gram-negative sepsis in the patient groups studied and a decline in endotoxin levels accompanies clinical improvement. However, with therapies designed to reduce levels of endotoxin, or to antagonize its effects, it is unclear whether clinical improvement occurs as a consequence of changes in the levels of endotoxemia. PMID:7621402

Hurley, J C

1995-01-01

13

Gene expression correlates of clinical prostate cancer behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prostate tumors are among the most heterogeneous of cancers, both histologically and clinically. Microarray expression analysis was used to determine whether global biological differences underlie common pathological features of prostate cancer and to identify genes that might anticipate the clinical behavior of this disease. While no expression correlates of age, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA), and measures of local invasion

Dinesh Singh; Phillip G. Febbo; Kenneth Ross; Donald G. Jackson; Judith Manola; Christine Ladd; Pablo Tamayo; Andrew A. Renshaw; Anthony V. D'Amico; Jerome P. Richie; Eric S. Lander; Massimo Loda; Philip W. Kantoff; Todd R. Golub; William R. Sellers

2002-01-01

14

Hemoglobin variants: biochemical properties and clinical correlates.  

PubMed

Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples. PMID:23388674

Thom, Christopher S; Dickson, Claire F; Gell, David A; Weiss, Mitchell J

2013-03-01

15

Do Online Information Retrieval Systems Help Experienced Clinicians Answer Clinical Questions?  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess the impact of clinicians' use of an online information retrieval system on their performance in answering clinical questions. Design: Pre-/post-intervention experimental design. Measurements: In a computer laboratory, 75 clinicians (26 hospital-based doctors, 18 family practitioners, and 31 clinical nurse consultants) provided 600 answers to eight clinical scenarios before and after the use of an online information retrieval system. We examined the proportion of correct answers pre- and post-intervention, direction of change in answers, and differences between professional groups. Results: System use resulted in a 21% improvement in clinicians' answers, from 29% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.4–32.6) correct pre- to 50% (95% CI 46.0–54.0) post-system use. In 33% (95% CI 29.1–36.9) answers were changed from incorrect to correct. In 21% (95% CI 17.1–23.9) correct pre-test answers were supported by evidence found using the system, and in 7% (95% CI 4.9–9.1) correct pre-test answers were changed incorrectly. For 40% (35.4–43.6) of scenarios, incorrect pre-test answers were not rectified following system use. Despite significant differences in professional groups' pre-test scores [family practitioners: 41% (95% CI 33.0–49.0), hospital doctors: 35% (95% CI 28.5–41.2), and clinical nurse consultants: 17% (95% CI 12.3–21.7; ?2 = 29.0, df = 2, p < 0.01)], there was no difference in post-test scores. (?2 = 2.6, df = 2, p = 0.73). Conclusions: The use of an online information retrieval system was associated with a significant improvement in the quality of answers provided by clinicians to typical clinical problems. In a small proportion of cases, use of the system produced errors. While there was variation in the performance of clinical groups when answering questions unaided, performance did not differ significantly following system use. Online information retrieval systems can be an effective tool in improving the accuracy of clinicians' answers to clinical questions. PMID:15684126

Westbrook, Johanna I.; Coiera, Enrico W.; Gosling, A. Sophie

2005-01-01

16

A perfect childhood? Clinical correlates of minimization and denial on the childhood trauma questionnaire.  

PubMed

Childhood trauma has pervasive and enduring effects on myriad health outcomes, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is a widely used screening tool. To assess recall and reporting biases, the CTQ includes a Minimization/Denial (MD) Scale, although this scale is typically omitted or not reported on. As this practice is not supported by empirical data, we sought to examine the clinical correlates of the CTQ MD Scale, as well as its function as a response bias index (i.e., its moderation effects). We examined correlations between the MD Scale and attachment style, temperament, personality, depression, and clinical diagnoses in a group of 200 adult psychiatric outpatients. Regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of MD on the relationships between the CTQ and clinical variables. Twenty percent of our sample met MD criteria. When patients were grouped as MD-positive versus MD-negative, significant between-group differences were found on several clinical measures. MD status, however, did not significantly moderate the relationships between the CTQ and clinical variables. This is one of the first clinically focused examinations of the CTQ's MD Scale. Although the MD Scale was associated with several clinical variables, it did not significantly moderate the relationship between the CTQ and clinical variables. These findings, therefore, call into question the value of the MD Scale as a response bias index, although they should be replicated in larger studies before the currently ubiquitous practice of ignoring it can be considered evidence-based. PMID:24981003

MacDonald, Kai; Thomas, Michael L; MacDonald, Tina M; Sciolla, Andres F

2015-03-01

17

Correlation of clinical and molecular features in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To characterize the clinical and genetic features of spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the first exon of the androgen receptor gene, in the United Kingdom. Methods: We created a national register for SBMA in the United Kingdom and recruited 61 patients between 2005 and 2013. In our cross-sectional study, we assessed, by direct questioning, impairment of activities of daily living (ADL) milestones, functional rating, and subjective disease impact, and performed correlations with both CAG repeat size and degree of somatic mosaicism. Ten patients were deceased, 46 patients participated in the study, and 5 declined. Results: Subjects had an average age at onset of 43.4 years, and weakness onset most frequently occurred in the lower limbs (87%). Impaired mobility was the most frequently reported problem by patients, followed by bulbar dysfunction. Age distribution of the impairment of ADL milestones showed remarkable overlap with a Japanese study. We have identified a significant correlation between the number of CAG repeats and both age at onset and ADL milestones. Somatic mosaicism also showed a correlation with CAG expansion size and age at onset. Conclusions: Clinical features in SBMA show a substantial overlap when comparing populations with different genetic backgrounds. This finding has major implications, because multicenter trials will be necessary to obtain sufficient power in future clinical trials. Clinical-genetic correlations are strong in SBMA and should inform any clinical research strategy in this condition. PMID:24814851

Nirmalananthan, Niranjanan; Masset, Luc; Skorupinska, Iwona; Collins, Toby; Cortese, Andrea; Pemble, Sally; Malaspina, Andrea; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Greensmith, Linda; Hanna, Michael G.

2014-01-01

18

Suicidality in eating disorders: Occurrence, correlates, and clinical implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review summarizes the published studies on suicide and suicide attempts in individuals with eating disorders, highlighting rates of occurrence, clinical correlates, and implications for practitioners. Multiple studies find high rates of suicide in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) [Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) for suicide range from 1.0 to 5.3], whereas suicide rates do not appear to be elevated in

Debra L. Franko; Pamela K. Keel

2006-01-01

19

How Do Students with Dyslexia Perform in Extended Matching Questions, Short Answer Questions and Observed Structured Clinical Examinations?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are an increasing number of students with learning difficulties attending university, and currently much debate about the suitability and ability of students with dyslexia at both medical school and once they graduate into clinical practice. In this study we describe the performance of students with dyslexia compared to fellow students in…

Gibson, Sandra; Leinster, Samuel

2011-01-01

20

Gray matter abnormalities in paranoid schizophrenia and their clinical correlations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous imaging studies have shown structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia. Recently, voxel-based morphometry enabled whole brain analysis beyond the regions of interest (ROI). Regional gray matter concentrations of magnetic resonance (MR) images from 35 patients with paranoid schizophrenia were compared with those from 35 age- and sex-matched controls, and their clinical correlations were explored using voxel-based morphometry. Gray matter concentrations

Tae Hyon Ha; Tak Youn; Kyoo Seob Ha; Kyu Sik Rho; Jong Min Lee; In Young Kim; Sun I. Kim; Jun Soo Kwon

2004-01-01

21

Clinical and biochemical correlates of starting “daily” hemodialysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical and biochemical correlates of starting “daily” hemodialysis.BackgroundDaily hemodialysis has been proposed to improve outcomes for patients with end-stage renal disease. There has been increasing evidence that daily hemodialysis might have potential advantages over intermittent dialysis. However, despite these potential advantages, daily hemodialysis is infrequently used in the United States, and published accounts on the technique are few.MethodsWe describe patient

John D. Woods; Friedrich K. Port; Sean Orzol; Umberto Buoncristiani; Eric Young; Robert A. Wolfe; Philip J. Held

1999-01-01

22

Sensitivity and Predictive Value of 15 PubMed Search Strategies to Answer Clinical Questions Rated Against Full Systematic Reviews  

PubMed Central

Background Clinicians perform searches in PubMed daily, but retrieving relevant studies is challenging due to the rapid expansion of medical knowledge. Little is known about the performance of search strategies when they are applied to answer specific clinical questions. Objective To compare the performance of 15 PubMed search strategies in retrieving relevant clinical trials on therapeutic interventions. Methods We used Cochrane systematic reviews to identify relevant trials for 30 clinical questions. Search terms were extracted from the abstract using a predefined procedure based on the population, interventions, comparison, outcomes (PICO) framework and combined into queries. We tested 15 search strategies that varied in their query (PIC or PICO), use of PubMed’s Clinical Queries therapeutic filters (broad or narrow), search limits, and PubMed links to related articles. We assessed sensitivity (recall) and positive predictive value (precision) of each strategy on the first 2 PubMed pages (40 articles) and on the complete search output. Results The performance of the search strategies varied widely according to the clinical question. Unfiltered searches and those using the broad filter of Clinical Queries produced large outputs and retrieved few relevant articles within the first 2 pages, resulting in a median sensitivity of only 10%–25%. In contrast, all searches using the narrow filter performed significantly better, with a median sensitivity of about 50% (all P < .001 compared with unfiltered queries) and positive predictive values of 20%–30% (P < .001 compared with unfiltered queries). This benefit was consistent for most clinical questions. Searches based on related articles retrieved about a third of the relevant studies. Conclusions The Clinical Queries narrow filter, along with well-formulated queries based on the PICO framework, provided the greatest aid in retrieving relevant clinical trials within the 2 first PubMed pages. These results can help clinicians apply effective strategies to answer their questions at the point of care. PMID:22693047

Merglen, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Delphine S; Combescure, Christophe; Garin, Nicolas; Perrier, Arnaud; Perneger, Thomas V

2012-01-01

23

Abdominal Wall Endometrioma: Ultrasonographic Features and Correlation with Clinical Findings  

PubMed Central

Background: The diagnosis of abdominal wall endometrioma (AWE) is often confused with other surgical conditions. Certain factors relating to knowledge of the clinical history of the disease make correct diagnosis and treatment difficult. Aims: To present the clinical findings and ultrasonographic (US) features of AWE with special emphasis on size-related features. Study Design: This study reviewed abdominal wall endometriomas during a 2-year period in the Radiology Department of Sifa University Hospital, Izmir. Methods: Eleven women (mean age 32.6 years) with 12 scar endometriomas (mean diameter 29.2 mm) were consecutively evaluated by US and Colour Doppler examination (CDUS) prior to surgery. Lesions were grouped into large (?3 cm) and small nodules. Vascularisation was classified as location (central, peripheral and mixed) and severity (absent, moderately vascular and hypervascular). In each patient, the nature of pain (absent, cyclic: associated with menstruation and continuous), historical and clinical data were documented. Four patients underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging and their findings were presented. Fisher’s exact test, ?2 test for categorical data and the unpaired T-test for continuous variables were used for statistical analysis. Results: In all the women, US of the AWE showed the presence of a solid hypoechoic mass (less echogenic than the surrounding hyperechoic fat) within the abdominal wall. There was a significant correlation between AWE sizes with repeated caesareans and the mean time between the last operation and admission to hospital (p<0.05). Large endometriomas showed increased central vascularity (p<0.05). Cyclic pain was more frequent in small lesions, whereas continuous pain was more commonly found in patients with larger lesions (p<0.05). Conclusion: AWE is often misdiagnosed clinically because endometriosis may occur years after the caesarean section, the pain is often non-cyclic in nature, and there is not always a palpable tender mass. The sonographic and Doppler findings, along with proper correlation with clinical data, may substantially contribute to the correct diagnosis of endometrioma. PMID:25207093

Solak, Aynur; Genç, Berhan; Yalaz, Seyhan; ?ahin, Neslin; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Solak, ?lhami

2013-01-01

24

Distinctive Clinical Correlates of Psychotic Major Depression: The CRESCEND Study  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this investigation was to identify distinctive clinical correlates of psychotic major depression (PMD) as compared with non-psychotic major depression (NPMD) in a large cohort of Korean patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods We recruited 966 MDD patients of age over 18 years from the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea (CRESCEND) study. Diagnoses of PMD (n=24) and NPMD (n=942) were made with the DSM-IV definitions and confirmed with SCID. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (HAMD), anxiety (HAMA), global severity (CGI-S), suicidal ideation (SSI-Beck), functioning (SOFAS), and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF). Using independent t-tests and ?2 tests, we compared clinical characteristics of patients with PMD and NPMD. A binary logistic regression model was constructed to identify factors independently associated with increased likelihood of PMD. Results PMD subjects were characterized by a higher rate of inpatient enrollment, and higher scores on many items on BPRS (somatic concern, anxiety, emotional withdrawal, guilt feelings, tension, depression, suspiciousness, hallucination, motor retardation, blunted affect and excitement) global severity (CGI-s), and suicidal ideation (SSI-Beck). The explanatory factor model revealed that high levels of tension, excitement, and suicidal ideation were associated with increased likelihood of PMD. Conclusion Our findings partly support the view that PMD has its own distinctive clinical manifestation and course, and may be considered a diagnostic entity separate from NPMD. PMID:25110501

Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Hwa-Young; Sakong, Jeong-Kyu; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo

2014-01-01

25

Prodromal Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Clinical, Neuropsychological and Radiological Correlation  

PubMed Central

We present longitudinal clinical, cognitive and neuroimaging data from a 63-year-old woman who enrolled in research as a normal control and evolved posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) over five year follow-up. At baseline she reported only subtle difficulty driving and performed normally on cognitive tests, but already demonstrated atrophy in left visual association cortex. With follow-up she developed insidiously progressive visuospatial and visuoperceptual deficits, correlating with progressive atrophy in bilateral visual areas. Amyloid PET was positive. This case tracks the evolution of PCA from the prodromal stage, and illustrates challenges to early diagnosis as well as the utility of imaging biomarkers. PMID:24308559

Chan, Lung Tat Andrew; Lynch, Whitney; De May, Mary; Horton, Jonathan C.; Miller, Bruce L.

2015-01-01

26

Correlation of Clinical Trachoma and Infection in Aboriginal Communities  

PubMed Central

Background Trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness due to conjunctival infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. The presence of active trachoma and evidence of infection are poorly correlated and a strong immunologically-mediated inflammatory response means that clinical signs last much longer than infection. This population-based study in five Aboriginal communities endemic for trachoma in northern Australia compared a fine grading of clinical trachoma with diagnostic positivity and organism load. Methods A consensus fine grading of trachoma, based on clinical assessment and photograding, was compared to PCR, a lipopolysacharide (LPS)-based point-of-care (POC) and a 16S RNA-based nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT). Organism load was measured in PCR positive samples. Results A total of 1282 residents, or 85.2% of the study population, was examined. Taking the findings of both eyes, the prevalence of trachomatous inflammation-follicular (TF) in children aged 1–9 years was 25.1% (96/383) of whom 13 (13.7%) were PCR positive on the left eye. When clinical data were limited to the left eye as this was tested for PCR, the prevalence of TF decreased to 21.4% (82/383). The 301 TF negative children, 13 (4.3%) were PCR positive. The fine grading of active trachoma strongly correlated with organism load and disease severity (rs?=?0.498, P?=?0.0004). Overall, 53% of clinical activity (TF1 or TF2) and 59% of PCR positivity was found in those with disease scores less than the WHO simplified grade of TF. Conclusion Detailed studies of the pathogenesis, distribution and natural history of trachoma should use finer grading schemes for the more precise identification of clinical status. In low prevalence areas, the LPS-based POC test lacks the sensitivity to detect active ocular infection and nucleic acid amplification tests such as PCR or the 16S-RNA based NAAT performed better. Trachoma in the Aboriginal communities requires specific control measures. PMID:21423648

Michel, Claude-Edouard C.; Roper, Katrina G.; Divena, Magda A.; Lee, Helen H.; Taylor, Hugh R.

2011-01-01

27

Clinical correlations of microstructural changes in progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed

In patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), previous reports have shown a severe white matter (WM) damage involving supra and infratentorial regions including cerebellum. In the present study, we investigated potential correlations between WM integrity loss and clinical-cognitive features of patients with PSP. By using magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging with tract based spatial statistic analysis, we analyzed WM volume in 18 patients with PSP and 18 healthy controls (HCs). All patients and HCs underwent a detailed clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. Relative to HCs, patients with PSP showed WM changes encompassing supra and infratentorial areas such as corpus callosum, fornix, midbrain, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, superior cerebellar peduncle, superior longitudinal fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, cingulate gyrus, and cortico-spinal tract bilaterally. Among different correlations between motor-cognitive features and WM structural abnormalities, we detected a significant association between fronto-cerebellar WM loss and executive cognitive impairment in patients with PSP. Our findings, therefore, corroborate the hypothesis that cognitive impairment in PSP may result from both "intrinsic" and "extrinsic" frontal lobe dysfunction, likely related to cerebellar disconnection. PMID:24786632

Tessitore, Alessandro; Giordano, Alfonso; Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Corbo, Daniele; De Micco, Rosa; Russo, Antonio; Liguori, Sara; Cirillo, Mario; Esposito, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

2014-10-01

28

Coordinated Surgical Immune Signatures Contain Correlates of Clinical Recovery  

PubMed Central

Delayed recovery from surgery causes personal suffering and substantial societal and economic costs. Whether immune mechanisms determine recovery after surgical trauma remains ill-defined. Single-cell mass cytometry was applied to serial whole blood samples from 32 patients undergoing hip replacement to comprehensively characterize the phenotypical and functional immune response to surgical trauma. The simultaneous analysis of 14,000 phosphorylation events in precisely phenotyped immune cell subsets revealed uniform signaling responses among patients, demarcating a surgical immune signature. When regressed against clinical parameters of surgical recovery, including functional impairment and pain, strong correlations were found with STAT3, CREB and NF-kB signaling responses in subsets of CD14+ monocytes (R=0.7–0.8, FDR < 0.01). These sentinel results demonstrate the capacity of mass cytometry to survey the human immune system in a relevant clinical context. The mechanistically derived immune correlates point to diagnostic signatures, and potential therapeutic targets, that could postoperatively improve patient recovery. PMID:25253674

Gaudilliere, Brice; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K; Bruggner, Robert V; Nicolau, Monica; Finck, Rachel; Tingle, Martha; Silva, Julian; Ganio, Edward A; Yeh, Christine G; Maloney, William J; Huddleston, James I; Goodman, Stuart B; Davis, Mark M; Bendall, Sean C; Fantl, Wendy J; Angst, Martin S; Nolan, Garry P

2015-01-01

29

American tegumentary leishmaniasis: correlations among immunological, histopathological and clinical parameters*  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND American tegumentary leishmaniasis has an annual incidence of 1 to 1.5 million cases. In some cases, the patient's immune response can eliminate the parasite, and the lesion spontaneously resolves. However, when this does not occur, patients develop the disseminated form of the disease. OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between clinical, laboratory and pathological findings in cases of American tegumentary leishmaniasis. METHODS A retrospective study of the medical records of 47 patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis. Clinical, laboratory and epidemiological data were collected, and semi-quantitative histopathological analyses were performed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (p <0.05). RESULTS Mean patient age was 40.5 years. A total of 29.7% individuals were female and 70.2% were male, and 40.4% of the patients were farmers. The ulcerative form was found in 53.2% of patients, of whom 59.6% had lesions in the limbs. The average time to diagnosis was 22.3 months. The following positive correlations were significant: age and duration of the disease, Montenegro reaction, degree of granulomatous transformation and epithelioid cell count; duration of disease, Montenegro reaction and number of lymphocytes; epithelial hyperplasia and edema, hemorrhaging, and epithelial aggression; number of plasmocytes and number of parasites. The main negative correlations found were as follows: age and serology; time and parasite load; epithelial hyperplasia and degree of granulomatous transformation. CONCLUSION The long duration of the disease could be explained by the fact that lesions were relatively asymptomatic, and therefore ignored by patients with low literacy levels. Individuals may have simply waited for spontaneous healing, which proved to be dependent on the activation of hypersensitivity mechanisms. PMID:24626648

Martins, Ana Luiza Grizzo Peres; Barreto, Jaison Antonio; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Martins, Ana Claudia Grizzo Peres

2014-01-01

30

Clinical correlates of depressive symptoms in familial Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Depression is one of the most common nonmotor complications of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has a major impact on quality of life. Although several clinical factors have been associated with depression in PD, the relationship between depression and stage of illness as well as between depression and degree of disability remains controversial. We have collected clinical data on 1,378 PD cases from 632 families, using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) Parts II (activities of daily living) & III (motor), the Mini-Mental State Exam, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and the Blessed Functional Activity Scale (Blessed). Analyses were performed using the 840 individuals with verified PD and without evidence of cognitive decline. Logistic regression was used to identify study variables that individually and collectively best predicted the presence of depressive symptoms (GDS >or= 10). After correcting for multiple tests, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with Hoehn and Yahr stage and other clinical measures but not with any genetic variant (parkin, LRRK2, APOE). The Blessed score, education, presence of a first degree relative with signs of depression, and UPDRS Part II were found to best predict depressive symptomatology (R(2) = 0.33; P = 4 x 10(-48)). Contrary to several reports, the results from this large study indicate that stage of illness, motor impairment, and functional disability are strongly correlated with depressive symptoms. PMID:18785635

Pankratz, Nathan; Marder, Karen S; Halter, Cheryl A; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Cliff W; Nichols, William C; Foroud, Tatiana

2008-11-15

31

Clinical and multimodal biomarker correlates of ADNI neuropathological findings  

PubMed Central

Background Autopsy series commonly report a high percentage of coincident pathologies in demented patients, including patients with a clinical diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). However many clinical and biomarker studies report cases with a single neurodegenerative disease. We examined multimodal biomarker correlates of the consecutive series of the first 22 Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative autopsies. Clinical data, neuropsychological measures, cerebrospinal fluid A?, total and phosphorylated tau and ?-synuclein and MRI and FDG-PET scans. Results Clinical diagnosis was either probable DAT or Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-type mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at last evaluation prior to death. All patients had a pathological diagnosis of AD, but only four had pure AD. A coincident pathological diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), medial temporal lobe pathology (TDP-43 proteinopathy, argyrophilic grain disease and hippocampal sclerosis), referred to collectively here as MTL, and vascular pathology were present in 45.5%, 40.0% and 22.7% of these patients, respectively. Hallucinations were a strong predictor of coincident DLB (100% specificity) and a more severe dysexecutive profile was also a useful predictor of coincident DLB (80.0% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity). Occipital FDG-PET hypometabolism accurately classified coincident DLB (80% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Subjects with coincident MTL showed lower hippocampal volume. Conclusions Biomarkers can be used to independently predict coincident AD and DLB pathology, a common finding in amnestic MCI and DAT patients. Cohorts with comprehensive neuropathological assessments and multimodal biomarkers are needed to characterize independent predictors for the different neuropathological substrates of cognitive impairment. PMID:24252435

2013-01-01

32

Analysis of short-answer question styles versus gender in pre-clinical veterinary education.  

PubMed

One large study in medical education has reported that the choice of question format (or question content) could introduce a gender bias, with men outperforming women on questions with a true-false component or that required knowledge of anatomy or physiology. The purpose of our study was to ascertain whether this finding is also true in veterinary medical education. Two veterinary student cohorts were analyzed across four different modules over a three-year period (804 questions in total). The results of the study show that the women's and men's performance did not differ in any of the question types analyzed across any module or year. When students' (both women and men) overall average performance on different question types was compared with their performance on standard multiple-choice questions (MCQs), performance levels increased when students were asked to answer MCQs that contained an image-based prop (IMCQ) such as a photograph, X-ray image, or diagram. In contrast, students' performance was consistently lower when answering assertion-reason questions (ARQs), and this performance could not be explained by the demographic makeup of the two cohorts analyzed. When comparing standard MCQs with MCQs that contained a true-false question stem, no specific trend in the data could be determined. In conclusion, this study suggests that the short-answer question style does not bias against one gender in veterinary medical education, but that overall students do perform differently according to question type and, in particular, less well when ARQs are used in examinations. PMID:21805937

Foster, Neil

2011-01-01

33

Clinical Correlates of Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use in Pregnancy.  

PubMed

A 2012 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists highlights the considerable increase in opioid addiction in recent years, yet little is known about clinical correlates of prescribed opioids among pregnant women. This study examines clinical and demographic factors associated with the use of opioid analgesics in pregnancy. Data were derived from a prospective cohort study of pregnant women. Participants were administered the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to identify depressive and anxiety disorders and data on medication use were gathered at three assessment points and classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code (ATC) classification system ATC group N02A. Participants included 2,748 English or Spanish speaking pregnant women. Six percent (n = 165) of women used opioid analgesics at any point in pregnancy. More pregnant women using opioids met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (16 vs. 8 % for non users), generalized anxiety disorder (18 vs. 9 % for non users), post-traumatic stress disorder (11 vs. 4 % for non users) and panic disorder (6 vs. 4 % for non users). Women who reported opioid use were also significantly more likely than non users to report using illicit drugs and almost three times as likely to report smoking cigarettes in the second or third trimester of pregnancy (4 and 23 %, respectively) as compared to non-opioid users (0.5 and 8 %). The use of opioids in pregnancy was associated with higher levels of psychiatric comorbidity and use of other substances as compared to non-opioid users. PMID:24951127

Smith, Megan V; Costello, Darce; Yonkers, Kimberly A

2014-06-21

34

Ethics of Mandatory Research Biopsy for Correlative End Points Within Clinical Trials in Oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical investigators in oncology are increasingly interested in using molecular analysis of cancer tissue to understand the biologic bases of response or resistance to novel interventions and to develop prognostic and predictive biomarkers that will guide clinical decision making. Some scientific questions of this nature can only be addressed, or may best be addressed, through the conduct of a clinical

Jeffrey Peppercorn; Iuliana Shapira; Deborah Collyar; Teresa Deshields; Nancy Lin; Ian Krop; Hans Grunwald; Paula Friedman; Ann H. Partridge; Richard L. Schilsky; Monica M. Bertagnolli

2010-01-01

35

Hemimegalencephaly: Clinical, EEG, neuroimaging, and IMP-SPECT correlation  

SciTech Connect

Iofetamine-single photon emission computed tomography (IMP-SPECT) was performed on 2 girls (5 1/2 and 6 years of age) with histories of intractable seizures, developmental delay, and unilateral hemiparesis secondary to hemimegalencephaly. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed frequent focal discharges in 1 patient, while a nearly continuous burst suppression pattern over the malformed hemisphere was recorded in the other. IMP-SPECT demonstrated a good correlation with neuroimaging studies. In spite of the different EEG patterns, which had been proposed to predict contrasting clinical outcomes, both IMP-SPECT scans disclosed a similar decrease in tracer uptake in the malformed hemisphere. These results are consistent with the pattern of decreased tracer uptake found in other interictal studies of focal seizures without cerebral malformations. In view of recent recommendations for hemispherectomy in these patients, we suggest that the IMP-SPECT scan be used to compliment EEG as a method to define the extent of abnormality which may be more relevant to long-term prognosis than EEG alone.

Konkol, R.J.; Maister, B.H.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA))

1990-11-01

36

question_1303305591 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This is an outstanding and intellectually-stimulating question which introduces a new way to translate more effectively metastasis research to the clinic. It is certainly worth exploring and badly needed. because, if positive, drugs could be immediately useful to help defined populations of patients. Per points, we agree that these are limited metastasis groups; however, results could at minimum justify moving forward to full adjuvant trials. Worthy cause given the "bottleneck" we experience nowadays since drugs are mostly not tested in metastasis prevention.

37

Circulating and Disseminated Tumor Cells in the Clinical Management of Breast Cancer Patients: Unanswered Questions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Although survival rates have improved with the use of new therapeutic agents, many issues remain unresolved and new predictive and prognostic factors are needed in clinical practice. Several studies have suggested a prognostic and predictive role for circulating and disseminated tumor cells in metastatic disease and adjuvant treatment. Because of recent

A. Amadori; E. Rossi; R. Zamarchi; P. Carli; D. Pastorelli; A. Jirillo

2009-01-01

38

A Widely Used In Vitro Biofilm Assay Has Questionable Clinical Significance for Enterococcal Endocarditis  

PubMed Central

Biofilm formation may play an important role in the pathogenesis of infections caused by Enterococcus faecalis, including endocarditis. Most biofilm studies use a polystyrene dish assay to quantify biofilm biomass. However, recent studies of E. faecalis strains in tissue and animal models suggest that polystyrene dish results need to be interpreted with caution. We evaluated 158 clinical E. faecalis isolates using a polystyrene dish assay and found variation in biofilm formation, with many isolates forming little biofilm even when different types of media were used. However, all tested clinical isolates were able to form biofilms on porcine heart valve explants. Dextrose-enhanced biofilm formation in the polystyrene dish assay was found in 6/12 (50%) of clinical isolates tested and may explain some, but not all of the differences between the polystyrene dish assay and the heart valve assay. These findings suggest that in studies assessing the clinical relevance of enterococcal biofilm-forming ability, ex vivo biofilm formation on a relevant tissue surface may be warranted to validate results of in vitro assays. PMID:25255085

Leuck, Anne-Marie; Johnson, James R.; Dunny, Gary M.

2014-01-01

39

Aromatase inhibition 2013: clinical state of the art and questions that remain to be solved  

PubMed Central

Following their successful implementation for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, the ‘third-generation’ aromatase inhibitors (anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane) have now become standard adjuvant endocrine treatment for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. These drugs are characterized by potent aromatase inhibition, causing >98% inhibition of estrogen synthesis in vivo. A recent meta-analysis found no difference in anti-tumor efficacy between these three compounds. As of today, aromatase inhibitor monotherapy and sequential treatment using tamoxifen followed by an aromatase inhibitor for a total of 5 years are considered equipotent treatment options. However, current trials are addressing the potential benefit of extending treatment duration beyond 5 years. Regarding side effects, aromatase inhibitors are not found associated with enhanced risk of cardiovascular disease, and enhanced bone loss is prevented by adding bisphosphonates in concert for those at danger of developing osteoporosis. However, arthralgia and carpal tunnel syndrome preclude drug administration among a few patients. While recent findings have questioned the use of aromatase inhibitors among overweight and, in particular, obese patients, this problem seems to focus on premenopausal patients treated with an aromatase inhibitor and an LH-RH analog in concert, questioning the efficacy of LH-RH analogs rather than aromatase inhibitors among overweight patients. Finally, recent findings revealing a benefit from adding the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to endocrine treatment indicate targeted therapy against defined growth factor pathways to be a way forward, by reversing acquired resistance to endocrine therapy. PMID:23625614

Lønning, Per Eystein; Eikesdal, Hans Petter

2013-01-01

40

Antipsychotic Drugs: Direct Correlation between Clinical Potency and Presynaptic Action on Dopamine Neurons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neuroleptic (antipsychotic) drugs inhibited the electrically stimulated release of [3H] dopamine from rat striatal slices. The concentrations for 50 percent inhibition (ranging from 11.5 nanomolar for spiroperidol to 800 nanomolar for thioridazine) correlated closely with the average daily dosages of 25 neuroleptic drugs used clinically for schizophrenia. The correlation includes butyrophenones, phenothiazines, reserpine, pimozide, clozapine, and (+)-butaclamol. Clinically inactive isomers

P. Seeman; T. Lee

1975-01-01

41

Short sleep is a questionable risk factor for obesity and related disorders: Statistical versus clinical significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Habitually insufficient sleep could contribute towards obesity, metabolic syndrome, etc., via sleepiness-related inactivity and excess energy intake; more controversially, through more direct physiological changes. Epidemiological studies in adult\\/children point to small clinical risk only in very short (around 5h in adults), or long sleepers, developing over many years, involving hundreds of hours of ‘too little’ or ‘too much’ sleep. Although

Jim Horne

2008-01-01

42

Modified barium swallow: clinical and radiographic correlation and relation to feeding recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical and videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing were correlated to determine their agreement and relationship to feeding recommendations. We reviewed a total of 148 patients with swallowing difficulties, of which 93 (45 women, 48 men; mean age 62 years) were evaluated by both clinical and radiographic examinations. A variety of materials were used for clinical bedside evaluation of oral and pharyngeal

David J. Ott; Richard G. Hodge; Leigh Ann Pikna; Michael Y. M. Chen; David W. Gelfand

1996-01-01

43

A Brief Measure of Worry Severity (BMWS): personality and clinical correlates of severe worriers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the development of a brief and valid self-report measure to assess severe and dysfunctional worry (the Brief Measure of Worry Severity or BMWS). Using three independent subject groups (clinical and non-clinical), the measure was used to examine the differential severity of worry in depression and anxiety and to examine the clinical and personality correlates of severe worriers.

Gemma L. Gladstone; Gordon B. Parker; Philip B. Mitchell; Gin S. Malhi; Kay A. Wilhelm; Marie-Paule Austin

2005-01-01

44

Correlates of symptoms of depression and anxiety among clinic outpatients in Western Jamaica  

PubMed Central

Objectives There is a paucity of studies on psychosocial disorders in a clinic population in Jamaica. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of symptoms of depression and anxiety in a clinic population in western Jamaica. Methods A total of 338 participants from four outpatient clinics of the Western Regional Health Authority (WRHA) were screened for symptoms of depression and anxiety using questions from the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. The chi-square test was used to examine differences in symptoms of anxiety and depression by gender. Multivariate linear and logistic regression were used to examine the associations between symptoms and socio-demographic variables with significance set at p<0.05. Results Approximately 30% of participants had moderate or severe depression symptoms while 18.6% had moderate or severe anxiety symptoms. Participants aged 30–39 years were more likely than older participants to have moderate or severe anxiety symptoms (odds ratio [OR]: 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.39–5.56). Women reported a statistically significant higher prevalence of anxiety symptoms (10.0% vs. 7.1%, p=0.003). There was also a statistically significant difference between anxiety means by gender. Furthermore, income was found to be a significant predictor of anxiety for women only (p=0.0113). Married persons were more likely than those who had never married to have moderate or severe anxiety symptoms (OR: 2.57, 95% CI: 1.14–5.76). Conclusions Our findings suggest that the prevalence of depression may be higher than global estimates in similar outpatient settings. Screening and intervention efforts may need to focus on younger persons, women, and married persons. PMID:24756741

Monroe, Cara E.; Affuso, Olivia; Martin, Michelle Y.; Aung, Maung; Crossman, Lisbeth; Jolly, Pauline E.

2012-01-01

45

Testing the utility of a cancer clinical trial specific Question Prompt List (QPL-CT) during oncology consultations. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

A QPL is a proven intervention to aid patients to be active participants in consultations with their physicians by asking questions. This study tested the efficacy of a targeted QPL for clinical trials.

46

Tumors of the Central Nervous System: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, Unanswered Questions, and Future Research Directions  

PubMed Central

Central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumors in children. Many histological subtypes and biological variants exist. The 2007 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 36th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to define current knowledge in the field and to develop specific aims for future clinical, translational, and fundamental science. Because of advances in structural and metabolic imaging, surgical technique, and combination therapies, the life expectancy of children with some of the most common tumors, such as cerebellar astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, has improved. Other common tumor types, including diffuse pontine gliomas and malignant embryonal tumors, still have a dismal prognosis. As novel therapies are identified for pediatric central nervous system tumors, long-term survival may be associated with considerable disability. A cooperative effort is crucial to early diagnosis and to translating basic research findings into safe, effective new treatments. PMID:18952577

Babcock, Michael A.; Kostova, Felina V.; Fountain, Jane; Guha, Abhijit; Packer, Roger J.; Pollack, Ian F.; Maria, Bernard L.

2013-01-01

47

Correlation between clinical clerkship achievement and objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) scores of graduating dental students on conservative dentistry  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of clinical clerkship-associated achievements, such as performance of procedures at the student clinic, observation, and attitude towards a clerkship, on the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) scores of dental students graduating in restorative dentistry. Materials and Methods The OSCEs consisted of two stations designed to assess students' clinical skills regarding cavity preparation for a class II gold inlay and a class IV composite restoration. The clerkship achievements, consisting of the number of student clinical procedures performed, observation-related OSCE, and scores of their attitudes towards a conservative dentistry clerkship, were assessed. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted. Results The correlation coefficient between the OSCE scores for cavity preparation for a class II gold restoration and clerkship attitude scores was 0.241 (p < 0.05). Regarding a class IV composite restoration, OSCE scores showed statistically significant correlations with the observation (r = 0.344, p < 0.01) and attitude (r = 0.303, p < 0.01) scores. In a multiple regression analysis, attitudes towards a clerkship (p = 0.033) was associated with the cavity preparation for a class II gold inlay OSCE scores, while the number of procedure observations (p = 0.002) was associated with the class IV composite restoration OSCE scores. Conclusions The number of clinical procedures performed by students, which is an important requirement for graduation, showed no correlation with either of the OSCEs scores. PMID:23741710

Bang, Jae-Beum

2013-01-01

48

Seasonality and its distinct clinical correlates in bipolar II disorder.  

PubMed

Seasonality is one of the key features in subjects with mood disorders and is involved in the multi-faceted nature of the clinical course. However, few studies have explored the clinical implications of seasonality in bipolar disorders. We examined the differential effects of seasonality on clinical variables between bipolar I and II disorder (BD I and II). Seasonality was assessed using the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ) in 204 subjects with BD I and 308 with BD II. Following the comparisons between BD I and II groups, clinical characteristics related to seasonality were explored. Next, to predict the presence of seasonality, a logistic regression model was applied. The global seasonality score on the SPAQ was significantly higher in the BD II group than in the BD I group. In the BD I group, seasonality was associated with suicide attempt history. In the BD II group, on the other hand, seasonality was associated with female gender, depressive predominance, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). In the regression models, the presence of PMDD and female gender was significantly associated with seasonality in the BD II group. Our findings suggest that high seasonality tendency, a vulnerability maker for cyclic worsening, may contribute to a differential pattern of clinical characteristics in BD II. PMID:25537487

Kim, Ji Sun; Ha, Tae Hyon; Chang, Jae Seung; Park, Yoon Seong; Huh, Iksoo; Kim, Jayoun; Hong, Kyung Sue; Park, Taesung; Ha, Kyooseob

2015-02-28

49

Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.  

PubMed Central

The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

1976-01-01

50

The role of Clinical Officers in the Kenyan health system: a question of perspective  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the increasing interest in using non-physician clinicians in many low-income countries, little is known about the roles they play in typical health system settings. Prior research has concentrated on evaluating their technical competencies compared to those of doctors. This work explored perceptions of the roles of Kenyan non-physician clinicians (Clinical Officers (COs). Methods Qualitative methods including in-depth interviews (with COs, nurses, doctors, hospital management, and policymakers, among others), participant observation and document analysis were used. A nomothetic-idiographic framework was used to examine tensions between institutions and individuals within them. A comparative approach was used to examine institutional versus individual notions of CO roles, how these roles play out in government and faith-based hospital (FBH) settings as well as differences arising from three specific work settings for COs within hospitals. Results The main finding was the discrepancy between policy documents that outline a broad role for COs that covers both technical and managerial roles, while respondents articulated a narrow technical role that focused on patient care and management. Respondents described a variety of images of COs, ranging from ‘filter’ to ‘primary healthcare physician’, when asked about CO roles. COs argued for a defined role associated with primary healthcare, feeling constrained by their technical role. FBH settings were found to additionally clarify CO roles when compared with public hospitals. Tensions between formal prescriptions of CO roles and actual practice were reported and coalesced around lack of recognition over COs work, role conflict among specialist COs, and role ambiguity. Conclusions Even though COs are important service providers their role is not clearly understood, which has resulted in role conflict. It is suggested that their role be redefined, moving from that of ‘substitute clinician’ to professional ‘primary care clinician’, with this being supported by the health system. PMID:23866692

2013-01-01

51

Eosinophilic/T-cell Chorionic Vasculitis: Histological and Clinical Correlations.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic T-cell chorionic vasculitis (E/TCV) is composed of eosinophils and T-lymphocytes originating within chorionic vessels, radiating toward the intervillous space and away from the amnion in a fashion different from the fetal vascular response seen in amnionitis. Clinical significance and risk factors are not well established. We report four pregnancies (five infants, one triplet was spared) with E/TCV, gestational ranging from 23 weeks to term. All had concurrent acute chorioamnionitis, three had the typical acute fetal inflammatory response. One had placental fetal obstructive vasculopathy and an upper extremity reduction defect (radio-ulnar synostosis), the mother had pre-eclampsia. A second case involved 2 of 3 23 week previable triplets. Our third case had a metatarsus varus resistant to casting, the mother had gestational diabetes. The last case was a normal infant. We review the literature, discuss the clinical findings and present the histologic characteristics of this infrequently recognized lesion. PMID:25338020

Cheek, Bradley; Heinrich, Stephen; Ward, Kenneth; Craver, Randall

2014-10-22

52

Villitis of unknown aetiology: correlation of recurrence with clinical outcome.  

PubMed

Villitis of unknown aetiology (VUA) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Consequently, an ability to predict recurrence could be clinically relevant. We examined placentas where villitis was diagnosed in a previous pregnancy to establish the risk of recurrence and outcome. A total of 304 cases of VUA were diagnosed in our laboratory over a 4-year period. Subsequently, 19 of this cohort had a second placenta examined histologically. Recurrence and clinical outcome were recorded. Villitis recurred in 7 of 19 cases (37%). There was a high level of adverse pregnancy outcome in this cohort overall, characterised by small for gestational age infants and stillbirth, particularly in cases with high-grade villitis. We identified recurrent villitis more frequently than previously reported. Our findings confirm an association between high-grade villitis and poor outcome. Adequately powered prospective studies are required to determine if enhanced surveillance of subsequent pregnancies is indicated following a diagnosis of villitis. PMID:20604650

Feeley, L; Mooney, E E

2010-01-01

53

Correlating familial Alzheimer's disease gene mutations with clinical phenotype  

PubMed Central

Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes devastating cognitive impairment and an intense research effort is currently devoted to developing improved treatments for it. A minority of cases occur at a particularly young age and are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited genetic mutations. Although rare, familial AD provides unique opportunities to gain insights into the cascade of pathological events and how they relate to clinical manifestations. The phenotype of familial AD is highly variable and, although it shares many clinical features with sporadic AD, it also possesses important differences. Exploring the genetic and pathological basis of this phenotypic heterogeneity can illuminate aspects of the underlying disease mechanism, and is likely to inform our understanding and treatment of AD in the future. PMID:20387306

Ryan, Natalie S; Rossor, Martin N

2014-01-01

54

Gastric malignant lymphoma: immunohistochemical findings correlated with histopathology and clinical data.  

PubMed

Nine cases of primary gastric lymphoma are reviewed. Clinical data are correlated with histopathology and immunohistochemical findings. The reported observations suggest a relationship between associated lesions (chronic gastritis, follicular gastritis) and primary gastric lymphoma. PMID:3899986

Pinto, E; De Stefano, A; Leoncini, L; Vindigni, C; Lorenzini, L; Cintorino, M

1985-01-01

55

Clinical correlates of graph theory findings in temporal lobe epilepsy  

PubMed Central

Purpose Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is considered a brain network disorder, additionally representing the most common form of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy in adults. There is increasing evidence that seizures in TLE arise from abnormal epileptogenic networks, which extend beyond the clinico-radiologically determined epileptogenic zone and may contribute to the failure rate of 30–50% following epilepsy surgery. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks using several neuroimaging and electrophysiologic modalities, and has potential to provide clinicians with clinically useful biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Methods We performed a review of the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain to localization of the epileptogenic zone, prediction of pre- and post-surgical seizure frequency and cognitive performance, and monitoring cognitive decline in TLE. Results Although different neuroimaging and electrophysiologic modalities have yielded occasionally conflicting results, several potential biomarkers have been characterized for identifying the epileptogenic zone, pre-/post-surgical seizure prediction, and assessing cognitive performance. For localization, graph theory measures of centrality have shown the most potential, including betweenness centrality, outdegree, and graph index complexity, whereas for prediction of seizure frequency, measures of synchronizability have shown the most potential. The utility of clustering coefficient and characteristic path length for assessing cognitive performance in TLE is also discussed. Conclusions Future studies integrating data from multiple modalities and testing predictive models are needed to clarify findings and develop graph theory for its clinical utility. PMID:25127370

Haneef, Zulfi; Chiang, Sharon

2014-01-01

56

Clinical Correlates of Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Depression in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A burgeoning body of literature addresses the comorbidity of depression and OCD in adults. The purpose of this study was to extend this area of research to children and adolescents by examining the clinical correlates associated with co-occurring depressive disorders in a clinical sample of youth with OCD. Participants included children and…

Canavera, Kristin E.; Ollendick, Thomas H.; Ehrenreich May, Jill T.; Pincus, Donna B.

2010-01-01

57

Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy: Design and Implementation of a First-Year Medical School Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical students state the need for a clinically oriented anatomy class so to maximize their learning experience. We hypothesize that the first-year medical students, who take the Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy program, will perform better than their peers in their anatomy course, their surgical clerkships and ultimately choose surgical…

Haubert, Lisa M.; Jones, Kenneth; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D.

2009-01-01

58

Sex-specific clinical correlates of hoarding in obsessive-compulsive disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about whether the clinical correlates of hoarding behavior are different in men and women with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the current study, we evaluated the association of hoarding with categories of obsessions and compulsions, psychiatric disorders, personality dimensions, and other clinical characteristics separately in 151 men and 358 women with OCD who were examined during the OCD

Jack F. Samuels; O. Joseph Bienvenu; Anthony Pinto; Dennis L. Murphy; John Piacentini; Scott L. Rauch; Abby J. Fyer; Marco A. Grados; Benjamin D. Greenberg; James A. Knowles; James T. McCracken; Bernadette Cullen; Mark A. Riddle; Steven A. Rasmussen; David L. Pauls; Kung-Yee Liang; Rudolf Hoehn-Saric; Ann E. Pulver; Gerald Nestadt

2008-01-01

59

Cavum Septum Pellucidum in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Neuropsychological Correlates  

PubMed Central

Increased frequency of cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) has been inconsistently observed in schizophrenia, and little is known about its functional implications. We investigated whether patients with schizophrenia were more likely than healthy controls to have CSP, and among patients assessed the relationship between CSP, psychiatric symptoms, and selected neuropsychological functions. Seventy-seven patients with diagnoses of DSM-IV schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 55 healthy controls were studied and completed a 1.5 T MRI scan. Two raters, blind to group membership, determined the presence, length and grade of the CSP. A subset of participants also underwent neuropsychological testing. A CSP of at least 1 mm in length was present in 68.8% of patients and 76.4% of controls, and the groups did not differ significantly with respect to presence or absence, length, overall size, or percent with an abnormally large CSP (? 6 mm). Patients with an abnormally large CSP demonstrated poorer performance on measures of verbal learning and memory than patients with smaller CSP. Among patients, CSP length was significantly correlated with negative symptoms, verbal learning, and sentence comprehension. Among patients with abnormally large CSP, CSP length was correlated with reaction time on two conditions of a Continuous Performance Test. CSP, while prevalent, was not more frequent in our sample of patients with schizophrenia, and had few associations with symptom severity or neuropsychological deficits. PMID:17291728

Flashman, Laura A.; Roth, Robert M.; Pixley, Heather S.; Cleavinger, Howard B.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Vidaver, Robert; Saykin, Andrew J.

2007-01-01

60

Mechanisms and clinical correlates of sperm DNA damage  

PubMed Central

Among the different DNA anomalies that can be present in the male gamete, DNA fragmentation is the most frequent, particularly in infertile subjects. There is now consistent evidence that a sperm containing fragmented DNA can be alive, motile, morphologically normal and able to fertilize an oocyte. There is also evidence that the oocyte is able to repair DNA damage; however, the extent of this repair depends on the type of DNA damage present in the sperm, as well as on the quality of the oocyte. Thus, it is important to understand the possible consequences of sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) for embryo development, implantation, pregnancy outcome and the health of progeny conceived, both naturally and by assisted reproductive technology (ART). At present, data on the consequences of SDF for reproduction are scarce and, in many ways, inconsistent. The differences in study conclusions might result from the different methods used to detect SDF, the study design and the inclusion criteria. Consequently, it is difficult to decide whether SDF testing should be carried out in fertility assessment and ART. It is clear that there is an urgent need for the standardisation of the methods and for additional clinical studies on the impact of SDF on ART outcomes. PMID:22138903

Tamburrino, Lara; Marchiani, Sara; Montoya, Margarita; Elia Marino, Francesco; Natali, Ilaria; Cambi, Marta; Forti, Gianni; Baldi, Elisabetta; Muratori, Monica

2012-01-01

61

Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

2000-04-01

62

Anhedonia and Substance Dependence: Clinical Correlates and Treatment Options  

PubMed Central

Anhedonia is a condition in which the capacity of experiencing pleasure is totally or partially lost, and it refers to both a state symptom in various psychiatric disorders and a personality trait. It has a putative neural substrate, originating in the dopaminergic mesolimbic and mesocortical reward circuit. Anhedonia frequently occurs in mood disorders, as a negative symptom in schizophrenia, and in substance use disorders. In particular, we focus our attention on the relationships occurring between anhedonia and substance use disorders, as highlighted by many studies. Several authors suggested that anhedonia is an important factor involved in relapse as well as in the transition from recreational use to excessive drug intake. In particular, anhedonia has been found to be a frequent feature in alcoholics and addicted patients during acute and chronic withdrawal as well as in cocaine, stimulant, and cannabis abusers. Furthermore, in subjects with a substance dependence disorder, there is a significant correlation between anhedonia, craving, intensity of withdrawal symptoms, and psychosocial and personality characteristics. Therefore treating anhedonia in detoxified alcohol-dependent subjects could be critical in terms of relapse prevention strategies, given its strong relationship with craving. PMID:21556280

Hatzigiakoumis, Daniele Stavros; Martinotti, Giovanni; Giannantonio, Massimo Di; Janiri, Luigi

2011-01-01

63

Clinically relevant correlates of accurate perception of patients' thoughts and feelings.  

PubMed

The goal was to explore the clinical relevance of accurate understanding of patients' thoughts and feelings. Between 2010 and 2012, four groups of participants (nursing students, medical students, internal medicine residents, and undergraduate students) took a test of accuracy in understanding the thoughts and feelings of patients who were videorecorded during their actual medical visits and who afterward reviewed their video to identify their thoughts and feelings as they occurred (Test of Accurate Perception of Patients' Affect, or TAPPA). Participants' accuracy scores were then correlated with participants' attitudes toward patient-centered care, clinical course background, recall of clinical conversation, evaluations of clinical performance made by preceptors, evaluations of interpersonal skill made by standardized patients in clinical encounters, and independent coding of behavior in a clinical encounter. Accuracy in understanding patients' thoughts and feelings was significantly correlated with nursing students' clinical course experience, clinicians' favorable attitudes to psychosocial discussion, standardized patients' evaluations of medical students' interpersonal skill, independent coding of medical students' patient-centered behavior while taking a social history, and undergraduates' more accurate recall of what an actor-physician said on video. Accuracy in perceiving patients' thoughts and feelings can be objectively measured and is a skill relevant to clinical performance. PMID:24949868

Hall, Judith A; Ship, Amy N; Ruben, Mollie A; Curtin, Elizabeth M; Roter, Debra L; Clever, Sarah L; Smith, C Christopher; Pounds, Karen

2015-05-01

64

Anti-Phospholipase A2 Receptor Antibodies Correlate with Clinical Status in Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy  

PubMed Central

Summary Background and objectives Circulating autoantibodies against the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (anti-PLA2R) were recently identified in the majority of patients in the United States with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN). The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of anti-PLA2R in a separate, European cohort of iMN patients and to correlate the presence of anti-PLA2R with clinical parameters reflective of disease activity. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Anti-PLA2R levels were blindly assessed by a Western blot immunoassay in 54 serum samples from 18 patients with iMN collected in various stages of clinical disease. Anti-PLA2R levels were correlated with other clinical parameters. Results 77.8% of iMN patients in our cohort had antibodies reactive with human PLA2R. The antibody levels in these patients correlated strongly with both clinical status and proteinuria (r = 0.73, P < 0.01). Conclusions The role of PLA2R as a major antigen in iMN was confirmed in an independent, European patient cohort, and levels of circulating anti-PLA2R revealed a strong correlation with clinical disease activity. We propose that detection and measurement of these autoantibodies may provide a tool for monitoring of disease activity and treatment efficacy. PMID:21474589

Beck, Laurence H.; Beck, David M.; Wetzels, Jack F.; Salant, David J.

2011-01-01

65

question_1296837100 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

While the causal mechanisms that link excess body weight to increased risk for certain cancers are largely unknown (as noted in other questions), we pose an associated question -- what are the causal mechanisms that link excess body weight to decreased risk of certain other cancers?

66

Do Workshops in Evidence-Based Practice Equip Participants to Identify and Answer Questions Requiring Consideration of Clinical Research? A Diagnostic Skill Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires practitioners to identify and formulate questions in response to patient encounters, and to seek, select, and appraise applicable clinical research. A standardized workshop format serves as the model for training of medical educators in these skills. We developed an evaluation exercise to assess the ability…

Wyer, Peter C,; Naqvi, Zoon; Dayan, Peter S.; Celentano, James J.; Eskin, Barnet; Graham, Mark J.

2009-01-01

67

Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

1998-01-01

68

Clinical deficits correlate with regional cerebral atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Most cerebral imaging studies of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) have noted subtle atrophy, although the full extent of atrophy and any correlates to clinical features have not been determined. We used voxel-based morphometry analysis of grey matter, white matter and CSF on MRI brain scans to map the statistical probability of regional tissue atrophy in 21 patients

N. J. Cordato; A. J. Duggins; G. M. Halliday; J. G. L. Morris; C. Pantelis

2005-01-01

69

Clinical correlates of renal dysfunction in hypertensive patients without cardiovascular complications: the REDHY study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our study was aimed to assess the clinical correlates of different degrees of renal dysfunction in a wide group of non-diabetic hypertensive patients, free from cardiovascular (CV) complications and known renal diseases, participating to the REDHY (REnal Dysfunction in HYpertension) study. A total of 1856 hypertensive subjects (mean age: 47±14 years), attending our hypertension centre, were evaluated. The glomerular filtration

G Cerasola; G Mulè; E Nardi; P Cusimano; A Palermo; R Arsena; M Guarneri; C Geraci; S Cottone

2010-01-01

70

Adiposity in children and adolescents: correlates and clinical consequences of fat stored in specific  

E-print Network

fat, imaging, visceral fat. Introduction Pediatric obesity has become one of the greatest publicAdiposity in children and adolescents: correlates and clinical consequences of fat stored. Studies among adults have shown that body fat stored in different depots (intra-abdominal, liver, etc

Southern California, University of

71

Demographic and Clinical Correlates of Autism Symptom Domains and Autism Spectrum Diagnosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Demographic and clinical factors may influence assessment of autism symptoms. This study evaluated these correlates and also examined whether social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior provided unique prediction of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. We analyzed data from 7352 siblings included in the Interactive…

Frazier, Thomas W.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Embacher, Rebecca; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Constantino, John N.; Law, Paul; Findling, Robert L.; Eng, Charis

2014-01-01

72

The Phenomenology and Clinical Correlates of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the phenomenology and clinical correlates of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in youth with ASD (N = 102; range 7-16 years). The presence of suicidal thoughts and behavior was assessed through the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Child and Parent Versions. Children and parents completed measures of anxiety severity,…

Storch, Eric A.; Sulkowski, Michael L.; Nadeau, Josh; Lewin, Adam B.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Mutch, P. Jane; Jones, Anna M.; Murphy, Tanya K.

2013-01-01

73

Correlation between power Doppler ultrasonography and clinical severity in Achilles tendinopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-five patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were clinically and ultrasonographically evaluated. A positive correlation existed between power Doppler ultrasonography (PDU) and tendon thickness (r=0.63, pr=0.40, pr=?0.57, pr=?0.46, p

Koen H. E. Peers; Peter P. M. Brys; Roeland J. J. Lysens

2003-01-01

74

Rage Attacks in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Phenomenology and Clinical Correlates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Rage attacks have been documented in youth with varied psychiatric disorders, but few data have been reported on the clinical characteristics and correlates of rage attacks among children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Participants were 86 children (ages 6-16 years) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Patients and their…

Storch, Eric A.; Jones, Anna M.; Lack, Caleb W.; Ale, Chelsea M.; Sulkowski, Michael L.; Lewin, Adam B.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Murphy, Tanya K.

2012-01-01

75

Clinical correlation of MRI findings of internal derangements of the temporomandibular joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied 131 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in 73 patients (56 women, 17 men) with internal derangement using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in addition to clinical examinations.The type of TMJ sounds correlated significantly with the degree of disc displacement. Rounded and folded disc deformities caused crepitus, which was a sign of the advanced stage of anterior disc displacement without reduction. Tenderness

N Ta?kaya-Yýlmaz; M Ö?ütcen-Toller

2002-01-01

76

Changes in the Neuropsychological Correlates of Clinical Dimensions between the Acute and Stable Phase of Schizophrenia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to investigate whether the neuropsychological correlates of the symptom dimensions of schizophrenia vary with the clinical state in patients followed from the acute to stable the phase of the illness. Fifteen patients were assessed for symptoms (SAPS-SANS) and undergone a complete neuropsychological assessment at two…

Guillem, F.; Ganeva, E.; Pampoulova, T.; Stip, E.; Lalonde, P.; Sasseville, M.

2005-01-01

77

Pressure Ulcer Prevalence in Ohio Nursing HomesClinical and Facility Correlates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pressure ulcers remain a common medical problem in nursing homes, despite the development of clinical guidelines for prevention and treatment. Prevention involves low technology but vigilant care. If the disease progresses, infections can develop, and surgery may be necessary to prevent death. This article examines pressure ulcer correlates in a representative sample of 15,121 nursing home residents in 1994 in

William D. Spector; Richard H. Fortinsky

1998-01-01

78

Mental Health and Clinical Correlates in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Queer Young Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examined the prevalence of mental health disorders and their clinical correlates in a university sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) students. Participants: College students at a large public university. Methods: An anonymous, voluntary survey was distributed via random e-mail generation to university students…

Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.; Derbyshire, Katherine; Schreiber, Liana R. N.; Lust, Katherine; Christenson, Gary

2014-01-01

79

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question_1337049045 — Provocative Questions  

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138

question_1409740665 — Provocative Questions  

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139

question_1309360864 — Provocative Questions  

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140

question_1301530459 — Provocative Questions  

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141

question_1410251969 — Provocative Questions  

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142

question_1296513894 — Provocative Questions  

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143

question_1297435384 — Provocative Questions  

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144

question_1299172071 — Provocative Questions  

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145

question_1299173164 — Provocative Questions  

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146

question_1411079495 — Provocative Questions  

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147

question_1413444261 — Provocative Questions  

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148

question_1296849841 — Provocative Questions  

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149

question_1408342453 — Provocative Questions  

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150

question_1298614465 — Provocative Questions  

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151

question_1410546275 — Provocative Questions  

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152

question_1296786512 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

An exciting development in this area that would be encouraged by attempting to answer this important question, is the connection between the observations of cancer risk modulation by epidemiologists and immune mechanisms that appear to be involved, described by immunologists.

153

question_1296185035 — Provocative Questions  

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154

question_1297499720 — Provocative Questions  

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155

question_1410689941 — Provocative Questions  

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156

question_1412835958 — Provocative Questions  

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157

question_1412859595 — Provocative Questions  

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158

question_1337052960 — Provocative Questions  

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159

question_1295444776 — Provocative Questions  

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160

question_1296826063 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

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161

Correlations of Theory of Mind Deficits with Clinical Patterns and Quality of Life in Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Background: Numerous studies have demonstrated the existence of theory of mind (ToM) impairments in patients with schizophrenia. The clinical consequences of these impairments are currently under debate. Accumulated evidence suggests that ToM deficits are linked to negative and disorganization symptoms, but direct correlations are lacking. Moreover, it is unclear whether ToM deficits are related to reduced quality of life (QoL). Methods: To extend the understanding of objective (i.e., clinical symptoms) and subjective (QoL) correlates of impaired ToM, we assessed 206 patients with schizophrenia based on performance of an ecological task (Versailles-Situational Intention Reading, V-SIR), a Communication Disorders Scale (SCD), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Clinical Global Impression rating, and a QoL questionnaire (S-QoL). Statistical inferences were drawn from correlations analyses considering both factors/subscales aggregates and single items. Results: ToM performance was negatively correlated to disorganization and negative PANSS factors. Poor V-SIR performance was correlated with “conceptual disorganization,” “difficulties in abstract thinking,” and “apathy/social withdrawal.” The SCD was correlated with “negative,” “disorganization,” and “anxiety/depression” PANSS factors. The S-QoL total score was not significantly correlated with ToM performance. Only the item “difficulties in expressing feelings” was significantly correlated with poorer V-SIR performance. Conclusion: We discuss the intriguing paucity of the results and what they reveal about the difficulties faced by psychiatrists with patients not expressing complaints about lack of social skills. PMID:23653606

Urbach, Mathieu; Brunet-Gouet, Eric; Bazin, Nadine; Hardy-Baylé, Marie-Christine; Passerieux, Christine

2013-01-01

162

[Correlation between radiologic and ultrasonographic patterns and clinical manifestations in symptomatic hip osteoarthritis].  

PubMed

Increasing amounts of data have recently been published regarding ultrasonographic (US) findings of osteoarthritic joints, but very few data concern hip joints. In the current study we described US patterns concerning 490 patients affected by symptomatic hip osteoarthritis (OA) who underwent to intra-articular injections of hyaluronic products under US guidance. All patients were studied by US and X-ray of hip, clinical evaluation was assessed by the followings indexes: Lequesne, pain VAS, ICED, Global Physician Assessment and Global Patient Assessment. US findings were summarized in four main patterns, effusion and synovial proliferation were also detected. The aim of this study was to correlate US findings with clinical assessment and radiographic findings (according to Kellgren-Lawrence classification). Pearson's r correlation coefficient were computed and come out significant and positive between X ray and US patterns and between clinical indexes and US patterns. Also the correlation between K-L score and US patterns showed a significant positive correlation indicating that higher K-L scores are associated with increasing abnormal US findings. Our data suggest that ultrasonography of the hip may give useful information about the state of synovial membrane, synovial fluid, joint margins and bone profile in hip OA. Further studies are needed to evaluate their prevalence in hip OA symptomatic and not-symptomatic patients and their correlation to treatment outcome. PMID:17435843

Migliore, A; Tormenta, S; Iannessi, F; Mascheroni, E; Barbati, E; Capuano, A; Diaco, M; Massafra, U; Padalino, C; Vacca, F; Alimonti, A; Martin, L S; Granata, M

2007-01-01

163

What is the clinical significance of finding cells from a primary tumor at another site? — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

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164

question_1413867548 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

PQ-1 Large amount of genomic data have been generated in last decade or so for various cancers. There are drugs and clinical trials data as well. Also, clinical data of patients are available in electronic medical record (EMR). Can we normalize and combine all these data to create a knowledge-base?

165

question_1410159378 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Looking at cell to cell differences within a tumor bed, contributed by either DNA mutations, epigenetic or post-translational modifications (PTM) or miRNA mediated control switches or even a combination of all these, the question rise how to best design a personalized drug trial?

166

question_1296796037 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

If this important question is answered we would be able to develop a highly tailored therapeutic approach for cancers. Actually, inflammatory type of the anti-tumor immune response such as IFN-g can also induce initial tumor inhibition but eventual tumor escape and progression.

167

question_1411052731 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This question is epidemiologic but prevention is better than cure. Since both ovarian low and high grade serous carcinomas originate from the distal fallopian tube, wouldn’t (large- scale) snipping of the fimbrial end of both tubes at the time of tubectomy (with informed consent) prevent the majority of serous carcinomas developing over time?

168

Ventricular Maps in 804 Adni Subjects: Correlations with CSF Biomarkers & Clinical Decline  

PubMed Central

Ideal biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease should correlate with accepted measures of pathology in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); they should also correlate with, or predict, future clinical decline, and should be readily measured in hundreds to thousands of subjects. Here we explored the utility of automated 3D maps of the lateral ventricles as a possible biomarker of AD. We used our multi-atlas fluid image alignment (MAFIA) method, to compute ventricular models automatically, without user intervention, from 804 brain MRI scans with 184 AD, 391 MCI, and 229 healthy elderly controls (446 men/338 women; age: 75.50+/-6.81 [SD] years). Radial expansion of the ventricles, computed pointwise, was strongly correlated with current cognition, depression ratings, Hachinski Ischemic scores, language scores and with future clinical decline after controlling for any effects of age, sex, and educational level. In statistical maps ranked by effect sizes, ventricular differences were highly correlated with CSF measures of A?1-42, and correlated with ApoE4 genotype. These statistical maps are highly automated, and offer a promising biomarker of AD for large-scale studies. PMID:20620663

Chou, Yi-Yu; Leporé, Natasha; Saharan, Priyanka; Madsen, Sarah K.; Hua, Xue; Jack, Clifford R.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

2010-01-01

169

Severe myocardial depression in a patient with aluminium phosphide poisoning: a clinical, electrocardiographical and histopathological correlation.  

PubMed

Aluminium phosphide poisoning is very common in India. It is one of the most fatal poisons. The clinical spectrum of poisoning varies depending upon the dosage and duration of consumption. The main effect of the poison is due to the release of phosphine which inhibits cytochrome oxidase and thereby hampers cellular oxygen utilization. Almost any organ can be affected by aluminium phosphide poisoning. We report a case where the heart was the predominantly affected organ. We describe the clinical symptoms and signs and their correlation with electrocardiographic and histopathological examinations. PMID:19881181

Shah, Viral; Baxi, Seema; Vyas, Tanmay

2009-01-01

170

Integrated fluorescence correlation spectroscopy device for point-of-care clinical applications  

PubMed Central

We describe an optical system which reduces the cost and complexity of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), intended to increase the suitability of the technique for clinical use. Integration of the focusing optics and sample chamber into a plastic component produces a design which is simple to align and operate. We validate the system by measurements on fluorescent dye, and compare the results to a commercial instrument. In addition, we demonstrate its application to measurements of concentration and multimerization of the clinically relevant protein von Willebrand factor (vWF) in human plasma. PMID:23847733

Olson, Eben; Torres, Richard; Levene, Michael J.

2013-01-01

171

Pattern of Pseudoexfoliation Deposits on the Lens and Their Clinical Correlation- Clinical Study and Review of Literature  

PubMed Central

Purpose To study the clinical correlates of pattern of deposits over the lens in patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXF) or pseudoexfoliation glaucoma. Methods This retrospective observational study screened 346 patients with PXF seen in glaucoma clinic of a tertiary hospital from 2011–2013. Details like pattern of deposits, location on the lens surface and pupillary abnormalities in slit lamp photographs and their correlation with clinical and demographic variables, were analysed. Results A total of 84 eyes of 42 patients with bilateral PXF were included for the study. Glaucoma was seen in 30 eyes with baseline IOP of 24+3.8 mm Hg. Comparing the type of deposits, namely classical (n?=?39 eyes), radial pigmentary (RP) form (n?=?39 eyes) and combined classical and radial pigmentary (CR) forms (n?=?6 eyes) of deposits, pupillary ruff atrophy was common in all forms while poor dilatation was rare in the RP type (n?=?5 vs n?=?25 in classical forms, p<0.001). Mean deviation (MD) was worse in the classical and CR form as compared to RP type with the latter presenting much earlier, 43±3.2 years vs 48±4.1 years in CR and 56±5.7 years in classical form, p<0.001. The baseline IOP in the RP group (18±2.3 mm Hg) was significantly lower than the other two forms (CR 20±3.2 mm Hg, classical 28±2.3 mm Hg), p<0.001, with only 2 eyes on anti-glaucoma drugs at presentation. Conclusion Pattern of exfoliation deposits may indicate the stage and severity of the disease process in evolution with the RP representing an earlier/less severe form of pseudoexfoliation syndrome. PMID:25478872

Rao, Aparna; Padhy, Debananda

2014-01-01

172

Anatomo-clinical atlases correlate clinical data and electrode contact coordinates: application to subthalamic deep brain stimulation.  

PubMed

For patients suffering from Parkinson's disease with severe movement disorders, functional surgery may be required when medical therapy is not effective. In Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), electrodes are implanted within the brain to stimulate deep structures such as SubThalamic Nucleus (STN). The quality of patient surgical outcome is generally related to the accuracy of nucleus targeting during surgery. In this paper, we focused on identifying optimum sites for STN DBS by studying symptomatic motor improvement along with neuropsychological side effects. We described successive steps for constructing digital atlases gathering patient's location of electrode contacts automatically segmented from postoperative images, and clinical scores. Three motor and five neuropsychological scores were included in the study. Correlations with active contact locations were carried out using an adapted hierarchical ascendant classification. Such analysis enabled the extraction of representative clusters to determine the optimum site for therapeutic STN DBS. For each clinical score, we built an anatomo-clinical atlas representing its improvement or deterioration in relation with the anatomical location of electrodes and from a population of implanted patients. To the best of our knowledge, we reported for the first time a discrepancy between a very good motor improvement by targeting the postero-superior region of the STN and an inevitable deterioration of the categorical and phonemic fluency in the same region. Such atlases and associated analysis may help better understanding of functional mapping in deep structures and may help pre-operative decision-making process and especially targeting. PMID:23147008

Lalys, Florent; Haegelen, Claire; Mehri, Maroua; Drapier, Sophie; Vérin, Marc; Jannin, Pierre

2013-01-30

173

Postoperative Expansion of Dural Sac Cross-Sectional Area after Unilateral Laminotomy for Bilateral Decompression: Correlation with Clinical Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Objective Dural sac cross-sectional area (DSCSA) is a way to measure the degree of central spinal canal compression. The objective was to investigate the correlation between the expansion ratio of DSCSA after unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression (ULBD) and the clinical results for lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data and radiographs of 103 patients who underwent ULBD for symptomatic spinal stenosis in one year. We compared preoperative and postoperative clinical data and DSCSA and evaluated the correlation between clinical and radiographic measurements. Results There was a significant increase of DSCSA after ULBD (p=0.000) and mean expansion ratio of DSCSA was 203.7±147.2%(range -32.9-826.1%). Clinical outcomes, measured by VAS and ODI were improved significantly not only in early postoperative period, but also in the last follow-up. However, there were no statistically significant correlations between the preoperative DSCSA and clinical symptoms, Perioperative expansion ratio of DSCSA and clinical parameters were also not correlated to the improvement of clinical symptoms significantly in both early postoperative phase and last follow-up. Conclusion Our result indicates that the DSCSA itself has a definite limitation to be correlated to the clinical symptoms, and thus meticulous correlation between the clinical presentation and MRI imaging is essential in determination of surgical treatment.

Chung, Seok-Won; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Baek, Oon-Ki; Lee, Sang-Ho

2014-01-01

174

question_1409912415 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Existing intervention clinical trials are now emerging as more and more expensive, labor-intensive and demand an exhaustive infrastructure. Thus these trials have become very difficult to execute especially in low resource settings. In view of this fact, how relevant it is to apply (similar) norms that govern clinical testing of new investigational drugs to re-purposing the existing drugs or active ingredients of traditional therapeutics extensively used in Ayurveda, Siddha and Homeopathy that already have defined safety and efficacy?

175

MRI in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Correlation with clinical and neuropathological data  

Microsoft Academic Search

To ascertain whether increased grey matter signal intensity on T2-weighted images in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob\\u000a disease (CJD) corresponds to the stage and severity of this disease, we correlated MRI findings in four of our own and previously\\u000a reported patients with sporadic CJD with the clinical variants, neuropathological changes at autopsy, duration of the disease\\u000a and survival time after MRI

H. Urbach; J. Klisch; H. K. Wolf; D. Brechtelsbauer; S. Gass; L. Solymosi

1998-01-01

176

Clinical laboratory parameters in osteoarthritic knee-joint effusions correlated to trace element concentrations.  

PubMed

Interactions of clinical laboratory parameters with trace elements in knee-joint effusions might turn out to be potential diagnostic tool, increasing our pathophysiological understanding and knowledge on knee-joint effusions. Thus, the 11 clinical laboratory parameters, total protein, albumin, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase, uric acid, pH, rheumatoid factor, antistreptolysin, C-reactive protein, leukocyte, and erythrocyte counts were determined in 39 osteoarthritic knee-joint effusions and in corresponding sera. Additionally, concentrations of the 17 trace elements barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cesium, copper, lanthanum, lithium, magnesium, molybdenum, lead, rubidium, antimony, tin, strontium, thallium, and zinc in both effusions and corresponding sera were quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Concentrations of most laboratory parameters in synovial fluid were within the normal ranges for serum. However, concentrations of total protein and albumin in effusions were distinctly lower than in sera of healthy adults. Results for rheumatoid factor, antistreptolysin, and C-reactive protein in the effusions were below their corresponding threshold values for serum. An indicator for inflammation, the leukocyte count had a median < 6.3 G/L. The erythrocyte count (median: < 0.06 T/L) revealed a very low presence of red blood cells in the effusions. Total protein concentrations and lactate dehydrogenase activity in the effusions correlated positively with effusion copper (r = 0.61 and 0.66) and effusion zinc (r = 0.71 and 0.49). For cesium, a negative correlation in both sera (r = -0.44) and effusions (r = -0.44) with LDH activity could be established. Concentrations of rubidium, strontium, and cesium responded to albumin concentrations in sera and in effusions, establishing an inverse correlation. All other trace elements showed no or only weak associations with the clinical laboratory parameters determined. Although distinct relationships between trace element concentrations and clinical laboratory parameters in knee-joint effusions exist, the clinical relevance of these findings needs to be further elucidated. PMID:11330520

Krachler, M; Domej, W

2001-02-01

177

question_1332002134 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Sequencing of natural human tumors is teaching us invaluable lessons. It is becoming clear that the new dogmas created in the post genome era are being questioned. The previously suspected genetic heterogeneity of tumors is now proven on the sequence level. The extreme genetic heterogeneity of individual tumors and the existence of multiple tumors (not metastases) pose fundamental doubt on the prevailing dogma of targeted drug(s) and personalized treatments.

178

Welcome to Provocative Questions: The Unanswered Questions in Cancer Research — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

The provocative questions initiative has assembled a list of 20 important questions from the research community to stimulate the NCI's research communities to use laboratory, clinical and population sciences in especially effective and imaginative ways to answer the questions.

179

Clinical Correlates of Awareness for Balance, Function, and Memory: Evidence for the Modality Specificity of Awareness  

PubMed Central

Awareness in dementia is increasingly recognized not only as multifactorial, but also as domain specific. We demonstrate differential clinical correlates for awareness of daily function, awareness of memory, and the novel exploration of awareness of balance. Awareness of function was higher for participants with mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and non-aMCI) than for those with dementia (due to Alzheimer disease; AD and non-AD), whereas awareness of memory was higher for both non-aMCI and non-AD dementia patients than for those with aMCI or AD. Balance awareness did not differ based on diagnostic subgroup. Awareness of function was associated with instrumental activities of daily living and caregiver burden. In contrast, awareness of balance was associated with fall history, balance confidence, and instrumental activities of daily living. Clinical correlates of awareness of memory depended on diagnostic group: associations held with neuropsychological variables for non-AD dementia, but for patients with AD dementia, depression and instrumental activities of daily living were clinical correlates of memory awareness. Together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that awareness and dementia are not unitary and are, instead, modality specific. PMID:24551452

O'Connell, Megan E.; Crossley, Margaret; Morgan, Debra

2014-01-01

180

Clinical Correlates of Antifungal Macrodilution Susceptibility Test Results for Non-AIDS Patients with Severe Candida Infections Treated with Fluconazole  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the clinical correlates of the reference antifungal susceptibility test results in hematogenous and deep-seated Candida infection are still controversial, we evaluated the clinical correlates of this test in deep- seated Candida infections in non-AIDS patients. Thirty-two non-AIDS patients with hematogenous or deep- seated Candida infections were treated with intravenous fluconazole (400 mg a day), and the clinical outcomes were

SAI-CHEONG LEE; JEN-SENG HUANG; CHI-JEN TSAI; KUO-SU CHEN; HUANG-YANG CHEN; NING LEE; LAI-CHU SEE; WEN-BEN SHIEH

2000-01-01

181

NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures  

PubMed Central

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

2014-01-01

182

NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures.  

PubMed

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26-27, 2013, entitled "Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research" and "Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems." The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

2014-10-01

183

Clinical Correlates of Apathy in Patients Recently Diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease: The ANIMO Study  

PubMed Central

Objective Little is known about apathy in the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). We determined the clinical correlates of apathy in a large representative sample of patients recently diagnosed with PD (ANIMO study). Methods PD patients, diagnosed within 2 years of inclusion, were recruited in 102 outpatient clinics situated in 82 populations throughout Spain. Apathy was quantified using the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS). Clinical comparisons and correlations were performed using nonparametric tests. Regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical variables with apathy. Results We recruited 557 PD patients (60.3% men) with a mean age of 68.8 ± 9.7 years, and UPDRS motor score of 21.1 ± 10.8. Apathy only was diagnosed in 186 (33.4%), and apathy and depression in 215 patients (38.6%). Patients with higher comorbidity (OR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.01?1.20, p = 0.001), motor impairment (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03?1.10, p < 0.0001), and lower education (OR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.21?;3.85, p = 0.009) had higher odds of having apathy, in contrast to patients living in a rural environment (OR = 0.35, 95% CI 0.32–0.85, p = 0.01), and left predominant PD motor laterality (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.13–0.88, p = 0.01). LARS scores were significantly correlated with UPDRS motor scores (rs = 0.44, p < 0.001), predominantly with axial score (rs = 0.43, p < 0.001). Conclusions In PD, apathy is a very common and disabling nonmotor symptom separable from depression. Patients living in a rural environment, with lower comorbidity and motor impairment, higher education background, and left predominant PD motor laterality are at lower risk of suffering from apathy. PMID:22236943

Cubo, Esther; Benito-León, Julián; Coronell, Carlos; Armesto, Diana

2012-01-01

184

question_1412835592 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Now we are aware about intratumoral genomic heterogeneity and its clonal nature within the tumor. These mutations may have distinct downstream functions based on its intra-genomic interactions. Therefore, in order to directly correlate genomic makeup of cells with its functions within the tumor, I am curious if we can devise methods to monitor in vivo functional heterogeneity among tumor cells.

185

Clinical, radiological and molecular diagnosis correlation in serum samples from patients with osteoarticular tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the role of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples, in the diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis (OTB) in a setting where only clinical and imaging diagnoses determine the treatment. Methods A total of 44 consecutive serum specimens were collected from clinically suspected OTB patients, based on clinical and radiological [X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography] features. They were screened by in-house nested PCR. In addition, a few specimens were examined by Gram stain, acid-fast bacilli stain, histopathology and routine bacterial culture. A total of 39 specimens were collected from patients suffering from other bone diseases of nontuberculous origin and included as negative controls. Results Of the 44 clinically suspected OTB patients, in-house nested PCR was positive in 40 (91%) cases; PCR was negative in 38 (97%) negative controls. Sensitivity and specificity of our in-house nested PCR was 90.9% and 97.4%, respectively. The PCR report was available within 48 h. It was possible to standardize serum PCR technique and in positive cases, a good correlation was observed in terms of an adequate treatment response. Conclusions Nested PCR in serum samples is a rapid, highly sensitive and specific modality for OTB detection. PCR should be performed in addition to clinical evaluation, imaging studies, acid-fast bacilli staining, culture and histopathology diagnosis, if possible. PMID:25183281

García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Martínez-Elizondo, Olga; del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

2014-01-01

186

Cluster without fluster: The effect of correlated outcomes on inference in randomized clinical trials.  

PubMed

Inference for randomized clinical trials is generally based on the assumption that outcomes are independently and identically distributed under the null hypothesis. In some trials, particularly in infectious disease, outcomes may be correlated. This may be known in advance (e.g. allowing randomization of family members) or completely unplanned (e.g. sexual sharing among randomized participants). There is particular concern when the form of the correlation is essentially unknown, in which case we cannot take advantage of the correlation to construct a more efficient test. Instead, we can only investigate the impact of potential correlation on the independent-samples test statistic. Randomization tends to balance out treatment and control assignments within clusters, so it is logical that performance of tests averaged over all possible randomization assignments would be essentially unaffected by arbitrary correlation. We confirm this intuition by showing that a permutation test controls the type 1 error rate in a certain average sense whenever the clustering is independent of treatment assignment. It is nonetheless possible to obtain a 'bad' randomization such that members of a cluster tend to be assigned to the same treatment. Conditioned on such a bad randomization, the type 1 error rate is increased. PMID:17594680

Proschan, Michael; Follmann, Dean

2008-03-15

187

Cutting a Long Story Short? The Clinical Relevance of Asking Parents, Nurses, and Young Children Themselves to Identify Children's Mental Health Problems by One or Two Questions  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims. Assessing young children's mental health is a crucial and challenging task. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical relevance of asking parents, nurses, and young children themselves to identify children's mental health problems by only one or two questions. Methods. In regular health check-ups of 4- to 9-year-old children (n = 2682), parents and public health nurses assessed by one question whether the child had any emotional or behavioral difficulties. The child completed a self-evaluation enquiry on his/her emotional well-being. A stratified proportion of the participating parents were invited to a diagnostic interview. Results. Sensitivities were fairly good for the parents' (68%), nurses' (65%), and their combined (79%) one-question screens. Difficulties identified by parents and nurses were major risks (OR 10–14) for any child psychiatric disorders (P < 0.001). The child's self-evaluation was related to 2-fold to 3-fold risks (P < 0.05) for any psychiatric diagnosis, for any emotional diagnosis, and for negative situational factors. Conclusion. The one-question screen for parents and public health nurses together quite adequately identified the young children with mental health problems. The child's self-evaluation provided relevant and complementary information on his/her mental health and especially emotional problems.

Joukamaa, Matti; Tamminen, Tuula

2014-01-01

188

Sexual distress, sexual dysfunction and relationship quality in women with systemic sclerosis: correlation with clinical variables.  

PubMed

To assess the rate of sexual distress, sexual dysfunction and relationship quality and their association with clinical variables in women with systemic sclerosis (SSc), 102 sexually active women with SSc were recruited. Sexual distress, sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction with relationship quality were investigated by Female Sexual Distress Scale Revised (FSDS-R), Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), respectively. The patients underwent medical examinations and nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC). Of the 102 patients, 37 (36%) reported sexual distress with FSDS-R score >11, 45 (44%) had sexual dysfunction with FSFI score <19 and 49 (48%) were not satisfied with relationship quality with DAS score <100. There was a negative correlation (p<0.001, R= -0.30) between FSDS-R and FSFI. No correlation was found between FSDS-R and DAS. FSFI showed a positive correlation with DAS (p<0.0001, R= 0.36). Age correlated negatively (p<0.05, R= -0.26) with FSFI, while FSDS-R and DAS did not correlate (p>0.05) with age. SSc women with digital ulcers (DU) had a reduction of FSFI and DAS compared with women without DU. In patients with late capillaroscopic pattern, mean value of FSFI was significantly lower than the other two capillaroscopic patterns. DAS decreased with progression of capillaroscopic damage. In a high percentage of women with SSc FSDS-R was increased, while FSFI and DAS were reduced. Age correlated negatively with FSFI, while skin score showed a negative correlation with DAS. Digital vascular damage negatively influenced FSFI and DAS. PMID:25004840

Rosato, E; Rossi, C; Molinaro, I; Di Giulio, M A; Trombetta, A C; Marra, A M; Gigante, A; Barbano, B; Quarta, S; Pisarri, S; Afeltra, A; Salsano, F

2014-01-01

189

Investigation of Possible Correlation between Giardia duodenalis Genotypes and Clinical Symptoms in Southwest of Iran  

PubMed Central

Background Giardia duodenalis is one of the most important human enteric parasites throughout the world. Clinical symptoms of this parasite vary from asymptomatic infection to chronic diarrhea. Still it is not clear, whether different types of pathogenesis are due to different strains of organism or to variable host factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible correlation of clinical symptoms with assemblages among symptomatic and asymptomatic cases collected from southwest of Iran. Methods Fecal samples were collected from 100 symptomatic and asymptomatic cases, which were positive for G. duodenalis. The samples were subjected to semi-nested PCR and RFLP for gdh gene. Results Among symptomatic patients, 54% had mixed genotypes AII and BIII, 28% and 18% of samples indicated assemblages BIII and AII, respectively. In contrast, among asymptomatic cases, 64%, 26% and 10%samples had mixed genotypes, BIII and AII assemblages, respectively. Statistical analysis using Chi- Square test showed that there was no significant correlation between assemblage and clinical symptoms in current study. Conclusion High prevalence of mixed infection in both groups may affect this conclusion, therefore further study in more details are necessary to clarify these finding. Additionally, it is important to carry out investigations regarding human host factors as well. PMID:24454431

RAFIEI, Abdollah; ROOINTAN, Elham Sadat; SAMARBAFZADEH, Ali Reza; SHAYESTEH, Ali Akbar; SHAMSIZADEH, Ahmad; POURMAHDI BORUJENI, Mahdi

2013-01-01

190

Sex-specific clinical correlates of hoarding in obsessive-compulsive disorder.  

PubMed

Little is known about whether the clinical correlates of hoarding behavior are different in men and women with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the current study, we evaluated the association of hoarding with categories of obsessions and compulsions, psychiatric disorders, personality dimensions, and other clinical characteristics separately in 151 men and 358 women with OCD who were examined during the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study. We found that, among men but not women, hoarding was associated with aggressive, sexual, and religious obsessions and checking compulsions. In men, hoarding was associated with generalized anxiety disorder and tics whereas, among women, hoarding was associated with social phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, nail biting, and skin picking. In women but not men, hoarding was associated with schizotypal and dependent personality disorder dimensions, and with low conscientiousness. These findings indicate that specific clinical correlates of hoarding in OCD are different in men and women and may reflect sex-specific differences in the course, expression, and/or etiology of hoarding behavior in OCD. PMID:18692168

Samuels, Jack F; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Pinto, Anthony; Murphy, Dennis L; Piacentini, John; Rauch, Scott L; Fyer, Abby J; Grados, Marco A; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Knowles, James A; McCracken, James T; Cullen, Bernadette; Riddle, Mark A; Rasmussen, Steven A; Pauls, David L; Liang, Kung-Yee; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Pulver, Ann E; Nestadt, Gerald

2008-09-01

191

Sex-Specific Clinical Correlates of Hoarding in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

PubMed Central

Little is known about whether the clinical correlates of hoarding behavior are different in men and women with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the current study, we evaluated the association of hoarding with categories of obsessions and compulsions, psychiatric disorders, personality dimensions, and other clinical characteristics separately in 151 men and 358 women with OCD who were examined during the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study. We found that, among men but not women, hoarding was associated with aggressive, sexual, and religious obsessions and checking compulsions. In men, hoarding was associated with generalized anxiety disorder and tics whereas, among women, hoarding was associated with social phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, nail biting, and skin picking. In women but not men, hoarding was associated with schizotypal and dependent personality disorder dimensions, and with low conscientiousness. These findings indicate that specific clinical correlates of hoarding in OCD are different in men and women and may reflect sex-specific differences in the course, expression, and/or etiology of hoarding behavior in OCD. PMID:18692168

Samuels, Jack F.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Pinto, Anthony; Murphy, Dennis L.; Piacentini, John; Rauch, Scott L.; Fyer, Abby J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Knowles, James A.; McCracken, James T.; Cullen, Bernadette; Riddle, Mark A.; Rasmussen, Steven A.; Pauls, David L.; Liang, Kung-Yee; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Pulver, Ann E.; Nestadt, Gerald

2008-01-01

192

Screening, assessment, and treatment of osteoporosis for the nurse practitioner: Key questions and answers for clinical practice—A Canadian perspective  

PubMed Central

Purpose Using a case-based approach, we review key clinical questions relevant to nurse practitioners (NPs) regarding the screening, assessment, and treatment of patients at risk for osteoporosis and fractures in a Canadian general practice setting. Data sources A case presentation with relevant questions and answers to guide management of a patient. Conclusions Osteoporosis is a common condition in both the aging male and female populations. Screening, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis is lagging behind relative to other chronic disease states. NPs have a unique opportunity to help reduce this care gap by playing an integral role in the identification, risk stratification, and treatment of patients at risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Implications for practice This case highlights the important role an NP can have in screening a patient previously not diagnosed or managed for osteoporosis. Performing a focused history and physical exam of the patient to determine appropriate screening tests and fracture risk will help in guiding treatment decisions. PMID:24911524

Rice, Peggy; Mehan, Upender; Hamilton, Celeste; Kim, Sandra

2014-01-01

193

Guest Expert Connie Ulrich: Ethics of clinical research participation~three questions for us to discuss | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Connie Ulrich, is an Associate Professor of Bioethics and Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Connie's research is all about clinical trial participation. I hope you find her insights as useful as we have. Please review her comments below and let us know your thoughts.

194

Question Builder  

MedlinePLUS

... Tips and Tools || Question Builder Text Size: Question Builder Be prepared for your next medical appointment. Create ... is important to be prepared. With the Question Builder, it is easy. Step 1: Choose the kind ...

195

The art and science of searching MEDLINE to answer clinical questions. Finding the right number of articles.  

PubMed

The current medical environment makes information retrieval a matter of practical importance for clinicians. Many avenues present themselves to the clinician, but here we focus on MEDLINE by summarizing the current state of the art and providing an innovative approach for skill enhancement. Because new search engines appear rapidly, we focus on generic principles that can be easily adapted to various systems, even those not yet available. We propose an idealized classification system for the results of a MEDLINE search. Type A searches produce a few articles of high quality that are directly focused on the immediate question. Type B searches yield a large number of articles, some more relevant than others. Type C searches produce few or no articles, and those that are located are not germane. Providing that relevant, high-quality articles do exist, type B and C searches may often be improved with attention to search technique. Problems stem from poor recall and poor precision. The most daunting task lies in achieving the balance between too few and too many articles. By providing a theoretical framework and several practical examples, we prepare the searcher to overcome the following barriers: a) failure to begin with a well-built question; b) failure to use the Medical Subject Headings; c) failure to leverage the relationship between recall and precision; and d) failure to apply proper limits to the search. Thought and practice will increase the utility and enjoyment of searching MEDLINE. PMID:10507188

Allison, J J; Kiefe, C I; Weissman, N W; Carter, J; Centor, R M

1999-01-01

196

question_1309956298 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Cell culture, the propagation of cells in artificial environment conducive to growth, has become one of the major tools in life sciences. Human cells grown in laboratory, subjected to various (single or multiple) perturbations, are serving well in elucidating physico-biochemical mechanisms of response in investigations of physiology and biochemistry. In addition, cell strains and cell lines have extensively been used to identify molecular markers of disease, and recent advances in cell culture have facilitated propagating stem cells for clinical and research purposes.

197

Correlation of clinical, cytological and histological findings in oral squamous cell carcinomas.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to investigate the efficiency of exfoliative cytology by correlating the clinical lesions of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with exfoliative cytology and histopathological findings. Cases of OSCC diagnosed between 1984 and 2010 were analyzed. The inclusion criteria for the present study were the availability of detailed clinical findings and a diagnosis of the disease through exfoliative cytology and histopathology. The cases were assessed and assigned scores, which were then submitted to modal expression analysis, which considers the higher frequency scores, thus relating the variables. The cytological findings demonstrated that the majority of the cases had malignant potential. Exfoliative cytology should be used as a supplementary tool for the diagnosis of OSCC, as it enables the early detection of these lesions. However, cytology should not be used as a substitute for histopathological examination. PMID:25013502

Sousa, Michele Cardoso; Alves, Monica Ghislaine Oliveira; Souza, Luciano Albino; Brandão, Adriana Aigotti Haberbeck; Almeida, Janete Dias; Cabral, Luiz Antonio Guimarães

2014-08-01

198

Prostatic adenocarcinoma: reproducibility and correlation with clinical stages of four grading systems.  

PubMed

One hundred cases of adenocarcinoma of the prostate were independently examined by light microscopy by three pathologists and graded according to the Gleason, Mostofi, Böcking, and MD Anderson systems (MDAH). The results were compared in order to establish which one of these classifications was the most reproducible and then correlated to the clinical stage in order to determine how accurately each classification can predict the spread of the tumors. The MDAH system, based on the percentage of gland formation in the tumor, was the easiest to use and most reproducible system. On the other hand, the Mostofi and the Böcking systems had the best correlation between grade and stage while the MDAH system had the worst. The Böcking system was the best grading system when reproducibility and accuracy in predicting the prognosis were both taken into account. PMID:3371983

de las Morenas, A; Siroky, M B; Merriam, J; Stilmant, M M

1988-05-01

199

Firing patterns of pallidal cells in parkinsonian patients correlate with their pre-pallidotomy clinical scores.  

PubMed

It is unclear how the disordered activity of cells in the basal ganglia contributes to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). We recorded from single neurons extracellularly in 3 regions of the globus pallidus (GPe, GPie and GPii) in patients undergoing pallidotomy for PD. Movement-related cell firing patterns, analysed using hidden Markov models, were significantly correlated with patients' preoperative clinical scores (off drugs). Responses of cells in GPii correlated best with the scores for specific motor tasks, rather than general ones related to activities of daily living, but the reverse was true for responses from GPe. In both GPii and GPe, a higher score (i.e. greater parkinsonian severity) was associated with greater variability in cell firing rather than an increase in firing rate itself. PMID:11059912

El-Deredy, W; Branston, N M; Samuel, M; Schrag, A; Rothwell, J C; Thomas, D G; Quinn, N P

2000-10-20

200

Oxidative Stress Correlates with Headache Symptoms in Fibromyalgia: Coenzyme Q10 Effect on Clinical Improvement  

PubMed Central

Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. Methods We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ10, catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. Results We found decreased CoQ10, catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively) We also found increased level of LPO in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.001). Significant negative correlations between CoQ10 or catalase levels in BMCs and headache parameters were observed (r?=??0.59, P<0.05; r?=??0.68, P<0.05, respectively). Furthermore, LPO levels showed a significant positive correlation with HIT-6 (r?=?0.33, P<0.05). Oral CoQ10 supplementation restored biochemical parameters and induced a significant improvement in clinical and headache symptoms (P<0.001). Discussion The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM. PMID:22532869

Cordero, Mario D.; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; De Miguel, Manuel; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio

2012-01-01

201

Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7: Clinical Course, Phenotype-Genotype Correlations, and Neuropathology  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. METHODS We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in 5, and autopsy in 4 cases. RESULTS We identified 4 stages of the illness. Stage 0; gene positive but phenotypically silent. Stage 1; no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms. Stage 2; symptoms and signs progress modestly. Stage 3; rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r=-0.74, p=0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p=0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. DISCUSSION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through 4 clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

Horton, Laura C.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Vangel, Mark G.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

2012-01-01

202

Interobserver variability of ultrasound elastography in transplant kidneys: correlations with clinical-Doppler parameters.  

PubMed

Real-time sonoelastography (RSE) is a relatively new imaging technique that visualizes relative difference in tissue hardness by evaluating changes in local strain in response to external stress. Our aim was to evaluate the ability of investigators to use sonoelastography to detect differences in renal cortical stiffness and assess the relationship between stiffness and clinical-Doppler parameters. In 42 adult renal transplant recipients, sonoelastography of kidney was performed to calculate the strain ratio (SR) of the central echo complex to the renal parenchyma. Resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) were also measured. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Parenchymal stiffness showed significant positive correlation with RI and PI (r: 0.41 p = 0.007 and r: 0.48 p = 0.001, respectively). Parenchymal stiffness and eGFR did not have a significant correlation (p = 0.42). Interobserver agreement, expressed as intraclass correlation coeffiicient was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.05-0.70). Parenchymal stiffness (SR) showed significant positive correlation with RI and PI but sonoelastography has also wide range intra- and low interobserver agreement in renal transplants. Further studies are warranted in larger patient groups to determine the reliability of sonoelastography in renal transplants. PMID:23103325

Ozkan, Fuat; Yavuz, Yasemin Coskun; Inci, Mehmet Fatih; Altunoluk, Bulent; Ozcan, Nuri; Yuksel, Murvet; Sayarlioglu, Hayriye; Dogan, Ekrem

2013-01-01

203

Clinically occult, noncalcified breast cancer: serial radiologic-pathologic correlation in 27 cases.  

PubMed

A serial radiographic-pathologic correlation based on specimen radiography was performed on 27 consecutive, clinically occult, noncalcified breast cancers to determine the frequency of and correlation between appearances at mammography, pathologic diagnoses, and the features of the histologic margins. Twenty (74%) of the lesions were infiltrating ductal cancers, five (19%) were intraductal cancers, and two (7%) were medullary cancers. Forty-one percent of these malignancies contained microscopic calcifications. Lesions demonstrated at mammography in these 27 cases consisted of a well-defined round mass (n = 1); well-defined lobulated masses (n = 2); indistinct round, oval, or lobulated masses (n = 7); irregular or mixed lesions (n = 7); spiculated masses (n = 9); and architectural distortion (n = 1). Histologic margins of infiltrating and intraductal cancers, created by several types of tumor-fat interfaces and surrounding reactive fibrosis, correlated with these radiographic appearances. Serial specimen radiographic-pathologic correlation can improve our understanding of the appearance of early breast cancer at mammography. PMID:2847231

Stomper, P C; Davis, S P; Weidner, N; Meyer, J E

1988-12-01

204

Clinical factors correlated with the success rate of miniscrews in orthodontic treatment  

PubMed Central

Miniscrews offer a reliable alternative for anchorage during orthodontic treatment, particularly for non-cooperative patients or periodontal patients with alveolar bone loss. The study aims at assessing the correlation of various clinical indicators with the success or failure of miniscrews used for anchorage during orthodontic treatment. Thirty-four consecutive patients with a cumulative total of 82 miniscrews implanted participated in the study. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to assess the correlation of various factors with success rates. The miniscrew was considered the unit of analysis clustered within site and within patient. The overall success rate of miniscrews was 90.2%. For every additional miniscrew used in a patient's oral cavity, the success rate was reduced by 67%. Retromandibular triangle and palatal placement and in movable mucosa resulted in lower success rate. The miniscrew length and diameter were found to correlate with success rates. Orthodontic force applied on miniscrews for uprighting purposes showed a lower success rate than that used for retraction. This study revealed that miniscrews present high success rates. The number of miniscrews used per patient, the miniscrew site placement, the soft tissue type of placement, the miniscrew length and diameter as well as the orthodontic force applied on the miniscrew showed significant correlation with success rates. PMID:22241373

Topouzelis, Nikolaos; Tsaousoglou, Phoebus

2012-01-01

205

Preclinical and Clinical In Vitro In Vivo Correlation of an hGH Dextran Microsphere Formulation  

PubMed Central

Purpose To investigate the in vitro in vivo correlation of a sustained release formulation for human growth hormone (hGH) based on hydroxyethyl methacrylated dextran (dex-HEMA) microspheres in Pit-1 deficient Snell dwarf mice and in healthy human volunteers. Materials and Methods A hGH-loaded microsphere formulation was developed and tested in Snell dwarf mice (pharmacodynamic study) and in healthy human volunteers (pharmacokinetic study). Results Single subcutaneous administration of the microspheres in mice resulted in a good correlation between hGH released in vitro and in vivo effects for the hGH-loaded microsphere formulation similar to daily injected hGH indicating a retained bioactivity. Testing the microspheres in healthy volunteers showed an increase (over 7–8 days) in hGH serum concentrations (peak concentrations: 1–2.5 ng/ml). A good in vitro in vivo correlation was obtained between the measured and calculated (from in vitro release data) hGH serum concentrations. Moreover, an increased serum concentration of biomarkers (insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) was found again indicating that bioactive hGH was released from the microspheres. Conclusions Good in vitro in vivo correlations were obtained for hGH-loaded dex-HEMA microspheres, which is an important advantage in predicting the effect of the controlled drug delivery product in a clinical situations. PMID:17929148

de Vrueh, R.; Gresnigt, M. G.; Hoogerbrugge, C. M.; van Buul-Offers, S. C.; de Leede, L. G. J.; Sterkman, L. G. W.; Crommelin, D. J. A.; Hennink, W. E.; Verrijk, R.

2007-01-01

206

Injury to the Preterm Brain and Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, Unanswered Questions, and Future Research Directions  

PubMed Central

Cerebral palsy will affect nearly 10% of the 60,000 very-low-birth-weight infants born in the United States in the next year, and an even greater percentage will display some form of permanent neurological impairment resulting from injury to the preterm brain. The 2008 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 37th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to define current knowledge and to develop specific aims for future clinical, translational, and fundamental science. A complex interplay of both destructive and developmental forces is responsible for injury to the preterm brain. Advances in imaging and histology have implicated a variety of cell types, though pre-oligodendrocyte injury remains the focus. Research into different mechanisms of injury is facilitating new neuroprotective and rehabilitative interventions. A cooperative effort is necessary to translate basic research findings into clinically effective therapies and better care for these children. PMID:19745084

Babcock, Michael A.; Kostova, Felina V.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Johnston, Michael V.; Brunstrom, Jan E.; Hagberg, Henrik; Maria, Bernard L.

2013-01-01

207

Unemployment among patients with newly diagnosed first-episode psychosis: prevalence and clinical correlates in a US sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Although it is well established that people with schizophrenia have markedly high rates of unemployment, less is known about\\u000a the prevalence and clinical correlates of unemployment in patients newly diagnosed with first-episode psychosis. This analysis\\u000a documented the prevalence of unemployment and examined previously reported clinical correlates of unemployment in patients\\u000a with first-episode psychosis hospitalized in an urban, public-sector setting in

Claire E. Ramsay; Tarianna Stewart; Michael T. Compton

208

Progressive polyradiculoneuropathy in diabetes: correlation of variables and clinical outcome after immunotherapy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To quantify the progression of diabetic polyradiculoneuropathy—a condition in which immune factors have been implicated—after immunotherapy.?METHODS—The study evaluated 15 consecutive patients with this condition. All patients were older than 40. Four had type I diabetes and six were women. The duration of pre-existing diabetes varied from 2 to 20 years. The clinical presentation was dominated by painful progressive motor weakness, with or without exacerbation of sensory symptoms. The weakness involved all limbs, but was often asymmetric.?RESULTS—Electrophysiological testing showed a predominantly axonal polyneuropathy, with more recent denervating polyradiculopathy. Analysis of CSF showed increased protein in 14 and oligoclonal bands in five. Quantitative autonomic tests showed abnormalities in all patients. Sural nerve biopsy was performed in 14 patients; all showed fibre loss and segmental demyelination, four had occasional onion bulbs, and 10 showed various inflammatory infiltrates. After immunomodulating therapy, there was no further deterioration and clinical improvement occurred in all patients. Sweat responses, cardiovascular reflexes, and sural nerve fibre density correlated best with functional outcome. There was no significant difference between plasmapheresis and intravenous gammaglobulin.?CONCLUSION—Immunotherapy may improve this condition, but only certain variables correlate with rapid therapeutic response.?? PMID:10519866

Jaradeh, S.; Prieto, T.; Lobeck, L.

1999-01-01

209

Correlation of the NBME Advanced Clinical Examination in EM and the National EM M4 exams  

PubMed Central

Introduction Since 2011 two online, validated exams for fourth-year emergency medicine (EM) students have been available (National EM M4 Exams). In 2013 the National Board of Medical Examiners offered the Advanced Clinical Examination in Emergency Medicine (EM-ACE). All of these exams are now in widespread use; however, there are no data on how they correlate. This study evaluated the correlation between the EM-ACE exam and the National EM M4 Exams. Methods From May 2013 to April 2014 the EM-ACE and one version of the EM M4 exam were administered sequentially to fourth-year EM students at five U.S. medical schools. Data collected included institution, gross and scaled scores and version of the EM M4 exam. We performed Pearson’s correlation and random effects linear regression. Results 303 students took the EM-ACE and versions 1 (V1) or 2 (V2) of the EM M4 exams (279 and 24, respectively). The mean percent correct for the exams were as follows: EM-ACE 74.8 (SD-8.83), V1 83.0 (SD-6.41), V2 78.5 (SD-7.70). Pearson’s correlation coefficient for the V1/EM-ACE was 0.51 (0.42 scaled) and for the V2/EM-ACE was 0.59 (0.41 scaled). The coefficient of determination for V1/EM-ACE was 0.72 and for V2/EM-ACE = 0.71 (0.86 and 0.49 for scaled scores). The R-squared values were 0.25 and 0.30 (0.18 and 0.13, scaled), respectively. There was significant cluster effect by institution. Conclusion There was moderate positive correlation of student scores on the EM-ACE exam and the National EM M4 Exams.

Hiller, Katherine; Miller, Emily S.; Lawson, Luan; Wald, David; Beeson, Michael; Heitz, Corey; Morrissey, Thomas; House, Joseph; Poznanski, Stacey

2015-01-01

210

Clinical Correlates of Hwa-Byung and a Proposal for a New Anger Disorder  

PubMed Central

This paper reviewed the studies on hwa-byung (HB), which literally means anger disorder and this is known as the culture-related chronic anger syndrome of Koreans. Based on these studies and a review of the literature on the anger syndromes of other cultures, I have proposed a new anger disorder. The rationale for this proposition is first that the clinical correlates of HB, including the epidemiological data, the etiological factors, the symptoms and the clinical course, are unique and different from those of the depressive disorders, which have been postulated to be similar to HB. Second, the symptoms of HB are characterized by pent-up anger and somatic and behavioral symptoms related to the release and suppression of anger. Third, a group of patients with only HB and who visit psychiatrists for treatment have been identified. Fourth, anger is thought to be the basic target of treatment for HB patients. Last, anger syndromes like HB have been identified, with various names, in other cultures. By reducing the cultural variation of HB and integrating the common clinical correlates of the syndromes related to anger, a new anger disorder for the mood of anger can be conceptualized, like that for other mood disorders for the corresponding pathological moods. The research diagnostic criteria for HB and the new anger disorder are also suggested. I propose that the new anger disorder to be included in the new international classification system as a member of the larger family of mood disorders. International collaborative studies are needed not only to identify such anger disorder in various cultures, but also to explore giving better treatment to these patients based on the bio-psycho-social model of anger disorder. PMID:20046356

2008-01-01

211

Molecular analysis of sarcoidosis lymph nodes for microorganisms: a case–control study with clinical correlates  

PubMed Central

Introduction Sarcoidosis is an incurable, chronic granulomatous disease primarily involving the lungs and lymph nodes of unknown aetiology, treated with non-specific anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive drugs. Persistently symptomatic patients worsen with a disabling, potentially fatal clinical course. To determine a possible infectious cause, we correlated in a case-control study the clinical information with the presence of bacterial DNA in sarcoidosis mediastinal lymph nodes compared with control lymph nodes resected during cancer surgery. Methods We retrospectively studied formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, mediastinal lymph nodes from 30 patients with sarcoidosis and 30 control patients with lung cancer. Nucleic acids were extracted from nodes, evaluated by ribosomal RNA PCR for bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA and the results were sequenced and compared with a bacterial sequence library. Clinical information was correlated. Results 11/30 (36.7%) of lymph nodes from patients with sarcoidosis had detectable bacterial DNA, significantly more than control patient lymph nodes (2/30, 6.7%), p=0.00516. At presentation, 19/30 (63.3%) patients with sarcoidosis were symptomatic including all patients with detectable bacterial DNA. Radiographically, there were 18 stage I and 12 stage II patients. All stage II patients were symptomatic and 75% had PCR-detectable bacteria. After a mean follow-up of 52.8±32.8?months, all patients with PCR-detectable bacteria in this series were persistently symptomatic requiring treatment. Discussion 36.6% of patients with sarcoidosis had detectable bacterial DNA on presentation, all of these patients were quite symptomatic and most were radiographically advanced stage II. These findings suggest that bacterial DNA-positive, symptomatic patients have more aggressive sarcoidosis that persists long term and might benefit from antimicrobial treatment directed against this presumed chronic granulomatous infection. PMID:24366580

Robinson, Lary A; Smith, Prudence; SenGupta, Dhruba J; Prentice, Jennifer L; Sandin, Ramon L

2013-01-01

212

Cytomorphologic spectrum of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and its clinical correlation: A retrospective study of 52 patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease and it is more prevalent in Asians. The incidence of HT seems to be increasing in the recent times. It is one of the most common cause of hypothyroidism. The purpose of this study is to review the cytomorphologic spectrum of HT and correlate it with clinical findings including thyroid function and antibody profile. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the fine-needle aspiration (FNA) features of 52 HT patients. Based on cytomorphologic features patients were categorized into three groups. Clinical findings including thyroid function and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody profile were correlated with cytomorphologic features in all three groups. Results: Majority of the patients were females and in 2nd, 3rd and 4th decades. Diffuse goiter and thyroid hypofunction were the common findings. Significant number of patients had thyroid hyperfunction. Increased lymphocytes on the background and lymphocytic infiltration of thyroid follicular cell clusters in cytology smears were diagnostic of HT. The 32 patients showed elevated titers of TPO antibodies. In the early stages and mild form of the disease, results of thyroid function and anti TPO antibodies are quite variable. Conclusions: HT is a disease of young and middle age and mostly occur in females. Clinical findings alone may not be adequate for definitive diagnosis. FNA is the gold standard for diagnosis. In the presence of abundant colloid, follicular hyperplasia or co-existing neoplasm, careful interpretation of cytology smears should be done. Aspiration from more than one site minimizes the diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:24987440

Chandanwale, Shirish S.; Gore, Charusheela R.; Bamanikar, Sunita A.; Gupta, Nidhi; Gupta, Kanika

2014-01-01

213

Adjusting head circumference for covariates in autism: clinical correlates of a highly heritable continuous trait  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Brain development follows a different trajectory in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) than in typically developing children. A proxy for neurodevelopment could be head circumference (HC), but studies assessing HC and its clinical correlates in ASD have been inconsistent. This study investigates HC and clinical correlates in the Simons Simplex Collection cohort. METHODS We used a mixed linear model to estimate effects of covariates and the deviation from the expected HC given parental HC (genetic deviation). After excluding individuals with incomplete data, 7225 individuals in 1891 families remained for analysis. We examined the relationship between HC/genetic deviation of HC and clinical parameters. RESULTS Gender, age, height, weight, genetic ancestry and ASD status were significant predictors of HC (estimate of the ASD effect=0.2cm). HC was approximately normally distributed in probands and unaffected relatives, with only a few outliers. Genetic deviation of HC was also normally distributed, consistent with a random sampling of parental genes. Whereas larger HC than expected was associated with ASD symptom severity and regression, IQ decreased with the absolute value of the genetic deviation of HC. CONCLUSIONS Measured against expected values derived from covariates of ASD subjects, statistical outliers for HC were uncommon. HC is a strongly heritable trait and population norms for HC would be far more accurate if covariates including genetic ancestry, height and age were taken into account. The association of diminishing IQ with absolute deviation from predicted HC values suggests HC could reflect subtle underlying brain development and warrants further investigation. PMID:23746936

Chaste, Pauline; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J.; Murtha, Michael T.; Hus, Vanessa; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Yu, Timothy W.; Fombonne, Eric; Geschwind, Daniel; Grice, Dorothy E.; Ledbetter, David H.; Lord, Catherine; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa Lese; Martin, Donna M.; Morrow, Eric M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Sutcliffe, James S.; State, Matthew W.; Devlin, Bernie; Cook, Edwin H.; Kim, Soo-Jeong

2013-01-01

214

Correlation of clinical and deletion data in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.  

PubMed Central

Cloned cDNA sequences representing exons from the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) gene were used for deletion screening in a population of 287 males males affected with DMD or BMD. The clinical phenotypes of affected boys were classified into three clinical severity groups based on the age at which ambulation was lost. Boys in group 1 had DMD, losing ambulation before their 13th birthday; those in group 2 had disease of intermediate severity, losing ambulation between the ages of 13 and 16 years; and boys in group 3 had BMD, being ambulant beyond 16 years. A fourth group consisted of patients too young to be classified. Clinical group allocation was made without previous knowledge of the DNA results. A gene deletion was found in 124 cases where the clinical severity group of the affected boy was known. The extent of the deletions was delineated using cDNA probes. There were 74 different deletions. Fifty-five of these were unique to individual patients, but the other 19 were found in at least two unrelated patients. The different clinical groups showed generally similar distributions of deletions, and the number of exon bands deleted (that is, deletion size) was independent of phenotype. Some specific deletion types, however, correlated with the clinical severity of the disease. Deletion of exons containing HindIII fragments 33 and 34 and 33 to 35 were associated with BMD and were not found in patients with DMD. Deletions 3 to 7 occurred in four patients with the intermediate phenotype and one patient with BMD. Other shared deletions were associated with DMD, although in four cases patients with disease of intermediate severity apparently shared the same deletion with boys with DMD. The range of phenotypes observed, and the overlap at the genetic level between severe and intermediate and mild and intermediate forms of dystrophy, emphasizes the essential continuity of the clinical spectrum of DMD/BMD. There were no characteristic deletions found in boys with mental retardation or short stature which differed from deletions in affected boys without these features. Images PMID:2585468

Hodgson, S; Hart, K; Abbs, S; Heckmatt, J; Rodillo, E; Bobrow, M; Dubowitz, V

1989-01-01

215

The Clinical Time-Course of Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis Using Topical Endoscopic Fundal Imaging with Histologic and Cellular Infiltrate Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE. EAU is an established preclinical model for assess- ment of immunotherapeutic efficacy toward translation of ther- apy for posterior uveitis. Reliable screening of clinical features that correlate with underlying retinal changes and damage has not been possible to date. This study was undertaken to de- scribe, validate, and correlate topical endoscopic fundus imag- ing (TEFI) with histologic features of

David A. Copland; Michael S. Wertheim; W. John Armitage; Lindsay B. Nicholson; Ben J. E. Raveney; Andrew D. Dick

216

[Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis. Sensitivity and correlation with the clinical picture].  

PubMed

The aim of imaging the brain in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is to prove the dissemination of lesions, so critical for the diagnosis and so difficult to ascertain clinically. Our study included 21 patients with clinically definite (12) and probable (9) MS. A 21 patients underwent a neurological standard examination, a double-dose delayed CT scan and a Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a superconducting 0.5 Tesla magnet. Jointed slices were performed with a T2-weighted Spin-Echo sequence (TE 60, 120; TR 2000 msec). MRI detected 640 lesions in 20 patients while CT scan detected only 24 lesions in 9 patients. Technical limiting factors are discussed. Abnormalities in MRI were high-intense spots, blotches and streaks, located predominantly in the periventricular area. Capping lesions were common around the ventricular horns. "Plaques" were visualized in the posterior fossa. For each patient, the total surface of the lesions was calculated and was found to be related with the presence of lesions and with the cortical atrophy on CT scan. A correlation between the surface of lesions calculated by MRI and the disability scale was found especially in the group of patients with clinically proven cerebral lesions, while patients with predominantly spinal forms had a significantly lower surface of lesions. This finding could yield a new quantitative evaluation of the MS pathologic process which could be used to assess therapeutic efficacy. PMID:3797931

Borgel, F; Hommel, M; Pollak, P; Gaio, J M; Crouzet, G; Lebas, J F; Pellat, J; Perret, J

1986-01-01

217

Clinical Factors Affecting Discrepant Correlation Between Asthma Control Test Score and Pulmonary Function  

PubMed Central

The Asthma Control Test (ACT) score is widely used in asthma clinics, particularly with the recent emphasis on achievement and maintenance of optimal asthma control. However, this self-assessment score does not always correspond with lung function parameters, leading to uncertainty about each patient's control status; therefore, we investigated the clinical characteristics that are associated with discrepant correlation between the ACT score and pulmonary function. The 252 adult asthmatic subjects were divided into 5 groups according to their changes in FEV1% predicted values and ACT scores between 2 consecutive visits three months apart. The data were retrospectively reviewed and several clinical variables were compared. Elderly, non-eosinophilic, non-atopic asthma patients were more likely to show paradoxical changes of pulmonary function and ACT score. Female patients were prone to report exaggerated changes of ACT score compared with baseline lung function and changes in FEV1 levels. This group was using more medications for rhinosinusitis. Male patients seemed less sensitive to changes in lung function. From these findings, we conclude that when assessing asthma control status, physicians should carefully consider patient age, gender, atopy status, blood eosinophil levels, and comorbidities along with their ACT scores and pulmonary function test results. PMID:25553267

Park, So Young; Yoon, Sun-Young; Shin, Bomi; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom

2015-01-01

218

Vitamin D insufficiency in myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes: clinical correlates and prognostic studies.  

PubMed

Vitamin D insufficiency is commonly observed in the general population; observational studies have suggested an association with increased risk of cancer development. We examined the clinical and prognostic relevance of low plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). A total of 409 patients were studied: 247 (60%) with primary myelofibrosis (PMF), 74 (18%) with de novo MDS, 63 (15%) with polycythemia vera (PV), and 25 (6%) with essential thrombocythemia (ET). Plasma 25(OH)D levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; a level lower than 25 ng/mL indicated vitamin D insufficiency and a level lower than 10 ng/mL indicated severe deficiency. The proportion of patients with 25(OH)D insufficiency was significantly greater in PMF (48%) and PV (43%) when compared with ET (28%) and MDS (28%) (P = 0.01). Severe 25(OH)D deficiency was significantly more frequent in ET (12%) and PMF (9%), compared with PV (3%) and MDS (1%) (P = 0.05). There were no significant correlations between 25(OH)D insufficiency, or severe deficiency, and a variety of clinical or laboratory variables in PMF, MDS, or PV. Furthermore, Vitamin D insufficiency did not influence either overall or leukemia-free survival in PMF, MDS, or PV (P > 0.05). We conclude that while hypovitaminosis D is relatively common in MPN and MDS, its clinical relevance for prognosis is limited. PMID:22086864

Pardanani, Animesh; Drake, Matthew T; Finke, Christy; Lasho, Terra L; Rozell, Shaina A; Jimma, Thitina; Tefferi, Ayalew

2011-12-01

219

Clinical factors affecting discrepant correlation between asthma control test score and pulmonary function.  

PubMed

The Asthma Control Test (ACT) score is widely used in asthma clinics, particularly with the recent emphasis on achievement and maintenance of optimal asthma control. However, this self-assessment score does not always correspond with lung function parameters, leading to uncertainty about each patient's control status; therefore, we investigated the clinical characteristics that are associated with discrepant correlation between the ACT score and pulmonary function. The 252 adult asthmatic subjects were divided into 5 groups according to their changes in FEV1% predicted values and ACT scores between 2 consecutive visits three months apart. The data were retrospectively reviewed and several clinical variables were compared. Elderly, non-eosinophilic, non-atopic asthma patients were more likely to show paradoxical changes of pulmonary function and ACT score. Female patients were prone to report exaggerated changes of ACT score compared with baseline lung function and changes in FEV1 levels. This group was using more medications for rhinosinusitis. Male patients seemed less sensitive to changes in lung function. From these findings, we conclude that when assessing asthma control status, physicians should carefully consider patient age, gender, atopy status, blood eosinophil levels, and comorbidities along with their ACT scores and pulmonary function test results. PMID:25553267

Park, So Young; Yoon, Sun-Young; Shin, Bomi; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

2015-01-01

220

Frequently Asked Questions - FAQs  

Cancer.gov

Frequently Asked Questions - FAQs CTRP Program >> What is the purpose of the Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP)? How will CTRP be connected to other databases within NCI and NIH? Will CTRP support the Cancer Centers Summary 4 Report? Will CTRP

221

Correlation of susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans to amphotericin B with clinical outcome.  

PubMed

Testing of Cryptococcus neoformans for susceptibility to antifungal drugs by standard microtiter methods has not been shown to correlate with clinical outcomes. This report describes a modified quantitative broth macrodilution susceptibility method showing a correlation with both the patient's quantitative biological response in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the survival of 85 patients treated with amphotericin B (AMB). The Spearman rank correlation between the quantitative in vitro measure of susceptibility and the quantitative measure of the number of organisms in the patient's CSF was 0.37 (P < 0.01; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.20, 0.60) for the first susceptibility test replicate and 0.46 (P < 0.001; 95% CI, 0.21, 0.62) for the second susceptibility test replicate. The median in vitro estimated response (defined as the fungal burden after AMB treatment) at 1.5 mg/liter AMB for patients alive at day 14 was 5 CFU (95% CI, 3, 8), compared to 57 CFU (95% CI, 4, 832) for those who died before day 14. These exploratory results suggest that patients whose isolates show a quantitative in vitro susceptibility response below 10 CFU/ml were more likely to survive beyond day 14. PMID:21947402

Larsen, R A; Bauer, M; Pitisuttithum, P; Sanchez, A; Tansuphaswadikul, S; Wuthiekanun, V; Peacock, S J; Simpson, A J H; Fothergill, A W; Rinaldi, M G; Bustamante, B; Thomas, A M; Altomstone, R; Day, N P J; White, N J

2011-12-01

222

Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants  

SciTech Connect

Implanted medical devices (e.g., prosthetic heart valves, permanent pacemakers) significantly improve the quality of life for many humans. However, a common clinical observation is that such devices become colonized with potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, which are difficult to combat with host defenses or antibiotics. This study attempts to draw a correlation between the clinical outcome of patients with implanted cardiac devices and the fundamental binding forces ultimately responsible for the initiation of an S. aureus biofilm in-situ. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure forces between a fibronectin-coated probe (simulating a prosthetic implant) and 15 different strains of S. aureus isolated from either patients with infected cardiac devices (invasive population) or healthy human subjects (control population). The fibronectin-coated probe was repeatedly brought into and out of contact with a bacterium’s surface, “fishing” for a reaction with the cell’s fibronectin-binding proteins. More than 40,000 force profiles were measured on 5-10 different cells for each of the 15 clinical strains. A unique force-signature was observed for a binding event between the fibronectin-coated probe and the bacteria. When grouped by the frequency of this force-signature, there was a strong distinction (p=0.01) between the invasive and control populations of S. aureus. This discovery suggests that biofilm forming bacteria may be classified according to their “force taxonomy”, which could have a positive effect on health care as it bridges the long-standing disconnect between macroscopic, clinical investigations and nanometer-scale forces ultimately responsible for a bond between S. aureus and the surface of a prosthetic device.

Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Fowler, Vance; Lower, Brian H.; Vellano, Francis P.; Alexander, Emily; Reller, L. Barth; Corey, G. Ralph; Lower, Steven

2007-02-01

223

Classification of Non-Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage: CT Correlation to the Clinical Outcome.  

PubMed

To propose a new computed tomography (CT)-based classification system for nonaneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which predicts patients' discharge clinical outcome and helps to prioritize appropriate patient management. A 5-year, retrospective, two-centre study was carried out involving 1486 patients presenting with SAH. One hundred and ninety patients with nonaneurysmal SAH were included in the study. Initial cranial CT findings at admission were correlated with the patients' discharge outcomes measured using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). A CT-based classification system (type 1 e 4) was devised based on the topography of the initial haemorrhage pattern. Seventy-five percent of the patients had type 1 haemorrhage and all these patients had a good clinical outcome with a discharge MRS of 1. Eight percent of the patients presented with type 2 haemorrhage, 62% of which were discharged with MRS of 1 and 12% of patients had MRS 3 or 4. Type 3 haemorrhage was found in 10%, of which 16% had good clinical outcome, but 53% had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4) and 5% were discharged with severe disability (MRS 5). Six percent of patients presented with type 4 haemorrhage of which 42% of the patients had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4), 42% had severe disability and one-sixth of the patients died. Highly significant differences were found between type 1 (1a and 1b) and type 2 (p¼ 0.003); type 2 and type 3 (p ¼ 0.002); type 3 and type 4 (p ¼ 0.001). Haemorrhages of the type 1 category are usually benign and do not warrant an extensive battery of clinical and radiological investigations. Type 2 haemorrhages have a varying prognosis and need to be investigated and managed along similar lines as that of an aneurysmal haemorrhage with emphasis towards radiological investigation. Type 3 and type 4 haemorrhages need to be extensively investigated to find an underlying cause. PMID:24059766

Nayak, S; Kunz, A B; Kieslinger, K; Ladurner, G; Killer, M

2011-10-31

224

Serial blood T cell repertoire alterations in multiple sclerosis patients; correlation with clinical and MRI parameters.  

PubMed

A significant skewing of the peripheral T cell repertoire has been shown in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Most of the studies already performed in this field are cross-sectional and therefore, little is known of the T cell repertoire evolution over time in MS and the correlation of T cell repertoire variation with clinical and MRI parameters. This study was performed on serially harvested frozen PBMC from nine untreated MS patients (27 samples) and 14 healthy individuals. The blood T cell repertoire of each patient was analysed at the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) level and compared with a monthly MRI scan performed over a six month period with assessment of T2 lesion load and gadolinium enhancing lesions. A highly significant blood T cell repertoire skewing was observed in MS patients as compared with healthy controls (p<0.01). In addition, the number of altered Vbeta families correlated significantly with both the T2 lesion volume and the number of gadolinium enhancing lesions as assessed by MRI (Spearman correlation tests, r=0.51 and r=0.44, p<0.01 and p<0.05 respectively). Furthermore, the variation of the number of altered Vbeta families over time also correlated with the appearance of new gadolinium enhancing lesions (r=0.36, p=0.05). These findings which need confirmation on larger serial cohorts, suggest an association between the magnitude of TCRBV CDR3 length distribution alterations in the peripheral blood of MS patients and the disease process. PMID:16806500

Laplaud, David-Axel; Berthelot, Laureline; Miqueu, Patrick; Bourcier, Kasia; Moynard, Julien; Oudinet, Yannick; Guillet, Marina; Ruiz, Catherine; Oden, Neal; Brouard, Sophie; Guttmann, Charles R G; Weiner, Howard L; Khoury, Samia J; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

2006-08-01

225

Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews 7 studies in the area of interpretation of correlation from the psychological point of view. The limitations and meanings of correlation methods have also been given. The statistical methods of calculating correlation, as given by 8 psychologists have been reported. Presents 22 reports, given by various psychologists, who have evaluated the tests using various correlation methods. Six studies were

James Burt Miner

1919-01-01

226

Clinical, Functional and Health-Related Quality of Life Correlates of Clinically Significant Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Survey  

PubMed Central

Objectives To identify clinical, functional and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) correlates of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods Three-hundred-and-eighty-one patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology and/or the Leroy and Medsger criteria for SSc were assessed for visceral involvement, disability and HRQoL (assessed by SF-36). Clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD) (defined cut-off?8). Results 9.2% the patients had limited SSc, 50.5% limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc), and 40.3% diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc). Overall, 40.4% and 58.8% of the patients had clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety, respectively. Compared to patients without clinically significant symptoms of depression, patients with clinically significant symptoms of depression had poorer health status, HRQoL mental and physical component, and greater global disability, hand disability and aesthetic impairment. Compared to patients without clinically significant symptoms of anxiety, patients with clinically significant symptoms of anxiety had poorer SF-36 mental and physical component scores. On multivariable analysis, excluding mental component score of SF-36, variables independently associated with clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety were global disability and physical component of SF-36, plus female gender for clinically significant symptoms of anxiety only. Remarkably, patients with and without clinically significant psychiatric symptoms were comparable for all disease-related clinical features assessed. Conclusion High levels of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression are observed among SSc patients. Clinically significant psychiatric symptoms are rather associated with increased disability and altered HRQoL, than with disease-specific organ manifestations. PMID:24587375

Nguyen, Christelle; Ranque, Brigitte; Baubet, Thierry; Bérezné, Alice; Mestre-Stanislas, Caroline; Rannou, François; Papelard, Agathe; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Revel, Michel; Moro, Marie-Rose; Guillevin, Loïc; Poiraudeau, Serge; Mouthon, Luc

2014-01-01

227

Correlation between gene expression and clinical data through linear and nonlinear principal components analyses: muscular dystrophies as case studies.  

PubMed

The large dimension of microarray data and the complex dependence structure among genes make data analysis extremely challenging. In the last decade several statistical techniques have been proposed to tackle genome-wide expression data; however, clinical and molecular data associated to pathologies have often been considered as separate dimensions of the same phenomenon, especially when clinical variables lie on a multidimensional space. A better comprehension of the relationships between clinical and molecular data can be obtained if both data types are combined and integrated. In this work we adopt a multidimensional correlation strategy together with linear and nonlinear principal component, to integrate genetic and clinical information obtained from two sets of dystrophic patients. With this approach we decompose different aspects of clinical manifestations and correlate these features with the correspondent patterns of differential gene expression. PMID:19405797

Romualdi, Chiara; Giuliani, Alessandro; Millino, Caterina; Celegato, Barbara; Benigni, Romualdo; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

2009-06-01

228

Cytogenetic findings at Down syndrome and their correlation with clinical findings.  

PubMed

Down syndrome is a genetic state characterized by trisomy of chromosome 21. In the retrospective study for 12 years period (1991-2002) we have conducted correlation between cytogenetics analyses and clinical findings in our centre at 96 male and 83 female patients. Down syndrome was confirmed by cytogenetics analyses in 84 (87.5%) male patients and excluded in 12 (12.5%) male patients. Down syndrome was confirmed by cytogenetics analyses in 71 (85.5%) female patients and excluded in 12 (14.5%) female patients. Most common karyotype is free trisomy found in 139 (89.7%) examinees, than follows translocation form determined in 9 (5.8%), and mosaicism determined in 7 (4.5%) examinees. Our results indicate that cytogenetics analyses are necessary to confirm diagnosis of Down syndrome. PMID:16351601

Catovi?, Amra; Kendi?, Sulejman

2005-11-01

229

Clinical correlation between N-terminal pro-b-type natriuretic peptide and angiographic coronary atherosclerosis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the clinical correlation between angiographic coronary atherosclerosis and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide along with other known correlated factors. METHODS: In total, 153 patients with a diagnostic hypothesis of stable angina, unstable angina or acute myocardial infarction were classified as group A (patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries) or group B (patients with angiographic coronary atherosclerosis). The two groups were analyzed with respect to the following factors: gender, age, body mass index, abdominal circumference, smoking, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, early family history of atherosclerosis, statin use, the presence of metabolic syndrome, clinical presentation and biochemical factors, including cholesterol, creatinine and fibrinogen plasma concentrations, monocyte counts and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. RESULTS: Univariate analyses comparing the two groups revealed that group B patients more frequently had diabetes, used statins and had systolic dysfunction, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels ?250 pg/mL, fibrinogen levels >500 mg/dL and ?501 monocytes/mm3 compared with group A patients (p<0.05). Nevertheless, multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the independent predictors of angiographic coronary atherosclerosis were an N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level ?250 pg/mL, diabetes mellitus and increased monocyte numbers and fibrinogen plasma concentration, regardless of the creatinine level or the presence of systolic dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: An N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide plasma concentration of ?250 pg/mL is an independent predictor of angiographic coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:24964305

Ribeiro, Demóstenes G. L.; Silva, Ricardo P.; Barboza, Daniella R. M. M.; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C. P.; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A.

2014-01-01

230

Computed Tomography Appearance of Early Radiation Injury to the Lung: Correlation With Clinical and Dosimetric Factors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To systematically assess the spectrum of radiologic changes in the lung after radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the cases of 146 patients treated with radical radiotherapy at our institution. All patients had computed tomography (CT) scans performed 3 months after completion of therapy. Radiographic appearances were categorized using a standard grading system. The association of these abnormalities with pretreatment factors and clinical radiation pneumonitis (RP) was investigated. Results: New intrapulmonary abnormalities were seen in 92 patients (63%). These were ground-glass opacity in 16 (11%), patchy consolidation in 19 (13%), and diffuse consolidation in 57 (39%). Twenty-five patients (17%) developed clinical symptoms of RP. Although 80% of the patients with RP had areas of consolidation seen on the posttreatment CT scan, the majority (74%) of patients with such radiographic changes were asymptomatic. For patients with lung infiltrates, the minimum isodose encompassing the volume of radiologic abnormality was usually {>=}27 Gy. Traditional dose-volume metrics, pulmonary function tests, and the coadministration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) were all strongly correlated with the presence of radiologic injury on univariate analysis (p {<=} 0.002). There was also an inverse correlation between prior smoking history and CT scan changes (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, dosimetric parameters and the use of ACE-I retained significance (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that there is substantial interindividual variation in lung radiosensitivity. ACE-I prevented the radiologic changes seen after high-dose radiation therapy, and their role as radioprotectants warrants further investigation.

Jenkins, Peter, E-mail: peter.jenkins@glos.nhs.uk [Gloucestershire Oncology Centre, Cheltenham General Hospital, Cheltenham (United Kingdom); Welsh, Anne [Gloucestershire Oncology Centre, Cheltenham General Hospital, Cheltenham (United Kingdom)

2011-09-01

231

Questioning Strategies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this brief article from the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin the best practices of questioning strategies are explained. The author illustrates the difference between an open and a closed question and provides examples of the five categories of questions that teachers should be asking. A bibliography of additional resources is included for further study.

2012-01-01

232

Circulating annexin A2 as a biomarker in gastric cancer patients: Correlation with clinical variables.  

PubMed

Annexin A2 (ANXA2) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple malignancies and its expression strongly also affects the outcomes of cancer patients. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the serum levels of ANXA2 in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 63 patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gastric cancer were enrolled into this study. Serum ANXA2 concentrations were determined by the solid-phase sandwich ELISA method. Age- and sex-matched 30 healthy controls were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 62years, range 28 to 82years. The baseline serum ANXA2 levels of the gastric cancer patients were a significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.001). The known clinical variables including age of patient, gender, site of lesion, histology, histological grade, stage of disease, and serum levels of LDH, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19.9 were not found to be correlated with serum ANXA2 concentrations (P>0.05). However, the chemotherapy-unresponsive patients had higher serum ANXA2 levels compared with chemotherapy-responsive ones (P=0.04). Conversely, serum ANXA2 concentration was found no prognostic role on survival (P=0.53). In conclusion, serum levels of ANXA2 may have a good diagnostic and predictive marker for response to chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer and have not associated with prognosis. PMID:25661364

Tas, Faruk; Tilgen Yasasever, Ceren; Karabulut, Senem; Tastekin, Didem; Duranyildiz, Derya

2015-02-01

233

Prevalence and Correlates of Substance Use Among South African Primary Care Clinic Patients  

PubMed Central

We aimed to assess prevalence and correlates of hazardous use of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs in a primary care population in Cape Town, South Africa. Stratified random sampling was used to select 14 of the 49 clinics in the public health sector in Cape Town, and every “nth” patient, with those ages 18–25 oversampled (N = 2,618). Data were collected from December 2003 through 2004, using the World Health Organization Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test. Hazardous use of tobacco was most common, followed by alcohol and then other drugs. Hazardous tobacco use was associated with the 18–25 years age group, no religious involvement, high school completion, and higher stress. Hazardous alcohol use was associated with male gender, younger men, no religious involvement, employment, some high school education, and higher stress. Hazardous use of other drugs was associated with Colored (mixed) race (particularly among men), no religious involvement, employment, and stress. For all substances, women, particularly Black women, had the lowest rates of hazardous use. Although the study is cross-sectional, it does identify groups that may be at high risk of substance misuse and for whom intervention is urgent. Because prevalence of substance use is high in this population, routine screening should be introduced in primary care clinics. PMID:18696375

WARD, CATHERINE L.; MERTENS, JENNIFER R.; FLISHER, ALAN J.; BRESICK, GRAHAM F.; STERLING, STACY A.; LITTLE, FRANCESCA; WEISNER, CONSTANCE M.

2010-01-01

234

Spontaneous elimination of hepatitis C virus infection: A retrospective study on demographic, clinical, and serological correlates  

PubMed Central

AIM: To find correlates to spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, this study compared individuals with self-limited and chronic infection with regard to clinical, demographic, and serological parameters. METHODS: Sixty-seven anti-HCV positive and repeatedly HCV RNA negative individuals were considered to have resolved HCV infection spontaneously. To determine the viral genotype these patients had been infected with HCV serotyping was performed. For comparison reasons, 62 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis C were enrolled. Cases and controls were compared stratified for age and sex. RESULTS: Retrospective analysis showed (1) a lower humoral reactivity to HCV in patients with self-limited compared to chronic HCV-infection and (2) that younger age, history of iv drug use, and acute/post-acute hepatitis A or B co-infections, but not viral genotypes, are independent correlates for spontaneous HCV clearance. CONCLUSION: The stronger humoral reactivity to HCV in patients with persistent infections and in those with a history of iv drug use is supposed to be due to continuous or repeated contact(s) to the antigen. Metachronous hepatitis A or hepatitis B infections might favor HCV clearance. PMID:17696252

Wietzke-Braun, Perdita; Mänhardt, Larissa Bettina; Rosenberger, Albert; Uy, Angela; Ramadori, Giuliano; Mihm, Sabine

2007-01-01

235

Mucocutaneous Manifestations of HIV and the Correlation with WHO Clinical Staging in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Skin diseases are indicators of HIV/AIDS which correlates with WHO clinical stages. In resource limited environment where CD4 count is not readily available, they can be used in assessing HIV patients. The study aims to determine the mucocutaneous manifestations in HIV positive patients and their correlation with WHO clinical stages. A prospective cross-sectional study of mucocutaneous conditions was done among 215 newly diagnosed HIV patients from June 2008 to May 2012 at adult ART clinic, Wesley Guild Hospital Unit, OAU Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ilesha, Osun State, Nigeria. There were 156 dermatoses with oral/oesophageal/vaginal candidiasis (41.1%), PPE (24.4%), dermatophytic infections (8.9%), and herpes zoster (3.8%) as the most common dermatoses. The proportions of dermatoses were 4.5%, 21.8%, 53.2%, and 20.5% in stages 1–4, respectively. A significant relationship (using Pearson's Chi square with P value <0.05) was obtained between dermatoses and WHO clinical stages. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed a positive correlation between the number of dermatoses and the WHO clinical stages. Dermatoses can therefore serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers in resource limited settings to initiate HAART in clinical stages 3 and 4. PMID:25587439

Oninla, Olumayowa Abimbola

2014-01-01

236

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and its clinical correlates in drug naïve Wilson's disease.  

PubMed

The purpose is to evaluate white matter (WM) abnormalities in Wilson's disease (WD) using the technique of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The prospective case-control study comprised of 15 drug-naïve patients with WD and 15 controls. The phenotype of subjects was evaluated. The DTI/conventional MRI was acquired (3T MRI): Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were extracted from regions of interest placed in pons, midbrain, bilateral frontal and occipital cerebral white matter, bilateral internal capsules (IC), middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP) and corpus callosum (CC). Six patients showed lobar WM signal changes on T(2)-Weighted (T2W)/Fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images while remaining had normal appearing WM. MD was significantly increased in the lobar WM, bilateral IC and midbrain of WD patients. FA was decreased in the frontal and occipital WM, bilateral IC, midbrain and pons. Normal-appearing white matter on FLAIR images showed significantly increased MD and decreased FA values in both frontal and occipital lobar WM and IC compared with those in controls. Correlation of clinical scores and DTI metrics revealed positive correlation between neurological symptom score (NSS) and MD of anterior limb of right internal capsule, Chu stage and MD of frontal and occipital WM. Negative correlation was observed between the Modified Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (MSEADL) score and MD of bilateral frontal and occipital WM and IC. This is the probably the first study to reveal widespread alterations in WM by DTI metrics in drug naïve WD. DTI analysis revealed lobar WM abnormalities which is less frequently noted on conventional MRI and suggests widespread WM abnormalities in WD. It may be valuable in assessing the true extent of involvement and therefore the severity of the illness. PMID:23636656

Jadav, Rakesh; Saini, Jitender; Sinha, Sanjib; Bagepally, Bhavanishankara; Rao, S; Taly, Arun B

2013-09-01

237

Clinical and molecular characterisation of 80 patients with 5p deletion: genotype-phenotype correlation  

PubMed Central

The majority of deletions of the short arm of chromosome 5 are associated with cri du chat syndrome (CdCS) and patients show phenotypic and cytogenetic variability. To perform a genotype-phenotype correlation, 80 patients from the Italian CdCS Register were analysed. Molecular cytogenetic analysis showed that 62 patients (77.50%) had a 5p terminal deletion characterised by breakpoint intervals ranging from p13 (D5S763) to p15.2 (D5S18). Seven patients (8.75%) had a 5p interstitial deletion, four (5%) a de novo translocation, and three (3.75%) a familial translocation. Of the remaining four patients, three (3.75%) had de novo 5p anomalies involving two rearranged cell lines and one (1.25%) had a 5p deletion originating from a paternal inversion. The origin of the deleted chromosome 5 was paternal in 55 out of 61 patients (90.2%). Genotype-phenotype correlation in 62 patients with terminal deletions highlighted a progressive severity of clinical manifestation and psychomotor retardation related to the size of the deletion. The analysis of seven patients with interstitial deletions and one with a small terminal deletion confirmed the existence of two critical regions, one for dysmorphism and mental retardation in p15.2 and the other for the cat cry in p15.3. Results from one patient permitted the cat cry region to be distally narrowed from D5S13 to D5S731. Furthermore, this study lends support to the hypothesis of a separate region in p15.3 for the speech delay.???Keywords: cri du chat syndrome; 5p deletion; phenotype-genotype correlation; FISH PMID:11238681

Mainardi, P; Perfumo, C; Cali, A; Coucourde, G; Pastore, G; Cavani, S; Zara, F; Overhauser, J; Pierluigi, M; Bricarelli, F

2001-01-01

238

Clinical Evaluation of 168 Korean Patients with Rosacea: The Sun Exposure Correlates with the Erythematotelangiectatic Subtype  

PubMed Central

Background Although rosacea is a chronic cutaneous inflammatory disorder that's commonly seen in adults, the etiology and pathogenesis of the illness remain unclear. A well established diagnostic classification and grading system may play a critical role in performing research and it would serve as a diagnostic reference in the clinical field. Objective We sought to classify the patients with the new standard classification and grading system and we wanted determine the peculiar features and relationships of each subtype. We also analyzed the relationships between the degree of sun exposure and each subtype. Methods We reviewed the medical records and clinical photos of 168 patients who were diagnosed with rosacea from 2002 to 2007 at our hospital. The standard classification and grading system suggested by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) Expert Committee was adopted to evaluate each patient's subtype and the severity. Results The male:female ratio was 1:2.29. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 47.8 years. The mean duration of disease was 3.5 years. Sun exposure and hot baths/exercise were the two most common precipitating factors, while the majority of patients did not have any specific factor that relieved their symptoms. According to the NRS classification and grading system, the patients were classified into four subtypes. One hundred sixty two (96.4%) patients were diagnosed with the erythematotelangiectatic subtype irrespective of severity. Eighty five (50.6%) patients had the papulopustular subtype and 24 (14.3%) patients had ocular rosacea. Eight (4.8%) patients displayed mild phymatous change. The degree of sun exposure had significant correlation with the development and severity of the erythematotelangiectatic subtype (p<0.05), while it had no correlation with the papulopustular, ocular and phymatous subtypes. Conclusion Although the erythematotelangiectatic subtype was the most common subtype of rosacea, many patients also had other subtypes of rosacea simultaneously. Based on our results, we proved that ocular rosacea is an extension of the clinical spectrum of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. In addition, the results of our study particularly suggest that sun exposure has a different influence on each subtype of rosacea. PMID:20523797

Bae, You In; Yun, Sook-Jung; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Seong-Jin; Won, Young Ho

2009-01-01

239

Correlation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This chapter will discuss the concept of correlation , which is used in later chapters that will explain the concepts of validity and reliability. Here, the authors introduce the Pearson correlation coefficient, a statistic that is used with ratio

Christmann, Edwin P.; Badgett, John L.

2008-11-01

240

Proposed Provocative Questions — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

View all of the questions that have been submitted and see how they have been evaluated by peers. Submit your own evaluation of a submitted question, or leave a comment about a question (commenting requires log in or creation of your own PQ account).

241

Clinical correlates of enlarged prostate size in subjects with sexual dysfunction  

PubMed Central

Digito-rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate provides useful information on the state of prostate growth and on the presence of suspected peripheral nodules. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biochemical correlates of finding an enlarged prostate size at DRE in subjects with sexual dysfunction (SD). A consecutive series of 2379 patients was retrospectively studied. The analysis was focused on a subset of subjects (n = 1823; mean age 54.7 ± 11.4) selected for being free from overt prostatic diseases. Several parameters were investigated. After adjusting for confounders, the presence of an enlarged prostate size at DRE was associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (HR = 1.346 (1.129–1.759); P = 0.030), type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR = 1.489 (1.120–1.980); P = 0.006), increased LDL cholesterol (>100 mg dl?1; HR = 1.354 (1.018–1.801); P = 0.037) and increased mean blood pressure (BP) values (HR = 1.017 (1.007–1.027) for each mmHg increment; P = 0.001). Accordingly, enlarged prostate size was also associated with a higher risk of arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED), as well as with other andrological conditions, such as varicocele and premature ejaculation (PE). PSA levels were significantly higher in subjects with enlarged prostate size when compared to the rest of the sample (HR = 3.318 (2.304; 4.799) for each log unit increment in PSA levels; P < 0.0001). Arteriogenic ED, according to different criteria, was also associated with increased PSA levels. In conclusion, our data support the need to examine prostate size either by clinical (DRE) or biochemical (PSA) inspection in subjects with SD, in order to have insights into the nature of the SD and the metabolic and cardiovascular (CV) background of the patient. PMID:24830688

Corona, Giovanni; Gacci, Mauro; Maseroli, Elisa; Rastrelli, Giulia; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra; Forti, Gianni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

2014-01-01

242

Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Parameters With Radiographic Lung Injury Following Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy.  

PubMed

Radiographic changes occur in over half of patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to the lung, correlating histopathologically with injury. We quantified radiographic density changes (ie, fibrosis) at 3, 6, and 12 months and investigated the relationship between these volumes and clinical and dosimetric parameters. The study population consisted of patients treated with SBRT to the lung for stage I primary lung cancers (n = 39) or oligometastatic lesions (n = 17). Fractionation schemes included 3 fractions of 12, 14, or 18 gray (Gy) and 4 fractions of 12 or 12.5 Gy prescribed to cover 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Planning computed tomography (CT) scans were rigidly registered to follow-up CT scans obtained at intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months. Fibrotic volumes were contoured on the follow-up scans. Associations between the volume of fibrosis and clinical and dosimetric parameters were investigated using univariate linear regression. Scans were available for 65 and 47 lesions at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Age, years since quitting smoking, and GOLD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease score were significantly associated with increasing volume of fibrosis (P < .05). Total dose, dose per fraction, PTV, and volumetric parameters (V0-V55) were also significantly associated with increasing volumes of fibrosis (P < .01). For dosimetric parameters, the effect was largest for V55. Age, significant smoking history, and GOLD score were significantly associated with increasing volumes of fibrosis following SBRT. In a multivariate model adjusted for age and smoking history, V10 through V50 and PTV size remained significant predictors of fibrotic volume. Further, there is a strong dose-response relationship between the volume of lung exposed to a certain dose and the fibrotic volume. The predominant kinetic patterns of fibrosis demonstrate peaking fibrotic volumes at 6 and 12 months. These results provide insight for expectations of fibrosis after SBRT. PMID:25261069

Kishan, Amar U; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Sheng, Ke; Yu, Victoria; Ruan, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Tenn, Stephen; Low, Daniel A; Lee, Percy

2014-09-26

243

Correlation of HOXD3 promoter hypermethylation with clinical and pathologic features in screening prostate biopsies  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Molecular markers that can discriminate indolent cancers from aggressive ones may improve the management of prostate cancer and minimize unnecessary treatment. Aberrant DNA methylation is a common epigenetic event in cancers and HOXD3 promoter hypermethylation (H3PH) has been found in prostate cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between H3PH and clinicopathologic features in screening prostate biopsies. METHODS Ninety-two patients who underwent a prostate biopsy at our institution between October 2011 and May 2012 were included in this study. The core with the greatest percentage of the highest grade disease was analyzed for H3PH by methylation-specific PCR. Correlational analysis was used to analyze the relationship between H3PH and various clinical parameters. Chi-square analysis was used to compare H3PH status between benign and malignant disease. RESULTS Of the 80 biopsies with HOXD3 methylation status assessable, 66 sets were confirmed to have cancer. In the 14 biopsies with benign disease there was minimal H3PH with the mean percentage of methylation reference (PMR) of 0.7%. In contrast, the HOXD3 promoter was hypermethylated in 16.7% of all cancers and in 50% of high risk tumors with an average PMR of 4.3% (P?=?0.008). H3PH was significantly correlated with age (P?=?0.013), Gleason score (P?=?0.031) and the maximum involvement of the biopsy core (P?=?0.035). CONCLUSIONS H3PH is associated with clinicopathologic features. The data indicate that H3PH is more common in older higher risk patients. More research is needed to determine the role of this marker in optimizing management strategies in men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. Prostate 74:714–721, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24847526

Chen, Leonard N; Rubin, Rachel S; Othepa, Eugide; Cer, Caroline; Yun, Elizabeth; Agarwal, Raghunath P; Collins, Brian T; McGeagh, Kevin; Pahira, John; Bandi, Guarav; Kowalczyk, Keith; Kumar, Deepak; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Collins, Sean P; Bostwick, David G; Lynch, John H; Suy, Simeng

2014-01-01

244

Correlation of bcl-2 rearrangement with clinical characteristics and outcome in indolent follicular lymphoma.  

PubMed

The t(14;18) translocation, which involves the bcl-2 oncogene, occurs in follicular lymphomas (FL) at two common sites: the major breakpoint region (MBR) and the minor cluster region (mcr). The biological and clinical significance of these breakpoints is unknown. The bcl-2 breakpoint site was determined in 247 previously untreated patients (49% men; median age 52 years) with indolent FL (155 grade I, 83 grade II, and 8 grade III) to correlate it with pretreatment characteristics, response, and outcome. The bcl-2 breakpoint site was determined by a polymerase chain reaction method of peripheral blood (all cases), bone marrows (149 cases), and fresh lymph node biopsy specimens (68 cases). The breakpoint site occurred at MBR in 175 cases (71%) and at mcr in 27 (11%). In 45 cases (18%), no breakpoint was detected (germline). No significant relationship was found between the rearrangements and the expression of BLC-2 and BAX proteins. Patients' germline for MBR and mcr tended to present more frequently with stage IV disease and higher beta2-microglobulin (beta2M) levels, whereas mcr-rearranged patients presented more frequently with early stage and normal beta2M. The complete response rate of germline patients was significantly lower than that of MBR and mcr patients. An estimated 3-year failure-free survival (FFS) for mcr, MBR, and germline cases was 95%, 76%, and 57%, respectively (P <.001). The bcl-2 breakpoint site was independent of serum beta2M and lactate dehydrogenase in its correlation with FFS. In conclusion, the bcl-2 rearrangement site is an important prognostic factor in indolent FL, useful to identify patients who may require different treatment. PMID:10216105

López-Guillermo, A; Cabanillas, F; McDonnell, T I; McLaughlin, P; Smith, T; Pugh, W; Hagemeister, F; Rodríguez, M A; Romaguera, J E; Younes, A; Sarris, A H; Preti, H A; Lee, M S

1999-05-01

245

Dermoscopic features of clinically inflammatory dermatoses and their correlation with histopathologic reaction patterns.  

PubMed

Dermoscopy can be used in diagnosis of some chronic inflammatory dermatoses. In this study, the single most recent, fully developed lesion in 74 patients with clinically inflammatory dermatoses was examined dermoscopically and correlated histopathologically with psoriasiform, lichenoid, or spongiotic reaction patterns. Vascular component (morphology and arrangement) was the most prominent feature in the studied patterns mostly in the shape of dots (45 specimens, 60.8 %), globules (30 specimens, 40.5 %), and lines (45 specimens, 60.8 %). Psoriasiform pattern showed vascular dots (20 specimens, 76.92 %), and/or red globules (15 specimen, 57.69 %), regularly distributed (17 specimens, 65.38 %), on intense red background (15 specimens, 57.69 %), and diffuse (13 specimens, 50 %) white scales (18 specimen, 69.23 %), with probability of these features together 100 %. Lichenoid pattern showed red lines (23 cases, 65.71 %), on dull or light red background (14 cases, 40 % for each), with discolored areas (15 cases, 42.86 %), brown reticular pigmentation (21 cases, 60 %), and white scales (13 cases, 37.14 %). Spongiotic pattern was characterized by follicular component and diffuse or peripheral scale distribution, with probability of both features together 100 %. The main histopathologic features of inflammatory dermatoses, which influenced their dermoscopic patterns, are depth and size of vessels, presence and shape of epidermal hyperplasia, presence of spongiosis, and degree of dermal inflammation and oedema. These features influenced vascular morphology and distribution, corneal component, and background color. Among the studied reaction patterns, psoriasiform pattern showed the most consistent correlation with dermoscopic features. Dermoscopic picture of lichenoid reaction was the most contradictory. Spongiotic reaction showed absent specific vascular component. PMID:25297393

Goncharova, Yana; Attia, Enas A S; Souid, Khawla; Protzenko, Oleg; Koktishev, Igor

2015-01-01

246

An autopsy study of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: correlations among clinical, radiological, and pathological features  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical evaluation to differentiate the characteristic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema is often difficult in patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), but diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis is important for evaluating treatment options and the risk of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia of such patients. As far as we know, it is the first report describing a correlation among clinical, radiological, and whole-lung pathological features in an autopsy cases of CPFE patients. Methods Experts retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts and examined chest computed tomography (CT) images and pathological findings of an autopsy series of 22 CPFE patients, and compared these with findings from 8 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients and 17 emphysema-alone patients. Results All patients had a history of heavy smoking. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) was significantly lower in the emphysema-alone group than the CPFE and IPF-alone groups. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO%) was significantly lower in the CPFE group than the IPF- and emphysema-alone groups. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern was observed radiologically in 15 (68.2%) CPFE and 8 (100%) IPF-alone patients and was pathologically observed in all patients from both groups. Pathologically thick-cystic lesions involving one or more acini with dense wall fibrosis and occasional fibroblastic foci surrounded by honeycombing and normal alveoli were confirmed by post-mortem observation as thick-walled cystic lesions (TWCLs). Emphysematous destruction and enlargement of membranous and respiratory bronchioles with fibrosis were observed in the TWCLs. The cystic lesions were always larger than the cysts of honeycombing. The prevalence of both radiological and pathological TWCLs was 72.7% among CPFE patients, but no such lesions were observed in patients with IPF or emphysema alone (p?=?0.001). The extent of emphysema in CPFE patients with TWCLs was greater than that in patients without such lesions. Honeycombing with emphysema was also observed in 11 CPFE patients. Conclusions TWCLs were only observed in the CPFE patients. They were classified as lesions with coexistent fibrosing interstitial pneumonia and emphysema, and should be considered an important pathological and radiological feature of CPFE. PMID:24972672

2014-01-01

247

Correlation of the clinical and physical image quality in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the quality of visually graded patient (clinical) chest images and a quantitative assessment of chest phantom (physical) images acquired with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. Methods: The results of a previously published study, in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer-simulated postero-anterior chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme, were used for the clinical image quality measurement. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose efficiency (eDE) were used as physical image quality metrics measured in a uniform chest phantom. Although optimal values of these physical metrics for chest radiography were not derived in this work, their correlation with VGAS in images acquired without an antiscatter grid across the diagnostic range of X-ray tube voltages was determined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Clinical and physical image quality metrics increased with decreasing tube voltage. Statistically significant correlations between VGAS and CNR (R=0.87, p<0.033) and eDE (R=0.77, p<0.008) were observed. Conclusion: Medical physics experts may use the physical image quality metrics described here in quality assurance programmes and optimisation studies with a degree of confidence that they reflect the clinical image quality in chest CR images acquired without an antiscatter grid. Advances in knowledge: A statistically significant correlation has been found between the clinical and physical image quality in CR chest imaging. The results support the value of using CNR and eDE in the evaluation of quality in clinical thorax radiography. PMID:23568362

Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

2013-01-01

248

Question Mars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about generating hypotheses and testable questions. Learners will use critical thinking and a collaborative approach to pose questions related to the study of Mars and evaluate the quality of their questions. They will explore remote-sensing data collected by a camera orbiting Mars - the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and develop a team science question. Students will practice critical thinking skills, use a collaborative approach to this first critical step of the scientific process. Exploring the images of the surface of Mars in Visible (VIS) images, students will come up with a topic of study, their team science question and hypotheses. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes and vocabulary.

249

The correlation between the number of eligible patients in routine clinical practice and the low recruitment level in clinical trials: a retrospective study using electronic medical records  

PubMed Central

Background A number of clinical trials have encountered difficulties enrolling a sufficient number of patients upon initiating the trial. Recently, many screening systems that search clinical data warehouses for patients who are eligible for clinical trials have been developed. We aimed to estimate the number of eligible patients using routine electronic medical records (EMRs) and to predict the difficulty of enrolling sufficient patients prior to beginning a trial. Methods Investigator-initiated clinical trials that were conducted at Kyoto University Hospital between July 2004 and January 2011 were included in this study. We searched the EMRs for eligible patients and calculated the eligible EMR patient index by dividing the number of eligible patients in the EMRs by the target sample size. Additionally, we divided the trial eligibility criteria into corresponding data elements in the EMRs to evaluate the completeness of mapping clinical manifestation in trial eligibility criteria into structured data elements in the EMRs. We evaluated the correlation between the index and the accrual achievement with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results Thirteen of 19 trials did not achieve their original target sample size. Overall, 55% of the trial eligibility criteria were mapped into data elements in EMRs. The accrual achievement demonstrated a significant positive correlation with the eligible EMR patient index (r?=?0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.42 to 0.92). The receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed an eligible EMR patient index cut-off value of 1.7, with a sensitivity of 69.2% and a specificity of 100.0%. Conclusions Our study suggests that the eligible EMR patient index remains exploratory but could be a useful component of the feasibility study when planning a clinical trial. Establishing a step to check whether there are likely to be a sufficient number of eligible patients enables sponsors and investigators to concentrate their resources and efforts on more achievable trials. PMID:24326039

2013-01-01

250

Correlates of Occupational Disability in a Clinical Sample of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine correlates of occupational disability in a large, clinical sample of individuals with a primary diagnosis of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Methods 238 individuals with a primary DSM-IV diagnosis of OCD were interviewed at intake into an observational study of the course of OCD. Primary was defined as the diagnosis that the patient identified as the most problematic lifetime. Results At the time of interview, 38% of the sample reported being unable to work due to psychopathology. OCD with occupational disability was associated with greater functional impairment in completing household duties, social functioning, and quality of life. Few differences in treatments received were found among individuals with and without occupational disability. Although number of years on psychotropic medications was similar among the two groups, those with disability had been on a greater number of serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) lifetime. Half of individuals with occupational disability had entered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) at some point but only one-third had received at least 13 sessions. Regression analyses revealed that OCD severity was the most powerful predictor of occupational disability, followed by depression severity, and presence of a lifetime substance use disorder. Conclusions A substantial proportion of individuals in our sample were unable to work. CBT treatment was underutilized and reasons for this remain unclear. Comorbid depression and substance use present additional risk factors for disability. Further advances in biological and psychosocial treatments are needed to improve functioning and the overall prognosis of the disorder. PMID:18063040

Mancebo, Maria C.; Greenberg, Benjamin; E.Grant, Jon; Pinto, Anthony; Eisen, Jane L.; Dyck, Ingrid; Rasmussen, Steven A.

2008-01-01

251

Serology of Lupus Erythematosus: Correlation between Immunopathological Features and Clinical Aspects  

PubMed Central

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the aberrant production of a broad and heterogenous group of autoantibodies. Even though the presence of autoantibodies in SLE has been known, for more than 60 years, still nowadays a great effort is being made to understand the pathogenetic, diagnostic, and prognostic meaning of such autoantibodies. Antibodies to ds-DNA are useful for the diagnosis of SLE, to monitor the disease activity, and correlate with renal and central nervous involvements. Anti-Sm antibodies are highly specific for SLE. Anti-nucleosome antibodies are an excellent marker for SLE and good predictors of flares in quiescent lupus. Anti-histone antibodies characterize drug-induced lupus, while anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies are associated with neonatal lupus erythematosus and photosensitivity. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies play a role in neuropsychiatric lupus, but their association with clinical manifestations is still unclear. Anti-phospholipid antibodies are associated with the anti-phospholipid syndrome, cerebral vascular disease, and neuropsychiatric lupus. Anti-C1q antibodies amplify glomerular injury, and the elevation of their titers may predict renal flares. Anti-RNP antibodies are a marker of Sharp's syndrome but can be found in SLE as well. Anti-PCNA antibodies are present in 5–10% of SLE patients especially those with arthritis and hypocomplementemia. PMID:24649358

Cozzani, Emanuele; Drosera, Massimo; Parodi, Aurora

2014-01-01

252

Trauma experience among homeless female veterans: correlates and impact on housing, clinical, and psychosocial outcomes.  

PubMed

This study examined lifetime exposure to traumatic events as reported by 581 homeless female veterans enrolled in a Homeless Women Veterans Program across 11 sites to characterize the types of trauma they experienced; their correlation with baseline characteristics; and their association with housing, clinical outcomes, and psychosocial functioning over a 1-year treatment period. Almost all participants endorsed multiple types and episodes of traumatic events. Among the most common were having someone close experience a serious or life-threatening illness (82%) and rape (67%). Exploratory factor analysis revealed 6 potential trauma categories: being robbed, experiencing accident or disasters, illness or death of others, combat, sexual assault, and physical assault. At baseline, trauma from sexual assault was associated with more days homeless (? = .18, p < .001), trauma from accidents or disasters was associated with poorer physical health (? = -.23, p < .001), and trauma from being robbed was related to greater use of drugs (? = .22, p < .001). Trauma reported at baseline, however, was not predictive of 1-year outcomes, suggesting type and frequency of trauma does not negatively affect the housing gains homeless women veterans can achieve through homeless services. PMID:23225030

Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A; Decker, Suzanne E; Desai, Rani A; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan

2012-12-01

253

Trauma Experience Among Homeless Female Veterans: Correlates and Impact on Housing, Clinical, and Psychosocial Outcomes.  

PubMed

This study examined lifetime exposure to traumatic events as reported by 581 homeless female veterans enrolled in a Homeless Women Veterans Program across 11 sites to characterize the types of trauma they experienced; their correlation with baseline characteristics; and their association with housing, clinical outcomes, and psychosocial functioning over a 1-year treatment period. Almost all participants endorsed multiple types and episodes of traumatic events. Among the most common were having someone close experience a serious or life-threatening illness (82%) and rape (67%). Exploratory factor analysis revealed 6 potential trauma categories: being robbed, experiencing accident or disasters, illness or death of others, combat, sexual assault, and physical assault. At baseline, trauma from sexual assault was associated with more days homeless (? = .18, p < .001), trauma from accidents or disasters was associated with poorer physical health (? = -.23, p < .001), and trauma from being robbed was related to greater use of drugs (? = .22, p < .001). Trauma reported at baseline, however, was not predictive of 1-year outcomes, suggesting type and frequency of trauma does not negatively affect the housing gains homeless women veterans can achieve through homeless services. PMID:23138863

Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A; Decker, Suzanne E; Desai, Rani A; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan

2012-11-01

254

Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression in breast cancer: correlation with clinical pathological features  

PubMed Central

The overexpressed HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) is a valuable therapeutic target. Precise assessment of HER2 status is thus crucial in the treatment of breast cancer. In this study, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of tumors from 304 breast cancer patients who underwent curative surgery procedures between 2011 and 2014 were tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a primary estimate of HER2 status, followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Concordance rate between IHC and FISH was evaluated. The ?2 test was used to evaluate the correlation between HER2 gene amplification status and different clinical pathological features including: (estrogen receptor) ER and (progesterone receptor) PR expression, age, menopausal status and tumor size. The results show that 84.8% of IHC score 3+ cases and 6.2% of IHC score 0/1+ cases were amplified by FISH. After exclusion of group IHC 2+, the concordance rate between FISH and IHC was 87.4%. There was a significant inverse association between expression of hormone receptors (ER and PR) and HER2 amplification (P < 0.001) among the patients studied. However, no relationship was observed between HER2 amplification and age, menopausal status and tumor size (P > 0.05). The data demonstrate a relatively high level of concordance rate for HER2 testing between FISH and IHC, and HER2 overexpression was associated with the levels of ER and PR.

Ning, Shu-Fang; Li, Ji-Lin; Luo, Cheng-Piao; Wei, Chang-Hong; Lu, Yong-Kui; Liu, Hai-Zhou; Wei, Wen-E; Zhang, Li-Tu

2014-01-01

255

Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis and vulvodynia: a clinical correlation.  

PubMed

Vulvodynia affects 25% of women with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC). The objective of our study was to clinically evaluate the association of PBS/IC and vulvodynia and possible contributing factors. To our knowledge, this has not been reported. Seventy women with PBS/IC were evaluated from December 2005 to December 2006 with a comprehensive history and exam. Two groups were formed--those with vulvodynia and those without vulvodynia for comparison. Of the women, 51.4% had vulvodynia and 48.6% did not have vulvodynia using our operative definition. Average levator pain levels were significantly greater in those with vulvodynia. There was no significant difference in the total number of lifetime pelvic surgeries, history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), vaginitis, or abuse history between groups. The correlation of vulvodynia and PBS/IC may have been underestimated. Research needs to explore the link between precipitating factors, symptoms, and effective treatment options for PBS/IC and vulvodynia. PMID:18038212

Peters, Kenneth; Girdler, Benjamin; Carrico, Donna; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Diokno, Ananias

2008-05-01

256

Expression of CCN family members correlates with the clinical features of hepatocellular carcinoma.  

PubMed

Studies have reported that the CCN family of proteins plays an important role in stimulating tumorigenesis. However, the relationship between the CCN protein family members and the features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the expression levels of CCN protein family members and the features of HCC. Expression levels of the CCN family of proteins in 80-paired primary HCC samples and 11 normal liver samples were determined by a quantitative real-time PCR assay. Enhanced expression of nephroblastoma overexpressed protein (NOV) and decreased expression of Wnt-induced secreted protein 1 (WISP1), cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were found in HCC samples when compared to levels in matched non-cancerous tissues. No significant difference in WISP2 was found between matched-pair samples; only a few samples showed WISP3 expression. Furthermore, the expression levels of NOV, WISP1 and CYR61 were closely correlated with certain clinical features, including venous invasion, cellular differentiation, pTNM stage, disease-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that HCC progression may be enhanced by NOV and suppressed by WISP1 and CYR61. Our statistical analysis suggests that these proteins may be valuable in determining the prognosis of this deadly disease and directs attention to modulating the levels of these proteins as a potential mode of therapy. PMID:25571929

Zhang, Heyun; Li, Wenbin; Huang, Pinbo; Lin, Lehang; Ye, Hua; Lin, Dechen; Koeffler, H Phillip; Wang, Jie; Yin, Dong

2015-03-01

257

Intraligamentous ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate Ligament: MR findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlations  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic resonance findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlation of intraligamentous cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are presented. Three cases of intraligamentous cysts of the ACL were identified out of 681 knee MRI examinations over a 2-year period. Arthroscopy and postoperative MRI were performed in all three patients, each of whom experienced knee pain with extreme flexion and extension. In all three cases the intraligamentous cyst was homogeneously hypointense on T1-weighted imaging and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging relative to the ACL. Two of the three ACL cysts required a 70{degrees} scope for adequate visualization and establishment of posteromedial and posterolateral portals for arthroscopic treatment. One cyst could not be visualized arthroscopically and probing of the ACL from the anterior portal resulted in drainage of the cyst. No patient had presence of ACL cyst on follow-up MRI or recurrence of symptoms at a mean of 24 months. Intraligamentous cyst of ACL is a rare cause of knee pain. It should be suspected in patients having chronic pain with extremes of motion. Magnetic resonance findings are diagnostic and help to guide arthroscopy. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Do-Dai, D.D.; Youngberg, R.A.; Lanchbury, F.D.; Pitcher, J.D. Jr.; Garver, T.H. [Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA (United States)] [Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA (United States)

1996-01-01

258

Pica associated with iron deficiency or depletion: clinical and laboratory correlates in 262 non-pregnant adult outpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There are many descriptions of the association of pica with iron deficiency in adults, but there are few reports in which observations available at diagnosis of iron deficiency were analyzed using multivariable techniques to identify significant predictors of pica. We sought to identify clinical and laboratory correlates of pica in adults with iron deficiency or depletion using univariable and

James C Barton; J Clayborn Barton; Luigi F Bertoli

2010-01-01

259

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Correlations with Enneatype-6 Alcohol or Other Drug Clients in Clinical Settings in Southeastern Wisconsin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research indicates that type six from the typology system of the Enneagram overrepresents the population of drug and alcohol abusers. Type six drug and alcohol abusers are correlated with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in a clinical setting in Wisconsin to reveal a “universal” nature of type six. Susceptibility toward addiction and depression are also revealed by the MBTI within this

Michael G. Huber

1999-01-01

260

Clinical Correlates of ADHD in Females: Findings From a Large Group of Girls Ascertained From Pediatric and Psychiatric Referral Sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe scientific literature about attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is based almost exclusively on male subjects, and girls with ADHD may be underidentified and undertreated. The aim of this study was to examine clinical correlates of ADHD in females using comprehensive assessments in multiple domains of functioning.

JOSEPH BIEDERMAN; STEPHEN V. FARAONE; ERIC MICK; SARAH WILLIAMSON; TIMOTHY E. WILENS; THOMAS J. SPENCER; WENDY WEBER; JENNIFER JETTON; ILANA KRAUS; JIM PERT; BARRY ZALLEN

1999-01-01

261

Correlation between clinical findings and magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of local response after standard treatment in cervical cancer?  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of our study is to evaluate the correlation between gynecological examination and magnetic resonance (MRI) findings for the assessment of local response in cervical cancer patients treated with radiotherapy/chemotherapy (RT/ChT). Patients and methods This study is a retrospective review of 75 consecutive cervical cancer patients from April 2004 to November 2009 treated with RT/ChT. Clinical and radiological data were subsequently analyzed. Patient's median age was 51 with a FIGO stage from Ib to IVb. Individualized RT/ChT was administered with a median dose of 45 Gy. Sixty-three patients received a complementary brachytherapy. Seventy-one patients received chemotherapy on a weekly basis. Gynecological exam was performed 3 months and 6 months after treatment and these findings were compared to MRI results at the same time. Statistic analysis We used the Spearman's Rho test to determine the correlation level between the clinical and radiological methods. Results A correlation of 0.68 (60%) was observed between the clinical and MRI findings at 3 months with a further increase of up to 0.86 (82.6%) at 6 months. In the few cases with a poor correlation, the subsequent assessment and the natural history of the disease showed a greater value of the clinical exam as compared with the MRI findings. Conclusions Physical exam remains an essential tool to evaluate the local response to RT/ChT for cervical cancer. The optimal clinical radiological correlation found at 6 months after treatment suggests that the combination of gynecological examination and MRI are probably adequate in patient monitoring. PMID:24416556

Valduvieco, Izaskun; Biete, Albert; Rios, Iván; Llorente, Ricardo; Rovirosa, Angels; Pahisa, Jaume; Vidal, Laura; Farrús, Blanca; Samper, Pilar

2013-01-01

262

Clinical and pathological correlates of severity classifications in trigger fingers based on computer-aided image analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The treatment of trigger finger so far has heavily relied on clinicians’ evaluations for the severity of patients’ symptoms and the functionality of affected fingers. However, there is still a lack of pathological evidence supporting the criteria of clinical evaluations. This study’s aim was to correlate clinical classification and pathological changes for trigger finger based on the tissue abnormality observed from microscopic images. Methods Tissue samples were acquired, and microscopic images were randomly selected and then graded by three pathologists and two physicians, respectively. Moreover, the acquired images were automatically analyzed to derive two quantitative parameters, the size ratio of the abnormal tissue region and the number ratio of the abnormal nuclei, which can reflect tissue abnormality caused by trigger finger. A self-developed image analysis system was used to avoid human subjectivity during the quantification process. Finally, correlations between the quantitative image parameters, pathological grading, and clinical severity classification were assessed. Results One-way ANOVA tests revealed significant correlations between the image quantification and pathological grading as well as between the image quantification and clinical severity classification. The Cohen’s kappa coefficient test also depicted good consistency between pathological grading and clinical severity classification. Conclusions The criteria of clinical classification were found to be highly associated with the pathological changes of affected tissues. The correlations serve as explicit evidence supporting clinicians in making a treatment strategy of trigger finger. In addition, our proposed computer-aided image analysis system was considered to be a promising and objective approach to determining trigger finger severity at the microscopic level. PMID:25055721

2014-01-01

263

Stereomicroscopic study of the human tooth caries: clinical and morphological correlations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objectives: Stereomicroscopy allows a three-dimensional study of the images and of laterality at superior quality in comparison with other methods. Those advantages are given by the large examination fields and the wide work distances. The adding of the clinical and morphological data at the results gathered with stereomicroscopy and the stereo micrometry is useful in order to appreciate the deepness and the widening of the carious process, and the necessity to reconsider the therapeutically strategy. Materials and methods: During 2009-2011 the study material was represented by 10 surgically removed impacted third molars, and by 20 premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes, with closed and macroscopically apparently integer surfaces. 13 premolars with different degrees of carious affectation and periodontal lesions, which were surgically extracted without trauma, were also selected. The in situ measurements at the occlusal site were realized through the utilization of a fluorescent laser device - DIAGNOdent. The basic principles in stereomicroscopy stood at the base of the obliquely and circularly coaxial illumination techniques, one with optical alignment adjustment of the optical microscope and mechanical adjustment for the optimal illumination and micrometry. The Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom has been used to study the samples in stereomicroscopy and through polarized light it. Results: The DiagnoDent measured the following data: out of 43 apparently healthy teeth, 18 presented values between 2 and 13 (D1), 13 showed values between 14 and 24 (D2), 12 measured values over 24 (D3). After the histological examination in stereomicroscopy and in the polarized light: 25 teeth were healthy, 10 presented caries extended in dental enamel and 8 presented dentinal caries. Stereomicroscopy has allowed the morphological study, the color absorption, the appreciation of the lesions' deepness and substance loss that is very useful in grading the progression of the carious lesion. Conclusions: The stereomicroscopic study correlated with clinical and morphological data allowed to appreciate the extent of tissue involved in the carious process, but also the understanding of the enamel, dentine and cement matrix demineralization process, in proximity with the morpho-embryological markings of the human tooth structure.

Oancea, Roxana; Vasile, Liliana; Marchese, Cristian; Sava-Rosianu, Ruxandra

2012-06-01

264

Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

265

Composing questions  

E-print Network

This dissertation motivates a new syntax and semantics for simplex and multiple wh-questions, concentrating on English and German data. The proposed theory combines Cable's (2007; 2010) Q-based syntax for wh-movement and ...

Kotek, Hadas

2014-01-01

266

Deficient conditioned pain modulation after spinal cord injury correlates with clinical spontaneous pain measures.  

PubMed

The contribution of endogenous pain modulation dysfunction to clinical and sensory measures of neuropathic pain (NP) has not been fully explored. Habituation, temporal summation, and heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulus-induced modulation of tonic heat pain intensity were examined in healthy noninjured subjects (n = 10), and above the level of spinal cord injury (SCI) in individuals without (SCI-noNP, n = 10) and with NP (SCI-NP, n = 10). Thermoalgesic thresholds, Cz/AFz contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs), and phasic or tonic (30 seconds) heat pain intensity were assessed within the C6 dermatome. Although habituation to tonic heat pain intensity (0-10) was reported by the noninjured (10 s: 3.5 ± 0.3 vs 30 s: 2.2 ± 0.5 numerical rating scale; P = 0.003), loss of habituation was identified in both the SCI-noNP (3.8 ± 0.3 vs 3.6 ± 0.5) and SCI-NP group (4.2 ± 0.4 vs 4.9 ± 0.8). Significant temporal summation of tonic heat pain intensity was not observed in the 3 groups. Inhibition of tonic heat pain intensity induced by heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulus was identified in the noninjured (-29.7% ± 9.7%) and SCI-noNP groups (-19.6% ± 7.0%), but not in subjects with SCI-NP (+1.1% ± 8.0%; P < 0.05). Additionally, the mean conditioned pain modulation response correlated positively with Cz/AFz CHEP amplitude (? = 0.8; P = 0.015) and evoked heat pain intensity (? = 0.8; P = 0.007) in the SCI-NP group. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the mean conditioned pain modulation (R = 0.72) correlated with pain severity and pressing spontaneous pain in the SCI-NP group. Comprehensive assessment of sensory dysfunction above the level of injury with tonic thermal test and conditioning stimuli revealed less-efficient endogenous pain modulation in subjects with SCI-NP. PMID:25599447

Albu, Sergiu; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Avila-Martin, Gerardo; Taylor, Julian

2015-02-01

267

MicroRNA expression patterns in adrenocortical carcinoma variants and clinical pathologic correlations.  

PubMed

Several microRNAs (miRNAs) were shown to be deregulated in adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) as compared with adenoma, but a detailed assessment of their expression in its histologic variants and correlation with clinicopathologic characteristics has not been performed, so far. Our aim was to assess the expression of 5 selected miRNAs (IGF2 gene-related miR-483-3p and 5p and hypoxia-induced miR-210, miR-195, and miR-1974) in a series of 51 ACCs (35 classical, 6 myxoid, and 10 oncocytic) as compared with clinical and pathologic features and immunohistochemical expression of prognostic markers, including steroidogenic factor 1, p53, ?-catenin, and glucose transporter 1. Oncocytic carcinomas had a reduced expression of miR-483-3p (P = .0325), miR-483-5p (P = .0175), and miR-210 (P = .0366), as compared with other histotypes. Overexpression of miR-210 was associated with the presence of necrosis (P = .0035), high Ki-67 index (P = .0013), and high glucose transporter 1 expression (P = .0043), whereas an inverse correlation with mitotic rate was observed in cases with high miR-493-3p (P = .0191) and miR-1974 (P = .0017) expression. High miR-1974 was also associated with low Ki-67 (P = .0312) and European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors stage (P = .0082) and negative p53 (P = .0013). At univariate analysis myxoid/classic histotype (P = .026), high miR-210 (P = .0465), high steroidogenic factor 1 protein (P = .0017), high Ki-67 (P = .0066), and high mitotic index (P = .0006) were significantly associated the shorter overall survival, the latter being the sole independent prognostic factor at multivariate analysis (P = .017). In conclusion, (a) miR-483-3p, miR-483-5p, and miR-210 are differentially expressed in ACC variants, and (b) high miR-210 is associated with clinicopathologic parameters of aggressiveness and a poor prognosis. PMID:24890943

Duregon, Eleonora; Rapa, Ida; Votta, Arianna; Giorcelli, Jessica; Daffara, Fulvia; Terzolo, Massimo; Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Volante, Marco; Papotti, Mauro

2014-08-01

268

Quick Questions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity provides an introduction to data analysis. The instructor poses a simple multiple choice question for the children to answer. Students are then prompted to answer questions about the data such as which answer is most common, which least common. Variations for presenting the data as a bar graph and using the data to make predictions are included. Students should have basic reading and writing skills.

2010-01-01

269

Disease quantification in dermatology: in vivo near-infrared spectroscopy measures correlate strongly with the clinical assessment of psoriasis severity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very useful in quantifying disease severity, they require an extensive clinical experience and carry a risk of subjectivity. We explore the opportunity to use in vivo near-infrared (NIR) spectra as an objective and noninvasive method for local disease severity assessment in 31 psoriasis patients in whom selected plaques were scored clinically. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was used to analyze and predict the severity scores on the NIR spectra of psoriatic and uninvolved skin. The correlation between predicted and clinically assigned scores was R=0.94 (RMSE=0.96), suggesting that in vivo NIR provides accurate clinical quantification of psoriatic plaques. Hence, NIR may be a practical solution to clinical severity assessment of psoriasis, providing a continuous, linear, numerical value of severity.

Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

2013-03-01

270

Dynamic rewiring of the androgen receptor protein interaction network correlates with prostate cancer clinical outcomes.  

PubMed

The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, which plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (CaP). The transformation to CaP has been linked to several somatic AR gene mutations and changes in AR protein complex formation, which in turn increase the potential activity of the receptor. Thus, to address the mechanism of AR-mediated neoplastic transformation, we developed in vitro methodology to isolate and characterize, via mass spectrometry, AR complexes of three AR genetic variants: wild type-AR, and two somatic gain-of-function AR prostatic mutants (T877A-AR and 0CAG-AR isoforms). To fully characterize the significance of our large raw data set, we employed a sophisticated systems biology approach to create an integrative protein-interaction network profile for each AR isoform. Our comparative analysis identified subnetwork cluster profiles for AR isoforms (WT, T877A, and 0CAG) that segregated AR isoforms on the basis of androgen stimulation conditions and mutant aggressiveness. Furthermore, results from additional correlative gene microarray analysis studies of all three AR isoform (WT, T877A, 0CAG) subnetwork clusters were assessed and found to be significantly enriched in tumor versus normal prostate tissues. We also identified two AR-interaction clusters, containing 21 and 30 proteins, respectively, that showed unfavourable prognosis outcome of recurrent cancers, on the basis of PSA, Gleason score and combined PSA/Gleason score. In conclusion, we have characterized a large panel of novel AR-interacting proteins, through a combined proteomics/systems biology screen, that are of clinical relevance and could potentially serve as novel markers for diagnosis and prognosis of CaP. PMID:21901193

Paliouras, Miltiadis; Zaman, Naif; Lumbroso, Rose; Kapogeorgakis, Laurie; Beitel, Lenore K; Wang, Edwin; Trifiro, Mark

2011-10-01

271

Liver lesions in children and adolescents: cytopathologic analysis and clinical correlates in 44 cases.  

PubMed

The role of fine needle aspiration (FNA) as a first-line diagnostic modality is well-established for neoplastic and nonneoplastic liver masses in adults. However, cytopathologic analysis of such lesions in children and adolescents has not been well studied. An 18-year retrospective review of the cytopathology archives at The Johns Hopkins Hospital identified 44 cases of hepatic FNA in children and adolescents (i.e., 21 years and younger). The cytopathologic material was reviewed and correlated with subsequent surgical pathology diagnoses and/or clinical follow-up. Among the 44 FNAs studied, 40 (90.9%) were deemed diagnostic for evaluation and 4 (9.1%) were nondiagnostic. Twenty four (60%) of the diagnostic FNAs were neoplasms, 10 (25%) were nonneoplastic lesions, and 6 (15%) were "atypical" or "suspicious." There were 21 (87.5%) malignant and 3 (12.5%) benign tumors. Among the malignant cases, metastases/secondary tumors accounted for 12 (54.5%) followed by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)--7 (38.1%). The types of metastatic/secondary neoplasms were Wilms tumor (2), germ cell tumor (2), acute leukemias (2), and miscellaneous others (6). Among the nonneoplastic lesions focal nodular hyperplasia was most common--4 (40%). Among the "atypical" cases, 4 (66.6%) turned out to be benign on follow-up, 2 were HCC, and 1 was Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunoperoxidase (IPOX) studies were done in 20 (45.5%) cases to confirm the cytopathologic diagnoses. Overall, FNA showed a sensitivity of 95.2% and a specificity of 100% for a malignant diagnosis. PMID:21309009

Laiq, Zenab; Bishop, Justin A; Ali, Syed Z

2012-07-01

272

Assessment of osteopontin in early breast cancer: correlative study in a randomised clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction Osteopontin (OPN) is a malignancy-associated glycoprotein that contributes functionally to tumor aggressiveness. In metastatic breast cancer, we previously demonstrated that elevated OPN in primary tumor and blood was associated with poor prognosis. Methods We measured OPN in plasma by ELISA, and in tumors by immunohistochemistry, in 624 (94%) and 462 (69%), respectively, of 667 postmenopausal women with hormone responsive early breast cancer treated by surgery followed by adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen +/? octreotide in a randomized trial (NCIC CTG MA.14; National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group Mammary.14). Results Plasma OPN was measured in 2,540 samples; 688 at baseline and 1,852 collected during follow-up. Mean baseline plasma OPN was 46 ng/ml (range 22.6 to 290) which did not differ from normal levels. Mean percentage OPN tumor cell positivity was 33.9 (95% CI: 30.2 to 37.9). There was no correlation between plasma and tumor OPN values. In multivariate analysis, neither was associated with event-free survival (EFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), bone RFS or non-bone RFS. An exploratory analysis in patients with recurrence showed higher mean OPN plasma levels 60.7 ng/ml (23.9 to 543) in the recurrence period compared with baseline levels. Conclusions The hypothesis that OPN tumor expression would have independent prognostic value in early breast cancer was not supported by multivariate analysis of this study population. Plasma OPN levels in women with hormone responsive early breast cancer in the MA.14 trial were not elevated and there was no evidence for prognostic value of plasma OPN in this defined group of patients. However, our finding of elevated mean OPN plasma level around the time of recurrence warrants further study. Trial registration NCT00002864, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00002864 PMID:24451146

2014-01-01

273

Oxidative Stress and Erythrocyte Membrane Alterations in Children with Autism: Correlation with Clinical Features  

PubMed Central

It has been suggested that oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), but the literature reports somewhat contradictory results. To further investigate the issue, we evaluated a high number of peripheral oxidative stress parameters, and some related issues such as erythrocyte membrane functional features and lipid composition. Twenty-one autistic children (Au) aged 5 to 12 years, were gender and age-matched with 20 typically developing children (TD). Erythrocyte thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, urinary isoprostane and hexanoyl-lysine adduct levels were elevated in Au, thus confirming the occurrence of an imbalance of the redox status of Au, whilst other oxidative stress markers or associated parameters (urinary 8-oxo-dG, plasma radical absorbance capacity and carbonyl groups, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and catalase activities) were unchanged. A very significant reduction of Na+/K+-ATPase activity (?66%, p<0.0001), a reduction of erythrocyte membrane fluidity and alteration in erythrocyte fatty acid membrane profile (increase in monounsaturated fatty acids, decrease in EPA and DHA-?3 with a consequent increase in ?6/?3 ratio) were found in Au compared to TD, without change in membrane sialic acid content. Some Au clinical features appear to be correlated with these findings; in particular, hyperactivity score appears to be related with some parameters of the lipidomic profile and membrane fluidity. Oxidative stress and erythrocyte membrane alterations may play a role in the pathogenesis of ASD and prompt the development of palliative therapeutic protocols. Moreover, the marked decrease in NKA could be potentially utilized as a peripheral biomarker of ASD. PMID:23840462

Visconti, Paola; Bolotta, Alessandra; Ferreri, Carla; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Malisardi, Gemma; Manfredini, Stefano; Marini, Marina; Nanetti, Laura; Pipitone, Emanuela; Raffaelli, Francesca; Resca, Federica; Mazzanti, Laura

2013-01-01

274

Provocative Questions feedback — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

275

Eye irritation of low-irritant cosmetic formulations: correlation of in vitro results with clinical data and product composition.  

PubMed

Alternative methods to the Draize eye irritation test, such as the hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM) or the bovine corneal opacity and permeability (BCOP) tests, are currently used to evaluate the irritant potential of cosmetic or consumer products. Although, for strong irritants, the results of these tests correlate well with those of the Draize test, they appear to be less suited to identify mild irritants. In order to improve the sensitivity of alternative eye irritation tests, we developed a novel method that uses a human corneal epithelial cell line (CEPI), and the endpoints of cytotoxicity and IL-8 release. Twelve make-up removers were assessed by the HET-CAM, BCOP and CEPI tests, as well as in a clinical in-use test under ophthalmological control after their application to the external eye lid. In addition, we investigated the impact of osmolality and raw material composition on in vitro and clinical results and compared the in vitro results with those of clinical studies. Overall, although HET-CAM results were unrelated to eye discomfort and adverse clinical signs, they correlated mainly with the presence and concentration of surfactants in the test articles. BCOP scores were unrelated to clinical signs, but related mainly to glycol and sodium lactate content and concentration in the test articles. Cytotoxicity in CEPI mainly correlated with presence and concentrations of surfactants, and IL-8 release to clinical signs and/or glycol and sodium lactate concentrations. Overall, IL-8 release appeared to be the most sensitive and reliable endpoint to predict human eye tolerance to mildly irritant products. Although our results suggest that the IL-8 assay appears to be a promising screen for borderline-irritant formulations, further experiments are required to confirm and validate these preliminary results. PMID:15582208

Debbasch, Caroline; Ebenhahn, Catherine; Dami, Nadia; Pericoi, Marc; Van den Berghe, Christine; Cottin, Martine; Nohynek, Gerhard J

2005-01-01

276

Absence of correlation between utrophin localization and quantity and the clinical severity in Duchenne/Becker dystrophies  

SciTech Connect

While present in the surface membrane of embryonic muscle fibers, in adult normal muscle fibers, utrophin is restricted to the motor endplate and cells of blood vessel walls. However, the observation that utrophin is maintained in the extrajunctional plasma membrane in Duchenne (DMD) and in mdx muscle fibers has led to the suggestion that excess utrophin might compensate for dystrophin deficiency in the Xp21 muscular dystrophies. In order to detect an inverse correlation of utrophin presence and clinical severity, we have assessed utrophin distribution and quantity in DMD and Becker (BMD) patients of different ages and stages of clinical severity. All patients showed a positive discontinuous immunolabeling of utrophin on the sarcolemma, staining equally small and large muscle fibers, indicating that immature characteristics are maintained in such fibers. On Western blot, utrophin bands with concentrations 2- to 10-fold greater than in normal controls were detected in all DMD/BMD patients. However, no negative correlation was found between the amount of utrophin and the severity of clinical course, implying that the detectable utrophin levels in these patients did not compensate for dystrophin deficiency. In a DMD patient with growth hormone (GH) deficiency and a BMD-like clinical course, utrophin levels were comparable to the other typical DMD cases, which reinforces the hypothesis that the observed increase in utrophin is apparently not responsible for a milder clinical course in some patients with Xp21 muscular dystrophies. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Vainzof, M.; Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Man, N.; Zatz, M. [IB USP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [and others

1995-09-25

277

Early-stage pulmonary adenocarcinoma (T1N0M0): a clinical, radiological, surgical, and pathological correlation of 104 cases. The MD Anderson Cancer Center Experience.  

PubMed

The recent proposal for histological subtyping of pulmonary adenocarcinoma by predominant pattern and introduction of the terms adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma to replace the term bronchioloalveolar carcinoma by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society has led us to conduct a study of 104 patients with early-stage primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma (T1N0M0), with a view to histological subtype as defined by the new proposal and clinical outcome. None of the clinical parameters of our patient population (type of surgery, age, gender, tumor size, and comorbidities) showed any statistically significant correlation with outcome, except for associated malignancies, which not surprisingly appeared to have a negative impact on survival. In addition, statistical analyses of the histological characteristics to include tumor differentiation and the percentage of a lepidic or bronchioloalveolar component did not show any statistically significant values in terms of survival. Our results failed to show any statistically significant difference of survival between those T1N0M0 adenocarcinomas with a lepidic component and those without, thus questioning the use of terms such as in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. On the basis of our results, we consider that the outcome for patients with T1N0M0 disease is still best determined by appropriate staging rather than by changes in the pathology nomenclature of adenocarcinoma. PMID:23542459

Weissferdt, Annikka; Kalhor, Neda; Marom, Edith M; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Godoy, Myrna C; Correa, Arlene M; Swisher, Stephen G; Moran, Cesar A

2013-08-01

278

Questionable Exercises.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

1999-01-01

279

Questor's Question  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Questor is a curious little bird whose four broad questions are helpful to anyone interested in making art or understanding the art of others. He was designed as a character in an online video for children, "Building on a River: Questor's Tale." The video is narrated by Questor, who relates the 2000 year history of architecture along the Salt…

Erickson, Mary; Dock, Michelle Nichols; Eldridge, Laurie

2009-01-01

280

Brazilian clinical trial of uniform multidrug therapy for leprosy patients: the correlation between clinical disease types and adverse effects.  

PubMed

This study sought to verify the correlation between leprosy types and the adverse effects of treatment drugs. This quantitative, prospective, nested study was developed at the Dona Libânia Dermatology Centre in Fortaleza, Brazil. Data were collected from November 2007-November 2008. During this period, 818 leprosy patients were diagnosed and began treatment. Forty patients with tuberculoid leprosy (TT) were selected. Twenty patients followed a standard therapy of dapsone and rifampicin and 20 were administered dapsone, rifampicin and clofazimine (U-MDT). Twenty patients with borderline lepromatous (BL) and lepromatous leprosy (LL) were also selected and treated with U-MDT. All of the subjects received six doses. With the exception of haemolytic anaemia, there was a low incidence of adverse effects in all the groups. We did not observe any differences in the incidence of haemolytic anaemia or other side effects across groups of patients with TT, BL or LL treated with U-MDT. PMID:23283457

Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Cruz, Rossilene; Almeida, Paulo Cesar; Moraes, Maria Elisabete Amaral de; Penna, Gerson Oliveira

2012-12-01

281

Fragile X Premutation Tremor\\/Ataxia Syndrome: Molecular, Clinical, and Neuroimaging Correlates  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a series of 26 patients, all 150 years of age, who are carriers of the fragile X premutation and are affected by a multisystem, progressive neurological disorder. The two main clinical features of this new syndrome are cerebellar ataxia and\\/or intention tremor, which were chosen as clinical inclusion criteria for this series. Other documented symptoms were short-term memory

Sébastien Jacquemont; Randi J. Hagerman; Maureen Leehey; Jim Grigsby; Lin Zhang; James A. Brunberg; Claudia Greco; Vincent Des Portes; Tristan Jardini; Richard Levine; Elizabeth Berry-Kravis; W. Ted Brown; Stephane Schaeffer; John Kissel; Flora Tassone; Paul J. Hagerman

2003-01-01

282

Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy: Design and Implementation of a First-Year Medical School Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the addition of a clinical program to a first year medical school curriculum. 25 students were randomly selected to participate in the program. Immediate outcomes measured include:pre-post opinion survey and examination grades. Future outcomes will analyze how this population vs. the traditional track students perform in course exams, clinical surgical rotation scores and residency matches.

2009-11-01

283

Clinical Trial Awareness Among Racial\\/Ethnic Minorities in HINTS 2007: Sociodemographic, Attitudinal, and Knowledge Correlates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was (1) to examine the association of race\\/ethnicity on clinical trial awareness, controlling for several sociodemographic, attitudinal, and knowledge variables, and (2) to inform future communication campaigns to increase clinical trial awareness and participation. Secondary analysis was conducted among 6,754 Hispanic, Black, and White adult respondents to the National Cancer Institute's 2007 Health Information National

Aisha Langford; Ken Resnicow; Lawrence An

2010-01-01

284

21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01...an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence...Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.28...acute pharmacological effect or clinical...

2013-04-01

285

21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01...an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence...Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.28...acute pharmacological effect or clinical...

2011-04-01

286

21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01...an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence...Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.28...acute pharmacological effect or clinical...

2010-04-01

287

21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01...an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence...Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.28...acute pharmacological effect or clinical...

2012-04-01

288

21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.  

21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01...an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence...Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.28...acute pharmacological effect or clinical...

2014-04-01

289

Treatment Effectiveness and Its Correlates in a Marriage and Family Therapy Training Clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

While a significant amount of attention has been paid to the efficacy of marriage and family therapy (MFT), research on the effectiveness of MFT is lacking. Furthermore, university training clinics are an underutilized, yet excellent resource for collecting effectiveness research data. This study examined the effectiveness of therapy provided at an MFT university training clinic, by examining therapists' ratings of

David B. Ward; Eric E. McCollum

2005-01-01

290

Clinical and cytogenetic studies of the Prader-Willi syndrome: Evidence of phenotype-karyotype correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-seven patients with the presumed diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) were studied clinically and cytogenetically. The patients were classified into three study groups on the basis of their clinical pictures: group 1 with 12 children meeting the strict diagnostic criteria for PWS; group 2 with nine floppy infants and young children, aged 3 years or less, without obesity and hyperphagia;

N. Niikawa; S. Ishikiriyama

1985-01-01

291

Examining the Clinical Correlates of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Youth by Ascertainment Source  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine whether presentation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and associated patterns of psychiatric comorbidity and dysfunction vary by referral source. ASD youth referred to a specialized ambulatory program for ASD (N = 143) were compared to ASD youth referred to a general child psychiatry clinic (N = 217). More ASD clinic youth met criteria…

Joshi, Gagan; Faraone, Stephen V.; Wozniak, Janet; Petty, Carter; Fried, Ronna; Galdo, Maribel; Furtak, Stephannie L.; McDermott, Katie; Epstien, Cecily; Walker, Rosemary; Caron, Ashley; Feinberg, Leah; Biederman, Joseph

2014-01-01

292

Empirical Correlates and Expanded Interpretation of the MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (Cynicism)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The recent release of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) has received much attention from the clinical psychology community. Particular concerns have focused on Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (RC3; Cynicism). This article briefly reviews the major criticisms and responses regarding the restructuring of…

Ingram, Paul B.; Kelso, Kristy M.; McCord, David M.

2011-01-01

293

Correlation of 24-hr esophageal pH patterns with clinical features and endoscopy in gastroesophageal reflux disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed 24-hr ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring in north Indian patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and correlated it with symptom severity and endoscopic abnormalities. Thirty-six consecutive patients with symptomatic GERD and 16 healthy volunteers underwent objective grading of clinical symptoms and endoscopic findings. Total, supine, and upright reflux periods as well as frequency and duration of reflux episodes were

V. A. Saraswat; R. K. Dhiman; A. Mishra; S. R. Naik

1994-01-01

294

Examining the clinical correlates of autism spectrum disorder in youth by ascertainment source.  

PubMed

To examine whether presentation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and associated patterns of psychiatric comorbidity and dysfunction vary by referral source. ASD youth referred to a specialized ambulatory program for ASD (N = 143) were compared to ASD youth referred to a general child psychiatry clinic (N = 217). More ASD clinic youth met criteria for a more robust form of ASD (autistic disorder); more youth referred to the psychiatry clinic met criteria for broader spectrum ASD (pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified). General psychiatry clinic youth with ASD suffered from a greater burden of psychopathologies and higher levels of dysfunction. The presentation of ASD in psychiatrically referred youth differs between general and ASD-specialized clinics, though both referral populations have high levels of comorbidity and dysfunction. PMID:24566937

Joshi, Gagan; Faraone, Stephen V; Wozniak, Janet; Petty, Carter; Fried, Ronna; Galdo, Maribel; Furtak, Stephannie L; McDermott, Katie; Epstien, Cecily; Walker, Rosemary; Caron, Ashley; Feinberg, Leah; Biederman, Joseph

2014-09-01

295

Examining the Clinical Correlates of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Youth by Ascertainment Source  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine whether presentation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and associated patterns of psychiatric comorbidity and dysfunction vary by referral source. Methods ASD youth referred to a specialized ambulatory program for ASD (N=143) were compared to ASD youth referred to a general child psychiatry clinic (N=217). Results More ASD clinic youth met criteria for a more robust form of ASD (autistic disorder); more youth referred to the psychiatry clinic met criteria for broader spectrum ASD (PDD-NOS). General psychiatry clinic youth with ASD suffered from a greater burden of psychopathologies and higher levels of dysfunction. Conclusion The presentation of ASD in psychiatrically referred youth differs between general and ASD-specialized clinics, though both referral populations have high levels of comorbidity and dysfunction. PMID:24566937

Joshi, Gagan; Faraone, Stephen V; Wozniak, Janet; Petty, Carter; Fried, Ronna; Galdo, Maribel; Furtak, Stephannie L.; McDermott, Katie; Epstien, Cecily; Walker, Rosemary; Caron, Ashley; Feinberg, Leah; Biederman, Joseph

2014-01-01

296

Air enema for diagnosis and reduction of intussusception in children: Clinical experience and fluoroscopy time correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The objective of this study was to correlate the fluoroscopy time with radiologic outcome in the pneumoreduction of intussusception in children. Methods: From September 1995 to December 1997, a prospective analysis of 181 cases of pediatric intussusception with pneumoreduction without sedation was done. A receiver operating characteristic curve of fluoroscopy time was drawn for correlation with radiologic outcome. Results:

Kar-Wai Lui; Ho-Fai Wong; Yun-Chung Cheung; Lai-Chu See; Koon-Kwan Ng; Man-Shan Kong; Yung-Liang Wan

2001-01-01

297

Correlation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Three hypothetical rock sections along an East-West transect are provided. Students correlate the three sections using the biostratigraphy of planktic forams (as a proxy for age), benthic forams (as a proxy of depth), and lithology (as a proxy of environment). Students are asked to provide an interpretation of the history of this depositional basin. An ash bed of known age is added and students are asked to determine if this new information affects their interpretation. Finally, an interesting lithologic feature is added, and students are asked to provide a geological explanation.

Pennilyn Higgins

298

Interleukin-1? level in peri-implant crevicular fluid and its correlation with the clinical and radiographic parameters  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Assessing only the clinical and radiographic parameters for evaluation of dental implants may not be enough as they often reflect extensive inflammatory changes in the periodontal tissues. As peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) can give us a more prompt and objective measure of the disease activity, the purpose of this case series is to assess the peri-implant health status of single tooth dental implants not only clinically and radiographically but also biochemically. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients were subjected to dental implants at single edentulous sites using a conventional surgical approach. At baseline, 6 months, and 12 months after implant placement, the clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded. Additionally, IL-1? in PICF was estimated using the ELISA kit at 6th and 12th month. Results: The clinical and radiographic parameters differed significantly around the implants at different time intervals with IL-1? levels showing highly significant differences between 6 months (31.79 ± 12.26 pg/?l) and 12 months (113.09 ± 51.11 pg/?l). However, Spearman's correlation coefficient showed no correlation with the clinical and radiographic parameters. Interpretation and Conclusion: Assessment of the various parameters confirmed that all the implants had a healthy peri-implant status. Although the levels of IL-1? in PICF were elevated at the 12th month, they were well within the healthy range as observed by previous studies. This indicates that IL-1?, a biochemical marker, can be used as an adjunct to clinical and radiographic parameters in the assessment of EARLY inflammatory changes around implants. PMID:24872632

Kajale, Aniruddha M.; Mehta, Dhoom S.

2014-01-01

299

HLA-B51 subtypes in Turkish patients with Behçet's disease and their correlation with clinical manifestations.  

PubMed

Behçet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic inflammatory disease believed to be triggered by microbial or environmental factors on a genetic platform. Clinically, it may have an impact on many body systems, including the mucocutaneous, ocular, articular, vascular, and neurological systems. In this study, we aimed to determine the HLA-B51 subtypes and their correlations with the clinical findings of BD. Fifty-one patients with BD and 44 gender- and age-matched healthy subjects were included in this study. The HLA-B51 subtypes of all participants were determined, and the correlations of the clinical manifestations of the disease with the HLA-B51 subtypes were analyzed. HLA-B51 positivity was found to be significantly higher in the patient group (P < 0.001, RR = 15.20), which had significantly more frequent HLA-B5101, HLA-B5102(01), HLA-B5109, and HLA-B5122 subtypes than the healthy subjects (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, considering the correlation between the genetic makeup and clinical findings, the HLA-B5109 subtype was found to be less frequent in patients with papulopustular skin lesions (P = 0.042). The frequency of HLA-B5103 was significantly higher in patients with central nervous system involvement (P = 0.015). There may be a relationship between HLA-B5102(01), HLA-B5109, and HLA-B5122 in addition to HLA-B51 and HLA-B5101(01) in Turkish patients with BD. The HLA-B5109 subtype can be protective against papulopustular lesion development; however, the HLA-B5103 subtype may pose a risk for neuro-Behçet development in BD. PMID:25062414

Demirseren, D D; Ceylan, G G; Akoglu, G; Emre, S; Erten, S; Arman, A; Metin, A

2014-01-01

300

Attitudinal barriers to participation in oncology clinical trials: factor analysis and correlates of barriers.  

PubMed

Patient participation in cancer clinical trials is low. Little is known about attitudinal barriers to participation, particularly among patients who may be offered a trial during an imminent initial oncology consult. The aims of the present study were to confirm the presence of proposed subscales of a recently developed cancer clinical trial attitudinal barriers measure, describe the most common cancer clinical trials attitudinal barriers, and evaluate socio-demographic, medical and financial factors associated with attitudinal barriers. A total of 1256 patients completed a survey assessing demographic factors, perceived financial burden, prior trial participation and attitudinal barriers to clinical trials participation. Results of a factor analysis did not confirm the presence of the proposed four attitudinal barriers subscale/factors. Rather, a single factor represented the best fit to the data. The most highly-rated barriers were fear of side-effects, worry about health insurance and efficacy concerns. Results suggested that less educated patients, patients with non-metastatic disease, patients with no previous oncology clinical trial participation, and patients reporting greater perceived financial burden from cancer care were associated with higher barriers. These patients may need extra attention in terms of decisional support. Overall, patients with fewer personal resources (education, financial issues) report more attitudinal barriers and should be targeted for additional decisional support. PMID:24467411

Manne, S; Kashy, D; Albrecht, T; Wong, Y-N; Lederman Flamm, A; Benson, A B; Miller, S M; Fleisher, Linda; Buzaglo, J; Roach, N; Katz, M; Ross, E; Collins, M; Poole, D; Raivitch, S; Miller, D M; Kinzy, T G; Liu, T; Meropol, N J

2015-01-01

301

How do we modify our clinical trials system to determine the optimal criteria for rapidly evaluating new cancer therapies? — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

302

Are there characteristics of cancers, especially early cancers, that can be used to match therapeutic strategies more accurately with clinical risk? — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

303

Questions Submitted Online — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Sequencing of natural human tumors is teaching us invaluable lessons. It is becoming clear that the new dogmas created in the post genome era are being questioned. The previously suspected genetic heterogeneity of tumors is now proven on the sequence level. The extreme genetic heterogeneity of individual tumors and the existence of multiple tumors (not metastases) pose fundamental doubt on the prevailing dogma of targeted drug(s) and personalized treatments.

304

Alcohol Use Disorders in Opioid Maintenance Therapy: Prevalence, Clinical Correlates and Treatment.  

PubMed

Maintenance therapy with methadone or buprenorphine is an established and first-line treatment for opioid dependence. Clinical studies indicate that about a third of patients in opioid maintenance therapy show increased alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorders. Comorbid alcohol use disorders have been identified as a risk factor for clinical outcome and can cause poor physical and mental health, including liver disorders, noncompliance, social deterioration and increased mortality risk. The effects of opioid maintenance therapy on alcohol consumption are controversial and no clear pattern has emerged. Most studies have not found a change in alcohol use after initiation of maintenance therapy. Methadone and buprenorphine appear to carry little risk of liver toxicity, but further research on this topic is required. Recent data indicate that brief intervention strategies may help reduce alcohol intake, but the existing evidence is still limited. This review discusses further clinical implications of alcohol use disorders in opioid dependence. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25413371

Soyka, Michael

2014-11-19

305

Benign soft-tissue lesions of the fingers: radiopathological correlation and clinical considerations.  

PubMed

Soft-tissue lesions of the fingers are commonly found in daily clinical practice. A wide range of tumors and pseudotumors have been described in this location, and the majority of them are benign. Ganglion cysts are the most common entity, and the localized type of tenosynovial giant cell tumors are the most frequent solid condition. Both may be easily recognized owing to their typical clinical and radiological characteristics. However, categorization of the spectrum of soft-tissue lesions of the fingers remains limited, despite imaging development, and many patients undergo surgery before radiological or histological diagnosis. Clinical history, radiographic features, and ultrasound and magnetic resonance patterns may help in obtaining the correct diagnosis or reducing the list of differential diagnoses. Radiologists should be familiar with imaging findings so that they can determine the size, extension, and affected neighboring anatomical structures, and provide information that allows adequate presurgical counseling. PMID:25367671

Oca Pernas, Roque; Prada González, Raquel; Santos Armentia, Eloísa; Hormaza Aguirre, Nerea; Tardáguila de la Fuente, Gonzalo; Trinidad López, Carmen; Delgado Sánchez-Gracián, Carlos

2015-04-01

306

Prevalence and clinical correlates of obsessive-compulsive disorder in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Obsessive compulsive symptoms frequently occur in a substantial proportion of patients with schizophrenia. The term schizoobsessive has been proposed to delineate this subgroup of schizophrenia patients who present with obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder. However, whether this co-occurrence is more than just co-morbidity and represents a distinct subgroup remains controversial. A striking variation is noted across studies examining prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder in schizophrenia patients and their impact on clinical profile of schizophrenia. Hence, in this study, we examined the prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder in a large sample of consecutively hospitalized schizophrenia patients and compared the clinical and functional characteristics of schizophrenia patients with and without obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder. We evaluated 200 consecutive subjects with the DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale, Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale, Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, Family Interview for Genetic Studies and World Health Organization Quality of Life scale. The prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia was 24% (n=48); 37 of them had obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and 11 had obsessive-compulsive symptoms not amounting to a clinical diagnosis of OCD (OCS). Schizophrenia patients with OCS/OCD had an earlier age at onset of schizophrenia symptoms, lower positive symptoms score, higher co-morbidity with Axis II disorders, higher occurrence of OCD in family and better quality of life. Findings of the study indicate a higher prevalence of OCS/OCD in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients with and without OCS/OCD have comparable clinical profile with few exceptions. High rates of OCD in first degree relatives suggest possible genetic contributions and differences in neurobiology. Finally, evidence to consider schizoobsessive as a distinct diagnostic entity is inconclusive and warrants further studies. PMID:25308405

Devi, Sugnyani; Rao, Naren P; Badamath, Suresh; Chandrashekhar, C R; Janardhan Reddy, Y C

2015-01-01

307

[Advances in pathogenesis and correlated clinical research of hypercoagulability in ? thalassemia].  

PubMed

This article summarizes the pathogenesis of hypercoagulability in ? thalassemia patients, including platelet activation, alteration of red blood cell membranes, abnormal expression of adhesion molecules on vascular endothelial cells and iron overload. Clinical evidence, clinical manifestations of hypercoagulable state and thrombosis in ? thalassemia and the effect of splenectomy on hypercoagulable state were reviewed. Strategies to prevent and treat the thromboembolic events in ?-thalassemia intermedia are also discussed, including transfusion therapy to raise hemoglobin levels, avoidance or delay of splenectomy and a number of treatments in the exploration. PMID:25008893

Lv, Rong-Yu; Wen, Fei-Qiu; Yu, Jie

2014-07-01

308

Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in primary degenerative dementia: correlation with neuropathological findings.  

PubMed Central

Neuropathological features and causes of death are presented in 27 deceased patients belonging to a prospective series of 71 hospitalised patients with primary degenerative dementia. The clinical criteria for primary degenerative dementia used in the present study were accurate enough to exclude patients with multi-infarct dementia. At necropsy, 82% of the cases had neuropathological changes of Alzheimer's disease. The clinical features of patients with other neuropathological changes are described. The most common immediate cause of death was bronchopneumonia which accounted for 59% of deaths in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:6842208

Sulkava, R; Haltia, M; Paetau, A; Wikström, J; Palo, J

1983-01-01

309

YKL-40 in Asthma and its correlation with different clinical parameters.  

PubMed

It has been suggested that elevated serum level of YKL-40 could be a marker for asthma and its severity. Along with few published studies, we investigated its correlation with asthma and its severity as well as spirometric indices.114 patients with asthma and 114 healthy controls underwent the assessment of serum level of YKL-40 (by ELISA) and spirometric indices. Pearson's coefficient determined the correlation between the variables and multivariate linear regression analysis was used for adjusting the effect of different probable confounding factors.Serum levels of YKL-40 were significantly higher in the asthmatic patients compared to those in healthy people (p<0.001). We also found a significant correlation between YKL-40 serum level and spirometric indices even after adjusting the effects of other variables.We report for the first time in an Iranian population that YKL-40 may be a good diagnostic marker of asthma in serum. PMID:24659163

Saba, Mohammadali; Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Akbari, Hossein; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Ramazani Jolfaii, Maryam

2014-08-01

310

Preoperative radiochemotherapy in locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer: regional radiofrequency hyperthermia correlates with clinical parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) is a widely used means of treatment for patients suffering from primary, locally advanced, or recurrent rectal cancer. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment due to additional application of regional hyperthermia (HRCT) to this conventional therapy regime in a Phase II study, employing the annular phased-array system BSD-2000 (SIGMA-60 applicator). The clinical results of the trial

B Rau; P Wust; W Tilly; J Gellermann; C Harder; H Riess; V Budach; R Felix; P. M Schlag

2000-01-01

311

Neural correlates of clinical symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions in obsessive–compulsive disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although results from neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have postulated the involvement of the frontal lobe and the subcortical brain regions in the pathophysiology of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), neuroimaging studies have provided little evidence that cognitive abnormalities in patients with OCD are related to dysfunctions in these areas. This study was designed to determine whether the clinical features and cognitive deficits

Jun Soo Kwon; Jae-Jin Kim; Dong Woo Lee; Jae Sung Lee; Dong Soo Lee; Myung-Sun Kim; In Kyoon Lyoo; Maeng Je Cho; Myung Chul Lee

2003-01-01

312

A Comparative Study of Clinical Correlates in Schizophrenia with Onset in Childhood, Adolescence and Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare disorder. Comparative data on the effect of differential age of onset on clinical profile in schizophrenia are very few. Method: Subjects with COS (n = 15), adolescence onset schizophrenia (AdOS, n = 20) and adulthood onset schizophrenia (AOS, n = 20) were compared on socio-demographic,…

Biswas, Parthasarathy; Malhotra, Savita; Malhotra, Anil; Gupta, Nitin

2006-01-01

313

Complete Atrioventricular Canal. Clinical Anatomic Correlations between Patients with and without Down's Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose - To compare clinical course, causes and symptoms beginning enset time in children with complete atrioventricular canal with and without Down's syndrome. Methods - Records of 80 patients <2 years of age, were reviewed. There were 55 (69%) with Down's syn- drome - group I (GI) and 25 (31%) without - group II (GII). Age at synpton enset intensity,

Liliana María Ferrín; Edmar Atik; Nana Miura Ikari; Miguel Barbero Marcial; Munir Ebaid

314

Acute and Chronic Craniofacial Pain: Brainstem Mechanisms of Nociceptive Transmission and Neuroplasticity, and Their Clinical Correlates  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the recent advances in knowledge of brainstem mechanisms related to craniofacial pain. It also draws attention to their clinical implications, and concludes with a brief overview and suggestions for future research directions. It first describes the general organizational features of the trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex (VBSNC), including its input and output properties and intrinsic characteristics that

Barry J. Sessle

2000-01-01

315

Clinical and Cognitive Correlates of Depressive Symptoms among Youth with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Depression is the most common comorbidity among adults with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), yet little is known about depressive symptoms in childhood OCD. This study examined clinical and cognitive variables associated with depressive symptomatology in 71 youths (62% male, M age = 12.7 years) with primary OCD. Youths presented with a range…

Peris, Tara S.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Asarnow, Joan R.; Langley, Audra; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

2010-01-01

316

Griscelli Disease: Genotype–Phenotype Correlation in an Array of Clinical Heterogeneity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Griscelli disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diffuse pigmentary dilution and occurrence of acute phases of uncontrolled lymphocyte and macrophage activation, so-called “hemophagocytic syndrome” (HS) that leads to death. Recently, two closely linked genes located on human 15q21 region have been found to be responsible for the disease. We present clinical and laboratory findings of 13 unrelated

Ozden Sanal; Fúgen Ersoy; Ilhan Tezcan; Ay?e Metin; Leman Yel; Gaël Ménasché; Aytemiz Gürgey; Izzet Berkel; Geneviève de Saint Basile

2002-01-01

317

Cerebral Dysfunctions Related to Perinatal Organic Damage: Clinical-Neuropathologic Correlations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent neuropathology studies identify hypoxia as the main cause of perinatal cerebral damage. Cerebral lesions present at birth, with transition to chronic scar lesions, are correlated to mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and minimal brain dysfunction. Gestation age and severity of hypoxic exposure essentially determine the cerebral…

Towbin, Abraham

1978-01-01

318

Sodium and potassium clearances by the maturing kidney: clinical-molecular correlates  

Microsoft Academic Search

A temporal dissociation exists between the early appearance of sodium absorptive and later detection of potassium secretory processes in the maturing rabbit collecting duct. To extend the latter findings to the human, we sought to correlate developmental changes in renal sodium and potassium clearances with the molecular expression of corresponding ion channels in kidneys of premature infants. In a longitudinal

Mercedes M. Delgado; Rajeev Rohatgi; Shahana Khan; Ian R. Holzman; Lisa M. Satlin

2003-01-01

319

Correlation between clinical diagnosis based on RDC\\/TMD and MRI findings of TMJ internal derangement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to investigate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic process based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorder (RDC\\/TMD) by evaluating agreement between RDC\\/TMD and MRI diagnosis of disc displacement (DD) and correlation amongst MRI findings such as DD, joint effusion (JE), degenerative change and superior lateral pterygoid muscle (SLPM) attachment. Randomly

J. W. Park; H. H. Song; H. S. Roh; Y. K. Kim; J. Y. Lee

320

Correlating anterior insula gray matter volume changes in young people with clinical and neurocognitive outcomes: an MRI study  

PubMed Central

Background The anterior insula cortex is considered to be both the structural and functional link between experience, affect, and behaviour. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have shown changes in anterior insula gray matter volume (GMV) in psychosis, bipolar, depression and anxiety disorders in older patients, but few studies have investigated insula GMV changes in young people. This study examined the relationship between anterior insula GMV, clinical symptom severity and neuropsychological performance in a heterogeneous cohort of young people presenting for mental health care. Methods Participants with a primary diagnosis of depression (n?=?43), bipolar disorder (n?=?38), psychosis (n?=?32), anxiety disorder (n?=?12) or healthy controls (n?=?39) underwent structural MRI scanning, and volumetric segmentation of the bilateral anterior insula cortex was performed using the FreeSurfer application. Statistical analysis examined the linear and quadratic correlations between anterior insula GMV and participants’ performance in a battery of clinical and neuropsychological assessments. Results Compared to healthy participants, patients had significantly reduced GMV in the left anterior insula (t?=?2.05, p?=?.042) which correlated with reduced performance on a neuropsychological task of attentional set-shifting (??=?.32, p?=?.016). Changes in right anterior insula GMV was correlated with increased symptom severity (r?=?.29, p?=?.006) and more positive symptoms (r?=?.32, p?=?.002). Conclusions By using the novel approach of examining a heterogeneous cohort of young depression, anxiety, bipolar and psychosis patients together, this study has demonstrated that insula GMV changes are associated with neurocognitive deficits and clinical symptoms in such young patients. PMID:22607202

2012-01-01

321

Thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis: outcome, clinical and pathological correlations in 197 patients on a 20-year experience.  

PubMed

We studied 197 patients with thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis (T-MG) to identify variables that can influence the natural history of the disease and the therapeutical approaches. Multivariate analysis showed that neither clinical nor pathological variables were associated with a better chance to reach complete stable remission. The video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (VATET) was not significantly correlated with a lower chance of achieving complete stable remission compared with the classical transsternal approach (T-3b) (p=0.1090). Thymoma recurrence was not correlated with surgery by VATET or T-3b. VATET was safe and reliable for removal of thymoma. The low chance of achieving remission (9.64%) in T-MG underlines the importance of an early diagnosis as well as the need for more aggressive therapeutic strategies. PMID:18722676

Maggi, Lorenzo; Andreetta, Francesca; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Bernasconi, Pia; Cavalcante, Paola; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Muscolino, Giuseppe; Novellino, Lorenzo; Mantegazza, Renato

2008-09-15

322

Variable clinical expression in patients with a germline MEN1 disease gene mutation: clues to a genotype–phenotype correlation  

PubMed Central

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is an inherited endocrine tumor syndrome, predominantly characterized by tumors of the parathyroid glands, gastroenteropancreatic tumors, pituitary adenomas, adrenal adenomas, and neuroendocrine tumors of the thymus, lungs or stomach. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is caused by germline mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 tumor suppressor gene. The initial germline mutation, loss of the wild-type allele, and modifying genetic and possibly epigenetic and environmental events eventually result in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 tumors. Our understanding of the function of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 gene product, menin, has increased significantly over the years. However, to date, no clear genotype–phenotype correlation has been established. In this review we discuss reports on exceptional clinical presentations of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, which may provide more insight into the pathogenesis of this disorder and offer clues for a possible genotype–phenotype correlation. PMID:22584706

Lips, Cornelis J.; Dreijerink, Koen M.; Höppener, Jo W.

2012-01-01

323

Clinical relevance of phenotype/genotype correlations in the diagnosis and therapy of pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas.  

PubMed

Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are tumors arising from neural crest-derived cells. They can be sympathetic in origin, catecholamine secreting and located in the abdomen or chest, or parasympathetic, generally non-secreting and located in the head and neck region. It is well established that about 35% of them are genetically determined. Germ-line mutations in one of the 10 so far known susceptibility genes is especially suspected when the tumors are diagnosed in young patients, multiple or recurrent or associated with additional lesions typical of syndromic clinical pictures such as von Hippel-Lindau, Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 or Neurofibromatosis type 1. Tumor genetic profile determines the type and pattern of catecholamine release, the clinical presentation, the risk of malignancy and may influence the choice of the radiotracers used in functional imaging, the type of surgical procedures as well as the type of medical therapy in the treatment of metastatic disease. PMID:23822988

Parenti, G; Zampetti, B; Rapizzi, E; Ercolino, T; Giachè, V; Fucci, R; Mannelli, M

2013-06-01

324

Comorbidity of adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and bipolar disorder: prevalence and clinical correlates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) comorbidity\\u000a with lifetime bipolar disorder, and the influence of this comorbidity on various demographic and clinical variables in patients.\\u000a Patients (n = 159) with a previous diagnosis of bipolar disorder (79 female, 80 male) were included in this study. All patients were\\u000a interviewed for the

Lut Tamam; Gonca Karakus; Nurgul Ozpoyraz

2008-01-01

325

Clinical Correlates of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) occurs globally and across different genetic clades\\u000a of the virus. However, few studies have examined HAND in South Africa, despite the prevalence of HIV in this region of the\\u000a world, and the predominance of clade C. The present study examined the relationship between a number of demographic and clinical\\u000a variables in a sample of

John A. Joska; Dylan S. Fincham; Dan J. Stein; Robert H. Paul; Soraya Seedat

2010-01-01

326

Prevalence and clinical correlates of white coat hypertension in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The role of white coat hypertension (WCH) in the poor control of blood pressure (BP) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is ill defined. Methods. We measured systolic clinical (CBP) and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 290 consecutive patients with non-dialysis CKD (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 ml\\/min\\/1.73 m2). We defined normo- tension (NOR) if CBP and daytime ABP <130

Roberto Minutolo; Silvio Borrelli; Raffaele Scigliano; Vincenzo Bellizzi; Paolo Chiodini; Bruno Cianciaruso; Felice Nappi; Pasquale Zamboli; Giuseppe Conte; Luca De Nicola

2007-01-01

327

Clinical-physiologic correlates of Alzheimer's disease and frontal lobe dementia  

SciTech Connect

Thirty patients with degenerative dementia underwent clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the blood flow tracer ({sup 123}I)-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine. Five of these patients were clinically and psychologically different from the others, demonstrating predominant behavioral disturbances with relative preservation of memory function. These five patients, who were felt to have a frontal lobe dementia (FLD), showed SPECT perfusion patterns which differed from the remaining 25 patients, who were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease (AD), and from 16 healthy control subjects. The FLD patients showed diminished perfusion in orbitofrontal, dorsolateral frontal, and temporal cortex relative to controls, while the AD patients showed lower perfusion in temporal and parietal cortex than controls. The FLD patients also showed hypoperfusion in both frontal cortical regions relative to AD patients. The pattern of performance on neuropsychological testing paralleled these differences in regional perfusion. These results suggest that clinical evaluation and physiological imaging may enable the differentiation of groups of degenerative dementia patients during life.

Jagust, W.J.; Reed, B.R.; Seab, J.P.; Kramer, J.H.; Budinger, T.F. (Martinez Veterans Administration Medical Center, CA (USA))

1989-01-01

328

Early- versus late-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder: investigating genetic and clinical correlates.  

PubMed

There is increasing evidence that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is mediated by genetic factors. Although the precise mechanism of inheritance is unclear, recent evidence has pointed towards the involvement of the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems in the disorder's development. Furthermore, early-onset OCD appears to be a subtype that exhibits distinct clinical features and that is associated with greater familial loading. In the present investigation, South African OCD patients (n=252) were stratified according to age of onset and were clinically assessed. Additionally, selected variants in genes encoding serotonergic and dopaminergic components were investigated in a Caucasian OCD subset (n=180). This subgroup was further stratified to evaluate the role that these candidate genes may play in the genetically homogeneous Afrikaner subset (n=80). Analysis of the clinical data revealed an association between early age of onset and an increased frequency of tics, Tourette's disorder, and trichotillomania (TTM). The genetic studies yielded statistically significant results when the allelic distributions of genetic variants in the dopamine receptor type 4 gene (DRD4) were analysed in the Caucasian OCD cohort. These data support a role for the dopaminergic system, which may be relevant to the development of early-onset OCD. PMID:15488960

Hemmings, Sîan M J; Kinnear, Craig J; Lochner, Christine; Niehaus, Dana J H; Knowles, James A; Moolman-Smook, Johanna C; Corfield, Valerie A; Stein, Dan J

2004-09-30

329

Correlations between statistical models of robotically collected kinematics and clinical measures of upper extremity function.  

PubMed

One of the obstacles in the development of rehabilitation robotics has been inadequacy in the measurement of treatment effects due to interventions. A measurement tool that will efficiently produce a large reliable sample of measurements collected during a single session that can also produce a rich set of data which reflects a subject's ability to perform meaningful functional activities has not been developed. This paper presents three linear regression models generated from seven kinematic measures collected during the performance of virtually simulated rehabilitation activities that were integrated with haptic robots by 19 persons with upper extremity hemiparesis due to chronic stroke. One of these models demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with the subjects' scores on the Jebsen Test of Hand Function (JTHF), a battery of six standardized upper extremity functional activities. The second and third models demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with the subjects' change scores on the JTHF. PMID:23366834

Rohafza, Maryam; Fluet, Gerard G; Qiu, Qinyin; Adamovich, Sergei

2012-01-01

330

Correlations between severity of clinical signs and histopathological changes in 60 dogs with spinal cord injury associated with acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease.  

PubMed

The outcome of spinal surgery in dogs with absent voluntary motor function and nociception following intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation is highly variable, which likely attests to differences in the severity of spinal cord damage. This retrospective study evaluated the extent to which neurological signs correlated with histologically detected spinal cord damage in 60 dogs that were euthanased because of thoracolumbar IVD herniation. Clinical neurological grades correlated significantly with the extent of white matter damage (P<0.001). However, loss of nociception also occurred in 6/31 (19%) dogs with relatively mild histological changes. The duration of clinical signs, Schiff-Sherrington posture, loss of reflexes and pain on spinal palpation were not significantly associated with the severity of spinal cord damage. Although clinical-pathological correlation was generally good, some clinical signs frequently thought to indicate severe cord injury did not always correlate with the degree of cord damage, suggesting functional rather than structural impairment in some cases. PMID:23702280

Henke, D; Vandevelde, M; Doherr, M G; Stöckli, M; Forterre, F

2013-10-01

331

CYP24A1 Expression Inversely Correlates with Melanoma Progression: Clinic-Pathological Studies  

PubMed Central

The major role of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) is to maintain 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) homeostasis. Recently, it has been discovered that CYP24A1 also catalyses the hydroxylation of 20(OH)D3, producing dihydroxy-derivatives that show very effective antitumorigenic activities. Previously we showed a negative correlation of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and CYP27B1 expression with progression, aggressiveness and overall or disease-free survivals of skin melanomas. Therefore, we analyzed CYP24A1 expression in relation to clinicopathomorphological features of nevi, skin melanomas and metastases. In melanocytic tumors, the level of CYP24A1 was higher than in the normal epidermis. The statistically highest mean CYP24A1 level was found in nevi and early stage melanomas. With melanoma progression, CYP24A1 levels decreased and in advanced stages were comparable to the normal epidermis and metastases. Furthermore, the CYP24A1 expression positively correlated with VDR and CYP27B1, and negatively correlated with mitotic activity. Lower CYP24A1 levels correlated with the presence of ulceration, necrosis, nodular type and amelanotic phenotypes. Moreover, a lack of detectable CYP24A1 expression was related to shorter overall and disease-free survival. In conclusion, the local vitamin D endocrine system affects melanoma behavior and an elevated level of CYP24A1 appears to have an important impact on the formation of melanocytic nevi and melanomagenesis, or progression, at early stages of tumor development. PMID:25334067

Bro?yna, Anna A.; Jochymski, Cezary; Janjetovic, Zorica; Jó?wicki, Wojciech; Tuckey, Robert C.; Slominski, Andrzej T.

2014-01-01

332

CYP24A1 expression inversely correlates with melanoma progression: clinic-pathological studies.  

PubMed

The major role of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) is to maintain 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) homeostasis. Recently, it has been discovered that CYP24A1 also catalyses the hydroxylation of 20(OH)D3, producing dihydroxy-derivatives that show very effective antitumorigenic activities. Previously we showed a negative correlation of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and CYP27B1 expression with progression, aggressiveness and overall or disease-free survivals of skin melanomas. Therefore, we analyzed CYP24A1 expression in relation to clinicopathomorphological features of nevi, skin melanomas and metastases. In melanocytic tumors, the level of CYP24A1 was higher than in the normal epidermis. The statistically highest mean CYP24A1 level was found in nevi and early stage melanomas. With melanoma progression, CYP24A1 levels decreased and in advanced stages were comparable to the normal epidermis and metastases. Furthermore, the CYP24A1 expression positively correlated with VDR and CYP27B1, and negatively correlated with mitotic activity. Lower CYP24A1 levels correlated with the presence of ulceration, necrosis, nodular type and amelanotic phenotypes. Moreover, a lack of detectable CYP24A1 expression was related to shorter overall and disease-free survival. In conclusion, the local vitamin D endocrine system affects melanoma behavior and an elevated level of CYP24A1 appears to have an important impact on the formation of melanocytic nevi and melanomagenesis, or progression, at early stages of tumor development. PMID:25334067

Bro?yna, Anna A; Jochymski, Cezary; Janjetovic, Zorica; Jó?wicki, Wojciech; Tuckey, Robert C; Slominski, Andrzej T

2014-01-01

333

The Clinical and Occupational Correlates of Work Productivity Loss Among Employed Patients With Depression  

PubMed Central

Employers who are developing strategies to reduce health-related productivity loss may benefit from aiming their interventions at the employees who need them most. We determined whether depression’s negative productivity impact varied with the type of work employees performed. Subjects (246 with depression and 143 controls) answered the Work Limitations Questionnaire and additional work questions. Occupational requirements were measured objectively. In multiple regression analyses, productivity was most influenced by depression severity (P < 0.01 in 5/5 models). However, certain occupations also significantly increased employee vulnerability to productivity loss. Losses increased when employees had occupations requiring proficiency in decision-making and communication and/or frequent customer contact (P < 0.05 in 3/5 models). The Work Limitations Questionnaire can help employers to reduce productivity loss by identifying health and productivity improvement priorities. PMID:15194895

Lerner, Debra; Adler, David A.; Chang, Hong; Berndt, Ernst R.; Irish, Julie T.; Lapitsky, Leueen; Hood, Maggie Y.; Reed, John; Rogers, William H.

2014-01-01

334

Perturbations of the endocannabinoid system in mantle cell lymphoma: correlations to clinical and pathological features  

PubMed Central

The cannabinoid receptors are upregulated in many types of cancers, including mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and have been suggested to constitute novel therapeutic targets. The expression pattern of the key members of the endocannabinoid system was analyzed in a well-characterized MCL patient cohort and correlated to biological features. 107 tumor tissues were analyzed for the mRNA levels of cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CNR1 and CNR2) and the two main enzymes regulating the endocannabinoid anandamide levels in tissue: NAPEPLD and FAAH (participating in synthesis and degradation, respectively). NAPEPLD, CNR1 and CNR2 were overexpressed while FAAH expression was reduced in MCL compared to non-malignant B-cells. Both low CNR1 and high FAAH levels correlated with lymphocytosis (p=0.016 and p=0.022, respectively) and with leukocytosis (p=0.0018 and p=0.047). Weak to moderate CNR1 levels were a feature of SOX11 negative MCL (p=0.006). Both high CNR2 and high FAAH levels correlated to anemia (p=0.0006 and p=0.038, respectively). In conclusion, the relative expression of the anandamide synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes in MCL is heavily perturbed. This finding, together with high expression of cannabinoid receptors, could favor enhanced anandamide signaling and suggest that targeting the endocannabinoid system might be considered as part of lymphoma therapy.

Wasik, Agata M.; Nygren, Lina; Almestrand, Stefan; Zong, Fang; Flygare, Jenny; Wennerholm, Stefanie Baumgartner; Saft, Leonie; Andersson, Patrik; Kimby, Eva; Wahlin, Björn E.; Christensson, Birger; Sander, Birgitta

2014-01-01

335

Correlation of B type natriuretic peptides with clinical and echocardiographic parameters in heterogeneous population of patients with symptoms suggestive of heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: NT-proBNP and BNP concentrations in CHF correlate with NYHA class and LVEF. Little research has been conducted to compare the clinical performance of these two natriuretic peptides in heterogeneous CHF population. Purpose: to evaluate and compare the clinical performance of NT-proBNP and BNP in heterogeneous group of CHF patients on the basis of these peptides' correlation with NYHA class,

Piechota WN; Piechota WT; Bejm J; Wierzbowski R

336

Lymphomatoid granulomatosis-a single institute experience: pathologic findings and clinical correlations.  

PubMed

Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) is a rare angiocentric and angiodestructive Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. It is hypothesized that these patients have dysregulated immune surveillance of EBV. We reviewed the biopsies of 55 patients with LYG who were referred for a prospective trial at the National Cancer Institute (1995 to 2010) and evaluated the histologic, immunohistochemical, in situ hybridization, and molecular findings of these biopsies in conjunction with clinical information. Grading of the lesions was based on morphologic features and the number of EBV-positive B cells. The median age was 46 years (M:F 2.2:1). Clinically, all patients had lung involvement (100%), with the next most common site being the central nervous system (38%). No patient had nodal or bone marrow disease. All patients had past EBV exposure by serology but with a low median EBV viral load. We reviewed 122 biopsies; the most common site was lung (73%), followed by skin/subcutaneous tissue (17%); other sites included kidney, nasal cavity, gastrointestinal tract, conjunctiva, liver, and adrenal gland. Histologically, the lesions showed angiocentricity, were rich in T cells, had large atypical B cells, and were positive for EBV. Grading was performed predominantly on the lung biopsy at diagnosis; they were distributed as follows: LYG grade 1 (30%), grade 2 (22%), and grade 3 (48%). Necrosis was seen in all grades, with a greater degree in high-grade lesions. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement studies were performed, and a higher percentage of clonal rearrangements were seen in LYG grade 2 (50%) and grade 3 (69%) as compared with grade 1 (8%). LYG is a distinct entity that can usually be differentiated from other EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders on the basis of the combination of clinical presentation, histology, and EBV studies. Grading of these lesions is important because it dictates the treatment choice. PMID:25321327

Song, Joo Y; Pittaluga, Stefania; Dunleavy, Kieron; Grant, Nicole; White, Therese; Jiang, Liuyan; Davies-Hill, Theresa; Raffeld, Mark; Wilson, Wyndham H; Jaffe, Elaine S

2015-02-01

337

Correlations between age, Charlson score and outcome in clinical unilateral T3a prostate cancer.  

PubMed

According to the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines, a life expectancy of > 10 years is considered an important factor in the treatment of prostate cancer. The Charlson score is used to predict mortality based on comorbidities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between age, Charlson score and outcome in patients with cT3a prostate cancer. Between 1987 and 2004, 200 patients, who were with clinical T3a prostate cancer and who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP), were previously detected by digital rectal examination (DRE). Patients were categorized into two age groups (< 65 and >or= 65 years old). Patients were also divided into two groups according to Charlson score ( = 0 and >or= 1). Both age and Charlson score were analyzed regarding their predictive power of patients' outcomes. The mean follow-up period was 70.6 months, and the mean age of patients was 63.3 years. In all, 106 patients were < 65 years old and 94 patients were >or= 65 years old. Age was a significant predictor of overall survival (OS). A Charlson score of 0 was found in 110 patients, and of >or= 1 in 90 patients. Charlson score was not a significant predictor of biochemical progression-free survival (BPFS), clinical progression-free survival (CPFS) or OS. Cox multivariate analysis showed that margin status was a significant independent factor in BPFS, and cancer volume was a significant independent factor in CPFS. Charlson score does not influence the outcome in patients with clinical locally advanced prostate cancer. Age may influence OS. RP can be performed in motivated healthy older patients. However, the patients need to be counseled regarding possible surgery-related side effects, such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, which are age- and comorbidity-dependent. PMID:19050679

Hsu, Chao-Yu; Joniau, Steven; Oyen, Raymond; Roskams, Tania; Van Poppel, Hein

2009-01-01

338

Using base rates and correlational data to supplement clinical risk assessments.  

PubMed

The current study is a partial replication of previous studies designed to estimate the level of risk posed by capital murder defendants. The study draws on data describing the behavior of nearly 2,000 incarcerated capital murderers to forecast violence propensity among defendants sentenced to life imprisonment. Logistic regression is used to model various violence outcomes, relying on the following predictors: age, educational attainment, prior imprisonment, and gang affiliation. This exercise is designed to illustrate how actuarial data may be used to anchor individualized clinical assessments of risk in capital murder trials. PMID:24051592

Davis, Jaya; Sorensen, Jon R

2013-01-01

339

Testing homogeneity of proportion ratios for stratified correlated bilateral data in two-arm randomized clinical trials.  

PubMed

Stratified data analysis is an important research topic in many biomedical studies and clinical trials. In this article, we develop five test statistics for testing the homogeneity of proportion ratios for stratified correlated bilateral binary data based on an equal correlation model assumption. Bootstrap procedures based on these test statistics are also considered. To evaluate the performance of these statistics and procedures, we conduct Monte Carlo simulations to study their empirical sizes and powers under various scenarios. Our results suggest that the procedure based on score statistic performs well generally and is highly recommended. When the sample size is large, procedures based on the commonly used weighted least square estimate and logarithmic transformation with Mantel-Haenszel estimate are recommended as they do not involve any computation of maximum likelihood estimates requiring iterative algorithms. We also derive approximate sample size formulas based on the recommended test procedures. Finally, we apply the proposed methods to analyze a multi-center randomized clinical trial for scleroderma patients. PMID:24974954

Pei, Yanbo; Tian, Guo-Liang; Tang, Man-Lai

2014-11-10

340

Properties of CD34+ CML stem/progenitor cells that correlate with different clinical responses to imatinib mesylate  

PubMed Central

Imatinib mesylate (IM) induces clinical remissions in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients but IM resistance remains a problem. We recently identified several features of CML CD34+ stem/progenitor cells expected to confer resistance to BCR-ABL-targeted therapeutics. From a study of 25 initially chronic-phase patients, we now demonstrate that some, but not all, of these parameters correlate with subsequent clinical response to IM therapy. CD34+ cells from the 14 IM nonresponders demonstrated greater resistance to IM than the 11 IM responders in colony-forming cell assays in vitro (P < .001) and direct sequencing of cloned transcripts from CD34+ cells further revealed a higher incidence of BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in the IM nonresponders (10%-40% vs 0%-20% in IM responders, P < .003). In contrast, CD34+ cells from IM nonresponders and IM responders were not distinguished by differences in BCR-ABL or transporter gene expression. Interestingly, one BCR-ABL mutation (V304D), predicted to destabilize the interaction between p210BCR-ABL and IM, was detectable in 14 of 20 patients. T315I mutant CD34+ cells found before IM treatment in 2 of 20 patients examined were preferentially amplified after IM treatment. Thus, 2 properties of pretreatment CML stem/progenitor cells correlate with subsequent response to IM therapy. Prospective assessment of these properties may allow improved patient management. PMID:20574046

Forrest, Donna; Nicolini, Franck; Turhan, Ali; Guilhot, Joelle; Yip, Calvin; Holyoake, Tessa; Jorgensen, Heather; Lambie, Karen; Saw, Kyi Min; Pang, Emily; Vukovic, Ranko; Lehn, Paeta; Ringrose, Ashley; Yu, Miao; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Smith, Clay; Eaves, Allen; Eaves, Connie

2010-01-01

341

Thermographic and clinical correlation of myofascial trigger points in the masticatory muscles  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of the study was to identify and correlate myofascial trigger points (MTPs) in the masticatory muscles, using thermography and algometry. Methods 26 female volunteers were recruited. The surface facial area over the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles was divided into 15 subareas on each side (n = 780). This investigation consisted of three steps. The first step involved thermographic facial examination, using lateral views. The second step involved the pressure pain threshold (PPT), marking the MTP pattern areas for referred pain (n = 131) and local pain (n = 282) with a coloured pencil, and a photograph of the lateral face with the head in the same position as the infrared imaging. The last step was the fusion of these two images, using dedicated software (Reporter® 8.5—SP3 Professional Edition and QuickReport® 1.2, FLIR Systems, Wilsonville, OR); and the calculation of the temperature of each point. Results PPT levels measured at the points of referred pain in MTPs (1.28 ± 0.45 kgf) were significantly lower than the points of local pain in MTPs (1.73 ± 0.59 kgf; p < 0.05). Infrared imaging indicated differences between referred and local pain in MTPs of 0.5 °C (p < 0.05). Analysis of the correlation between the PPT and infrared imaging was done using the Spearman non-parametric method, in which the correlations were positive and moderate (0.4 ? r < 0.7). The sensitivity and specificity in MTPs were 62.5% and 71.3%, respectively, for referred pain, and 43.6% and 60.6%, respectively, for local pain. Conclusion Infrared imaging measurements can provide a useful, non-invasive and non-ionizing examination for diagnosis of MTPs in masticatory muscles. PMID:23166359

Haddad, D S; Brioschi, M L; Arita, E S

2012-01-01

342

Morphometry of the suprascapular notch: correlation with scapular dimensions and clinical relevance  

PubMed Central

Background Better knowledge of the suprascapular notch anatomy may help to prevent and to assess more accurately suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome. Our purposes were to verify the reliability of the existing data, to assess the differences between the two genders, to verify the correlation between the dimensions of the scapula and the suprascapular notch, and to investigate the relationship between the suprascapular notch and the postero-superior limit of the safe zone for the suprascapular nerve. Methods We examined 500 dried scapulae, measuring seven distances related to the scapular body and suprascapular notch; they were also catalogued according to gender, age and side. Suprascapular notch was classified in accordance with Rengachary’s method. For each class, we also took into consideration the width/depth ratio. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation was calculated. Results The frequencies were: Type I 12.4%, Type II 19.8%, Type III 22.8%, Type IV 31.1%, Type V 10.2%, Type VI 3.6%. Width and depth did not demonstrate a statistical significant difference when analyzed according to gender and side; however, a significant difference was found between the depth means elaborated according to median age (73 y.o.). Correlation indexes were weak or not statistically significant. The differences among the postero-superior limits of the safe zone in the six types of notches was not statistically significant. Conclusions Patient’s characteristics (gender, age and scapular dimensions) are not related to the characteristics of the suprascapular notch (dimensions and Type); our data suggest that the entrapment syndrome is more likely to be associated with a Type III notch because of its specific features. PMID:23705803

2013-01-01

343

Contrast-enhanced [18?F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography in clinical oncology: tumor-, site-, and question-based comparison with standard positron emission tomography/computed tomography  

PubMed Central

Background The present study aimed to evaluate the added value of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) in comparison to standard, non-enhanced CT in the context of a combined positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examination by means of a tumor-, site-, and clinical question-based approach. Methods Analysis was performed in 202 patients undergoing PET/CT consisting of a multiphase CT protocol followed by a whole-body PET. The Cochran Q test was performed, followed by a multiple comparisons correction (McNemar test and Bonferroni adjustment), to compare standard and contrast-enhanced PET (cePET/CT). Histopathology or clinical-radiologic follow-up greater than 1 year was used as a reference. Results cePET/CT showed significantly different results with respect to standard PET/CT in head and neck and gastrointestinal cancer (P?=?0.02 and 0.0002, respectively), in the evaluation of lesions located in the abdomen (P?=?0.009), and in the context of disease restaging (P?=?0.003). In all these clinical scenarios, adding ceCT resulted in a distinct benefit, by yielding a higher percentage of change in patient management. Conclusion These data strongly underline the importance of strictly selecting patients for the combined exam. In particular, patient selection should not be driven solely by mere tumor classification, but should also account for the clinical question and the anatomical location of the neoplastic disease, which can significantly impact patient management. PMID:25609564

2014-01-01

344

Distinct lymphocytes subsets in IgM-related neuropathy: clinical-immunological correlations.  

PubMed

IgM-related neuropathy generally presents as a late-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy with predominant sensory loss and ataxia. However, we recently reported the clinical, neurophysiological and pathological findings from our cohort and identified in about a third of patients an atypical phenotype. We analyzed by flow cytometry the different lymphocytes subsets in the peripheral blood of patients affected by IgM-related neuropathy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and healthy subjects, to investigate whether different immunological patterns may differentiate the classical phenotype from atypical forms. IFN-gamma producing CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing T-bet (T-helper type 1, Th1) were increased in CIDP patients. The percentage of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IL-10 as well as the percentage of CD19+ cells expressing Blimp-1 were higher in patients with IgM-neuropathy. We did not find any significant differences in the different lymphocytes subsets in the IgM-related neuropathy between patients with classical and atypical phenotype. Th1 cells are increased in CIDP patients while a T helper type 2-phenotype seems to prevail in patients with IgM-neuropathy. Further studies involving a larger patient population are needed to evaluate if different lymphocytes subset may be involved in different clinical phenotypes of IgM-related neuropathy. PMID:25192662

Iorio, Raffaele; Sabatelli, Mario; Del Grande, Alessandra; Bisogni, Giulia; Damato, Valentina; Plantone, Domenico; Marti, Alessandro; Frisullo, Giovanni; Romano, Angela; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Luigetti, Marco

2015-02-01

345

Lifetime Obesity in Patients with Eating Disorders: Increasing Prevalence, Clinical and Personality Correlates  

PubMed Central

Objectives : The aims of our study were to examine the lifetime prevalence of obesity rate in eating disorders (ED) subtypes and to examine whether there have been temporal changes among the last 10 years and to explore clinical differences between ED with and without lifetime obesity. Methods : Participants were 1383 ED female patients (DSM-IV criteria) consecutively admitted, between 2001 and 2010, to Bellvitge University Hospital. They were assessed by means of the Eating Disorders Inventory-2, the Symptom Checklist-90—Revised, the Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh and the Temperament and Character Inventory—Revised. Results : The prevalence of lifetime obesity in ED cases was 28.8% (ranging from 5% in anorexia nervosa to 87% in binge-eating disorders). Over the last 10 years, there has been a threefold increase in lifetime obesity in ED patients (p < .001). People with an ED and obesity had higher levels of childhood and family obesity (p < .001), a later age of onset and longer ED duration; and had higher levels of eating, general and personality symptomatology. Conclusions : Over the last 10 years, the prevalence of obesity associated with disorders characterized by the presence of binge episodes, namely bulimic disorders, is increasing, and this is linked with greater clinical severity and a poorer prognosis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:22383308

Villarejo, Cynthia; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Peñas-Lledó, Eva; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Tinahones, Francisco J; Sancho, Carolina; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Montserrat-Gil de Bernabé, Mónica; Casanueva, Felipe F; Fernández-Real, Jose Manuel; Frühbeck, Gema; De la Torre, Rafael; Treasure, Janet; Botella, Cristina; Menchón, José Manuel

2012-01-01

346

Toxoplasma encephalitis in Haitian adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinical-pathologic-CT correlation  

SciTech Connect

The clinical data, histologic findings, and computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in eight adult Haitians with toxoplasma encephalitis were analyzed retrospectively. Diagnosis was established by identification of Toxoplasma gondii on autopsy in five and brain biopsy in three specimens and subsequently confirmed by the immunoperoxidase method. All these patiens, six of whom had been in the United States for 24 months or less, had severe idiopathic immunodeficiency syndrome. All were lymphopenic and six were on treatment for tuberculosis when the toxoplasma encephalitis developed. All patients were studied with CT when they developed an altered mental status and fever associated with seizures and/or focal neurologic deficits. Scans before treatment showed multiple intraparenchymal lesions in seven and a single lesion in the thalamus in one. Ring and/or nodular enhancement of the lesions was found in six and hypodense areas in two. Progressions of abnormalities occurred on serial studies. These CT findings that were best shown on axial and coronal thin-section double-dose contrast studies were useful but not diagnostically pathognomonic. In patients with similar clinical presentation CT is recommended to identify focal areas of involvement and to guide brain biopsy or excision so that prompt medical thereapy of this often lethal infection can be instituted.

Post, M.J.D.; Chan, J.C.; Hensley, G.T.; Hoffman, T.A.; Moskowitz, L.B.; Lippmann, S.

1983-05-01

347

Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u{sup ?1}, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 ?m and ?1.72 ?m in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 ?m. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions.

Niklas, Martin, E-mail: m.niklas@dkfz.de [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, Amir [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Akselrod, Mark S. [Stillwater Crystal Growth Division, Landauer Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Debus, Jürgen [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); and others

2013-12-01

348

Physical activity level and its clinical correlates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Decreased physical activity is associated with higher mortality in subjects with COPD. The aim of this study was to assess clinical characteristics and physical activity levels (PALs) in subjects with COPD. Methods Seventy-three subjects with COPD (67?±?7 yrs, 44 female) with one-second forced expiratory volume percentage (FEV1%) predicted values of 43?±?16 were included. The ratio of total energy expenditure (TEE) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) was used to define the physical activity level (PAL) (PAL?=?TEE/RMR). TEE was assessed with an activity monitor (ActiReg), and RMR was measured by indirect calorimetry. Walking speed (measured over 30-meters), maximal quadriceps muscle strength, fat-free mass and systemic inflammation were measured as clinical characteristics. Hierarchical linear regression was applied to investigate the explanatory values of the clinical correlates to PAL. Results The mean PAL was 1.47?±?0.19, and 92% of subjects were classified as physically very inactive or sedentary. The walking speed was 1.02?±?0.23 m/s, the quadriceps strength was 31.3?±?11.2 kg, and the fat-free mass index (FFMI) was 15.7?±?2.3 kg/m2, identifying 42% of subjects as slow walkers, 21% as muscle-weak and 49% as FFM-depleted. The regression model explained 45.5% (p?correlates of physical activity. Further explorations of the longitudinal effects of the factors characterizing the most inactive subjects are warranted. PMID:24237876

2013-01-01

349

Clinical profile and genetic correlation of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia: A study from a tertiary care centre in Eastern India  

PubMed Central

Background: Progressive cerebellar ataxia inherited by autosomal dominant transmission is known as Spino Cerebellar Ataxia (SCA). Aims and Objectives: To look for various clinical profile and molecular genetics of patients with SCAs and their phenotype-genotype correlation of patients with SCAs. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Bangur Institute of Neurosciences, Kolkata from June 2010 to April 2013. We selected patients from the neurogenetic clinic of our institute and performed genetic test for SCA 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12. The diagnosis was based on suggestive clinical features and positive genetic study, done by polymerase chain reaction. Results: 83 patients were tested for trineucleotide repeats and turned out 45 positive for the mentioned SCAs. We found 13(28.9%) SCA-1, 18(40%) SCA-2, 7(15.6%) SCA-3, 6(13.3) SCA-6 and 1(2.2%) SCA-12 patients. Half of the remaining 38 patients had positive family history. The mean age of onset were 38.46 years in SCA-1, 29.55 years in SCA-2, 38.43 years in SCA-3, 47.33 years in SCA-6. Slow saccades were observed in 7(53.8%) SCA-1, 17(94.4%) SCA-2, 4(57.1%) SCA-3, 3(50%) SCA-6 patients. Hyporeflexia was noticed in 5(27.8%) SCA-2 patients. Pyramidal tract involvement was found in 8(61.5%) SCA-1, 4(22.2%) SCA-2, 4(57.1%) SCA-3 and 1(16.7%) SCA-6 patients. Conclusion: Our study showed SCA-2 is the most common variety of SCA and genotypic-phenotypic correlation was observed in SCA-1,2,6 and 12 patients. PMID:25506158

Pulai, Debabrata; Guin, Deb Shankar; Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B; Ganguly, Goutam; Joardar, Anindita; Roy, Sarnava; Biswas, Atanu; Pandit, Alak; Roy, Arijit; Senapati, Asit Kumar

2014-01-01

350

Judgments of Omitted BE and DO in Questions as Extended Finiteness Clinical Markers of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) to 15 Years  

E-print Network

Purpose: Clinical grammar markers are needed for children with SLI older than 8 years. This study followed children who were previously studied on sentences with omitted finiteness to determine if affected children continue ...

Rice, Mabel L.

351

Correlation of IL-1alpha and IL-4 gene polymorphisms and clinical parameters in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.  

PubMed

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a serious disease characterized with progressive scarring of the lungs in which a genetic background is supposed. We have tested correlation of promotor regions of IL-1alpha and IL-4 gene polymorphisms with clinical parameters in IPF. We investigated the group of 30 patients with IPF. The correlations of vital capacity (VC) and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL(CO)), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cell counts and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) alveolar and interstitial scores with different genotypes of IL-4 at (-1098), (-590) and (-33) positions and IL-1 alpha at (-889) position were tested. The PCR method was used for genotyping. The carriers of CT genotype at IL-1 alpha (-889) position had higher VC at the time of diagnosis. The CC genotype at this position was more frequent in patients with higher counts of HLADR+ T lymphocytes in BAL. The GT genotype at IL-4 (-1098) position correlated with higher counts of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and inversely the TT genotype with higher counts of CD8(+) T lymphocytes in BAL fluid. According to dynamic changes of HRCT score the CT genotype at IL-4 (-33) was more frequent in patients with progressive disease compared to that with stable disease. We assume from our data that the gene polymorphisms of the promotor region of IL-4 at position (-1098) and (-33) and IL-1 alpha at position (-889) are likely to play a pathogenic role in IPF and in modification of its clinical presentation and severity. PMID:17309781

Vasakova, M; Striz, I; Slavcev, A; Jandova, S; Dutka, J; Terl, M; Kolesar, L; Sulc, J

2007-03-01

352

Machine-Based Morphologic Analysis of Glioblastoma Using Whole-Slide Pathology Images Uncovers Clinically Relevant Molecular Correlates  

PubMed Central

Pathologic review of tumor morphology in histologic sections is the traditional method for cancer classification and grading, yet human review has limitations that can result in low reproducibility and inter-observer agreement. Computerized image analysis can partially overcome these shortcomings due to its capacity to quantitatively and reproducibly measure histologic structures on a large-scale. In this paper, we present an end-to-end image analysis and data integration pipeline for large-scale morphologic analysis of pathology images and demonstrate the ability to correlate phenotypic groups with molecular data and clinical outcomes. We demonstrate our method in the context of glioblastoma (GBM), with specific focus on the degree of the oligodendroglioma component. Over 200 million nuclei in digitized pathology slides from 117 GBMs in the Cancer Genome Atlas were quantitatively analyzed, followed by multiplatform correlation of nuclear features with molecular and clinical data. For each nucleus, a Nuclear Score (NS) was calculated based on the degree of oligodendroglioma appearance, using a regression model trained from the optimal feature set. Using the frequencies of neoplastic nuclei in low and high NS intervals, we were able to cluster patients into three well-separated disease groups that contained low, medium, or high Oligodendroglioma Component (OC). We showed that machine-based classification of GBMs with high oligodendroglioma component uncovered a set of tumors with strong associations with PDGFRA amplification, proneural transcriptional class, and expression of the oligodendrocyte signature genes MBP, HOXD1, PLP1, MOBP and PDGFRA. Quantitative morphologic features within the GBMs that correlated most strongly with oligodendrocyte gene expression were high nuclear circularity and low eccentricity. These findings highlight the potential of high throughput morphologic analysis to complement and inform human-based pathologic review. PMID:24236209

Kong, Jun; Cooper, Lee A. D.; Wang, Fusheng; Gao, Jingjing; Teodoro, George; Scarpace, Lisa; Mikkelsen, Tom; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Moreno, Carlos S.; Saltz, Joel H.; Brat, Daniel J.

2013-01-01

353

Disseminated Tumor Cells in Bone Marrow of Gastric Cancer Patients: Correlation with Tumor Hypoxia and Clinical Relevance  

PubMed Central

Aim. The evaluation of the clinical relevance of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow (BM) of patients with gastric cancer (GC) and their association with primary tumor hypoxia. Patients and Methods. 89 resected specimens were used. DTCs were detected using immunocytochemistry, the level of tumor hypoxia using NMR spectroscopy, CD68, CD34, VEGF, and VEGFR-1 (Flt-1) expression using immunohistochemistry, and MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity using zymography. Results. DTCs were detected in 51.4% of GC patients with M0. There was significant correlation between frequency of DTCs in BM and level of tumor hypoxia (P < 0.024). DTCs presence was accompanied with Flt-1 positivity of BM. The correlation between DTCs and tumor VEGF expression in patients with M0 was shown (P < 0.0248). Activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in BM was linked with DTCs in patients with M0 (P < 0.05). Overall survival (OS) of patients with M0 and DTCs was shorter than that of patients without DTCs (patients in both groups were operated only) (P = 0.0497). Conclusion. Appearance of DTCs correlates with hypoxia level in primary tumors. Detection of DTCs in GC patients may be relevant indicator for adjuvant chemotherapy using. PMID:24669218

Bubnovskaya, Larissa; Kovelskaya, Antonina; Gumenyuk, Lilya; Ganusevich, Irina; Mamontova, Lesya; Mikhailenko, Victor; Osinsky, Dmitry; Merentsev, Sergej; Osinsky, Sergej

2014-01-01

354

Epiploic appendagitis: a case report highlighting correlation between clinical features, computed tomography images and laparoscopic findings.  

PubMed

We present a case of a 72 year old male patient, who presented to the emergency department with a 2 day history of right iliac fossa pain. On examination he was apyrexial and haemodynamically stable, yet displayed signs of right iliac fossa peritonism. Inflammatory markers were mildly raised. Computed tomography and diagnostic laparoscopy both demonstrated typical features of epiploic appendagitis. Epiploic appendagitis is an uncommon cause of the acute abdomen, yet is probably underdiagnosed. The term was first used by Lynn et al. in the mid 1950s. With the increase in CT scanning and diagnostic laparoscopy, we feel that both surgeons and radiologists need to be increasingly aware of the clinical and radiological appearances of epiploic appendagitis. PMID:20457285

Bunni, J; Corrigan, A; Jacob, K; Schuijtvlot, M

2010-01-01

355

Atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance (AGUS): clinical considerations and cytohistologic correlation.  

PubMed

The diagnoses of atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance (AGUS) made upon evaluation of cervical/vaginal (Pap) smears is examined to ascertain salient clinical and cytologic features that may lead to better characterization of the true nature of these lesions. Prior history of squamous dysplasia, age of the patient, and the occurrence of abnormal microbiopsy tissue fragments are investigated to determine their value in the proper evaluation of AGUS specimens. Of the 86,234 Pap smears submitted to our laboratory during a period of 2 yr, 187 (0.2%) were diagnosed as AGUS. Available follow-up in 128 (69%) cases revealed 54 (42%) significant tissue proven abnormalities, the majority (55%, 30 patients) of which were diagnosed as squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL). Squamous dysplasia is significantly more common in women younger than 40 (15/18, 83%) and in patients with prior history of SIL (29/30, 97%). In addition, all nine patients diagnosed with endometrial lesions on subsequent histology were older than 40. Age, however, was not a discriminating factor in women proven to have endocervical glandular lesions. Additionally, certain tissue fragment cytomorphologic features were significantly more often observed on follow-up in specific histologic diagnostic categories. The Pap smears of patients diagnosed with SIL were noted to contain tissue fragments composed of both dysplastic squamous and benign glandular cells in 29 of 30 (97%). The presence of two distinct populations of glandular tissue fragments (typical and atypical) was found in the Pap smears of all nine women with endometrial abnormalities and in the smears of most women subsequently diagnosed with endocervical glandular lesions (87%, 13/15). These observations suggest that a more specific and clinically useful Pap smear interpretation other than AGUS is often possible by consideration of the patient's age and prior history along with the correct identification of the type of atypical cells observed in abnormal tissue fragments. PMID:11892026

Nasuti, Joseph F; Fleisher, Seth R; Gupta, Prabodh K

2002-03-01

356

Early Repolarization Pattern in Competitive Athletes: Clinical Correlates and the Effects of Exercise Training  

PubMed Central

Background Inferior lead early repolarization pattern (ERP) has recently been associated with sudden cardiac death. Although ERP is common among athletes, prevalence, ECG lead distribution, clinical characteristics, and effects of physical training remain uncertain. We sought to examine the non-anterior early repolarization pattern (ERP) in competitive athletes. Methods and Results ERP was assessed in a cross-sectional cohort of collegiate athletes (n=879). The relationship between ERP and cardiac structure were then examined in a longitudinal subgroup (n=146) before and after a 90-day period of exercise training. ERP was defined as J-point elevation ? 0.1 mV in at least two leads within a non-anterior territory (inferior [II, III, aVF] or lateral [I, aVL, V4-V6]). Non-anterior ERP was present in 25.1% (221/879) of athletes including the inferior subtype in 3.8% (33/879). Exercise training led to significant increases in the prevalence of ERP and the inferior subtype but there were no associations between ERP and echocardiographic measures of left ventricular remodeling. In a multivariable model, ERP was associated with black race (OR 5.84, CI 3.54-9.61, p<0.001), increased QRS voltage (OR 2.08, CI 1.71-2.52, p<0.001), and slower HR (OR 1.54, CI 1.26-1.87, p<0.001). Conclusions Non-anterior ERP including the inferior subtype are common and have strong clinical associations among competitive athletes. The finding of increased ERP prevalence following intense physical training establishes a strong association between exercise and the ERP. PMID:21543642

Noseworthy, Peter A.; Weiner, Rory; Kim, Jonathan; Keelara, Varsha; Wang, Francis; Berkstresser, Brant; Wood, Malissa J.; Wang, Thomas J.; Picard, Michael H.; Hutter, Adolph M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Baggish, Aaron L.

2012-01-01

357

Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Clinical Course, Genetic Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation  

PubMed Central

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients. PMID:25337067

Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

2014-01-01

358

Prediction scores do not correlate with clinically adjudicated categories of pulmonary embolism in critically ill patients  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Prediction scores for pretest probability of pulmonary embolism (PE) validated in outpatient settings are occasionally used in the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation of Geneva and Wells scores with adjudicated categories of PE in ICU patients. METHODS: In a randomized trial of thromboprophylaxis, patients with suspected PE were adjudicated as possible, probable or definite PE. Data were then retrospectively abstracted for the Geneva Diagnostic PE score, Wells, Modified Wells and Simplified Wells Diagnostic scores. The chance-corrected agreement between adjudicated categories and each score was calculated. ANOVA was used to compare values across the three adjudicated PE categories. RESULTS: Among 70 patients with suspected PE, agreement was poor between adjudicated categories and Geneva pretest probabilities (kappa 0.01 [95% CI ?0.0643 to 0.0941]) or Wells pretest probabilities (kappa ?0.03 [95% CI ?0.1462 to 0.0914]). Among four possible, 16 probable and 50 definite PEs, there were no significant differences in Geneva scores (possible = 4.0, probable = 4.7, definite = 4.5; P=0.90), Wells scores (possible = 2.8, probable = 4.9, definite = 4.1; P=0.37), Modified Wells (possible = 2.0, probable = 3.4, definite = 2.9; P=0.34) or Simplified Wells (possible = 1.8, probable = 2.8, definite = 2.4; P=0.30). CONCLUSIONS: Pretest probability scores developed outside the ICU do not correlate with adjudicated PE categories in critically ill patients. Research is needed to develop prediction scores for this population. PMID:24083302

Katsios, CM; Donadini, M; Meade, M; Mehta, S; Hall, R; Granton, J; Kutsiogiannis, J; Dodek, P; Heels-Ansdell, D; McIntyre, L; Vlahakis, N; Muscedere, J; Friedrich, J; Fowler, R; Skrobik, Y; Albert, M; Cox, M; Klinger, J; Nates, J; Bersten, A; Doig, C; Zytaruk, N; Crowther, M; Cook, DJ

2014-01-01

359

Dopaminergic and Clinical Correlates of Pathological Gambling in Parkinson’s Disease: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Dopaminergic medication for motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) recently has been linked with impulse control disorders, including pathological gambling (PG), which affects up to 8% of patients. PG often is considered a behavioral addiction associated with disinhibition, risky decision-making, and altered striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. Using [11C]raclopride with positron emission tomography, we assessed dopaminergic neurotransmission during Iowa Gambling Task performance. Here we present data from a single patient with PD and concomitant PG. We noted a marked decrease in [11C]raclopride binding in the left ventral striatum upon gambling, indicating a gambling-induced dopamine release. The results imply that PG in PD is associated with a high dose of dopaminergic medication, pronounced motor symptomatology, young age at disease onset, high propensity for sensation seeking, and risky decision-making. Overall, the findings are consistent with the hypothesis of medication-related PG in PD and underscore the importance of taking clinical variables, such as age and personality, into account when patients with PD are medicated, to reduce the risk of PG. PMID:23908610

Callesen, Mette Buhl; Hansen, K. V.; Gjedde, A.; Linnet, J.; Møller, A.

2013-01-01

360

Hepatic artery flow improvement after portacaval shunt: a single hemodynamic clinical correlate.  

PubMed Central

We have documented a highly significant increment in hepatic arterial flow following a portacaval shunt in patients with cirrhosis of the liver and portal hypertension. In contrast with other hemodynamic variables, the increment in arterial flow was directly related to morbidity, hospital mortality, and long term survival. Patients with increments smaller than 100 ml/min had the worst clinical results. They accounted for all of the hospital mortality, the largest incidence of encephalopathy, and the worst long term cumulative survival rates. The extent of the increment was not related directly to the type of shunt but, rather, to some intrinsic capability of the cirrhotic liver to increase its arterial flow in response to the relief of sinusoidal hypertension produced by the shunt. This capablilty appears related to the degree of entrapment of the hepatic arterioles by the fibrous tissues of cirrhosis. This encasement of arterioles should change the elastic properties of the hepatic arterial bed and we propose to measure these properties by determining the characteristic input impedance of the arterial bed. PMID:962397

Burchell, A R; Moreno, A H; Panke, W F; Nealon, T F

1976-01-01

361

Mitochondrial mutation in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis, correlation between haplogroups H, A and clinical manifestations.  

PubMed

As multiple sclerosis (MS) has long been known to be associated with Leber, hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a disease caused by mitochondrial (mtDNA) mutations, in this study we assessed possible involvement of mtDNA point mutation in MS patients. Fifty-two MS patients whose disease was confirmed with revised McDonald criteria and referred to Iranian Center of Neurological Research of Imam Khomeini hospital during 2006-2007 entered the study. Secondary mtDNA mutations, age, gender, clinical disability according to expanded disability status scale (EDSS), course of the disease, and presenting symptoms were the variables investigated in this study. DNA purification was performed by Diatom DNA Extraction Kit. Analysis of data was done by SPSS V11.5. The prevalent mutations with frequency of 19.2% were J, L, and T haplogroups. Haplotype A was more prevalent in patients with younger age of onset (P-value = 0.012) and high proportion of haplogroup H was associated with optic nerve involvement (P-value = 0.015). No motor symptoms were seen in haplogroup H patients. There is no significant relationship between duration of the disease and EDSS in different mutation of mtDNA. PMID:19009343

Ghabaee, Mojdeh; Omranisikaroudi, Motahar; Amrisaroukolaei, Shahla; Meysamie, Alipasha; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Bayati, Asghar; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Houshman, Mossoud; Sadeghian, Homa; Vajihazaman, Khalili

2009-05-01

362

Clinical Correlates of Hachinski Ischemic Score and Vascular Factors in Cognitive Function of Elderly  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between Hachinski ischemic score (HIS) and vascular factors as well as between HIS and the cognitive function in elderly community. Demographic characteristics, such as sex, age, education, history of drinking and smoking, family history of dementia and stroke, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and dementia, were surveyed. Neurological examination was administered to every subject and HIS was checked by a neurologist. From a total of 392 participants aged 65 and over in a rural community, 348 completed the survey and were finally enrolled. Among the vascular factors, history of hypertension (P = 0.008), history of stroke (P < 0.001), family history of dementia (P = 0.01), and history of cardiac diseases (P = 0.012) showed a significant relationship with HIS. In the cognitive function tests, both Korean version of the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Clinical Dementia Rating (Global and Sum of Boxes) had a significant relationship with HIS. Our study suggested HIS may have an association with some vascular factors and cognitive scales in community dwelling elderly. In this study, the HIS seemed to contribute to the evaluation of the quantity of vascular factors and to the prediction of status of cognitive function. PMID:25247189

Kim, Youn Ho

2014-01-01

363

Age-related differences in collagen-induced arthritis: clinical and imaging correlations.  

PubMed

Arthritis is among the most common chronic diseases in both children and adults. Although intraarticular inflammation is the feature common among all patients with chronic arthritis there are, in addition to age at onset, clinical characteristics that further distinguish the disease in pediatric and adult populations. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the utility of microCT (?CT) and ultrasonography in characterizing pathologic age-related differences in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Juvenile (35 d old) and young adult (91 d old) male Wistar rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and incomplete Freund adjuvant to induce polyarthritis. Naïve male Wistar rats served as controls. All paws were scored on a scale of 0 (normal paw) to 4 (disuse of paw). Rats were euthanized at 14 d after the onset of arthritis and the hindpaws imaged by ?CT and ultrasonography. Young adult rats had more severe signs of arthritis than did their juvenile counterparts. Imaging demonstrated that young adult CIA rats exhibited more widespread and severe skeletal lesions of the phalanges, metatarsals, and tarsal bones, whereas juvenile CIA rats had more localized and less proliferative and osteolytic damage that was confined predominantly to the phalanges and metatarsals. This report demonstrates the utility of imaging modalities to compare juvenile and young adult rats with CIA and provides evidence that disease characteristics and progression differ between the 2 age groups. Our observations indicate that the CIA model could help discern age-related pathologic processes in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24326225

Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Pratt, Isaac V; Cooper, David M L; Silver, Tawni I; Rosenberg, Alan M

2013-01-01

364

Clinical and personality correlates of outcome in depressive disorders in a Turkish sample.  

PubMed

Effects of clinical and personality traits on the course of depression were investigated after a mean period of 30 months. 66 out of 119 depressive patients (according to DSM-III-R and ICD-10 diagnostic criteria) were re-assessed by the same clinicians of the index episode. Schedule for Standardized Assessment of Depressive Disorders (SADD) was the main instrument for the initial phase; the follow-up schedule of SADD was used for the second phase. In both phases personality was evaluated by Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). Severity of the disorder was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory. We found a chronicity rate of 9.1%, recurrence rate of 31.8%. Common features of chronic depressives were female sex, being over 30 years of age, gradual and late onset, presence of anxiety and multiple life events. EPQ results of the subjects who were free of depression were compared at the follow-up assessment. The remitted recurrent depression group showed significantly lower neuroticism scores than remitted single depression group. Neurotic depression subgroup was significantly associated with higher neuroticism scores. PMID:9089053

Ulu?ahin, A; Ulu?, B

1997-01-01

365

EGFR mutations in Indian lung cancer patients: clinical correlation and outcome to EGFR targeted therapy.  

PubMed

Screening for EGFR mutation is a key molecular test for management of lung cancer patients. Outcome of patients with mutation receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor is known to be better across different ethnic populations. However, frequency of EGFR mutations and the clinical response in most other ethnic populations, including India, remains to be explored. We conducted a retrospective analysis of Indian lung cancer patients who were managed with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Majority of the patients in the study had adenocarcinoma and were non-smokers. 39/111 patients tested positive for EGFR kinase domain mutations determined by Taqman based real time PCR. The overall response to oral TKI therapy was 30%. Patients with an activating mutation of EGFR had a response rate of 74%, while the response rate in patients with wild type EGFR was 5%, which was a statistically significant difference. Progression free survival of patients with EGFR mutations was 10 months compared to 2 months for EGFR mutation negative patients. Overall survival was 19 months for EGFR mutation patients and 13 months for mutation negative patients. This study emphasizes EGFR mutation as an important predictive marker for response to oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the Indian population. PMID:23620765

Noronha, Vanita; Prabhash, Kumar; Thavamani, Abhishek; Chougule, Anuradha; Purandare, Nilendu; Joshi, Amit; Sharma, Rashmi; Desai, Saral; Jambekar, Nirmala; Dutt, Amit; Mulherkar, Rita

2013-01-01

366

EGFR Mutations in Indian Lung Cancer Patients: Clinical Correlation and Outcome to EGFR Targeted Therapy  

PubMed Central

Screening for EGFR mutation is a key molecular test for management of lung cancer patients. Outcome of patients with mutation receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor is known to be better across different ethnic populations. However, frequency of EGFR mutations and the clinical response in most other ethnic populations, including India, remains to be explored. We conducted a retrospective analysis of Indian lung cancer patients who were managed with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Majority of the patients in the study had adenocarcinoma and were non-smokers. 39/111 patients tested positive for EGFR kinase domain mutations determined by Taqman based real time PCR. The overall response to oral TKI therapy was 30%. Patients with an activating mutation of EGFR had a response rate of 74%, while the response rate in patients with wild type EGFR was 5%, which was a statistically significant difference. Progression free survival of patients with EGFR mutations was 10 months compared to 2 months for EGFR mutation negative patients. Overall survival was 19 months for EGFR mutation patients and 13 months for mutation negative patients. This study emphasizes EGFR mutation as an important predictive marker for response to oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the Indian population. PMID:23620765

Chougule, Anuradha; Purandare, Nilendu; Joshi, Amit; Sharma, Rashmi; Desai, Saral; Jambekar, Nirmala; Dutt, Amit; Mulherkar, Rita

2013-01-01

367

Correlation between the expression of integrins in prostate cancer and clinical outcome in 1284 patients.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of a panel of integrins in prostate cancer in order to explore their potential for tumor biology. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 1284 prostate cancer patients were retrieved from the archive of the Department of Pathology. Immunostaining was done with rabbit monoclonal antibodies directed against ?v?3, ?v?5, ?v?6, ?v?8, ?3, and ?v-pan. Staining results were correlated with clinicopathologic patient characteristics and patient survival. Immunostaining of tumor cells performed on whole tissue sections of 52 patients was sparse for ?v?3, ?v?6, and ?v?8, and more prevalent for ?v?5 and ?v-pan. ?v?5, ?v?8, and ?v-pan were selected for further analyses in tissue microarrays representing the entire study cohort. ?v?8 staining was generally observed in peripheral nerves. ?v?5 and ?v-pan provided strong evidence for the differential expression of these integrins in prostate cancer. The expression was variable with regard to the histoanatomical/cytoanatomical localization, cell type, intensity of immunolabeling, and Gleason pattern. ?v?5 and ?v-pan are differentially expressed in prostate cancer, and the differentiation of prostate cancer seems to influence integrin expression and subcellular distribution. PMID:25305804

Heß, Katharina; Böger, Christine; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Röcken, Christoph

2014-12-01

368

Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccines and monkeypox virus challenge: proteomic assessment and clinical correlations.  

PubMed

Despite the eradication of smallpox, orthopoxviruses (OPV) remain public health concerns. Efforts to develop new therapeutics and vaccines for smallpox continue through their evaluation in animal models despite limited understanding of the specific correlates of protective immunity. Recent monkeypox virus challenge studies have established the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) as a model of human systemic OPV infections. In this study, we assess the induction of humoral immunity in humans and prairie dogs receiving Dryvax, Acam2000, or Imvamune vaccine and characterize the proteomic profile of immune recognition using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), neutralization assays, and protein microarrays. We confirm anticipated similarities of antigenic protein targets of smallpox vaccine-induced responses in humans and prairie dogs and identify several differences. Subsequent monkeypox virus intranasal infection of vaccinated prairie dogs resulted in a significant boost in humoral immunity characterized by a shift in reactivity of increased intensity to a broader range of OPV proteins. This work provides evidence of similarities between the vaccine responses in prairie dogs and humans that enhance the value of the prairie dog model system as an OPV vaccination model and offers novel findings that form a framework for examining the humoral immune response induced by systemic orthopoxvirus infection. PMID:23135728

Townsend, M B; Keckler, M S; Patel, N; Davies, D H; Felgner, P; Damon, I K; Karem, K L

2013-01-01

369

Humoral Immunity to Smallpox Vaccines and Monkeypox Virus Challenge: Proteomic Assessment and Clinical Correlations  

PubMed Central

Despite the eradication of smallpox, orthopoxviruses (OPV) remain public health concerns. Efforts to develop new therapeutics and vaccines for smallpox continue through their evaluation in animal models despite limited understanding of the specific correlates of protective immunity. Recent monkeypox virus challenge studies have established the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) as a model of human systemic OPV infections. In this study, we assess the induction of humoral immunity in humans and prairie dogs receiving Dryvax, Acam2000, or Imvamune vaccine and characterize the proteomic profile of immune recognition using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), neutralization assays, and protein microarrays. We confirm anticipated similarities of antigenic protein targets of smallpox vaccine-induced responses in humans and prairie dogs and identify several differences. Subsequent monkeypox virus intranasal infection of vaccinated prairie dogs resulted in a significant boost in humoral immunity characterized by a shift in reactivity of increased intensity to a broader range of OPV proteins. This work provides evidence of similarities between the vaccine responses in prairie dogs and humans that enhance the value of the prairie dog model system as an OPV vaccination model and offers novel findings that form a framework for examining the humoral immune response induced by systemic orthopoxvirus infection. PMID:23135728

Keckler, M. S.; Patel, N.; Davies, D. H.; Felgner, P.; Damon, I. K.; Karem, K. L.

2013-01-01

370

Correlation of SRSF1 and PRMT1 expression with clinical status of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequently-occurring malignant neoplasm in children, but the pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear. In a microarray assay using samples from 100 children with ALL, SFRS1 was found to be up-regulated. Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1, also termed SF2/ASF), encoded by the SFRS1 gene, had been shown to be a pro-oncoprotein. Our previous study indicated that SRSF1 can be methylated by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) in vitro; however, the biological function of SRSF1 and PRMT1 in pediatric ALL are presently unknown. Methods Matched, newly diagnosed (ND), complete remission (CR) and relapse (RE) bone marrow samples from 57 patients were collected in order to evaluate the expression patterns of SRSF1 and PRMT1. The potential oncogenic mechanism of SRSF1 and PRMT1 in leukemogenesis was also investigated. Results We identified significant up-regulation of SRSF1 and PRMT1 in the ND samples. Importantly, the expression of SRSF1 and PRMT1 returned to normal levels after CR, but rebounded in the RE samples. Our observation that SRSF1 could predict disease relapse was of particular interest, although the expression patterns of SRSF1 and PRMT1 were independent of the cytogenetic subtypes. In pre-B-cell lines, both SRSF1 and PRMT1 expression could be efficiently attenuated by the clinical chemotherapy agents arabinoside cytosine (Ara-c) or vincristine (VCR). Moreover, SRSF1 and PRMT1 were associated with each other in leukemia cells in vivo. Knock-down of SRSF1 resulted in an increase in early apoptosis, which could be further induced by chemotherapeutics. Conclusions Our results indicate that SRSF1 serves as an anti-apoptotic factor and potentially contributes to leukemogenesis in pediatric ALL patients by cooperating with PRMT1. PMID:22839530

2012-01-01

371

Age-Related Differences in Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Clinical and Imaging Correlations  

PubMed Central

Arthritis is among the most common chronic diseases in both children and adults. Although intraarticular inflammation is the feature common among all patients with chronic arthritis there are, in addition to age at onset, clinical characteristics that further distinguish the disease in pediatric and adult populations. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the utility of microCT (µCT) and ultrasonography in characterizing pathologic age-related differences in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Juvenile (35 d old) and young adult (91 d old) male Wistar rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and incomplete Freund adjuvant to induce polyarthritis. Naïve male Wistar rats served as controls. All paws were scored on a scale of 0 (normal paw) to 4 (disuse of paw). Rats were euthanized at 14 d after the onset of arthritis and the hindpaws imaged by µCT and ultrasonography. Young adult rats had more severe signs of arthritis than did their juvenile counterparts. Imaging demonstrated that young adult CIA rats exhibited more widespread and severe skeletal lesions of the phalanges, metatarsals, and tarsal bones, whereas juvenile CIA rats had more localized and less proliferative and osteolytic damage that was confined predominantly to the phalanges and metatarsals. This report demonstrates the utility of imaging modalities to compare juvenile and young adult rats with CIA and provides evidence that disease characteristics and progression differ between the 2 age groups. Our observations indicate that the CIA model could help discern age-related pathologic processes in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24326225

Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Pratt, Isaac V; Cooper, David M L; Silver, Tawni I; Rosenberg, Alan M

2013-01-01

372

COMORBID ANXIETY IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH BIPOLAR SPECTRUM DISORDERS: PREVALENCE AND CLINICAL CORRELATES  

PubMed Central

Objective Anxiety disorders are among the most common comorbid conditions in youth with bipolar disorder (BP). We aimed to examine the prevalence and correlates of comorbid anxiety disorders among youth with BP. Methods As part of the Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth study (COBY), 446 youth ages 7 to 17, who met DSM-IV criteria for BP-I (n=260), BP-II (n=32) or operationalized criteria for BP not otherwise specified (BP-NOS; n=154) were included. Subjects were evaluated for current and lifetime Axis-I psychiatric disorders at intake using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children–Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL), and standardized instruments to assess functioning and family history. Results Forty-four percent (n=194) of the sample met DSM-IV criteria for at least one lifetime anxiety disorder, most commonly Separation Anxiety (24%) and Generalized Anxiety Disorders (16%). Nearly 20% met criteria for two or more anxiety disorders. Overall, anxiety disorders predated the onset of BP. BP-II subjects were more likely than BP-I or BP-NOS subjects to have a comorbid anxiety disorder. After adjusting for confounding factors, BP youth with anxiety were more likely to have BP-II, longer duration of mood symptoms, more severe ratings of depression, and family history of depression, hopelessness and somatic complaints during their worst lifetime depressive episode than those without anxiety. Conclusions Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in youth with BP, and most often predate BP onset. BP-II, a family history of depression, and more severe lifetime depressive episodes distinguish BP youth with comorbid anxiety disorders from those without. Careful consideration should be given to the assessment of comorbid anxiety in BP youth. PMID:20868643

Sala, Regina; Axelson, David A.; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Goldstein, Tina R.; Ha, Wonho; Liao, Fangzi; Gill, Mary Kay; Iyengar, Satish; Strober, Michael A; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Yen, Shirley; Hower, Heather; Hunt, Jeffrey; Ryan, Neal D.; Dickstein, Daniel; Keller, Martin B.; Birmaher, Boris

2010-01-01

373

Chronic opioid use is associated with increased DNA methylation correlating with increased clinical pain.  

PubMed

Environmentally caused changes in chromosomes that do not alter the DNA sequence but cause phenotypic changes by altering gene transcription are summarized as epigenetics. A major epigenetic mechanism is methylation or demethylation at CpG-rich DNA islands. DNA methylation triggered by drugs has largely unexplored therapeutic consequences. Here we report increased methylation at a CpG rich island in the OPRM1 gene coding for ?-opioid receptors and at a global methylation site (LINE-1) in leukocytes of methadone-substituted former opiate addicts compared with matched healthy controls. Higher DNA methylation associated with chronic opioid exposure was reproduced in an independent cohort of opioid-treated as compared to non-opioid-treated pain patients. This suggests that opioids may stimulate DNA methylation. The OPRM1 methylation had no immediate effect on ?-opioid receptor transcription and was not associated with opioid dosing requirements. However, the global DNA methylation at LINE-1 was significantly correlated with increased chronic pain. This suggests inhibitory effects on the transcription of still unspecified nocifensive gene products. It further implies that opioids may be causally associated with increased genome-wide DNA methylation, although currently there is no direct evidence of this. This has phenotypic consequences for pain and may provide a new, epigenetics-associated mechanism of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. The results indicate a potential influence of opioid analgesics on the patients' epigenome. They emphasize the need for reliable and cost-effective screening tools and may imply that high-throughput screening for lead compounds in artificial expression systems may not provide the best tools for identifying new pain medications. PMID:23273101

Doehring, Alexandra; Oertel, Bruno Georg; Sittl, Reinhard; Lötsch, Jörn

2013-01-01

374

Analysis of EHMT1 expression and its correlations with clinical significance in esophageal squamous cell cancer  

PubMed Central

Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a highly aggressive malignancy, requiring effective biomarkers for prognosis and therapeutic responsiveness. Histone H3K9 methyltransferases (EHMT1 and EHMT2) are global genome organizers, which are crucial for maintaining the balance state of cells in a tissue-specific manner. It was previously suggested that EHMT1 expression is a predictor of prognosis in several malignant tumors; however, the prognostic significance of EHMT1 expression in ESCC has not been determined. A cohort of 50 ESCC cases and 46 paired normal esophageal tissue samples were evaluated to assess the levels of EHMT1 expression by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The SPSS software package was used for statistical data analysis. A significantly upregulated EHMT1 expression was observed in squamous preinvasive lesions and ESCC compared to the matched normal esophageal epithelia (52.0 vs. 21.7%, respectively). The expression of EHMT1 was correlated with tumor grade (G), depth of invasion (T) and lymph node metastasis (N) in ESCC. EHMT1 overexpression was found to be associated with poor cancer-specific survival in squamous cell carcinomas (?2=3.922, P=0.048). The expression of EHMT1 was identified as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in ESCC patients. In conclusion, EHMT1 expression is upregulated in ESCC and early preinvasive esophageal squamous lesions and the overexpression of EHMT1 is associated with poor prognosis in ESCC. Therefore, the expression of EHMT1 may be an effective prognostic biomarker for ESCC. PMID:24649311

GUAN, XIAOJIAO; ZHONG, XINWEN; MEN, WANFU; GONG, SHULEI; ZHANG, LIN; HAN, YUCHEN

2014-01-01

375

Analysis of EHMT1 expression and its correlations with clinical significance in esophageal squamous cell cancer.  

PubMed

Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a highly aggressive malignancy, requiring effective biomarkers for prognosis and therapeutic responsiveness. Histone H3K9 methyltransferases (EHMT1 and EHMT2) are global genome organizers, which are crucial for maintaining the balance state of cells in a tissue-specific manner. It was previously suggested that EHMT1 expression is a predictor of prognosis in several malignant tumors; however, the prognostic significance of EHMT1 expression in ESCC has not been determined. A cohort of 50 ESCC cases and 46 paired normal esophageal tissue samples were evaluated to assess the levels of EHMT1 expression by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The SPSS software package was used for statistical data analysis. A significantly upregulated EHMT1 expression was observed in squamous preinvasive lesions and ESCC compared to the matched normal esophageal epithelia (52.0 vs. 21.7%, respectively). The expression of EHMT1 was correlated with tumor grade (G), depth of invasion (T) and lymph node metastasis (N) in ESCC. EHMT1 overexpression was found to be associated with poor cancer-specific survival in squamous cell carcinomas (?(2)=3.922, P=0.048). The expression of EHMT1 was identified as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in ESCC patients. In conclusion, EHMT1 expression is upregulated in ESCC and early preinvasive esophageal squamous lesions and the overexpression of EHMT1 is associated with poor prognosis in ESCC. Therefore, the expression of EHMT1 may be an effective prognostic biomarker for ESCC. PMID:24649311

Guan, Xiaojiao; Zhong, Xinwen; Men, Wanfu; Gong, Shulei; Zhang, Lin; Han, Yuchen

2014-01-01

376

Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia and Its Clinical Correlates in Patients with Early Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis in the SCOT Trial  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe the prevalence and clinical correlates of endoscopic gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE; “watermelon stomach”) in early diffuse systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods Subjects with early, diffuse SSc and evidence of specific internal organ involvement were considered for the Scleroderma: Cyclophosphamide Or Transplant (SCOT) trial. In the screening procedures, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Patients were then categorized into those with or without endoscopic evidence of GAVE. Demographic data, clinical disease characteristics, and autoantibody data were compared using Pearson chi-square or Student t tests. Results Twenty-three of 103 (22.3%) individuals were found to have GAVE on endoscopy. Although not statistically significant, anti-topoisomerase I (anti-Scl70) was detected less frequently among those with GAVE (18.8% vs 44.7%; p = 0.071). Similarly, anti-RNP antibodies (anti-U1 RNP) showed a trend to a negative association with GAVE (0 vs 18.4%; p = 0.066). There was no association between anti-RNA polymerase III and GAVE. Patients with GAVE had significantly more erythema or vascular ectasias in other parts of the stomach (26.1% vs 5.0%; p = 0.003). Conclusion Endoscopic GAVE was present on screening in almost one-fourth of these highly selected patients with early and severe diffuse SSc. While anti-Scl70 and anti-U1 RNP trended toward a negative association with GAVE, there was no correlation between anti-RNA Pol III and GAVE. Patients with GAVE had a higher frequency of other gastric vascular ectasias outside the antrum, suggesting that GAVE may represent part of the spectrum of the vasculopathy in SSc. PMID:23418384

Hung, Emily W.; Mayes, Maureen D.; Sharif, Roozbeh; Assassi, Shervin; Machicao, Victor I.; Hosing, Chitra; St. Clair, E. William; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh; Forman, Stephen; Mineishi, Shin; Phillips, Kristine; Seibold, James R.; Bredeson, Christopher; Csuka, Mary Ellen; Nash, Richard A.; Wener, Mark H.; Simms, Robert; Ballen, Karen; Leclercq, Sharon; Storek, Jan; Goldmuntz, Ellen; Welch, Beverly; Keyes-Elstein, Lynette; Castina, Sharon; Crofford, Leslie J.; Mcsweeney, Peter; Sullivan, Keith M.

2013-01-01

377

Clinical significance and positive correlation of FoxM1 and Her-2 expression in gastric cancer.  

PubMed

The transcription factor forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1) and tyrosine kinase receptor Her-2, aberrantly expressing in various kinds of human malignancies, are closely related to the development of cancer. However, the correlation of them is still little explored, especially in gastric cancer. In current study, we examined FoxM1 and Her-2 levels in gastric cancers, and the clinical significance and association of them were further explored. As a result, FoxM1 and Her-2 expression were significantly higher in gastric cancer compared with para-cancer tissues and gastric cell lines (P < 0.01), while a positive association was found between the two genes at both RNA and protein levels (P = 0.007, P = 0.025). No significant association was observed between FoxM1 expression and clinic-pathological parameters (P > 0.1), whereas the positive frequency of Her-2 correlated with TNM stage significantly (P = 0.045). In addition, multivariate analysis showed Her-2 was not a prognostic predictor in gastric cancer (P = 0.625), while FoxM1 was independently associated with prognosis (P = 0.001), which especially affected the survival in patients with advanced stage (P < 0.01). These results suggest that FoxM1 and Her-2 are important diagnostic markers for gastric cancer, and FoxM1 is a favorable prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. FoxM1 may be a potential cellular target for therapeutic intervention, especially in Her2-targeted therapy-resistant cancers. PMID:24101296

Li, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Dongfang; Yao, Yasai; Qi, Weiwei; Liang, Jun

2014-11-01

378

Characterization of glycan binding specificities of influenza B viruses with correlation with hemagglutinin genotypes and clinical features.  

PubMed

The carbohydrate binding specificities are different among avian and human influenza A viruses and may affect the tissue tropism and transmission of these viruses. The glycan binding biology for influenza B, however, has not been systematically characterized. Glycan binding specificities of influenza B viral isolates were analyzed and correlated to hemagglutinin (HA) genotypes and clinical manifestations. A newly developed solution glycan array was applied to characterize the receptor binding specificities of influenza B virus clinical isolates from 2001 to 2007 in Taiwan. Thirty oligosaccharides which include ?-2,3 and ?-2,6 linkage glycans were subjected to analysis. The glycan binding patterns of 53 influenza B isolates could be categorized into three groups and were well correlated to their HA genotypes. The Yamagata-like strains predominantly bound to ?-2,6-linkage glycan (24:29, 83%) while Victoria-like strains preferentially bound to both ?-2,3- and ?-2,6-linkage glycans (13:24, 54%). A third group of viruses bound to sulfated glycans and these all belonged to Victoria-like strains. Based on the HA sequences, Asn-163, Glu-198, Ala-202, and Lys-203 were conserved among Victoria-like strains which may influence their carbohydrate recognition. The viruses bound to dual type glycans were more likely to be associated with the development of bronchopneumonia and gastrointestinal illness than those bound only to ?-2,6 sialyl glycans (P?

Wang, Ya-Fang; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Chi, Chia-Yu; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Su, Ih-Jen

2012-04-01

379

Is there a group effect? It depends on how you ask the question: Intraclass correlations for California Psychotherapy Alliance Scale-Group items.  

PubMed

California Psychotherapy Alliance Scale-Group (CALPAS-G) data were collected from 1,138 group sessions attended by 248 group members in 16 counseling groups. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to derive between-groups, between-member, and between-session variance components and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the 12 CALPAS-G items. Using Ledermann and Kenny's (2012) descriptions of variable types, we examined differences in between-groups variance for the 6 CALPAS-G items classified as "Individual" items and the 6 CALPAS-G items classified as "Group" items. A Related-Samples Wilcoxon's Signed Ranked Test showed that the ICCs for the Group items were significantly larger than the ICCs for the Individual items. The results show the importance of how items are worded. If researchers want to accurately examine the between-groups component of the group therapy relationship they should develop measures that ask clients to describe their perceptions of the group, not the members own experience of the group. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25364982

Kivlighan, Dennis M; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Gullo, Salvatore

2015-01-01

380

Aggressive Behavior Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Prevalence and Correlates in a Large Clinical Sample.  

PubMed

Aggressive behavior problems (ABP) are frequent yet poorly understood in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and are likely to co-vary significantly with comorbid problems. We examined the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of ABP in a clinical sample of children with ASD (N = 400; 2-16.9 years). We also investigated whether children with ABP experience more intensive medical interventions, greater impairments in behavioral functioning, and more severe comorbid problems than children with ASD who do not have ABP. One in four children with ASD had Child Behavior Checklist scores on the Aggressive Behavior scale in the clinical range (T-scores ? 70). Sociodemographic factors (age, gender, parent education, race, ethnicity) were unrelated to ABP status. The presence of ABP was significantly associated with increased use of psychotropic drugs and melatonin, lower cognitive functioning, lower ASD severity, and greater comorbid sleep, internalizing, and attention problems. In multivariate models, sleep, internalizing, and attention problems were most strongly associated with ABP. These comorbid problems may hold promise as targets for treatment to decrease aggressive behavior and proactively identify high-risk profiles for prevention. PMID:25221619

Hill, Alison Presmanes; Zuckerman, Katharine E; Hagen, Arlene D; Kriz, Daniel J; Duvall, Susanne W; van Santen, Jan; Nigg, Joel; Fair, Damien; Fombonne, Eric

2014-09-01

381

Extracting drug mechanism and pharmacodynamic information from clinical electroencephalographic data using generalised semi-linear canonical correlation analysis.  

PubMed

Conventional analysis of clinical resting electroencephalography (EEG) recordings typically involves assessment of spectral power in pre-defined frequency bands at specific electrodes. EEG is a potentially useful technique in drug development for measuring the pharmacodynamic (PD) effects of a centrally acting compound and hence to assess the likelihood of success of a novel drug based on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) principles. However, the need to define the electrodes and spectral bands to be analysed a priori is limiting where the nature of the drug-induced EEG effects is initially not known. We describe the extension to human EEG data of a generalised semi-linear canonical correlation analysis (GSLCCA), developed for small animal data. GSLCCA uses data from the whole spectrum, the entire recording duration and multiple electrodes. It provides interpretable information on the mechanism of drug action and a PD measure suitable for use in PK-PD modelling. Data from a study with low (analgesic) doses of the ?-opioid agonist, remifentanil, in 12 healthy subjects were analysed using conventional spectral edge analysis and GSLCCA. At this low dose, the conventional analysis was unsuccessful but plausible results consistent with previous observations were obtained using GSLCCA, confirming that GSLCCA can be successfully applied to clinical EEG data. PMID:25402261

Brain, P; Strimenopoulou, F; Diukova, A; Berry, E; Jolly, A; Hall, J E; Wise, R G; Ivarsson, M; Wilson, F J

2014-12-01

382

Proposed Diagnostic Criteria for the DSM-5 of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Female Adolescents: Diagnostic and Clinical Correlates  

PubMed Central

Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is included as conditions for further study in the DSM-5. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the proposed diagnostic criteria and the diagnostic and clinical correlates for the validity of a diagnostic entity. The authors investigated the characteristics of NSSI disorder and the proposed diagnostic criteria. A sample of 73 female inpatient adolescents and 37 nonclinical adolescents (aged 13 to 19 years) was recruited. Patients were classified into 4 groups (adolescents with NSSI disorder, adolescents with NSSI without impairment/distress, clinical controls without NSSI, and nonclinical controls). Adolescents were compared on self-reported psychopathology and diagnostic cooccurrences. Results indicate that adolescents with NSSI disorder have a higher level of impairment than adolescents with other mental disorders without NSSI. Most common comorbid diagnoses were major depression, social phobia, and PTSD. There was some overlap of adolescents with NSSI disorder and suicidal behaviour and borderline personality disorder, but there were also important differences. Results further suggest that the proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for NSSI are useful and necessary. In conclusion, NSSI is a highly impairing disorder characterized by high comorbidity with various disorders, providing further evidence that NSSI should be a distinct diagnostic entity. PMID:24236273

Schmid, Marc

2013-01-01

383

Marchetti, Dario — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This is an outstanding and intellectually-stimulating question which introduces a new way to translate more effectively metastasis research to the clinic. It is certainly worth exploring and badly needed. because, if positive, drugs could be immediately useful to help defined populations of patients. Per points, we agree that these are limited metastasis groups; however, results could at minimum justify moving forward to full adjuvant trials. Worthy cause given the "bottleneck" we experience nowadays since drugs are mostly not tested in metastasis prevention.

384

Increasing the quantity and quality of searching for current best evidence to answer clinical questions: protocol and intervention design of the MacPLUS FS Factorial Randomized Controlled Trials.  

PubMed

Background & aimsFinding current best evidence for clinical decisions remains challenging. With 3,000 new studies published every day, no single evidence-based resource provides all answers or is sufficiently updated. McMaster Premium LiteratUre Service ¿ Federated Search (MacPLUS FS) addresses this issue by looking in multiple high quality resources simultaneously and displaying results in a one-page pyramid with the most clinically useful at the top. Yet, additional logistical and educational barriers need to be addressed to enhance point-of-care evidence retrieval. This trial seeks to test three innovative interventions, among clinicians registered to MacPLUS FS, to increase the quantity and quality of searching for current best evidence to answer clinical questions.Methods & designIn a user-centered approach, we designed three interventions embedded in MacPLUS FS: (A) a web-based Clinical Question Recorder; (B) an Evidence Retrieval Coach composed of eight short educational videos; (C) an Audit, Feedback and Gamification approach to evidence retrieval, based on the allocation of `badges¿ and `reputation scores.¿We will conduct a randomized factorial controlled trial among all the 904 eligible medical doctors currently registered to MacPLUS FS at the hospitals affiliated with McMaster University, Canada. Postgraduate trainees (n¿=¿429) and clinical faculty/staff (n¿=¿475) will be randomized to each of the three following interventions in a factorial design (A x B x C). Utilization will be continuously recorded through clinicians¿ accounts that track logins and usage, down to the level of individual keystrokes. The primary outcome is the rate of searches per month per user during the six months of follow-up. Secondary outcomes, measured through the validated Impact Assessment Method questionnaire, include: utility of answers found (meeting clinicians¿ information needs), use (application in practice), and perceived usefulness on patient outcomes.DiscussionBuilt on effective models for the point-of-care teaching, these interventions approach evidence retrieval as a clinical skill. If effective, they may offer the opportunity to enhance it for a large audience, at low cost, providing better access to relevant evidence across many top EBM resources in parallel.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.Gov NCT02038439. PMID:25239537

Agoritsas, Thomas; Iserman, Emma; Hobson, Nicholas; Cohen, Natasha; Cohen, Adam; Roshanov, Pavel S; Perez, Miguel; Cotoi, Chris; Parrish, Rick; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Iorio, Alfonso; Haynes, R

2014-09-20

385

Question, Problem, Purpose  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Questions and question-formulating strategies are central to science. In many ways the formulation of a question forms the basis for high-quality instruction in science. Effective questioning has a strong connection to cognitive theory. The sentence start

Klentschy, Michael P.

2008-04-01

386

Correlation of three immunohistochemically detected markers of neuroendocrine differentiation with clinical predictors of disease progression in prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

Background The importance of immuno-histological detection of neuroendocrine differentiation in prostatic adenocarcinoma with respect to disease at presentation and Gleason grade is gaining acceptance. There is limited literature on the relative significance of three commonly used markers of NE differentiation i.e. Chromogranin A (CgA), Neuron specific enolase (NSE) and Synaptophysin (Syn). In the current work we have assessed the correlation of immuno-histological detection of neuroendocrine differentiation in prostatic adenocarcinoma with respect to disease at presentation and Gleason grade and to determine the relative value of various markers. Materials and methods Consecutive samples of malignant prostatic specimens (Transurethral resection of prostate or radical retropubic prostatectomy) from 84 patients between January 1991 and December 1998 were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining (PAP technique) using selected neuroendocrine tumor markers i.e. Chromogranin A (CgA), Neuron specific enolase (NSE), and Synaptophysin (Syn). According to the stage at diagnosis, patients were divided into three groups. Group (i) included patients who had organ confined disease, group (ii) included patients with locally invasive disease, and group (iii) with distant metastasis. NE expression was correlated with Gleason sum and clinical stage at presentation and analyzed using Chi-Square test and one way ANNOVA. Results The mean age of the patients was 70 ± 9.2 years. Group I had 14 patients, group II had 31 patients and group III had 39 patients. CgA was detected in 33 cases, Syn in 8 cases, and NSE in 44 cases. Expression of CgA was seen in 7% of group I, 37% in group II and 35% of group III patients (p 0.059). CgA (p 0.024) and NSE (p 0.006) had a significantly higher expression with worsening Gleason grade. Conclusion CgA has a better correlation with disease at presentation than other markers used. Both NSE and CgA had increasing expression with worsening histological grade this correlation has a potential for use as a prognostic indicator. Limitations in the current work included small number and retrospective nature of work. The findings of this work needs validation in a larger cohort. PMID:19115997

Ather, M Hammad; Abbas, Farhat; Faruqui, Nuzhat; Israr, Mohammad; Pervez, Shahid

2008-01-01

387

Demographic and clinical factors correlating with high levels of psychological distress in HIV-positive women living in Ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

The concept of psychological distress includes a range of emotional states with symptoms of depression and anxiety and has yet to be reported in HIV-positive women living in Ontario, Canada, who are known to live with contributing factors. This study aimed to determine the prevalence, severity, and correlates of psychological distress among women accessing HIV care participating in the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). The K10 is a 10-item, five-level response scale. K10 values range from 10 to 50 with values less than or equal to 19 categorized as not clinically significant, scores between 20 and 24 as moderate levels, 25-29 as high, and 30-50 as very high psychological distress. Correlates of psychological distress were assessed using the Pearson's chi-square test and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Moderate, high, and very high levels of psychological distress were experienced by 16.9, 10.4, and 15.1% of the 337 women in our cohort, respectively, with 57.6% reporting none. Psychological distress levels greater than 19, correlated with being unemployed (vs. employed/student/retired; AOR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13-0.83), living in a household without their child/children (AOR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.33-4.52), CD4 counts < 200 cells/mm(3) (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 0.89-4.80), and to a lesser degree an education of some college or less (vs. completed college or higher; AOR=1.71, 95% CI: 0.99-2.95). Age and ethnicity, a priori variables of interest, did not correlate with psychological distress. Findings suggest that socioeconomic factors which shape the demography of women living with HIV in Ontario, low CD4 counts, and losing the opportunity to care for their child/children has a significant relationship with psychological distress. Approaches to manage psychological distress should address and make considerations for the lived experiences of women since they can act as potential barriers to improving psychological well-being. PMID:24215281

Benoit, Anita C; Light, Lucia; Burchell, Ann N; Gardner, Sandra; Rourke, Sean B; Wobeser, Wendy; Loutfy, Mona R

2014-01-01

388

Further development of titanium miniplate fixation for mandibular fractures. Experience gained and questions raised from a prospective clinical pilot study with 2.0 mm fixation plates.  

PubMed

Miniplate systems are often used instead of more rigid systems for the treatment of mandibular fractures. While the most stable fixation method for all mandibular fractures is the 2.7 mm plate, most fracture sites and types are eminently suitable for miniplate fixation via an intraoral approach. However, the relatively low stability of the miniplate systems compared with rigid plate systems limits the indications for their use in mandibular fracture treatment, especially when immediate postoperative function is desired. A more rigid miniplate which provides increased stability was studied. The results of a preliminary study and a clinical trial of a 2.0 mm titanium miniplate system are presented in this paper. The therapeutic consequences of the lesser stability afforded by small plate systems are discussed. Indications for miniplate fixation without additional immobilization are reviewed. PMID:1401098

Schmelzeisen, R; McIff, T; Rahn, B

1992-01-01

389

Mutations in CFTR gene and clinical correlation in Argentine patients with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens.  

PubMed

Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) is a form of male infertility in which mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have been identified. Here we identify different mutations of CFTR and the poly-T variant of intron 8 (IVS8) in Argentine patients and analyze sweat test values and clinical characteristic related to Cystic Fibrosis (CF). For counseling purposes the two most frequent mutations in Argentine CF population: deltaF508 and G542X were screened in wives. In all cases, it was possible to reduce the risk of CF/CBAVD descendants in these couples because none of the mutation were found in the 36 samples. Eight patients (23%) showed abnormal chloride values (> 60 mmol/l). A second group of 6 patients (18%) had borderline values of sweat chloride (40-59 mmol/l). We defined another group with 6 patients (18%), with normal sweat chloride levels (30-39 mmo/l) and a fourth group of 14 (41%) patients with sweat chloride below 30 mmol/l. deltaF508, the most frequent CF mutation in the Argentine population, was found on 15 of the 72 chromosomes (21%), R117H mutation was detected on 2 of 62 chromosomes (3%). Only one R347P allele was found on 28 chromosomes analyzed (2%). On a sample of 27 patients, IVS8 analysis showed a frequency of 6/56 chromosomes (11%) of 5T allele. Even though these findings present an improvement in the detection of mutations related to clinical correlations in Argentine CBAVD population, the search for other common and uncommon mutations should be continued. PMID:15239534

Levy, Estrella M; Granados, Patricia; Rawe, Vanesa; Olmedo, Santiago Brugo; Luna, Maria C; Cafferata, Eduardo; Pivetta, Omar H

2004-01-01

390

Clinical utility of a dipstick assay in patients with brucellosis: correlation with the period of evolution of the disease.  

PubMed

To examine the clinical utility of a dipstick assay for the detection of Brucella-specific IgM antibodies, and the correlation with the evolution of the disease. Twenty-six patients who were admitted to the General Hospital of Albacete (Spain) over a 2-year period and diagnosed with brucellosis were included in the study. One hundred and twenty-five serum samples collected at the time of diagnosis and at intervals during and after treatment were tested by the Coombs test, the standard seroagglutination test (SAT), the SAT in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT-SAT), and a dipstick assay for the detection of Brucella-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. The sensitivity of the dipstick assay at the moment of the diagnosis was similar to that of the SAT (62% and 73%, respectively), somewhat higher than that of the DTT-SAT (50%), and lower than that of the Coombs test (100%). Patients with a negative dipstick test at the moment of diagnosis displayed a period of evolution of the disease longer than that of the dipstick-positive patients. After the beginning of therapy, the detection rate of the dipstick assay decreased faster than those of the SAT, the DTT-SAT, and the Coombs test. Thirty days after the start of therapy, the detection rate of the dipstick assay had decreased to 7%, whereas that of the SAT and DTT-SAT was 46%, and that of the Coombs test was still 92%. The dipstick assay could be used as a rapid diagnostic test for patients in the early stages of illness. Patients with a long period of illness will probably have a negative dipstick test, and could be diagnosed with the aid of the Coombs test and classical clinical findings. PMID:12667240

Casao, M A; Smits, H L; Navarro, E; Solera, J

2003-04-01

391

Suppression of HIV Replication by Lymphoid Tissue CD8+ Cells Correlates with the Clinical State of HIV-Infected Individuals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lymphoid tissues from asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals, as compared with symptomatic HIV-infected subjects, show limited histopathological changes and lower levels of HIV expression. In this report we correlate the control of HIV replication in lymph nodes to the non-cytolytic anti-HIV activity of lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells. Five subjects at different stages of HIV-related disease were studied and the ability of their CD8+ cells, isolated from both lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood, to inhibit HIV replication was compared. CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood of two HIV-infected long-term survivors suppressed HIV replication at a low CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.1. The CD8+ cells from the lymphoid tissue of a third asymptomatic subject suppressed HIV replication at a CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.25; the subject's peripheral blood CD8+ cells showed this antiviral response at a lower ratio of 0.05. The lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells from two AIDS patients were not able to suppress HIV replication, and the peripheral blood CD8+ cells of only one of them suppressed HIV replication. The plasma viremia, cellular HIV load as well as the extent of pathology and virus expression in the lymphoid tissue of the two long-term survivors, were reduced compared with these parameters in the three other subjects. The data suggest that the extent of anti-HIV activity by CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue relative to peripheral blood correlates best with the clinical state measured by lymphoid tissue pathology and HIV burden in lymphoid tissues and blood. The results and further emphasis to the importance of this cellular immune response in controlling HIV pathogenesis.

Blackbourn, David J.; Mackewicz, Carl E.; Barker, Edward; Hunt, Thomas K.; Herndier, Brian; Haase, Ashley T.; Levy, Jay A.

1996-11-01

392

Menopause Analytical Hormonal Correlate Outcome Study (MAHCOS) and the Association to Brain Electrophysiology (P300) in a Clinical Setting  

PubMed Central

Various studies have demonstrated that increased leptin levels and obesity are inversely related to cognitive decline in menopausal women. It is hypothesized that adiposity is inversely correlated with cognitive decline, as women with increased weight are less vulnerable to diminishing cognition. However, it is increasingly observed that menopausal women, even with increased adiposity, experience significant cognitive decline. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to analyze cognitive function and processing in menopausal women. Evoked potentials (P300) and neurophysiologic tests have validated brain metabolism in cognitively impaired patients. Post-hoc analyses of 796 female patients entering PATH Medical Clinic, between January 4, 2009 and February 24, 2013, were performed as part of the “Menopause Analytical Hormonal Correlate Outcome Study” (MAHCOS). Patient age range was 39–76 years (46.7±0.2). P300 latency and amplitude correlated with a number of hormones: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, estrone, estriol, DHEA, pregnenolone, progesterone, free and total testosterone, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), Vitamins D 1.25 and D 25OH, leptin, and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3). Corrected statistics did not reveal significant associations with P300 latency or amplitude for these hormones except for leptin plasma levels. However, factor analysis showed that FSH and LH clustered together with Vitamin D1.25 and Vitamin D25OH, P300 latency (not amplitude), and log leptin were found to be associated in the same cluster. Utilizing regression analysis, once age adjusted, leptin was the only significant predictor for latency or speed (p?=?0.03) with an effect size of 0.23. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with abnormal P300 speed (OR?=?0.98). Our findings show a significant relationship of higher plasma leptin levels, potentially due to leptin resistance, and prolonged P300 latency. This suggests leptin resistance may delay electrophysiological processing of memory and attention, which appears to be the first of such an association. PMID:25251414

Braverman, Eric R.; Han, David; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Karikh, Tatiana; Truesdell, Courtney; Dushaj, Kristina; Kreuk, Florian; Li, Mona; Stratton, Danielle; Blum, Kenneth

2014-01-01

393

Why "Who Is the Client?" Is the Wrong Ethical Question  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The familiar question "Who is the client?" elicits a singular answer. This may be appropriate as a clinical question, and it is sometimes necessary as a legal question or reimbursement question, but on ethical questions, the National Association of School Psychologists Ethics Code requires school psychologists to "think plural"…

Fisher, Mary Alice

2014-01-01

394

Correlation of long non-coding RNA expression with metastasis, drug resistance and clinical outcome in cancer  

PubMed Central

The therapeutic response and clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with the same cancer type and that receive identical treatment is highly variable to reflect the genetic heterogeneity within tumor cells. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are recently discovered molecules that regulate eukaryotic gene expression and represent a significant advance towards a better understanding of the mechanisms that govern cellular growth. NcRNAs are essential for the proper regulation of cell proliferation and survival under physiologic conditions and are deregulated in many pathologies, e.g., human cancers. NcRNAs have been associated with cancer diagnosis, staging, treatment response, metastasis and survival and include distinct subtypes, e.g., long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). LncRNAs have been linked to essential growth-promoting activities and their deregulation contributes to tumor cell survival. A prominent example is the Hox transcript antisense intergenic lncRNA, HOTAIR, that cooperates with the polycomb repressive complex to reprogram chromatin organization. HOTAIR expression is deregulated in a spectrum of cancers and HOTAIR expression correlates with patient survival. Here, we highlight emerging evidence that supports a role for lncRNAs in cancer with implications for the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25275300

Malek, Ehsan; Jagannathan, Sajjeev; Driscoll, James J.

2014-01-01

395

Child behaviour checklist emotional dysregulation profiles in youth with disruptive behaviour disorders: Clinical correlates and treatment implications.  

PubMed

Two Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) profiles were correlated to poor self-regulation, Deficient Emotional Self-Regulation (DESR) (elevation between 1 and 2 Standard Deviations (SD) in Anxiety/Depression, Aggression, Attention subscales), and Dysregulation Profile (DP) (elevation of 2 Standard Deviations or more). We explored youths with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Conduct Disorder (CD) whether these profiles are associated with specific clinical features. The sample included 57 patients with DESR profile and 41 with DP profile, ages 9 to 15 years, all assigned to a non-pharmacological Multimodal Treatment Program. No differences resulted between groups in demographic features, diagnosis ratio, and comorbidities with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Bipolar Disorder (BD), and Anxiety Disorder. The DP group was associated with higher scores in Withdrawn, Social Problem, Thought, Rule Breaking, and Somatic CBCL subscales, and higher scores in Narcissism and Impulsivity (but not Callous-Unemotional (CU)), according to the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD). After treatment, patients with DESR improved their personality traits (Narcissistic and Callous-Unemotional, but not Impulsivity), while changes in CBCL scales were modest. Patients with DP improved scales of Attention, Aggression, Anxiety-Depression, Rule Breaking, Withdrawal, Social Problem and Thought, while personality features did not change. These results suggest diagnostic implications of CBCL profiles, and indications for targeted treatment strategies. PMID:25480545

Gabriele, Masi; Pietro, Muratori; Azzurra, Manfredi; Simone, Pisano; Annarita, Milone

2015-01-30

396

Mutation Spectrum of RB1 Gene in Unilateral Retinoblastoma Cases from Tunisia and Correlations with Clinical Features  

PubMed Central

Retinoblastoma, an embryonic neoplasm of retinal origin, is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in children. Somatic inactivation of both alleles of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene in a retinal progenitor cell through diverse mechanisms including genetic and epigenetic modifications, is the crucial event in initiation of tumorigenesis in most cases of isolated unilateral retinoblastoma. We analyzed DNA from tumor tissue and from peripheral blood to determine the RB1 mutation status and seek correlations with clinical features of 37 unrelated cases of Tunisian origin with sporadic retinoblastoma. All cases were unilateral except one who presented with bilateral disease, in whom no germline coding sequence alteration was identified. A multi-step mutation scanning protocol identified bi-allelic inactivation of RB1 gene in 30 (81%) of the samples tested. A total of 7 novel mutations were identified. There were three tumors without any detectable mutation while a subset contained multiple mutations in RB1 gene. The latter group included tumors collected after treatment with chemotherapy. There were seven individuals with germline mutations and all presented with advanced stage of tumor. There was no difference in age of onset of RB based on the germline mutation status. Thus 20% of the individuals with sporadic unilateral RB in this series carried germline mutations and indicate the importance of genetic testing all children with sporadic retinoblastoma. These findings help to characterize the spectrum of mutations present in the Tunisian population and can improve genetic diagnosis of retinoblastoma. PMID:25602518

Ayari-Jeridi, Hajer; Moran, Kimberly; Chebbi, Amel; Bouguila, Hédi; Abbes, Imen; Charradi, Khaoula; Benammar-Elgaaïed, Amel; Ganguly, Arupa

2015-01-01

397

Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion Coupled to SRM: Correlation with Clinical Immunoassay Tests  

PubMed Central

Recently, selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) has been more frequently applied to measure low abundance biomarker candidates in tissues and biofluids, owing to its high sensitivity and specificity, simplicity of assay configuration, and exceptional multiplexing capability. In this study, we report for the first time the development of immunoaffinity depletion-based workflows and SRM-MS assays that enable sensitive and accurate quantification of total and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in serum without the requirement for specific PSA antibodies. Low ng/mL level detection of both total and free PSA was consistently achieved in both PSA-spiked female serum samples and actual patient serum samples. Moreover, comparison of the results obtained when SRM PSA assays and conventional immunoassays were applied to the same samples showed good correlation in several independent clinical serum sample sets. These results demonstrate that the workflows and SRM assays developed here provide an attractive alternative for reliably measuring candidate biomarkers in human blood, without the need to develop affinity reagents. Furthermore, the simultaneous measurement of multiple biomarkers, including the free and bound forms of PSA, can be performed in a single multiplexed analysis using high-resolution liquid chromatographic separation coupled with SRM-MS. PMID:22846433

Liu, Tao; Hossain, Mahmud; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Izmirlian, Grant; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Wei-Jun; Leach, Robin J.; Thompson, Ian M.; Chan, Daniel W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Camp, David G.

2012-01-01

398

Mutation Spectrum of RB1 Gene in Unilateral Retinoblastoma Cases from Tunisia and Correlations with Clinical Features.  

PubMed

Retinoblastoma, an embryonic neoplasm of retinal origin, is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in children. Somatic inactivation of both alleles of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene in a retinal progenitor cell through diverse mechanisms including genetic and epigenetic modifications, is the crucial event in initiation of tumorigenesis in most cases of isolated unilateral retinoblastoma. We analyzed DNA from tumor tissue and from peripheral blood to determine the RB1 mutation status and seek correlations with clinical features of 37 unrelated cases of Tunisian origin with sporadic retinoblastoma. All cases were unilateral except one who presented with bilateral disease, in whom no germline coding sequence alteration was identified. A multi-step mutation scanning protocol identified bi-allelic inactivation of RB1 gene in 30 (81%) of the samples tested. A total of 7 novel mutations were identified. There were three tumors without any detectable mutation while a subset contained multiple mutations in RB1 gene. The latter group included tumors collected after treatment with chemotherapy. There were seven individuals with germline mutations and all presented with advanced stage of tumor. There was no difference in age of onset of RB based on the germline mutation status. Thus 20% of the individuals with sporadic unilateral RB in this series carried germline mutations and indicate the importance of genetic testing all children with sporadic retinoblastoma. These findings help to characterize the spectrum of mutations present in the Tunisian population and can improve genetic diagnosis of retinoblastoma. PMID:25602518

Ayari-Jeridi, Hajer; Moran, Kimberly; Chebbi, Amel; Bouguila, Hédi; Abbes, Imen; Charradi, Khaoula; Benammar-Elgaaïed, Amel; Ganguly, Arupa

2015-01-01

399

Clinical observations on the effect of carotid artery occlusion on cerebral blood flow mapped by xenon computed tomography and its correlation with carotid artery back pressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Xenon computed tomographic cerebral blood flow mapping was correlated with internal carotid artery stump pressures and clinical neurologic assessment during temporary internal carotid artery occlusion. One hundred fourteen patients with skull base tumors or intracranial aneurysms potentially requiring carotid resection or ligation underwent angiography, xenon CT cerebral blood flow mapping, and internal carotid artery blood pressure monitoring. The internal carotid

David L. Steed; Marshall W. Webster; Egbert J DeVries; Charles A. Jungreis; Joseph A. Horton; Laligam Sehkar; Howard Yonas

1990-01-01

400

Trends in HIV & syphilis prevalence and correlates of HIV infection: results from cross-sectional surveys among women attending ante-natal clinics in Northern Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Sentinel surveillance for HIV in ante-natal clinics (ANC) remains the primary method for collecting timely trend data on HIV prevalence in most of sub-Saharan Africa. We describe prevalence of HIV and syphilis infection and trends over time in HIV prevalence among women attending ante-natal clinics (ANC) in Magu district and Mwanza city, part of Mwanza region in Northern Tanzania. HIV prevalence from ANC surveys in 2000 and 2002 was 10.5% and 10.8% respectively. In previous rounds urban residence, residential mobility, the length of time sexually active before marriage, time since marriage and age of the partner were associated with HIV infection. Methods A third round of HIV sentinel surveillance was conducted at ante-natal clinics in Mwanza region, Tanzania during 2006. We interviewed women attending 27 ante-natal clinics. In 15 clinics we also anonymously tested women for syphilis and HIV infection and linked these results to the questionnaire data. Results HIV prevalence was 7.6% overall in 2006 and 7.4% at the 11 clinics used in previous rounds. Geographical variations in HIV prevalence, apparent in previous rounds, have largely disappeared but syphilis prevalence is still higher in rural clinics. HIV prevalence has declined in urban clinics and is stable in rural clinics. The correlates of HIV infection have changed over time. In this round older age, lower gravidity, remarriage, duration of marriage, sexual activity before marriage, long interval between last birth and pregnancy and child death were all associated with infection. Conclusions HIV prevalence trends concur with results from a community-based cohort in the region. Correlates of HIV infection have also changed and more proximate, individual level factors are now more important, in line with the changing epidemiology of infection in this population. PMID:20836872

2010-01-01

401

Pica associated with iron deficiency or depletion: clinical and laboratory correlates in 262 non-pregnant adult outpatients  

PubMed Central

Background There are many descriptions of the association of pica with iron deficiency in adults, but there are few reports in which observations available at diagnosis of iron deficiency were analyzed using multivariable techniques to identify significant predictors of pica. We sought to identify clinical and laboratory correlates of pica in adults with iron deficiency or depletion using univariable and stepwise forward logistic regression analyses. Methods We reviewed charts of 262 non-pregnant adult outpatients (ages ?18 y) who required treatment with intravenous iron dextran. We tabulated their sex, age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, symptoms and causes of iron deficiency or depletion, serum iron and complete blood count measures, and other conditions at diagnosis before intravenous iron dextran was administered. We excluded patients with serum creatinine >133 ?mol/L or disorders that could affect erythrocyte or iron measures. Iron deficiency was defined as both SF <45 pmol/L and TS <10%. Iron depletion was defined as serum ferritin (SF) <112 pmol/L. We performed univariable comparisons and stepwise forward logistic regression analyses to identify significant correlates of pica. Results There were 230 women (184 white, 46 black; ages 19-91 y) and 32 men (31 white, 1 black; ages 24-81 y). 118 patients (45.0%) reported pica; of these, 87.3% reported ice pica (pagophagia). In univariable analyses, patients with pica had lower mean age, black race/ethnicity, and higher prevalences of cardiopulmonary and epithelial manifestations. The prevalence of iron deficiency, with or without anemia, did not differ significantly between patients with and without pica reports. Mean hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were lower and mean red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and platelet count were higher in patients with pica. Thrombocytosis occurred only in women and was more prevalent in those with pica (20.4% vs. 8.3%; p = 0.0050). Mean total iron-binding capacity was higher and mean serum ferritin was lower in patients with pica. Nineteen patients developed a second episode of iron deficiency or depletion; concordance of recurrent pica (or absence of pica) was 95%. Predictors of pica in logistic regression analyses were age and MCV (negative associations; p = 0.0250 and 0.0018, respectively) and RDW and platelet count (positive associations; p = 0.0009 and 0.02215, respectively); the odds ratios of these predictors were low. Conclusions In non-pregnant adult patients with iron deficiency or depletion, lower age is a significant predictor of pica. Patients with pica have lower MCV, higher RDW, and higher platelet counts than patients without pica. PMID:21176208

2010-01-01

402

The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes…

Faught, I. Charie

2012-01-01

403

Fetuin-A levels in obesity: differences in relation to metabolic syndrome and correlation with clinical and laboratory variables  

PubMed Central

Introduction Fetuin-A is an important player in the enhancement of insulin resistance. There are very limited data available concerning the relationships between fetuin-A, weight status and features of the metabolic syndrome (Met S) in obese Egyptian subjects, and especially in children. The aim of the study was to evaluate fetuin-A serum level in subjects with obesity and its possible association with other laboratory and clinical variables. Material and methods A total of 140 obese subjects and 50 controls aged 10-40 years were recruited. Demographic, anthropometric and biochemical features were collected according to a standard protocol. Serum fetuin-A levels were measured using ELISA and the modified Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP-ATP III) criteria were adopted to diagnose Met S. Results A higher level of serum fetuin-A was detected in obese subjects. Met S cases were also significantly associated with higher serum fetuin-A. Fetuin-A correlated significantly with BMI (r = 0.437), systolic (r = 0.228) and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.295), waist circumference (r = 0.332), insulin resistance calculated by the homeostasis model (HOMA-IR) (r = 0.295) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (r = 0.362). Conclusions Fetuin-A levels were higher in adults and children with obesity and Met S. They were related to insulin resistance and to features of the Met S in cross-sectional analyses. Our study demonstrates a novel association between human fetuin-A and the Met S among obese subject. Therefore, fetuin-A might be a new promising link between obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:23185191

Ragab, Shadia; El Dayem, Soha M. Abd; ElBaky, Abeer Abd; Salah, Nehal; Hamed, Mona; Assal, Heba; Koura, Hala

2012-01-01

404

Study Questions for Geophysics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website hosts over fifty practice questions relating geophysics. Topics covered in these questions include gravity, earthquake waves and seismicity, Earth's structure, geochronology, anomalies, viscosity, and polar wandering.

Susan Slaymaker

405

Wound healing anomalies after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy: correlation of clinical outcomes, corneal topography, and confocal microscopy.  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE: To further the understanding of wound healing anomalies affecting visual function after myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). METHOD: Analysis of a clinical database of PRK on 133 eyes with myopia of -1.5 to -7.0 D and 43 eyes with myopia of -6.0 to -12.0 D. Visual function was analyzed by subgroups of 1) no topographic anomalies; 2) topographic central islands; and 3) topographic keyhole patterns. The natural course of healing was documented over 6 months with visual acuity measurements, clinical observation, and corneal topography. In vivo clinical-pathologic correlations were made by scanning confocal microscopy. RESULTS: Topographic anomalies were identified 1 month post-PRK in 48 eyes (40.3%) with low-moderate myopia and in 14 eyes (32.5%) with moderate-high myopia. For patients with 6 month follow-up, these rates declined to 25% and 23%, respectively. At 1 month post-PRK, topographic anomalies significantly reduced uncorrected and best-corrected visual acuity and refractive predictability. By 6 months post-PRK, the small number of eyes with persistent anomalies had visual outcomes similar to patients with normal topography. A simple approach to anti-island pre-treatment reduced islands slightly and keyhole anomalies significantly (anti-island pre-treatment vs no pretreatment: islands 25% vs 31.8%; keyholes 2.3% vs 17.6%; p = 0.021) but with decreased predictability of induced refractive change at 1 month post-PRK. Confocal microscopy in vivo demonstrated prominent deposition of subepithelial extracellular material 1 to 2 months after PRK that diminished by 6 to 8 months, but persisted in the presence of central islands. Scar formation appeared to represent an elevated plaque of new collagen with active keratocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Topographic anomalies of wound healing are common after PRK. Vision and predictability are reduced by anomalies 1 month post-PRK but anomalies often resolve by 6 months. Marked improvement of vision occurs even when anomalies persist. Central islands appear to consist of persistent dense subepithelial extracellular deposits. Local scars are caused by new collagen deposition. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9A FIGURE 9B FIGURE 9C FIGURE 10A FIGURE 10B FIGURE 11A FIGURE 11B FIGURE 11C FIGURE 12A FIGURE 12B FIGURE 13A FIGURE 13B FIGURE 13C FIGURE 14A FIGURE 14B FIGURE 14C FIGURE 14D FIGURE 14E FIGURE 15A FIGURE 15B FIGURE 15C FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18A FIGURE 18B FIGURE 21A FIGURE 21B FIGURE 20A FIGURE 20B FIGURE 19A FIGURE 19B FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 PMID:9440190

Steinert, R F

1997-01-01

406

Review of clinical studies on dendritic cell-based vaccination of patients with malignant melanoma: assessment of correlation between clinical response and vaccine parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past years numerous clinical trials have been carried out to assess the ability of dendritic cell (DC) based immunotherapy\\u000a to induce clinically relevant immune responses in patients with malignant diseases. A broad range of cancer types have been\\u000a targeted including malignant melanoma which in the disseminated stage have a very poor prognosis and only limited treatment\\u000a options with

Lotte Engell-Noerregaard; Troels Holz Hansen; Mads Hald Andersen; Per thor Straten; Inge Marie Svane

2009-01-01

407

Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: New High Resolution Computed Tomography Scoring System and Correlation between the High Resolution Computed Tomography Score and Clinical Severity  

PubMed Central

Objective To develop an high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scoring system for the assessment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and determine its usefulness as compared with the chest radiographic score. Materials and Methods Forty-two very low-birth-weight preterm infants with BPD (25 male, 17 female) were prospectively evaluated with HRCT performed at the mean age of 39.1-week postmenstrual age. Clinical severity of BPD was categorized as mild, moderate or severe. The HRCT score (0-36) of each patient was the sum of the number of bronchopulmonary segments with 1) hyperaeration and 2) parenchymal lesions (linear lesions, segmental atelectasis, consolidation and architectural distortion), respectively. We compared the HRCT scores with the chest radiographic scores (the Toce system) in terms of correlation with clinical severity. Results The HRCT score had good interobserver (r = 0.969, p < 0.001) and intraobserver (r = 0.986, p < 0.001) reproducibility. The HRCT score showed better correlation (r = 0.646, p < 0.001) with the clinical severity of BPD than the chest radiographic score (r = 0.410, p = 0.007). The hyperaeration score showed better correlation (r = 0.738, p < 0.001) with the clinical severity of BPD than the parenchymal score (r = 0.523, p < 0.001). Conclusion We have developed a new HRCT scoring system for BPD based on the quantitative evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities of BPD consisting of the hyperaeration score and the parenchymal score. The HRCT score shows better correlation with the clinical severity of BPD than the radiographic score. PMID:23483104

Shin, Su-Mi; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Han Suk; Lee, Whal; Jung, Ah Young; Kim, In-One; Choi, Jung Hwan

2013-01-01

408

A method to quantitate the neutralizing capacity of anti-therapeutic protein antibodies in serum and their correlation to clinical impact.  

PubMed

A robust, quantitative method for assessing the neutralizing capacity of anti-therapeutic protein antibodies was developed and tested using 4 analytical assay platforms typically used for detection of anti-drug neutralizing antibodies. The method described here utilized titration of increasing concentrations of therapeutic protein into serum containing anti-therapeutic protein antibodies, either positive control antibodies or clinical samples. Neutralizing capacities were calculated by determining the EC50 from the titration curves. The neutralizing capacity of purified anti therapeutic protein antibodies was expressed in terms of "?g of drug neutralized per ?g of anti-TP antibody" present. In the case of serum originating from clinical study subjects, the neutralizing capacity of the samples was expressed as "?g of drug neutralized per mL of serum". A relative shift in EC50 values was observed as the amount of serum or antibody was changed resulting in a proportional shift of the calculated neutralizing capacity. Application of this approach using different assay platforms was consistent providing evidence for its potential to be a useful approach to characterize, qualify and compare neutralizing positive control antibody preparations or clinical samples. Using this methodology, we were able to draw a clear correlation between the neutralizing capacity and the effect of these antibodies on a clinical pharmacodynamic (PD) marker. Determination of the neutralizing capacity of antibody positive samples from subjects in a clinical study indicated direct correlation of pharmacodynamic results with non-response, partial response and response to high, mid and low neutralizing capacities respectively. PMID:25279937

Kaliyaperumal, Arunan; Pennucci, Jason; Nagatani, Janice; Juan, Gloria; Swanson, Steven; Gupta, Shalini

2015-01-01

409

Posing Einstein's Question: Questioning Einstein's Pose.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the events surrounding a famous picture of Albert Einstein in which he poses near a blackboard containing a tensor form of his 10 field equations for pure gravity with a question mark after it. Speculates as to the content of Einstein's lecture and the questions he might have had about the equation. (Contains over 30 references.) (WRM)

Topper, David; Vincent, Dwight E.

2000-01-01

410

Frequently Asked Questions: Questions About Paleontology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site asks and answers questions about paleontology, fossils and dinosaurs. Paleontology questions are: What is paleontology? How does paleontology differ from anthropology and archaeology? What are the practical uses of paleontology? How do paleontologists know how old their fossils are? What training is necessary to become a paleontologist? What organizations exist for paleontologists?

2007-01-01

411

QUESTIONS IN CHINESE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS ARTICLE, BASED ON A CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH AND CHINESE, IS DESIGNED TO BE USED IN THE PREPARATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FOR THE PRESENTATION OF QUESTIONS IN THE TEACHING OF CHINESE. QUESTIONS CAN BE CLASSIFIED INTO THREE CATEGORIES, ACCORDING TO THEIR FUNCTIONS--(1) PURE QUESTIONS, (2) RHETORICAL QUESTIONS, AND (3)…

TSAO, WEN YEN

412

Beak and feather disease virus: correlation between viral load and clinical signs in wild Cape parrots (Poicepahlus robustus) in South Africa.  

PubMed

Psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD), the most prevalent viral disease affecting psittacines, is caused by beak and feather disease virus (BFDV). This study assessed viral load using qPCR in a wild Cape parrot population affected by PBFD and compared it to overall physical condition based on clinical signs attributable to PBFD. A significant inverse correlation between viral load and overall physical condition was found, which confirmed that clinical signs may confidently be used to diagnose the relative severity of BFDV infections in wild populations. This is the first assessment of BFDV viral load in a wild psittacine population. PMID:25193072

Regnard, Guy L; Boyes, Rutledge S; Martin, Rowan O; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

2015-01-01

413

Frequently Asked Questions about Clinical Research  

MedlinePLUS

... National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) are developing advanced methods for studying the fundamental mechanisms of inherited ... the complex roles that multiple genes and environmental factors play in disease. Such studies will enable the ...

414

Rural Health Clinics Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... RHC rules is being modified such that RHCs will be required to follow state law or state regulatory requirements. If there is no ... or NP is practicing in accordance with state law/state regulatory mechanism you will have satisfied the new requirement. For further clarification ...

415

Get Answers to Common Questions About...  

Cancer.gov

Get Answers to Common Questions About... Biological Specimens Drug Availability, Labeling and Distribution Ethics Indemnity Insurance Planning Clinical Trials and Navigating Regulatory Requirements Protocols Quality Assurance and Monitoring Software

416

Information seeking during "bad news" oncology interactions: Question asking by patients and their companions.  

PubMed

Previous research has investigated patient question asking in clinical settings as a strategy of information seeking and as an indicator of the level of active patient participation in the interaction. This study investigates questions asked by patients and their companions during stressful encounters in the oncology setting in the USA. We transcribed all questions patients and companions asked the oncologist during 28 outpatient interactions in which "bad news" was discussed (n = 705) and analyzed them for frequency and topic. Additionally, we analyzed the extent to which personal and demographic characteristics and independently obtained ratings of the oncologist-patient/companion relationships were related to question asking. Findings demonstrated that at least one companion was present in 24 (86%) of the 28 interactions and companions asked significantly more questions than patients. The most frequently occurring topics for both patients and companions were treatment, diagnostic testing, diagnosis, and prognosis. In general, personal and demographic characteristics were unrelated to question asking, but older patients asked fewer questions, while more educated patients asked more questions. With regard to ratings of the quality of the dyadic relationships, results showed that "trust" between the physician and companions was positively correlated and "conversational dominance by physician" was negatively correlated with the frequency of companion questions. Additionally, positive ratings of the relationship between physicians and companions were correlated with fewer patient questions. This study demonstrates that companions are active participants in stressful oncology interactions. Future research and physician training in communication would benefit from expanding the focus beyond the patient-physician dyad to the roles and influence of multiple participants in medical interactions. PMID:16962218

Eggly, Susan; Penner, Louis A; Greene, Meredith; Harper, Felicity W K; Ruckdeschel, John C; Albrecht, Terrance L

2006-12-01

417

Correlation of LMP10 Expression and Clinical Outcome in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Positive and HPV-Negative Tonsillar and Base of Tongue Cancer  

PubMed Central

Aim To examine LMP10 expression and its possible impact on clinical outcome in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and HPV-negative tonsillar and base of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC and BOTSCC). Background Outcome is better in HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC compared to matching HPV-negative tumours, with roughly 80% vs. 40% 5-year disease free survival (DFS) with less aggressive treatment than today’s chemoradiotherapy. Since current treatment often results in harmful side effects, less intensive therapy, with sustained patient survival would be an attractive alternative. However, other markers together with HPV status are necessary to select patients and for this purpose LMP10 expression is investigated here in parallel to HPV status and clinical outcome. Materials and Methods From 385 patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 at the Karolinska University Hospital, 278 formalin fixed paraffin embedded TSCC and BOTSCC biopsies, with known HPV DNA status, were tested for LMP10 nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (fraction of positive cells and staining intensity). The data was then correlated to clinical outcome. Results An absent/low compared to a moderate/high LMP10 nuclear fraction of positive cells was correlated to a better 3-year DFS in the HPV-positive group of patients (log-rank p?=?0.005), but not in the HPV-negative group. In the HPV-negative group of patients, in contrast to the HPV-positive group, moderate/high LMP10 cytoplasmic fraction and weak/moderate/high LMP10 cytoplasmic intensity correlated to a better 3-year DFS (p?=?0.003 and p?=?0.001) and 3-year overall survival (p?=?0.001 and 0.009). Conclusion LMP10 nuclear expression in the HPV-positive group and LMP10 cytoplasmic expression in the HPV-negative group of patients correlated to better clinical outcome. PMID:24752327

Tertipis, Nikolaos; Haeggblom, Linnea; Nordfors, Cecilia; Grün, Nathalie; Näsman, Anders; Vlastos, Andrea

2014-01-01

418

MR imaging findings in the follow-up of patients with different stages of knee osteoarthritis and the correlation with clinical symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the rate of cartilage loss, the change in bone marrow edema pattern and internal joint derangement at 1.5-T MRI\\u000a in patients with knee osteoarthritis and to correlate these findings with the clinical Western Ontario and McMaster University\\u000a Osteoarthitis (WOMAC) score. Methods: Forty subjects (mean age 57.7±15 years; 16 females and 24 males) were recruited: 6 healthy volunteers

Catherine M. Phan; Thomas M. Link; Gabrielle Blumenkrantz; Timothy C. Dunn; Michael D. Ries; Lynne S. Steinbach; Sharmila Majumdar

2006-01-01

419

Interactions between adiponectin, visfatin, and omentin in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues and serum, and correlations with clinical and peripheral metabolic factors.  

PubMed

Adiponectin, visfatin, and omentin are adipokines involved in insulin sensitivity. This study aimed to determine interactions between these adipokines in subcutaneous and visceral fat and in serum, and their associations with clinical factors. Adiponectin was present at the highest levels in subcutaneous and visceral fat and serum. Subcutaneous adiponectin showed positive correlations with serum adiponectin and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). Serum adiponectin correlated positively with QUICKI and serum omentin-1 but negatively with body weight, BMI, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Subcutaneous omentin correlated positively with QUICKI but negatively with waist and hip circumferences. Serum omentin-1 correlated positively with QUICKI but negatively with body weight, BMI, waist and hip circumferences, weight gain, and HOMA-IR. Serum visfatin correlated positively with serum omentin-1 and negatively with weight gain. Serum peptide YY (PYY) levels were correlated positively with subcutaneous visfatin but negatively with visceral visfatin. Positive correlations were observed between subcutaneous expression of adiponectin, visfatin, and omentin and visceral expression of these genes. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that serum adiponectin was associated with BMI and QUICKI. Serum omentin-1 could be predicted from BMI, QUICKI, and weight gain. Weight gain, serum adiponectin, omentin-1, and DBP could be used to predict serum visfatin. In conclusion, adiponectin and omentin from subcutaneous fat displayed correlations with decreased obesity and increased insulin sensitivity while visfatin showed an association with serum PYY and weight gain. The expressions of these adipokines were correlated within each type of fat but not between different fat depots. PMID:25453978

Sitticharoon, Chantacha; Nway, Nay Chi; Chatree, Saimai; Churintaraphan, Malika; Boonpuan, Peerada; Maikaew, Pailin

2014-12-01

420

Provocative Questions new account request — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

421

Correlation of nodal mast cells with clinical outcome in dogs with mast cell tumour and a proposed classification system for the evaluation of node metastasis.  

PubMed

Lymph node metastasis in dogs with mast cell tumour has been reported as a negative prognostic indicator; however, no standardized histological criteria exist to define metastatic disease. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether different histological patterns of node-associated mast cells correlate with clinical outcome in dogs with mast cell tumour. A secondary goal was to propose a criteria-defined classification system for histological evaluation of lymph node metastasis. The Colorado State University Diagnostic Medicine Center database was searched for cases of canine mast cell tumours with reported lymph node metastasis or evidence of node-associated mast cells. Additional cases were obtained from a clinical trial involving sentinel lymph node mapping and node extirpation in dogs with mast cell neoplasia. Forty-one cases were identified for inclusion in the study. Demographic data, treatment and clinical outcome were collected for each case. Lymph nodes were classified according to a novel classification system (HN0-HN3) based on the number of, distribution of, and architectural disruption by, nodal mast cells. The findings of this study indicate that characterization of nodal mast cells as proposed by this novel classification system correlates with, and is prognostic for, clinical outcome in dogs with mast cell tumours. PMID:25172053

Weishaar, K M; Thamm, D H; Worley, D R; Kamstock, D A

2014-11-01

422

Workshops & Outcomes — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

The participants of the first Provocative Questions meeting supported the idea that the format of small workshops are a useful means to engage in conversations about questions that might stimulate innovative research on various aspects of cancer.

423

Correlation of Age and Severity of Clinical Manifestation Assessed by UPDRS in Patients with Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Aim: in older people with Parkinson's disease the symptoms are more expressed. Background: Essential change in Parkinson's disease is the impaired neurotransmission in basal ganglia. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is the most frequent type of Parkinsonism, being present in about 70% of the patients with Parkinsonism. Material and methods: This study has been prospective, clinically one, which has been lasting for whole 2 years. This study comprised a total of 32 subjects with clinically verified diagnosis for idiopathic Parkinson's disease, 18 men and 14 women (with mean age of 52,7 years). Control group consisted of 31 randomly selected, literally healthy persons, at similar age, with similar gender representation without clinical and anamnestic data for Parkinsonism and similar clinical entities. This study was made at the University Clinic of Neurology in Skopje, Medical Faculty, University “St. Cyril and Methodius”. The persons investigated had idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), in whom IPD was verified by means of detailed anamnesis, detailed clinical neurologic examination, strictly keeping to Brain Bank Criteria, and by means of neurophysiologic investigations, neuroimaging investigations and neuropsychologic investigations. Minimal symptoms of IPD after UPDRS were present in 34,4% of the examinees, there were 40,6% with slight signs, while equal number of the examinees 4 (12,5%) had pronounce and very expressed symptoms of Parkinson's disease after UPDRS. Conclusion: Parkinson's disease is with more expressed signs and symptoms and with slight symptoms in older patients with this diagnosis. PMID:24783912

Taravari, Arben; Medziti, Fatmir; Grunevska, Bojana; Adili, Fatlume; Ademi, Blerim; Miftari, Visar; Haliti, Gazmend

2014-01-01

424

Exam Question Exchange.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Acceptable answers are provided for two chemistry questions. The first question is related to the prediction of the appearance of non-first-order proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The second question is related to extraterrestrial kinetic theory of gases. (JN)

Alexander, John J., Ed.

1983-01-01

425

Improving Student Question Classification  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This paper analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the natural…

Heiner, Cecily; Zachary, Joseph L.

2009-01-01

426

Questions for Surveys  

PubMed Central

We begin with a look back at the field to identify themes of recent research that we expect to continue to occupy researchers in the future. As part of this overview, we characterize the themes and topics examined in research about measurement and survey questions published in Public Opinion Quarterly in the past decade. We then characterize the field more broadly by highlighting topics that we expect to continue or to grow in importance, including the relationship between survey questions and the total survey error perspective, cognitive versus interactional approaches, interviewing practices, mode and technology, visual aspects of question design, and culture. Considering avenues for future research, we advocate for a decision-oriented framework for thinking about survey questions and their characteristics. The approach we propose distinguishes among various aspects of question characteristics, including question topic, question type and response dimension, conceptualization and operationalization of the target object, question structure, question form, response categories, question implementation, and question wording. Thinking about question characteristics more systematically would allow study designs to take into account relationships among these characteristics and identify gaps in current knowledge. PMID:24970951

Schaeffer, Nora Cate; Dykema, Jennifer

2011-01-01

427

Community Dialog — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

View all of the questions that have been submitted and see how they have been evaluated by peers. Submit your own evaluation of a submitted question, or leave a comment about a question (commenting requires log in or creation of your own PQ account).

428

Student Questioning Educational Outreach  

E-print Network

Student Questioning Educational Outreach Dr. Dan Steinberg Kimberly Carroll #12;What is PUMA? 19 of discussing why questioning is important, how research classes(like PUMA) differ from previous science classes the development of high school students questions(PUMA) using our own rubric Teach the students the importance

Petta, Jason

429

Variation in cross-correlation as a discriminator for microvessel imaging using clinical intravascular optical coherence tomography systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cross-correlation of Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography (IV-OCT) images is affected by image distortion due to the non-uniform rotational velocity of the imaging catheter. It results in non-representative cross-correlation maps such that for a static scan, the coefficients fluctuate from high to low correlation values. The variation in cross-correlation at flow locations is muted, in comparison to stationary regions. In the present study, the variation of correlation values and its standard deviation (SD) is used to suppress the distortion related noise effects and to extract flow maps from static scan images. The standard deviation of the cross-correlation variation can distinguish flow locations from the surrounding tissue region. The advantage of this technique is its ability to identify slow flow, even Brownian flow, in the presence of motion artifacts. The SD mask used for generating flow maps, is optimized using tissue mimicking phantoms. Finally, the ability of this technique to suppress noise and capture flow maps is demonstrated by imaging microflow through excised porcine coronary artery wall and mucosa membrane imaging.

Joseph, Shiju; Rousseau, Clément; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin; Adlam, David

2014-03-01

430

Circulating levels of miR-146a and IL-17 are significantly correlated with the clinical activity of Graves' ophthalmopathy.  

PubMed

Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is a common autoimmune disease that is difficult to deal with due to limited clinical evaluation methods. Recently miR-146a and Interleukin-17 (IL-17) have been found to be involved in autoimmune disorders and correlated with disease activity. However, it is unclear whether they are involved in Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation of circulating levels of miR-146a and IL-17 with clinical activity in GO patients. Fifty-seven study subjects were enrolled in four groups according to the corresponding criteria: active-GO, inactive-GO, Graves disease (GD) without ophthalmopathy, and healthy control group. The circulating levels of miR-146a and IL-17 were determined by qRT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Serum IL-17 levels of GD, inactive-GO, and active-GO groups were all significantly higher than that of control (all P < 0.001). Active-GO group had significantly higher IL-17 level than inactive-GO and GD groups (P = 0.024 and P = 0.001, respectively). Active-GO and inactive-GO group had significantly lower miR-146a expressions than control (P < 0.05). Active-GO group had significantly lower miR-146a than inactive-GO group (P < 0.05). Serum levels of IL-17 and miR-146a were both significantly correlated with clinical activity score (CAS) in GO patients (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively). There was a significant negative correlation of circulating miR-146a expression with serum IL-17 levels (P < 0.01). These findings indicated that circulating levels of miR-146a and IL-17 may be potential biomarkers of active GO, and may play a key role in the progression of GO. PMID:25100151

Wei, Hongfa; Guan, Meiping; Qin, Yan; Xie, Cuihua; Fu, Xiajun; Gao, Fang; Xue, Yaoming

2014-11-28

431

Clinical correlates of maltreatment and traumatic experiences in childhood and adolescence among predominantly African American, socially disadvantaged, hospitalized, first-episode psychosis patients.  

PubMed

Associations among maltreatment and traumatic experiences in childhood and adolescence, later substance use, and subsequent mental health outcomes for individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders have been initially explored in previous studies; however, research on these factors in socially disadvantaged patients with first-episode psychosis is unavailable. This exploratory, correlational analysis examined associations between maltreatment and trauma-related variables (e.g., traumatic experiences, parental harsh discipline, violence exposure) and: social variables (years of education attained and extent of Axis IV psychosocial problems at initial hospitalization), substance abuse (age at initiation of alcohol and cannabis use, as well as estimates of lifetime intake of both), and positive and negative symptom severity. Rates of childhood abuse and traumatic events were remarkably high in the sample. Years of educational attainment and number of Axis IV psychosocial problems were substantially correlated with several domains of childhood abuse/traumatic events. Age at initiation of alcohol and cannabis use, and lifetime alcohol and cannabis intake, were correlated with a number of trauma domains. Whereas positive symptom severity was correlated with four of the trauma variables, negative symptom severity was correlated only with prior emotional neglect. These results provide insights into the relations among childhood traumatic events, substance use, and clinical features of first-episode psychosis, creating hypotheses for future research. PMID:21665293

Ramsay, Claire E; Flanagan, Peggy; Gantt, Stephanie; Broussard, Beth; Compton, Michael T

2011-08-15

432

Clinical correlates of maltreatment and traumatic experiences in childhood and adolescence among predominantly African American, socially disadvantaged, hospitalized, first-episode psychosis patients  

PubMed Central

Associations among maltreatment and traumatic experiences in childhood and adolescence, later substance use, and subsequent mental health outcomes for individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders have been initially explored in previous studies; however, research on these factors in socially disadvantaged patients with first-episode psychosis is unavailable. This exploratory, correlational analysis examined associations between maltreatment and trauma-related variables (e.g., traumatic experiences, parental harsh discipline, violence exposure) and: social variables (years of education attained and extent of Axis IV psychosocial problems at initial hospitalization), substance abuse (age at initiation of alcohol and cannabis use, as well as estimates of lifetime intake of both), and positive and negative symptom severity. Rates of childhood abuse and traumatic events were remarkably high in the sample. Years of educational attainment and number of Axis IV psychosocial problems were substantially correlated with several domains of childhood abuse/traumatic events. Age at initiation of alcohol and cannabis use, and lifetime alcohol and cannabis intake, were correlated with a number of trauma domains. Whereas positive symptom severity was correlated with four of the trauma variables, negative symptom severity was correlated only with prior emotional neglect. These results provide insights into the relations among childhood traumatic events, substance use, and clinical features of first-episode psychosis, creating hypotheses for future research. PMID:21665293

Ramsay, Claire E.; Flanagan, Peggy; Gantt, Stephanie; Broussard, Beth; Compton, Michael T.

2011-01-01

433

Profiling the Prognosis of Gastric Cancer Patients: Is It Worth Correlating the Survival with the Clinical/Pathological and Molecular Features of Gastric Cancers?  

PubMed Central

Background. The prognosis of gastric cancer patients still remains poor. The aim of this study was investigating the prognostic value of several clinical/pathological/molecular features in a consecutive series of gastric cancers. Methods. 150 R0 gastrectomies plus 77 gastric cancer patients evaluated for the HER2 overexpression were selected. Survival was calculated and patients stratified according to the stage, the T-stage, the LNRs, the LNH, and the HER2 scoring system. ROC curves were calculated in order to compare the performance of the LRN and LNH systems. Results. Prognosis correlated with the stage and with the T-stage. We documented a statistical correlation between the LNRs and the survival. Conversely, a LNH > 15 did not correlate with the outcomes. The ROC curves documented a significant performance of the LRN system, whereas a statistical correlation was documented for the LNH exclusively with the endpoint of disease-free survival. We documented a trend of worse prognosis for patients with an HER2 overexpression, even though it was not of statistical value. Conclusion. The LNR and the evaluation of the HER2 overexpression might be useful since they correlate with survival, might identify patients with a higher risk of recurrence, and might select patients for a tailored medical treatment. PMID:24453810

Mercantini, Paolo; Ferri, Mario; La Torre, Marco; Sparagna, Alessandra; Balducci, Genoveffa; Romiti, Adriana; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Ziparo, Vincenzo

2013-01-01

434

Serum concentrations of thyroid hormones, cholesterol and triglyceride, and their correlations together in clinically healthy camels (Camelus dromedarius): Effects of season, sex and age  

PubMed Central

To evaluate the effects of season, sex and age on serum concentrations of thyroid hormones, cholesterol and triglyceride, and their correlations together in dromedarian camels, these parameters were measured in 180 clinically healthy dromedary camels. No significant difference was detected for the measured serum parameters between the two sexes and among the different age groups of camels and none of them had significant correlation with the age of the animals. There was a significant correlation between serum T4 and triglyceride (r = -0.243, p = 0.002). There were significant differences between summer and winter seasons in the serum concentrations of T4 (p < 0.001), T3 (p = 0.01) and triglyceride (p < 0.001). In winter, the serum concentration of triglyceride had a significant correlation with the age of the sampled camels (r = -0.235, p = 0.026). In male camels,T4 had a marginally significant correlation with cholesterol (r= -0.158, p = 0.06).The effects of season, sex and age on the serum concentrations and relationships between thyroid hormones, cholesterol and triglyceride in dromedary camels can be proposed as the probable causes of the controversial findings in the previous studies.

Tajik, Javad; Sazmand, Alireza; Hekmati moghaddam, Seyedhossein; Rasooli, Aria

2013-01-01

435

An overview of international literature from cystic fibrosis registries. Part 3. Disease incidence, genotype/phenotype correlation, microbiology, pregnancy, clinical complications, lung transplantation, and miscellanea.  

PubMed

This is the third article related to a review of the literature based on data from national cystic fibrosis (CF) patient registries up to June 2008 and covering a total of 115 published studies. It focuses on several topics: CF incidence, genotype/phenotype correlation, microbiology, pregnancy/paternity, clinical complications, lung transplantation, and others. Seventy seven papers meeting the inclusion criteria were found to be related to the topics listed above. Another seven studies, already evaluated in previous papers of this series, were recalled for specific topics. Incidence is described by several studies, results being quite different from one country to another and quite inhomogeneous among regions within the same country. Studies on genetics address the genotype/phenotype correlation and look for a predictive value of CFTR mutations in terms of clinical outcome, with controversial results. Papers on microbiology describe the clinical relevance of different pathogens and their role in the progress of CF lung disease. A few articles give information on the features of CF women undergoing a pregnancy and try to identify the ones associated with a better outcome. Studies on clinical complications discuss prevalence and the role of haemoptysis, pneumothorax, CF related diabetes, ABPA and cancer. Papers on lung transplantation focus on models able to improve the selection criteria for transplantation candidates and the factors linked to post transplantation survival. Finally, several studies deal with a number of interesting topics related to CF epidemiology: clinical trial methodology, quality of care comparison among countries and centers, relationship between diagnosis and age/gender, and evaluation of pharmacological therapy. On the whole, CF Registries have already contributed to important advances in the knowledge of the natural history of CF, establishing the foundations for future improvement in CF research and care. PMID:21257352

Salvatore, Donatello; Buzzetti, Roberto; Baldo, Ermanno; Forneris, Maria Pia; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Manunza, Daniela; Marinelli, Italo; Messore, Barbara; Neri, Anna Silvia; Raia, Valeria; Furnari, Maria Lucia; Mastella, Gianni

2011-03-01

436

Proposed Provocative Questions for the Indian PQ Workshops — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

To stimulate wider participation in the Provocative Questions Initiative, scientists may pose their own Provocative Questions (Indian "Pose a Question" link) on this website or comment on questions submitted online (Indian "Questions Submitted Online" link) from the research community.

437

Mapping ventricular expansion and its clinical correlates in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment using multi-atlas fluid image alignment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed an automated analysis pipeline to analyze 3D changes in ventricular morphology; it provides a highly sensitive quantitative marker of Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression for MRI studies. In the ADNI image database, we created expert delineations of the ventricles, as parametric surface meshes, in 6 brain MRI scans. These 6 images and their embedded surfaces were fluidly registered to MRI scans of 80 AD patients, 80 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 80 healthy controls. Surface averaging within subjects greatly reduced segmentation error. Surface-based statistical maps revealed powerful correlations between surface morphology at baseline and (1) diagnosis, (2) cognitive performance (MMSE scores), (3) depression, and (4) predicted future decline, over a 1 year interval, in 3 standard clinical scores (MMSE, global and sum-of-boxes CDR). We used a false discovery rate method (FDR) method based on cumulative probability plots to find that 40 subjects were sufficient to discriminate AD from normal groups. 60 and 119 subjects, respectively, were required to correlate ventricular enlargement with MMSE and clinical depression. Surface-based FDR, along with multi-atlas fluid registration to reduce segmentation error, will allow researchers to (1) estimate sample sizes with adequate power to detect groups differences, and (2) compare the power of mapping methods head-to-head, optimizing cost-effectiveness for future clinical trials.

Chou, Yi-Yu; Lepore, Natasha; Avedissian, Christina; Madsen, Sarah K.; Hua, Xue; Jack, Clifford R., Jr.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

2009-02-01

438

Boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma-correlation between radiation dose and radiation injury and clinical outcome  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and clinical outcome of sodium borocaptate-based intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy in patients with malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: The first protocol (P1998, n = 8) prescribed a maximal gross tumor volume (GTV) dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a dose-escalated protocol was introduced (P2001, n 11), which prescribed a maximal vascular volume dose of 15 Gy or, alternatively, a clinical target volume (CTV) dose of 18 Gy. Results: The GTV and CTV doses in P2001 were 1.1-1.3 times greater than those in P1998. The maximal vascular volume dose of those with acute radiation injury was 15.8 Gy. The mean GTV and CTV dose in long-term survivors with glioblastoma was 26.4 and 16.5 Gy, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between the GTV dose and median survival time was found. In the 11 glioblastoma patients in P2001, the median survival time was 19.5 months and 1- and 2-year survival rate was 60.6% and 37.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose escalation contributed to the improvement in clinical outcome. To avoid radiation injury, the maximal vascular volume dose should be <12 Gy. For long-term survival in patients with glioblastoma after boron neutron capture therapy, the optimal mean dose of the GTV and CTV was 26 and 16 Gy, respectively.

Kageji, Teruyoshi [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan)]. E-mail: kageji@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Nagahiro, Shinji [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Matsuzaki, Kazuhito [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Toi, Hiroyuki [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Nakagawa, Yoshinobu [Department of Neurosurgery, National Kagawa Children's Hospital, Kagawa (Japan); Kumada, Hiroaki [Department of Research Reactor, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaragi (Japan)

2006-08-01

439

Evidence of Bacterial Biofilms among Infected and Hypertrophied Tonsils in Correlation with the Microbiology, Histopathology, and Clinical Symptoms of Tonsillar Diseases  

PubMed Central

Diseases of the tonsils are becoming more resistant to antibiotics due to the persistence of bacteria through the formation of biofilms. Therefore, understanding the microbiology and pathophysiology of such diseases represent an important step in the management of biofilm-related infections. We have isolated the microorganisms, evaluated their antimicrobial susceptibility, and detected the presence of bacterial biofilms in tonsillar specimens in correlation with the clinical manifestations of tonsillar diseases. Therefore, a total of 140 palatine tonsils were collected from 70 patients undergoing tonsillectomy at University Malaya Medical Centre. The most recovered isolate was Staphylococcus aureus (39.65%) followed by Haemophilus influenzae (18.53%). There was high susceptibility against all selected antibiotics except for cotrimoxazole. Bacterial biofilms were detected in 60% of patients and a significant percentage of patients demonstrated infection manifestation rather than obstruction. In addition, an association between clinical symptoms like snore, apnea, nasal obstruction, and tonsillar hypertrophy was found to be related to the microbiology of tonsils particularly to the presence of biofilms. In conclusion, evidence of biofilms in tonsils in correlation with the demonstrated clinical symptoms explains the recalcitrant nature of tonsillar diseases and highlights the importance of biofilm's early detection and prevention towards better therapeutic management of biofilm-related infections. PMID:24454384

Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Dhabaan, Ghulam N.

2013-01-01

440

Empirical Correlates of Low Scores on MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales in a Sample of University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the present study, the authors explored the meaning of low scores on the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical (RC) scales. Using responses of a sample of university students (N = 811), the authors examined whether low (T less than 39), within-normal-limits (T = 39-64), and high (T greater than 65) score levels on the RC scales are…

Avdeyeva, Tatyana V.; Tellegen, Auke; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

2012-01-01