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Sample records for corrosion resistant ceramic

  1. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  2. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  3. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  4. Corrosion-resistant ceramic thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two-layer thermal barrier coating, consisting of metal-CrA1Y bond coating and calcium silicate ceramic outer layer, greatly improves resistance of turbine parts to hot corrosion from fuel and air impurities. Both layers can be plasma sprayed, and ceramic layer may be polished to reduce frictional losses. Ceramic provides thermal barrier, so parts operate cooler metal temperatures, coolant flow can be reduced, or gas temperatures increased. Lower grade fuels also can be used.

  5. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  6. Corrosion resistant refractory ceramics for slagging gasifier environment

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedovski, E.; Chinn, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle power systems are the most efficient and economical power generation systems with a relatively low environmental impact. The gasification process requires the optimal design of gasifiers with extremely corrosion resistant refractory lining. The majority of the refractory materials tested for gasifier lining applications cannot resist the action of slagging corrosive environment combined with high operation temperatures as high as 1600?C and possible thermal shocks and thermal expansion mismatch between the lining and the slag. Silicon carbide-based ceramics and some zirconia- and zircon-based ceramics manufactured by Ceramic Protection Corporation (CPC) have been tested in a simulated coal-fired slagging gasifier environment at a temperature of 1500?C. Crucible ceramic samples have been examined after exposure to the slag at high temperature. Microstructure studies of the ceramic zone contacted with the slag have been carried out. The highest performance, i.e. the absence of corrosion damage and thermal cracking after testing, was observed for silicon carbide-based ceramics ABSC formed by silicon carbide grains with an optimized particle size distribution bonded by the aluminosilicate crystalline-glassy matrix. Dense zirconia and alumina-zirconia and slightly porous zircon ceramics demonstrated comparatively lower performance due to their lower corrosion resistance and greater thermal cracking. ABSC ceramics can be manufactured as thick-walled large components and may be considered as a promising material for gasifier refractory applications. Similar ceramics, but with finer grain sizes, may also be recommended for thermocouple protection.

  7. High temperature, low expansion, corrosion resistant ceramic and gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Rauch, Sr., Harry W.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention relates to ZrO.sub.2 -MgO-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 ceramic materials having improved thermal stability and corrosion resistant properties. The utilization of these ceramic materials as heat exchangers for gas turbine engines is also disclosed.

  8. Method for preparing corrosion-resistant ceramic shapes

    DOEpatents

    Arons, R.M.; Dusek, J.T.

    1979-12-07

    Ceramic shapes having impermeable tungsten coatings can be used for containing highly corrosive molten alloys and salts. The shapes are prepared by coating damp green ceramic shapes containing a small amount of yttria with a tungsten coating slip which has been adjusted to match the shrinkage rate of the green ceramic and which will fire to a theoretical density of at least 80% to provide an impermeable coating.

  9. Method for preparing corrosion-resistant ceramic shapes

    DOEpatents

    Arons, Richard M.; Dusek, Joseph T.

    1983-09-13

    Ceramic shapes having impermeable tungsten coatings can be used for containing highly corrosive molten alloys and salts. The shapes are prepared by coating damp green ceramic shapes containing a small amount of yttria with a tungsten coating slip which has been adjusted to match the shrinkage rate of the green ceramic and which will fire to a theoretical density of at least 80% to provide a impermeable coating.

  10. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings with improved corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, J.T.; Courtright, E.L.

    1987-02-01

    A method for limiting the ingress of corrosive species into physical vapor deposited zirconia thermal barrier coatings by inserting dense ceramic sealing layers into the usual columnar (segmented) ceramic microstructure has been examined. The concept was evaluated by sputtering a series of ZrO/sub 2/-2OY/sub 2/O/sub 3/ deposits onto In792 substrates coated with a CoCrAlY bondlayer.

  11. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  12. Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

    2004-03-31

    Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

  13. Ion Implanted Nanolayers in Alloys and Ceramic Coatings for Improved Resistance to High-Temperature Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Z.; Szymczyk, W.; Piekoszewski, J.

    Ion implantation effects on resistance of alloys and ceramic coatings to the high-temperature corrosion have been reviewed. The most significant results on implantation of reactive elements (Y, La, Ce and other rare earth elements) into alloys and aluminum, boron, silicon, tantalum, and titanium into ceramic coatings have been cited. Ion implantation affects not only the oxide growth rate, but also seems to modify the growth mechanism and the oxide structure.

  14. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing condition by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Kato, T.; Hanada, K.; Koizumi, T.; Aose, S.

    2005-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas. In addition, the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides on ceramics corrosion were evaluated in that condition. Most of ceramic oxides showed good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride from thermodynamic calculation results. On the other hand, from corrosion test result, silicon nitride, mullite (Al6Si2O13) and cordierite (Mg2Al3(AlSi5O18)) have a good corrosion resistance which is corresponding to 0.1 mm/y or less. No cracks on the materials were observed and flexural strength did not drop remarkably after 480 h corrosion testing in molten salt under Cl2 O2 atmosphere.

  15. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; Lee, Woo Y.

    1997-01-01

    A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

  16. Polyurethane/polysiloxane ceramer coatings: Corrosion resistant unicoat system for aircraft application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Hai

    New organic/inorganic ceramer coating system was developed using polyurethane as an organic phase and polysiloxane as the inorganic phase. The objective of the study was to develop a unicoat corrosion resistant coating which strongly adheres to aluminum substrates. The pre-ceramic silicon-oxo clusters react with the metal substrate, protecting it from oxidation, whereas the organic composition functions as a binder providing mechanical properties, optical properties, and chemical, wear and fluid resistance. The new ceramer coatings were evaluated as a replacement for chromate based coatings. The alkoxysilane-functionalized coupling agent was prepared from hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) isocyanurate and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The functionalized isocyanurate was characterized by 1H, 13C and 29Si NMR and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. An organic/inorganic hybrid coating system was formulated using the alkoxysilane-functionalized isocyanurate and HDI isocyanurate. The coating properties indicated that alkoxysilane-functionalized isocyanurate enhanced adhesion up to 500%. Based on the hybrid polyurea/alkoxysilane system, the polyurea/polysiloxane ceramer coating system was formulated with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) oligomers. Evaluation of ceramer coatings showed that coating properties were affected by both the concentration of TEOS oligomers and alkoxysilane functionalized isocyanurate. In addition, the para-toluene sulfonic acid was used to catalyze the moisture curing process for the ceramer coating system. The addition of acid catalyst further increased the adhesion. A series of high solids cycloaliphatic polyesters were synthesized to improve the UV-resistance for the organic/inorganic unicoat system. The polyurethane/polysiloxane ceramer coatings were formulated with the addition of the cycloaliphatic polyesters into the polyurea/polysiloxane system. The investigation of the polyurethane ceramer coatings indicated that the film

  17. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

    1997-09-30

    A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

  18. Corrosion resistance and durability of siloxane ceramic/polymer films for aluminum alloys in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusada, Kentaro

    The objective of this study is to evaluate corrosion resistance and durability of siloxane ceramic/polymer films for aluminum alloys in marine environments. Al5052-H3 and Al6061-T6 were selected as substrates, and HCLCoat11 and HCLCoat13 developed in the Hawaii Corrosion Laboratory were selected for the siloxane ceramic/polymer coatings. The HCLCoat11 is a quasi-ceramic coating that has little to no hydrocarbons in its structure. The HCLCoat13 is formulated to incorporate more hydrocarbons to improve adhesion to substrate surfaces with less active functionalities. In this study, two major corrosion evaluation methods were used, which were the polarization test and the immersion test. The polarization tests provided theoretical corrosion rates (mg/dm 2/day) of bare, HCLCoat11-coated, and HCLCoat13-coated aluminum alloys in aerated 3.15wt% sodium chloride solution. From these results, the HCLCoat13-coated Al5052-H3 was found to have the lowest corrosion rate which was 0.073mdd. The next lowest corrosion rate was 0.166mdd of the HCLCoat11-coated Al5052-H3. Corrosion initiation was found to occur at preexisting breaches (pores) in the films by optical microscopy and SEM analysis. The HCLCoat11 film had many preexisting breaches of 1-2microm in diameter, while the HCLCoat13 film had much fewer preexisting breaches of less than 1microm in diameter. However, the immersion tests showed that the seawater immersion made HCLCoat13 film break away while the HCLCoat11 film did not apparently degrade, indicating that the HCLCoat11 film is more durable against seawater than the HCLCoat13. Raman spectroscopy revealed that there was some degradation of HCLCoat11 and HCLCoat13. For the HCLCoat11 film, the structure relaxation of Si-O-Si linkages was observed. On the other hand, seawater generated C-H-S bonds in the HCLCoat13 film resulting in the degradation of the film. In addition, it was found that the HCLCoat11 coating had anti-fouling properties due to its high water contact

  19. Corrosion Resistant Ceramic Coating for X80 Pipeline Steel by Low-Temperature Pack Aluminizing and Oxidation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Huang; Qian-Gang, Fu; Yu, Wang; Wen-Wu, Zhong

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the formation of ceramic coatings by a combined processing of low-temperature pack aluminizing and oxidation treatment on the surface of X80 pipeline steel substrates in order to improve the corrosion resistance ability of X80 pipeline steel. First, Fe-Al coating consisting of FeAl3 and Fe2Al5 was prepared by a low-temperature pack aluminizing at 803 K which was fulfilled by adding zinc in the pack powder. Pre-treatment of X80 pipeline steel was carried out through surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). Further oxidation treatment of as-aluminized sample was carried out in the CVD reactor at 833 K under oxygen containing atmosphere. After 1 h duration in these conditions, ceramic coating consisting of α-Al2O3 was formed by in situ oxidation reaction of Fe-Al coating. Those coatings have been characterized by different techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS), respectively. Ceramic coating shows a dense and uniform microstructure, and exhibits good coherences with X80 pipeline steel substrates. By electrochemical corrosion test, the self-corrosion current density of X80 pipeline steel with as-obtained ceramics coating in 3.5% NaCl solution shows an obvious decrease. The formation of α-Al2O3 ceramic coating is considered as the main reason for the corrosion resistance improvement of X80 pipeline steel.

  20. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  1. Silicon nitride: A ceramic material with outstanding resistance to thermal shock and corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, K. H.; Saure, F.

    1983-01-01

    The known physical, mechanical and chemical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride are summarized. This material deserves interest especially because of its unusually good resistance to thermal shock and corrosion at high temperatures. Two types are distinguished: reaction-sintered (porous) and hot-pressed (dense) Si3N4. Only the reaction-sintered material which is being produced today in large scale as crucibles, pipes, nozzles and tiles is considered.

  2. Coatings for improved corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1992-05-01

    Several coating approaches are being developed to resist attack in coal-fired environments and thereby minimize corrosion of underlying substrate alloys and extend the time for onset of breakaway corrosion. In general, coating systems can be classified as either diffusion or overlay type, which are distinguished principally by the method of deposition and the structure of the resultant coating-substrate bond. The coating techniques examined are pack cementation, electrospark deposition, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spray, and ion implantation. In addition, ceramic coatings are used in some applications.

  3. Corrosion Issues for Ceramics in Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Nickel, Klaus G.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements for hot-gas-path materials in gas turbine engines are demanding. These materials must maintain high strength and creep resistance in a particularly aggressive environment. A typical gas turbine environment involves high temperatures, rapid gas flow rates, high pressures, and a complex mixture of aggressive gases. Over the past forty years, a wealth of information on the behavior of ceramic materials in heat engine environments has been obtained. In the first part of the talk we summarize the behavior of monolithic SiC and Si3N4. These materials show excellent baseline behavior in clean, oxygen environments. However the aggressive components in a heat engine environment such as water vapor and salt deposits can be quite degrading. In the second part of the talk we discuss SiC-based composites. The critical issue with these materials is oxidation of the fiber coating. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions in ceramic corrosion research.

  4. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  5. Oxidation and Corrosion of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Lee, Kang N.

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites are candidates for numerous applications in high temperature environments with aggressive gases and possible corrosive deposits. There is a growing realization that high temperature oxidation and corrosion issues must be considered. There are many facets to these studies, which have been extensively covered in some recent reviews. The focus of this paper is on current research, over the past two years. In the authors' view, the most important oxidation and corrosion studies have focused on four major areas during this time frame. These are; (I) Oxidation of precursor-based ceramics; (II) Studies of the interphase material in ceramic matrix composites; (III) Water vapor interactions with ceramics, particularly in combustion environments; and (IV) Development of refractory oxide coatings for silicon-based ceramics. In this paper, we shall explore the most current work in each of these areas.

  6. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  7. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.T.; Hovis, V.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Pullen, W.C.

    1983-05-31

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  8. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  9. Influence of heat treatment on bond strength and corrosion resistance of sol-gel derived bioglass-ceramic coatings on magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sibo; Cai, Shu; Xu, Guohua; Zhao, Huan; Niu, Shuxin; Zhang, Ruiyue

    2015-05-01

    In this study, bioglass-ceramic coatings were prepared on magnesium alloy substrates through sol-gel dip-coating route followed by heat treatment at the temperature range of 350-500°C. Structure evolution, bond strength and corrosion resistance of samples were studied. It was shown that increasing heat treatment temperature resulted in denser coating structure as well as increased interfacial residual stress. A failure mode transition from cohesive to adhesive combined with a maximum on the measured bond strength together suggested that heat treatment enhanced the cohesion strength of coating on the one hand, while deteriorated the adhesion strength of coating/substrate on the other, thus leading to the highest bond strength of 27.0MPa for the sample heat-treated at 450°C. This sample also exhibited the best corrosion resistance. Electrochemical tests revealed that relative dense coating matrix and good interfacial adhesion can effectively retard the penetration of simulated body fluid through the coating, thus providing excellent protection for the underlying magnesium alloy. PMID:25728582

  10. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  11. Corrosion Issues for Ceramics in Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Fox, Dennis S.; Smialek, James L.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; More, Karren L.; Nickel, Klaus G.; Hirata, Takehiko; Yoshida, Makoto; Yuri, Isao

    2000-01-01

    The requirements for hot-gas-path materials in gas turbine engines are demanding. These materials must maintain high strength and creep resistance in a particularly aggressive environment. A typical gas turbine environment involves high temperatures, rapid gas flow rates, high pressures, and a complex mixture of aggressive gases. Figure 26.1 illustrates the requirements for components of an aircraft engine and critical issues [1]. Currently, heat engines are constructed of metal alloys, which meet these requirements within strict temperature limits. In order to extend these temperature limits, ceramic materials have been considered as potential engine materials, due to their high melting points and stability at high temperatures. These materials include oxides, carbides, borides, and nitrides. Interest in using these materials in engines appears to have begun in the 1940s with BeO-based porcelains [2]. During the 1950s, the efforts shifted to cermets. These were carbide-based materials intended to exploit the best properties of metals and ceramics. During the 1960s and 1970s, the silicon-based ceramics silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) were extensively developed. Although the desirable high-temperature properties of SiC and Si3N4 had long been known, consolidation of powders into component-sized bodies required the development of a series of specialized processing routes [3]. For SiC, the major consolidation routes are reaction bonding, hot-pressing, and sintering. The use of boron and carbon as additives which enable sintering was a particularly noteworthy advance [4]. For Si3N4 the major consolidation routes are reaction bonding and hot pressing [5]. Reaction-bonding involves nitridation of silicon powder. Hot pressing involves addition of various refractory oxides, such as magnesia (MgO), alumina (Al2O3), and yttria (y2O3). Variations on these processes include a number of routes including Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), gas-pressure sintering

  12. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K.; Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  13. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K. NY); Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2011-06-07

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  14. Preparation of ceramic coating on Ti substrate by plasma electrolytic oxidation in different electrolytes and evaluation of its corrosion resistance: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokouhfar, M.; Dehghanian, C.; Montazeri, M.; Baradaran, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to discuss the growth characteristics and corrosion behavior of the prepared ceramic coatings on titanium by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique in different electrolytes. PEO process was carried out on titanium under constant voltage regime using a pulse power supply. Three kinds of electrolytes, phosphate, silicate and borate based solutions, were used to evaluate the influence of electrolyte composition on the structure, surface morphology, phase composition and corrosion behavior of prepared ceramic oxide films (titania). The phase composition of the coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to evaluate the growth and surface morphology of coatings. Elements of coatings were investigated with energy dispersive spectrometer. Corrosion behavior of the coatings was also examined by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The spark voltage of oxide films had a significant effect on the surface morphology, size and homogeneity of micro-pores, thickness and corrosion properties of coatings.

  15. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  16. Ceramic corrosion/erosion project description

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

    1981-02-01

    As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in a Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. Objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating with a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two facilities are designed and installed to burn a varying low-Btu coal-derived gas in a controlled manner. This report contains the objectives and testing philosophy as well as the operating, specimen handling, and emergency procedures for the facilities. The facilities were checked out in August/September 1980. Testing is scheduled to begin in late 1980 with completion of 1000 hours of ceramic materials exposure to be completed by early 1981. Most of the enclosed is an update of two METC Information Releases (IR), i.e., IR 442 (1979) Test Plan for Ceramic Corrosion/Erosion Project, and IR 817 (1980) Ceramic Corrosion/Erosion Project Description.

  17. Corrosion resistant coatings for SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Thierry; Shaokai Yang; J.J. Brown

    1998-09-01

    It is the goal of this program to (1) develop coatings for SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} that will enhance their performance as heat exchangers under coal combustion conditions and (2) to conduct an in-depth evaluation of the cause and severity of ceramic heat exchanger deterioration and failure under coal combustion conditions.

  18. Novel High Strength Ceria-Zirconia Toughened Alumina Ceramic with Superior High Temperature Corrosion and Erosion Resistance. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Giulio, R.; Butcher, K.

    2004-01-13

    Composite CeTZP/A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} (CeZTA) foams were developed and tested to determine their suitability as particulate filters in hot gaseous conditions generated by coal combustion in electric power plants. Exposure to these extreme corrosive conditions did not cause significant degradation in strength. Superior properties of these foams suggests they could be used for a variety of applications in environment, energy and chemical fields.

  19. Hot corrosion of ceramic engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Smialek, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of commercially available SiC and Si3N4 materials were exposed to 1000 C in a high velocity, pressurized burner rig as a simulation of a turbine engine environment. Sodium impurities added to the burner flame resulted in molten Na2SO4 deposition, attack of the SiC and Si4N4 and formation of substantial Na2O-x(SiO2) corrosion product. Room temperature strength of the materials decreased. This was a result of the formation of corrosion pits in SiC, and grain boundary dissolution and pitting in Si3N4. Corrosion regimes for such Si-based ceramics have been predicted using thermodynamics and verified in rig tests of SiO2 coupons. Protective mullite coatings are being investigated as a solution to the corrosion problem for SiC and Si3N4. Limited corrosion occurred to cordierite (Mg2Al4Si5O18) but some cracking of the substrate occurred.

  20. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  1. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  2. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  3. Corrosion resistant filter unit

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, J.M.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a fluid filter assembly adapted for the filtration of corrosive fluid to be injected into a well bore at pressure levels which may exceed 10,000 pounds per square. It comprises: a frame assembly for the mounting of a portion of the fluid filter assembly therein, the frame assembly; filter pods, the plurality of filter pods forming at least two banks of filter pods, each bank having at least two filter pods therein, each bank of the filter pods being supported by one or more the supports of the plurality of supports secured to selected struts of the frame assembly; an inlet manifold to direct the corrosive fluid to the plurality of filter pods, the inlet manifold being interconnected to the banks of filter pods formed by the filter pods whereby flow of the corrosive fluid can be directed to each bank of the filter pods; an outlet manifold to direct the corrosive fluid from the filter pods, the outlet manifold being interconnected to the banks of filter pods formed by the filter pods; a first valve means to control the flow of the corrosive fluid between banks of filter pods formed by the filter pods whereby the flow of the corrosive fluid can be selectively directed to each bank of the filter pods; a second valve means to selectively control the flow of the corrosive fluid between the inlet manifold and the outlet manifold; and union means for interconnecting the filter pods, inlet manifold and outlet manifold, each of the union means including mechanical connection means and internal seal means for isolating the corrosive fluids from the mechanical connection means.

  4. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  5. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  6. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  7. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.L.; Sarin, V.K.

    1997-12-01

    For the first time, crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited on SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion and oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments.

  8. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOEpatents

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Reactor faul elements of the elongated cylindrical type which are jacketed in a corrosion resistant material are described. Each feel element is comprised of a plurality of jacketed cylinders of fissionable material in end to end abutting relationship, the jackets being welded together at their adjoining ends to retain the individual segments together and seat the interior of the jackets.

  9. Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Schneibel, Joachim H.; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2007-05-01

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

  10. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  11. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Derkacy, James A.

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of .beta.-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB.sub.2. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800.degree. C. to less than the transition temperature of .beta.-SiC to .alpha.-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material.

  12. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Derkacy, J.A.

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance are disclosed. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of [beta]-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB[sub 2]. Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800 C to less than the transition temperature of [beta]-SiC to [alpha]-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material. 6 figures.

  13. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  14. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  15. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOEpatents

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Jacketed metal bodies of the type used as fuel elements for nuclear reactors, which contain an internal elongated body of fissionable material jacketed in a corrosion resistant metal are described. The ends of the internal bodies are provided with screw threads having a tapered outer end. The jacket material overlaps the ends and extends into the tapered section of the screw threaded opening. Screw caps with a mating tapered section are screwed into the ends of the body to compress the jacket material in the tapered sections to provtde an effective seal against corrosive gases and liquids.

  16. Degradation mechanisms of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in corrosive environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, S. K.; Bratton, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical as well as thermal-mechanical interactions between the ceramics and gas turbine combustion gases/condensates are found to play critical roles in the degradation of porous plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings. The detailed degradation mechanisms of several state-of-the-art ceramic thermal barrier coatings, including several zirconia compositions and a calcium silicate, in corrosive environments are examined in this paper. Approaches to extend coating lifetime are also described.

  17. Oxidation/corrosion of metallic and ceramic materials in an aluminum remelt furnace. [For fluidized bed waste heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.; Jones, P.J.

    1985-12-01

    Both metallic alloys and ceramic materials are candidates for the distributor plate and other components of fluidized bed waste heat recovery (FBWHR) systems. Eleven Fe-, Ni-, and Co-base alloys were exposed to air at elevated temperatures in laboratory furnaces and to flue gases in an aluminum remelt furnace to assess their resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Four SiC ceramics and two oxide ceramics were also tested in the aluminum remelt furnace. Some alloys were coated with aluminum or SiO2 by commercial processes in an effort to enhance their oxidation and corrosion resistance.

  18. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  19. Corrosion properties of zirconium-based ceramic coatings for micro-bearing and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, J.; Zavaleyev, V.; Dobruchowska, E.; Murzynski, D.; Donkov, N.; Zykova, A.; Safonov, V.; Yakovin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Ceramic oxide ZrO2 and oxynitride ZrON coatings are widely used as protective coatings against diffusion and corrosion. The enhancement of the coatings' mechanical properties, as well as their wear and corrosion resistance, is very important for their tribological performance. In this work, ZrO2 and ZrON coatings were deposited by magnetron sputtering on stainless steel (AISI 316) substrates. The adhesion, hardness and elastic properties were evaluated by standard methods. The surface structure of the deposited coatings was observed by electron scanning microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The composition of the coatings was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The corrosion resistance properties were evaluated using the potentiodynamic method. The results show that the corrosion parameters are significantly increased in the cases of both oxynitride and oxide coatings in comparison with the stainless steel (AISI 316) substrates.

  20. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVDMullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.; Auger, M.

    1997-05-01

    Silicon carbide ceramics are the leading candidate materials for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants because of their unique combination of high temperature strength, high thermal conductivity, excellent thermal shock resistance, and good high temperature stability and oxidation resistance. Ceramic coatings are being considered for diesel engine cylinder liners, piston caps, valve faces and seats, piston rings, and for turbine components such as combustors, blades, stators, seals, and bearings. Under such conditions ceramics are better suited to high temperature environments than metals. For the first time, adherent crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion/oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments. These corrosive environments include thermal, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and coal slag.

  1. Corrosion resistant materials in MCFC environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeaud, A.; Yuh, C. Y.; Singh, P.

    A 24-month effort in the development of a corrosion resistant hardware material for molten carbonate fuel cell (MFC) application is described. The objective was to identify an inexpensive alloy for MCFC current collector/bipolar plate application. For this, 310S was selected as the base alloy composition and La, Ce and Si were added to improve corrosion resistance. Eight candidate alloys, including 310S and 316L, were screened in MCFC anode and cathode atmospheres. The techniques used include isothermal corrosion, acoustic emission, thermal cycling corrosion, thermogravimetric analyses, electrical surface resistance, and dual atmosphere corrosion testing. Oxide scales formed were analyzed by standard metallographic techniques. The results indicate that COLT-25+ and Crutemp-25 alloys (both containing 25Cr-25Ni and balance Fe) have the best corrosion resistance in the MCFC environment. Rare earth additives, La and Ce, do not appear to improve isothermal or thermal cycling resistance. Silicon addition appears to improve thermal cycling but not isothermal corrosion resistance. High Mn content (approx. 18%) appears detrimental based on this limited investigation. Currently used 316L has the least corrosion resistance of all the alloys tested. Pressurized tests have shown that high pressure (10 atm) reduces corrosion rate in the anode atmosphere whereas it only slightly affects corrosion rate in the cathode atmosphere.

  2. Corrosion experience with a slurry-fed ceramic melter

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, S.M.; Sevigny, G.J.; Goles, R.W.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into the long-term performance of construction materials for joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters. The materials investigated include: the glass contact refractories, the melter electrodes, and the process off-gas containment materials. The corrosion rate and mechanism for these materials are presented. The report also includes the initial corrosion data from testing of improved effluent containment materials.

  3. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOEpatents

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    S>Metal jacketed metallic bodies of the type used as feel elements fer nuclear reactors are presented. The fuel element is comprised of a plurality of jacketed cylindrical bodies joined in end to end abutting relationship. The abutting ends of the internal fissionable bodies are provided with a mating screw and thread means for joining the two together. The jacket material is of a corrosion resistant metal and overlaps the abutting ends of the internal bodies, thereby effectively sealing these bodies from contact with exteral reactive gases and liquids.

  5. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  6. Magnetron Sputtering Deposits Corrosion-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Thakoor, A. P.; Williams, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dense, amorphous, metallic film resists corrosion attack by acid. Coatings thermally stable up to 800 degrees C and made corrosion resistant by proper choice of sputtering deposition conditions. Protective, corrosionresistant coatings applied to process equipment that comes in contact with aqueous, neutral, or acidic solutions in chemical, petroleum, and paper industries, in wastewater treatment, and in heat exchangers.

  7. Localized corrosion resistance of automotive exhaust alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sabata, A.; Brossia, C.S.; Behling, M.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion in automotive exhaust systems can be broadly classified as (a) cold end corrosion and (b) hot end corrosion. For the cold end, the requirements include inside-out perforation corrosion resistance and cosmetic corrosion resistance. Perforation corrosion causes noticeable degradation in noise quality and may even affect the back pressure. For the hot end, the key concern has been perforation corrosion resistance. With the use of oxygen sensors in catalytic converters, the failure criteria will become more stringent. Numerous accelerated corrosion tests have been used to rank materials for the Hot End and the Cold End. These include (a) Continuous Test, (b) Cyclic Tests -- Hot End, (c) Cyclic Tests -- Cold End, (d) Electrochemical Ranking. In this paper the authors evaluate some of the commonly used exhaust materials in these accelerated tests. These accelerated tests are easy to use, inexpensive to run as compared to proving ground testing or trailer testing and can provide information in a relatively short time. Here they report lab work to date on some of the accelerated corrosion testing for perforation corrosion resistance. Note that these tests are useful for ranking materials only. Life expectancy of the material can be given only after a correlation is established between the accelerated tests and field performance. The electrochemical tests were designed to gain insight into pit growth kinetics in the accelerated tests.

  8. Fabrication and testing of corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Riester, L.

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub n} to sodium corrosion mandates that corrosion resistant coatings be developed to protect silicon-based turbine engine components. Materials with good corrosion resistance and thermal expansions that nearly match SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been identified. Corrosion testing of hot-pressed pellets of these compounds has identified the most promising materials. Development of chemical vapor deposition system to apply these materials has been initiated. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Hot corrosion of ceramic-coating materials for industrial/utility gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Barkalow, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Furnace hot corrosion tests of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and other candidate ceramic coating materials were run under combinations of temperature, salt deposits, and gaseous environments know to cause severe hot corrosion of state-of-the-art metallic coatings for industrial/utility gas turbines. Specimens were free-standing ceramic coupons and ceramic-coated IN 792. X-ray fluorescence and diffraction data on free-standing YSZ coupons showed surface yttrium loss and cubic-to-monoclinic transformation as a result of exposure to liquid salt and SO/sub 3/. Greater destabilization was observed at the lower of two test temperatures (704 and 982/sup 0/C), and destabilization increased with increasing SO/sub 3/ pressure and V-containing salt deposits. The data suggest that hot corrosion of YSZ can occur by a type of acidic dissolution of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from the ZrO/sub 2/ solid solution. In spite of the greater surface destabilization at 704/sup 0/C, the bond coat and substrate of YSZ-coated IN 792 were not attacked at 704/sup 0/C but severely corroded at 982/sup 0/C. These results show that degradation of ceramic-coated metallic components can be more strongly influenced by the porosity of the microstructure and fluidity of the liquid salt than by the chemical stability of the ceramic coating material in the reactive environment. Other ceramic materials (SiO/sub 2/, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, ZrSiO/sub 2/, and mullite), concurrently exposed to the same conditions which produced significant destabilization of YSZ, showed no evidence of reaction at 704/sup 0/C but noticeable corrosion at 982/sup 0/C. Also, the high temperature corrosion was greater in air than in SO/sub 3/-containing gases. These trends suggest that hot corrosion of the silicon-containing ceramics was basic in nature, and such materials have potential for good resistance to chemical decomposition under the acidic conditions characteristics of industrial/utility gas turbines.

  10. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

    1984-08-30

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  11. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, Donald G.; Davis, Mary S.

    1990-01-01

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  12. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    This book reviews the mechanisms and forms of corrosion and examines the corrosion of stainless steels and similar chromium-bearing nickel containing higher alloys, detailing various corrosive environments including atmospheric and fire-side corrosion, corrosion by water and soil, and corrosion caused by particular industrial processes. It provides information on specific groups and grades of stainless steels; summarizes typical applications for specific stainless alloys; describes common corrosion problems associated with stainless steels; presents the acceptable isocorrosion parameters of concentration and temperature for over 250 chemicals for which stainless steels are the preferred materials of construction; discusses product forms and their availability; elucidates fabrication, welding, and joining techniques; and covers the effects of pickling and passivation.

  13. Method of preparing corrosion resistant composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Method of manufacture of ceramic materials which require stability in severely-corrosive environment having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These surfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  14. Corrosion of Silicon-Based Ceramics in Combustion Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1993-01-01

    The processes of passive oxidation, deposit-induced corrosion, active oxidation, scale/substance interactions, and scale volatility are presently studied in the case of high-purity SiC and Si3N4 in pure oxygen, giving attention to such secondary elements in the ceramics as water and CO2 oxidants, combustion environment impurities, and thermal cycling. Deposit-induced corrosion is discussed for the cases of NaSO4 as well as vanadate and oxide-slag deposits; issues associated with the active-to-passive oxidation transition are noted.

  15. An Innovative Ceramic Corrosion Protection System for Zircaloy Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald H. Baney, Dr. D. Butt, Dr. P. Demkowicz, Dr. G. Fuchs Department of Materials Science; James S. Tulenko, Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering; University of Florida.

    2003-02-19

    Light Water reactor (LWR) fuel performance is currently limited by thermal, chemical and mechanical constraints associated with the design, fabrication, and operation of the fuel in incore operation. Corrosion of the zirconium based (Zircaloy-4) alloy cladding of the fuel is a primary limiting factor. Recent success at the University of Florida in developing thin ceramic films with great adhesive properties for metal substrates offers an innovative breakthrough for eliminating a major weakness of the Zircaloy clad. ?The University of Florida proposes to coat the existing Zircaloy clad tubes with a ceramic coating for corrosion protection. An added bonus of this approach would be the implementation of a boron-containing burnable poison outer layer will also be demonstrated as part of the ceramic coating development. In this proposed effort, emphasis will be on the ceramic coating with only demonstration of feasibility on the burnable outer coating approach. This proposed program i s expected to give a step change (approximately a doubling) in clad lifetime before failure due to corrosion. In the development of ceramic coatings for Zircaloy-4 clad, silicon carbide and zirconium carbide coatings will first be applied to Zircaloy-4 coupons and cladding samples by thermal assisted chemical vapor deposition, plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition or by laser ablation deposition. All of these processes are in use at the University of Florida and have shown great potential. The questions of adhesion and thermal expansion mismatch of the ceramic coating to the Zircaloy substrate will be addressed. Several solutions to these conditions will be examined, if needed. These solutions include the use of a zirconium oxide compliant layer, employment of a laser roughened surface and the use of a gradient composition interlayer. These solutions have already been shown to be effective for other high modulus coatings on metal substrates. Mechanical properties and adhesion of the

  16. Letter report on PCT/Monolith glass ceramic corrosion tests

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Charles L.

    2015-09-24

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is collaborating with personnel from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to study advanced waste form glass ceramics for immobilization of waste from Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) separations processes. The glass ceramic waste forms take advantage of both crystalline and glassy phases where ‘troublesome’ elements (e.g., low solubility in glass or very long-lived) partition to highly durable ceramic phases with the remainder of elements residing in the glassy phase. The ceramic phases are tailored to create certain minerals or unique crystalline structures that can host the radionuclides by binding them in their specific crystalline network while not adversely impacting the residual glass network (Crum et al., 2011). Glass ceramics have been demonstrated using a scaled melter test performed in a pilot scale (1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) (Crum et al., 2014; Maio et al., 2015). This report summarizes recent results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving crucible fabrication and corrosion testing of glass ceramics using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Preliminary results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving statistically designed matrices have previously been reported (Crawford, 2013; Crawford, 2014).

  17. Corrosion performance of ceramic materials in slagging environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1996-10-01

    Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that use coal as feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces that can operate at temperatures much higher than in current coal-fired power plants. Combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments requires advanced ceramics. Objectives of this program are to evaluate the (a) chemistry of gaseous and condensed products arising during coal combustion, (b) corrosion behavior of candidate materials in air, slag, and salt environments, and (c)residual mechanical properties of the materials after corrosion. Temperatures in the range of 1000-1400 C for ceramics and 600-1000 C for metallic alloys are emphasized. Coal/ash chemistries developed on the basis of thermodynamic/kinetic calculations, together with slags from actual combustors, are used. Materials being evaluated include monolithic Si carbides from several sources: Si nitride, Si carbide in alumina composites, Si carbide fibers in a Si carbide-matrix composite, and some advanced Ni-base alloys. This paper presents results from an ongoing program on corrosion performance of candidate ceramic materials exposed to air, salt, and slag environments and their effect on flexural strength and energy absorbed during fracture of these materials. 10 figs, 4 tabs, 8 refs.

  18. Corrosion protection of metallic waste packages using thermal sprayed ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Hopper, R W; Shell, T E; Wilfinger, K R

    1998-11-01

    Ceramic coated carbon steel coupons were corrosion tested in water with dissolved salts to simulate exposure to evaporation concentrated groundwater in an underground nuclear repository. Metallography revealed no corrosion at the ceramic metal interface of dense coatings, even though electrical measurements demonstrated that the coatings were slightly porous. Experimental results and a model to predict corrosion rates influenced by a porous ceramic coating and coating lifetimes are presented

  19. Corrosion resistant coatings from conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1993-12-01

    Cr-based corrosion resistant undercoatings will have to be replaced because of environmental and health concerns. A coating system of a conducting polyaniline primer layer topcoated with epoxy or polyurethane, is being evaluated for corrosion resistance on mild steel in 0.1 M HCl or in a marine setting. Results of both laboratory and Beach Site testing indicate that this coating is very effective; even when the coatings are scratched to expose bare metal, the coated samples show very little signs of corrosion in the exposed area. 3 figs, 6 refs.

  20. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous bioglass-ceramic coated magnesium alloy under applied forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feiyang; Cai, Shu; Xu, Guohua; Shen, Sibo; Li, Yan; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    In order to research the corrosion behavior of bioglass-ceramic coated magnesium alloys under applied forces, mesoporous 45S5 bioactive glass-ceramic (45S5 MBGC) coatings were successfully prepared on AZ31 substrates using a sol-gel dip-coating technique followed by a heat treatment at the temperature of 400°C. In this work, corrosion behavior of the coated samples under applied forces was characterized by electrochemical tests and immersion tests in simulated body fluid. Results showed that the glass-ceramic coatings lost the protective effects to the magnesium substrate in a short time when the applied compressive stress was greater than 25MPa, and no crystallized apatite was formed on the surface due to the high Mg(2+) releasing and the peeling off of the coatings. Whereas, under low applied forces, apatite deposition and crystallization on the coating surface repaired cracks to some extent, thus improving the corrosion resistance of the coated magnesium during the long-term immersion period. PMID:26703229

  1. Crack resistance of a constructional ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarenko, G.S.; Gogotsi, G.A.; Zavada, V.P.

    1985-04-01

    The purpose of this article is the development and substantiation of methods of determination of crack resistance and the investigation of features of fracture of a machine building ceramic intended for use at high temperatures. Studied were a silicon nitride base reaction-sintered ceramic, designated NKKKM, and self-bonded silicon carbide produced by industry. Electrical porcelain and sodium glass were used as model materials in the development and testing of the methods.

  2. Conducting polymers as corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Although the majority of top coatings used for corrosion protection are electrically insulating, previous workers have proposed using an electrically active barrier for corrosion control. The most effective corrosion resistant undercoatings in use today are based on chromium compounds. Coatings based on other materials will need to replace these coatings by the turn of the century because of environmental and health concerns. For this reason the authors have begun an investigation of the use of conducting polymers as corrosion resistant coatings as an alternative to metal-based coatings. Conducting polymers have long been considered to be unsuitable for commercial processing, hindering their use for practical applications. Research in the field of electrically conducting polymers has recently produced a number of polymers such as polyaniline and its derivatives which are readily soluble in common organic solvents. The authors coating system, consisting of a conducting polyaniline primer layer, topcoated with epoxy or polyurethane, has been evaluated for corrosion resistance on mild steel substrates. In this paper, the authors report the results of laboratory testing under acidic and saline conditions and the results of testing in the severe launch environment at the Beach Testing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The launch environment consists of exposure to corrosive HCl exhaust fumes and the salt spray from the Atlantic Ocean.

  3. Corrosion-resistant coating prepared by the thermal decomposition of lithium permanganate

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrando, W.A.

    1999-09-01

    A ceramic, metal, or metal alloy surface is covered with lithium permanganate which is then thermally decomposed to produce a corrosion resistant coating on the surface. This coating serves as a primer coating which is preferably covered with an overcoat of a sealing paint.

  4. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Corrosion-Resistant Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-07-18

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Fe-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  5. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yang; Meng, Wen-Jin; Swathirajan, Swathy; Harris, Stephen Joel; Doll, Gary Lynn

    2002-01-01

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell's operating environment. Stainless steels rich in CR, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers.

  6. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yang; Meng, Wen-Jin; Swathirajan, Swathy; Harris, Stephen Joel; Doll, Gary Lynn

    2001-07-17

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell's operating environment. Stainless steels rich in CR, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers.

  7. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Y.; Meng, W.J.; Swathirajan, S.; Harris, S.J.; Doll, G.L.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell`s operating environment. Stainless steels rich in Cr, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers. 6 figs.

  8. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yang; Meng, Wen-Jin; Swathirajan, Swathy; Harris, Stephen J.; Doll, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell's operating environment. Stainless steels rich in CR, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers.

  9. Corrosion resistance of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1992-04-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. This paper describes the corrosion performance of these alloys, determined at Argonne Naitonal Laboratory, in environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted at temperatures of 650--1000{degrees}C in air, 1 vol. % CO-CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}S environments at two sulfur activities. Upon completion of the kinetic runs, the morphology and structure of the scales formed on the alloy surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Corrosion tests in simulated combustion environments were conducted at 900{degrees}C in the presence of reagent-grade CaSO{sub 4} and circulating-fluidized-bed deposits for 1000 and 3000 h. The test data on the aluminides from the TGA and combustion tests were compared with the corrosion performance of Type 310 stainless steel tested under similar conditions.

  10. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    There are several ceramic materials which are currently being considered for use as structural elements in coal combustion and coal conversion systems because of their thermal and mechanical properties. These include alumina (refractories, membranes, heat engines); silicon carbide and silicon nitride (turbine engines, internal combustion engines, heat exchangers, particulate filters); zirconia (internal combustion engines, turbine engines, refractories); and mullite and cordierite (particulate filters, refractories, heat exchangers). High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, and zirconia. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products and determination of the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time. 145 refs., 29 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Cermet compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance, and particularly adapted for production of high temperature resistant cermet insulator bodies are presented. The compositions are comprised of a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Also disclosed are novel ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride.

  12. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.; Mulpuri, R.; Auger, M.

    1996-04-20

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can withstand the rigorous requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being developed as a potential solution. Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}- SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  13. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  14. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  15. Strong, corrosion-resistant aluminum tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.; Adams, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    When aluminum tubing having good corrosion resistance and postweld strength is needed, type 5083 alloy should be considered. Chemical composition is carefully controlled and can be drawn into thin-wall tubing with excellent mechanical properties. Uses of tubing are in aircraft, boats, docks, and process equipment.

  16. Application of High Temperature Corrosion-Resistant Materials and Coatings Under Severe Corrosive Environment in Waste-to-Energy Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Yuuzou

    2007-06-01

    Corrosion-resistant materials (CRMs) and coatings are key technologies to increase power generation efficiency and reduce maintenance in waste-to-energy (WTE) plants. Corrosion environment became severe as steam temperatures have increased. The steam condition of more than 400 °C/3.9 MPa became possible in WTE boilers by using highly durable corrosion-resistant coatings, such as thermal spray of Al/80Ni20Cr alloy, HVOF-sprayed NiCrSiB alloy, Alloy 625 weld overlay for waterwall tubes and also superheater tubes. Also, the use of 310S type stainless steels and high Cr-high Mo-Ni base and high Si-Cr-Ni-Fe alloys have progressed because of a better understanding of corrosion mechanisms. Furthermore, high durability coatings using cermet and ceramic materials were applied to high temperature superheaters. This paper describes the major developments and the application of CRMs and coating technologies in the last 30 years in WTE plants, the corrosion mechanisms of alloys, the deterioration mechanisms of spray coating layers, and future subjects for the development of corrosion-resistant materials and coatings.

  17. Strength and corrosion behavior of SiC - based ceramics in hot coal combustion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Breder, K.; Parten, R.J.

    1996-08-01

    As part of an effort to evaluate the use of advanced ceramics in a new generation of coal-fired power plants, four SiC-based ceramics have been exposed to corrosive coal slag in a laboratory furnace and two pilot scale combustors. Initial results indicate that the laboratory experiments are valuable additions to more expensive pilot plant experiments. The results show increased corrosive attack with increased temperature, and that only slight changes in temperature may significantly alter the degree of strength degradation due to corrosive attack. The present results are part of a larger experimental matrix evaluating the behavior of ceramics in the coal combustion environment.

  18. Corrosion, erosion-corrosion and wear resistance of HVOF sprayed WC type coatings with a corrosion resistant binder

    SciTech Connect

    Rogne, T.; Berget, J.; Solem, T.

    1999-07-01

    WC based coatings with high alloy binders were investigated with respect to structure, corrosion and wear. The coatings were made by HVOF spraying of different powders. All powders studied were made by agglomeration/sintering, i.e. agglomeration of metal particles with WC particles with subsequent sintering. Some powders were made using pre-alloyed metal particles. A blend of ceramic-metallic powder and pure metallic powder was also studied. Different methods were used for characterization of the powders and coatings.

  19. Thermal sprayed zirconium coatings for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bamola, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) is conducted in inert reduced pressures. This results in higher particle velocities than in atmospheric plasma spraying. Reverse arc sputter cleaning and pre-heating of the workpiece lead to elevated substrate temperatures during deposition, allowing sintering of the coating and, thus, enhanced densities and bond strengths. Inert Environment Electric Arc Spraying (IEAS) is performed in inert gas chambers, utilizing wire as the feedstock. This leads to lower gas content in the coating, since the initial gas content in wire is lower than that of the powder feedstock used in VPS. Controlled atmosphere sprayed zirconium coatings had inferior mechanical and corrosion properties when compared with bulk zirconium. The VPS coatings displayed higher bond strengths and better cavitation erosion resistance than did the IEAS coatings. The IEAS coatings had lower gas content and showed better electrochemical and corrosion behavior. The lower gas content for IEAS was due to a lower initial gas level in the wire feedstock used in this process. Also, scanning electron microscopy revealed that larger particles result in the IEAS process. Thus, a smaller surface-area-to-volume ratio is available for gas-metal reactions to occur. Improvements in mechanical and corrosion properties for the IEAS coatings were due to elevated substrate temperatures during deposition. Compressive surface stresses induced by post-spray shot-peening enhanced corrosion and cavitation resistance of IEAS coatings. Coating porosity caused failure during immersion testing. Therefore, it was concluded that controlled environment thermal spraying of zirconium is not suitable for forming corrosion resistant coatings on steel. ZrN coatings were formed by electric arc spraying using a nitrogen shroud and post-spray nitriding. Two phases; ZrN and zirconium solid solution, exist in the as-sprayed coating. Nitriding increases the proportion of ZrN.

  20. Poly(aniline) in corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    McAndrew, T.P.; Miller, S.A.; Gilicinski, A.G.; Robeson, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    During the past two decades, one of the most active fields of solid-state science has been electrically conductive polymers. These are polymers which are insulators as prepared, but which can be converted to polymers having many or all the properties of a metal, by virtue of appropriate chemical/electrochemical oxidation or reduction. Typically, applications examined for electrically conductive polymers have been in areas such as rechargeable batteries and charge dissipative coatings. Recently it has been reported that poly(aniline), in its electrically conductive, protonated form, shows excellent performance as a coating for preventing the corrosion of carbon steel. The present research has shown that in fact, the non-conductive, unprotonated form of poly(aniline) shows even better performance in corrosion prevention than the conductive form. Moreover, it has been shown that poly(aniline) can be blended with other polymers to improve their corrosion resistance performance (e.g., polyimides), or used as a hardener for epoxides or diisocyanates, to give very good corrosion resistant coatings. Poly(aniline) performance is explained in terms of its ability to form dense, adherent films, and create a basic surface on carbon steel surfaces.

  1. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  2. DIMENSIONALLY STABLE, CORROSION RESISTANT NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Kittel, J.H.

    1963-10-31

    A method of making a uranium alloy of improved corrosion resistance and dimensional stability is described. The alloy contains from 0-9 weight per cent of an additive of zirconium and niobium in the proportions by weight of 5 to 1 1/ 2. The alloy is cold rolled, heated to two different temperatures, air-cooled, heated to a third temperature, and quenched in water. (AEC)

  3. Corrosion resistant pipe with extremely high impact resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, S.

    1999-11-01

    The next generation of fiberglass pipe, which combines outstanding corrosion resistance to an extremely wide range of industrial chemicals with impact resistance more than 100 times better than existing fiberglass pipe, is introduced. This pipe is initially rated for operating pressures of 150 psi (10 Bar) at up to 225 F (107 C), and has corrosion resistance that generally is as good or better than traditional vinyl ester or epoxy resins. Its resistance to halogens such as chlorine and bromine is especially outstanding. These properties are achieved with the use of a new type of DUCTILE thermosetting resin. Included is a discussion of the resin system and data comparing the properties of this new piping system with traditional epoxy and vinyl ester piping.

  4. Ion leaching from dental ceramics during static in vitro corrosion testing.

    PubMed

    Milleding, Percy; Haraldsson, Conny; Karlsson, Stig

    2002-09-15

    Dental ceramics are often called inert materials. It can be hypothesized, however, that differences in the composition, microstructure, and environmental conditions will affect the degree of corrosion degradation in an aqueous environment. The aims of the study were, therefore, to study the ion dissolution from glass-phase ceramics, with or without crystalline inclusions, and from all-crystalline ceramics and to compare the effects of different corrosion media. Ceramic specimens were produced from glass-phase and oxide ceramics and given an equivalent surface smoothness, after which they were subjected to in vitro corrosion (Milli-Q water at 37 +/- 2 degrees C for 18 h and 4% acetic acid solution at 80 +/- 2 degrees C for 18 h, respectively). The temperature of the corrosion solution was slowly increased until it reached 80 +/- 2 degrees C to reduce the risk of microcrack formation at the surface. The analyses of ion leakage were performed with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. A large number of inorganic elements leached out from the various dental ceramics. The major leaching elements were sodium and potassium; in the acid-corrosion experiments, there were also magnesium, silicon, and aluminum and, on a lower scale, yttrium, calcium, and chromium. The various glass-phase ceramics displayed significant differences in ion leakage and significantly higher leakage values than all-crystalline alumina and zirconia ceramics. No significant difference in dissolution was found between high and low-sintering glass-phase ceramics or between glass-phase ceramics with high volume fractions of crystallites in the glass phase in comparison with those with lower crystalline content. It can be concluded, therefore, that none of the dental ceramics studied are chemically inert in an aqueous environment. PMID:12115444

  5. Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Barrier Applications Against Molten Uranium Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Pragatheeswaran, A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramic coatings are applied on engineering components for protecting them from large thermal load and hot corrosion. Choices of coating material for protection against hot corrosion by uranium are few, because of its high reactivity. Yttrium oxide has a high melting temperature and is inert towards uranium. Therefore, yttrium oxide coatings are effective as a barrier against hot corrosion by uranium and its alloys. This paper gives a summary of the developmental work on plasma-sprayed yttria coatings for corrosion barrier applications against molten uranium. Results show that plasma-sprayed yttria coatings offer a long-term solution to hot corrosion problems.

  6. Corrosion Resistance of Friction Surfaced AISI 304 Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid Rafi, H.; Phanikumar, G.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2013-02-01

    Corrosion resistance of friction surfaced AISI 304 coating in boiling nitric acid and chloride containing environments was found to be similar to that of its consumable rod counterpart. This was in contrast to the autogenous fusion zone of GTAW weld which showed inferior corrosion resistance with respect to the consumable rod. The superior corrosion resistance of friction surfaced coatings was attributed to the absence of δ-ferrite in it.

  7. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  8. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Claire L

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and conventional metal with module. A specially constructed jig and an Instron testing machine were used to measure the static frictional resistance for 0.014 inches round and 0.018 x 0.025 inches rectangular stainless steel wires at 0° and 7° angulations. Main outcome measures: static frictional force at the bracket/archwire interface; recorded and measured in units of force (Newtons). Results Self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems generated significantly less static frictional resistance than conventional ceramic bracket systems with the wire at both angulations (P < 0.05). Changing the wire from 0.014 round to 0.018 x 0.025 rectangular wire significantly increased frictional forces for metal slot ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems (P < 0.01). Increasing wire angulation significantly increased frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface for all four types of bracket systems tested (P < 0.001). Conclusions Compared to conventional ceramic, self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems should give improved clinical performance, matching that of conventional metal brackets. PMID:24478913

  9. Corrosion resistant process piping changes in economics

    SciTech Connect

    Lain, E.H. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    In recent years, the process piping industry has seen dramatic changes occur in corrosion resistant materials. Some changes have occurred in the form of new and modified materials becoming available. However, the most dramatic changes have occurred in the pricing of some older and well known materials. These economic changes have been dramatic and quick, so much so that the old established budget pricing ``rules of thumb`` used for many years to estimate piping projects are no longer valid. In many instances, the prices of some premium metals (titanium, for example) are now on a comparatively equal basis even with high alloys when all factors including densities, special fabrication requirements and service life are taken into account. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some commonly encountered corrosion resistant piping materials, a brief summary of their chemical and mechanical properties and usage. However, the focus of the paper presented will be economic. It will detail the current raw material prices for high alloys including duplex stainless steels, nickel and nickel alloys, Hastelloys+, as well as the reactive metals, zirconium and titanium. In addition, a typical fabricated piping spool in various diameters will be estimated for all of the above metals and the results plotted in graphical format for quick comparison. Last, a quick method will be presented to estimate as fabricated piping costs if the base material price for pipe is known.

  10. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of...

  11. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of...

  12. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of...

  13. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of...

  14. Resistance of Some Steels to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Evaluations of stress-corrosion cracking resistance of five high-strength low-alloy steels described in report now available. Steels were heat-treated to various tensile strengths and found to be highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  15. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of...

  16. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D K

    2003-04-22

    The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100°F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles' Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

  17. Intermetallic-ceramic coatings for metals protection against erosion-corrosion at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.Q.; Verstak, A.; Beliaev, A.

    1999-07-01

    A series of erosion-corrosion (E-C) tests was carried out on the NiAl-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} intermetallic-ceramic coatings deposited with high-velocity oxygen-fuel method (HVOF). The tests attempted to simulate the erosion conditions at the heat exchanger tubes in coal-fired boilers. The E-C behavior of these coatings was investigated and compared with other thermal sprayed coatings. It was found that in comparison to other coatings, eroded by the bed ash at 300 C, the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} coating exhibited the lowest thickness loss at a 90{degree} impact angle, and was the second best at a 30{degree} impact angle. Eroded by the fly ash under test temperatures 450--600 C, the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating demonstrated the highest erosion-corrosion resistance at all impact angles of testing. At temperatures below 200 C, the E-C wastage of the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating had essentially no dependence on temperature. From 200 C to 600 C the coating thickness loss increased and from 600 to 800 C the thickness loss decreased with temperature. The HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating eroded by cracking and chipping brittle mechanism.

  18. Increasing corrosion resistance of carbon steels by surface laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsky, V. I.; Yakushin, V. L.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Petrovsky, V. N.; Safonov, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results of investigation of the microstructure, elemental composition and corrosion resistance of the samples of low-alloy steel widely used in the engineering, after the application of laser cladding. The level of corrosion damage and the corrosion mechanism of cladded steel samples were established. The corrosion rate and installed discharge observed at the total destruction of cladding were obtained. The regularities of structure formation in the application of different powder compositions were obtained. The optimal powder composition that prevents corrosion of samples of low-carbon low-alloy steel was established.

  19. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  20. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; McKamey, Claudette G.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; David, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium.

  1. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.; McKamey, C.G.; Tortorelli, P.F.; David, S.A.

    1994-06-14

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium. 9 figs.

  2. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000 and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni; Ni-50 at.% Cr; and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. Corrosion isopleths were prepared from these equations. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  3. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-02-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  4. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    PubMed

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer. PMID:26831689

  5. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  6. Refractory Oxidative-Resistant Ceramic Carbon Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature, lightweight, ceramic carbon insulation is prepared by coating or impregnating a porous carbon substrate with a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of an organodialkoxy silane and an organotrialkoxy silane in an acid or base medium in the presence of the carbon substrate. The siloxane gel is subsequently dried on the carbon substrate to form a ceramic carbon precursor. The carbon precursor is pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the ceramic insulation containing carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The carbon insulation is characterized as a porous, fibrous, carbon ceramic tile which is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft.

  7. Abrasion, erosion and scuffing resistance of carbide and oxide ceramic thermal sprayed coatings for different applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbezat, G.; Nicoll, A. R.; Sickinger, A.

    1993-04-01

    In the area of antiwear coatings, carbide-containing coatings and oxide ceramic coatings are applied using different thermal spray processes in the form of individual layers. In many industries these coatings have become technically significant on components where wear and friction can cause critical damage in the form of abrasion, erosion and scuffing together with corrosion. Carbide-containing and ceramic coatings have been produced with different thermal spray processes for the determination of abrasive, adhesive and erosive wear resistance. Two types of abrasion test, namely an adhesion wear test and an erosion test in water at a high velocity, were used for the characterization of wear resistance under different conditions. The coatings were also characterized with regard to microstructure, composition and fracture toughness. The influence of the thermal spraying process parameters on the microstructure is presented together with the influence of the microstructure on the behavior of the coatings under simulated service conditions.

  8. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  9. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W.

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  10. Thermal shock resistance of ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, D. M.; Nied, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental and analytical investigation of the thermal shock phenomena in ceramic matrix composites is detailed. The composite systems examined were oxide-based, consisting of an aluminosilicate matrix with either polycrystalline aluminosilicate or single crystal alumina fiber reinforcement. The program was divided into three technical tasks; baseline mechanical properties, thermal shock modeling, and thermal shock testing. The analytical investigation focused on the development of simple expressions for transient thermal stresses induced during thermal shock. The effect of various material parameters, including thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and thermal expansion, were examined analytically for their effect on thermal shock performance. Using a simple maximum stress criteria for each constituent, it was observed that fiber fracture would occur only at the most extreme thermal shock conditions and that matrix fracture, splitting parallel to the reinforcing fiber, was to be expected for most practical cases. Thermal shock resistance for the two material systems was determined experimentally by subjecting plates to sudden changes in temperature on one surface while maintaining the opposite surface at a constant temperature. This temperature change was varied in severity (magnitude) and in number of shocks applied to a given sample. The results showed that for the most severe conditions examined that only surface matrix fracture was present with no observable fiber fracture. The impact of this damage on material performance was limited to the matrix dominated properties only. Specifically, compression strength was observed to decrease by as much as 50 percent from the measured baseline.

  11. Durable Corrosion and Ultraviolet-Resistant Silver Mirror

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, G. J.; Gee, R.

    2006-01-24

    A corrosion and ultra violet-resistant silver mirror for use in solar reflectors; the silver layer having a film-forming protective polymer bonded thereto, and a protective shield overlay comprising a transparent multipolymer film that incorporates a UV absorber. The corrosion and ultraviolet resistant silver mirror retains spectral hemispherical reflectance and high optical clarity throughout the UV and visible spectrum when used in solar reflectors.

  12. Corrosion performance and application limits of corrosion-resistant alloys in oilfield service

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, A.; Ogawa, H.

    1995-03-01

    The corrosion behavior of corrosion-resistant alloys (CRA) in sour environment was investigated using a duplex stainless steel as a representative CRA. Changes in corrosion morphologies resulting from changes in environmental aggressiveness were elucidated. The application limits of CRA were shown to be determined by whether pitting corrosion occurred. A theory was proposed for predicting the corrosion morphologies and, thus, determining the application limits of the CRA. The validity of prediction by this new theory was confirmed by good agreement with results from long-term immersion tests and a field test for actual-size test pipes. Since this theory was based on the corrosion mechanism, it showed many advantages: the prediction was accurate, the results for one environment could be extended to other environments, and the prediction was conducted very quickly.

  13. Vapor aluminum diffused steels for high-temperature corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    Steel products and fabrications that are vapor aluminum diffused by the pack cementation process offer greatly enhanced corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing, sulfidizing, carburizing, and hydrogen-containing environments. Pipes and tubing are most frequently diffused with aluminum for use as transfer lines, heat exchangers, reactors, or in process furnaces handling corrosive materials. Vapor aluminum diffusion by the pack cementation process is the only practical way of providing this form of high-temperature corrosion resistance on the inside of pipes and tubes.

  14. Amorphous alloys resistant to corrosion in artificial saliva solution.

    PubMed

    Kwokal, A; Metikos-Huković, M; Radić, N; Poljak-Guberina, R; Catović, A

    2003-07-01

    The tailoring of new corrosion-resistant alloys with specific properties has recently been performed mostly by the sputter deposition technique. The aim of this work was to investigate corrosion resistance of aluminum-tungsten (Al-W) amorphous alloys in artificial saliva solution, pH=5.5, based on the electrochemical methods of cyclic voltammetry and linear polarization. Thin alloy films were prepared on a sapphire substrate by magnetron codeposition. Completely amorphous films were obtained in the Al(80)W(20)-Al(67)W(33) composition range. Amorphous Al-W alloys exhibit very high corrosion resistance due to their homogeneous single-phase nature. The passive films spontaneously formed at their surface are uniform with characteristics of an insulator film and prevent corrosion progression in the bulk in a very demanding oral environment. The mechanism of increasing resistivity of Al-W alloys to pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion has been discussed in the view of increasing tungsten content in the alloy. Considering these exceptional corrosion properties and microhardness which falls in the range 7.5+/-1.6 Pa, Al-W alloys represent promising materials for dental applications. PMID:15348422

  15. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of friction stir welded aluminum alloy 5454

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, G.S.; Xia, Z.

    1999-02-01

    The susceptibility of welded and unwelded samples of Al 5454 (UNS A95454) in the -O and -H34 tempers to pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride solutions was studied. Welded samples were fabricated using the relatively new friction stir welding (FSW) process as well as a standard gas-tungsten arc welding process for comparison. Pitting corrosion was assessed through potentiodynamic polarization experiments. U-bend and slow strain rate tests were used to determine SCC resistance. The FSW samples exhibited superior resistance to pitting corrosion compared to the base metal and arc-welded samples. U-bend tests indicated adequate SCC resistance for the FSW samples. However, the FSW samples exhibited discontinuities that probably were associated with remnant boundaries of the original plates. These defects resulted in intermittent increased susceptibility to pitting and, particularly for Al 5454-H34 samples, poor mechanical properties in general.

  16. Towards Long-Term Corrosion Resistance in FE Service Environments

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb and P. Wang

    2010-10-01

    The push for carbon capture and sequestration for fossil fuel energy production has materials performance challenges in terms of high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance. Such challenges will be illustrated with examples from several current technologies that are close to being realized. These include cases where existing technologies are being modified—for example fireside corrosion resulting from increased corrosivity of flue gas in coal boilers refit for oxy-fuel combustion, or steam corrosion resulting from increased temperatures in advanced ultra supercritical steam boilers. New technology concepts also push the high temperature corrosion and oxidation limits—for example the effects of multiple oxidants during the use of high CO2 and water flue gas used as turbine working fluids.

  17. Effect of alloying elements Al and Ca on corrosion resistance of plasma anodized Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anawati, Asoh, Hidetaka; Ono, Sachiko

    2016-04-01

    Plasma anodizing is a surface treatment used to form a ceramic-type oxide film on Mg alloys by the application of a high anodic voltage to create intense plasma near the metal surface. With proper selection of the process parameters, the technique can produce high quality oxide with superior adhesion, corrosion resistance, micro-hardness, wear resistance and strength. The effect of alloying element Al on plasma anodizing process of Mg alloys was studied by comparing the anodizing curves of pure Mg, AZ31, and AZ61 alloys while the effect of Ca were studied on AZ61 alloys containing 0, 1, and 2 wt% Ca. Anodizing was performed in 0.5 M Na3PO4 solution at a constant current density of 200 Am-2 at 25°C. Anodic oxide films with lava-like structure having mix composition of amorphous and crystal were formed on all of the alloys. The main crystal form of the oxide was Mg3(PO4)2 as analyzed by XRD. Alloying elements Al and Ca played role in modifying the plasma lifetime during anodization. Al tended to extend the strong plasma lifetime and therefore accelerated the film thickening. The effect of Ca on anodizing process was still unclear. The anodic film thickness and chemical composition were altered by the presence of Ca in the alloys. Electrochemical corrosion test in 0.9% NaCl solution showed that the corrosion behavior of the anodized specimens depend on the behavior of the substrate. Increasing Al and Ca content in the alloys tended to increase the corrosion resistance of the specimens. The corrosion resistance of the anodized specimens improved significantly about two orders of magnitude relative to the bare substrate.

  18. Factors affecting the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    The concentrations of approximately a dozen elements in the products of coal combustion affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used to construct the combustion system. The elements, including H, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe, affect corrosion rates in three ways: as primary corrodants of the materials, as secondary corrodants that affect the activities of the primary corrodants, and by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodants. A full factorial study of corrosion rates performed by varying the concentrations of these elements would involve X{sup n} tests, where X is the number of variations of each element and n is the number of different elements. For three variations (low, medium, and high concentrations) of each of 12 elements, the number of tests is 531,441 for a single temperature and pressure condition. The numbers can be reduced with the use of a fractional factorial test matrix, but the most effective way to perform corrosion tests is to base them on realistic system conditions. In this paper, the effects of the composition and physical state of the products of coal combustion on ceramic corrosion rates are given along with suggestions of appropriate test conditions for specific system components.

  19. Impurity control and corrosion resistance of magnesium-aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is very sensitive to the contents of impurity elements such as iron. In this study, a series of diecast AXJ530 magnesium alloy samples were prepared with additions of Mn and Fe. Through a comprehensive phase diagram calculation and corrosion evaluation, the mechanisms for the tolerance limit of Fe in magnesium alloy are discussed. This adds a new dimension to control the alloying impurity in terms of alloying composition design and casting conditions.

  20. The corrosion resistance of thermoset composites in alkaline environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, D.H.; Thompson, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion engineers need guidelines for selecting thermoset resins for aggressive applications such as hot alkali and alkaline peroxide. The suitability of fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) for alkaline service depends on factors such as the ester content of the resin, the unsaturated monomer composition, and the cure system. The purpose of the present paper is to show the effect of these factors on the alkaline corrosion resistance of FRP and provide corrosion engineers with the guidance needed for selecting the best epoxy vinyl ester resins for alkaline environments.

  1. Corrosion testing of zirconia, beryllia and magnesia ceramics in molten alkali metal carbonates at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Valery; Bendikov, Tatyana; Feldman, Yishay; Gartsman, Konstantin; Wachtel, Ellen; Lubomirsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    An electrochemical cell containing molten Li2CO3-Li2O at 900 °C has been proposed for the conversion of the greenhouse gas CO2 to CO for chemical energy storage. In the current work, we have examined the corrosion resistance of zirconia, beryllia and magnesia ceramics at 900 °C in the Li2CO3-Li2O and Li-Na-K carbonate eutectic mixtures to identify suitable electrically insulating materials. Conclusions regarding material stability were based on elemental analysis of the melt, primarily via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, a particularly sensitive technique. It was found that magnesia is completely stable for at least 33 h in a Li2CO3-Li2O melt, while a combined lithium titanate/lithium zirconate layer forms on the zirconia ceramic as detected by XRD. Under the same melt conditions, beryllia shows considerable leaching into solution. In a Li-Na-K carbonate eutectic mixture containing 10.2 mol% oxide at 900 °C under standard atmospheric conditions, magnesia showed no signs of degradation. Stabilization of the zirconia content of the eutectic mixture at 0.01-0.02 at% after 2 h is explained by the formation of a lithium zirconate coating on the ceramic. On the basis of these results, we conclude that only magnesia can be satisfactorily used as an insulating material in electrolysis cells containing Li2CO3-Li2O melts.

  2. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Day, S D; Lian, T; Aprigliano, L F; Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C

    2007-02-18

    Iron-based amorphous alloys possess enhanced hardness and are highly resistant to corrosion, which make them desirable for wear applications in corrosive environments. It was of interest to examine the behavior of amorphous alloys during anodic polarization in concentrated salt solutions and in the salt-fog testing. Results from the testing of one amorphous material (SAM2X5) both in ribbon form and as an applied coating are reported here. Cyclic polarization tests were performed on SAM2X5 ribbon as well as on other nuclear engineering materials. SAM2X5 showed the highest resistance to localized corrosion in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} solution at 105 C. Salt fog tests of 316L SS and Alloy 22 coupons coated with amorphous SAM2X5 powder showed resistance to rusting. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated pinpoint rust spots in some coatings.

  3. Galvanic corrosion study of container materials using zero resistance ammeter

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A. K., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Galvanic corrosion behavior of A 516 steel separately coupled to six different corrosion-resistant alloys was investigated in an acidic brine (pHa2.70) at 30{degree}C 60{degree}C and 80{degree}C using zero resistance ammeter technique. The corrosion-resistant alloys include Alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4 and C-22; and Ti Grade-12, which were coupled to A 516 steel at an anode-to- cathode area ratio of one. The galvanic current and galvanic potential were measured as a function of time at all three temperatures. Optical microscopic examination was also performed on all tested specimens to evaluate the extent of surface degradation due to galvanic coupling. The overall results are presented in this paper.

  4. Investigation of corrosion experienced in a spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    Dierks, R.D.; Mellinger, G.B.; Miller, F.A.; Nelson, T.A.; Bjorklund, W.J.

    1980-08-01

    After periodic testing of a large-scale spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system over a 2-yr period, sufficient corrosion was noted on various parts of the vitrification system to warrant its disassembly and inspection. A majority of the 316 SS sintered metal filters on the spray calciner were damaged by chemical corrosion and/or high temperature oxidation. Inconel-601 portions of the melter lid were attacked by chlorides and sulfates which volatilized from the molten glass. The refractory blocks, making up the walls of the melter, were attacked by the waste glass. This attack was occurring when operating temperatures were >1200/sup 0/C. The melter floor was protected by a sludge layer and showed no corrosion. Corrosion to the Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal, and no corrosion was noted in the offgas treatment system downstream of the sintered metal filters. It is believed that most of the melter corrosion occurred during one specific operating period when the melter was operated at high temperatures in an attempt to overcome glass foaming behavior. These high temperatures resulted in a significant release of volatile elements from the molten glass, and also created a situation where the glass was very fluid and convective, which increased the corrosion rate of the refractories. Specific corrosion to the calciner components cannot be proven to have occurred during a specific time period, but the mechanisms of attack were all accelerated under the high-temperature conditions that were experienced with the melter. A review of the materials of construction has been made, and it is concluded that with controlled operating conditions and better protection of some materials of construction corrosion of these systems will not cause problems. Other melter systems operating under similar strenuous conditions have shown a service life of 3 yr.

  5. Absorption Voltages and Insulation Resistance in Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Time dependence of absorption voltages (Vabs) in different types of low-voltage X5R and X7R ceramic capacitors was monitored for a maximum duration of hundred hours after polarization. To evaluate the effect of mechanical defects on Vabs, cracks in the dielectric were introduced either mechanically or by thermal shock. The maximum absorption voltage, time to roll-off, and the rate of voltage decrease are shown to depend on the crack-related leakage currents and insulation resistance in the parts. A simple model that is based on the Dow equivalent circuit for capacitors with absorption has been developed to assess the insulation resistance of capacitors. Standard measurements of the insulation resistance, contrary to the measurements based on Vabs, are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects and fail to reveal capacitors with cracks. Index Terms: Ceramic capacitor, insulation resistance, dielectric absorption, cracking.

  6. Corrosion-resistant iridium-platinum anode material for high polarization application in corrosive acids

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.

    1993-09-08

    The present invention relates to highly corrosion resistant components for use in an electrochemical cell. Specifically, these components are resistant to corrosion under very extreme conditions such as exposure to aqua regia in the presence of a constant current density of 100mA/m{sup 2}. The components are comprised of an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy comprises 15-20% iridium. In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy is deposited on the surface of an electrochemical cell component by magnetron sputtering. The present invention also relates to a method for conducting an electrochemical reaction in the presence of highly corrosive acids under a high degree of polarization wherein the electrochemical cell comprises a component, preferably the anode, containing an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium.

  7. Corrosion resistance of porous NiTi biomedical alloy in simulated body fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergioudi, F.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Pavlidou, E.; Skolianos, S.; Michailidis, N.

    2016-09-01

    The corrosion performance of two porous NiTi in physiological and Hank’s solutions was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization, cyclic polarization and impedance spectroscopy. Electric models simulating the corrosion mechanism at early stages of immersion were proposed, accounting for both microstructural observations and electrochemical results. Results indicate that both porous samples were susceptible to localized corrosion. The porosity increase (from 7% to 18%) resulted in larger and wider pore openings, thus favoring the corrosion resistance of 18% porous NiTi. Strengthening of corrosion resistance was observed in Hank’s solution. The pore morphology and micro-galvanic corrosion phenomena were determining factors affecting the corrosion resistance.

  8. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Mawdsley, Jennifer R.; Niyogi, Suhas; Wang, Xiaoping; Cruse, Terry; Santos, Lilia

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  9. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  10. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  11. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  12. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  13. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  14. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  15. New line pipe resists preferential corrosion at welds

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Sigeru; Fujita, Sakae; Nagae, Moriyasu; Hirano, Osamu

    1997-03-17

    Line pipe with preferential corrosion resistance in the welded joint in CO{sub 2}-containing gas and oil environments has been produced and delivered for use in the North Sea. NKK Corp., Tokyo, developed the pipe by taking into consideration the mechanism of preferential corrosion. The chemistry was optimized to prevent preferential corrosion of both heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal. The project also developed girth-welding consumables for the pipe. Based on test results, 6,000 tons of the preferential-corrosion-resistant pipes were mass produced for a North Sea marine pipeline. Overall, the testing program led to the following conclusions: the immersed potential of the HAZ was clearly higher than that of the base metal in the lower S, Cu, and Ni-containing steels with a bainitic microstructure. Hence, preferential corrosion of the HAZ of this type of steel is unlikely in a CO{sub 2} environment. The sign of the galvanic current density is positive when the chemical composition difference between the weld an base metals in Cu and Ni are greater than 0.5% and that of Mo is above 0.05%.

  16. Corrosion investigation of multilayered ceramics and experimental nickel alloys in SCWO process environments

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, K.M.; Mizia, R.

    1995-02-01

    A corrosion investigation was done at MODAR, Inc., using a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) vessel reactor. Several types of multilayered ceramic rings and experimental nickel alloy coupons were exposed to a chlorinated cutting oil TrimSol, in the SCWO process. A corrosion casing was designed and mounted in the vessel reactor with precautions to minimize chances of degrading the integrity of the pressure vessel. Fifteen of the ceramic coated rings were stacked vertically in the casing at one time for each test. There was a total of 36 rings. The rings were in groupings of three rings that formed five sections. Each section saw a different SCWO environment, ranging from 650 to 300{degrees}C. The metal coupons were mounted on horizontal threaded holders welded to a vertical rod attached to the casing cover in order to hang down the middle of the casing. The experimental nickel alloys performed better than the baseline nickel alloys. A titania multilayered ceramic system sprayed onto a titanium ring remained intact after 120-180 hours of exposure. This is the longest time any coating system has withstood such an environment without significant loss.

  17. Corrosion of ceramics in high temperature steam environments

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Howell, M.; Gondolfe, J.M.; Arnold, D.T.

    1997-02-01

    Ethylene is one of the principal building blocks in the petrochemical industry, and world-wide production and consumption have been steadily increasing. Production of ethylene is accomplished primarily by the pyrolytic stripping of hydrogen from ethane or a higher molecular weight hydrocarbon. This cracking process, sometimes referred to as steam cracking, is currently accomplished in metallic tubes in high temperature furnaces with a conversion efficiency, for ethane of 60-65%. Operation at significantly higher temperature could increase the efficiency as much as 20%, but materials with better high temperature strength would be required. To help identify suitable materials, tests have been conducted to determine the behavior of selected ceramic materials in environments similar to those anticipated for a high-efficiency, advanced steam cracking system. The effects of exposure on weight change, mechanical strength, and microstructure have been determined in a series of 100 hour tests. In addition, 500 hour tests have been conducted to determine the effect of time on material behavior. From these tests, several strong candidates have been identified.

  18. PM alloy 625M for high strength corrosion resistant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, F.J.; Floreen, S.

    1997-06-01

    In applications where the combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance are required, there have been only a few alloys of choice. A new powder metallurgy alloy has been developed, PM 625M, a niobium modification of Alloy 625, as a material to fill this need. One area of particular interest is the nuclear power industry, where many problems have been encountered with bolts, springs, and guidepins. Mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking data of PM 625M are presented in this paper.

  19. The evaluation of corrosion resistant rod end rolling element bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Braza, J.F.; Giuntoli, K.; Imundo, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    Recent developments on carburizing grades of stainless steels have provided new materials to produce corrosion resistant airframe control bearings. This paper presents the application of one of these new carburizing grades of stainless steel to rod end ball bearings. The outer ring of the rod end bearing is made out of carburized stainless steel, while the inner ring and balls are made out of through-hardened stainless steel. The stainless steel rod end bearings were evaluated according to various ASTM and Military specifications for performance and corrosion resistance. The stainless steel rod end bearings exceeded the performance requirements of standard rod end bearings (which are comprised of a carburized 8620 steel outer ring and 52100 steel inner ring and balls) in accordance with MIL-B-6039. The rod end bearings were evaluated in the radial fracture load, axial fracture load, and radial dynamic load tests. Also, salt spray and alternate immersion corrosion tests (ASTM B 117-85 and G 44-88, respectively) were conducted on the stainless steel rod end bearings. The stainless steel rod end bearings exhibited superior corrosion resistance to the standard 8620/52100 steel rod end bearings.

  20. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E.

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  1. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe2C5. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  2. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abudaia, F. B. Khalil, E. O. Esehiri, A. F. Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  3. Corrosion and wear resistance of chrome white irons—A correlation to their composition and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Baotong; Luo, Jingli; Chiovelli, Stefano

    2006-10-01

    The corrosion and wear resistances of a series of cast chromium white irons (CWIs) were evaluated using electrochemical and low stress sliding abrasion tests. The results show clearly that corrosion resistance of these materials is largely dependent on the quantity of chromium in the matrix, while wear resistance is mainly controlled by the volume fraction of chromium carbides. Based on theoretical analysis, a wear/corrosion performance map is established to identify alloy compositions that may be suited for erosion/corrosion conditions.

  4. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  5. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-06-01

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  6. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-08-28

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  7. Laser surface melting of aluminium alloy 6013 for improving stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Long

    Laser surface treatment of aluminium alloy 6013, a relatively new high strength aluminium alloy, was conducted with the aim of improving the alloy's resistance to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. In the first phase of this research, laser surface melting (LSM) of the alloy was conducted using an excimer laser. The microstructural changes induced by the laser treatment were studied in detail and characterised. The results showed that excimer LSM produced a relatively thin, non-dentritic planar re-melted layer which is largely free of coarse constituent particles and precipitates. The planar growth phenomenon was explained using the high velocity and high temperature gradient absolute stability criteria. The structure of the oxide and/or the nitride bearing film at the outmost surface of the re-melted layer was also characterised. The results of the electrochemical tests showed that the pitting corrosion resistance of the alloy could be greatly increased by excimer laser melting, especially when the alloy was treated in nitrogen gas: the corrosion current density of the N2-treated specimen was some two orders of magnitude lower than that of the air-treated specimen which was one order of magnitude lower than that of the untreated specimen. The effect of the outer surface oxide and/or nitride bearing film per se on pitting corrosion resistance was determined. The results of a Mott - Schottky analysis strongly suggest that the outer surface film, which exhibited the nature of an n-type semiconductor was responsible for the significant improvement of the corrosion resistance of the laser-treated material. Furthermore, the corrosion response of the surface film was modelled using equivalent circuits. Based on the results of the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) and corrosion fatigue tests, the stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion fatigue behaviour of the excimer laser treated material was evaluated. The results of the SSRT test showed that, in

  8. Oxidation-resistant cermet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Chromium metal alloys and chromium oxide ceramic are combined to produce cermets with oxidation-resistant properties. Application of cermets includes use in hot corrosive environments requiring strong resistive materials.

  9. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  10. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  11. Thermal shock and erosion resistant tantalum carbide ceramic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honeycutt, L., III; Manning, C. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic tantalum carbide artifacts with high thermal shock and mechanical erosion resistance are provided by incorporating tungsten-rhenium and carbon particles in a tantalum carbide matrix. The mix is sintered by hot pressing to form the ceramic article which has a high fracture strength relative to its elastic modulus and thus has an improved thermal shock and mechanical erosion resistance. The tantalum carbide is preferable less than minus 100 mesh, the carbon particles are preferable less than minus 100 mesh, and the tungsten-rhenium particles are preferable elongate, having a length to thickness ratio of at least 2/1. Tungsten-rhenium wire pieces are suitable as well as graphite particles.

  12. Centrifugally cast bimetallic pipe for offshore corrosion resistant pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitake, A.; Torigoe, T.

    1994-12-31

    Centrifugally cast bimetallic pipes and fittings have been developed for the use of offshore oil and gas production. The metallurgical properties, mechanical properties, and corrosion properties of centrifugal a cast bimetallic pipe with outside metal of API 5L X52 to X65 internally clad with alloy 825 and 625 are discussed. First, molten steel for outer pipe is introduced into a rotating metallic mold. During the solidification of the outer pipe (carbon steel), the temperature of the pipe inside is monitored. After the solidification of the outer pipe, and when a certain temperature is reached, then a corrosion resistant alloy such as Alloy 825 or 625 for inside layer is poured. By controlling the casting conditions and selecting suitable flux, sound metallurgical bonded bimetallic pipe is produced with a minimum mixing layer at the interface also keeping a homogeneous outside wall thickness along the pipe length. The weld joints of the pipe are also evaluated from the view points of weldability, mechanical strength, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance properties. The welding method applied was basically TIG welding (GTAW). COD tests at {minus}10 C are applied to the welds to investigate fracture toughness of the weld joints. Huey test according to ASTM A262C is carried out on the root of the welds as the corrosion test. As a result, the weld joint using filler wire of alloy625 from root to cover pass has proved a very reliable method from the point of view of mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. These centrifugally cast bimetallic pipes and fittings have been widely used for riser pipes, template process lines, top side and subsea manifolds, and flow bends for christmas trees in the North Sea.

  13. Improved corrosion resistance of excimer laser treated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmel, A.; Schubert, Emil; Barnikel, J.; Stiele, H. J.; Bergmann, Hans W.

    1994-09-01

    Excimer laser surface processing is well-known for material ablation, cleaning, deoxidation, smoothing or roughening. A typical industrial application is the polymer ablation for electronic components, however, the treatment of metals is only on the threshold of industrial use. A novel application reported here, may be an excimer treatment in air leading to oxide and nitrogen dissolution, resulting in an improved corrosion resistance. It is known from literature that corrosion resistance can be enhanced by laser surface alloying e.g. gas nitriding of Ti using CO2-lasers. However, all these techniques have the disadvantage of producing inhomogeneous layers. The aim of this study was to use the reactions during excimer laser irradiation of steel in air to produce layers in the thickness range of 0,1 to 2 micrometers with novel properties. Using the Siemens XP2020 excimer laser it was possible to scan technologically reasonable surface areas with energy densities in the range of 20 to 80 mJ/mm2 and several pulses per area. Steel sheets of 1.4541 (DIN) were irradiated in air and subsequently analyzed by XRD, SEM, TEM, AES and Mossbauer spectroscopy. The corrosion behavior was tested potentio-dynamically in 0,5 N H2SO4 and by gravimetric measurements of the weight loss. The XRD results showed, that the remaining delta-ferrite was eliminated. Both Mossbauer and Auger spectroscopy indicated a strong N- dissolution, hereby stabilizing the austenite. The TEM-investigations revealed fine dispersed oxides (chromites) and an increased dislocation density, resulting in pre-cellular arrangements after relaxation. Corrosion tests suggested the reduction of the material removal rates by a factor of 10 compared to untreated samples. The U(i) curves showed that after the excimer treatment less Cr is presented due to oxide formation in the surface layer. These Cr-oxides are the main reason for the improved corrosion resistance of excimer laser treated stainless steel.

  14. IMPROVED CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ALUMINA REFRACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven

    2001-09-30

    The initial objective of this project was to do a literature search to define the problems of refractory selection in the metals and glass industries. The problems fall into three categories: Economic--What do the major problems cost the industries financially? Operational--How do the major problems affect production efficiency and impact the environment? and Scientific--What are the chemical and physical mechanisms that cause the problems to occur? This report presents a summary of these problems. It was used to determine the areas in which the EERC can provide the most assistance through bench-scale and laboratory testing. The final objective of this project was to design and build a bench-scale high-temperature controlled atmosphere dynamic corrosion application furnace (CADCAF). The furnace will be used to evaluate refractory test samples in the presence of flowing corrodents for extended periods, to temperatures of 1600 C under controlled atmospheres. Corrodents will include molten slag, steel, and glass. This test should prove useful for the glass and steel industries when faced with the decision of choosing the best refractory for flowing corrodent conditions.

  15. Influence of Applied Voltage and Film-Formation Time on Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Coatings Formed on Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca Bio-magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandong, Yu; Shuzhen, Kuang; Jie, Li

    2015-09-01

    The influence of applied voltage and film-formation time on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of coatings formed on a Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy has been investigated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment. Phase composition and microstructure of as-coated samples were analyzed by the x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. And the porosity and average of micro-pore aperture of the surface on ceramic coatings were analyzed by general image software. Corrosion microstructure of as-coated samples was caught by a microscope digital camera. The long-term corrosion resistance of as-coated samples was tested in simulated body fluid for 30 days. The results showed that the milky white smooth ceramic coating formed on the Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy was a compound of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3, and its corrosion resistance was significantly improved compared with that of the magnesium substrate. In addition, when the MAO applied voltage were 450 V and 500 V and film-formation time were 9 min and 11 min, the surface micro-morphology and the corrosion resistance of as-coated samples were relatively improved. The results provided a theoretical foundation for the application of the Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy in biomedicine.

  16. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Angel Sanjurjo

    2004-05-01

    Heat-exchangers, filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand demanding conditions of high temperatures and pressure differentials. Under the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas, the performance of components degrade significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. A review of the literature indicates that the corrosion reaction is the competition between oxidation and sulfidation reactions. The Fe- and Ni-based high-temperature alloys are susceptible to sulfidation attack unless they are fortified with high levels of Cr, Al, and Si. To impart corrosion resistance, these elements need not be in the bulk of the alloy and need only be present at the surface layers.

  17. Enhancement of Corrosion Resistance of Zinc Coatings Using Green Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punith Kumar, M. K.; Srivastava, Chandan

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, morphology, microstructure, and electrochemical behavior of Zn coatings containing non-toxic additives have been investigated. Zn coatings were electrodeposited over mild steel substrates using Zn sulphate baths containing four different organic additives: sodium gluconate, dextrose, dextrin, and saccharin. All these additives are "green" and can be derived from food contents. Morphological and structural characterization using electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and texture co-efficient analysis revealed an appreciable alteration in the morphology and texture of the deposit depending on the type of additive used in the Zn plating bath. All the Zn coatings, however, were nano-crystalline irrespective of the type of additive used. Polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis, used to investigate the effect of the change in microstructure and morphology on corrosion resistance behavior, illustrated an improved corrosion resistance for Zn deposits obtained from plating bath containing additives as compared to the pure Zn coatings.

  18. Highly corrosion resistant weld overlay for oil patch applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hibner, E.L.; Maligas, M.N.; Vicic, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    Petroleum equipment companies currently sell 4130 and 4140 steel pipe with alloy 625 (UNS N06625) weld overlay for Oil Patch applications. Alloy 686 (UNS N06686), because of it`s superior corrosion resistance, is currently being evaluated as a replacement material for alloy 625. Mechanical properties and Slow Strain Rate test results for the alloy 686 weld overlay are discussed relative to the alloy 625 weld overlay.

  19. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Kwai S.; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry; Liang, Wuwei

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  20. Non-Magnetic, Tough, Corrosion- and Wear-Resistant Knives From Bulk Metallic Glasses and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Douglas C.; Potter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Quality knives are typically fabricated from high-strength steel alloys. Depending on the application, there are different requirements for mechanical and physical properties that cause problems for steel alloys. For example, diver's knives are generally used in salt water, which causes rust in steel knives. Titanium diver's knives are a popular alternative due to their salt water corrosion resistance, but are too soft to maintain a sharp cutting edge. Steel knives are also magnetic, which is undesirable for military applications where the knives are used as a tactical tool for diffusing magnetic mines. Steel is also significantly denser than titanium (8 g/cu cm vs. 4.5 g/cu cm), which results in heavier knives for the same size. Steel is hard and wear-resistant, compared with titanium, and can keep a sharp edge during service. A major drawback of both steel and titanium knives is that they must be ground or machined into the final knife shape from a billet. Since most knives have a mirrored surface and a complex shape, manufacturing them is complex. It would be more desirable if the knife could be cast into a net or near-net shape in a single step. The solution to the deficiencies of titanium, steel, and ceramic knives is to fabricate them using bulk metallic glasses (or composites). These alloys can be cast into net or near-net shaped knives with a combination of properties that exceed both titanium and steel. A commercially viable BMG (bulk metallic glass) or composite knife is one that exhibits one or all of the following properties: It is based on titanium, has a self-sharpening edge, can retain an edge during service, is hard, is non-magnetic, is corrosion-resistant against a variety of corrosive environments, is tough (to allow for prying), can be cast into a net-shape with a mirror finish and a complex shape, has excellent wear resistance, and is low-density. These properties can be achieved in BMG and composites through alloy chemistry and processing. For

  1. Electrodeposition and Corrosion Resistance of Ni-Graphene Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeptycka, Benigna; Gajewska-Midzialek, Anna; Babul, Tomasz

    2016-03-01

    The research on the graphene application for the electrodeposition of nickel composite coatings was conducted. The study assessed an important role of graphene in an increased corrosion resistance of these coatings. Watts-type nickel plating bath with low concentration of nickel ions, organic addition agents, and graphene as dispersed particles were used for deposition of the composite coatings nickel-graphene. The results of investigations of composite coatings nickel-graphene deposited from the bath containing 0.33, 0.5, and 1 g/dm3 graphene and one surface-active substance were shown. The contents of particles in coatings, the surface morphology, the cross-sectional structures of the coated samples, and their thickness and the internal stresses were studied. Voltammetric method was used for examination of the corrosion resistance of samples of composite coatings in 0.5 M NaCl. The obtained results suggest that the content of incorporated graphene particles increases with an increasing amount of graphene in plating bath. The application of organic compounds was advantageous because it caused compressive stresses in the deposited coatings. All of the nickel-graphene composite layers had better corrosion resistance than the nickel coating.

  2. Gas-flame deposition of corrosion-resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lakhotkin, Yu.V.; Kuz`min, V.P.; Nikolaev, V.N.

    1995-07-01

    A technology has been developed for the gas-flame deposition of corrosion-resistant coatings. The coatings have a number of potential uses: for regulating valves and stop valves on oil and gas pipelines; for important friction elements subject to abrasive and corrosive wear during service; for hard-alloy cutting plates and tools made of high-speed steel that are used to machine metal, wood, stone, and glass; for dies and die plates used to shape metals. The technology makes is possible to obtain coatings of tungsten carbide on products made of hard alloys, structural and high-speed steels, copper, and nickel. The process is conducted at a temperature of 450-550{degrees}C. Deposition rate is 100-500 {mu}m/h. Coating thickness ranges up to 500 {mu}m. The microhardness of the coating can reach 3500 kg/mm{sup 2} (35 kN/mm{sup 2}), which is 2-3 times greater than the microhardness of hard alloys, titanium nitride, and galvanic chromium. Adhesion approaches 15-20 kg/mm{sup 2}. The coatings are resistant to corrosion in acidic and alkaline media and hydrogen sulfide. The most promising application of the technology is for important friction elements subject to corrosive wear during service. Tests of pipeline valves and bushings in corrosive media showed that service life is increased by a factor between ten and a hundred. The inventors of the method own the rights to this technology in the Russian Federation.

  3. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  4. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  5. Support services for ceramic fiber-ceramic matrix composites. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W.

    1996-12-27

    Ceramic and advanced alloy corrosion in fossil energy systems is being investigated. During 1995-6, ash was collected for testing corrosion resistance of materials in air-blown fluidized-bed gasification systems. Descriptions of the activities are presented in this report, which is an extension of a technical paper on testing corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems. A section of this report covers factors affecting the composition of ash deposits.

  6. Status of coal ash corrosion resistant materials test program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.K.; Meisenhelter, D.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1999-07-01

    In November of 1998, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) began development of a system to permit testing of several advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam conditions of 1100 F and higher in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B and W, and First Energy's Ohio Edison jointly fund the project. CONSOL Energy Company is also participating as an advisor. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. The coal-ash corrosion resistant materials test program will provide full scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater and reheater tube materials. These newer materials may be capable of operating at higher steam temperatures while resisting external/fire-side corrosion. For high sulfur coal applications, this is a key issue for advanced cycle pulverized coal-fired plants. Fireside corrosion is also a critical issue for many existing plants. Previous testing of high temperature materials in the United States has been based primarily on using laboratory test coupons. The test coupons did not operate at conditions representative of a high sulfur coal-fired boiler. Testing outside of the United States has been with low sulfur coal or natural gas firing and has not addressed corrosion issues. This test program takes place in an actual operating boiler and is expected to confirm the performance of these materials with high sulfur coal. The system consists of three identical sections, each containing multiple pieces of twelve different materials. They are cooled by reheater steam, and are located just above the furnace exit in Ohio Edison's Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. After one year of operation, the first section will be removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation. The second and third sections will operate for three and

  7. Corrosion resistance of steel materials in LiCl-KCl melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Li, Bing; Shen, Miao; Li, Shi-yan; Yu, Jian-guo

    2012-10-01

    The corrosion behaviors of 304SS, 316LSS, and Q235A in LiCl-KCl melts were investigated at 450°C by Tafel curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). 316LSS shows the best corrosion resistance behaviors among the three materials, including the most positive corrosion potential and the smallest corrosion current from the Tafel curves and the largest electron transfer resistance from the Nyquist plots. The results are in good agreement with the weight losses in the static corrosion experiments for 45 h. This may be attributed to the better corrosion resistance of Mo and Ni existing as alloy elements in 316LSS, which exhibit the lower corrosion current densities and more positive corrosion potentials than 316LSS in the same melts.

  8. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot-gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, M.F.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of the 3M material to a combustion environment for as little as 25 hours at 800{degrees}C. The study of heat exchanger materials has focused on enhancing the corrosion resistance of DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} composite tubes by adding chromium to its surfaces by (1) heat treatments in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed, or (2) infiltrating surface porosity with molten chromium nitrate. Each process is followed by a surface homogenization at 1500{degrees}C. The powder bed method has been most successful, producing continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. As-received and Cr-modified DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} samples will be reacted with commonly encountered coal-ash slags to determine the Cr effects on corrosion resistance.

  9. Corrosion resistance tests on NiTi shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, G

    1996-10-01

    The corrosion performances of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) in human body simulating fluids were evaluated in comparison with other implant materials. As for the passivity current in potentiostatic conditions, taken as an index of ion release, the values are about three times higher for NiTi than for Ti6Al4V and austenitic stainless steels. Regarding the localized corrosion, while plain potentiodynamic scans indicated for NiTi alloy good resistance to pitting attack similar to Ti6Al4V, tests in which the passive film is abruptly damaged (i.e. potentiostatic scratch test and modified ASTM F746) pointed out that the characteristics of the passive film formed on NiTi alloy (whose strength can be related to the alloy's biocompatibility) are not as good as those on Ti6Al4V but are comparable or inferior to those on austenitic stainless steels. PMID:8894095

  10. Corrosion-resistant catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C.; LaConti, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    High-surface-area carbon blacks such as Vulcan XC-72 (Cabot Corp.) and graphitized carbon blacks such as 2700{degree}C heat-treated Black Pearls 2000 (HTBP) (Cabot Corp.) have found widespread applications as catalyst supports in phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs). However, due to the operating temperatures and pressures being utilized in PAFCs currently under development, the carbon-based cathode catalyst supports suffer from corrosion, which decreases the performance and life span of a PAFC stack. The feasibility of using alternative, low-cost, corrosion-resistant catalyst support (CRCS) materials as replacements for the cathode carbon support materials was investigated. The objectives of the program were to prepare high-surface-area alternative supports and to evaluate the physical characteristics and the electrochemical stability of these materials. The O{sub 2} reduction activity of the platinized CRCS materials was also evaluated. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Coatings for directional eutectics. [for corrosion and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, E. J.; Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven coating systems based on MCrAlY overlay and diffusion aluminide prototypes were evaluated to determine their capability for protecting the gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic alloy (Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) in gas turbine engine applications. Furnace oxidation and hot corrosion, Mach 0.37 burner-rig, tensile ductility, stress-rupture and thermomechanical fatigue tests were used to evaluate the coated gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy. The diffusion aluminide coatings provided adequate oxidation resistance at 1144 K (1600 F) but offered very limited protection in 114 K (1600 F) hot corrosion and 1366 K (2000 F) oxidation tests. A platinum modified NiCrAlY overlay coating exhibited excellent performance in oxidation testing and had no adverse effects upon the eutectic alloy.

  12. Recent developments in wear and corrosion resistant alloys for oil industry

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, D.; Wu, J.B.C.

    1997-08-01

    Oil production and refining environments pose a very severe wear and corrosion environment. Material designers are challenged with the need to design and develop materials that combine a high corrosion resistance with very good wear resistance. Coupled with that is the need for these materials to meet requirements, such as, fracture toughness and resistance to sulfide and chloride stress corrosion cracking. Often times, increasing the resistance to wear compromises the corrosion and welding characteristics. This paper covers a variety of material developments that aim to address the twin problems of wear and corrosion. The paper covers the alloy design fundamentals and discusses the pertinent wear properties and general corrosion resistance compared to traditional wear resistant materials. Proven applications, with particular reference to petroleum and petro-chemical areas are discussed. Potential applications are also cited.

  13. Detecting Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90 deg fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  14. Detecting Cracks in Ceramic Matrix Composites by Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90o fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  15. Absorption Voltages and Insulation Resistance in Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Time dependence of absorption voltages (V(sub abs)) in different types of low-voltage X5R and X7R ceramic capacitors was monitored for a maximum duration of hundred hours after polarization. To evaluate the effect of mechanical defects on V(sub abs)), cracks in the dielectric were introduced either mechanically or by thermal shock. The maximum absorption voltage, time to roll-off, and the rate of voltage decrease are shown to depend on the crack-related leakage currents and insulation resistance in the parts. A simple model that is based on the Dow equivalent circuit for capacitors with absorption has been developed to assess the insulation resistance of capacitors. Standard measurements of the insulation resistance, contrary to the measurements based on V(sub abs)), are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects and fail to reveal capacitors with cracks.

  16. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS

  17. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  18. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1987-09-22

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate. 2 figs.

  19. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1987-01-01

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  20. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J S; Haslam, J; Lian, T; Day, S; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peters, W; Bayles, R; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E; Ajdelsztajn, A; Grave, O; Aprigliano, L; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, B

    2006-04-11

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative thermal phase stability, microstructure, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, and corrosion resistance. Some alloy additions are known to promote glass formation and to lower the critical cooling rate [F. Guo, S. J. Poon, Applied Physics Letters, 83 (13) 2575-2577, 2003]. Other elements are known to enhance the corrosion resistance of conventional stainless steels and nickel-based alloys [A. I. Asphahani, Materials Performance, Vol. 19, No. 12, pp. 33-43, 1980] and have been found to provide similar benefits to iron-based amorphous metals. Many of these materials can be cast as relatively thick ingots, or applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. A wide variety of thermal spray processes have been developed by industry, and can be used to apply these new materials as coatings. Any of these can be used for the deposition of the formulations discussed here, with varying degrees of residual porosity and crystalline structure. Thick protective coatings have now been made that are fully dense and completely amorphous in the as-sprayed condition. An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Project will be given, with particular emphasis on the corrosion resistance of several different types of iron-based amorphous metals in various environments of interest. The salt fog test has been used to compare the performance of various wrought alloys, melt-spun ribbons, arc-melted drop-cast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings for their susceptibility to corrosion in marine environments. Electrochemical tests have also been performed in seawater. Spontaneous breakdown of the passive film and localized corrosion require that the open-circuit corrosion potential exceed the critical potential. The resistance to localized corrosion is seawater has been

  1. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions. [for thermal resistant insulators and refractory coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance are properties of cermet compositions particularly to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on metal substrates, for use as electrical insulation seals for thermionic converters. The compositions comprise a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride are also described.

  2. Facile formation of superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface and corrosion-resistant behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Libang; Yan, Zhongna; Qiang, Xiaohu; Liu, Yanhua; Wang, Yanping

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic surface with excellent corrosion resistance was prepared on aluminum alloy via boiling water treatment and surface modification with stearic acid. Results suggested that the micro- and nanoscale hierarchical structure along with the hydrophobic chemical composition surface confers the aluminum alloy surface with good superhydrophobicity, and the water contact angle and the water sliding angle can reach 156.6° and 3°, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the superhydrophobic aluminum alloy was first characterized by potentiodynamic polarization, and then the long-term corrosion resistance was investigated by immersing the sample in NaCl solution for 90 days. The surface wettability, morphology, and composition before and after immersion were examined, and results showed that the superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface possessed good corrosion resistance under the experimental conditions, which is favorable for its practical application as an engineering material in seawater corrosion conditions. Finally, the mechanism of the superhydrophobicity and excellent corrosion resistance is deduced.

  3. The influence of albumin on corrosion resistance of titanium in fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Ide, Katsuhisa; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2003-09-01

    Proteins can interact with corrosion reactions in several ways. In this study, we investigated the effect of albumin on the corrosion resistance of titanium in the presence of fluoride. The effects of the NaF concentration, albumin concentration, and pH on the corrosion characteristics of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) were examined by means of electrochemical techniques. The corrosion resistance of titanium decreased as the NaF concentration increased and as pH decreased. The corrosion resistance of titanium in NaF solutions was improved in the presence of albumin. The natural electrode potential was elevated, and the passive current density was reduced by albumin at a concentration of 0.01%. The polarization resistance rose with increased concentrations of albumin in fluoride solution. These results showed that the albumin in saliva and dental plaque affected the corrosion resistance of CP-Ti in fluoride solution. PMID:14621001

  4. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant, weldable FeAl alloys have been developed with improved high-temperature strength industrial applications. Previous processing difficulties with these alloys led to their evaluation as weld-overlay claddings on conventional structural steels to take advantage of their good properties now. Simplified and better processing methods for monolithic FeAl components are also currently being developed so that components for industrial testing can be made. Other avenues for producing FeAl coatings are currently being explored. Neutron scattering experiments residual stress distributions in the FeAl weld-overlay cladding began in FY 1993 and continued this year.

  5. Improved fracture toughness corrosion-resistant bearing material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Nahm, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    A development program was performed to establish whether a corrosion-resistant bearing material, such as a 14Cr steel, could be modified to allow carburization, thereby providing the excellent fracture toughness characteristics feasible with this process. The alloy selected for investigation was AMS 5749. Several modifications were made including the addition of a small amount of nickel for austenite stabilization. While some promising results were achieved, the primary objective of an acceptable combination of case hardness and microstructure was not attained. Because the high chromium content presents a serious problem in achieving a viable carburizing cycle, a number of experimental steels having lower chromium contents (8 to 12%) were produced in laboratory quantities and evaluated. The results were basically the same as those initially obtained with the modified AMS 5749. Corrosion tests were performed on AMS 5749, AISI M50, and 52100 bearing steels as well as some of the lower chromium steels. These tests showed that a reduced chromium level (10 to 12%) provided essentially the same corrosion protection as the 14Cr steels.

  6. Effect of the deposition temperature on corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladescu, A.; Braic, M.; Azem, F. Ak; Titorencu, I.; Braic, V.; Pruna, V.; Kiss, A.; Parau, A. C.; Birlik, I.

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics belong to a class of calcium phosphate-based materials, which have been widely used as coatings on titanium medical implants in order to improve bone fixation and thus to increase the lifetime of the implant. In this study, HAP coatings were deposited from pure HAP targets on Ti6Al4V substrates using the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique at substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 800 °C. The surface morphology and the crystallographic structure of the films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the coatings in saliva solution at 37 °C was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization. Additionally, the human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) was used to test the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results showed that all of the coatings grown uniformly and that the increasing substrate temperature induced an increase in their crystallinity. Corrosion performance of the coatings was improved with the increase of the substrate temperature from 400 °C to 800 °C. Furthermore, all the coatings support the attachment and growth of the osteosarcoma cells with regard to the in vitro test findings.

  7. High strength and corrosion resistant alloys weld overlays for oil patch applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hibner, E.L.; Maligas, M.N.; Vicic, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    Corrosion resistant alloys (CRAs) are specified for oilfield applications where severe environments cause general corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, chloride stress corrosion cracking and more importantly sulfide stress cracking. Historically, alloy 625 (UNS N06625) weld overlay has successfully been used in severely corrosive environments. Alloy 686 (UNS N06686) and alloy 725 (UNS N07725) have recently been evaluated as replacement materials for alloy 625. Alloy 686, because of it`s high alloying content, exhibits superior corrosion resistance to alloy 625. And, alloy 725 is a highly corrosion resistant alloy capable of being age hardened to 0.2% yield strengths of above 827 MPa (120 ksi) Mechanical properties and Slow Strain Rate test results for the alloy 686 and alloy 725 weld overlays are discussed relative to alloy 625, alloy C-22 (UNS N06622) and alloy 59 (UNS N06059) weld overlays.

  8. Corrosion resistance of titanium ion implanted AZ91 magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chenglong; Xin Yunchang; Tian Xiubo; Zhao, J.; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-03-15

    Degradable metal alloys constitute a new class of materials for load-bearing biomedical implants. Owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, magnesium alloys are promising in degradable prosthetic implants. The objective of this study is to improve the corrosion behavior of surgical AZ91 magnesium alloy by titanium ion implantation. The surface characteristics of the ion implanted layer in the magnesium alloys are examined. The authors' results disclose that an intermixed layer is produced and the surface oxidized films are mainly composed of titanium oxide with a lesser amount of magnesium oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the oxide has three layers. The outer layer which is 10 nm thick is mainly composed of MgO and TiO{sub 2} with some Mg(OH){sub 2}. The middle layer that is 50 nm thick comprises predominantly TiO{sub 2} and MgO with minor contributions from MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and TiO. The third layer from the surface is rich in metallic Mg, Ti, Al, and Ti{sub 3}Al. The effects of Ti ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of the magnesium alloys are investigated in simulated body fluids at 37{+-}1 deg. C using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit potential techniques. Compared to the unimplanted AZ91 alloy, titanium ion implantation significantly shifts the open circuit potential (OCP) to a more positive potential and improves the corrosion resistance at OCP. This phenomenon can be ascribed to the more compact surface oxide film, enhanced reoxidation on the implanted surface, as well as the increased {beta}-Mg{sub 12}Al{sub 17} phase.

  9. Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez-Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

    2007-03-31

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the hightemperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period, we analyzed several 409 low alloy steel samples after coating them in our fluidized bed reactor and also after exposing them to our corrosion test. We report the following findings: 1. A protective coating was deposited inside a porous 409 steel sample to protect it from sulfidation attack. The coating was based on a combination of Si diffusion layer, Nb interlayer and nitrides of titanium and silicon. 2. Analysis of solid coupons exposed to simulated coal gas at 900 C for 300 h showed that multilayer metal/ceramic coatings provide a better protection than ceramic coatings. 3. Deposition of several ceramic/metal multilayer coatings showed that coatings with niobium and tantalum interlayers have good adhesion. However, coatings with a tungsten interlayer suffered localized delaminating and coatings with Zr interlayers showed poor adhesion. 4. Analysis of solid coupons, coated with the above-mentioned multilayer films, after exposure to simulated coal gas at 900 C for 300 h showed that niobium is the best candidate for interlayer material.

  10. The effect of ceramic/metal gradient armor's components characteristic on its impact-resistant characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Lisheng; Zhang Qingjie; Zhai Pengcheng; Cao Dongfeng

    2008-02-15

    The effect of ceramic/metal gradient armor's components characteristic on its impact-resistant characteristic has been investigated by a new modified Alekseevskii-Tate equation. The following researching work is done by the former model [1]: the effect of ceramic layer on the impact-resistant characteristic, the effect of gradient layer on the impact-resistant characteristic and the effect of metal layer on the impact-resistant characteristic.

  11. Corrosion resistance of premodeled wires made of stainless steel used for heart electrotherapy leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przondziono, J.; Walke, W.; Młynarski, R.; Szatka, W.

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate resistance to electrochemical corrosion of wire made of X10CrNi18-8 stainless steel designed for use in cardiology treatment. The influence of strain formed in the premodeling process and methods of wire surface preparation to corrosive resistance in artificial plasma solution were analysed. Wire corrosion tests were carried out in the solution of artificial plasma. Resistance to electrochemical corrosion was evaluated on the ground of recorded curves of anodic polarization by means of potentiodynamic method. Potentiodynamic tests carried out enabled to determine how the resistance to pitting corrosion of wire changes, depending on strain formed in the premodeling process as well as on the method of wire surface preparation. For evaluation of phenomena occurring on the surface of tested steel, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was applied. Deterioration of corrosive properties of wire along with the increase in the formed strain hardening was observed.

  12. Characterization of the corrosion resistance of biologically active solutions: The effects of anodizing and welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1991-01-01

    An understanding of fabrication processes, metallurgy, electrochemistry, and microbiology is crucial to the resolution of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) problems. The object of this effort was to use AC impedance spectroscopy to characterize the corrosion resistance of Type II anodized aluminum alloy 2219-T87 in sterile and biologically active media and to examine the corrosion resistance of 316L, alloy 2219-T87, and titanium alloy 6-4 in the welded and unwelded conditions. The latter materials were immersed in sterile and biologically active media and corrosion currents were measured using the polarization resistance (DC) technique.

  13. Effects of Pulse Electromagnetic Field on Corrosion Resistance of Al-5 % Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Tang, L. D.; Qi, J. G.; Wang, J. Z.

    2013-03-01

    It was investigated that corrosion resistance of Al-5 % Cu alloy was influenced by pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF). The morphologies were observed by scanning election microscopy (SEM). The corrosion behaviors were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization tests and immersion tests. The results indicated that corrosion resistance of samples could be increased by using pulse electromagnetic field, moreover, the optimum parameter of pulse electromagnetic field in this experiment was showed as follows: 500 V, 3 Hz, 30 s. Decreasing the quantity of eutectic in grain boundaries and refining the grains were main causations for increasing corrosion resistance of Al-5 % Cu alloy with pulse electromagnetic field.

  14. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Stratis V. Sotirchos

    2001-02-01

    The main objective of this research project was the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Since alumina has excellent resistance to corrosion but coefficient than silicon carbide, the key idea of this project has been to develop graded coatings with composition varying smoothly along their thickness between an inner (base) layer of mullite in contact with the silicon carbide component and an outer layer of pure alumina, which would function as the actual protective coating of the component. (Mullite presents very good adhesion towards silicon carbide and has thermal expansion coefficient very close to that of the latter.)

  15. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  16. [The corrosion resistance of aluminum and aluminum-based alloys studied in artificial model media].

    PubMed

    Zhakhangirov, A Zh; Doĭnikov, A I; Aboev, V G; Iankovskaia, T A; Karamnova, V S; Sharipov, S M

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum and its alloys, designed for orthodontic employment, were exposed to 4 media simulating the properties of biologic media. The corrosion resistance of the tested alloys was assessed from the degree of aluminum migration to simulation media solutions, which was measured by the neutron activation technique. Aluminum alloy with magnesium and titanium has shown the best corrosion resistance. PMID:1799002

  17. Environmental Considerations in the Studies of Corrosion Resistant Alloys for High-Level Radioactive Waste Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Ilevbare, G O; Lian, T; Farmer, J C

    2001-11-26

    The corrosion resistance of Alloy 22 (UNS No.: N06022) was studied in simulated ground water of different pH values and ionic contents at various temperatures. Potentiodynamic polarization techniques were used to study the electrochemical behavior and measure the critical potentials in the various systems. Alloy 22 was found to be resistant to localized corrosion in the simulated ground waters tested.

  18. Structural factors governing steel resistance during operation in corrosive media under cavitation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Berezovskaya, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of structural factors on the corrosion resistance of steel under cavitation, a study was made of the effect of cavitation on chromium (95Kh18) and chromium-nickel (12Kh18N9T) corrosion-resistant steels and also on maraging steel 03Kh10N5K5M3KTYuS, specially developed for the loading conditions being studied, together with the austenitic steel 03Kh23N28M3D3T. A study of the effect of martensite content on corrosion and cavitation-corrosion resistance was carried out on steels 12Kh18N9T and 95Kh18 after different treatments. Corrosion tests were conducted in solutions of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ and scanning electron microscopy was used to assess phase and corrosion behavior. Maraging steels treated for maximum hardness and overaging exhibited high cavitation-corrosion resistance in acid solutions owing to high strength and resistance to microcrack initiation and propagation. It was recommended that under cavitation conditions in corrosive media, high alloy austenitic corrosion-resistant steels are substituted by maraging steels.

  19. A high-specific-strength and corrosion-resistant magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wanqiang; Birbilis, Nick; Sha, Gang; Wang, Yu; Daniels, John E.; Xiao, Yang; Ferry, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Ultra-lightweight alloys with high strength, ductility and corrosion resistance are desirable for applications in the automotive, aerospace, defence, biomedical, sporting and electronic goods sectors. Ductility and corrosion resistance are generally inversely correlated with strength, making it difficult to optimize all three simultaneously. Here we design an ultralow density (1.4 g cm-3) Mg-Li-based alloy that is strong, ductile, and more corrosion resistant than Mg-based alloys reported so far. The alloy is Li-rich and a solute nanostructure within a body-centred cubic matrix is achieved by a series of extrusion, heat-treatment and rolling processes. Corrosion resistance from the environment is believed to occur by a uniform lithium carbonate film in which surface coverage is much greater than in traditional hexagonal close-packed Mg-based alloys, explaining the superior corrosion resistance of the alloy.

  20. A high-specific-strength and corrosion-resistant magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanqiang; Birbilis, Nick; Sha, Gang; Wang, Yu; Daniels, John E; Xiao, Yang; Ferry, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Ultra-lightweight alloys with high strength, ductility and corrosion resistance are desirable for applications in the automotive, aerospace, defence, biomedical, sporting and electronic goods sectors. Ductility and corrosion resistance are generally inversely correlated with strength, making it difficult to optimize all three simultaneously. Here we design an ultralow density (1.4 g cm(-3)) Mg-Li-based alloy that is strong, ductile, and more corrosion resistant than Mg-based alloys reported so far. The alloy is Li-rich and a solute nanostructure within a body-centred cubic matrix is achieved by a series of extrusion, heat-treatment and rolling processes. Corrosion resistance from the environment is believed to occur by a uniform lithium carbonate film in which surface coverage is much greater than in traditional hexagonal close-packed Mg-based alloys, explaining the superior corrosion resistance of the alloy. PMID:26480229

  1. Effect of High Temperature Aging on the Corrosion Resistance of Iron Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-10

    Iron-based amorphous alloys can be more resistant to corrosion than polycrystalline materials of similar compositions. However, when the amorphous alloys are exposed to high temperatures they may recrystallize (or devitrify) thus losing their resistance to corrosion. Four different types of amorphous alloys melt spun ribbon specimens were exposed to several temperatures for short periods of time. The resulting corrosion resistance was evaluated in seawater at 90 C and compared with the as-prepared ribbons. Results show that the amorphous alloys can be exposed to 600 C for 1-hr. without losing the corrosion resistance; however, when the ribbons were exposed at 800 C for 1-hr. their localized corrosion resistance decreased significantly.

  2. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Corrosion Resistance of Carbon Steel Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of carbon steel weld metal with three different microstructures has been systematically evaluated using electrochemical techniques with the simulated produced water containing CO2 at 90 °C. Microstructures include acicular ferrite, polygonal ferrite, and a small amount of pearlite. With welding heat input increasing, weld metal microstructure becomes more uniform. Electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic polarization curve, linear polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the corrosion properties on weld joint, indicating that the best corrosion resistance corresponded to the weld metal with a polygonal ferrite microstructure, whereas the weld metal with the acicular ferrite + polygonal ferrite microstructure showed the worst corrosion resistance. The samples with high welding heat input possessed better corrosion resistance. Results were discussed in terms of crystal plane orientation, grain size, and grain boundary type found in each weld metal by electron backscatter diffraction test.

  3. Field trials for corrosion inhibitor selection and optimization, using a new generation of electrical resistance probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ridd, B.; Blakset, T.J.; Queen, D.

    1998-12-31

    Even with today`s availability of corrosion resistant alloys, carbon steels protected by corrosion inhibitors still dominate the material selection for pipework in the oil and gas production. Even though laboratory screening tests of corrosion inhibitor performance provides valuable data, the real performance of the chemical can only be studied through field trials which provide the ultimate test to evaluate the effectiveness of an inhibitor under actual operating conditions. A new generation of electrical resistance probe has been developed, allowing highly sensitive and immediate response to changes in corrosion rates on the internal environment of production pipework. Because of the high sensitivity, the probe responds to small changes in the corrosion rate, and it provides the corrosion engineer with a highly effective method of optimizing the use of inhibitor chemicals resulting in confidence in corrosion control and minimizing detrimental environmental effects.

  4. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)₂ solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete. PMID:27618054

  5. Nanostructure and Properties of Corrosion Resistance in C+Ti Multi-Ion-Implanted Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong-He; Wu, Yu-Guang; Liu, An-Dong; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xiao-Yan

    2003-09-01

    The corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance of C+Ti dual and C+Ti+C ternary implanted H13 steel were studied by using a multi-sweep cyclic voltammetry and a scanning electron microscope. The effects of phase formation on corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance were explored. The x-ray diffraction analysis shows that the nanometer-sized precipitate phases consist of compounds of Fe2Ti, TiC, Fe2C and Fe3C in dual implanted layer and even in ternary implanted layer. The passivation layer consists of these nanometer phases. It has been found that the corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance of dual and ternary implanted H13 steel are improved extremely. The corrosion resistance of ternary implanted layer is better than that of dual implantations and is enhanced with the increasing ion dose. When the ion dose of Ti is 6×1017/cm2 in the ternary implantation sample, the anodic peak current density is 95 times less than that of the H13 steel. The pitting corrosion potential of dual and ternary implantation samples is in the range from 55 mV to 160 mV which is much higher than that of the H13 steel. The phases against the corrosion and pitting corrosion are nanometer silkiness phases.

  6. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-07-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  7. Monitoring Damage Accumulation in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai H.

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection and accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites. Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) possess unique properties such as high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, improved toughness, and good environmental stability (oxidation resistance), making them particularly suitable for hot structure applications. In specific, CMCs could be applied to hot section components of gas turbines [1], aerojet engines [2], thermal protection systems [3], and hot control surfaces [4]. The benefits of implementing these materials include reduced cooling air requirements, lower weight, simpler component design, longer service life, and higher thrust [5]. It has been identified in NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program that the SiC/SiC CMC has the most promise for high temperature, high oxidation applications [6]. One of the critical issues in the successful application of CMCs is on-board or insitu assessment of the damage state and an accurate prediction of the remaining service life of a particular component. This is of great concern, since most CMC components envisioned for aerospace applications will be exposed to harsh environments and play a key role in the vehicle s safety. On-line health monitoring can enable prediction of remaining life; thus resulting in improved safety and reliability of structural components. Monitoring can also allow for appropriate corrections to be made in real time, therefore leading to the prevention of catastrophic failures. Most conventional nondestructive

  8. Erosion-corrosion resistance of thermal sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.W.; Wang, B.Q.

    1996-11-01

    A series of laboratory erosion-corrosion experiments at the elevated temperature, 300 C and different impact velocities (2.5 m/s, 30 m/s) were carried on AISI 1018 low carbon steel and three different sprayed coating specimens. Angular silica quartz particles of 742 um were the erodent material for testing three different impact angles of 30{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree}. Material wastage rates were determined from thickness loss measurements of the specimens. The morphologies of the specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The erosion-corrosion resistance of coating was found to be related to their composition and microstructure rather than to their hardness. The material wastage of the specimen was determined by weight and thickness loss measurements. The morphologies of the specimens were examined scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the material wastage of the coating specimens, High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) coatings (DS200) and the arc-sprayed coating at elevated temperature condition exhibited 2 to 3 times lower erosion wastage than that of AISI 1018 steel.

  9. High-rate timing resistive plate chambers with ceramic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laso Garcia, A.; Kotte, R.; Naumann, L.; Stach, D.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Kämpfer, B.

    2016-05-01

    We describe recent advances in developing radiation-hard ceramic resistive plate chambers (CRPCs) with Si3N4/SiC composites. Bulk resistivity measurements for this material for different manufacturing processes are reported. The results show that the bulk resistivity ρ can vary between 107 and1013 Ω cm. The varistor type behaviour of the material is analysed. A comparison with other materials used in timing RPCs is given. We describe the assembly and tests of CRPC prototypes in electron and proton beams. For a prototype with ρ ~ 5 ×109 Ω cm, the efficiency of the detectors is 95% at a flux of 2 ×105cm-2s-1. The time resolution at the same flux is about 120 ps. A prototype with ρ ~ 2 ×1010 Ω cm shows an efficiency of about 85% up to fluxes of 5 ×104cm-2s-1 with a time resolution better than 80 ps. The results are compared with RPC models.

  10. Structural strength of welded shells made of corrosion-resistant maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Raimond, E.D.; Lapin, P.G.; Pautkin, U.S.; Shiganov, N.V.; Tashchikov, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors devise special measures to increase the resistance of welded shells made of corrosion-resistant maraging steels. High structural strenght is ensured for shells loaded by internal pressure when ait (impact toughness) greater than or equal to10 J/cm/sup 2/. For welds of corrosion-resistant maraging steels of the O3Kh11N10M2T type, this condition is satisfied when the weld strength does not exceed 1400-1450 MPa. A structural strength of 15001750 MPa in welds of corrosion-resistant maraging steels can be obtained by means of mechanicothermal treatment.

  11. 77 FR 13093 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea... administrative review of the countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat... Review'' below. \\1\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of...

  12. 76 FR 77775 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea covering the period January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2009. See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel...

  13. 77 FR 24221 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... COMMISSION Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Notice of Commission... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea and the antidumping duty orders on corrosion- resistant carbon steel flat products from Germany and Korea would be likely to...

  14. Resistive Memory for Harsh Electronics: Immunity to Surface Effect and High Corrosion Resistance via Surface Modification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Teng-Han; Yang, Po-Kang; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Chen-Fang; Tsai, Meng-Lin; Chueh, Yu-Lun; He, Jr-Hau

    2014-01-01

    The tolerance/resistance of the electronic devices to extremely harsh environments is of supreme interest. Surface effects and chemical corrosion adversely affect stability and operation uniformity of metal oxide resistive memories. To achieve the surrounding-independent behavior, the surface modification is introduced into the ZnO memristors via incorporating fluorine to replace the oxygen sites. F-Zn bonds is formed to prevent oxygen chemisorption and ZnO dissolution upon corrosive atmospheric exposure, which effectively improves switching characteristics against harmful surroundings. In addition, the fluorine doping stabilizes the cycling endurance and narrows the distribution of switching parameters. The outcomes provide valuable insights for future nonvolatile memory developments in harsh electronics. PMID:24638086

  15. Friction and Surface Damage of Several Corrosion-resistant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Marshall B; Johnson, Robert L

    1952-01-01

    Friction and surface damage of several materials that are resistant to corrosion due to liquid metals was studied in air. The values of kinetic friction coefficient at low sliding velocities and photomicrographs of surface damage were obtained. Appreciable surface damage was evident for all materials tested. The friction coefficients for the combinations of steel, stainless steel, and monel sliding against steel, stainless steel, nickel, Iconel, and Nichrome ranged from 0.55 for the monel-Inconel combination to 0.97 for the stainless-steel-nickel combination; for steel, stainless steel, monel, and tungsten carbide against zirconium, the friction coefficient was approximately 0.47. Lower coefficients of friction (0.20 to 0.60) and negligible surface failure at light loads were obtained with tungsten carbide when used in combination with various plate materials.

  16. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan

    2004-05-01

    Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated gasification combined cycle plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. A startup meeting was held at the National Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA site on July 28, 2003. SRI staff described the technical approach of the project.

  17. Nitrogen-atomized, nickel-based, corrosion-resistant alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Frank J.

    1996-04-01

    Nitrogen gas atomization has been used for many years to produce iron-based powder-metal materials such as stainless and tool steels. However, it is more typical to use argon atomization with nickel-based alloys because it avoids the formation of nitrides that, in some cases, can be detrimental to the mechanical properties of these materials. In this article, two nickel-based materials— alloy 625 and alloy 690—normally used for applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance were evaluated in their nitrogen-atomized powder metal form. Nitrogen atomization uncovered attributes of these nickel alloys that are not present in their conventionally produced counterparts or in argon-atomized versions of the same compositions.

  18. Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components

    SciTech Connect

    Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Hirschfeld, D.A.

    1998-11-01

    Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

  19. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  20. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  1. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Clads of Inconel 625 and Metco 41C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Fidler, Lukáš; Fišerová, Pavla

    The present paper explores the impact of laser cladding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of the resulting surface. Powders of Inconel 625 and austenitic Metco 41C steel were deposited on steel substrate. It was confirmed that the level of dilution has profound impact on the corrosion resistance and that dilution has to be minimized. However, the chemical composition of the cladding is altered even in the course of the cladding process, a fact which is related to the increase in the substrate temperature. The cladding process was optimized to achieve maximum corrosion resistance. The results were verified and validated using microscopic observation, chemical analysis and corrosion testing.

  2. Assessment of corrosion resistance of Nd-Fe-B magnets by silanization for orthodontic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiano, F.; Celegato, F.; Giordano, A.; Borsellino, C.; Bonaccorsi, L.; Calabrese, L.; Tiberto, P.; Cordasco, G.; Matarese, G.; Fabiano, V.; Azzerboni, B.

    2014-02-01

    Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets are characterised by excellent magnetic properties. However, being extremely vulnerable to the attack of both climate and corrosive environments, their applications are limited. This paper describes how, at different thicknesses of N-propyl-trimetoxy-silane, the coating affects the magnetic force of nickel plated magnets. We also investigate if the corrosion resistance of silanized Nd-Fe-B magnets increases in mildly corrosive environments by immersing them in a synthetic saliva solution. It was found that the silanization treatment does not affect the strength of the magnetic force and provide an enhancement of the corrosion resistance of the substrate.

  3. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    PubMed

    Salahinejad, E; Ghaffari, M; Vashaee, D; Tayebi, L

    2016-05-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn-Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn-Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. PMID:26952444

  4. Environmental Cracking of Corrosion Resistant Alloys in the Chemical Process Industry - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    A large variety of corrosion resistant alloys are used regularly in the chemical process industry (CPI). The most common family of alloys include the iron (Fe)-based stainless steels, nickel (Ni) alloys and titanium (Ti) alloys. There also other corrosion resistant alloys but their family of alloys is not as large as for the three groups mentioned above. All ranges of corrosive environments can be found in the CPI, from caustic solutions to hot acidic environments, from highly reducing to highly oxidizing. Stainless steels are ubiquitous since numerous types of stainless steels exist, each type tailored for specific applications. In general, stainless steels suffer stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hot chloride environments while high Ni alloys are practically immune to this type of attack. High nickel alloys are also resistant to caustic cracking. Ti alloys find application in highly oxidizing solutions. Solutions containing fluoride ions, especially acid, seem to be aggressive to almost all corrosion resistant alloys.

  5. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment. PMID:26652422

  6. Effect of Micro Arc Oxidation Coatings on Corrosion Resistance of 6061-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Nitin P.; Jyothirmayi, A.; Rama Krishna, L.; Sundararajan, G.

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, the corrosion behavior of micro arc oxidation (MAO) coatings deposited at two current densities on 6061-Al alloy has been investigated. Corrosion in particular, simple immersion, and potentiodynamic polarization tests have been carried out in 3.5% NaCl in order to evaluate the corrosion resistance of MAO coatings. The long duration (up to 600 h) immersion tests of coated samples illustrated negligible change in weight as compared to uncoated alloy. The anodic polarization curves were found to exhibit substantially lower corrosion current and more positive corrosion potential for MAO-coated specimens as compared to the uncoated alloy. The electrochemical response was also compared with SS-316 and the hard anodized coatings. The results indicate that the overall corrosion resistance of the MAO coatings is significantly superior as compared to SS316 and comparable to hard anodized coating deposited on 6061 Al alloy.

  7. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Angel Sanjurjo

    2004-05-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. A review of the literature indicated that the Fe- and Ni-based high-temperature alloys are susceptible to sulfidation attack unless they are fortified with high levels of Cr, Al, and Si. To impart corrosion resistance, these elements need not be in the bulk of the alloy and need only be present at the surface layers. We selected diffusion coatings of Cr and Al, and surface coatings of Si and Ti for the preliminary testing. These coatings will be applied using the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition technique developed at SRI which is rapid and relatively inexpensive. We have procured coupons of typical alloys used in a gasifier. These coupons will be coated with Cr, Al, Si, and Ti. The samples will be tested in a bench-scale reactor using simulated coal gas compositions. In addition, we will be sending coated samples for insertion in the gas stream of the coal gasifier.

  8. Substitution for chromium in 304 stainless steel. [effects on oxidation and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of substituting less strategic elements for Cr on oxidation and corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel. Cyclic oxidation resistance was evaluated at 870 C. Corrosion resistance was determined by exposure of specimens to a boiling copper-rich solution of copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. Alloy substitutes for Cr included Al, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, V, Y, and misch metal. A level of about 12% Cr was the minimum amount of Cr required for adequate oxidation and corrosion resistance in the modified composition 304 stainless steels. This represents a Cr saving of 33 percent. Two alloys containing 12% Cr plus 2% Al plus 2% Mo and 12% Cr plus 2.65% Si were identified which exhibited oxidation and corrosion resistance comparable to AISI 304 stainless steel.

  9. Plasma Arc Melting (PAM) and Corrosion Resistance of Pure NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuissi, A.; Rondelli, G.; Bassani, P.

    2015-03-01

    Plasma arc melting (PAM) as a suitable non-contaminating melting route for manufacturing high-quality NiTi alloy was successfully examined. The corrosion resistance of PAM Nitinol was evaluated by both potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests and compared with lower purity NiTi produced by vacuum induction melting (VIM). For the electro-polished surfaces, excellent corrosion resistance of NiTi comparable with the Ti alloys was found with no pitting up to 800 mV versus saturated calomel electrode in simulated body fluid at 37 °C. Potentiostatic results of PAM Nitinol indicate slightly better corrosion resistance than the lower quality VIM alloy.

  10. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical insulation and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Cho, W.D.

    1996-11-01

    Several intermetallic films were applied to high-temperature alloys (V alloys and 304, 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain growth at 1000 C for the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy was investigated to determine stability of the alloy substrate during coating formation by CVD or metallic vapor processes at 800-850 C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and XRD analysis; they were also tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. Results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  11. Corrosion Behavior of Titanate Ceramics in Short-Term MCC-1 Tests: The Effects of Surface Finish

    SciTech Connect

    Bakel, A.J.; Basco, J.K.; Nole, M.K.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    2000-07-28

    Two series of MCC-1 tests were designed and conducted to describe the effects of surface finish on the corrosion behavior of titanate ceramics. These effects are important for the comparison of short-term test results from different laboratories. Test samples were prepared with 240- and 600-grit finishes. Tests, conducted for 1, 3, 7, and 14 days at 90 C, were carried out in Teflon{reg_sign} vessels. Two different ceramics were used in this study: a Hf-Ce-Ce ceramic containing pyrochlore, perovskite, rutile and a small amount of a silicate phase, and a Hf-Ce-U ceramic containing pyrochlore and rutile. This study shows no detectable difference in the results of tests with ceramics finished to 240-grit and 600-grit; therefore, tests conducted at these two surface finishes can be directly compared. Due to its broader use, we recommend that short-term tests be conducted with monoliths finished to 600-grit. Comparison of data from blank tests in Teflon{reg_sign} and stainless steel vessels shows that the background associated with Teflon{reg_sign} vessels is lower. Therefore, we recommend that short-term tests be conducted in Teflon{reg_sign} vessels.

  12. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-03-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we conducted two exposure tests with coated and uncoated coupons. The first one was aborted after a short period, because of a leak in the pressure regulator of a CO/CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} gas mixture gas cylinder that was used to prepare the simulated coal gas stream. Nevertheless, this run was very instructive as it showed that during the brief exposure when the concentration of H{sub 2}S increased to 8.6%, even specialty alloys such as HR160 and I800 were badly corroded, yet the sample of a SS405-steel that was coated with Ti/Ta showed no signs of corrosion. After replacing the pressure regulator, a second run was conducted with a fresh set of coated and uncoated samples. The Ti/Ta-coated on to SS405 steel from the earlier runs was also exposed in this test. The run proceeded smoothly, and at the end of test the uncoated steels were badly damaged, some evidence of corrosion was found on coupons of HR160 and I800 alloys and the Cr-coated steels, but again, the Ti/Ta-coated sample appeared unaffected.

  13. Corrosion-Resistant Container for Molten-Material Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore G.; McNaul, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In a carbothermal process, gaseous methane is passed over molten regolith, which is heated past its melting point to a temperature in excess of 1,625 C. At this temperature, materials in contact with the molten regolith (or regolith simulant) corrode and lose their structural properties. As a result, fabricating a crucible to hold the molten material and providing a method of contact heating have been problematic. Alternative containment approaches use a large crucible and limit the heat zone of the material being processed, which is inefficient because of volume and mass constraints. Alternative heating approaches use non-contact heating, such as by laser or concentrated solar energy, which can be inefficient in transferring heat and thus require higher power heat sources to accomplish processing. The innovation is a combination of materials, with a substrate material having high structural strength and stiffness and high-temperature capability, and a coating material with a high corrosion resistance and high-temperature capability. The material developed is a molybdenum substrate with an iridium coating. Creating the containment crucible or heater jacket using this material combination requires only that the molybdenum, which is easily processed by conventional methods such as milling, electric discharge machining, or forming and brazing, be fabricated into an appropriate shape, and that the iridium coating be applied to any surfaces that may come in contact with the corrosive molten material. In one engineering application, the molybdenum was fashioned into a container for a heat pipe. Since only the end of the heat pipe is used to heat the regolith, the container has a narrowing end with a nipple in which the heat pipe is snugly fit, and the external area of this nipple, which contacts the regolith to transfer heat into it, is coated with iridium. At the time of this reporting, no single material has been found that can perform the functions of this combination

  14. Development of corrosion-resistant improved Al-doped austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Keietsu; Miwa, Yukio; Okubo, Nariaki; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    Aluminum-doped type 316L SS (316L/Al) has been developed for the purpose of suppressing the degradation of corrosion resistance induced by irradiation in austenitic stainless steels (SSs). The electrochemical corrosion properties of this material were estimated after Ni-ion irradiation at a temperature range from 330 °C to 550 °C. When irradiated at 550 °C up to 12 dpa, 316L/Al showed high corrosion resistance in the vicinity of grain boundaries (GBs) and in grains, while severe GB etching and local corrosion in grains were observed in irradiated 316L and 316 SS. It is supposed that aluminum enrichment was enhanced by high-temperature irradiation at GBs and in grains, to compensate for lost corrosion resistance induced by chromium depletion.

  15. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  16. Corrosion resistance of the AISI 304, 316 and 321 stainless steel surfaces modified by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szubzda, B.; Antończak, A.; Kozioł, P.; Łazarek, Ł.; Stępak, B.; Łęcka, K.; Szmaja, A.; Ozimek, M.

    2016-02-01

    The article presents the analysis results of the influence of laser fluence on physical and chemical structure and corrosion resistance of stainless steel surfaces modified by irradiating with nanosecond-pulsed laser. The study was carried out for AISI 304, AISI 316 and AISI 321 substrates using Yb:glass fiber laser. All measurements were made for samples irradiated in a broad range of accumulated fluence (10÷400 J/cm2). The electrochemical composition (by EDX) and surface morphology (by SEM) of the prepared surfaces were carried out. Finally, corrosion resistance was analyzed by a potentiodynamic electrochemical test. The obtained results showed very high corrosion resistance for samples made by fluency of values lower than 100 J/cm2. In this case, higher values of corrosion potentials and breakdown potentials were observed. A correlation between corrosion phenomena, the range of laser power (fluence) and the results of chemical and structural tests were also found.

  17. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  18. Comparison of the crevice corrosion resistance of alloys 625 and 22

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J; Kehler, B; Iloybare, G O; Scully, J R

    1999-09-15

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is concerned with the corrosion resistance of candidate engineered waste package materials. A variety of waste package designs have been proposed for US and Canadian High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A common feature of each design is the possibility of utilizing a corrosion resistant material such as a nickel-based super alloy or titanium-based alloy. A suitable corrosion resistant material may provide (a) kinetic immunity if the combination of repository environmental conditions and alloy resistance assure both: (i) a passive condition with negligible chance of localized corrosion stabilization, as well as (ii) low enough passive dissolution rates to insure conventional corrosion allowance over geological times, (b) a second form of ''corrosion allowance,'' if it can be scientifically demonstrated that a mechanism for stifling (i.e., death) of localized corrosion propagation occurs well before waste canisters are penetrated, or (c) such a low probability of initiation and continued propagation that a tolerably low degree of penetration occurs. Unfortunately, a large database on the crevice corrosion properties of alloy 22 does not exist in comparison to alloy 625. Alloy screening tests in oxidizing acids containing FeCl3 indicate that alloy 22 is more resistant to crevice corrosion than 625 as indicated by critical pit and crevice temperatures. Differences in alloying element compositions as expressed by pitting resistance equivalency number calculations support these findings. However, these data only provide the relative ranking of these alloys in terms of crevice corrosion and do not answer the critical questions proposed above.

  19. Amorphous Fe72Cr8P13C7 Powder with High Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kangjo; Hwang, Choll-Hong; Pak, Chang-Su; Ryeom, Yeong-Jo

    1982-07-01

    Amorphous Fe72Cr8P13C7 powder has been prepared by the spark erosion technique and its corrosion behavior investigated potentiodynamically. It is concluded that the powder prepared this way possesses a relatively high corrosion resistance, as does amorphous Fe72Cr8P13C7 ribbon prepared by rapid quenching.

  20. Structure Analysis Of Corrosion Resistant Thermal Sprayed Coatings On Low Alloy Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-23

    Metallic coatings have been proved to reduce the rate of corrosion of steel in various atmospheres. In this work the structure of Al, Cu-Al and Zn thermal sprayed coatings is examined. The as formed coatings are extremely rough, and they are composed of several phases which increase corrosion resistance as it was determined Salt Spray Chamber tests.

  1. Resistance Measurements and Activation Energies Calculations of Pure and Platinum Doped Stannic Oxide Ceramics in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Zuhairi; Othman, Zulkafli; Karim, Mohd Mustamam Abd; Holland, Diane

    2007-05-09

    Pure SnO2 and Pt-SnO2 ceramics were fabricated by the dry pressing method using a pressure of 40 Mpa and sintered at 1000 deg. C. Electrical resistance measurements were made using an impedance analyzer, in air and temperatures between 25 deg. C and 450 deg. C. The change in resistance in both pure and platinum-doped stannic oxide ceramics was discussed.

  2. Corrosion of SiC and oxide-composite ceramics by a simulated steam-reformer atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.; Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1991-09-01

    To achieve higher process efficiency by using pressurized reactants and/or heat transfer fluids, the US DOE is promoting development of high-pressure heat exchanger systems under cost-sharing agreements with industrial contractors. The steam reformer would contain more than 600 tubes. Because the combination of high temperature and pressure differential of 12.7 kg/cm{sup 2} (180 psig) across the tube wall is too severe for metallic tubes, ceramic materials are being considered for reformer tubes. Their use is expected to increase the efficiency of steam reformers by about 19%. At ORNL, four SiC ceramics, a SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite, a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-bonded SiC ceramic, and two alumina-matrix composites were selected as candidate materials for heat exchanger/steam-reformer tubes. These commercially available materials were exposed to a simulated steam-reformer atmosphere for up to 2000 h at 1260{degrees}C to assess their corrosion behavior and the effect of the exposure on their flexure strength (in air) at 20 and 1260{degrees}C. The approximate partial pressures of the constituents of the gas mixture at 1 atm total pressure were 0.54 H{sub 2}, 0.13 CO, 0.03 CO{sub 2}m 0.004 CH{sub 4}, and 0.30 H{sub 2}O. All but one material had net weight gains during the exposure test. The flexure strengths of the SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics and the SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite at 20 and 1260{degrees}C were not changed significantly by corrosion. The strengths of the alumina-matrix composites were decreased by corrosion; however, the strength of one of these (reinforced with SiC whiskers) was still higher than that of any other material after 500 h. The other alumina composite (containing SiC particles) exhibited the largest strength decrease of any material. The strength retention of the SiC ceramics and the SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite and the strength loss of the composites were associated with surface layers caused by corrosion. 12 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Al/Al2O3 Duplex Coating on Pipeline Steel X80 in Simulated Oil and Gas Well Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Wang, Yu; Wang, Ping-Gu; Shi, Qin-Yi; Zhang, Meng-Xian

    2015-04-01

    Corrosion resistant Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating for pipeline steel X80 was prepared by a combined treatment of low-temperature aluminizing and micro-arc oxidation (MAO). Phase composition and microstructure of mono-layer Fe-Al coating and Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Corrosion resistance of the coated pipeline steel X80 in a simulated oil and gas well condition was also investigated. Mono-layer Fe-Al coating consists of Fe2Al5 and FeAl, which is a suitable transitional layer for the preparation of ceramic coating by MAO on the surface of pipeline steel X80. Under the same corrosion condition at 373 K for 168 h with 1 MPa CO2 and 0.1 MPa H2S, corrosion weight loss rate of pipeline steel X80 with Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating decreased to 23% of original pipeline steel X80, which improved by 10% than that of pipeline steel X80 with mono-layer Fe-Al coating. It cannot find obvious cracks and pits on the corrosion surface of pipeline steel X80 with Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating.

  4. Detection of crevice corrosion in natural seawater using polarization resistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Inman, M.; Taylor, E.J.; Rawat, A.; Sunkara, M.; Kain, R.M.; Moran, P.J.; Hays, R.

    1997-12-01

    The initiation time and propagation associated with crevice corrosion on alloy 625 (UNS-N06625) and S31603 (UNS-S31603) tubing in flowing natural seawater has been successfully detected by polarization resistance measurements. A substantial decrease in the polarization resistance accompanied the initiation of crevice corrosion which was confirmed by visual observation of the attack through transparent crevice formers and by a decrease in the corrosion potential. After sixty one days exposure, the test was terminated and the degree of crevice corrosion attack was quantified as area of attack, depth of penetration, and mass loss. An excellent inverse correlation between mass loss during the exposure period and the final polarization resistance was obtained for both UNS-N06625 and UNS-S31603. An inverse correlation between area of attack and depth of penetration with the final polarization resistance was also examined. The utilization of polarization resistance measurements for determining the onset of crevice corrosion and the mass loss due to crevice corrosion was clearly established. It is also interesting to note that the affected are of crevice corrosion for the UNS-N06625 increased continually following initiation while the depth of attack remained relatively constant and shallow.

  5. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, B.D.; Ward, M.E.

    1998-09-22

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  6. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  7. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the reinforcing member and having a strengthening member wrapped around the refractory material. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  8. XPS study on double glow plasma corrosion-resisting surface alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jiahe; Xu, Jiang; He, Fei; Xie, Xishan; Xu, Zhong

    2003-02-01

    Double glow plasma corrosion-resisting surface alloying layer (SAL) formed on low carbon steel 1020 was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and other means. Results show that the passive film of the surface alloying layer after electrochemical test in 3.5% NaCl solution consists of Cr and Fe oxide such as CrO 3, Cr 2O 3, Fe 2O 3 and FeO and metallic Ni and Mo, and it attributes to the fact that a continuous and compact corrosion-resisting surface alloying layer with rich Cr, Ni and Mo was formed on the surface of steel 1020 so as to increase its corrosion resistance greatly. Therefore, double glow plasma technique will be widely used in corrosion-resisting surface science.

  9. Resistance to Corrosion of Zirconia Coatings Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis in Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, G. I.; Olaya, J. J.; Bethencourt, M.; Cifredo, G.; Blanco, G.

    2013-10-01

    Coatings of zirconium oxide were deposited onto three types of stainless steel, AISI 316L, 2205, and tool steel AISI D2, using the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method. The effect of the flux ratio on the process and its influence on the structure and morphology of the coatings were investigated. The coatings obtained, 600 nm thick, were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The resistance to corrosion of the coatings deposited over steel (not nitrided) and stainless steel nitrided (for 2 h at 823 K) in an ammonia atmosphere was evaluated. The zirconia coating enhances the stainless steel's resistance to corrosion, with the greatest increase in corrosion resistance being observed for tool steel. When the deposition is performed on previously nitrided stainless steel, the morphology of the surface improves and the coating is more homogeneous, which leads to an improved corrosion resistance.

  10. White primer permits a corrosion-resistant coating of minimum weight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, R. H.; Jensen, D. P.; Schnake, P.

    1966-01-01

    White primer for coating 2219 aluminum alloy supplies a base for a top coating of enamel. A formulation of pigments and vehicle results in a primer with high corrosion resistance and minimum film thickness.

  11. Corrosion-resistant multilayer coatings for the 28-75 nm wavelength region

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, R; Fernandez-Perea, M; Al, E T

    2011-11-08

    Corrosion has prevented use of SiC/Mg multilayers in applications requiring good lifetime stability. We have developed Al-based barrier layers that dramatically reduce corrosion, while preserving high reflectance and low stress. The aforementioned advances may enable the implementation of corrosion-resistant, high-performance SiC/Mg coatings in the 28-75 nm region in applications such as tabletop EUV/soft x-ray laser sources and solar physics telescopes. Further study and optimization of corrosion barrier structures and coating designs is underway.

  12. Fire resistance properties of ceramic wool fiber reinforced intumescent coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, N.; Othman, W. M. S. W.; Ahmad, F.

    2015-07-01

    This research studied the effects of varied weight percentage and length of ceramic wool fiber (CWF) reinforcement to fire retardant performance of epoxy-based intumescent coating. Ten formulations were developed using ammonium polyphosphate (APP), expandable graphite (EG), melamine (MEL) and boric acid (BA). The mixing was conducted in two stages; powdered materials were grinded in Rocklabs mortar grinder and epoxy-mixed using Caframo mixer at low speed mixing. The samples were applied on mild steel substrate and exposed to 500°C heat inside Carbolite electric furnace. The char expansion and its physical properties were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were conducted to inspect the fiber dispersion, fiber condition and the cell structure of both coatings and chars produced. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted to study the thermal properties of the coating such as degradation temperature and residual weight. Fire retardant performance was determined by measuring backside temperature of substrate in 1-hour, 1000°C Bunsen burner test according to UL 1709 fire regime. The results showed that intumescent coating reinforced with CWF produced better fire resistance performance. When compared to unreinforced coating, formulation S6-15 significantly reduced steel temperature at approximately 34.7% to around 175°C. However, higher fiber weight percentage had slightly decreased fire retardant performance of the coating.

  13. Fire resistance properties of ceramic wool fiber reinforced intumescent coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Amir, N. Othman, W. M. S. W. Ahmad, F.

    2015-07-22

    This research studied the effects of varied weight percentage and length of ceramic wool fiber (CWF) reinforcement to fire retardant performance of epoxy-based intumescent coating. Ten formulations were developed using ammonium polyphosphate (APP), expandable graphite (EG), melamine (MEL) and boric acid (BA). The mixing was conducted in two stages; powdered materials were grinded in Rocklabs mortar grinder and epoxy-mixed using Caframo mixer at low speed mixing. The samples were applied on mild steel substrate and exposed to 500°C heat inside Carbolite electric furnace. The char expansion and its physical properties were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were conducted to inspect the fiber dispersion, fiber condition and the cell structure of both coatings and chars produced. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted to study the thermal properties of the coating such as degradation temperature and residual weight. Fire retardant performance was determined by measuring backside temperature of substrate in 1-hour, 1000°C Bunsen burner test according to UL 1709 fire regime. The results showed that intumescent coating reinforced with CWF produced better fire resistance performance. When compared to unreinforced coating, formulation S6-15 significantly reduced steel temperature at approximately 34.7% to around 175°C. However, higher fiber weight percentage had slightly decreased fire retardant performance of the coating.

  14. Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we focused on getting a bench-scale test system to expose alloy coupons to simulated gasifier environment. The test facility was designed to allow about 20 specimen coupons to be exposed simultaneously for an extend period to a simulated coal gas stream at temperatures up to 1000 C. The simulated gas stream contained about 26%H{sub 2}, 39%CO, 17%CO{sub 2}, 1.4% H{sub 2}S and balance steam. We successfully ran a 100+h test with coated and uncoated stainless steel coupons. The tested alloys include SS304, SS316, SS405, SS409, SS410, and IN800. The main finding is that Ti/Ta coating provides excellent protection to SS405 under conditions where uncoated austenitic and ferritic stainless steel alloy coupons are badly corroded. Cr coatings also appear to afford some protection against corrosion.

  15. Effect of Boron and Cerium on Corrosion Resistance of Cu -Fe -P Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jin; Lu, Lei; Lu, De-ping; Liu, Ke-Ming; Chen, Zhi-bao; Zhai, Qi-jie

    2016-03-01

    The effects of B and Ce on the corrosion resistance of Cu-0.22Fe-0.06P alloy were investigated by salt spray and electrochemical tests. The corrosion morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The corrosion products were characterized by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. The impurity content was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The conductivity was measured using an eddy current conductivity meter. The grains of Cu-0.22Fe-0.06P alloy were refined by the addition of B and Ce. The electrochemical corrosion process of alloy is retarded due to purification effect of B and Ce. After the addition of a trace amount of B, the corrosion resistance of the alloy decreased. The corrosion resistance of Cu-0.22Fe-0.06P-0.025B-0.05Ce was better than that of Cu-0.22Fe-0.06P-0.025B due to the fact that the purification effect of Ce is better than that of B. The main corrosion products of the Cu-Fe-P alloys in a NaCl solution are Cu2Cl(OH)3 and Cu2O. The addition of trace amounts of B and Ce did not change the components of the corrosion product.

  16. Superior Corrosion Resistance Properties of TiN-Based Coatings on Zircaloy Tubes in Supercritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    Fauzia Khatkhatay; Liang Jiao; Jie Jian; Zhijie Jiao; Hongbin Zhang; Jian Gan; Haiyan Wang; Wenrui Zhang; Xinghang Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Thin films of TiN and Ti0.35Al0.65N nanocomposite were deposited on polished Zircaloy-4 tubes. After exposure to supercritical water for 48 h, the coated tubes are remarkably intact, while the bare uncoated tube shows severe oxidation and breakaway corrosion. X-ray diffraction patterns, secondary electron images, backscattered electron images, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data from the tube surfaces and cross-sections show that a protective oxide, formed on the film surface, effectively prevents further oxidation and corrosion to the Zircaloy-4 tubes. This result demonstrates the effectiveness of thin film ceramics as protective coatings under extreme environments.

  17. Experience with IN 939 as a hot corrosion resistant turbine vane material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.; Bauer, R.; Grunling, H.W.; Staubli, M.

    1984-06-01

    For stationary gas turbine vanes IN 939 was evaluated very thoroughly in Europe as a promising hot corrosion resistant nickel base alloy. This paper shows examples of properties and behavior of IN 939 from literature and from actual application in stationary gas turbines. After long-term operation in stationary gas turbines vanes are analysed to show the type of oxide scale formation, the hot corrosion attack and phase stability. The alloy IN 939 exhibited excellent hot corrosion resistance under severe environmental conditions comparable to that of commercial hot corrosion protective coatings. Phases are described developed after casting and during heat treatment and sensitivity towards ..gamma..-phase formation is briefly discussed. Creep and fatique data of IN 939 are compared with IN 738 LC as well as the hot corrosion behavior.

  18. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-12-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions.

  19. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions. PMID:26667968

  20. Relation between the structure and the pitting corrosion resistance of hypereutectoid U10 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, L. Yu.; Savrai, R. A.; Berezovskaya, V. V.; Makarov, A. V.; Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Merkushkin, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Polarization pitting corrosion tests are used to investigate the effect of a structure on the corrosion resistance of hypereutectoid U10 steel. In the steel structure, coarse-lamellar and fine-lamellar pearlite forms as a result of isothermal decomposition at temperatures of 500 and 650°C and fine-lamellar pearlite forms during additional annealing at 650°C for 10 or 300 min. The nonequilibrium structure of fine-lamellar pearlite obtained in the process of isothermal decomposition at a temperature of 500°C is found to have the maximum pitting corrosion resistance among the structural states under study.

  1. Improved corrosion resistance on biodegradable magnesium by zinc and aluminum ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruizhen; Yang, Xiongbo; Suen, Kai Wong; Wu, Guosong; Li, Penghui; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have promising applications as biodegradable materials, and plasma ion implantation can enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition. In this study, suitable amounts of zinc and aluminum are plasma-implanted into pure magnesium. The surface composition, phases, and chemical states are determined, and electrochemical tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are conducted to investigate the surface corrosion behavior and elucidate the mechanism. The corrosion resistance enhancement after ion implantation is believed to stem from the more compact oxide film composed of magnesium oxide and aluminum oxide as well as the appearance of the β-Mg17Al12 phase.

  2. Detecting Corrosion Resistance of Coated Steel Rebars by Electrochemical Technique (eis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, J.; Shah, S.

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is one of the electrochemical techniques used in materials science. The present measurements are used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of new types of coated steel rebar used in reinforced concrete. In this study, Si-based coating materials are used and evaluated, because adding Si to metals and alloys, including steel, generally increases their corrosion, oxidation, and erosion resistance. The result suggests that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy may be useful for monitoring corrosion activity on coated steel rebars. Based upon impedance changes, it appears that the silicon powder coating bonds well to the steel, and that the coating has a good performance.

  3. High temperature ceramics for automobile gas turbines. Part 2: Development of ceramic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walzer, P.; Koehler, M.; Rottenkolber, P.

    1978-01-01

    The development of ceramic components for automobile gas turbine engines is described with attention given to the steady and unsteady thermal conditions the ceramics will experience, and their anti-corrosion and strain-resistant properties. The ceramics considered for use in the automobile turbines include hot-pressed Si3N4, reaction-sintered, isostatically pressed Si3N4, hot-pressed SiC, reaction-bonded SiC, and glass ceramics. Attention is given to the stress analysis of ceramic structures and the state of the art of ceramic structural technology is reviewed, emphasizing the use of ceramics for combustion chambers and ceramic shrouded turbomachinery (a fully ceramic impeller).

  4. Influence of Electrical Resistivity and Machining Parameters on Electrical Discharge Machining Performance of Engineering Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 Ω·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 Ω·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 Ω·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge

  5. Influence of electrical resistivity and machining parameters on electrical discharge machining performance of engineering ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 Ω·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 Ω·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 Ω·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge

  6. Corrosion Resistance of Powder Metallurgy Processed TiC/316L Composites with Mo Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shaojiang; Xiong, Weihao

    2015-06-01

    To find out the effects of Mo addition on corrosion resistance of TiC/316L stainless steel composites, TiC/316L composites with addition of different contents of Mo were prepared by powder metallurgy. The corrosion resistance of these composites was evaluated by the immersion tests and polarization curves experiments. Results indicated that Mo addition decreased the corrosion rates of TiC/316L composites in H2SO4 solution in the case of Mo content below 2% whereas it displayed an opposite effect when Mo content was above that value. It was found that with an increase in the Mo content, the pitting corrosion resistance increased monotonically for TiC/316L composites in NaCl solution.

  7. The corrosion resistance and neutron-absorbing properties of coatings based on amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevryukov, O. N.; Polyansky, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The object of the present study was the corrosion-resistant amorphizing alloys with an increased content of boron for cladding the surface of metals, rapidly quenched alloys without boron for protective coatings on a high-boron cladding layer, as well as steel samples with a protective coating with a high content of boron and without boron. The aim of the work is to investigate the corrosion resistance of a coating in water at the temperature of 40 °C in conditions of an open access of oxygen for 1000 h, as well as the features of the microstructure of clad samples before and after the corrosion tests. New data on the corrosion resistance of Cr18Ni10Ti steel samples with a protective layer from a rapidly quenched alloy Ni-19Cr-10Si (in wt.%) on a high-boron coating have been obtained.

  8. Corrosion resistance and antithrombogenic behavior of La and Nd ion implanted stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, F. J.; Jin, F. Y.; Liu, Y. W.; Wan, G. J.; Liu, X. M.; Zhao, X. B.; Fu, R. K. Y.; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, N.; Chu, Paul K.

    2006-09-15

    Lanthanide ions such as lanthanum (La) and neodymium (Nd) were implanted into 316 stainless steel samples using metal vapor vacuum arc to improve the surface corrosion resistance and antithrombogenic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that lanthanum and neodymium exist in the +3 oxidation state in the surface layer. The corrosion properties of the implanted and untreated control samples were investigated utilizing electrochemical tests and our results show that La and Nd implantations enhance the surface corrosion resistance. In vitro activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests were used to evaluate the antithrombogenic properties. The APTT time of the implanted samples was observed to be prolonged compared to that of the unimplanted stainless steel control. La and Nd ion implantations can be used to improve the surface corrosion resistance and biomedical properties of 316 stainless steels.

  9. Electrodeposition of high corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan; Cao, Fahe; Chang, Linrong; Zheng, JunJun; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Jianqing; Cao, Chunan

    2011-08-01

    High corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coatings were electrodeposited on AZ91D magnesium alloy via suitable pretreatments, such as one-step acid pickling-activation, once zinc immersion and environment-friendly electroplated copper as the protective under-layer, which made Ni-P deposit on AZ91D Mg alloy in acid plating baths successfully. The pH value and current density for Ni-P electrodeposition were optimized to obtain high corrosion resistance. With increasing the phosphorous content of the Ni-P coatings, the deposits were found to gradually transform to amorphous structure and the corrosion resistance increased synchronously. The anticorrosion ability of AZ91D Mg alloy was greatly improved by the amorphous Ni-P deposits, which was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion current density ( Icorr) of the coated Mg alloy substrate is about two orders of magnitude less than that of the uncoated.

  10. Hot Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Behavior of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Conventional and Nanostructured Zirconia Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Mohsen; Keyvani, Ahmad; Heydarzadeh Sohi, Mahmoud

    Conventional and nanostructured zirconia coatings were deposited on In-738 Ni super alloy by atmospheric plasma spray technique. The hot corrosion resistance of the coatings was measured at 1050°C using an atmospheric electrical furnace and a fused mixture of vanadium pent oxide and sodium sulfate respectively. According to the experimental results nanostructured coatings showed a better hot corrosion resistance than conventional ones. The improved hot corrosion resistance could be explained by the change of structure to a dense and more packed structure in the nanocoating. The evaluation of mechanical properties by nano indentation method showed the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of the YSZ coating increased substantially after hot corrosion.

  11. Determination of the crack resistance of a ceramic in bending of beams with a notch

    SciTech Connect

    Gogotsi, G.A.; Petrenko, V.P.; Zavada, V.P.

    1985-06-01

    These authors investigate crack resistance in new ceramic materials with particular regard to temperature and to the features of notches. Charts present data on the relationship of experimental values of crack resistance to crack depth for silicon carbide; on the influence of notch depth on crack resistance; on the relationship of stress intensity to notch tip radius; on characteristic load-time curves for various materials; and on the relationship of temperature to crack resistance.

  12. Martensitic stainless steel seamless linepipe with superior weldability and CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Koseki, T.; Toyooka, T.; Murase, F.

    1997-08-01

    Two types of new martensitic stainless steel with good weldability and superior corrosion resistance have been developed for line pipe application. Both steels are suitable for welding without preheating owing to lowering C and N contents, and they show good low temperature toughness in welds without PWHT. One is applied to sweet environments. It gives better resistance to CO{sub 2} corrosion than the 13Cr martensitic stainless steel for OCTG. Lowering C and addition of Ni contribute to reduction of general corrosion rate in the CO{sub 2} environment. The addition of Cu improves the pitting resistance. The other is applied to light sour environments. It gives good SSC resistance in welds owing to the improvement of the pitting resistance due to Mo addition. The seamless pipes of these martensitic stainless steels are applicable as substitutes for a part of duplex stainless steel flow lines.

  13. Development of oxidation/corrosion-resistant composite materials and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Shanmugham, S.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed for high temperature structural applications, many of which are in oxidative environments. Such composites are attractive since they are light-weight and possess the desired mechanical properties at elevated temperature and in aggressive environments. The most significant advantage is their toughness and their non-catastrophic failure behavior. The mechanical properties of CFCCs have been characteristically linked with the nature of the interfacial bond between the fibers and the matrix. Weakly bonded fiber-matrix intefaces allow an impinging matrix crack to be deflected such that the fracture process occurs through several stages: Crack deflection, debonding at the interface, fiber slip and pull-out, and ultimately fiber failure. Such a composite will fail in a graceful manner and exhibit substantial fracture toughness. Currently, carbon interface coatings are used to appropriately tailor interface properties, however their poor oxidation resistance has required a search of an appropriate replacement. Generally, metal oxides are inherently stable to oxidation and possess thermal expansion coefficients relatively close to those of Nicalon and SiC. However, the metal oxides must also be chemically compatible with the fiber and matrix. If the fiber/interface/matrix system is chemically compatible, then the interfacial bonding stress is influenced by the thermal residual stresses that are generated as the composite is cooled from processing to room temperature. In the current work, thermomechanical computational results were obtained from a finite element model (FEM) for calculating the thermal residual stresses. This was followed by experimental evaluation of Nicalon/SiC composites with carbon, alumina, and mullite interfacial coatings.

  14. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  15. Fracture-tough, corrosion-resistant bearing steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles allowing design of stainless bearing steels with enhanced toughness and stress corrosion resistance has involved both investigation of basic phenomena in model alloys and evaluation of a prototype bearing steel based on a conceptual design exercise. Progress in model studies has included a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) study of the kinetics of interfacial segregation of embrittling impurities which compete with the kinetics of alloy carbide precipitation in secondary hardening steels. These results can define minimum allowable carbide precipitation rates and/or maximum allowable free impurity contents in these ultrahigh strength steels. Characterization of the prototype bearing steel designed to combine precipitated austenite transformation toughening with secondary hardening shows good agreement between predicted and observed solution treatment response including the nature of the high temperature carbides. An approximate equilibrium constraint applied in the preliminary design calculations to maintain a high martensitic temperature proved inadequate, and the solution treated alloy remained fully austenitic down to liquid nitrogen temperature rather than transforming above 200 C. The alloy can be martensitically transformed by cryogenic deformation, and material so processed will be studied further to test predicted carbide and austenite precipitation behavior. A mechanistically-based martensitic kinetic model was developed and parameters are being evaluated from available kinetic data to allow precise control of martensitic temperatures of high alloy steels in future designs. Preliminary calculations incorporating the prototype stability results suggest that the transformation-toughened secondary-hardening martensitic-stainless design concept is still viable, but may require lowering Cr content to 9 wt. pct. and adding 0.5 to 1.0 wt. pct. Al. An alternative design approach based on strain-induced martensitic transformation during

  16. The effect of repeated porcelain firings on corrosion resistance of different dental alloys

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Ismail; Polat, Serdar; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Dalkiz, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of repeated porcelain firing process on the corrosion rates of the dental alloys. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cr-Co, Cr-Ni and Pd-Ag alloys were used for this study. Each metal supported porcelain consisted of 30 specimens of 10 for 7, 9 and 11 firing each. Disc-shaped specimens 10 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness were formed by melting alloys with a propane-oxygen flame and casted with a centrifuge casting machine and then with the porcelain veneer fired onto the metal alloys. Corrosion tests were performed in quintuplicate for each alloy (after repeated porcelain firing) in Fusayama artificial saliva solution (pH = 5) in a low thermal-expansion borosilicate glass cell. Tamhane and Sheffe test was used to compare corrosion differences in the results after repeated firings and among 7, 9 and 11 firing for each alloy. The probability level for statistical significance was set at α=0.05. RESULTS The corrosion resistance was higher (30 mV), in case of 7 times firing (Commercial). On the other hand, it was lower in case of 11 times firing (5 mV) (P<.05). CONCLUSION Repeated firings decreased corrosion resistance of Pd-Ag, Cr-Co and Cr-Ni alloys. The Pd-Ag alloy exhibited little corrosion in in vitro tests. The Cr-Ni alloy exhibited higher corrosion resistance than Cr-Co alloys in in vitro tests. PMID:23507983

  17. Effect of manufacturing process sequence on the corrosion resistance characteristics of coated metallic bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dur, Ender; Cora, Ömer Necati; Koç, Muammer

    2014-01-01

    Metallic bipolar plate (BPP) with high corrosion and low contact resistance, durability, strength, low cost, volume, and weight requirements is one of the critical parts of the PEMFC. This study is dedicated to understand the effect of the process sequence (manufacturing then coating vs. coating then manufacturing) on the corrosion resistance of coated metallic bipolar plates. To this goal, three different PVD coatings (titanium nitride (TiN), chromium nitride (CrN), zirconium nitride (ZrN)), with three thicknesses, (0.1, 0.5, 1 μm) were applied on BPPs made of 316L stainless steel alloy before and after two types of manufacturing (i.e., stamping or hydroforming). Corrosion test results indicated that ZrN coating exhibited the best corrosion protection while the performance of TiN coating was the lowest among the tested coatings and thicknesses. For most of the cases tested, in which coating was applied before manufacturing, occurrence of corrosion was found to be more profound than the case where coating was applied after manufacturing. Increasing the coating thickness was found to improve the corrosion resistance. It was also revealed that hydroformed BPPs performed slightly better than stamped BPPs in terms of the corrosion behavior.

  18. Structural Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  19. Air-Impregnated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Layers for Enhancing the Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chanyoung; Lee, Junghoon; Sheppard, Keith; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2015-10-13

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layers were fabricated on aluminum substrates with systematically varied pore diameters (20-80 nm) and oxide thicknesses (150-500 nm) by controlling the anodizing voltage and time and subsequent pore-widening process conditions. The porous nanostructures were then coated with a thin (only a couple of nanometers thick) Teflon film to make the surface hydrophobic and trap air in the pores. The corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate was evaluated by a potentiodynamic polarization measurement in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution (saltwater). Results showed that the hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate compared to a hydrophilic oxide layer of the same nanostructures, to bare (nonanodized) aluminum with only a natural oxide layer on top, and to the latter coated with a thin Teflon film. The hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer with the largest pore diameter and the thickest oxide layer (i.e., the maximized air fraction) resulted in the best corrosion resistance with a corrosion inhibition efficiency of up to 99% for up to 7 days. The results demonstrate that the air impregnating the hydrophobic nanopores can effectively inhibit the penetration of corrosive media into the pores, leading to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance. PMID:26393523

  20. Corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium alloys in glacial acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, L.V.; Romaniv, V.I.

    1984-05-01

    Vessels for the storage and conveyance of glacial acetic acid are produced from ADO and AD1 aluminum, which are distinguished by corrosion resistance, weldability and workability in the hot and cold conditions but have low tensile strength. Aluminum-magnesium alloys are stronger materials close in corrosion resistance to technical purity aluminum. An investigation was made of the basic alloying components on the corrosion resistance of these alloys in glacial acetic acid. Both the base metal and the weld joints were tested. With an increase in temperature the corrosion rate of all of the tested materials increases by tens of times. The metals with higher magnesium content show more pitting damage. The relationship of the corrosion resistance of the alloys to magnesium content is confirmed by the similar intensity of failure of the joint metal of all of the investigated alloys and by electrochemical investigations. The data shows that AMg3 alloy is close to technically pure ADO aluminum. However, the susceptibility of even this material to local corrosion eliminates the possibility of the use of aluminum-magnesium alloys as reliable constructional materials in glacial acetic acid.

  1. Thin boron phosphide coating as a corrosion-resistant layer

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-08-25

    A surface prone to corrosion in corrosive environments is rendered anticorrosive by CVD growing a thin continuous film, e.g., having no detectable pinholes, thereon, of boron phosphide. In one embodiment, the film is semiconductive. In another aspect, the invention is an improved photoanode, and/or photoelectrochemical cell with a photoanode having a thin film of boron phosphide thereon rendering it anticorrosive, and providing it with unexpectedly improved photoresponsive properties.

  2. [Determination of the corrosion resistance of dental alloys with a new measurement method].

    PubMed

    Schmidli, Fredy; Jungo, Markus; Jäger, Kurt; Lüthy, Heinz; Büchler, Markus

    2009-01-01

    A corrosion sensor newly developed by the Swiss Society for Corrosion, modified for a potential application in the oral cavity, was tested in vitro. By measuring the impedance with a special sensor in the size of a bur handpiece, it allows a quick determination of the corrosion resistance. For the evaluation of the method, measurements were done on six conventional dental alloys (two precious alloys, one Pd-based alloy and three non-precious alloys) which had been tested in crevice corrosion by the authors in an earlier stage. Qualitatively the results are quite in concordance with the ones got with the usual tests. On the base of the present results the use directly in the oral cavity of this corrosion test method appears to be very promising. PMID:20112638

  3. Influence of pre-deformation and oxidation in high temperature water on corrosion resistance of type 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Hongyun, Luo; Tongxiang, Liang

    2015-11-01

    The passivation properties of deformed 304 stainless steels after immersion in borate buffer solution containing 0.2821 mol/L Cl- at 288 °C were investigated. The spinel and magnetite oxides were formed on all the samples. However, the hematite oxides reduced significantly with the increasing of strain. The sample with maximum strain possessed the poorest corrosion resistance. The hematite oxide could offer high corrosion resistance, while magnetite evidently deteriorated corrosion resistance. Moreover, the influence of the donors in outer layer of oxide film on corrosion resistance was more important than that of the acceptors in inner layer.

  4. Corrosion Resistance Analysis of Sintered NdFeB Magnets Using Ultrasonic-Aided EDM Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wei, X. T.; Li, Z. Y.; Cheng, X.

    2015-01-01

    Sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) permanent magnets are widely used in many fields because of their excellent magnetic property. However, their poor corrosion resistance has been cited as a potential problem that limits their extensive application. This paper presents an experimental investigation into the improvement of surface corrosion resistance with the ultrasonic-aided electrical discharge machining (U-EDM) method. A scanning electron microscope was used to analyze the surface morphology of recast layers formed through the EDM and U-EDM processes. The chemical structure and elements of these recast layers were characterized using x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Corrosion resistance was also studied by means of potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and immersion tests in 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 solution. Experimental results show that an amorphous structure was formed in the recast layer during the EDM and U-EDM processes and that this structure could improve the corrosion resistance of sintered NdFeB magnets. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of U-EDM-treated surface was better than that of the EDM-treated surface.

  5. High-strength economically alloyed corrosion-resistant steels with the structure of nitrogen martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O.; Blinov, V.; Lukin, E.

    2016-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as the main alloying element allowing one both to increase the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of steels and to improve their processability is a new trend in physical metallurgy of high-strength corrosion resistant steels. The principles of alloying, which are developed for high-nitrogen steel in IMET RAS, ensure the formation of the structure, which contains predetermined amounts of martensite (70-80%) and austenite (20-30%) and is free from δ-ferrite, σ-phase, and Cr23C6 carbide. These principles were used as the base for the creation of new high-strength corrosion-resistant weldable and deformable 0Kh16AN5B, 06Kh16AN4FD, 08Kh14AN4MDB, 09Kh16AN3MF, 27Kh15AN3MD2, 40Kh13AN3M2, and 19Kh14AMB steels, which are operative at temperatures ranging from - 70 to 400°C. The developed nitrogen-containing steels compared with similar carbon steels are characterized by a higher resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion and are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. The new steels successfully passed trial tests as heavy duty articles.

  6. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Corrosion Resistance of Electroless Ni-B-Mo Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serin, Ihsan Gökhan; Göksenli, Ali; Yüksel, Behiye; Yildiz, Rasid Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    The Ni-B-Mo coating on steel by electroless plating and the evaluation of the morphology and corrosion performance after applying heat treatments at different temperatures for 1 h were investigated in this study. The 25-μm-thick coating was uniform and adhesion between the substrate and the coating was good. The coating consisted of an amorphous-like structure in their as-plated condition, and after annealing at 400 °C for 1 h, crystallized nickel, nickel borides, and molybdenum carbide were formed. Immersion tests in 10% HCl solution and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution were applied to investigate corrosion resistance. The corrosion performance of heat-treated coatings was compared with steel and the as-plated coating. By increasing the annealing temperature, corrosion potential shifted toward a noble direction, corrosion current density decreased and the weight loss of specimens decreased, demonstrating an increase in corrosion resistance. Best corrosion performance was achieved by the coating heat treated at 550 °C.

  7. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-10-31

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty,cycles (high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) andto investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment.

  8. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by Slow Strain Rate Testing. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of rapidly solidified ribbons is significantly improved relative to the conventional cast alloy due to the increased Al content dissolved in the α-Mg matrix and the correspondingly reduced presence of the β-phase (Mg17 Al12 ). Unfortunately, extrusion consolidated solidified ribbons exhibited a substantial reduction in the environmental performance and stress corrosion resistance. This was mainly attributed to the detrimental effect of the extrusion process, which enriched the iron impurities and increased the internal stresses by imposing a higher dislocation density. In terms of immersion tests, the average corrosion rate of the rapidly solidified ribbons was <0.4 mm/year compared with ∼2 mm/year for the conventionally cast alloy and 26 mm/year for the rapidly solidified extruded ribbons. PMID:25491147

  9. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating. [protecting gas turbines and other engine parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates.

  10. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Krishnamurti

    1992-01-01

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9-30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.

  11. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1992-11-17

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9--30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000--1100 C. 7 figs.

  12. Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Prelas

    2009-06-25

    This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

  13. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Otto, Neil C.; Warner, Barry T.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  14. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Otto, N.C.; Warner, B.T.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1982-07-07

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  15. Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic films of Mo49Cr33B18 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Distefano, S.; Fitzgerald, D.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic alloy films of Mo49Cr33B18 with a crystallization temperature of 590 C were deposited onto glass and quartz substrates by magnetron sputter-quench technique. The amorphous nature of the films was confirmed by their diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns. The deposited films are densely packed (zone T) and exhibit low stress and good adhesion to the substrate. Corrosion current of as-deposited coating of MoCrB amorphous metallic alloy is approximately three orders of magnitude less than the corrosion current of 304 stainless steel in 1N H2SO4 solution.

  16. Corrosion-resistant tube materials for extended life of openings in recovery boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, L.D.; Danielson, M.J.; Harper, S.L. . Research and Development Div.); Barna, J.L. . Fossil Power Div.)

    1993-08-01

    The corrosive conditions causing rapid corrosion of Type 304L stainless steel in tube openings have been duplicated in the laboratory. Alternate materials also have been tested, and some show improved corrosion resistance over Type 304L. Alloy 825 and Alloy 625 composite tubing and Alloy 600 and Alloy 625 weld overlay materials all show promise as a replacement for Type 304L in tube openings. All recovery boilers designed or operated at 8.375 MPa (1,200 psi) and above should consider using these replacement materials for tube openings.

  17. Effect of current density on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of microarc oxidized ZK60 magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    You, Qiongya; Yu, Huijun; Wang, Hui; Pan, Yaokun; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2014-09-01

    The application of magnesium alloys as biomaterials is limited by their poor corrosion behavior. Microarc oxidation (MAO) treatment was used to prepare ceramic coatings on ZK60 magnesium alloys in order to overcome the poor corrosion resistance. The process was conducted at different current densities (3.5 and 9.0 A/dm(2)), and the effect of current density on the process was studied. The microstructure, elemental distribution, and phase composition of the MAO coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction, respectively. The increment of current density contributes to the increase of thickness. A new phase Mg2SiO4 was detected as the current density increased to 9.0 A/dm(2). A homogeneous distribution of micropores could be observed in the coating produced at 3.5 A/dm(2), while the surface morphology of the coating formed at 9.0 A/dm(2) was more rough and apparent microcracks could be observed. The coating obtained at 3.5 A/dm(2) possessed a better anticorrosion behavior. PMID:25280850

  18. Preparation and Testing of Corrosion and Spallation-Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2015-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT®, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding and involves placing a thin foil of zinc between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the zinc melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The zinc then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. During this annual reporting period, the finite element model was completed and used to design clamping jigs to hold the APMT plate to the larger blocks of superalloys during the bonding process. The clamping system was machined from titanium–zirconium–molybdenum and used to bond the APMT plate to the superalloy blocks. The bond between the APMT plate was weak for one of each of the superalloy blocks. We believe that this occurred because enough oxidation had occurred on the surface of the parts as a result of a 1-month time period between sandblasting to prepare the parts and the actual bonding process. The other blocks were, therefore, bonded within 1 day of preparing the parts for bonding, and their joints appear strong. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of representative joints showed that no zinc remained in the alloys after bonding. Also, phases rich in hafnium and tantalum had precipitated near the bond line in the APMT. Iron from the APMT had diffused into the superalloys during bonding, more extensively in the CM247LC than in the Rene 80. Nickel from the superalloys had diffused into the APMT, again more extensively in the joint with the CM247LC than

  19. Effect of Waterproofing Admixtures on the Flexural Strength and Corrosion Resistance of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, A.; Perumal, P.

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals about the flexural strength and corrosion behaviour of concrete using waterproofing admixtures. The effect of waterproofing admixtures on the corrosion behaviour of RCC specimen has been studied by conducting accelerated corrosion test. To identify the effect of corrosion in pull out strength, corrosion process was induced by means of accelerated corrosion procedure. To accelerate the reinforcement corrosion, direct electric current was impressed on the rebar embedded in the specimen using a DC power supply system that has a facility to adjust voltage. The addition of waterproofing admixtures also shows the improvement in the flexural strength of concrete has been studied by conducting flexural strength tests on the concrete prism specimen of size 100 × 100 × 500 mm with and without admixtures for various dosages and various curing periods of 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the presence of waterproofing admixtures always improves the corrosion resistance and thus increases the strength of concrete due to the hydrophobic action of waterproofing admixtures.

  20. A High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal - The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Haslam, J.; Day, D.; Lian, T.; Saw, C.; Hailey, P.; Choi, J.S.; Rebak, R.; Yang, N.; Bayles, R.; Aprigliano, L.; Payer, J.; Perepezko, J.; Hildal, K.; Lavernia, E.; Ajdelsztajn, L.; Branagan, D.; Beardsley, B.

    2007-07-01

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of high-performance Ni-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal also makes it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications, as discussed in companion publications. Corrosion data for SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) is discussed here. (authors)

  1. In vitro corrosion resistance of Lotus-type porous Ni-free stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Kelly; Hyun, Soong-Keun; Fujimoto, Shinji; Nakajima, Hideo

    2008-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of three kinds of austenitic high nitrogen Lotus-type porous Ni-free stainless steels was examined in acellular simulated body fluid solutions and compared with type AISI 316L stainless steel. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical techniques, the analysis of released metal ions was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and the cytotoxicity was investigated in a culture of murine osteoblasts cells. Total immunity to localized corrosion in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions was exhibited by Lotus-type porous Ni-free stainless steels, while Lotus-type porous AISI 316L showed very low pitting corrosion resistance evidenced by pitting corrosion at a very low breakdown potential. Additionally, Lotus-type porous Ni-free stainless steels showed a quite low metal ion release in SBF solutions. Furthermore, cell culture studies showed that the fabricated materials were non-cytotoxic to mouse osteoblasts cell line. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that the investigated alloys are biocompatible and corrosion resistant and a promising material for biomedical applications. PMID:18545945

  2. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe/Mo composite amorphous coatings prepared by air plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-ping; Xing, Ya-zhe; Zhang, Feng-ying; Hao, Jian-min

    2012-07-01

    Fe/Mo composite coatings were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS) using Fe-based and Mo-based amorphous and nanocrystalline mixed powders. Microstructural studies show that the composite coatings present a layered structure with low porosity due to adding the self-bonded Mo-based alloy. Corrosion behaviors of the composite coatings, the Fe-based coatings and the Mo-based coatings were investigated by electrochemical measurements and salt spray tests. Electrochemical results show that the composite coatings exhibit a lower polarization current density and higher corrosion potentials than the Fe-based coating when tested in 3.5wt% NaCl solutions, indicating superior corrosion resistance compared with the Fe-based coating. Also with the increase in addition of the Mo-based alloy, a raised corrosion resistance, inferred by an increase in corrosion potential and a decrease in polarization current density, can be found. The results of salt spray tests again show that the corrosion resistance is enhanced by adding the Mo-based alloy, which helps to reduce the porosity of the composite coatings and enhance the stability of the passive films.

  3. Study on Corrosion Resistance of Fe-based Amorphous Coating by Laser Cladding in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. J.; Guo, S. B.; Yang, X. J.; Zhou, X. L.; Hua, X. Z.; Zhu, X. H.; Duan, Z.

    In this study, the Fe41Co7Cr15Mo14C15B6Y2 bulk amorphous alloy with high glass-forming ability was prepared using the arc- melting copper mold casting technique, and corresponding amorphous coating was obtained using the laser melt amorphous powders on the surface of carbon steel. The corrosion resistance performance of the laser cladding coating in hydrochloric acid was analyzed and tested in experiments under the conditions of different laser cladding speeds. The amorphous alloy coating with different fabrication parameters have the difference internal structure, which lead to the difference corrosion resistance in the same environment to some extent. The nature of amorphous alloy and the corrosion morphology were investigated using XRD and SEM method, respectively. The corrosion experiments showed that: when the laser power was 3300W, the corrosion resistance of four kinds of samples in hydrochloric acid from strong to weak as follows: as-cast sample > the coating with laser cladding speed 110 mm/min > the coating with laser cladding speed 120 mm/min > the coating with laser cladding speed 130 mm/min. The free corrosion current density of casting sample, sample 1, sample 2 and sample 3 is 3.304 × 10-6 A/cm2, 2.600×10-3 A/cm2, 2.030×10-3 A/cm2 and 3.396×10-4 A/cm2, respectively.

  4. Overview: Damage resistance of graded ceramic restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Improving mechanical response of materials is of great interest in a wide range of disciplines, including biomechanics, tribology, geology, optoelectronics, and nanotechnology. It has been long recognized that spatial gradients in surface composition and structure can improve the mechanical integrity of a material. This review surveys recent results of sliding-contact, flexural, and fatigue tests on graded ceramic materials from our laboratories and elsewhere. Although our findings are examined in the context of possible applications for next-generation, graded all-ceramic dental restorations, implications of our studies have broad impact on biomedical, civil, structural, and an array of other engineering applications. PMID:22778494

  5. Corrosion-resistant multilayer structures with improved reflectivity

    DOEpatents

    Soufli, Regina; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Robinson, Jeff C.

    2013-04-09

    In one general embodiment, a thin film structure includes a substrate; a first corrosion barrier layer above the substrate; a reflective layer above the first corrosion barrier layer, wherein the reflective layer comprises at least one repeating set of sub-layers, wherein one of the sub-layers of each set of sub-layers being of a corrodible material; and a second corrosion barrier layer above the reflective layer. In another general embodiment, a system includes an optical element having a thin film structure as recited above; and an image capture or spectrometer device. In a further general embodiment, a laser according to one embodiment includes a light source and the thin film structure as recited above.

  6. Evaluation of corrosion testing techniques for selection of corrosion resistant alloys for sour gas service

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Hibner, E.L.

    1996-08-01

    Slow strain rate (SSR) and C-ring stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests have historically been used to screen alloys for sour gas environments. The relevance of these testing techniques in predicting actual field corrosion behavior was evaluated for age-hardenable nickel base alloy 925 (UNS N09925) and alloy 718 (UNS N07718). While SSR testing provides an acceptable accelerated screening tool for ranking alloys in sour oil field environments, C-ring SCC testing ranks alloys higher in sour environments than SSR testing.

  7. Resistance of nitrogen-containing stainless alloys to corrosion in chloride media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1982-01-01

    The pitting resistance of a series of experimental stainless steels with varying amounts of nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese and nitrogen and a number of commercial stainless steels and nickel based alloys has been studied in highly concentrated chloride media. The results show that nitrogen enhances the pitting resistance of stainless steel and exceptional corrosion resistance is achieved with high levels of nitrogen in combination with suitable amounts of molybdenum and chromium.

  8. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Cho, W.D.

    1994-10-01

    Several intermetallic films were fabricated to high-temperature alloys (V-alloys and 304 and 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain-growth behavior at 1000{degrees}C for the V-5Cr-5Ti was investigated to determine the stability of alloy substrate during coating formation by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or metallic vapor processes at 800-850{degrees}C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and X-ray diffraction analysis and tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. The results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  9. Influence of a corrosive media on the crack resistance of analuminum-boron composite

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimovich, G.G.; Chaplya, M.E.; Filipovskii, A.V.; Gvozdyuk, N.M.; Mikheev, V.I.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this work was to study the influence of brittle transition zones and a corrosive media on the crack resistance of an aluminum-boron material. The investigation was carried out using composite materials with a matrix of aluminum alloy M40. It was established that the crack resistance of the aluminum-boron composite material in the direction perpendicular to the fibers steadily increased after holding the samples in 3% aqueous solutions of NaCl. However, after testing for 10,000 hours, a reverse tendency was observed. In the direction along the fibers, the crack resistance begins to lower only after 10,000 hours in the corrosive media which is caused by general corrosive damage to the samples.

  10. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of phytic acid conversion coatings for magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiufang; Li, Qingfen; Li, Ying; Wang, Fuhui; Jin, Guo; Ding, Minghui

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, a new innoxious and pollution-free chemical protective coating for magnesium alloys, phytic acid conversion coating, was prepared. The conversion coatings are found to have high cover ratio and no cracks are found by atomic force microscopes (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The main elements of the conversion coatings are Mg, Al, O, P and C by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The chemical state of the elements in the coatings was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). AES depth profile analysis suggests that the thickness of the conversion coating is about 340 nm. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by polarization curves. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance for the conversion coated AZ91D magnesium alloys in 3.5% NaCl solution increases markedly. The mechanisms of corrosion resistance and coatings formation are also discussed.

  11. Stability and corrosion resistance of superhydrophobic surface on oxidized aluminum in NaCl aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Damei; Ou, Junfei; Xue, Mingshan; Wang, Fajun

    2015-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surface (SHS) was fabricated on aluminum via surface roughening by NaClO and surface passivation by hexadecyltrimethoxysilane. The long-term durability for storing the sample in air and the chemical stability for contacting the sample with NaCl solution were investigated. The short-term corrosion resistance for immersing the sample in NaCl solution for 1 h was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization, and the long-term corrosion resistance for immersing the sample in NaCl solution for 7 days was investigated by variation analyses on surface wettability, surface morphology, and surface chemistry. All experimental results suggested that the so-obtained SHS possessed good stability and good corrosion resistance under the testing conditions.

  12. Improved Erosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Corrosive Environment with Gas Tungsten Arc Melt Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aiguo; Guo, Mianhuan; Ma, Yinan; Hu, Hailong

    2013-06-01

    Cr3C2-NiCr particles were injected into surface of 304 stainless steel using a gas tungsten arc melt injection process. Microstructure, composition, and phases in the treated layer were characterized. Hardness of the treated layer was tested. Corrosion resistance and erosion resistance of the treated layer were tested in 5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. Polarization curve was obtained by an electrochemical measuring system. An untreated substrate was tested for comparison. The results showed that large amount of (Cr, Fe)7C3 carbides were formed in the treated layer. Corrosion potential of the substrate was increased from -1.04 to -0.618 V. But the passivation effect was weakened, and the corrosion current density became higher. The hardness of the treated layer was greatly improved, from Hv245.0 to Hv1098.9. The erosion resistance of the treated layer was 1.5 times higher than that of the untreated substrate.

  13. The fabricability and corrosion resistance of several Al-Cu-Li aerospace alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.W.; Danford, M.; Sanders, J.

    1996-12-31

    Al-Li-Cu alloys are attractive to the aerospace industry. The high specific strength and stiffness of these alloys will improve lift efficiency, fuel economy, performance and increase payload capabilities. The objectives of this study were to measure the fabricability of Al 2195 (Al-4Cu-1Li) and to assess the effect of welding on corrosion behavior. Al 2219 samples were used in parallel tests to provide a baseline for the data generated. In this study samples were exposed to 3.5% NaCl and mild corrosive water solutions in both the as received and as welded conditions. Fabricability was assessed using Gleeble testing, Varestraint testing and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results indicate that Alloy 2195 is much more susceptible to hot cracking than Al 2219, and that cracking sensitivity is a strong function of chemical composition within specification ranges for Al 2195. Furthermore, for base metal samples, corrosion in mild corrosive water was more severe than corrosion in salt water. In addition, welding increases the corrosion rate in Al 2195 and 2219, and causes severe localization in Al 2195. Furthermore, autogenously welded Al 2195 samples were more susceptible to attack than heterogeneously welded Al 2195 samples and autogenously welded Al2219 samples were less susceptible to corrosion than autogenously welded Al 2195 samples. Heterogeneously welded samples in both materials had high corrosion rates, but only the Al 2195 material was subject to localization of attack. The partially melted zones of Al 2195 samples were subject to severe, focused attack. In all cases, interdendritic constituents in welded areas and intergranular constituents in base material were cathodic to the Al rich matrix materials. Fabricability and corrosion resistance were correlated to material microstructure using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, polarization resistance and environmental scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Oxidation resistant filler metals for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1986-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using essentially pure trinickel aluminide and trinickel aluminide containing small amounts of carbon. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  15. Methods of Calculation of Resistance to Polarization (Corrosion Rate) Using ASTM G 59

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, L L; King, K J; Martin, S I; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    The corrosion rate of a metal (alloy) can be measured using: (1) Immersion tests or weight loss such as in ASTM G 1 and G 31 or (2) Electrochemical techniques such as in ASTM G 59. In the polarization resistance (PR) or linear polarization method (G 59), the resistance to polarization (Rp) of a metal is measured in the electrolyte of interest in the vicinity of the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}). This polarization resistance can be mathematically converted into corrosion rates (CR). A plot of E vs. I in the vicinity of E{sub corr} is generated by increasing the potential at a fixed rate of 0.1667 mV/s and measuring the output current. The polarization resistance (Rp) is defined as the slope of a potential (E) (Y axis) vs. Current (I) (X axis) plot in the vicinity of the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}). When the potential is ramped and the current is measured, E is the independent variable and I is the dependent variable. In a proper mathematical plot, E should be represented in the X axis and I in the Y axis. However, in the conventions of the corrosion community, E is always plotted in the Y axis and I in the X axis. Therefore, how this plot of Delta E/Delta I is analyzed is a matter of current debate.

  16. Effect of laser polishing on the surface roughness and corrosion resistance of Nitinol stents.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Hee; Tijing, Leonard D; Pant, Hem Raj; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of laser polishing at different treatment times on the surface roughness and corrosion resistance of a biliary nickel-titanium (NiTi or Nitinol) stent. A specific area of the stent wire surface was checked for changes in roughness by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a noncontact profilometer. The corrosion resistance was assessed by potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The surface characterization revealed that laser polishing reduced the surface roughness of stent by 34-64% compared to that of the as-received stent surface condition depending on the treatment time (i.e., 700-1600 μm). Measurements using potentiodynamic polarization in simulated body fluid solution showed better anti-corrosion performance of laser-polished stent compared to magnetically-polished stent and has comparable corrosion resistance with the as-received stent condition. In this paper, we have shown a preliminary study on the potential of laser polishing for the improvement of surface roughness of stent without affecting much its corrosion resistance. PMID:25585981

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Corrosion resistance of Si-Al-bearing ultrafine-grained weathering steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu

    2008-01-01

    In the Ultra-steel project at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), which run from 1996 to 2005, high-Si-Al-content ultrafine-grained (UFG) weathering steel was developed by grain refinement and weathering guidance. It was found that this steel has excellent strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Samples were prepared by multi pass warm rolling at temperatures between 773 and 873 K. The grain size of steel rolled at 873 K was about 1 μ m, and the tensile strength (TS) and elongation (EL) had excellent values of 800 MPa and 20%, respectively. In general, steels with high Si and Al contents exhibit inferior toughness to carbon steel (SM); however, the toughness of the developed sample was markedly improved by grain refinement. Cyclic corrosion tests in the presence of chloride ions confirmed that the developed steel exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, superior to that of SM. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses showed that Si and Al mainly exist in the inner rust layer. Si and Al were identified as existing in the Si2 + and Al3 + states in the nanoscale complex oxides constituting the inner rust layer. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS) measurement showed that the corrosion reaction resistance (Rt) of the developed steel was much greater than that of SM. In the developed steel, the nanoscale complex oxides were formed in the inner rust layer, which increased Rt, and resulted in the excellent corrosion resistance.

  18. Fe-Based Amorphous Coatings on AISI 4130 Structural Steel for Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana; Santhanakrishnan, S.; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2012-06-01

    The current study focuses on synthesizing a novel functional coating for corrosion resistance applications, via laser surface alloying. The iron-based (Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B) amorphous precursor powder is used for laser surface alloying on AISI 4130 steel substrate, with a continuous wave ytterbium Nd-YAG fiber laser. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is evaluated for different processing conditions. The microstructural evolution and the response of the microstructure to the corrosive environment is studied using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural studies indicate the presence of face-centered cubic Fe-based dendrites intermixed within an amorphous matrix along with fine crystalline precipitates. The corrosion resistance of the coatings decrease with an increase in laser energy density, which is attributed to the precipitation and growth of chromium carbide. The enhanced corrosion resistance of the coatings processed with low energy density is attributed to the self-healing mechanism of this amorphous system.

  19. The influence of electropolishing on the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J

    1980-09-01

    A study was conducted which examined the influence of electropolishing on the corrosion resistance of a cold rolled 316L stainless steel. Test specimens were surface prepared to a final mechanical finish of wetted 600 grit SiC paper, prior to electropolishing. An o-H3PO4/Glycerol/H2O electropolishing solution was employed for times of 15, 20, and 25 min. Control specimens were surface prepared only to the final mechanical finish. Anodic polarization tests were performed in a deaerated Ringer's solution (37 degrees C) which was acidified to pH 1, with HCl. The electropolished specimens demonstrated increased corrosion resistance, when compared to the control specimens. This was evidenced for the former by more anodic corrosion and breakdown potentials, and the absence of a dissolution peak which was observed for the control specimens at the initial polarization potentials. Surface hardness measurements indicated that this increase in corrosion resistance was produced, in part, by the removal of the cold worked surface layer produced by the mechanical finish. In terms of increasing corrosion resistance, no optimum electropolishing time was found within the 15-25 min treatment period. PMID:7349665

  20. Effects of porosity on corrosion resistance of Mg alloy foam produced by powder metallurgy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Aghion, E. Perez, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Magnesium alloy foams have the potential to serve as structural material for regular light-weight applications as well as for biodegradable scaffold implants. However, their main disadvantage relates to the high reactivity of magnesium and consequently their natural tendency to corrode in regular service conditions and in physiological environments. The present study aims at evaluating the effect of porosity on the corrosion resistance of MRI 201S magnesium alloy foams in 0.9% NaCl solution and in phosphate buffer saline solution as a simulated physiological electrolyte. The magnesium foams were produced by powder metallurgy technology using space-holding particles to control the porosity content. Machined chips were used as raw material for the production of Mg alloy powder by milling process. The microstructure of the foams was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the porosity has a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the tested foams. Foams with 14–19% porosity have a corrosion rate of 4–10 mcd and 7–15 mcd in NaCl and phosphate buffer saline solution, respectively, compared to only 0.10 mcd for the same alloy in as cast conditions. This increased corrosion degradation of the Mg foams by more than one order of magnitude compared to the cast alloy may limit their potential application in regular and physiological environments. - Highlights: • Porosity has a detrimental effect on corrosion resistance of MRI 201S Mg foams. • 14–19% porosity increases the corrosion rate by more than one order of magnitude. • Accelerated corrosion limits the use of foams in regular/physiological environments.

  1. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.

  2. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  3. Enhanced High Temperature Corrosion Resistance in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems by Nano-Passive Layer Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold R. Marder

    2007-06-14

    Due to their excellent corrosion resistance, iron aluminum alloys are currently being considered for use as weld claddings in fossil fuel fired power plants. The susceptibility to hydrogen cracking of these alloys at higher aluminum concentrations has highlighted the need for research into the effect of chromium additions on the corrosion resistance of lower aluminum alloys. In the present work, three iron aluminum alloys were exposed to simulated coal combustion environments at 500 C and 700 C for both short (100 hours) and long (5,000 hours) isothermal durations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the corrosion products. All alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the short term tests. For longer exposures, increasing the aluminum concentration was beneficial to the corrosion resistance. The addition of chromium to the binary iron aluminum alloy prevented the formation iron sulfide and resulted in lower corrosion kinetics. A classification of the corrosion products that developed on these alloys is presented. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the as-corroded coupons revealed that chromium was able to form chromium sulfides only on the higher aluminum alloy, thereby preventing the formation of deleterious iron sulfides. When the aluminum concentration was too low to permit selective oxidation of only aluminum (upon initial exposure to the corrosion environment), the formation of chromium oxide alongside the aluminum oxide led to depletion of chromium beneath the oxide layer. Upon penetration of sulfur through the oxide into this depletion layer, iron sulfides (rather than chromium sulfides) were found to form on the low aluminum alloy. Thus, it was found in this work that the role of chromium on alloy corrosion resistance was strongly effected by the aluminum concentration of the alloy. STEM analysis also revealed the encapsulation of external iron sulfide products with a thin layer of aluminum oxide, which may provide a

  4. NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

  5. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Refractory Ceramics Literature Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark; Perusich, Stephen; Whitten, Mary C.; Trejo, David; Zidek, Jason; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Coffman, Brekke E.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramics can be defmed as a material consisting of hard brittle properties produced from inorganic and nonmetallic minerals made by firing at high temperatures. These materials are compounds between metallic and nonmetallic elements and are either totally ionic, or predominately ionic but having some covalent character. This definition allows for a large range of materials, not all applicable to refractory applications. As this report is focused on potential ceramic materials for high temperature, aggressive exposure applications, the ceramics reviewed as part of this report will focus on refractory ceramics specifically designed and used for these applications. Ceramic materials consist of a wide variety of products. Callister (2000) 1 characterized ceramic materials into six classifications: glasses, clay products, refractories, cements, abrasives, and advanced ceramics. Figure 1 shows this classification system. This review will focus mainly on refractory ceramics and cements as in general, the other classifications are neither applicable nor economical for use in large structures such as the flame trench. Although much work has been done in advanced ceramics over the past decade or so, these materials are likely cost prohibitive and would have to be fabricated off-site, transported to the NASA facilities, and installed, which make these even less feasible. Although the authors reviewed the literature on advanced ceramic refractories 2 center dot 3 center dot 4 center dot 5 center dot 6 center dot 7 center dot 8 center dot 9 center dot 10 center dot 11 center dot 12 after the review it was concluded that these materials should not be ' the focus of this report. A review is in progress on materials and systems for prefabricated refractory ceramic panels, but this review is focusing more on typical refractory materials for prefabricated systems, which could make the system more economically feasible. Refractory ceramics are used for a wide variety of applications

  6. Mechanisms of hot corrosion of a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Fox, A.G.; Wang, Shaio-Wen

    1996-12-31

    Hot corrosion of a SiC (Nicalon) fiber-reinforced calcium aluminosilicate (CAS) has been investigated by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Samples of SiC/CAS and monolithic CAS were hot corroded by liquid sodium sulfate at 900{degrees}C for 50 hours in both air and argon. Corrosion damage in monolithic CAS was less severe as compared with the composite in both air and argon. The mechanisms of corrosion are discussed in terms of the kinetics of the dissociation of the sodium sulfate and its reaction with both the oxidized silicon carbide fibers and the CAS matrix.

  7. A corrosion resistant cerium oxide based coating on aluminum alloy 2024 prepared by brush plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Junlei; Han, Zhongzhi; Zuo, Yu; Tang, Yuming

    2011-01-01

    Cerium oxide based coatings were prepared on AA2024 Al alloy by brush plating. The characteristic of this technology is that hydrogen peroxide, which usually causes the plating solution to be unstable, is not necessary in the plating electrolyte. The coating showed laminated structures and good adhesive strength with the substrate. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the coatings were composed of Ce(III) and Ce(IV) oxides. The brush plated coatings on Al alloys improved corrosion resistance. The influence of plating parameters on structure and corrosion resistance of the cerium oxide based coating was studied.

  8. Modification of aluminide coating with yttrium for improved resistance to corrosive erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.; Luo, Y.; Li, D.Y.

    1999-12-01

    Aluminide coatings on a mild steel substrate were modified by using an oxygen-active element, yttrium, for improved resistance to corrosive erosion. The performance of the yttrium-containing coating during the following three erosion conditions was evaluated: dry sand erosion at different temperatures, erosion in a dilute NaCl slurry containing 30% silica sand, and erosion in a dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} slurry containing 30% silica sand. Results of the study demonstrated that yttrium significantly improved the resistance of the aluminide coating to both corrosive erosion and dry sand erosion.

  9. Protection of NdFeB magnets by corrosion resistance phytic acid conversion film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Haiyang; Zhu, Liqun; Liu, Huicong; Li, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    Phytic acid conversion film was prepared on NdFeB magnets by dipping the NdFeB into phytic acid solution. The morphology, composition, structure and corrosion resistance of the film were systematically investigated. The results showed that the phytic acid film was effective in improving the corrosion resistance of NdFeB magnets. XRD, TEM and FT-IR analyses revealed that the film was amorphous and had a strong peak of phosphate radical (PO43-). The formation mechanism of the film was also explored by XPS and the potential of zero charge (Epzc) measurement at the solution-metal interface.

  10. Effect of electrodeposition temperature on grain orientation and corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline pure nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang

    2016-08-01

    The nanocrystalline pure nickels with different grain orientations were fabricated by direct current electrodeposition process. The grain size slightly decreased with the increasing of electrodeposition solution temperature. However, grain orientation was affected significantly. Comparing with samples obtained at 50 °C and 80 °C, sample obtained at 20 °C had the strongest (111) orientation plane which increased electrochemical corrosion resistance of this sample. At the same time, the lowest (111) orientation plane deteriorated electrochemical corrosion resistance of sample obtained at 50 °C.

  11. Manufacture of high-density ceramic sinters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibata, Y.

    1986-01-01

    High density ceramic sinters are manufactured by coating premolded or presintered porous ceramics with a sealing material of high SiO2 porous glass or nitride glass and then sintering by hot isostatic pressing. The ceramics have excellent abrasion and corrosion resistances. Thus LC-10 (Si3N2 powder) and Y2O3-Al2O3 type sintering were mixed and molded to give a premolded porous ceramic (porosity 37%, relative bulk density 63%). The ceramic was dipped in a slurry containing high SiO2 porous glass and an alcohol solution of cellulose acetate and dried. The coated ceramic was treated in a nitrogen atmosphere and then sintered by hot isostatic pressing to give a dense ceramic sinter.

  12. Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lichun; Yang, Jian; Qiu, Tai

    2014-09-01

    The effects of CuO addition on phase composition, microstructure, sintering behavior, and microwave dielectric properties of 0.80Sm(Mg0.5Ti0.5)O3-0.20 Ca0.8Sr0.2TiO3(8SMT-2CST) ceramics prepared by a conventional solid-state ceramic route have been studied. CuO addition shows no obvious influence on the phase of the 8SMT-2CST ceramics and all the samples exhibit pure perovskite structure. Appropriate CuO addition can effectively promote sintering and grain growth, and consequently improve the dielectric properties of the ceramics. The sintering temperature of the ceramics decreases by 50°C by adding 1.00 wt.%CuO. Superior microwave dielectric properties with a ɛ r of 29.8, Q × f of 85,500 GHz, and τ f of 2.4 ppm/°C are obtained for 1.00 wt.%CuO doped 8SMT-2CST ceramics sintered at 1500°C, which shows dense and uniform microstructure as well as well-developed grain growth.

  13. Effect of Different Treatment on Corrosion Resistance of Sputtered Al Coating on Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangyan; Qi, Zeyan; Su, Yong; Liu, Qun; Guo, Xingxing

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum coating on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel was prepared by magnetron sputtering method. The specimens were treated with pre-oxidation (PO) or vacuum diffusion annealing (VA). Hot corrosion resistance of the coatings beneath the deposits of Na2SO4 at 1050 °C was investigated. Corrosion products were analyzed by XRD and SEM. Results show that the presence of coating could improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. FeAl phase appeared after VA at 600 °C, which enhanced cohesive force between the coating and the substrate, and reduced the oxidation and sulfidation rate. PO treatment can protect the substrate more effectively than VA treatment for metastable Al2O3 formed during PO treatment can be translated to stable Al2O3 more quickly at high temperatures. The corrosion products of the two kinds of specimens with aluminum coating were both composed of Al2O3, a little amount of FeS and Fe2O3 after 24 h corrosion. Al2O3 was formed mainly in the coatings, FeS was mainly distributed in the interface between coating and substrate of the specimens, and a small amount of FeS was distributed in the substrate. Al2O3 film remained intact after 24 h corrosion, and kept its protective effect on the substrate.

  14. Prediction of Corrosion Resistance of Concrete Containing Natural Pozzolan from Compressive Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, A. M.; Ismat, R.; Diyab, M. E.; Aliyan, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    A lot of Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures in Syria have suffered from reinforcement corrosion which shortened significantly their service lives. Probably, one of the most effective approaches to make concrete structures more durable and concrete industry on the whole - more sustainable is to substitute pozzolan for a portion of Portland cement (PC). Syria is relatively rich in natural pozzolan. In the study, in order to predict the corrosion resistance from compressive strength, concrete specimens were produced with seven cement types: one plain Portland cement (control) and six natural pozzolan-based cements with replacement levels ranging from 10 to 35%. The development of the compressive strengths of concrete cube specimens with curing time has been investigated. Chloride penetrability has also been evaluated for all concrete mixes after three curing times of 7, 28 and 90 days. The effect on resistance of concrete against damage caused by corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel has been investigated using an accelerated corrosion test by impressing a constant anodic potential for 7, 28 and 90 days curing. Test results have been statistically analysed and correlation equations relating compressive strength and corrosion performance have been developed. Significant correlations have been noted between the compressive strength and both rapid chloride penetrability and corrosion initiation times. So, this prediction could be reliable in concrete mix design when using natural pozzolan as cement replacement.

  15. Effects of Boronizing Treatment on Corrosion Resistance of 65Mn Steel in two Acid Mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyu; Zhao, Yufeng; Yuan, Xiaoming; Chen, Kangmin; Xu, Ruihua

    To explore the soil workability of rotary blade suitable for large tilling depth (over 20 cm) manufactured through boronizing treatment, this work focuses on the corrosion behavior of 65Mn steel after boronizing treatment in two acid mediums, i.e. the strong acidic medium that hydrochloric solution and the weak acidic that fertilizer-containing soil, and the comparison with existing technology of general rotary blade (lonnealing after overall quenching). The result shows that the corrosion resistance in the two acid mediums of 65Mn steel after boronizing treatment is remarkably improved. After 168 hours' corrosion in the hydrochloric acid solution, the weight loss of boronizing-status sample is only 27.9% of that of lonnealing-status sample. Moreover, there is no obvious weight loss in boronizing-status sample after 168 hours' corrosion in the fertilizer-containing soil, while the weight of lonnealing-status sample is lighter than the original weight after about 150 hours' corrosion. The improvement of the corrosion resistance lies in the significant reduction of the anodization speed in strong acid medium and the effective prevention of phosphorization reaction in weak acidic medium.

  16. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  17. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-06-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  18. 78 FR 16832 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic of Korea: Revocation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ...-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 77 FR 85 (January 3, 2012). \\2\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat... Corrosion- Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea, 77 FR 301 (January 4, 2012). As a...: Final Results of Expedited Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review of the Countervailing Duty Order, 77 FR...

  19. 78 FR 55057 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from the Republic of Korea... Requests for Revocation in Part, 77 FR 59168 (September 26, 2012). \\2\\ The period of review (POR) ends...

  20. 76 FR 3613 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Countervailing Duty Determinations: Certain Steel Products from Korea, 58 FR 43752 (August 17, 1993). On... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products...

  1. Influence of microstructure on the corrosion resistance of Fe-44Ni thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Liu, Tian-cheng; Li, Xiao-gang

    2016-06-01

    An Fe-44Ni nanocrystalline (NC) alloy thin film was prepared through electrodeposition. The relation between the microstructure and corrosion behavior of the NC film was investigated using electrochemical methods and chemical analysis approaches. The results show that the NC film is composed of a face-centered cubic phase (γ-(Fe,Ni)) and a body-centered cubic phase (α-(Fe,Ni)) when it is annealed at temperatures less than 400°C. The corrosion resistance increases with the increase in grain size, and the corresponding corrosion process is controlled by oxygen reduction. The NC films annealed at 500°C and 600°C do not exhibit the same pattern, although their grain sizes are considerably large. This result is attributed to the existence of an anodic phase, Fe0.947Ni0.054, in these films. Under this condition, the related corrosion process is synthetically controlled by anodic dissolution and depolarization.

  2. Comparative investigation of corrosion resistance of steel reinforcement in alinite and Portland cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Kostogloudis, G.C.; Kalogridis, D.; Ftikos, C.; Malami, C.; Georgali, B.; Kaloidas, V.

    1998-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of steel-reinforced mortar specimens made from alinite cement was investigated using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) specimens as reference. The specimens were prepared and exposed in three different environments: continuous exposure in tap water, interrupted exposure in tap water, and interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution. The steel weight loss and the half cell potential were measured vs. exposure time, up to the age of 12 months. Pore solution extraction and analysis and porosity determination were also performed. In continuous exposure in tap water, alinite cement provided adequate protection against corrosion. In interrupted exposure in tap water, a higher corrosion was observed for alinite cement compared to OPC. In the case of interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution, the simultaneous action of free chlorides and oxygen resulted in the depassivation of steel reinforcing bars in alinite and Portland cement mortars, and led to severe corrosion effect.

  3. Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Limaye, Santosh Y.

    1996-01-01

    Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4 P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.2X O.sub.24, .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-2X Y.sub.2X P.sub.6 O.sub.24 and .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-X Y.sub.X P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.X O.sub.24 wherein .phi. is either Strontium or Barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures.

  4. Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Limaye, S.Y.

    1996-01-30

    Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub 2X}O{sub 24}, {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}2X}Y{sub 2X}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} and {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}X}Y{sub X}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub X}O{sub 24} wherein {phi} is either strontium or barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures. 7 figs.

  5. The Fabrication of Nano-Particles in Aqueous Solution From Oxyfluoride Glass Ceramics by Thermal Induction and Corrosion Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    An innovative route is reported to fabricate nano-particles in aqueous solution from oxyfluoride glass by the thermal induction and corrosion treatment in this letter. The investigations of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope based on nano-particles in glass ceramics (GCs) and aqueous solution indicate that the nano-particles formed in glass matrix during the thermal induction process are released to aqueous solution and their structure, shape and luminescent properties in glass host can be kept. Owing to the designable composition of the nano-particles during glass preparation process, the method is a novel way to obtain nano-particles in aqueous solution from GCs. PMID:20596443

  6. Thermal shock resistance of core reinforced all-ceramic crown systems.

    PubMed

    Mora, G P; O'Brien, W J

    1994-02-01

    The coefficient of thermal expansion of core and veneer porcelains for all ceramic crowns must be compatible to prevent formation of stresses during the firing cycles. The purpose of this study was to use a thermal shock test to evaluate the crazing resistance of six all-ceramic crown systems. The systems tested were: Vita In-Ceram, Vita Hi-Ceram, Dicor veneered with Vitadur N, magnesia core veneered with Ceramco II, magnesia core veneered with Silhouette, and magnesia core veneered with Vita VMK 68. A maxillary central incisor was prepared with 1.0 mm axial and 1.5 mm incisal reduction. Refractory dies were prepared and crowns were fabricated using the manufacturers' recommendations. Six specimens of each system were placed inside a beaker in a furnace at 90 degrees C. After 15 min heat soak, ice water was poured into the beaker through a funnel. The samples were dried in air, reheated, and inspected for crazing using light microscopy. If crazing was observed, this would constitute a failure at a temperature difference (delta T) of 90 degrees C. If no failure occurred, the test was repeated at increasing temperature increments of 10 degrees C until failure. The crazing resistance of each system, expressed as the mean delta T, was: > 200 (Hi-Ceram), 163 +/- 14 (In-Ceram), 152 +/- 19 (Dicor/Vitadur N), 143 +/- 5 (magnesia core/Vita VMK 68), 122 +/- 21 (magnesia core/Silhouette), and 118 +/- 10 (magnesia core/Ceramco II) degrees C. All systems tested resisted crazing due to quenching in ice cold water from 100 degrees C. Systems with lower coefficients of expansion showed significantly greater resistance to thermal shock using ANOVA. PMID:8207030

  7. Electrochemical study of resistance to localized corrosion of stainless steels for biomaterial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, J.; Karlen, C.; Ulfvin, C.

    2000-03-01

    Sandvik Bioline High-N and 316 LVM are two austenitic stainless steels especially developed for biomaterial applications. Their resistance to localized corrosion was investigated by electrochemical methods including cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and potentiostatic polarization measurements in a phosphate-buffered saline solution and in a simulated crevice solution, i.e., designed for crevice corrosion testing. Sandvik SAF 2507 (a high-performance super duplex stainless steel) was included in the tests as a reference material High-N, higher alloyed than 316 LVM, demonstrated excellent resistance to pitting initiation and a strong tendency to repassivation. High-N proved to have an equivalent or even higher resistance to localized corrosion than SAF 2507. The latter is known for its impressive corrosion properties, particularly in chloride containing environments. While 316 LVM may run the risk of crevice corrosion in implant applications, the risk seems negligible for High-N. In view of the fact that also the mechanical properties are superior to those of 316 LVM, High-N is a very attractive implant material.

  8. Enhanced antibacterial properties, biocompatibility, and corrosion resistance of degradable Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; An, Zhiquan; Cheng, Mengqi; Wang, Qi; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Qiaojie; Wang, Jiaxing; Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Xianlong; Yuan, Guangyin

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg), a potential biodegradable material, has recently received increasing attention due to its unique antibacterial property. However, rapid corrosion in the physiological environment and potential toxicity limit clinical applications. In order to improve the corrosion resistance meanwhile not compromise the antibacterial activity, a novel Mg alloy, Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (Hereafter, denoted as JDBM), is fabricated by alloying with neodymium (Nd), zinc (Zn), zirconium (Zr). pH value, Mg ion concentration, corrosion rate and electrochemical test show that the corrosion resistance of JDBM is enhanced. A systematic investigation of the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial capability of JDBM is performed. The results of microbiological counting, CLSM, SEM in vitro, and microbiological cultures, histopathology in vivo consistently show JDBM enhanced the antibacterial activity. In addition, the significantly improved cytocompatibility is observed from JDBM. The results suggest that JDBM effectively enhances the corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and antimicrobial properties of Mg by alloying with the proper amount of Zn, Zr and Nd. PMID:25890720

  9. The development of dental alloys conserving precious metals: improving corrosion resistance by controlled ageing.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, K; Hisatsune, K; Ohta, M

    1983-03-01

    To determine the conditions which confer desirable mechanical properties and corrosion resistance upon dental alloys, age-hardening mechanism and the associated structural changes were studied by means of resistometric measurements, hardness tests, electron microscope observations and electron diffraction studies. Five commercial dental alloys, a high-gold content alloy, a low-gold alloy and three Au-Ag-Pd silver-based alloys and two experimental gold alloys, were examined. The structural and morphological changes which gave rise to age-hardening were classified into five types of phase transformation, i.e., (1) the formation of the AuCu I type superlattice and its twinning characterized by a stair-step mode, (2) the formation of the AuCu II type super-lattice with periodic antiphase domain structure, (3) the precipitation of the CuPd superlattice with fct structure analogous to the AuCu I type, (4) spinodal decomposition giving rise to a modulated structure and (5) the formation of the lamellar structure developed from grain boundaries by discontinuous precipitations. (1), (2) and (3) made a contribution to corrosion resistance superior to (4) and (5). A lamellar structure was prone to a high corrosion rate. The results obtained in this study are useful in predicting age-hardening characteristics and structural changes associated with corrosion, because the microstructural variation induced by ageing as well as nobility of alloys affects greatly their corrosion resistance. PMID:6574108

  10. Hydroxyapatite/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) double coating on magnesium for enhanced corrosion resistance and coating flexibility.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ji-Hoon; Li, Yuanlong; Kim, Sae-Mi; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite was deposited on pure magnesium (Mg) with a flexible poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer to reduce the corrosion rate of Mg and enhance coating flexibility. The poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer was uniformly coated on Mg by a spraying method, followed by hydroxyapatite deposition on the poly(ε-caprolactone) using an aerosol deposition method. In scanning electron microscopy observations, inorganic/organic composite-like structure was observed between the hydroxyapatite and poly(ε-caprolactone) layers, resulting from the collisions of hydroxyapatite particles into the poly(ε-caprolactone) matrix at the initial stage of the aerosol deposition. The corrosion resistance of the coated Mg was examined using potentiodynamic polarization tests. The hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating remarkably improved the corrosion resistance of Mg in Hank's solution. In the in vitro cell tests, the coated Mg showed better cell adhesion compared with the bare Mg due to the reduced corrosion rate and enhanced biocompatibility. The stability and flexibility of hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy inspections after the coated Mg was deformed. The hydroxyapatite coating on the poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer revealed enhanced coating stability and flexibility without cracking or delamination during bending and stretching compared with the hydroxyapatite single coating. These results demonstrated that the hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating significantly improved the surface corrosion resistance of Mg and enhanced coating flexibility for use of Mg as a biodegradable implant. PMID:23241964

  11. New Oxide Ceramic Developed for Superior High-Temperature Wear Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Farmer, Serene C.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramics, for the most part, do not have inherently good tribological properties. For example friction coefficients in excess of 0.7 have been reported for silicon nitride sliding on silicon nitride or on bearing steel (ref. 1). High friction is always accompanied by considerable wear. Despite their inherently poor tribological properties, the high strength and high toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics has led to their successful use in tribological applications (refs. 1 to 4). The upper temperature limit for the application of Si3N4 as wear-resistant material is limited by reaction with the tribological environment (ref. 3). Silicon nitride is known to produce a thin silicon dioxide film with easy shear capability that results in low friction and low wear in a moist environment (ref. 5). At elevated temperatures, the removal of the reaction product that acts as lubricant causes the friction coefficient to increase and, consequently, the wear performance to become poor. New materials are sought that will have wear resistance superior to that of Si3N4 at elevated temperatures and in harsh environments. A new class of oxide ceramic materials has been developed with potential for excellent high-temperature wear resistance. The new material consists of a multicomponent oxide with a two-phase microstructure, in which the wear resistance of the mixed oxide is significantly higher than that of the individual constituents. This is attributed to the strong constraining effects provided by the interlocking microstructures at different length scales, to the large aspect ratio of the phases, to the strong interphase bonding, and to the residual stresses. Fretting wear tests were conducted by rubbing the new ceramic material against boron carbide (B4C). The new ceramic material produced a wear track groove on B4C, suggesting significantly higher wear resistance for the oxide ceramic. The new material did not suffer from any microstructural degradation after the wear

  12. Lightweight ceramic filter components: Evaluation and application

    SciTech Connect

    Eggerstedt, P.M.

    1995-11-01

    Ceramic candle filtration is an attractive technology for particulate removal at high temperatures. The primary objective of this SBIR research program is to increase the performance, durability, and corrosion resistance of lightweight filter candles and filter tubesheet components (Fibrosic{trademark}), fabricated from vacuum formed chopped ceramic fiber (VFCCF), for use in advanced coal utilization applications. Phase 1 results proved that significant gains in material strength and particle retentivity are possible by treatment of VFCCF materials with colloidal ceramic oxides. Phase 2 effort will show how these treated materials tolerate high temperature and vapor-phase alkali species, on a long-term basis. With good durability and corrosion resistance, high temperature capability, and a low installed and replacement cost, these novel materials will help promote commercial acceptance of ceramic candle filter technology, as well as increase the efficiency and reliability of coal utilization processes in general.

  13. Effect of Alloying Elements on Tensile Properties, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of Reinforcing Bar Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, B. K.; Srikanth, S.; Sahoo, G.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of copper, phosphorus, and chromium present in a semikilled reinforcing bar steel produced by in-line quenching [thermomechanical treatment (TMT)] process on the tensile properties, microstructure, and corrosion resistance of steel in simulated chloride environment has been investigated. The results have been compared with that of a semikilled C-Mn reinforcing bar steel without these alloying elements produced by the same process route. Though the amount of phosphorus (0.11 wt.%) was higher than that specified by ASTM A 706 standard, the Cu-P-Cr steel exhibited a composite microstructure, and good balance of yield stress, tensile stress, elongation, and ultimate tensile to yield stress ratio. Two conventional test methods, namely, the salt fog, and potentiodynamic polarization tests, were used for the corrosion test. The rust formed on Cu-P-Cr steel was adherent, and was of multiple colors, while the corrosion products formed on the C-Mn steel were weakly adherent and relatively darker blue. Also, the free corrosion potential of the Cu-P-Cr steel was nobler, and the corrosion current was markedly lower than that of a C-Mn rebar. The Cu-P-Cr steel did not develop any pits/deep grooves on its surface even after the prolonged exposure to salt fog. The improved corrosion resistance of the Cu-P-Cr steel has been attributed to the presence of copper, phosphorus, and small amount of chromium in the dense, adherent rust layer on the surface of reinforcing steel bar. A schematic mechanism of charge transfer has been proposed to explain the improved corrosion resistance of the Cu-P-Cr alloyed TMT rebar.

  14. Development, Processing, and Testing of High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant HVOF Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Wong, F; Haslam, J; Estill, J; Branagan, D; Yang, N; Blue, C

    2003-08-26

    New amorphous-metal and ceramic coatings applied by the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process may reduce the waste package materials cost of the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository by over $4 billion (cost reduction of 27 to 42%). Two critical requirements that have been determined from design analysis are protection in brines that may evolve from the evaporative concentration of pore waters and protection for waste package welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Our efforts are directed towards producing and evaluating these high-performance coatings for the development of lower cost waste packages, and will leverage a cost-effective collaboration with DARPA for applications involving marine corrosion.

  15. Corrosion resistant coatings. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the anticorrosive behavior of protective coatings based on such materials as ceramics, metals, and polymers. Topics include high and low temperature corrosion, surface structure, mechanical and chemical properties, applications, and performance evaluations. Paints and powder coatings, and methods of application are also considered. Protective coatings for specific applications such as gas turbines, coal gasification, power plants, papermaking, carbon steels, reinforced concrete, pipelines, antifouling coatings, and conversion coatings are examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Corrosion resistant coatings. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the anticorrosive behavior of protective coatings based on such materials as ceramics, metals, and polymers. Topics include high and low temperature corrosion, surface structure, mechanical and chemical properties, applications, and performance evaluations. Paints and powder coatings, and methods of application are also considered. Protective coatings for specific applications such as gas turbines, coal gasification, power plants, papermaking, carbon steels, reinforced concrete, pipelines, antifouling coatings, and conversion coatings are examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Corrosion resistant coatings. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the anticorrosive behavior of protective coatings based on such materials as ceramics, metals, and polymers. Topics include high and low temperature corrosion, surface structure, mechanical and chemical properties, applications, and performance evaluations. Paints and powder coatings, and methods of application are also considered. Protective coatings for specific applications such as gas turbines, coal gasification, power plants, papermaking, carbon steels, reinforced concrete, pipelines, antifouling coatings, and conversion coatings are examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Improving impact resistance of ceramic materials by energy absorbing surface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, H. P.; Seretsky, J.

    1974-01-01

    Energy absorbing surface layers were used to improve the impact resistance of silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics. Low elastic modulus materials were used. In some cases, the low elastic modulus was achieved using materials that form localized microcracks as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy, thermal expansion differences between phases, or phase transformations. In other cases, semi-vitreous or vitreous materials were used. Substantial improvements in impact resistance were observed at room and elevated temperatures.

  19. Polymer production by two newly isolated extremely halophilic archaea: application of a novel corrosion-resistant bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hezayen, F F; Rehm, B H; Eberhardt, R; Steinbüchel, A

    2000-09-01

    A novel corrosion-resistant bioreactor composed of polyetherether ketone (PEEK), tech glass and silicium nitrite ceramics was constructed and applied for the cultivation of two newly isolated, extremely halophilic archaea producing poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (PGA), or poly(beta-hydroxy butyric acid) (PHB), respectively. These bacteria were isolated from hypersaline soil close to Aswan (Egypt). The isolate strain 40, which is related to the genus Natrialba, produced large amounts of PGA when cultivated on solid medium. Culture conditions were optimised applying the corrosion-resistant bioreactor. PGA production was dependent on NaCl concentration and occurred about at 20% (w/v) NaCl in the medium. A maximum cell density of about 1.6 g cell dry matter/l was obtained when the bioreactor was stirred and aerated in a batch fermentation process using proteose-peptone medium. The supernatant was monitored with respect to PGA formation, and after 90 h a maximum of 470 mg/l culture volume was detected by HPLC analysis. Culture conditions were optimized for the isolate 56, which accumulated PHB as intracellular granules. Batch fermentations in the stirred and aerated bioreactor applying acetate and n-butyric acid as carbon sources led to cell density of 2.28 g cell dry matter/l and a maximum PHB accumulation contributing to about 53% of cellular dry weight. About 4.6 g PHB were isolated from 10.6 g dried cells of strain 56, which exhibited a weight average molar mass of 2.3 x 10(5) g mol(-1) and a polydispersity of about 1.4. PMID:11030566

  20. Reduced platelet adhesion and improved corrosion resistance of superhydrophobic TiO₂-nanotube-coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoling; Yang, Yun; Hu, Ronggang; Lin, Changjian; Sun, Lan; Vogler, Erwin A

    2015-01-01

    Superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays were fabricated on 316L stainless steel (SS) to improve corrosion resistance and hemocompatibility of SS. Vertically-aligned superhydrophilic amorphous TNTs were fabricated on SS by electrochemical anodization of Ti films deposited on SS. Calcination was carried out to induce anatase phase (superhydrophilic), and fluorosilanization was used to convert superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. The morphology, structure and surface wettability of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle goniometry. The effects of surface wettability on corrosion resistance and platelet adhesion were investigated. The results showed that crystalline phase (anatase vs. amorphous) and wettability strongly affected corrosion resistance and platelet adhesion. The superhydrophilic amorphous TNTs failed to protect SS from corrosion whereas superhydrophobic amorphous TNTs slightly improved corrosion resistance of SS. Both superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic anatase TNTs significantly improved corrosion resistance of SS. The superhydrophilic amorphous TNTs minimized platelet adhesion and activation whereas superhydrophilic anatase TNTs activated the formation of fibrin network. On the contrary, both superhydrophobic TNTs (superhydrophobic amorphous TNTs and superhydrophobic anatase TNTs) reduced platelet adhesion significantly and improved corrosion resistance regardless of crystalline phase. Superhydrophobic anatase TNTs coating on SS surface offers the opportunity for the application of SS as a promising permanent biomaterial in blood contacting biomedical devices, where both reducing platelets adhesion/activation and improving corrosion resistance can be effectively combined. PMID:25481855

  1. Superhydrophobic surface fabricated on iron substrate by black chromium electrodeposition and its corrosion resistance property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Feng, Haitao; Lin, Feng; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Liping; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of superhydrophobic surface on iron substrate is carried out through 20 min black chromium electrodeposition, followed by immersing in 0.05 M ethanolic stearic acid solution for 12 h. The resultant superhydrophobic complex film is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), disperse Spectrometer (EDS), atomic force microscope (AFM), water contact angle (CA), sliding angle (SA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and its corrosion resistance property is measured with cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the fabricated superhydrophobic film has excellent water repellency (CA, 158.8°; SA, 2.1°) and significantly high corrosion resistance (1.31 × 106 Ω cm-2) and excellent corrosion protection efficiency (99.94%).

  2. "A L C L A D" A New Corrosion Resistant Aluminum Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dix, E H , Jr

    1927-01-01

    Described here is a new corrosion resistant aluminum product which is markedly superior to the present strong alloys. Its use should result in greatly increased life of a structural part. Alclad is a heat-treated aluminum, copper, manganese, magnesium alloy that has the corrosion resistance of pure metal at the surface and the strength of the strong alloy underneath. Of particular importance is the thorough character of the union between the alloy and the pure aluminum. Preliminary results of salt spray tests (24 weeks of exposure) show changes in tensile strength and elongation of Alclad 17ST, when any occurred, to be so small as to be well within the limits of experimental error. Some surface corrosion of the pure metal had taken place, but not enough to cause the specimens to break through those areas.

  3. Effects of Al Contents on Carburization Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of TiAl Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Cui Jiao; He, Yue Hui; Ming, Xing Zu

    2015-10-01

    TiAl alloys with Al contents of 30.7, 37, 46.5, and 54.2 at.% were carburized. Corrosion resistance of the untreated and the carburized TiAl alloys was comparatively analyzed. The phase and microstructure of the carburized TiAl alloys were studied by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of the untreated and the carburized TiAl alloys was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Experimental results indicate that different Al contents bring about distinct microstructure of the carburized layers. The lower Al content leads to the formation of the thicker binary carbides and the thinner Ti2AlC phase. Additionally, the lower Al content leads to higher corrosion resistance in the untreated and the carburized states.

  4. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  5. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  6. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Joseph; Choi, Jor-Shan; Saw, Cheng; Haslam, Jeffrey; Day, Dan; Hailey, Phillip; Lian, Tiangan; Rebak, Raul; Perepezko, John; Payer, Joe; Branagan, Daniel; Beardsley, Brad; D'Amato, Andy; Aprigliano, Lou

    2009-06-01

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition, materials synthesis, thermal stability, corrosion resistance, environmental cracking, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, radiation effects, and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as meltspun ribbons (MSRs), dropcast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of MSRs and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently, thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests; good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while the open-circuit corrosion potentials (OCPs) were simultaneously monitored; reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber and suitable for criticality-control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and Ni-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  7. Use of additives to improve microstructures and fracture resistance of silicon nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Becher, Paul F.; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2011-06-28

    A high-strength, fracture-resistant silicon nitride ceramic material that includes about 5 to about 75 wt-% of elongated reinforcing grains of beta-silicon nitride, about 20 to about 95 wt-% of fine grains of beta-silicon nitride, wherein the fine grains have a major axis of less than about 1 micron; and about 1 to about 15 wt-% of an amorphous intergranular phase comprising Si, N, O, a rare earth element and a secondary densification element. The elongated reinforcing grains have an aspect ratio of 2:1 or greater and a major axis measuring about 1 micron or greater. The elongated reinforcing grains are essentially isotropically oriented within the ceramic microstructure. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a room temperature flexure strength of 1,000 MPa or greater and a fracture toughness of 9 MPa-m.sup.(1/2) or greater. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a peak strength of 800 MPa or greater at 1200 degrees C. Also included are methods of making silicon nitride ceramic materials which exhibit the described high flexure strength and fracture-resistant values.

  8. Relation Between Open Circuit Potential and Polarization Resistance with Rust and Corrosion Monitoring of Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, S.; Garg, A.; Mondal, K.

    2016-07-01

    The present work discusses continuous corrosion assessment from a unique correlation of open circuit potential (OCP) and linear polarization resistance with rust formation on mild steel after prolong exposure in 3.5% NaCl salt fog environment. The OCP measurement and linear polarization tests were carried out of the rusted samples only without the removal of rust. It also discusses the strong influence of the composition, fraction, and morphology of the rust layers with OCP and linear polarization resistance. The rust characterization was done after the measurement of OCP and linear polarization resistance of the rusted steel samples. Therefore, monitoring of both the OCP and linear polarization resistance of the rusted mild steels coupled with rust characterization could be used for easy and dynamic assessment of the nature of corrosion.

  9. Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song; Zhu, De-Gui; Cai, Xu-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    The dense monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics have been prepared by a two-step sintering process at a sintering temperature of 1173 K (900 °C). Firstly, the pre-sintered monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 powders containing small SiO2·Al2O3 crystal phases were obtained by continuously sintering a powder mixture of SrCO3 and kaolin at 1223 K (950 °C) for 6 hours and 1673 K (1400 °C) for 4 hours, respectively. Subsequently, by the combination of the pre-sintered ceramic powders with the composite flux agents, which are composed of a SrO·3B2O3 flux agent and α-Al2O3, the low-temperature densification sintering of the monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics was accomplished at 1173 K (900 °C). The low-temperature sintering behavior and microstructure evolvement of the monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics have been investigated in terms of Al2O3 in addition to the composite flux agents. It shows that due to the low-meting characteristics, the SrO·3B2O3 flux agent can urge the dense microstructure formation of the monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics and the re-crystallization of the grains via a liquid-phase sintering. The introduction of α-Al2O3 to the SrO·3B2O3 flux agent can apparently lead to more dense microstructures for the monoclinic-SrAl2Si2O8 ceramics but also cause the re-precipitation of SiO2·Al2O3 compounds because of an excessive Al2O3 content in the SrO·3B2O3 flux agent.

  10. Effect of alloying elements and residuals on corrosion resistance of type 444 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, N.J.E.; Kim, Y.H.; Ahn, S.K.; Lee, Y.D.

    1999-02-01

    The principal criteria for the corrosion resistance of intermediate-grade ferritic stainless steels (SS) were examined in a neutral chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) solution. The effect of increasing quantities of chromium and molybdenum was estimated for several heats in terms of the breakdown potential (E{sub b}). The effect of inclusions (particularly the oxide-sulfide type) in type 444 SS ([UNS S44400] 19% Cr-2% Mo-Nb or 19% Cr-2% Mo alloy), combined with the alloying element trend, permitted derivation of an expression that integrated both phenomena. The expression represents the mutually opposing effects of the chromium/molybdenum passive film reinforcement as represented by the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN), as well as incorporating the deleterious contribution of the inclusion density ({Psi}/mm{sup 2}). Aluminum reduced the total inclusion content, which was associated with an increase in E{sub b}. Since no aluminum was detected in the passive film of high aluminum steels, it appeared likely that the prime effect of this element on corrosion resistance was via inclusion suppression. Corrosion studies of welded type 444 SS demonstrated that dual stabilization with low individual concentrations of titanium and niobium provided optimum corrosion resistance. This apparent synergism of niobium and titanium was independent of the surface of the welded materials, which were examined in the as-received, pickled, or polished states. The effect of the surface state in all cases was shown to exercise a critical effect on passive behavior.

  11. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Coatings Prepared by Twin Wires Arc Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinran; Wang, Zehua; Lin, Pinghua; Cheng, Jiangbo; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xin

    2014-02-01

    FeB, FeBSi, and FeNiCrBSiNbW coatings were prepared by twin wires arc spraying process on AISI 1045 steel substrate, and the microstructure and phases were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and x-ray diffraction. The corrosion resistance was investigated by means of electrochemical tests. It was found that FeB coating and FeBSi coating were composed of α-Fe, FeO, and Fe2O3 phases. FeNiCrBSiNbW coating consisted of amorphous phase and α-(Fe, Cr) nanocrystalline phase, with porosity of 1.8%, hardness of 807 Hv0.1 and tensile bonding strength of 52.1 MPa. Three kinds of electrochemical tests were employed to identify the corrosion resistance of the coatings. The results indicated that the FeNiCrBSiNbW coating had a superior corrosion resistance, much better than FeB and FeBSi coatings. It was attributed to the amorphous/nanocrystalline structure and the presence of corrosion-resistant element Cr.

  12. Oxidation and corrosion resistance of candidate Stirling engine heater-head-tube alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen candidate iron base Stirling engine heater head tube alloys are evaluated in a diesel fuel fired simulator materials test rig to determine their oxidation and corrosion resistance. Sheet specimens are tested at 820 C for 3500 hr in 5 hr heating cycles. Specific weight change data and an attack parameter are used to categorize the alloys into four groups; 10 alloys show excellent for good oxidation and corrosion resistance and six alloys exhibit poor or catastrophic resistance. Metallographic, X-ray, and electron microprobe analyses aid in further characterizing the oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. Alloy compositions, expecially the reactive elements aluminum, titanium, and chromium, play a major role in the excellent oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. The best oxidation resistance is associated with the formation of an iron nickel aluminum outer oxide scale, an intermediate oxide scale rich in chromium and titanium, and an aluminum outer oxide scale adjacent to the metallic substrate, which exhibits a zone of internal oxidation of aluminum and to some extent titanium.

  13. CHROMIUM-FREE CORROSION-RESISTANT HYBRID UV COATINGS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SBIR Phase I project is designed to determine the feasibility of preparing an environmentally friendly chromium-free solvent-free hybrid ultraviolet (UV) resin coating system suitable for applications such as industrial, automotive, and aerospace corrosion resistance. In...

  14. Corrosion and wear resistance study of Ni-P and Ni-P-PTFE nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankita, Sharma; Singh, Ajay

    2011-09-01

    This article reports on the corrosion and wear resistance of Ni-P and Ni-P-PTFE nanocomposite coatings deposited on mild steel substrates using the electroless plating technique. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-Ray (EDAX), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The coatings were smooth and had thicknesses between 7 and 23 µm. They contained Ni, P, and additionally, F, in the case of the Ni-P-PTFE films. A broadening of the Ni peak in XRD was attributed to the amorphous nature and/or fine grain size of the films. Corrosion resistance was measured using immersion and electrochemical polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution whereas wear resistance was determined by the pin-on-disc method. Both Ni-P and Ni-P-PTFE coatings exhibited significant improvement in corrosion (in salty media) and wear behavior. Furthermore, the addition of PTFE in the coatings showed improvement in their corrosion resistance as well as a reduction in friction coefficient. Our testing revealed that the coatings' wore out following the "adhesive type" mechanism.

  15. Corrosion-resistant fuel cladding allow for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, Jr., William F.; Colburn, Richard P.

    1982-01-01

    An aluminide coating for a fuel cladding tube for LMFBRs (liquid metal fast breeder reactors) such as those using liquid sodium as a heat transfer agent. The coating comprises a mixture of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases and presents good corrosion resistance to liquid sodium at temperatures up to 700.degree. C. while additionally presenting a barrier to outward diffusion of .sup.54 Mn.

  16. Corrosion fracture resistance of welded joints in 16GMYuCh steel

    SciTech Connect

    Steklov, O.I.; Efimenko, L.A.; Khakimov, A.M.; Paul', A.I.; Pushkina, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of combined welding of thick-wall gas and oil chemical equipment consisting of welding the weld root by automatic submerged-arc welding and electrosag welding (ESW) with the control of thermal cycles (CWC) of the main joint, on the corrosion resistance of welded joints in low-alloy normalized 16GMYuCh steel 50 mm thick. The chemical composition of the steel, % 0.16 C; 1.05 Mn; 0.25 Si; 0.42 Mo; 0.14 Ni; 0.1 Cu; 0.11 Cr; 0.049 Al; 0.032 S; 0.019 P. The authors determined the effect of cooling rate in the temperature range of diffusion transformation of austenite on the corrosion resistance of the weld zone. Attention was then given to the corrosion resistance of the welded joints produced by conventional ESW welding and ESW with CWC. The investigations show that the corrosion resistance of the parent metal is lower than that of the welded joints.

  17. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  18. Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Tang; Feng, Si; Ying-xiang, Li; He-tuo, Chen; Xiao, Zhang; Shu-ren, Zhang

    2014-11-01

    The effects of Ta2O5/Y2O3 codoping on the microstructure and microwave dielectric properties of Ba(Co0.56Zn0.40)1/3Nb2/3O3- xA- xB (A = 0.045 wt.% Ta2O5; B = 0.113 wt.% Y2O3) ceramics ( x = 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32) prepared according to the conventional solid-state reaction technique were investigated. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the main crystal phase in the sintered ceramics was BaZn0.33Nb0.67O3-Ba3CoNb2O9. The additional surface phase of Ba8CoNb6O24 and trace amounts of Ba5Nb4O15 second phase were present when Ta2O5/Y2O3 was added to the ceramics. The 1:2 B-site cation ordering was affected by the substitution of Ta5+ and Y3+ in the crystal lattice, especially for x = 4. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the optimally doped ceramics sintered at 1340°C for 20 h showed a compact microstructure with crystal grains in dense contact. Though the dielectric constant increased with the x value, appropriate addition would result in a tremendous modification of the Q × f and τ f values. Excellent microwave dielectric properties ( ɛ r = 35.4, Q × f = 62,993 GHz, and τ f = 2.6 ppm/°C) were obtained for the ceramic with x = 0.4 sintered in air at 1340°C for 20 h.

  19. Corrosion resistance improvement for 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents by trimethylsilane plasma nanocoatings

    PubMed Central

    Jones, John Eric; Chen, Meng; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    To improve their corrosion resistance and thus long-term biocompatibility, 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents were coated with trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coatings of 20–25 nm in thickness. Both direct current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) glow discharges were utilized for TMS plasma coatings and additional NH3/O2 plasma treatment to tailor the surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the coating surface chemistry. It was found that both DC and RF TMS plasma coatings had Si- and C-rich composition, and the O-and N-contents on the surfaces were substantially increased after NH3/O2 plasma treatment. Surface contact angle measurements showed that DC TMS plasma nanocoating with NH3/O2 plasma treatment generated very hydrophilic surface. The corrosion resistance of TMS plasma coated stents was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization and electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The potentiodynamic polarization demonstrated that the TMS plasma coated stents imparted higher corrosion potential and pitting potential, as well as lower corrosion current densities as compared with uncoated controls. The surface morphology of stents before and after potentiodynamic polarization testing was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, which indicated less corrosion on coated stents than uncoated controls. It was also noted that, from EIS data, the hydrophobic TMS plasma nanocoatings showed stable impedance modulus at 0.1 Hz after 21 day immersion in an electrolyte solution. These results suggest improved corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel stents by TMS plasma nanocoatings and great promise in reducing and blocking metallic ions releasing into the bloodstream. PMID:24500866

  20. Corrosion resistance improvement for 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents by trimethylsilane plasma nanocoatings.

    PubMed

    Eric Jones, John; Chen, Meng; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-10-01

    To improve their corrosion resistance and thus long-term biocompatibility, 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents were coated with trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coatings of 20-25 nm in thickness. Both direct current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) glow discharges were utilized for TMS plasma coatings and additional NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment to tailor the surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the coating surface chemistry. It was found that both DC and RF TMS plasma coatings had Si- and C-rich composition, and the O- and N-contents on the surfaces were substantially increased after NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment. Surface contact angle measurements showed that DC TMS plasma nanocoating with NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment generated very hydrophilic surface. The corrosion resistance of TMS plasma coated stents was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The potentiodynamic polarization demonstrated that the TMS plasma coated stents imparted higher corrosion potential and pitting potential, as well as lower corrosion current densities as compared with uncoated controls. The surface morphology of stents before and after potentiodynamic polarization testing was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, which indicated less corrosion on coated stents than uncoated controls. It was also noted that, from EIS data, the hydrophobic TMS plasma nanocoatings showed stable impedance modulus at 0.1 Hz after 21 day immersion in an electrolyte solution. These results suggest improved corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel stents by TMS plasma nanocoatings and great promise in reducing and blocking metallic ions releasing into the bloodstream. PMID:24500866

  1. Microstructure Aspects of a Newly Developed, Low Cost, Corrosion-Resistant White Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Sharma, C. P.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the influence of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of a newly developed white cast iron, basically suitable for corrosion- and wear-resistant applications, and to attain a microstructure that is most suitable from the corrosion resistance point of view. The composition was selected with an aim to have austenitic matrix both in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The difference in electrochemical potential between austenite and carbide is less in comparison to that between austenite and graphite. Additionally, graphitic corrosion which is frequently encountered in gray cast irons is absent in white cast irons. These basic facts encouraged us to undertake this work. Optical metallography, hardness testing, X-ray diffractometry, and SEM-EDX techniques were employed to identify the phases present in the as-cast and heat-treated specimens of the investigated alloy and to correlate microstructure with corrosion resistance and hardness. Corrosion testing was carried out in 5 pct NaCl solution (approximate chloride content of sea water) using the weight loss method. In the investigated alloy, austenite was retained the in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The same was confirmed by X-ray and EDX analysis. The stability and volume fraction of austenite increased with an increase of heat-treated temperature/time with a simultaneous decrease in the volume fraction of massive carbides. The decrease in volume fraction of massive carbides resulted in the availability of alloying elements. These alloying elements, on increasing the heat treatment temperature or increasing the soaking period at certain temperatures, get dissolved in austenite. As a consequence, austenite gets enriched as well as becomes more stable. On cooling from lower soaking period/temperature, enriched austenite decomposes to lesser enriched austenite and to a dispersed phase due to decreasing solid solubility of alloying elements with decreasing temperature

  2. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, K.E.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of these materials to a simulated coal combustion environment for relatively short periods of time (10-50 hours). Heat exchanger tubes from DuPont Lanxide Composite Inc. were cut and infiltrated with Cr by heating in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed. This resulted in continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. The Cr-free and the Cr-infiltrated specimens were reacted with the molten Illinois No. 6 slag for 2 and 20 h at 1260{degrees}C, and the reaction layers examined with SEM and EDX. In the Cr-free specimens, the segregation of Fe and the precipitation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were detected near the liquid/gas interface, but no evidence of corrosion was present. In the Cr-infiltrate specimens, corrosion was evident, since a rearrangement and segregation of the Cr-rich grains occurred toward the surface of the molten slag. In addition, evidence of the diffusion of major quantities of Fe was observed from the liquid slag into the Cr-rich layer formed by infiltration.

  3. Protection of 2024-T3 aluminium alloy by corrosion resistant phytic acid conversion coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongwei; Han, En-Hou; Liu, Fuchun; Kallip, Silvar

    2013-09-01

    The corrosion protection properties of environmentally friendly phytic acid conversion coatings were studied on 2024-T3 aluminium alloy. The films were prepared under acidic conditions with various pH values and characterised by SEM, EDS, ATR-FTIR and electrochemical techniques. The results indicate that the conversion coatings obtained by immersing the alloy in phytic acid solutions at pH from 3 to 5.5 provide excellent corrosion resistance. ATR-FTIR confirms that the film is formed by deposition of reaction products between Al3+ and phosphate groups in phytic acid molecules. The conformation models of the deposition film are proposed.

  4. Alloy 31, a new 6 moly stainless steel with improved corrosion resistance in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Jasner, M.; Heubner, U.

    1995-10-01

    Alloy 31--UNS N08031--31Ni-27Cr-6.5Mo-1.2Cu-0.2N-balance iron--is an advanced 6 Mo stainless steel with increased chromium and nickel, contents for seawater service. In hot seawater the pitting potential of alloy 31 remains high up to 90 C (194 F). Investigations of resistance to crevice corrosion in real piping systems in natural seawater, both North Sea and Baltic Sea, show that the threshold conditions for alloy 31 in chlorinated seawater (North Sea) are at 40 C and 1 ppm chlorine well superior to the 6 Mo stainless grades being currently in use. In addition, alloy 31 shows an excellent resistance to corrosion versus both hot reducing media (e.g. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and hot oxidizing media (e.g. HNO{sub 3}). The combination of high resistance to localized corrosion vs. hot chloride-bearing cooling waters including seawater and aggressive oxidizing and reducing hot corrosive media is a unique feature of alloy 31. Alloy 31 is recommended for the construction of heat exchangers, process coolers and piping systems. The material is supplied in a number of semifinished products such as seamless and welded pipes, fittings, flanges, forged bars, plate, sheet, strip, wire and prefabricated piping systems.

  5. Ultrasonic irradiation and its application for improving the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings on aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Minqi; Wang, Chao; Zhong, Qingdong; Wei, Yinyin; Wang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic irradiation was utilized for improving the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings on aluminum alloys. The chemical composition and morphology of the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings was investigated by polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Various effects of the addition of Nd(2)O(3) in phosphating bath on the performance of the coatings were also investigated. Results show that the composition of phosphate coating were Zn(3)(PO(4))(2).4H(2)O(hopeite) and Zn crystals. The phosphate coatings became denser with fewer microscopic holes by utilizing ultrasonic irradiation treatment. The addition of Nd(2)O(3) reduced the crystallinity of the coatings, with the additional result that the crystallites were increasingly nubby and spherical. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was also significantly improved by ultrasonic irradiation treatment; both the anodic and cathodic processes of corrosion taking place on the aluminum alloy substrate were suppressed consequently. In addition, the electrochemical impedance of the coatings was also increased by utilizing ultrasonic irradiation treatment compared with traditional treatment. PMID:19692286

  6. Multiscale Electrochemical Investigation of the Corrosion Resistance of Various Alloys Used in Dental Prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacoban, Sorin; Mareci, Daniel; Bolat, Georgiana; Munteanu, Corneliu; Souto, Ricardo Manuel

    2015-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Ag-Pd (Paliag), Ni-Cr (Heraenium NA), and Co-Cr (Heraenium CE) alloys used in dental prosthetics construction of crowns and bridges was studied in 0.9 pct NaCl solution at 298 K (25 °C). The localized electrochemical characteristics related to corrosion resistance and eventual breakdown of the protecting oxide layers were investigated by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), whereas potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques were employed to establish oxide stability. When the corrosion resistance of the alloys was evaluated by means of the corrosion current value determined around their corresponding open circuit potential in 0.9 pct NaCl solution, good protection can be expected resulting from their spontaneous passivation (low current densities in the order of tenths of μA cm-2). The polarization resistance of all the samples increased with immersion time, in the sequence Ag-Pd < Heraenium NA < Heraenium CE. Yet, increased electrochemical activity was detected with SECM when the alloys were polarized at +0.40 V SCE, a value that may be eventually experienced in the human body. Although a passivation mechanism was still operating in the chromium-containing alloys, oxide dissolution and precipitation of corrosion products occurred on Ag-Pd instead.

  7. Electrical Resistance of Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection or inspection of a component during "down time". The correlation of damage with appropriate failure mechanism can then be applied to accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites.

  8. Towards a Better Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility Improvement of Nitinol Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokicki, Ryszard; Hryniewicz, Tadeusz; Pulletikurthi, Chandan; Rokosz, Krzysztof; Munroe, Norman

    2015-04-01

    Haemocompatibility of Nitinol implantable devices and their corrosion resistance as well as resistance to fracture are very important features of advanced medical implants. The authors of the paper present some novel methods capable to improve Nitinol implantable devices to some marked degree beyond currently used electropolishing (EP) processes. Instead, a magnetoelectropolishing process should be advised. The polarization study shows that magnetoelectropolished Nitinol surface is more corrosion resistant than that obtained after a standard EP and has a unique ability to repassivate the surface. Currently used sterilization processes of Nitinol implantable devices can dramatically change physicochemical properties of medical device and by this influence its biocompatibility. The Authors' experimental results clearly show the way to improve biocompatibility of NiTi alloy surface. The final sodium hypochlorite treatment should replace currently used Nitinol implantable devices sterilization methods which rationale was also given in our previous study.

  9. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  10. Strengthening of oxidation resistant materials for gas turbine applications. [treatment of silicon ceramics for increased flexural strength and impact resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics were treated to form compressive surface layers. On the silicon carbide, quenching and thermal exposure treatments were used, and on the silicon nitride, quenching, carburizing, and a combination of quenching and carburizing were used. In some cases substantial improvements in impact resistance and/or flexural strength were observed. The presence of compressive surface stresses was demonstrated by slotted rod tests.

  11. Corrosion Resistance of Electrogalvanized Steel Coated with PEG-Modified Ceria Layers in Chloride and Sulfate Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlaoui, Y.; Boudellioua, H.; Tifouti, L.; Pedraza, F.

    2015-12-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance and corrosion products formed on polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified and untreated cerium oxide-based coatings onto electrogalvanized steel substrate in chloride and sulfate media is presented. The corrosion monitoring was investigated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and d.c. polarization measurements. The corrosion products were analyzed by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. In the absence of PEG, the corrosion resistance impaired by the cerium oxide coatings was lost after short immersion times in the chloride medium but not in the sulfate one. The cracks in the cerium oxide coatings were found to be responsible for their fast degradation with the formation of zinc hydroxides. However, the incorporation of PEG to the cerium oxide deposits displayed a perfect stability in both media, due to the disappearance of cracks in the coatings and to the formation of stable corrosion products.

  12. Renewal project improves scrubbers' long-term corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Weilert, C.V.; Ashton, S.M.; Campbell, F.W.; Norton, R.D.; Hamilton, R.

    1994-12-01

    This article describes a five-year scrubber renewal plan aimed at reducing corrosion-induced maintenance costs at its Gibbons Creek plant. Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) owns and operates the 443-MW Gibbons Creek Station. The scrubber system started up in 1982, but by late 1990 TMPA found it necessary to develop a 5-year scrubber renewal plan to improve its reliability and reduce operation and maintenance costs. Upgrading the system's original construction materials became an important component of the plan. The Gibbons Creek Steam Electric Station, located near Carlos, Texas, consists of a single, lignite-fired unit. Fuel is supplied from a captive mine located adjacent to the plant site. Air pollution control equipment serving the plant includes an electrostatic precipitator and a wet limestone scrubber system.

  13. Topological design of all-ceramic dental bridges for enhancing fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Chen, Junning; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Layered all-ceramic systems have been increasingly adopted in major dental prostheses. However, ceramics are inherently brittle, and they often subject to premature failure under high occlusion forces especially in the posterior region. This study aimed to develop mechanically sound novel topological designs for all-ceramic dental bridges by minimizing the fracture incidence under given loading conditions. A bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique is implemented within the extended finite element method (XFEM) framework. Extended finite element method allows modeling crack initiation and propagation inside all-ceramic restoration systems. Following this, BESO searches the optimum distribution of two different ceramic materials, namely porcelain and zirconia, for minimizing fracture incidence. A performance index, as per a ratio of peak tensile stress to material strength, is used as a design objective. In this study, the novel XFEM based BESO topology optimization significantly improved structural strength by minimizing performance index for suppressing fracture incidence in the structures. As expected, the fracture resistance and factor of safety of fixed partial dentures structure increased upon redistributing zirconia and porcelain in the optimal topological configuration. Dental CAD/CAM systems and the emerging 3D printing technology were commercially available to facilitate implementation of such a computational design, exhibiting considerable potential for clinical application in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26444905

  14. The effects of RE and Si on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn-6Al-3Mg hot dip coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiwei; Gao, Bo; Yin, Shaohua; Tu, Ganfeng; Zhu, Guanglin; Sun, Shuchen; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2015-12-01

    The effects of Si and RE on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn-6Al-3Mg coating (ZAM) have been investigated. Surface morphology observations of the coating and corrosion products reveal that the additions of Si and rare earth metals (RES) improve the microstructural homogeneity of ZAMSR coating and stability of corrosion products formed on ZAMSR coating. Moreover, only uniform corrosion occurs in ZAMSR coating during the corrosion test, while intergranular corrosion and pitting occur in ZAM. As a result, the corrosion resistance of ZAM coating is improved by the additions of Si and RES.

  15. Glass ceramics for explosive device headers

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, C. P.; Eagan, R. J.; Kjeldgaard, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    The desired features of a header for our advanced explosive devices include small size; 700 Mpa static burst strength; corrosion resistant alloys for electrodes, bridgewire, and housing; integral charge holder; high thermal conductivity (approaching that of alumina ceramic); no braze around the electrodes; design flexibility and quick turnaround time for fabrication of development prototypes; and low cost.

  16. Mechanically reliable surface oxides for high-temperature corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Veal, B.W.; Grimsditch, M.; Renusch, D.; Paulikas, A.P.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion is widely recognized as being important, but an understanding of the underlying phenomena involves factors such as the chemistry and physics of early stages of oxidation, chemistry and bonding at the substrate/oxide interface, role of segregants on the strength of that bond, transport processes through scale, mechanisms of residual stress generation and relief, and fracture behavior at the oxide/substrate interface. Because of this complexity a multilaboratory program has been initiated under the auspices of the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, with strong interactions and cross-leveraging with DOE Fossil Energy and US industry. Objective is to systematically generate the knowledge required to establish a scientific basis for designing and synthesizing improved protective oxide scales/coatings (slow-growing, adherent, sound) on high-temperature materials without compromising the requisite properties of the bulk materials. The objectives of program work at Argonne are to (1) correlate actual corrosion performance with stresses, voids, segregants, interface roughness, initial stages of oxidation, and microstructures; (2) study such behavior in growing or as-grown films; and (3) define prescriptive design and synthesis routes to mechanically reliable surface oxides. Several techniques, such as Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray grazing incidence reflectance, grazing-angle X-ray fluorescence, optical fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy, are used in the studies. Tne project has selected Fe-25 wt.% Cr-20 wt.% Ni and Fe-Cr-Al alloys, which are chromia- and alumina-formers respectively, for the studies. This paper presents some of the results on early stages of oxidation and on surface segregation of elements.

  17. Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enzhu; Zou, Mengying; Duan, Shuxin; Xu, Ning; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Xiaohua

    2014-11-01

    The effects of excess Li content on the phase structure and microwave dielectric properties, especially on the temperature coefficient, of LiNb0.6 Ti0.5O3 (LNT) ceramics were studied. The results show that small amounts of Li effectively enhanced the sintering process due to the compensation of high volatility of Li, leading to a densification and homogenous microstructure, and therefore enhanced the dielectric properties. However, too much Li leads to a secondary phase and cause abnormal grain growth. The LNT + 5 wt.% Li ceramic sintered at 1075°C in the air shows the best properties of ɛ r = 69.73, Q × f = 5543 GHz, and τ f = -4.4 ppm/°C.

  18. Improved corrosion resistance and interfacial contact resistance of 316L stainless-steel for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates by chromizing surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. B.; Cho, K. H.; Lee, W. G.; Jang, H.

    The electrochemical performance and electrical contact resistance of chromized 316 stainless-steel (SS) are investigated under simulated operating condition in a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The corrosion resistance of the chromized stainless steel is assessed by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests and the interfacial contact resistance (ICR) is examined by measuring the electrical contact resistance as a function of the compaction force. The results show that the chromizing surface treatment improves the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel due to the high-chromium concentration in the diffuse coating layer. On the other hand, the excess Chromium content on the surface increases the contact resistance of the steel plate to a level that is excessively high for commercial applications. This study examines the root cause of the high-contact resistance after chromizing and reports the optimum process to improve the corrosion resistance without sacrificing the ICR by obtaining a chrome carbide on the outer layer.

  19. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with ceramic inlays and different base materials.

    PubMed

    Saridag, Serkan; Sari, Tugrul; Ozyesil, Atilla Gokhan; Ari Aydinbelge, Hale

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with different base materials and mesioocclusal-distal (MOD) ceramic inlays. Fifty mandibular molars were assigned into five groups (n=10 per group). Group1 (control) comprised intact molar teeth without any treatment. Teeth in other groups were subjected to root canal treatment and restored with MOD ceramic inlays on different base materials. In Group 2, base material was zinc phosphate cement; Group 3's was glass ionomer cement; Group 4's was composite resin, and Group 5's was composite resin reinforced with fiber. Finally, a continuous occlusal load was applied until fracture occurred. Mean fracture resistance of Group 1 (3,027 N) was significantly higher than the other groups (890, 1,070, 1,670, 1,226 N respectively). Fracture resistance of Group 4 was statistically comparable with Group 5 and significantly higher than Groups 2 and 3 (p<0.05; Tukey's HSD). Use of different base materials under ceramic inlay restorations could affect the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. PMID:25740162

  20. Improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel by nanocrystalline and electrochemical nitridation in artificial saliva solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jinlong; Liang, Tongxiang

    2015-12-01

    The fluoride ion in artificial saliva significantly changed semiconductor characteristic of the passive film formed on the surface of 316L stainless steels. The electrochemical results showed that nanocrystalline α‧-martensite improved corrosion resistance of the stainless steel in a typical artificial saliva compared with coarse grained stainless steel. Moreover, comparing with nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, corrosion resistance of the nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel was also improved significantly, even in artificial saliva solution containing fluoride ion. The present study showed that the cryogenic cold rolling and electrochemical nitridation improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel for the dental application.

  1. Correlation Between Two Types of Surface Stress Mitigation and the Resistance to Corrosion of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, A; Fix, D V; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2005-02-04

    When metallic plates are welded, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 (N06022) plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to compare the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied.

  2. Study of the corrosion resistance of metals in a lithium bromide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mel'nik, V.V.; Spivak, R.Sh.; Sokolov, V.V.; Trofimenko, A.G.

    1988-07-01

    Results are reported of a study of the corrosion resistance of the stainless steels 12Kh19N10T, 10Kh17N13M3T, 08Kh17N15M3T, 10Kh21N6M2T, and 06KhI28MDT, cupronickel MNZhMts 30-1-1, nickel NP-2, and titanium alloys VT1-0, PT-1M, and PT-3V in a solution of lithium bromide for purposes of assessing these alloys for use in absorption-type refrigerating units using the bromide as an absorbent. The uniform corrosion rate was determined from the weight loss; the nonuniform corrosion rate was determined by measuring the maximum depth of the pits under a microscope. Results are comparatively evaluated.

  3. High corrosion resistant Ti-5%Ta-1.8%Nb alloy for fuel reprocessing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, K.; Kain, Vivekanand; Gopalkrishna, T.; Sanyal, T.; De, P. K.

    2003-10-01

    The conventional low carbon austenitic stainless steels display good corrosion resistance behaviour in nitric acid media. However, they are sensitive to intergranular corrosion in boiling nitric acid media in the presence of oxidizing ions like hexavalent chromium, tetravalent iron and hexavalent plutonium. The Ti-5%Ta-1.8%Nb alloy was evaluated as a candidate material for such applications of nuclear fuel reprocessing. Extensive tests were carried out to establish the superior corrosion properties in comparison to the conventional stainless steel or nitric acid grade stainless steel. The fabricability of this new alloy to various shapes like rod, sheet, wire and its weldability, which is required for making vessels, was found to be good.

  4. Corrosion resistance of a composite polymeric coating applied on biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Zomorodian, A; Garcia, M P; Moura e Silva, T; Fernandes, J C S; Fernandes, M H; Montemor, M F

    2013-11-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium alloys is the main drawback to their widespread use, especially in biomedical applications. There is a need for developing new coatings that provide simultaneously corrosion resistance and enhanced biocompatibility. In this work, a composite coating containing polyether imide, with several diethylene triamine and hydroxyapatite contents, was applied on AZ31 magnesium alloys pre-treated with hydrofluoric acid by dip coating. The coated samples were immersed in Hank's solution and the coating performance was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the behavior of MG63 osteoblastic cells on coated samples was investigated. The results confirmed that the new coatings not only slow down the corrosion rate of AZ31 magnesium alloys in Hank's solution, but also enhance the adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteoblastic cells, especially when hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were introduced in the coating formulation. PMID:23454214

  5. Studies of Corrosion Resistant Materials Being Considered for High-Level Nuclear Waste Containment in Yucca Mountain Relevant Environments

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; Ilevbare, G.; Estill, J.; Rebak, R.

    2001-12-09

    Containment of spent nuclear fuel and vitrified forms of high level nuclear waste require use of materials that are highly corrosion resistant to all of the anticipated environmental scenarios that can occur in a geological repository. Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is proposed for the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container at the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. A range of water compositions that may contact the outer barrier is under consideration, and a testing program is underway to characterize the forms of corrosion and to quantify the corrosion rates. Results from the testing support models for long term prediction of the performance of the container. Results obtained to date indicate a very low general corrosion rate for Alloy 22 and very high resistance to all forms of localized and environmentally assisted cracking in environments tested to date.

  6. Bio-Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility of a ZrTi-BASED Bmgmc as Potential Hard Tissue Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaobo; Zou, Jiaojuan; Wang, Chan; Hang, Ruiqiang; Qiao, Junwei; Tang, Bin

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we compared the bio-corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of a ZrTi-based BMGMC (Zr58.5Ti14.3Ni4.9Cu6.1Nb5.2Be11.0). The Ti-6Al-4V alloy was used as a reference material. By utilizing the electrochemical measurements and M3T3 cell culture, the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of this BMGMC were evaluated. The BMGMC displayed high positive corrosion potentials and low corrosion current densities, which indicated that this material exhibited a highly improved corrosion resistance than the Ti alloy. The cells could adhere on the surface of this BMGMC and exhibited improved cellular behaviors, such as cellular viability and cytoskeketal structure. In summary, the ZrTi-based BMGMC showed great potential for applications in the hard tissue implants.

  7. Chipping Resistance of Graded Zirconia Ceramics for Dental Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Chai, H.; Lee, J.J.-W.; Lawn, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    A serious drawback of veneering porcelains is a pronounced susceptibility to chipping. Glass-infiltrated dense zirconia structures can now be produced with esthetic quality, making them an attractive alternative. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that such infiltrated structures are much more chip-resistant than conventional porcelains, and at least as chip-resistant as non-infiltrated zirconia. A sharp indenter was used to produce chips in flat and anatomically correct glass-infiltrated zirconia crown materials, and critical loads were measured as a function of distance from the specimen edge (flat) or side wall (crown). Control data were obtained on zirconia specimens without infiltration and on crowns veneered with porcelains. The results confirmed that the resistance to chipping in graded zirconia is more than 4 times higher than that of porcelain-veneered zirconia and is at least as high as that of non-veneered zirconia. PMID:22232142

  8. Corrosion resistance enhancement of Ni-P-nano SiO2 composite coatings on aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadreddini, Sina; Afshar, Abdollah

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the influences of different concentrations of SiO2 nano sized particles in the bath on deposition rate, surface morphology and corrosion behavior of Ni-P-SiO2 Composite coatings were investigated. The deposition rate of coating was influenced by incorporation of SiO2 particles. The microstructure was investigated with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The amount of SiO2 was examined by Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-Ray (EDX) and amount of SiO2 nanoparticles co-deposited reached a maximum value at 4.5 %wt. Corrosion behavior of coated aluminum was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization techniques. The results illustrated that the corrosion rate decreases (6.5-0.6 μA/cm2) and the corrosion potential increases (-0.64 to -0.3) with increasing the quantity of the SiO2 nanoparticles in the bath. Moreover, Ni-p-SiO2 nano-composite coating possesses less porosity than that in Ni-P coating, resulting in improving corrosion resistance.

  9. The effect of tempering temperature on pitting corrosion resistance of 420 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Moch. Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Mabruri, Efendi

    2016-04-01

    The AISI Type 420 stainless steels are commonly used to steam generators, mixer blades, etc. These stainless steels are most prone to pitting in dissolved Cl- containing environments. In this paper, the effect of tempering temperature on pitting corrosion resistance of AISI Type 420 stainless steels was studied. The AISI Type 420 stainless steels specimens were heat treated at the temperature of 1050°C for 1 hour to reach austenite stabilization and then quench in the oil. After that, the specimens were tempered at the temperature of 150, 250, 350 and 450°C for 30 minutes and then air cooled to the room temperature. The electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization test was conducted at 3.5% sodium chloride solution to evaluate corrosion rate and pitting corrosion behaviour. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to evaluate the pitting corrosion product. The result have shown that highest pitting potential was found in the sample tempered at 250°C and corrosion pits were found to initiate preferentially around chromium carbides.

  10. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, R.B.; Kamat, H.S.; Ghosal, S.K.; De, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance of pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constituent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  11. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, R. B.; Kamat, H. S.; Ghosal, S. K.; de, P. K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 °C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance to pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constitutent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  12. Pulse electrodeposited nickel using sulphamate electrolyte for hardness and corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Sivasakthi, P.; Sekar, R.; Bapu, G.N.K.Ramesh

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Nickel deposits from sulphamate solutions using pulse method are prepared. • Effect of duty cycle and frequency are studied. • XRD, SEM and AFM of the nickel deposits are characterized. • Corrosion characteristics of the nickel deposit are reported. - Abstract: Nickel deposits have been obtained on mild steel substrate by pulse current (PC) electrodeposition method using nickel sulphamate electrolyte. Micro hardness values increased with decreasing duty cycle and pulse frequency. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that (2 0 0) plane was predominant and the nickel deposit obtained at low duty cycle and low frequency has the smallest grain size. The surface morphology of the coatings was explored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy. These studies showed that the microstructure of the nickel coatings changed from pyramidal structure to homogeneous structure with increasing duty cycle and pulse frequencies. The corrosion resistance of coatings was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance studies in 3.5 wt% sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions. An enhancement of the corrosion resistance, charge-transfer resistance and wear resistance has been obtained at low duty cycle and low frequencies.

  13. Corrosion resistance of CrN thin films produced by dc magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruden, A.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Paladines, A. U.; Sequeda, F.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the electrochemical behavior of chromium nitride (CrN) coatings deposited on two steel substrates, AISI 304 and AISI 1440, was investigated. The CrN coatings were prepared using a reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering deposition technique at two different pressures (P1 = 0.4 Pa and P2 = 4 Pa) with a mixture of N2-Ar (1.5-10). The microstructure and crystallinity of the CrN coatings were investigated using X-ray diffraction. The aqueous corrosion behavior of the coatings was evaluated using two methods. The polarization resistance (Tafel curves) and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) in a saline (3.5% NaCl solution) environment were measured in terms of the open-circuit potentials and polarization resistance (Rp). The results indicated that the CrN coatings present better corrosion resistance and Rp values than do the uncoated steel substrates, especially for the coatings produced on the AISI 304 substrates, which exhibited a strong enhancement in the corrosion resistance. Furthermore, better behavior was observed for the coatings produced at lower pressures (0.4 Pa) than those grown at 4 Pa.

  14. Wear and corrosion resistance of anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings on titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Xiangyu; He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Huang, Xiaobo; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Anti-bacterial coatings with excellent wear and corrosion resistance play a vital role in ensuring the durability of implant materials in constant use. To this end, a novel anti-bacterial surface modification by combining magnetron sputtering with plasma nitriding was adopted in this paper to fabricate Cu-bearing Ti-based nitrides coatings (Ti-Cu-N) on titanium surface. The anti-bacterial properties of Ti-Cu-N coatings were evaluated. The microstructures and composition of the coatings were investigated by using FESEM, EDS, GDOES, XRD. The wear and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The results confirmed that an anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coating with a thickness of 6 μm and good adhesive strength to substrate was successfully achieved on titanium surface. As implied by XRD, the coatings were consisted of TiN, Ti2N, TiN0.3 phases. The surface micro-hardness and wear resistance of Ti-Cu-N coatings were significantly enhanced after plasma nitriding treatment. The analysis of potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plots obtained in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution suggested that the Ti-Cu-N coatings also exhibited an excellent corrosion resistance. As mentioned above, it can be concluded that the duplex-treatment reported here was a versatile approach to develop anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings with excellent comprehensive properties on titanium implants.

  15. Corrosion resistance and electrical properties of carbon/chromium-titanium-nitride multilayer coatings on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kai; Li, Zhuguo; Lu, Fenggui; Huang, Jian; Cai, Xun; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-03-01

    High electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance are central to advances in wider application of metallic bipolar plates in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this study, C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coatings are deposited by physical vapor deposition and the effect of Cr:Ti ratio on the corrosion resistance and interfacial contact resistance (ICR) are systematically investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) result shows that the carbon layer is compact and uniform. Excellent corrosion resistance of 0.127 μA cm-2 current density at operating voltage in PEMFC cathode environment and low ICR of 2.03 mΩ-cm2 at compaction force of 150 N cm-2 are achieved when Cr:Ti ratio is 2:4 and 3:3, respectively. The significant enhancement in surface conductivity is probably because that the current comes from carbon paper is homogenized by two electrically conductive layers and flows to the passive film with much more contact area. After polarization, ICR increase to 3.07 mΩ-cm2 and 3.02 mΩ-cm2 in the simulated PEMFC cathode and anode environment, respectively. However, the Raman spectroscopy results disclose that the bonding type of top carbon film before and after polarization shows little difference. The results indicate that C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coating with Cr:Ti ratio of 2:4 achieves the optimal composition.

  16. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  17. Structure and corrosive wear resistance of plasma-nitrided alloy steels in 3% sodium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.K.; Shih, H.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Type 304 stainless steel (SS), type 410 SS, and type 4140 low-alloy steel were plasma nitrided in a commercial furnace at 560 C for 50 h. Microstructure and the composition of the nitrided layer were analyzed. The resistance to corrosive wear was evaluated by a tribotest in which the specimen was held under potentiostatic control at anodic and cathodic potentials in 3% sodium chloride solution (pH 6.8). Electrochemical polarization measurements were made, and the surface morphology and composition after corrosive wear were examined. Wear rates at cathodic potentials were very low, but significant weight losses were observed as the applied potentials were increased anodically. The coefficient of friction varied in a fashion similar to the wear rate. For the untreated alloys, the magnitude of the wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased as follows: type 4140 alloy > type 41 SS > type 304 SS. For the plasma-nitrided alloys, the ranking was: type 304 SS > type 410 SS. type 4140 alloy. Plasma nitriding was shown to be beneficial to the corrosive wear resistance of type 4140 alloy, but an adverse effect was obtained for types 304 and 410 SS. These findings could be interpreted in terms of the electrochemical polarization characteristics of a static specimen and were strongly related to the subtleties of the nitrided microstructures. The stable chromium nitride (CrN) segregated in the [gamma]-iron (type 304 SS) and [alpha]-Fe (type 41 SS) matrices and resulted in a pitting and spalling type of corrosive wear mechanism. The phases [epsilon]-(Fe, Cr)[sub 2-3]N and [gamma]-(Fe, Cr)[sub 4]N enriched in the surface layer of nitrided type 4140 alloy provided excellent corrosive wear resistance.

  18. METC ceramic corrosion/erosion studies: turbine-material screening tests in high-temperature, low-Btu, coal-derived-gas combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Waltermire, D.M.; Hawkins, L.W.; Jarrett, T.L.

    1982-05-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center, through its Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies, has participated in the United States Department of Energy's High-Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Ceramic Technology Readiness. The program's overall objective is to advance the turbine firing temperature to a range of 2600/sup 0/ to 3000/sup 0/F (1700 to 1922K) with a reasonable service life using coal or coal-derived fuel. The Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies' major objective was to conduct a screening test for several ceramic materials to assess their probability of survival in turbine applications. The materials were exposed to combustion products from low heating value coal-derived gas and air at several high temperatures and velocities. The combustion product composition and temperatures simulated actual environment that may be found in stationary power generating gas turbines except for the pressure levels. The results of approximately 1000 hours of accumulative exposure time of material at the specific test conditions are presented in this report.

  19. Corrosion resistance of stressed NiTi and stainless steel orthodontic wires in acid artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Huang, Her-Hsiung

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the corrosion resistance of stressed NiTi and stainless steel orthodontic wires using cyclic potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests in acid artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. An atomic force microscope was used to measure the 3-D surface topography of as-received wires. Scanning electron microscope observations were carried out before and after the cyclic potentiodynamic tests. The surface chemical analysis was characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy after the potentiostatic tests. The cyclic potentiodynamic test results showed that the pH had a significant influence on the corrosion parameters of the stressed NiTi and stainless steel wires (p < 0.05). The pitting potential, protection potential, and passive range of stressed NiTi and stainless steel wires decreased on decreasing pH, whereas the passive current density increased on decreasing pH. The load had no significant influence on the above corrosion parameters (p > 0.05). For all pH and load conditions, stainless steel wire showed higher pitting potential and wider passive range than NiTi wire (p < 0.001), whereas NiTi wire had lower passive current density than stainless steel wire (p < 0.001). The corrosion resistance of the stressed NiTi and stainless steel wires was related to the surface characterizations, including surface defect and passive film. PMID:12926035

  20. Durable superhydrophilic/phobic surfaces based on green patina with corrosion resistance.

    PubMed

    Cho, Handong; Lee, Jeongwon; Lee, Sangmin; Hwang, Woonbong

    2015-03-14

    Special wetting surfaces with superhydrophilicity or superhydrophobicity have attracted great interest because of their potential for practical applications. However, since the special wetting surface may be used in a severe environment, including polluted air and seawater, it is necessary to develop a durable special wetting surface with excellent corrosion-resistance. Here, we report a new strategy for robust superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic green patina surfaces on copper substrates with superior corrosion resistance and adhesion strength, which have great potential for treating marine pollution. The as-prepared surfaces exhibited superhydrophilicity with underwater superoleophobicity or superoleophilicity with under-oil superhydrophobicity, which allowed them to selectively separate oil and water with high efficiency. More importantly, the surface displayed not only good mechanical stability but also chemical stability in corrosive liquids owing to the intrinsic properties of the patina and hydrophobic coating. Furthermore, the surface can be utilized as coating material for the decoration of building exteriors and prevention from surface fouling. We believe that our proposed method would make it possible to develop engineering materials that require robust anti-fouling, anti-frost, and anti-corrosion properties in marine environments. PMID:25670158

  1. Corrosion resistance of duplex and gradient CrN x coated H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q. G.; Bai, X. D.; Chen, X. W.; Peng, D. Q.; Ling, Y. H.; Wang, D. R.

    2003-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of H13 steel coated with duplex and gradient CrN x coatings deposited by cathodic arc deposition has been studied. The substrate material was coated with CrN by cathodic arc deposition technique. Duplex layers of CrN x, which normally include an interlayer approximately 100-200 nm of Cr under the main CrN coating, were prepared; gradient CrN x coating were produced with continuous elevated nitrogen pressure. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was applied to characterize the chemical composition, and the glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) was used to examine the crystallographic structure. The potentiodynamic polarization was examined by Zahner IM6e electrochemical workstation in a 0.5 M H 2SO 4 solution at ambient temperature, and the corrosive surface was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was shown that the gradient coating could enhance the corrosion performance of CrN x coated H13 steel. The corrosion resistance improvement was not only attributed to the increase in thickness, but also to the internal microstructure and phase composition. Gradient CrN x coating produced in this work was proved to be particularly promising in terms of corrosion resistance, owing to its incontinuous pinholes and different composition: Cr, Cr 2N in inner part and CrN in surface. The results showed that the gradient coating had an improved electrochemical performance than duplex CrN coating.

  2. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering. PMID:27230299

  3. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M.; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering. PMID:27230299

  4. Development of Custom 465® Corrosion-Resisting Steel for Landing Gear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daymond, Benjamin T.; Binot, Nicolas; Schmidt, Michael L.; Preston, Steve; Collins, Richard; Shepherd, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Existing high-strength low-alloy steels have been in place on landing gear for many years owing to their superior strength and cost performance. However, there have been major advances in improving the strength of high-performance corrosion-resisting steels. These materials have superior environmental robustness and remove the need for harmful protective coatings such as chromates and cadmium now on the list for removal under REACH legislation. A UK government-funded collaborative project is underway targeting a refined specification Custom 465® precipitation hardened stainless steel to replace the current material on Airbus A320 family aircraft main landing gear, a main fitting component developed by Messier-Bugatti-Dowty. This is a collaborative project between Airbus, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, and Carpenter Technology Corporation. An extensive series of coupon tests on four production Heats of the material have been conducted, to obtain a full range of mechanical, fatigue, and corrosion properties. Custom 465® is an excellent replacement to the current material, with comparable tensile strength and fracture toughness, better ductility, and very good general corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Fatigue performance is the only significant area of deficit with respect to incumbent materials, fatigue initiation being often related to carbo-titanium-nitride particles and cleavage zones.

  5. Influence of Processing and Heat Treatment on Corrosion Resistance and Properties of High Alloyed Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Horst; Weber, Sebastian; Raab, Ulrich; Theisen, Werner; Wagner, Lothar

    2012-09-01

    Corrosion and abrasive wear are two important aspects to be considered in numerous engineering applications. Looking at steels, high-chromium high-carbon tool steels are proper and cost-efficient materials. They can either be put into service as bulk materials or used as comparatively thin coatings to protect lower alloyed construction or heat treatable steels from wear and corrosion. In this study, two different corrosion resistant tool steels were used for the production of coatings and bulk material. They were processed by thermal spraying and super solidus liquid phase sintering as both processes can generally be applied to produce coatings on low alloyed substrates. Thermally sprayed (high velocity oxygen fuel) coatings were investigated in the as-processed state, which is the most commonly used condition for technical applications, and after a quenching and tempering treatment. In comparison, sintered steels were analyzed in the quenched and tempered condition only. Significant influence of alloy chemistry, processing route, and heat treatment on tribological properties was found. Experimental investigations were supported by computational thermodynamics aiming at an improvement of tribological and corrosive resistance.

  6. Incorporating Nano-silica as a Binder to Improve Corrosion Resistance of High Alumina Refractory Castables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Abbas; Mohebi, Mohammad Masoud; Souri, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    In this study, four types of castables as calcium-aluminate cement (CAC)-bonded and nano-silica (NS)-bonded castables based on tabular-alumina and bauxite aggregates were prepared to investigate the replacement of the calcium-aluminate cement by NS. All samples were allowed to dry at 110 °C then fired at 800 and 1200 °C. Bulk density and apparent porosity of samples were measured. The molten aluminum static corrosion test (cup test) results showed that NS-bonded specimens had higher resistance to corrosion compared to CAC-bonded samples (based on the measured average aluminum penetration depth into the refractory texture). However no penetration was observed in bauxite NS-bonded samples. The results were consistent with dynamic corrosion test in aluminum melt carried out at 800 °C for 100 h. The small pore size in NS-bonded castables was found to be the main cause for high corrosion resistance as micro-pores prevented the melt to penetrate into the refractory.

  7. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M.; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M.

    2016-05-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering.

  8. On texture, corrosion resistance and morphology of hot-dip galvanized zinc coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, H.; Toroghinejad, M. R.; Golozar, M. A.

    2007-06-01

    Texture is an important factor which affects the coating properties. Chemical composition of the zinc bath can strongly influence the texture of hot-dip galvanized coatings. In this study, lead content of the zinc bath was changed from 0.01 wt.% to 0.11 wt.%. Specimens were prepared from zinc baths of different lead content and its texture was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behaviour was analyzed by Tafel extrapolation and linear polarization tests. To study the corrosion products of the specimens, salt spray test was employed. Also, the spangle size of the specimens was determined using line intercept method. From the experimental results it was found that (00.2) basal plane texture component would be weakened by increasing the lead content of the zinc and conversely, (20.1) high angle pyramidal texture components strengthened. Besides, coatings with strong (00.2) texture component and weaker (20.1) component have better corrosion resistance than the coatings with weak (00.2) and strong (20.1) texture components. In addition, surface morphology would be changed and presence of basal planes decreases at the coating surface due to the increase of lead in the zinc bath. Furthermore, spangle size would be increased by increasing the lead content of the zinc bath. Investigation on the effects of skin pass rolling showed that in this case, (00.2) basal texture component and corrosion resistance of the skin passed specimens, in comparison with non-skin passed specimens, have been decreased.

  9. The biofilm ecology of microbial biofouling, biocide resistance and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C. |; Kirkegaard, R.D.; Palmer, R.J. Jr.; Flemming, C.A.; Chen, G.; Leung, K.T.; Phiefer, C.B.; Arrage, A.A. |

    1997-06-01

    In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. Heterogeneous distribution of microbes and/or their metabolic activity can promote microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) which is a multibillion dollar problem. Consequently, it is important that biofilm microbial ecology be understood so it can be manipulated rationally. It is usually simple to select organisms that form biofilms by flowing a considerably dilute media over a substratum, and propagating the organisms that attach. To examine the biofilm most expeditiously, the biomass accumulation, desquamation, and metabolic activities need to be monitored on-line and non-destructively. This on-line monitoring becomes even more valuable if the activities can be locally mapped in time and space within the biofilm. Herein the authors describe quantitative measures of microbial biofouling, the ecology of pathogens in drinking water distributions systems, and localization of microbial biofilms and activities with localized MIC.

  10. Sodium sulfate corrosion of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maldia, L.C.

    1993-12-01

    Sodium sulfate hot corrosion of a SiC fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Changes in the microstructural chemical composition of the specimens were investigated. The samples provided by Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Warminster, PA were grouped as follows: (1) as-received, (2) Na2SO4 salt-coated and heat-treated in oxygen, (3) noncoated and heat-treated in oxygen, (4) Na2SO4. Salt-coated and heat-treated in argon, and (5) noncoated and heat-treated in argon. Heat treatment was performed by NAWC for 100 hours at 900 deg C. Experimental data obtained indicated that the presence of Na2SO4 in an oxidative environment resulted in rapid corrosion of the matrix and SiC fibers and in the latter rings of SiO2 replaced what had previously been SiC. There was very limited degradation of the fibers and matrix exposed at the surface in the noncoated sample heat-treated in oxygen and in the salt-coated sample heat-treated in argon. A significant reduction in the amount of mullite in the matrices of all heat-treated samples was observed. Mullite dissolved into either the glassy phase or into the Beta-spodumene matrix. Lastly, the presence of distinct magnesium silicate crystalline phases in the salt-coated and heat-treated in oxygen sample implies that the MgO at the surface reacted with the SiO2 in the matrix.

  11. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  12. 16 CFR 23.10 - Misuse of “corrosion proof,” “noncorrosive,” “corrosion resistant,” “rust proof,” “rust resistant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Misuse of âcorrosion proof,â ânoncorrosive,â âcorrosion resistant,â ârust proof,â ârust resistant,â etc. 23.10 Section 23.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND...

  13. 16 CFR 23.10 - Misuse of “corrosion proof,” “noncorrosive,” “corrosion resistant,” “rust proof,” “rust resistant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Misuse of âcorrosion proof,â ânoncorrosive,â âcorrosion resistant,â ârust proof,â ârust resistant,â etc. 23.10 Section 23.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND...

  14. 16 CFR 23.10 - Misuse of “corrosion proof,” “noncorrosive,” “corrosion resistant,” “rust proof,” “rust resistant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Misuse of âcorrosion proof,â ânoncorrosive,â âcorrosion resistant,â ârust proof,â ârust resistant,â etc. 23.10 Section 23.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND...

  15. 16 CFR 23.10 - Misuse of “corrosion proof,” “noncorrosive,” “corrosion resistant,” “rust proof,” “rust resistant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Misuse of âcorrosion proof,â ânoncorrosive,â âcorrosion resistant,â ârust proof,â ârust resistant,â etc. 23.10 Section 23.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND...

  16. 16 CFR 23.10 - Misuse of “corrosion proof,” “noncorrosive,” “corrosion resistant,” “rust proof,” “rust resistant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Misuse of âcorrosion proof,â ânoncorrosive,â âcorrosion resistant,â ârust proof,â ârust resistant,â etc. 23.10 Section 23.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND...

  17. Surface composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high-intensity pulsed ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.; Lei, M.K.; Zhu, X.P.

    2011-06-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation of AZ31 magnesium alloy is performed and electrochemical corrosion experiment of irradiated samples is carried out by using potentiodynamic polarization technology in order to explore the effect of HIPIB irradiation on corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. The surface composition, cross-sectional morphology and microstructure are characterized by using electron probe microanalyzer, optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results indicated that HIPIB irradiation leads to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy, in terms of the considerable increase in both corrosion potential and pitting breakdown potential. The microstructural refinement and surface purification induced by HIPIB irradiation are responsible for the improved corrosion resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} A modified layer about 30 {mu}m thick is obtained by HIPIB irradiation. {yields} Selective ablation of element/impurity phase having lower melting point is observed. {yields} More importantly, microstructural refinement occurred on the irradiated surface. {yields} The modified layer exhibited a significantly improved corrosion resistance. {yields} Improved corrosion resistance is ascribed to the combined effect induced by HIPIB.

  18. Enhanced corrosion resistance of strontium hydroxyapatite coating on electron beam treated surgical grade stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, D.; Rajeswari, D.; Ramya, S.; Sekar, M.; R, Pramod; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kavitha, L.; Ramaseshan, R.

    2013-12-01

    The surface of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) is irradiated by high energy low current DC electron beam (HELCDEB) with energy of 500 keV and beam current of 1.5 mA followed by the electrodeposition of strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HAp) to enhance its corrosion resistance in physiological fluid. The coatings were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). The Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS exhibits micro-flower structure. Electrochemical results show that the Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS possesses maximum corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution.

  19. Nanotextured stainless steel for improved corrosion resistance and biological response in coronary stenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Chandini C.; Prabhath, Anupama; Cherian, Aleena Mary; Vadukumpully, Sajini; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Chennazhi, Krishnaprasad; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-12-01

    Nanosurface engineering of metallic substrates for improved cellular response is a persistent theme in biomaterials research. The need to improve the long term prognosis of commercially available stents has led us to adopt a `polymer-free' approach which is cost effective and industrially scalable. In this study, 316L stainless steel substrates were surface modified by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline pH, with and without the addition of a chromium precursor, to generate a well adherent uniform nanotopography. The modified surfaces showed improved hemocompatibility and augmented endothelialization, while hindering the proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Moreover, they also exhibited superior material properties like corrosion resistance, surface integrity and reduced metal ion leaching. The combination of improved corrosion resistance and selective vascular cell viability provided by nanomodification can be successfully utilized to offer a cell-friendly solution to the inherent limitations pertinent to bare metallic stents.

  20. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy dental castings.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, E; Wang, T J; Doi, H; Yoneyama, T; Hamanaka, H

    1998-10-01

    With the aim of applying a novel titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-7Nb, to a dental casting material, a comprehensive research work was carried out on its characteristics, such as castability, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in the present study. As a result, Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy exhibited sufficient castability by a dental casting method for titanium alloys and enough mechanical properties for dental application. It is also showed excellent corrosion resistance through an immersion test in 1.0% lactic acid and an anodic polarization test in 0.9% NaCl solution. From these results, it is concluded that this Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy is applicable as a dental material in place of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which includes cytotoxic vanadium. PMID:15348689

  1. Resistance of thermal-sprayed duplex coating composed of aluminum and 80Ni-20Cr alloy against aqueous corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tobe, S.; Kitamura, Y.

    2001-09-01

    The development of corrosion-resistant sprayed coatings without sealing is required to increase the reliability of the thermal spray coating method and to expand the field of application for wet corrosion environments. The conventional wire flame-sprayed aluminum coating on steel without sealing has poor resistance against aqueous corrosion and has restricted practical use. A duplex coating composed of sprayed aluminum on an 80Ni-20Cr alloy undercoat exhibited sufficient resistance in a hot, near-neutral aqueous environment through a trial use in a vegetable oil process. In this paper, the mechanism of corrosion resistance of the duplex coating is investigated by electrochemical polarization measurements and electron probe microchemical analysis (EPMA) to examine the individual role of each layer and the change of the microstructure with time.

  2. The Nature of Surface Oxides on Corrosion-Resistant Nickel Alloy Covered by Alkaline Water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A nickel alloy with high chrome and molybdenum content was found to form a highly resistive and passive oxide layer. The donor density and mobility of ions in the oxide layer has been determined as a function of the electrical potential when alkaline water layers are on the alloy surface in order to account for the relative inertness of the nickel alloy in corrosive environments. PMID:20672134

  3. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  4. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  5. Corrosion resistant three-dimensional nanotextured silicon for water photo-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Rachel; Chatterjee, Shahana; Gordon, Evan; Share, Keith; Erwin, William R.; Cohn, Adam P.; Bardhan, Rizia; Pint, Cary L.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm-2 under 100 mW cm-2 (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications.We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm-2 under 100 mW cm-2 (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental details, (ii) Nyquist plot from EIS data, (iii) FTIR of H-terminated silicon, (iv) reflectance measurements to quantify light trapping in nanotextured silicon, (v) LSV from Tafel analysis, and (vi) J-V curves for H-terminated flat samples, (vii) stability test of photoanode, and (viii) forward and reverse scans for each sample type. See DOI: 10

  6. Improving both bond strength and corrosion resistance of steel rebar in concrete by water immersion or sand blasting of rebar

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, J.; Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Water immersion (2 days) and sand blasting were similarly effective for treating steel rebars for the purpose of improvement steel-concrete bond strength and corrosion resistance of steel in concrete. The increase in bond strength is due to surface roughening in the case of sand blasting and the presence of a surface layer in the case of water immersion. The increase in corrosion resistance is due to the surface uniformity rendered by either treatment.

  7. Enhancement of wear and corrosion resistance of beta titanium alloy by laser gas alloying with nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Lee, Seunghwan; Smith, Graham; Sarri, Gianluca; Ng, Chi-Ho; Sharba, Ahmed; Man, Hau-Chung

    2016-03-01

    The relatively high elastic modulus coupled with the presence of toxic vanadium (V) in Ti6Al4V alloy has long been a concern in orthopaedic applications. To solve the problem, a variety of non-toxic and low modulus beta-titanium (beta-Ti) alloys have been developed. Among the beta-Ti alloy family, the quaternary Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta (TNZT) alloys have received the highest attention as a promising replacement for Ti6Al4V due to their lower elastic modulus and outstanding long term stability against corrosion in biological environments. However, the inferior wear resistance of TNZT is still a problem that must be resolved before commercialising in the orthopaedic market. In this work, a newly developed laser surface treatment technique was employed to improve the surface properties of Ti-35.3Nb-7.3Zr-5.7Ta alloy. The surface structure and composition of the laser-treated TNZT surface were examined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wear and corrosion resistance were evaluated by pin-on-plate sliding test and anodic polarisation test in Hanks' solution. The experimental results were compared with the untreated (or base) TNZT material. The research findings showed that the laser surface treatment technique reported in this work can effectively improve the wear and corrosion resistance of TNZT.

  8. Enhanced pitting corrosion resistance of aluminum alloy 7075 in the presence of oxalate anions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobotiatis, L.; Tsikrikas, C.; Koutsoukos, P.G.

    1995-01-01

    The presence of oxalate in chloride-containing corrosive aqueous media was found to protect aluminum alloy AA 7075 (UNS A95075). The effect of 0.05 M sodium oxalate on induction times for the initiation of pit formation was measured on AA 7075 specimens. The variance and the mean value of the induction times measured increased with the time of specimen immersion at the open circuit potential (OCP). Statistical analysis was done by potentiostatic measurement of several specimens using electrochemical instrumentation controlled by a personal computer. Pit generation rates were found to be inversely proportional to the duration of the immersion period at OCP. Therefore, it was concluded that prolonged exposure of the tested specimens to sodium oxalate solutions enhanced their resistance to corrosion. Impedance measurements confirmed this finding. The increased resistance was attributed to the retardation of the process by which the surface protective layer would have been destroyed. This retardation may have been ascribable to the formation of surface complexes between Al{sup 3+} and oxalates from the bulk solution. Polarization of the specimens at anodic potentials reduced the corrosion resistance of AA 7075, possibly because of the destabilization of the surface complexes formed between Al and the oxalate ions.

  9. Sodium sulfate corrosion of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced calcium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, P.J.

    1994-03-01

    Hot corrosion effects of Sodium Sulfate (NaSO4) coated Calcium Aluminosilicate (CAS)/Silicon Carbide (SiC) reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The samples provided by the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) were unidirectional SiC/CAS as follows: (1) as received, (2) uncoated in air, (3) Na2SO4, coated in air and (4) Na2SO4 coated in argon. A heat treatment was conducted at 900 deg C for 100 hours. Experimental observations indicated that the Na2S04 coating in an oxidising environment had severely corroded the silicon fiber resulting in a silica rich, Nepheline, Wollastonite, Rankinite, Albite and glassy phases. In the argon atmosphere fiber degradation was present although less severe than in the oxygen environment. Similar phases of silica rich, Nepheline, Albite, Rankinite, Mullite, Pseudo-Wollastonite and a glassy region were present. Minimal fiber and matrix degradation was observed in the uncoated sample beat treated in air. Calcium aluminosilicate, SiC Fiber reinforced composites.

  10. "A New Class of Creep Resistant Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites"

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mohit Jain, Dr. Ganesh Skandan, Prof. Roger Cannon, Rutgers University

    2007-03-30

    Despite recent progress in the development of SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), their application in industrial gas turbines for distributed energy (DE) systems has been limited. The poor oxidation resistance of the non-oxide ceramics warrants the use of envrionmental barrier coatings (EBCs), which in turn lead to issues pertaining to life expectancy of the coatings. On the other hand, oxide/oxide CMCs are potential replacements, but their use has been limited until now due to the poor creep resistance at high temperatures, particularly above 1200 oC: the lack of a creep resistant matrix has been a major limiting factor. Using yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) as the matrix material system, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in oxide/oxide CMCs by introducing innovations in both the structure and composition of the matrix material, thereby leading to high temperature matrix creep properties not achieved until now. An array of YAG-based powders with a unique set of particle characteristics were produced in-house and sintered to full density and compressive creep data was obtained. Aided in part by the composition and the microstructure, the creep rates were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially. Even after accounting for porosity and a smaller matrix grain size in a practical CMC component, the YAG-based matrix material was found to creep slower than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially.

  11. The intrinsically high pitting corrosion resistance of mechanically polished nitinol in simulated physiological solutions.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhijun; Rotermund, Harm H

    2011-10-01

    Nitinol wires have been widely used in many biomedical applications, such as cardiovascular stent due to their superelasticity and shape memory effect. However, their corrosion properties and the related biocompatibility are not well understood, and the reported results are controversial. In this study, we evaluate the pitting corrosion property of nitinol, titanium, nickel, and 316L stainless steel (316LSS) wires with different surface roughnesses in a saline solution at 37 °C. The cyclic potentiodynamic polarization results show that mechanically polished nitinol and Ti wires are highly resistant to pitting corrosion, while Ni and 316LSS wires are susceptible to pitting corrosion. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is used to study the interface of oxide film/solution and all mechanically polished nitinol wires are covered by 2-3 nm thick films formed under open circuit potential. Furthermore, the electronic structures and semiconducting properties of passive films on nitinol, Ti and Ni wires are studied by Mott-Schottky analysis. Passive films formed on nitinol and Ti exhibit n-type semiconducting characteristics, whereas films on Ni show p-type semiconducting characteristics. Scanning Kelvin Microscopy is used to measure the surface potential difference between common inclusions from the nitinol matrix and the results indicate that the inclusions are more electrochemically noble than the nitinol matrix. Band energy theory is used to model the electrochemical interface between the passive films of nitinol and the solution under different applied potential conditions. A mechanism for the strong pitting corrosion resistance of nitinol in saline solution is proposed. PMID:21648066

  12. A study on microstructure and corrosion resistance of ZrO2-containing PEO coatings formed on AZ31 Mg alloy in phosphate-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, J. J.; Guo, Y. Q.; Xiang, N.; Xiong, Y.; Hu, Q.; Song, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    ZrO2-containing ceramic coatings formed on the AZ31 Mg alloy were fabricated in an alkaline electrolyte containing sodium phosphate and potassium fluorozirconate (K2ZrF6) by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO). X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were used to study the phase structure and composition of the coatings. It is indicated that the coatings formed in the K2ZrF6-containing electrolyte were composed of MgO, MgF2 and t-ZrO2. Morphological investigation carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and stereoscopic microscopy, revealed that the uniformity of coatings increased and roughness of coatings decreased after the addition of K2ZrF6. Electrochemical investigation was achieved by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test. The results showed that the PEO coating formed in K2ZrF6-containing electrolyte exhibited an improved corrosion resistance than that of the coating formed in K2ZrF6-free electrolyte. In addition, the polarization and EIS tests results both showed that the suitable concentration (2.5 g/l) of K2ZrF6 is of significant ability to improve the corrosion resistance of coatings. However, 5 g/l and 10 g/l K2ZrF6 has a negative effect on improving the corrosion resistance of PEO coatings compared with the coating formed in 2.5 g/l K2ZrF6-containing electrolyte.

  13. Corrosion/Erosion Resistance of Ultimet\\256 R31233 in a Simulated Feed for a Radioactive Vitrification Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1999-05-21

    Corrosion, erosion and corrosion/erosion tests were performed to evaluate the performance of nickel and cobalt based alloys in a simulated sludge/borosilicate frit slurry representative of the feed preparation system for a radioactive waste vitrification facility. Alloys tested included Type 304L stainless steel, Hastelloy\\256 C-276, Stellite\\256 6B, and Ultimet\\256. Testing indicated that Ultimet\\256 had improved wear resistance and similar corrosion resistance compared to Hastelloy\\256 C-276 in the simulated sludge/frit environment.

  14. Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components

    SciTech Connect

    Haselkorn, M.H. )

    1992-04-01

    Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

  15. Corrosion behavior of a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and its constituents.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M. A.; Ebert, W. L.; Morss, L.

    1999-06-18

    A ceramic waste form (CWF) of glass bonded sodalite is being developed as a waste form for the long-term immobilization of fission products and transuranic elements from the U.S. Department of Energy's activities on spent nuclear fuel conditioning. A durable waste form was prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. During HIP the zeolite is converted to sodalite, and the resultant CWF is been completed for durations of up to 182 days. Four dissolution modes were identified: dissolution of free salt, dissolution of the aluminosilicate matrix of sodalite and the accompanying dissolution of occluded salt, dissolution of the boroaluminosilicate matrix of the glass, and ion exchange. Synergies inherent to the CWF were identified by comparing the results of the tests with pure glass and sodalite with those of the composite CWF.

  16. Mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of TiO2 nanoparticles reinforced Ni coating by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, W.; Nabb, D.; Renevier, N.; Sherrington, I.; Luo, J. K.

    2012-09-01

    Coatings have been widely used in engineering and decoration to protect components and products and enhance their life span. Nickel (Ni) is one of the most important hard coatings. Improvement in its tribological and mechanical properties would greatly enhance its use in industry. Nanocomposite coatings of metals with various reinforced nanoparticles have been developed in last few decades. Titania (TiO2) exhibit excellent mechanical properties. It is believed that TiO2 incorporation in Ni matrix will improve the properties of Ni coatings significantly. The main purpose of the current work is to investigate the mechanical and anti-corrosion properties of the electroplated nickel nanocomposite with a small percentage of TiO2. The surface morphology of nanocomposite coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The hardness of the nanocoating was carried out using micromaterials nanoplatform. The sliding wear rate of the coating at room temperature in dry condition was assessed by a reciprocating ball-on-disk computer-controlled oscillating tribotester. The results showed the nanocomposite coatings have a smoother and more compact surface than the pure Ni layer and have higher hardness and lower wear rate than the pure Ni coating. The anti-corrosion property of nanocomposite coating was carried out in 3.5% NaCl and high concentrated 35% NaCl solution, respectively. The results also showed that the nanocomposite coating improves the corrosion resistance significantly. This present work reveals that incorporation of TiO2 in nickel nanocomposite coating can achieve improved corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of both hardness and wear resistance performances, and the improvement becomes stronger as the content of TiO2 is increased.

  17. Effect of chromuium, aluminum, and titanium on the corrosion resistance of nickel in molten sodium sulfate and chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Oryshich, I.V.

    1985-09-01

    The author reports on a study whose purpose was to determine the corrosion of binary nickel alloys, containing aluminum, titanium and chromium, in molten sodium sulfate and chloride. The work was undertaken because under operating conditions, gas-turbine materials are subject to oxidation and high-temperature corrosion caused by contact with molten salt based on sodium sulfate formed during fuel combustion. It is concluded that: on alloying nickel with chromium, resistance to sulfide corrosion increases, but with aluminum and titanium it is reduced; alloying nickel with aluminum, titanium (up to 6-8 %) and chromium (up to 10-12 %) leads to an increase in its resistance to the action of molten sodium chloride; and, binary Ni-Al, Ni-Ti and ternary Ni-Al-Ti alloys have a lower corrosion resistance in sodium solfate than in sodium chloride.

  18. Contact damage resistance and strength degradation of glass-infiltrated alumina and spinel ceramics.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y G; Peterson, I M; Pajares, A; Lawn, B R

    1999-03-01

    All-ceramic crowns are coming into widespread use because of their superior esthetics and chemical inertness. This study examines the hypothesis that glass-infiltrated alumina and spinel core ceramics are resistant to damage accumulation and strength degradation under representative oral contact conditions. Accordingly, Hertzian indentation testing with hard spheres is used to evaluate damage accumulation in alumina and spinel ceramics with different pre-form grain morphologies and porosities. Indentation stress-strain curves measured on fully infiltrated materials reveal a marked insensitivity to the starting pre-form state. The glass phase is shown to play a vital role in providing mechanical rigidity and strength to the ceramic structures. All the infiltrated ceramics show subsurface cone fracture and quasi-plastic deformation above critical loads P(C) (cracking) and P(Y) (yield), depending on sphere radius, with P(Y) < P(C). Strength degradation from accumulation of damage in Hertzian contacts above these critical loads is conspicuously small, suggesting that the infiltrated materials should be highly damage-tolerant to the "blunt" contacts encountered during mastication. Failure in the strength tests originates from either cone cracks ("brittle mode") or yield zones ("quasi-plastic mode"), with the brittle mode more dominant in the spinels and the quasi-plastic mode more dominant in the aluminas. Multi-cycle contacts at lower loads, but still above loads typical of oral function, are found to be innocuous up to 10(5) cycles in air and water, although contacts at 10(6) cycles in water do cause significant strength degradation. By contrast, contacts with Vickers indenters produce substantial strength losses at low loads, suggesting that the mechanical integrity of these materials may be compromised by inadvertent "sharp" contacts. PMID:10096457

  19. High temperature corrosion of MoSi2 HfO2 composites in coal slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael; Hilpert, Klaus; Singheiser, Lorenz

    2005-02-01

    The corrosion behaviour of MoSi2 15%HfO2 composites was investigated under simulated Pressurized Pulverized Coal Combustion (PPCC) conditions at 1450 °C in the presence of liquid slag. The composites form a dense glassy corrosion product layer which consists mainly of SiO2 and HfSiO4. The specimens show relative good corrosion resistance against coal slag in comparison to most commercial available ceramic materials.

  20. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we coated coupons of selected alloy steels with diffusion coatings of Cr and Al, as well as with titanium and tantalum nitrides. The coated samples were analyzed for their surface composition. In several instances, the samples were also cut to determine the depth profile of the coating. Several of the early runs did not yield uniform or deep enough coatings and hence a significant portion of the effort in this period was devoted fixing the problems with our fluidized bed reactor. Before the end of the quarter we had prepared a number of samples, many of them in duplicates, and sent one set to Wabash River Energy Laboratory for them to install in their gasifier. The gasifier was undergoing a scheduled maintenance and thus presented an opportunity to place some of our coupons in the stream of an operating gasifier. The samples submitted included coated and uncoated pairs of different alloys.

  1. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2-δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner.

  2. Corrosion resistance of biodegradable polymeric layer-by-layer coatings on magnesium alloy AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lan-Yue; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Zhu, Xiao-Xiao; Pang, Ting-Ting; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen

    2016-03-01

    Biocompatible polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) and polysiloxane hybrid coatings were prepared to improve the corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy AZ31. The PEMs, which contained alternating poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), were first self-assembled on the surface of the AZ31 alloy substrate via electrostatic interactions, designated as (PAH/PSS)5/AZ31. Then, the (PAH/PSS)5/AZ31 samples were dipped into a methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) solution to fabricate the PMTMS films, designated as PMTMS/(PAH/PSS)5/AZ31. The surface morphologies, microstructures and chemical compositions of the films were investigated by FE-SEM, FTIR, XRD and XPS. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and hydrogen evolution measurements demonstrated that the PMTMS/(PAH/PSS)5/AZ31 composite film significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the AZ31 alloy in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). The PAH and PSS films effectively improved the deposition of Ca-P compounds including Ca3(PO4)2 and hydroxyapatite (HA). Moreover, the corrosion mechanism of the composite coating was discussed. These coatings could be an alternative candidate coating for biodegradable Mg alloys.

  3. Corrosion resistance of biodegradable polymeric layer-by-layer coatings on magnesium alloy AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lan-Yue; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Zhu, Xiao-Xiao; Pang, Ting-Ting; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen

    2016-06-01

    Biocompatible polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) and polysiloxane hybrid coatings were prepared to improve the corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy AZ31. The PEMs, which contained alternating poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), were first self-assembled on the surface of the AZ31 alloy substrate via electrostatic interactions, designated as (PAH/PSS)5/AZ31. Then, the (PAH/PSS)5/AZ31 samples were dipped into a methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) solution to fabricate the PMTMS films, designated as PMTMS/(PAH/PSS)5/AZ31. The surface morphologies, microstructures and chemical compositions of the films were investigated by FE-SEM, FTIR, XRD and XPS. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and hydrogen evolution measurements demonstrated that the PMTMS/(PAH/PSS)5/AZ31 composite film significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the AZ31 alloy in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). The PAH and PSS films effectively improved the deposition of Ca-P compounds including Ca3(PO4)2 and hydroxyapatite (HA). Moreover, the corrosion mechanism of the composite coating was discussed. These coatings could be an alternative candidate coating for biodegradable Mg alloys.

  4. The effect of strain hardening on resistance to electrochemical corrosion of wires for orthopaedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przondziono, J.; Walke, W.; Hadasik, E.; Szymszal, J.

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate electrochemical corrosion resistance of wire with modified surface, made of stainless steel of Cr-Ni-Mo type, widely used in implants for orthopaedics, depending on hardening created in the process of drawing. Tests have been carried out in the environment imitating human osseous tissue. Pitting corrosion was determined on the ground of registered anodic polarisation curves by means of potentiodynamic method with application of electrochemical testing system VoltaLab® PGP 201. Wire corrosion tests were carried out in Tyrode solution on samples that were electrochemically polished as well as electrochemically polished and finally chemically passivated. Initial material for tests was wire rod made of X2CrNiMo17-12-2 steel with diameter of 5.5 mm in supersaturated condition. Wire rod was drawn up to diameter of 1.35 mm. This work shows the course of flow curve of wire made of this grade of steel and mathematical form of yield stress function. The study also presents exemplary curves showing the dependence of polarisation resistance in strain function in the drawing process of electrochemically passivated and electrochemically polished and then chemically passivated wire.

  5. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  6. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Laser Additively Manufactured 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trelewicz, Jason R.; Halada, Gary P.; Donaldson, Olivia K.; Manogharan, Guha

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metal alloys to produce complex part designs via powder bed fusion methods such as laser melting promises to be a transformative technology for advanced materials processing. However, effective implementation of AM processes requires a clear understanding of the processing-structure-properties-performance relationships in fabricated components. In this study, we report on the formation of micro and nanoscale structures in 316L stainless steel samples printed by laser AM and their implications for general corrosion resistance. A variety of techniques including x-ray diffraction, optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructure and chemistry of the laser additively manufactured 316L stainless steel, which are compared with wrought 316L coupons via electrochemical polarization. Apparent segregation of Mo has been found to contribute to a loss of passivity and an increased anodic current density. While porosity will also likely impact the environmental performance (e.g., facilitating crevice corrosion) of AM alloys, this work demonstrates the critical influence of microstructure and heterogeneous solute distributions on the corrosion resistance of laser additively manufactured 316L stainless steel.

  7. Hierarchically ordered self-lubricating superhydrophobic anodized aluminum surfaces with enhanced corrosion resistance.

    PubMed

    Vengatesh, Panneerselvam; Kulandainathan, Manickam Anbu

    2015-01-28

    Herein, we report a facile method for the fabrication of self-lubricating superhydrophobic hierarchical anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) surfaces with improved corrosion protection, which is greatly anticipated to have a high impact in catalysis, aerospace, and the shipping industries. This method involves chemical grafting of as-formed AAO using low surface free energy molecules like long chain saturated fatty acids, perfluorinated fatty acid (perfluorooctadecanoic acid, PFODA), and perfluorosulfonicacid-polytetrafluoroethylene copolymer. The pre and post treatment processes in the anodization of aluminum (Al) play a vital role in the grafting of fatty acids. Wettability and surface free energy were analyzed using a contact angle meter and achieved 161.5° for PFODA grafted anodized aluminum (PFODA-Al). This study was also aimed at evaluating the surface for corrosion resistance by Tafel polarization and self-lubricating properties by tribological studies using a pin-on-disc tribometer. The collective results showed that chemically grafted AAO nanostructures exhibit high corrosion resistance toward seawater and low frictional coefficient due to low surface energy and self-lubricating property of fatty acids covalently linked to anodized Al surfaces. PMID:25529561

  8. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y T; Zhang, B; Zheng, S J; Wang, J; San, X Y; Ma, X L

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu(2+)-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu(2-δ)S layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  9. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  10. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2−δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  11. Enhancing biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of Mg implants via surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ji-Hoon; Hong, Ji-Yeon; Shin, Kwang-Seon; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag

    2012-11-01

    Oxide coating layers were formed on a pure magnesium (Mg) substrate through anodization and micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in order to enhance the biocompatibility and reduce the degradation rate. A thin, smooth MgO coating layer was formed after the anodization. On the other hand, when the Mg was treated using the MAO process, a relatively thick, rough MgO layer was formed. The corrosion properties were investigated using electrochemical and ion release tests in a simulated body fluid. Both the anodization and the MAO treatment enhanced the corrosion resistance of the Mg specimens. However, the MgO layers that formed on the surface were not stable enough to render favorable environments for cell growth. The anodized and MAO-treated specimens were post-treated in a cell-culturing medium in order to improve the stability of the coating layer. The biocompatibility was evaluated using in vitro cell tests, including cell attachment, DNA measurement, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity tests. The DNA levels of the surface-treated Mg were about 6-10 times higher than the bare Mg. The ALP activity levels were also more than double after either the anodization or the MAO followed by the post-treatments. These results demonstrated that the biocompatibility and the corrosion resistance of Mg were significantly improved by the series of surface treatments. PMID:21862515

  12. Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of SrHAp/ZnO composite implant coating on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Hongjuan; Wang, Xuexin; Wang, Deshun

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of electrodeposited ZnO containing and strontium doped hydroxyapatite (SrHAp/ZnO) coating on titanium (Ti) substrate was investigated. The microstructure, phase composition and corrosion resistance of the coating were studied. The results reveal that Sr2+ and ZnO incorporation markedly increased the density of HAp coating, i.e. the fabricated coating had significantly lower porosity than the original HAp coating. The SrHAp/ZnO coating was dense and uniform, with a flocculent morphological structure of apatite. The SrHAp/ZnO crystals were carbonated calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite, and Sr2+ and ZnO were homogeneously distributed in the coating. The thickness of the composite coating was almost 10 μm without delamination or cracks at the interface. Bond strength test revealed that the adhesion of the SrHAp/ZnO coating was more enhanced than that of the HAp coating. The SrHAp/ZnO-coated Ti had a lower corrosion rate than the pure HAp-coated sample, which suggests the protective characteristic of the composite coating. Osteoblast cellular tests demonstrated that the SrHAp/ZnO composite coating greatly enhanced the in vitro biocompatibility of the Ti substrate.

  13. Effect of Na2WO4 on Growth Process and Corrosion Resistance of Micro-arc Oxidation Coatings on 2A12 Aluminum Alloys in CH3COONa Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhaoqing; Yu, Huijun; He, Siyu; Wang, Diangang; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic coatings were deposited on 2A12 aluminum alloys using micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technology in CH3COONa-Na2WO4 electrolyte. The MAO process was studied by recording the current-time curve. The influences of Na2WO4 concentrations on the coatings in CH3COONa electrolyte were investigated. The results show that the Na2WO4 concentrations affect the MAO process and performances of the coatings directly. Na2WO4 in excess is harmful for the formation of Al2O3 in this electrolyte. The corrosion resistance was enhanced with the decrease of Na2WO4 concentration.

  14. Ceramic materials testing and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfinger, K. R., LLNL

    1998-04-30

    Certain refractory ceramics (notably oxides) have desirable properties suitable for the construction of ceramic waste containers for long term use in nuclear waste disposal applications. In particular, they are far less prone to environmental corrosion than metals under realistic repository conditions. The aqueous corrosion rates of oxides such as magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}0{sub 4}) and alumina (Al{sub 2}0{sub 4}) fall in the range of a few millimeters per million years. Oxide ceramics are also not likely to be subject to microbiologically influenced corrosion, which apparently can attack most, if not all, of the available engineering metals. Ceramics have a reputation for poor mechanical performance and large, impermeable objects are not easily fabricated by most current fabrication methods. As a result, the most promising approach for incorporating ceramics in large waste packages appears to be to apply a high density ceramic coating to a supporting metallic structure. Ceramic coatings 2048 applied by a thermal spray technique can be made effectively seamless and provide a method for final closure of the waste package while maintaining low average temperatures for the entire assembly. The corrosion resistance of the ceramic should prevent or delay water penetration to the underlying metal, which will in turn provide most of the mechanical strength and toughness required by the application. In this way, the major concerns regarding the ceramic coating become ensuring it is impervious to moisture, its adherence and its resistance to mechanical stresses during handling or resulting from rock fall in the repository. Without water, electrochemical corrosion and microbiologically influenced corrosion processes are considered impossible, so a complete coating should protect the metal vessels for far longer than the current design requirements. Even an imperfect coating should extend the life of the package, delaying the onset and reducing the severity of

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.W.; Stinton, D.P.

    1992-12-31

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride heat engine components are susceptible to hot corrosion by molten Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} which forms from impurities present in fuel and the environment. Chemically vapor deposited Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings are being developed as a means to protect components from reaction with these salts and preserve their structural properties. Investigations to optimize the structure of the coating have revealed that the deposition conditions dramatically affect the coating morphology. Coatings deposited at high temperatures are typically columnar in structure; high concentrations of the reactant gases produce oxide powders on the substrate surface. Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} deposited at low temperatures consists of grains that are finer and have significantly less porosity than that formed at high temperatures. Samples of coatings which have been produced by CVD have successfully completed preliminary testing for resistance to corrosion by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  16. Chromium-modified a-C films with advanced structural, mechanical and corrosive-resistant characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Miao Yi; Jiang, Xiaohong; Piliptsou, D. G.; Zhuang, Yuzhao; Rogachev, A. V.; Rudenkov, A. S.; Balmakou, A.

    2016-08-01

    To improve structural, mechanical and chemical properties of diamond-like carbon films, we developed amorphous carbon chromium-modified composite films fabricated by means of cathode magnetic filtered arc deposition. The properties were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for the purpose of the structure characterization, elemental analysis and topology examination. Moreover, we also assessed residual stress, the coefficient of friction, hardness, the elastic modulus and corrosion parameters through X-ray double-crystal surface profilometry, tribo-testing, nanoindenter-testing, as well as contact angle measurements and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. As a result of a comparative analysis, we revealed a substantial improvement in the characteristics of developed composite films in comparison with amorphous carbon films. For example, Cr-modification is resulted, in greater integrated performance, toughness and corrosion resistance; the residual stress was reduced substantially.

  17. Influence of Laser Peening on Phase Transformation and Corrosion Resistance of AISI 321 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, D.; Swaroop, S.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of laser peening without coating (LPwC) on austenitic to martensitic (γ → α') phase transformation and corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 in 3.5% NaCl environment. Results indicate that LPwC induces a large compressive residual stresses of nearly -854 MPa and γ → α' phase transformation of about 18% (volume fraction). Microstructures of peened surface confirmed the γ → α' phase transformation and showed no grain refinement. Hardness increased slightly with a case depth of 900 μm. Despite the smaller surface roughness introduced, corrosion resistance improved after peening due to compressive residual stresses.

  18. Influence of Laser Peening on Phase Transformation and Corrosion Resistance of AISI 321 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, D.; Swaroop, S.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of laser peening without coating (LPwC) on austenitic to martensitic (γ → α') phase transformation and corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 in 3.5% NaCl environment. Results indicate that LPwC induces a large compressive residual stresses of nearly -854 MPa and γ → α' phase transformation of about 18% (volume fraction). Microstructures of peened surface confirmed the γ → α' phase transformation and showed no grain refinement. Hardness increased slightly with a case depth of 900 μm. Despite the smaller surface roughness introduced, corrosion resistance improved after peening due to compressive residual stresses.

  19. Post-fatigue fracture resistance of metal core crowns: press-on metal ceramic versus a conventional veneering system

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Campos-Estellés, Carlos; Labaig-Rueda, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the mechanical failure behavior and to analyze fracture characteristics of metal ceramic crowns with two veneering systems – press-on metal (PoM) ceramic versus a conventional veneering system – subjected to static compressive loading. Material and Methods Forty-six crowns were constructed and divided into two groups according to porcelain veneer manufacture. Group A: 23 metal copings with porcelain IPS-InLine veneering (conventional metal ceramic). Group B: 23 metal copings with IPS-InLine PoM veneering porcelain. After 120,000 fatigue cycles, the crowns were axially loaded to the moment of fracture with a universal testing machine. The fractured specimens were examined under optical stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscope. Results Fracture resistance values showed statistically significant differences (Student’s t-test) regarding the type of ceramic veneering technique (p=0.001): Group A (conventional metal ceramics) obtained a mean fracture resistance of 1933.17 N, and Group B 1325.74N (Press-on metal ceramics). The most common type of fracture was adhesive failure (with metal exposure) (p=0.000). Veneer porcelain fractured on the occlusal surface following a radial pattern. Conclusions Metal ceramic crowns made of IPS InLine or IPS InLine PoM ceramics with different laboratory techniques all achieved above-average values for clinical survival in the oral environment according to ISO 6872. Crowns made with IPS InLine by conventional technique resisted fracture an average of 45% more than IPS InLine PoM fabricated with the press-on technique. Key words:Mechanical failure, conventional feldspathic, pressable ceramic, chewing simulator, thermocycling, compressive testing, fracture types, scanning electron microscope. PMID:26155346

  20. Voltage-dependent resistance of undoped rutile, TiO{sub 2}, ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; West, Anthony R.

    2013-12-23

    Lightly reduced rutile ceramics are n-type semiconductors whose resistance increases reversibly by 1–2 orders of magnitude, depending on temperature, on application of a small dc bias of 10–100 V cm{sup −1}. A similar effect is seen on changing the oxygen partial pressure surrounding the sample during impedance measurements and the bias dependence is attributed to changes in the equilibria between various ionised oxygen species adsorbed on sample surfaces, leading to changes in the mobile electron concentration in the sample bulk. The increase in resistance of n-type TiO{sub 2} with dc bias mirrors the decrease in resistance seen with p-type semiconductors such as acceptor-doped BaTiO{sub 3} and represents an effect, which has certain memristive characteristics but also significant differences.