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1

Replaceable blade turbine and stationary specimen corrosion testing facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A facility was constructed to provide relatively low cost testing of hot section turbine blade and vane materials under hot corrosion conditions more akin to service environments. The facility consists of a small combustor whose pressurized gas flow can be directed to either a test section consisting of three small cascaded specimens or to a partial admittance single-stage axial flow turbine. The turbine rotor contains 28 replaceable turbine blades. The combustion gases resulting from the burning of Jet A-l fuel can be seeded with measured amounts of alkali salts. This facility is described here along with preliminary corrosion test results obtained during the final checkout of the facility.

Santoro, G. J.; Calfo, F. D.

1985-01-01

2

Characterization of the Facility for Atmospheric Corrosion Testing (FACT) at Sandia  

SciTech Connect

The capability to perform atmospheric corrosion testing of materials and components now exists at Sandia resulting from the installation of a system called the Facility for Atmospheric Corrosion Testing (FACT). This report details the design, equipment, operation, maintenance, and future modifications of the system. This report also presents some representative data acquired from testing copper in environments generated by the FACT.

Greenholt, C.J.; Sorensen, N.R.; Poulter, G.A.; Guilinger, T.R.

1993-06-01

3

Multisystem corrosion monitoring in a cyclic reheat test facility: Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was the first stage of an EPRI-sponsored corrosion investigation utilizing the CAPCIS electrochemical monitoring system installed in a cyclic reheat test facility on a flue gas slipstream at the Scholz Steam Plant of Gulf Power Company. The primary reasons for incorporating the continuous corrosion monitoring system in the cyclic reheat investigation were that unexpectedly high corrosion rates had been observed in earlier tests at certain locations within the test exchanger and the precise reasons for these high rates of attack were not well understood. The corrosion behavior was not typical of the limited service experience on full scale units and the reasons for this required clarification. Controlled temperature weight loss and electrochemical probes were installed in the unit in place of three of the 1-inch diameter heat exchanger tubes. The corrosion behavior of Inconel Alloy 625 over the temperature range 260/degree/ to 120/degree/F (127/degree/ to 49/degree/C) was evaluated at mid-stream and sidewall locations. The efects on corrosion of operational variables and cleaning procedures were also evaluated. The severe corrosion attack sustained on the Inconel Alloy 625 was proved to result from a combination of effects which included the flue gas flow pattern, local cool-spots within the unit and preferential locations at which ash deposits could accumulate. 5 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.

Farrell, D.M.; Cox, W.M.; Gearey, D.

1988-04-01

4

Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment  

SciTech Connect

A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90{degrees}C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys.

Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

1994-10-01

5

Superheater/intermediate temperature air heater tube corrosion tests in the MHD coal fired flow facility (Montana Rosebud POC tests)  

SciTech Connect

Nineteen alloys have been exposed for approximately 1000 test hours as candidate superheater and intermediate temperature air heater tubes in a U.S. DOE facility dedicated to demonstrating Proof of Concept for the bottoming or heat and seed recovery portion of coal fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generating plants. Corrosion data have been obtained from a test series utilizing a western United States sub-bituminous coal, Montana Rosebud. The test alloys included a broad range of compositions ranging from carbon steel to austenitic stainless steels to high chromium nickel-base alloys. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO-containing deposits, developed principally, oxide scales by an oxidation/sulfidation mechanism. In addition to being generally porous, these scales were frequently spalled and/or non-compact due to a dispersed form of outward growth by oxide precipitation in the adjacent deposit. Austenitic alloys generally had internal penetration as trans Tranular and/or intergranular oxides and sulfides. While only two of the alloys had damage visible without magnification as a result of the relatively short exposure, there was some concern about Iona-term corrosion performance owing to the relatively poor quality scales formed. Comparison of data from these tests to those from a prior series of tests with Illinois No. 6, a high sulfur bituminous coal, showed less corrosion in the present test series with the lower sulfur coal. Although K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}was the principal corrosive agent as the supplier of sulfur, which acted to degrade alloy surface scales, tying up sulfur as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} prevented the occurrence of complex alkali iron trisulfates responsible for severe or catastrophic corrosion in conventional power plants with certain coals and metal temperatures.

White, M.

1996-01-01

6

OTEC biofouling-control and corrosion-protection study at the Seacoast Test Facility: 1981-1983  

SciTech Connect

Results from the first two years of operation of the OTEC Seacoast Test Facility in Hawaii are presented. No detectable biofouling from cold water in smooth tubes has been observed. Intermittent, low-level chlorination appears to control biofouling from warm water in smooth tubes. Uniform corrosion of all aluminum alloys is low in warm water, with no pitting observed. In cold water, preliminary data indicate pitting of all alloys, but corrosion is considerably less uniform than in warm water.

Panchal, C.B.; Larsen-Basse, J.; Berger, L.R.; Berger, J.A.; Little, B.J.; Stevens, H.C.; Darby, J.B.; Genens, L.E.; Hillis, D.L.

1985-07-01

7

Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Corrosion Test Report (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the corrosion tests that were performed to aid in the selection of the construction materials for multi-function waste tanks to be built in the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Two alloys were tested: 304L and Alloy 20 austenitic stainless steel. The test media were aqueous solutions formulated to represent the extreme of the chemical compositions of waste to be stored in the tanks. The results summerized by alloy are as follows: For 304L the tests showed no stress-corrosion cracking in any of the nine test solutions. The tests showed pitting in on of the solutions. There were no indications of any weld heat-tint corrosion, nor any sign of preferential corrosion in the welded areas. For Alloy 20 the tests showed no general, pitting, or stress-corrosion cracking. One crevice corrosion coupon cracked at the web between a hole and the edge of the coupon in one of the solutions. Mechanical tests showed some possible crack extension in the same solution. Because of the failure of both alloys to meet test acceptance criteria, the tank waste chemistry will have to be restricted or an alternative alloy tested.

Carlos, W. C.; Fritz, R. L.

1993-12-27

8

OTEC biofouling-control and corrosion-protection study at the Seacoast Test Facility: 1981-1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results from the first two years of operation of the OTEC Seacoast Test Facility in Hawaii are presented. No detectable biofouling from cold water in smooth tubes has been observed. Intermittent, low-level chlorination appears to control biofouling from warm water in smooth tubes. Uniform corrosion of all aluminum alloys is low in warm water, with no pitting observed. In cold

C. B. Panchal; J. Larsen-Basse; L. R. Berger; J. A. Berger; B. J. Little; H. C. Stevens; J. B. Darby; L. E. Genens; D. L. Hillis

1985-01-01

9

Biofouling and corrosion studies at the Seacoast Test Facility in Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

Results from the first three years of operation are presented. No detectable biofouling from cold water in smooth tubes has been observed. Intermittent, low-level chlorination appears to control biofouling from warm water in smooth tubes. Uniform corrosion of 5052 aluminum alloy is low, with less pitting found with warm water than with cold water over the same period. Although the testing of waterside enhancements has just begun, results to date indicate that low-level chlorination may be effective in preventing biofouling buildup on such enhancements. Corrosion data indicate that aluminum-based materials may achieve long service lives in marine environments.

Panchal, C.B.; Stevens, H.S.; Genens, L.E.; Hillis, D.L.; Larsen-Basse, J.; Zaidi, S.; Daniel, T.

1984-01-01

10

Microbiologically influenced corrosion testing  

SciTech Connect

This symposium was held November 16--17, 1992 in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for state-of-the-art information on the effects of microorganisms on the corrosion of metals. Many industrial needs in the area of microbial influenced corrosion testing are identified in the presentations along with latest laboratory and field testing techniques. Strategies to monitor and control corrosion and biofouling in water distribution systems, underground pipelines, buildings, and marine vessels are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Kearns, J.R.; Little, B.J. (eds.)

1994-01-01

11

Biofouling and Corrosion Studies at the Seacoast Test Facility in Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results from the first three years of operation are presented. No detectable biofouling from cold water in smooth tubes has been observed. Intermittent, low-level chlorination appears to control biofouling from warm water in smooth tubes. Uniform corrosion of 5052 aluminum alloy is low, with less pitting found with warm water than with cold water over the same period. Although the

C. B. Panchal; H. S. Stevens; L. E. Genens; D. L. Hillis; J. Larsen-Basse; S. Zaidi; T. Daniel

1984-01-01

12

Corrosion testing using isotopes  

DOEpatents

A method is described for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness. 3 figs.

Hohorst, F.A.

1995-12-05

13

Corrosion testing using isotopes  

DOEpatents

A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

Hohorst, Frederick A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-12-05

14

Accelerated Testing of Copper Corrosion  

Microsoft Academic Search

An innovative, short-term corrosion test has been developed that can predict long-term copper corrosion behavior. When used in a six-day study of uniform copper corrosion in five waters, the test predicted corrosion rates that were in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with known long-term (210-day) results. A second phase of the study examined the poorly understood phenomenon of soft-water pitting.

Marc Edwards; John F. Ferguson

1993-01-01

15

Mobile evaporator corrosion test results  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

1997-05-01

16

Accelerated testing of copper corrosion  

SciTech Connect

An innovative, short-term corrosion test has been developed that can predict long-term copper corrosion behavior. When used in a six-day study of uniform copper corrosion in five waters, the test predicted corrosion rates that were in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with known long-term (210-day) results. A second phase of the study examined the poorly understood phenomenon of soft-water pitting. Initial work successfully reproduced soft-water copper pitting in the laboratory using a synthetic water, facilitating future studies of pit initiation and potential remedies. Relative pitting tendencies were predicted using the short-term test, as was the long-term release of the by-products of copper corrosion. Pitting severity increased with increasing pH and duration of stagnation and decreased in the presence of natural organic matter or chlorine residuals.

Edwards, M. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Ferguson, J.F. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1993-10-01

17

Atlas 5013 tank corrosion test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The type and cause of corrosion in spot welded joints were determined by X-ray and chemical analysis. Fatigue and static tests showed the degree of degradation of mechanical properties. The corrosion inhibiting effectiveness of WD-40 compound and required renewal period by exposing typical joint specimens were examined.

Sutherland, W. M.; Girton, L. D.; Treadway, D. G.

1978-01-01

18

Mitigation strategies for microbiologically influenced corrosion in gas industry facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a study of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and its mitigation in gas industry facilities. The results show that MIC commonly occurs on both external and internal surfaces of pipes, in down hole tubulars and in process equipment such as separators. Mitigation strategies were tested in side-stream devices at several sites. The results demonstrate that many biocides

D. H. Pope; T. P. Zintel; B. A. Cookingham; D. Howard; R. G. Morris; R. A. Day; J. R. Frank; G. E. Pogemiller

1989-01-01

19

NETL- Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility  

ScienceCinema

NETL's Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany studies how new and old materials will stand up to new operating conditions. Work done in the lab supports NETL's oxy-fuel combustion oxidation work, refractory materials stability work, and the fuels program, in particular the hydrogen membrane materials stability work, to determine how best to upgrade existing power plants.

None

2014-06-16

20

NETL- Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility  

SciTech Connect

NETL's Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany studies how new and old materials will stand up to new operating conditions. Work done in the lab supports NETL's oxy-fuel combustion oxidation work, refractory materials stability work, and the fuels program, in particular the hydrogen membrane materials stability work, to determine how best to upgrade existing power plants.

None

2013-09-12

21

Research and test facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

1993-01-01

22

Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

2007-01-01

23

Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: HD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.

2007-01-01

24

Corrosion tests of DWPF recycle solution  

SciTech Connect

Coupon immersion tests were performed on ASTM A537, Class 1 carbon steel in simulated Defense Waste Processing Facility recycle solutions at 93 {plus_minus} 2{degree}C, in an effort to reproduce the results of earlier tests in which hard, shock-sensitive deposits were found. There was no evidence of pitting corrosion on the coupons exposed to solutions containing 0.5 M hydroxide and 2000 ppm (0.043 M) nitrite. Liquid mercury and small solid deposits were found on the specimens` immersed surfaces. However, the deposits were soft and not shock-sensitive. The absence of shock-sensitive deposits may have been due to a lower mercuric ion concentration in the test solutions or to different post-immersion handling. Coupons of 304L stainless steel and alloy C276 were also immersed in the simulated recycle solution. These coupons were not subject to localized corrosion, nor were shock-sensitive deposits found. Additional immersion tests on A537 coupons will be started in July 1992.

Zapp, P.E.

1992-07-28

25

Corrosion tests of DWPF recycle solution  

SciTech Connect

Coupon immersion tests were performed on ASTM A537, Class 1 carbon steel in simulated Defense Waste Processing Facility recycle solutions at 93 [plus minus] 2[degree]C, in an effort to reproduce the results of earlier tests in which hard, shock-sensitive deposits were found. There was no evidence of pitting corrosion on the coupons exposed to solutions containing 0.5 M hydroxide and 2000 ppm (0.043 M) nitrite. Liquid mercury and small solid deposits were found on the specimens' immersed surfaces. However, the deposits were soft and not shock-sensitive. The absence of shock-sensitive deposits may have been due to a lower mercuric ion concentration in the test solutions or to different post-immersion handling. Coupons of 304L stainless steel and alloy C276 were also immersed in the simulated recycle solution. These coupons were not subject to localized corrosion, nor were shock-sensitive deposits found. Additional immersion tests on A537 coupons will be started in July 1992.

Zapp, P.E.

1992-07-28

26

Failure Prevention by Short Time Corrosion Tests  

SciTech Connect

Short time corrosion testing of perforated sheets and wire meshes fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel, Alloy 600 and C276 showed that 304L stainless steel perforated sheet should perform well as the material of construction for dissolver baskets. The baskets will be exposed to hot nitric acid solutions and are limited life components. The corrosion rates of the other alloys and of wire meshes were too high for useful extended service. Test results also indicated that corrosion of the dissolver should drop quickly during the dissolutions due to the inhibiting effects of the corrosion products produced by the dissolution processes.

MICKALONIS, JOHN

2005-05-01

27

Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys.

Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

1999-12-14

28

Standard Test Method for Sandwich Corrosion Test  

E-print Network

1.1 This test method defines the procedure for evaluating the corrosivity of aircraft maintenance chemicals, when present between faying surfaces (sandwich) of aluminum alloys commonly used for aircraft structures. This test method is intended to be used in the qualification and approval of compounds employed in aircraft maintenance operations. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information. 1.3 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements appear in Section 9.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01

29

Fifty cell test facility  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design of a facility capable of the simultaneous testing of up to 50 high-temperature (400 to 500/sup 0/C) lithium alloy/iron sulfide cells; this facility is located in the Chemical Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The emphasis will be on the lifetime testing of cells fabricated by ANL and industrial contractors to acquire statistical data on the performance of cells of various designs. A computer-based data-acquisition system processes the cell performance data generated from the cells on test. The terminals and part of the data-acquisition equipment are housed in an air-conditioned enclosure adjacent to the testing facility; the computer is located remotely.

Arntzen, J. D.; Kolba, V. M.; Miller, W. E.; Gay, E. C.

1980-07-01

30

CORROSION PERFORMANCE TESTS FOR REINFORCING STEEL IN CONCRETE: TEST PROCEDURES  

Microsoft Academic Search

16. Abstract The existing test method to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, mainly ASTM G109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, and often expensive. However, corrosion of reinforcement is a major challenge to the performance and long-term durability of infrastructure systems. Improvements in the corrosion performance of materials could add significant

David Trejo; Ceki Halmen

31

Fabrication and testing of corrosion resistant coatings  

SciTech Connect

The susceptibility of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub n} to sodium corrosion mandates that corrosion resistant coatings be developed to protect silicon-based turbine engine components. Materials with good corrosion resistance and thermal expansions that nearly match SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been identified. Corrosion testing of hot-pressed pellets of these compounds has identified the most promising materials. Development of chemical vapor deposition system to apply these materials has been initiated. 20 refs., 3 figs.

Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Riester, L.

1991-01-01

32

Test Tube Geology: The Corrosion of Iron  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Materials Science and Technology Teacher's Workshop (MAST) provides this demonstration on corrosion. The class will observe the corrosion of iron nails in a test tube over a period of several days. The lesson includes a step by step explanation of the laboratory procedure and discussion questions.

2012-03-05

33

Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented.

Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

1994-11-01

34

Electromagnetic propulsion test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

Gooder, S. T.

1984-01-01

35

Corrosion prevention with an organic metal (polyaniline): corrosion test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The organic metal polyaniline (PAni) was found by us some years ago to be a powerful corrosion protection agent. The properties of the new PAni containing primer CORRPASSIVTM sealed with different top coats are characterized and compared with top coated probes using no or a conventional zinc primer. The combination of measurements of salt spray test, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

Bernhard Wessling; Joerg Posdorfer

1999-01-01

36

49 CFR 192.469 - External corrosion control: Test stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test stations. 192.469 Section...FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.469 External corrosion control: Test stations. Each...

2011-10-01

37

49 CFR 192.469 - External corrosion control: Test stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test stations. 192.469 Section...FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.469 External corrosion control: Test stations. Each...

2012-10-01

38

Corrosion testing in flash tanks  

SciTech Connect

As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

1999-07-01

39

Cathode Life Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cathode Life Test Facility (CLTF) has been in operation for ten years and has tested ten different cathode types for a total of approximately 2.0 million hours of life test data. As part of the defense management review (DMR) process, Rome Laboratory (RL) has eliminated internal research efforts pertaining to cathode life testing. Based on this directive, the CLTF was moved to the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) at Crane, Indiana. This report summarizes the process of moving the CLTF from RL to the NSWC.

Jardieu, Ronald J.

1994-10-01

40

A facility for studying irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A facility for the study of irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water using in situ proton irradiation has been developed and validated. A specially designed beamline and flowing-water corrosion cell added to the 1.7 MV tandem accelerator at the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory provide the capability to study the simultaneous effects of displacement damage and radiolysis on corrosion. A thin sample serves as both a “window” into the corrosion cell through which the proton beam passes completely, and the sample for assessing irradiation accelerated corrosion. The facility was tested by irradiating stainless steel samples at beam current densities between 0.5 and 10 ?A/cm2 in 130 °C and 320 °C deaerated water, and 320 °C water with 3 wppm H2. Increases in the conductivity and dissolved oxygen content of the water varied with the proton beam current, suggesting that proton irradiation was accelerating the corrosion of the sample. Conductivity increases were greatest at 320 °C, while DO increases were highest at 130 °C. The addition of 3 wppm H2 suppressed DO below detectable levels. The facility will enable future studies into the effect of irradiation on corrosion in high temperature water with in situ proton irradiation.

Raiman, Stephen S.; Flick, Alexander; Toader, Ovidiu; Wang, Peng; Samad, Nassim A.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

2014-08-01

41

Effect of deposits on corrosion of materials exposed in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility  

SciTech Connect

Candidate heat exchanger materials tested in the Low Mass Flow train at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at Tullahoma, TN. were analyzed to evaluate their corrosion performance. Tube specimens obtained at each foot of the 14-ft-long Unbend tubes were analyzed for corrosion-scale morphologies, scale thicknesses, and internal penetration depths. Results developed on 1500- and 2000- h exposed specimens were correlated with exposure temperature. In addition, deposit materials collected at several locations in the CFFF were analyzed in detail to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the deposits and their influence on corrosion performance of tube materials.

Natesan, K.

1993-05-01

42

Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to provide the data to form the basis for a method to test the corrosiveness of various thermal insulating materials used in residential structures. The insulating materials tested included celluloses containing several different fire-retarding additives, glass fibers some of which had been intentionally made more corrosive, mineral wool and urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam. Experiments were conducted with steel, copper and aluminum coupons embedded in samples of the different insulating materials at 45/sup 0/C and 75% RH, both with and without a thermal gradient of 10/sup 0/C to cause condensation. When there was no temperature gradient, the corrosion rates of the three metals tested were negligible indicating that in the absence of condensation or a water leak there is little likelihood of corrosion in the insulating materials tested. Some field tests were conducted in attics in three locations. Steel, copper and aluminium coupons were placed in the attics in a way to enable condensation to occur. Several possible accelerated test procedures were investigated. Because of the widely differing physical properties of thermal insulating materials used in residences and because some insulations were not wetted so as to provide a continuous electrical path which is a necessity for the electrochemical methods, it became apparent that leachants had to be used. The justification for using leachants was that the test results showed that the corrosive electrolyte appears to be moisture containing soluble ingredients of the insulating materials. Two test methods involving leachants correlated sufficiently well with the condensation and attic tests and met most of the other test criteria to qualify as possible corrosiveness-test procedures.

Sheppard, K.; Weil, R.

1984-08-01

43

Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion  

SciTech Connect

Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the bedded salt at the WIPP. This test program started on July 22, 1986 and has achieved its projected five-year lifetime. All in situ samples have been retrieved and sent to multiple laboratories for posttest analyses. Most of the analyses on metal samples have been completed and the results are summarized in this paper. The tested metal alloys proposed for waste canister or overpack use included titanium alloys (grade-2 and grade-12), Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, austenitic stainless steels (304L, 316, and NS 24/AISI 309), carbon steels (Belgian C and ASTM A216/WCA), copper, and lead. After five-years of test exposure immersed in WIPP brine A and/or salt at about 90{degree}C, the corrosion-resistant materials (Ti; Inconel, Hastelloy) exhibited very little corrosion. The austenitic stainless steels suffered pitting, crevice corrosion, and some evidence of stress corrosion cracking. The carbon steels, copper, and lead exhibited both extensive general and localized attack. Details of the test, analyses, and results obtained will be discussed.

Sorensen, N.R.; Molecke, M.A.

1992-12-31

44

Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion  

SciTech Connect

Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the bedded salt at the WIPP. This test program started on July 22, 1986 and has achieved its projected five-year lifetime. All in situ samples have been retrieved and sent to multiple laboratories for posttest analyses. Most of the analyses on metal samples have been completed and the results are summarized in this paper. The tested metal alloys proposed for waste canister or overpack use included titanium alloys (grade-2 and grade-12), Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, austenitic stainless steels (304L, 316, and NS 24/AISI 309), carbon steels (Belgian C and ASTM A216/WCA), copper, and lead. After five-years of test exposure immersed in WIPP brine A and/or salt at about 90[degree]C, the corrosion-resistant materials (Ti; Inconel, Hastelloy) exhibited very little corrosion. The austenitic stainless steels suffered pitting, crevice corrosion, and some evidence of stress corrosion cracking. The carbon steels, copper, and lead exhibited both extensive general and localized attack. Details of the test, analyses, and results obtained will be discussed.

Sorensen, N.R.; Molecke, M.A.

1992-01-01

45

Universal Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

Laughery, Mike

1994-01-01

46

Universal Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

Laughery, Mike

47

49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471 Section 192.471 Transportation... § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as...

2013-10-01

48

49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471 Section 192.471 Transportation... § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as...

2011-10-01

49

49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471 Section 192.471 Transportation... § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as...

2010-10-01

50

49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471 Section 192.471 Transportation... § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as...

2012-10-01

51

PFBC HGCU Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is the tenth technical progress report in connection with the Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the First Quarter of C 1992. Work focused on supporting field construction activities and expediting delivery of equipment. The project is on schedule. The following significant events occurred during this report period: The major components of the system were delivered to the site and installed: contract Modification No. 5 issued to Westinghouse authorized partial funding for proof-of-concept touting of an alternate filter candle material at Karhula, Finland; and contract Modification No. 2, issued to Babcock Wilcox covered additional material (hangers, steel) and certain work scope changes.

Not Available

1992-04-01

52

OTEC research and the seacoast test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

OTEC mariculture, and other developing research programs at the Natural Energy Laboratory at Keahole Point, Hawaii are reviewed. The installation is designed to feature both onshore and offshore facilities, including cold water intakes and discharge pipelines, warm water intake and discharge pipelines, a pumping station, constant head tanks, laboratories, and support facilities. The Seacoast Test Facility for OTEC development is being constructed to have a ten year lifetime, a 50-ft depth warm water intake, 2100-ft cold water intake, uninterrupted flow from the intakes, cold water temperature rise limited to 1 C, degassing capability for the cold water, and biologically inert pipeline materials. An additional 250 gpm cold water pipeline is being fabricated for mariculture experimentation. Heat transfer monitors, biofouling and corrosion test sections are also being constructed.

Hallanger, L. W.

53

PFBC HGCU Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is the thirteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Fourth Quarter of CY 1992. The following are highlights of the activities that occurred during this report period: Initial operation of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) occurred during this quarter. The following table summarizes the operating dates and times. HGCU ash lockhopper valve plugged with ash. Primary cyclone ash pluggage. Problems with the coal water paste. Unit restarted warm 13 hours later. HGCU expansion joint No. 7 leak in internal ply of bellows. Problems encountered during these initial tests included hot spots on the APP, backup cyclone and instrumentation spools, two breakdowns of the backpulse air compressor, pluggage of the APF hopper and ash removal system, failure (breakage) of 21 filter candles, leakage of the inner ply of one (1) expansion joint bellows, and numerous other smaller problems. These operating problems are discussed in detail in a subsequent section of this report. Following shutdown and equipment inspection in December, design modifications were initiated to correct the problems noted above. The system is scheduled to resume operation in March, 1993.

Not Available

1993-01-01

54

A3 Altitude Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

Dulreix, Lionel J.

2009-01-01

55

ACCELERATED CORROSION TESTING OF GALVANIC COUPLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

New materials and structural designs are required for advanced aircraft functionalities. Long standing standardized corrosion test methods (e.g. ASTM B117) are regularly called out in procurement documents to qualify these new materials. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these test methods can be misleading resulting in approval of material systems that have very poor in service performance and\\/or the

James F. Dante; Josh Averett; Fritz Friedersdorf; Christy Vestal

56

COMPARISON OF ACCELERATED CORROSION TESTS TO CORROSION PERFORMANCE IN NATURAL ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is interest in the comparison of accelerated corrosion tests to corrosion performance in natural atmospheric environments. Currently, there are some concerns that accelerated corrosion testing may not accurately predict performance in natural atmospheric environments. This provided motivation to compare the corrosion behavior of Al 1060, Al 6061-T6, Al 7075-T6, Al 2024-T3, pure copper, pure magnesium, coated pure magnesium, 1008

R. Sugamoto; G. A. Hawthorn

57

Corrosion/Erosion Resistance of Ultimet\\256 R31233 in a Simulated Feed for a Radioactive Vitrification Facility  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion, erosion and corrosion/erosion tests were performed to evaluate the performance of nickel and cobalt based alloys in a simulated sludge/borosilicate frit slurry representative of the feed preparation system for a radioactive waste vitrification facility. Alloys tested included Type 304L stainless steel, Hastelloy\\256 C-276, Stellite\\256 6B, and Ultimet\\256. Testing indicated that Ultimet\\256 had improved wear resistance and similar corrosion resistance compared to Hastelloy\\256 C-276 in the simulated sludge/frit environment.

Imrich, K.J.

1999-05-21

58

Laser Based Fusion Test Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Fusion Test Facility (FTF) is a high repetition rate ignition facility that would bridge the gap between single shot facilities (such as NIF and LMJ) and a fully functioning laser fusion power plant. It would allow development of science and technolog...

A. J. Schmitt, J. D. Sethian, S. P. Obenschain

2008-01-01

59

CORROSION TESTING IN SIMULATED TANK SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Three simulated waste solutions representing wastes from tanks SY-102 (high nitrate, modified to exceed guidance limits), AN-107, and AY-102 were supplied by PNNL. Out of the three solutions tested, both optical and electrochemical results show that carbon steel samples corroded much faster in SY-102 (high nitrate) than in the other two solutions with lower ratios of nitrate to nitrite. The effect of the surface preparation was not as strong as the effect of solution chemistry. In areas with pristine mill-scale surface, no corrosion occurred even in the SY-102 (high nitrate) solution, however, corrosion occurred in the areas where the mill-scale was damaged or flaked off due to machining. Localized corrosion in the form of pitting in the vapor space of tank walls is an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of the liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. It has been shown that the liquid waste condensate chemistry influences the amount of corrosion that occurs along the walls of the storage tanks. To minimize pitting corrosion, an effort is underway to gain an understanding of the pitting response in various simulated waste solutions. Electrochemical testing has been used as an accelerated tool in the investigation of pitting corrosion. While significant effort has been undertaken to evaluate the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in various simulated waste solutions, additional effort is needed to evaluate the effect of liquid waste supernates from six Hanford Site tanks (AY-101, AY-102, AN-102, AN-107, SY-102 (high Cl{sup -}), and SY-102 (high nitrate)) on carbon steel. Solutions were formulated at PNNL to replicate tank conditions, and in the case of SY-102, exceed Cl{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} conditions, respectively, to provide a contrast between in and out of specification limits. The majority of previous testing has been performed on pristine polished samples. To evaluate the actual tank carbon steel surface, efforts are needed to compare the polished surfaces to corroded and mill-scale surfaces, which are more likely to occur in application. Additionally, due to the change in liquid waste levels within the tanks, salt deposits are highly likely to be present along the tank wall. When the level of the tank decreases, a salt deposit will form as the solution evaporates. The effects of this pre-existing salt, or supernate deposit, are unknown at this time on the corrosion effect and thus require investigation. Additionally, in the presence of radiation, moist air undergoes radiolysis, forming a corrosive nitric acid condensate. This condensate could accelerate the corrosion process in the vapor space. To investigate this process, an experimental apparatus simulating the effects of radiation was designed and constructed to provide gamma irradiation while coupons are exposed to a simulate tank solution. Additionally, ammonia vapors will also be introduced to further represent the tank environment.

Hoffman, E.

2010-12-09

60

LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

2013-08-30

61

Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

2007-05-01

62

Fusion Test Facilities John Sheffield  

E-print Network

Fusion Test Facilities John Sheffield ISSE - University of Tennessee FPA meeting Livermore December Stambaugh, and their colleagues #12;Destructive Testing · It is common practice to test engineered components to destruction prior to deployment of a system e.g., - Automobile crash tests - Airplane wing

63

Test Laboratory Facilities and Capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located inside the boundaries of 40,000 acre Redstone Arsenal military reservation, has over 50 test facilities across 400+ acres, many inside an additional secure, fenced area. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate test facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength/dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

Hamilton, Jeff

2004-01-01

64

College of Engineering Testing Facilities  

E-print Network

moments about these axes for sports biomechanics and seating evaluations Dept. of Mechanical Engr. Dr Biomechanical Evaluation.......................................................... 4 Chemical Analysis@egr.msu.edu #12;MSU College of Engineering Testing Facilities 1855-2005 4 BIOMECHANICAL EVALUATION Nearly any

65

Low thrust rocket test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A low thrust chemical rocket test facility has recently become operational at the NASA-Lewis. The new facility is used to conduct both long duration and performance tests at altitude over a thruster's operating envelope using hydrogen and oxygen gas for propellants. The facility provides experimental support for a broad range of objectives, including fundamental modeling of fluids and combustion phenomena, the evaluation of thruster components, and life testing of full rocket designs. The major mechanical and electrical systems are described along with aspects of the various optical diagnostics available in the test cell. The electrical and mechanical systems are designed for low down time between tests and low staffing requirements for test operations. Initial results are also presented which illustrate the various capabilities of the cell.

Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.

1990-01-01

66

Automated production holography test facility  

SciTech Connect

A holographic nondestructive testing facility has been designed and built to measure the residual strain resulting from proof pressurization of stainless assemblies. The system is now in use as an in-line production test of these assemblies produced at Rockwell International's Rocky Flats Division. A complete high-pressure argon facility was built to achieve the necessary proof pressures. The entire holography and pressurizing operation is performed remotely and controlled automatically by means of a programmable controller using a microprocessor. Details of the holography optics, the pressurized gas system and the electronic controls are given. The holographic reconstruction and interference fringe counting and analysis capabilities of this facility are also discussed.

Dutton, G.W.; Brown, F.A.; Bailey, L.R.

1981-01-01

67

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2007-12-31

68

NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF CORROSION UNDER COATINGS  

EPA Science Inventory

Surface corrosion on aluminum aircraft skins, nears joints and around fasteners is often an indicator of buried structural corrosion and cracking. Aircraft paints are routinely removed to reveal the presence of corrosion on the surface of metal structures, and the aircraft is su...

69

(abstract) Cryogenic Telescope Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An optical test Dewar is being constructed with the unique capability to test mirrors of diameter less than or equal to 1 m, f less than or equal to 6, at temperatures from 300 to 4.2 K with a ZYGO Mark IV interferometer. The design and performance of this facility will be presented.

Luchik, T. S.; Chave, R. G.; Nash, A. E.

1995-01-01

70

Thermal energy storage test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thermal behavior of prototype thermal energy storage units (TES) in both heating and cooling modes is determined. Improved and advanced storage systems are developed and performance standards are proposed. The design and construction of a thermal cycling facility for determining the thermal behavior of full scale TES units is described. The facility has the capability for testing with both liquid and air heat transport, at variable heat input/extraction rates, over a temperature range of 0 to 280 F.

Ternes, M. P.

1980-03-01

71

Weld region corrosion during chemical cleaning of PWR (pressurized-water reactor) steam generators: Volume 2, Tests and analyses: Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential for preferential corrosion of steam generator weld regions during chemical cleaning using the generic SGOG solvents was investigated. The investigations included development and use of a corrosion assessment test facility which measured corrosion currents in a realistic model of the steam generator geometry in the vicinity of a specific weld during a simulated chemical dissolution of sludge consisting

J. L. Barna; S. A. Bozeka; J. M. Jevec; B. P. Miglin; M. E. Scott; C. R. Turner; T. A. Beineke; M. L. Fortier; J. P. Machnicki; E. O. Strohm

1987-01-01

72

An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

1981-01-01

73

Selectable-Tip Corrosion-Testing Electrochemical Cell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The figure depicts aspects of an electrochemical cell for pitting- corrosion tests of material specimens. The cell is designed to generate a region of corrosion having a pit diameter determined by the diameter of a selectable tip. The average depth of corrosion is controlled by controlling the total electric charge passing through the cell in a test. The cell is also designed to produce minimal artifacts associated with crevice corrosion. There are three selectable tips, having diameters of 0.1 in. (0.254 cm), 0.3 in. (0.762 cm), and 0.6 in. (1.524 cm), respectively.

Lomness, Janice; Hintze, Paul

2008-01-01

74

Fabrication of Test Tubes for Coal Ash Corrosion Testing  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the fabrication of tube sections of four alloys for incorporating into test sections to be assembled by Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) for installation at Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant. The primary purpose of the installation was to determine the corrosion behavior of ten different alloys for flue gas corrosion. Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant is burning an Ohio coal containing approximately 3.4% S (dry basis) and approximately 0.4% alkali which causes chronic coal ash corrosion of the unit?s superheater tubing. The 2.5-in.-OD x 0.4in.-wall x 6-in-long sections of four alloys {type 304H coated with Fe3Al alloy FAS [developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)], 310 + Ta, modified 800H, and Thermie alloy} were fabricated at ORNL. Each alloy tubing was characterized in terms of chemical analysis and microstructure. The machined tubes of each of the alloys were inspected and shipped on time for incorporation into the test loop fabricated at B&W. Among the alloys fabricated, Thermie was the hardest to extrude and machine.

Johnson, R.; Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wright, I.G.

1999-05-11

75

Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin II Accelerated Corrosion Tests and the Behavior of High-Strength Aluminum Alloys of Different Compositions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The permanence, with respect to corrosion, of light aluminum alloy sheets of the duralumin type, that is, heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si is discussed. Alloys of this type are subject to surface corrosion and corrosion of the interior by intercrystalline paths. Results are given of accelerated corrosion tests, tensile tests, the effect on corrosion of various alloying elements and heat treatments, electrical resistance measurements, and X-ray examinations.

Rawdon, Henry S

1928-01-01

76

NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

2013-01-01

77

In-situ coal-ash corrosion testing  

SciTech Connect

Coal-ash corrosion has plagued the coal-fired boiler industry for half a century. This paper presents test results from field exposures of corrosion probes and in-line tubular samples for over two years. Laboratory tests, effective for studying the variables affecting coal-ash corrosion, only approximate the real, complex operating conditions of a coal-fired boiler. In situ boiler exposure of boiler samples on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes overcame that drawback and provided realistic heat transfer and combustion exposure, with ready access to the probe at any time -- independent of the boiler and in no way affecting availability. In the actual boiler tubular test sections were exposed, and a wide range of corrosiveness was found dependent not only on metal temperatures, but also on flue gas temperature and location in the tubing element. These findings were based on ultrasonic wall thickness measurements and will be confirmed by metallurgical investigation in the future.

Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J.; Krawchuk, M.; Wolowodiuk, W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Bakker, W.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Brooks, J. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

1995-12-31

78

In-situ corrosion sensor for coating, testing and screening  

SciTech Connect

An in-situ corrosion censor facilitates coating development and screening by detecting the early stages of corrosion well before degradation is visible. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), the sensor extends the use of this established laboratory technique from immersion only to different accelerated test conditions (such as salt fog or humidity) and ambient service environments. By enabling a direct quantitative comparison of the early stages of coating deterioration and substrate corrosion that occur in laboratory accelerated tests and service or field conditions, the laboratory tests can be validated and coatings screened more quickly.

Davis, G.D.; Dacres, C.M.; Krebs, L.A.

2000-02-01

79

Thermal energy storage test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two loops making up the facility, using either air or liquid as the thermal transport fluid, are described. These loops will be capable of cycling residential-size thermal energy storage units through conditions simulating solar or off-peak electricity applications to evaluate the unit's performance. Construction of the liquid cycling loop was completed, and testing of thermal stratification techniques for hot and cold water is reported.

Ternes, M. P.

1981-03-01

80

Explosive components facility certification tests  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed construction of a new Explosive Components Facility (ECF) that will be used for the research and development of advanced explosives technology. The ECF includes nine indoor firing pads for detonating explosives and monitoring the detonations. Department of Energy requirements for certification of this facility include detonation of explosive levels up to 125 percent of the rated firing pad capacity with no visual structural degradation resulting from the explosion. The Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia decided to expand this certification process to include vibration and acoustic monitoring at various locations throughout the building during these explosive events. This information could then be used to help determine the best locations for noise and vibration sensitive equipment (e.g. scanning electron microscopes) used for analysis throughout the building. This facility has many unique isolation features built into the explosive chamber and laboratory areas of the building that allow normal operation of other building activities during explosive tests. This paper discusses the design of this facility and the various types of explosive testing performed by the Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia. However, the primary focus of the paper is directed at the vibration and acoustic data acquired during the certification process. This includes the vibration test setup and data acquisition parameters, as well as analysis methods used for generating peak acceleration levels and spectral information. Concerns over instrumentation issues such as the choice of transducers (appropriate ranges, resonant frequencies, etc.) and measurements with long cable lengths (500 feet) are also discussed.

Dorrell, L.; Johnson, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-08-01

81

BUILDING INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAIC TEST FACILITY  

E-print Network

The widespread use of building integrated photovoltaics appears likely as a result of the continuing decline in photovoltaic manufacturing costs, the relative ease in which photovoltaics can be incorporated within the building envelope, and the fact that buildings account for over 40 percent of the U.S. energy consumption. However, designers, architects, installers, and consumers need more information and analysis tools in order to judge the merits of building-integrated solar photovoltaic products. In an effort to add to the knowledge base, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has undertaken a multiple-year project to collect high quality experimental performance data. The data will be used to validate computer models for building integrated photovoltaics and, where necessary, to develop algorithms that may be incorporated within these models. This paper describes the facilities that have been constructed to assist in this effort. The facilities include a mobile tracking photovoltaic test facility, a building integrated photovoltaic “test bed”, an outdoor aging rack, and a meteorological station.

A. Hunter Fanney; Brian P. Dougherty

82

3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY (SATURN V IN BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

83

Evaluation of annual corrosion tests for aggressive water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Internal corrosion has a significant effect on the useful life of pipes, the hydraulic conditions of a distribution system and the quality of the water transported. All water is corrosive under some conditions, and the level of this corrosion depends on the physical and chemical properties of the water and properties of the pipe material. Galvanic treatment is an innovation for protecting against corrosion, and this method is also suitable for removal of water stone too. This method consists of the electrogalvanic principle, which is generated by the flowing of water between a zinc anode and the cupro-alloy cover of a column. This article presents experimental corrosion tests at water resource Pernek (This water resource-well marked as HL-1 is close to the Pernek of village), where the device is operating based on this principle.

Dubová, V.; Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.

2011-12-01

84

Erosion/corrosion concerns in feed preparation systems at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950`s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the high level radioactive waste resulting from these processes as a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF, after having undergone extensive testing, has been approved for operations and is currently immobilizing radioactive waste. To ensure reliability of the DWPF remote canyon processing equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed prior to radioactive operations to determine to what extent erosion/corrosion would impact design life of equipment. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections on critical equipment and follow-up inspections after completion of DWPF cold chemical demonstration runs. Non-destructive examination (NDE) techniques were used to assess erosion/corrosion as well as evaluation of corrosion coupon racks. These results were used to arrive at predicted equipment life for selected feed preparation equipment. It was concluded with the exception of the coil and agitator for the slurry mix evaporator (SME), which are exposed to erosive glass frit particles, all of the equipment should meet its design life.

Gee, J.T.; Chandler, C.T.; Daugherty, W.L.; Imrich, K.J.; Jenkins, C.F.

1997-12-31

85

NASA White Sands Test Facility Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory  

NASA Video Gallery

Tour the NASA White Sands Test Facility's Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory in Las Cruces, New Mexico. To learn more about White Sands Test Facility, go to http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wstf/home/...

86

Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

2007-05-01

87

Stress corrosion cracking—A new approach to testing methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

So far, the primary objectives of the investigation of stress corrosion cracking have been to understand the basic mechanisms\\u000a and also to find suitable testing methods for screening materials according to their degree of susceptibility, with an aim\\u000a to avoid failures caused by stress corrosion cracking in various applications and environments. Because of the complexity\\u000a of interplay among various mechanical,

W. Dietzel; S. K. Ghosal

1997-01-01

88

Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current/voltage data have been obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consist of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to evaluate fully this approach to corrosion screening.

Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

1990-01-01

89

Aspects of corrosion testing of thermal-insulating materials  

SciTech Connect

The literature dealing with corrosion by thermal-insulating materials in residential buildings is reviewed. Current corrosiveness test methods are discussed. In view of their shortcomings, the need for a new procedure is evident. Possible methods applicable to various types of insulation are considered. The program for developing the new procedure is outlined. Preliminary test results indicate relationships between existing coupon and rapidly executable electrochemical tests. Field data, which are beginning to be collected, are needed to establish the validity of the new test and its ability to predict behavior under service conditions.

Sheppard, K.G.; Weil, R.

1983-01-01

90

An improved technique for high-temperature salt corrosion tests  

SciTech Connect

A method for long-term corrosion tests in sodium sulfate and chloride melts is described. The method takes account of the salt amount in the bath an admissible variation of sodium chloride concentration, which is of a negligible effect on the corrosion rate. The specimen immersion depth in the bath is regularly reestablished to compensate the evaporation of the salt melt and, hence, to provide permanent test conditions. The method ensures much more stable test results in comparison with conventional tests in crucibles.

Oryshich, I.V.; Rakitskii, A.N.; Poryadchenko, N.E.; Bogaevskii, V.V. [Institute of Materials Science Problems, Kiev (Russian Federation)

1994-07-01

91

Pilot-plant testing of materials proposed for use as NWCF feed and fuel nozzle caps. [New Waste Calcining Facility  

SciTech Connect

Results of a series of tests performed on materials proposed for use at New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) fuel and feed nozzle caps are described. Results show that Haynes Alloys 25 and 188 and Inconel Alloys 617, 625, and 690 have acceptable corrosion and erosion rates based upon the high-temperature oxidation, erosion, and corrosion tests conducted.

Birrer, S.A.

1980-12-01

92

Design of accelerated corrosion tests for electronic components in automotive applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new accelerated laboratory corrosion tests for electronic components in automotive applications have been developed, based on the use of metallic copper as a meter for corrosivity. The accelerated tests are designed so that they reproduce the same kind of corrosion effects as observed with exposure of copper in real vehicle environments. The test cycle that best simulates the corrosion

Peter Eriksson; Bo Carlsson; I. O. Wallinder

2001-01-01

93

Electromagnetic test facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes major electromagnetic test facilities at Sandia National Laboratories; each has undergone recent upgrades. The paper discusses each facility, their uses, and upgrades pertaining to the facilities performance and diagnostic capabilities. The facilities discussed are the Sandia lightning simulator, the electromagnetic environments simulator (a large TEM cell), the mode-stirred chamber, and the anechoic chamber. Sandia's expertise in electromagnetics

Michele Caldwell; Matthew B. Higgins

2005-01-01

94

Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph shows a fully assembled solar thermal engine placed inside the vacuum chamber at the test facility prior to testing. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move theNation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

1999-01-01

95

Microbiologically influenced corrosion of stainless steel in a nuclear waste facility  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion in stainless steel cooling water piping in a nuclear waste processing facility occurred during an extended system lay-up. The failure characteristics indicated microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). The corrosion occurred at welds as pinhole penetrations in the surfaces, which opened into large subsurface void formations. Corrosive attack started in the heat-affected zones of the assembly welds, usually adjacent to fusion lines. Stepwise grinding, polishing, and etching in the affected areas revealed that voids generally grew in the wrought material as uniform, general corrosion. Tunneling (wormholing) erosion was also present. Selective attack occurred within the two-phase weld filler zone. The result was a void wall that was rough and porous-appearing, a consequence of preferential attack on the austenite. The three-dimensional spongy surface was studied optically and with the scanning electron microscope.

Jenkins, C.F.; Doman, D.L.

1992-01-01

96

Microbiologically influenced corrosion of stainless steel in a nuclear waste facility  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion in stainless steel cooling water piping in a nuclear waste processing facility occurred during an extended system lay-up. The failure characteristics indicated microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). The corrosion occurred at welds as pinhole penetrations in the surfaces, which opened into large subsurface void formations. Corrosive attack started in the heat-affected zones of the assembly welds, usually adjacent to fusion lines. Stepwise grinding, polishing, and etching in the affected areas revealed that voids generally grew in the wrought material as uniform, general corrosion. Tunneling (wormholing) erosion was also present. Selective attack occurred within the two-phase weld filler zone. The result was a void wall that was rough and porous-appearing, a consequence of preferential attack on the austenite. The three-dimensional spongy surface was studied optically and with the scanning electron microscope.

Jenkins, C.F.; Doman, D.L.

1992-12-31

97

Tri-Service Thermal Flash Test Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the status and capabilities of the Thermal Nuclear Flash Test Facility which is used for investigating the effects of thermal radiation on materials. The Facility consists of several quartz lamp banks for simulating thermal radiation...

R. A. Servais, N. J. Olson, B. H. Wilt

1978-01-01

98

Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph, taken at MSFC's Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility, shows a concentrator mirror, a combination of 144 mirrors forming this 18-ft diameter concentrator, and a vacuum chamber that houses the focal point. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-foot diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

1999-01-01

99

Infrared sensor test methodology and facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the Air Force Systems Command designated Center of Expertise for Space Simulation Testing, AEDC has defined a test methodology for the ground testing of infrared sensor systems. This test methodology and the test facilities envisioned to implement it has been addressed in another report. The progress on the implementation of that test methodology is reported and the status of the test facilities presently existing or under construction to implement it is described.

Matty, Jere J.; Dawbarn, Ronald

1990-01-01

100

Corrosion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

Slabaugh, W. H.

1974-01-01

101

In-situ corrosion testing of selected HLW container materials  

SciTech Connect

To qualify corrosion resistant materials for long-lived HLW containers that could act as a barrier for immobilization of radionuclides in a rock salt repository, the corrosion behavior of preselected materials is being examined under simulated disposal conditions. In the present study, long-term in-situ corrosion experiments (field experiments) were performed in the Asse salt mine on materials which were identified as promising in previous work. These are: the passively corroding alloys Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 (a Cr-Ni-Mo alloy) as reference materials for a corrosion resistant concept, and the actively corroding TStE 355 carbon steel as reference material for a corrosion allowance concept. Besides there materials, the Cr-Ni steel 1.4833 as potential canister material for vitrified HLW was also investigated. The corrosion experiments were performed in the framework of the HLW test disposal in the Asse salt mine under conditions prevailing in the normal operating phase of the repository.

Smailos, E. [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgungstechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

1996-12-01

102

EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

BOOMER KD

2009-01-08

103

The Revamping of an Ignition Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The revamping of an Ignition Test Facility, located in the Research Combustion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. The history of how the test cell has adapted efficiently to a variety of test programs is discussed. The addition of a second test stand for ignition and small-scale rocket testing is detailed. An overview of the facility and the current test programs is offered. Planned upgrades for the future are outlined.

Kearns, Kimberly A.

2002-01-01

104

License plate cosmetic corrosion test of automotive coated steel sheet  

SciTech Connect

A new standard laboratory test (SAE J2334) for evaluation of the cosmetic corrosion resistance of autobody steel sheet has been developed through the joint efforts of the Society of Automotive Engineers Automotive Corrosion Prevention Committee (SAE/ACAP) and the Auto/Steel Partnership (A/SP) Corrosion Task Force. Results from this test gave an excellent correlation with those of on-vehicle tests conducted for 5 years in Canada at St. John`s, Newfoundland, and Montreal, Quebec. To determine how results of the Canadian tests related to environments in the United States, racks of identical materials were mounted on the front license plate brackets of cars driven in various locations in the US snowbelt, including Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; Detroit, Michigan, and Chardon, Ohio. After 4 years to 5 years, these tests showed the US environments produced less scribe creep and more red rust than those conducted in Canada. Similar rankings were obtained for the scribe creep resistance of the various coated steel sheet products when compared at equivalent amounts of corrosion. However, the ranking of materials changed at longer exposure times in Canada, and for that reason, it was concluded that the 5-year Canadian results used in the development of the SAE J2334 test provided a better real-world performance standard.

Townsend, H.E. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Bethlehem, PA (United States)., Homer Research Labs.; Simpson, M.W. [PPG/Chemfil Corp., Troy, MI (United States). Coatings and Resins Group; Linde, W.B. van der [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Automotive Products Development; McCune, D.C. [Quality/Statistics, Beaver, PA (United States)

1999-04-01

105

Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a

1992-01-01

106

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) maintenance provisions  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was designed with maintainability as a primary parameter, and facilities and provisions were designed into the plant to accommodate the maintenance function. This paper describes the FFTF and its systems. Special maintenance equipment and facilities for performing maintenance on radioactive components are discussed. Maintenance provisions designed into the plant to enhance maintainability are also described.

Marshall, J.L.

1981-05-01

107

Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Fantasia, Peter M.

2011-01-01

108

Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF): User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the RHTF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

DelPapa, Steven

2011-01-01

109

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of  

E-print Network

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) Overview: The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of power electronics that will be located at the TVA the testing of power electronics and energy storage technology from laboratory development and testing through

110

Accelerated corrosion test for aluminum-zinc alloy coatings  

SciTech Connect

An electrochemically monitored etching method has been developed to enable accelerated service life testing of aluminum/zinc alloy coatings with a dendritic microstructure. The method involved pre-exposure of materials to the etching solution to remove the most active phases from the coatings. This process simulated the early phases of atmospheric corrosion. The method significantly shortened the time required for an atmospheric exposure test. Historical performance data and data collected using the accelerated test method agreed.

Simpson, T.C. (Bethlehem Steel Corp., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Homer Research Labs.)

1993-07-01

111

Engineering Test Facilities Having the facilities to develop and test spaceflight hardware  

E-print Network

Engineering Test Facilities Having the facilities to develop and test spaceflight hardware onsite is a key ingredient to LASP's success. Our extensive test and calibration facilities enable our in-house engineers to work closely with scientists and mission operations staff in "test-like-you-fly" scenarios. Our

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

112

In-situ electrochemical study of corrosion of steel and aluminum/steel couples during cyclic corrosion test  

SciTech Connect

Use of aluminum alloys for automotive applications is growing steadily. Galvanic corrosion is a major concern for those alloys. Because of the predominate use of steels in the automotive industry, the majority of accelerated test procedures commonly accepted by the industry are designed for cosmetic corrosion and perforation of steels. SAE 52334 and Ford Arizona Proving Ground (Ford APG) tests are two examples. Adopting those tests for galvanic corrosion of Al alloys without any fundamental understanding of the process may lead to misleading results. In this paper, electrochemical studies were conducted to examine the acceleration effects of several parameters on different types of corrosion. Galvanic corrosion of aluminum 6111 alloy and cold rolled steel (Al/ CRS) couples and general corrosion of cold rolled steel substrates were studied.

Gao, G. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1998-12-31

113

Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

Simpson, J.D.

1992-07-20

114

Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Power Systems Test Facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation provides a detailed description of the Johnson Space Center's Power Systems Facility located in the Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Facilities and the resources used to support power and battery systems testing are also shown. The contents include: 1) Power Testing; 2) Power Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 3) Source/Load; 4) Battery Facilities; 5) Battery Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 6) Battery Testing; 7) Performance Test Equipment; 8) Battery Test Environments; 9) Battery Abuse Chambers; 10) Battery Abuse Capabilities; and 11) Battery Test Area Resources.

Situ, Cindy H.

2010-01-01

115

STUDY AND COMPUTER MODELING OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING DURING DET TEST  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 °C under constant external load using

M. BLAHETOVÁ; S. LASEK; R. BLAHETA

116

Long-term corrosion tests on Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term corrosion tests were performed on sintered magnets in an environment similar to their working conditions. It was found that the corrosion process proceeds faster for magnets containing higher Nd contents. A small degree of oxidation slows down the corrosion rate and improves the corrosion resistance. However, high oxidation of magnets leads to degradation of the microstructure and the magnetic

Waldemar Kaszuwara; Marcin Leonowicz

1999-01-01

117

Assessing corrosion problems in photovoltaic cells via electrochemical stress testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of accelerated electrochemical experiments to study the degradation properties of polyvinylbutyral-encapsulated silicon solar cells has been carried out. The cells' electrical performance with silk screen-silver and nickel-solder contacts was evaluated. The degradation mechanism was shown to be electrochemical corrosion of the cell contacts; metallization elements migrate into the encapsulating material, which acts as an ionic conducting medium. The corrosion products form a conductive path which results in a gradual loss of the insulation characteristics of the encapsulant. The precipitation of corrosion products in the encapsulant also contributes to its discoloration which in turn leads to a reduction in its transparency and the consequent optical loss. Delamination of the encapsulating layers could be attributed to electrochemical gas evolution reactions. The usefulness of the testing technique in qualitatively establishing a reliability difference between metallizations and antireflection coating types is demonstrated.

Shalaby, H.

1985-01-01

118

Fast Flux Test Facility Instrumentation Requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the major irradiation test facility planned for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Program. This paper discusses the facility instrumentation requirements, placing particular emphasis on out-of-core instrumentation. In-core instrumentation requirements are described in more general terms due to their greater dependence on reactor concept decisions. Out-of-reactor instrumentation requirements included in these discussions

C. D. Swanson

1969-01-01

119

Corrosivity Test Methods for Polymeric Materials. Part 3- Modified DIN Test Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the third in a series of papers to investigate corrosivity test methods published by the Polyolefins Fire Performance Council, an operating unit of The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. In the first paper, 24 polymeric materials were evaluated for smoke corrosivity following the \\

James G. Bennett; Stephen L. Kessel; Charles E. Rogers

1994-01-01

120

The LSP/SNI Test Facility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Vendors implementing Standard Network Interconnection (SNI) protocols for computer to computer communications can now test their implementation against the Linked Systems Project/SNI Test Facility developed by Library of Congress. The facility is intended to verify correct functioning of SNI protocols for Open System Interconnection (OSI) layers.…

Denenberg, Ray

1986-01-01

121

Packaging test facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many unique facilities exist at Sandia National Laboratories which can be used for completing a range of performance tests on radioactive material packagings or component sections. Both regulatory and extra-regulatory test environments can be simulated. Key factors in the successful utilization of these facilities are the analysis, instrumentation, and support services available and the experience base that has been established

G. C. Allen; D. C. Bickel; F. H. Mathews; N. R. Keltner

1983-01-01

122

Lead Coolant Test Facility Development Workshop  

SciTech Connect

A workshop was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on May 25, 2005, to discuss the development of a next generation lead or lead-alloy coolant test facility. Attendees included representatives from the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) program, Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, and several universities. Several participants gave presentations on coolant technology, existing experimental facilities for lead and lead-alloy research, the current LFR design concept, and a design by Argonne National Laboratory for an integral heavy liquid metal test facility. Discussions were focused on the critical research and development requirements for deployment of an LFR demonstration test reactor, the experimental scope of the proposed coolant test facility, a review of the Argonne National Laboratory test facility design, and a brief assessment of the necessary path forward and schedule for the initial stages of this development project. This report provides a summary of the presentations and roundtable discussions.

Paul A. Demkowicz

2005-06-01

123

Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

1998-01-01

124

Galvanic corrosion testing using electrochemical and immersion techniques  

SciTech Connect

This activity plan is prepared in accordance with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Yucca Mountain Project procedure 033.YMP-QP 3.0, ?Scientific Investigation Control.? This plan is written for activity E-20-46, entitled ?Galvanic Corrosion Testing,? which is a part of the Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) ?Metal Barrier Selection and Testing? (SIP-CM-01, Rev 2, CN SIP-CM-01-2-l).

Roy, A

1996-07-09

125

[Corrosion testing of high level radioactive waste. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Alloys under consideration as candidates for the high level nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain were exposed to a range of corrosion conditions and their performance measured. The alloys tested were Incoloy 825, 70/30 Copper-Nickel, Monel 400, Hastelloy C- 22, and low carbon steel. The test conditions varied were: temperature, concentration, agitation, and crevice simulation. Only in the case of carbon steel was significant attack noted. This attack appeared to be transport limited.

NONE

1996-06-01

126

CIF (Consolidated Incineration Facility) offgas components test facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is planned for start-up at the Savannah River Site in 1993. The CIF has a unique offgas system design utilizing state-of-the-art technology and experience gained from other radioactive\\/hazardous waste incinerators. A high efficiency steam-atomized offgas scrubber with separate quench and scrubber liquid recirculation loops will be used. The Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1:10

1990-01-01

127

Buffet test in the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A buffet test of a commercial transport model was accomplished in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. This aeroelastic test was unprecedented for this wind tunnel and posed a high risk to the facility. This paper presents the test results from a structural dynamics and aeroelastic response point of view and describes the activities required for the safety analysis and risk assessment. The test was conducted in the same manner as a flutter test and employed onboard dynamic instrumentation, real time dynamic data monitoring, automatic, and manual tunnel interlock systems for protecting the model. The procedures and test techniques employed for this test are expected to serve as the basis for future aeroelastic testing in the National Transonic Facility. This test program was a cooperative effort between the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company and the NASA Langley Research Center.

Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Hergert, Dennis W.; Butler, Thomas W.; Herring, Fred M.

1992-01-01

128

Systems test facilities existing capabilities compilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Systems test facilities (STFS) to test total photovoltaic systems and their interfaces are described. The systems development (SD) plan is compilation of existing and planned STFs, as well as subsystem and key component testing facilities. It is recommended that the existing capabilities compilation is annually updated to provide and assessment of the STF activity and to disseminate STF capabilities, status and availability to the photovoltaics program.

Weaver, R.

1981-01-01

129

Single tube hydride heat exchanger test facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heat exchanger tests were conducted to develop heat transfer data which would be needed to design a reasonably optimal HYCSOS device. To meet this primary objective, it was necessary to: (1) design and construct a test facility suitable for small scale heat transfer testing; (2) design and construct several representations of proposed HYCSOS heat exchangers; (3) test these designs under

H. P. Egbert; J. S. Horowitz; G. M. Warapius

1979-01-01

130

Advanced launch system Component Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Upgrading of existing test facilities required for development of liquid fuel rocket engines for advanced launch systems is discussed. The Component Test Facility (CTF) for testing generators and turbopumps assemblies of the future engine is presented with emphasis on design criteria, design, test frequency, test duration, safety, and operational issues of the cryogenic propellant and high-pressure gas systems. Attention is also given to methods of controlling propellant temperatures and flows to the test components; pressurization of propellants accomplished with high-pressure hydrogen and nitrogen gases; and use of high-pressure pumps and vaporizers, which convert liquid nitrogen and hydrogen to gases at pressures up to 15,000 psig.

Pitalo, Gerald A.

1991-01-01

131

Status of the Large Coil Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is serving as the focus for international collaboration in the development of superconducting toroidal field coils. The United States is providing the test facility and three test coils. EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland are each providing one coil, to be tested in a six-coil compact torus. Construction of the LCTF was completed in November 1983 within the $35.75 million budget established in December 1980. Concurrently with the later stages of construction, the vacuum system, the liquid nitrogen system, and the helium refrigeration system were operated in acceptance and performance tests. Two test coils with bath-cooled windings were received and installed by October 1983. Shakedown of the integrated facility systems and limited testing of the two coils are beginning in December 1983. Preparations have been made for installation of the other four test coils, which are now nearing completion in Europe and the United States.

Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; May, J.R.; Miller, H.E.

1983-01-01

132

Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is desirable to employ a corrosion screening test for catalyst or support candidates for the fuel cell cathode before entering upon optimization of the candidate or of the catalytic electrode. To this end, corrosion test electrodes, intended for complete immersion and maximum wetting, have been made with 30 to 40 vol. pct Teflon; with perovskites this is about 10 to 15 pct. The candidates were synthesized by methods intended for single-phase product without special emphasis on high surface area, although the substances tested were no coarser than 2 m squared/g. A typical loading was 25 mg/cm sq of the pure substance, usually on gold screen, a few mm squared of which were left bare for contacting. Contact to the gold lead wire was made by welding with a micro-torch or a spot-welder. Corrosion testing consisted of obtaining current-voltage data under flowing inert gas in the potential region for reduction of O2. The electrode was immersed in 30 pct KOH. Observations were made at 20 C and 80 C, and the results compared with data from gold standards. Results with some perovskites, pyrochlores, spinels, and interstitial compounds will be discussed.

Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

1989-12-01

133

Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is desirable to employ a corrosion screening test for catalyst or support candidates for the fuel cell cathode before entering upon optimization of the candidate or of the catalytic electrode. To this end, corrosion test electrodes, intended for complete immersion and maximum wetting, have been made with 30 to 40 vol. pct Teflon; with perovskites this is about 10 to 15 pct. The candidates were synthesized by methods intended for single-phase product without special emphasis on high surface area, although the substances tested were no coarser than 2 m squared/g. A typical loading was 25 mg/cm sq of the pure substance, usually on gold screen, a few mm squared of which were left bare for contacting. Contact to the gold lead wire was made by welding with a micro-torch or a spot-welder. Corrosion testing consisted of obtaining current-voltage data under flowing inert gas in the potential region for reduction of O2. The electrode was immersed in 30 pct KOH. Observations were made at 20 C and 80 C, and the results compared with data from gold standards. Results with some perovskites, pyrochlores, spinels, and interstitial compounds will be discussed.

Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

1989-01-01

134

Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current/voltage data was obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consists of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to fully evaluate this approach to corrosion screening. Corrosion test screening of candidates for the oxygen reduction electrode of the alkaline fuel cell was applied to two substances, the pyrochlore Pb2Ru2O6.5 and the spinel NiCo2O4. The substrate gold screen and a sample of the IFC Orbiter Pt-Au performance electrode were included as blanks. The pyrochlore data indicate relative stability, although nothing yet can be said about long term stability. The spinel was plainly unstable. For this type of testing to be validated, comparisons will have to be made with long term performance tests.

Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

1989-01-01

135

Fast flux test facility hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for the Fast Flux Test Facility on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

Sutton, L.N.

1994-10-24

136

Description of Liquid Nitrogen Experimental Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Liquid Nitrogen Test Facility is a unique test facility for ground-based liquid nitrogen experimentation. The test rig consists of an insulated tank of approximately 12.5 cubic ft in volume, which is supplied with liquid nitrogen from a 300 gal dewar via a vacuum jacketed piping system. The test tank is fitted with pressure and temperature measuring instrumentation, and with two view ports which allow visual observation of test conditions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility, the initial test program is briefly described. The objective of the test program is to measure the condensation rate by injecting liquid nitrogen as a subcooled spray into the ullage of a tank 50 percent full of liquid nitrogen at saturated conditions. The condensation rate of the nitrogen vapor on the subcooled spray can be analytically modeled, and results validated and corrected by experimentally measuring the vapor condensation on liquid sprays.

Jurns, John M.; Jacobs, Richard E.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

1991-01-01

137

Buffet test in the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A buffet test of a commercial transport model was accomplished in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. This aeroelastic test was unprecedented for this wind tunnel and posed a high risk for the facility. Presented here are the test results from a structural dynamics and aeroelastic response point of view. The activities required for the safety analysis and risk assessment are described. The test was conducted in the same manner as a flutter test and employed on-board dynamic instrumentation, real time dynamic data monitoring, and automatic and manual tunnel interlock systems for protecting the model.

Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Hergert, Dennis W.; Butler, Thomas W.; Herring, Fred M.

1992-01-01

138

The Mars Science Laboratory Touchdown Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Touchdown Test Program for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, a facility was developed to use a full-scale rover vehicle and an overhead winch system to replicate the Skycrane landing event.

White, Christopher; Frankovich, John; Yates, Phillip; Wells Jr, George H.; Losey, Robert

2009-01-01

139

Cryogenics for the Superconducting Module Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A group of laboratories and universities, with Fermilab taking the lead, are constructing a superconducting cryomodule test facility (SMTF) in the Meson Detector Building (MDB) area at Fermilab. The facility will be used for testing and validating designs for both pulsed and CW systems. A multi phase approach is taken to construct the facility. For the initial phase of the project, cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule will be supplied from the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. A cryogenic distribution system to supply cryogens from CTF to MDB is under construction. This paper describes plans, status and challenges of the initial phase of the SMTF cryogenic system.

Klebaner, A. L.; Theilacker, J. C.

2006-04-01

140

40 CFR 160.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Inspection of a testing facility. 160...of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS... Inspection of a testing facility. (a) A testing...

2012-07-01

141

40 CFR 160.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Inspection of a testing facility. 160...of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS... Inspection of a testing facility. (a) A testing...

2013-07-01

142

40 CFR 160.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Inspection of a testing facility. 160...of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS... Inspection of a testing facility. (a) A testing...

2011-07-01

143

Radiation effects test facility at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The beam line end station, associated instrumentation and dosimetry used at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility for radiation effects research and testing with up to 200 MeV protons are described. Access to beam for radiation effects studies is greatly enhanced by the capability to share beam with other users on a millisecond time scale. Use of shared beam mandates that

C. C. Foster; S. L. Casey; A. L. Johnson; P. Miesle; N. Sifri; A. H. Skees; K. M. Murray

1997-01-01

144

Integrated Disposal Facility FY 2012 Glass Testing Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

PNNL is conducting work to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility for Hanford immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program, PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. Key activities in FY12 include upgrading the STOMP/eSTOMP codes to do near-field modeling, geochemical modeling of PCT tests to determine the reaction network to be used in the STOMP codes, conducting PUF tests on selected glasses to simulate and accelerate glass weathering, developing a Monte Carlo simulation tool to predict the characteristics of the weathered glass reaction layer as a function of glass composition, and characterizing glasses and soil samples exhumed from an 8-year lysimeter test. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and the first quarter of FY 2013 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of LAW glasses.

Pierce, Eric M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Krogstad, Eirik J.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Crum, Jarrod V.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2013-03-29

145

Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall  

SciTech Connect

The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which various insulation materials were installed. The panel was located in an environmental chamber. The test samples included various cellulosic, glass fiber and rockwool insulations as well as sterile cotton as a control. Steel and copper coupons together with water-cooled copper pipes were embedded in the insulation and exposed for 6 months. It was found that moisture absorption by the insulation was the primary factor in causing corrosion but required that chemical activity from insulation components also be present. No corrosion occurred in the absence of insulation or in rockwool and glassfiber insulation. All cellulose insulations caused some corrosion. Mostly this was minimal but in a few cases severe pitting resulted. Such behavior of the cellulose did not correspond to previous laboratory test results in saturated insulation or leachants made from the insulation. However, laboratory testing of leachants made from some of the cellulose after the simulated wall test showed a change in pitting tendency, suggesting that time and/or exposure to moisture can change the corrosiveness. This should be further explored. 12 refs., 9 figs, 3 tabs.

Sheppard, K.; Weil, R.; Desjarlais, A.

1988-09-01

146

Temporary (mobile) storage testing facilities  

E-print Network

during grid distur- bances, manufacturers and utility grid operators need to perform a series of tests frequency during situations when they need additional energy quickly, and after design modifications and to a matrix of electronic and mechanical storage devices, all of which are located within close proximity

147

Integrated Geothermal Well Testing: Test Objectives and Facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new and highly integrated geothermal well test program was designed for three geothermal operators in the US (MCR, RGI and Mapco Geothermal). This program required the design, construction and operation of new well test facilities. The main objectives of the test program and facilities are to investigate the critical potential and worst problems associated with the well and produced fluids in a period of approximately 30 days. Field and laboratory investigations are required to determine and quantify the problems of fluid production, utilization and reinjection. The facilities are designed to handle a flow rate from a geothermal well of one million pounds per hour at a wellhead temperature of approximately 268 C (515 F). The facilities will handle an entire spectrum of temperature and rate conditions up to these limits. All pertinent conditions for future fluid exploitations can be duplicated with these facilities, thus providing critical information at the very early stages of field development. The new well test facilities have been used to test high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley of California. The test facilities still have some problems which should be solvable. The accomplishments of this new and highly integrated geothermal well test program are described in this paper.

Nicholson, R. W.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01

148

Recommissioning the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Center of Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE) was established under the technical direction of Dr. James E. Beavers with a mandate to assess, by analyses and testing, the seismic capacity of building structures that house sensitive processes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This mandate resulted in a need to recommission the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility (STF) at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, which had been shutdown for 6 years. This paper documents the history of the facility and fives some salient construction, operation, and performance details of its 8-ton, 20-foot center of gravity payload bi-axial seismic simulator. A log of activities involved in the restart of this valuable resource is included as Table 1. Some of problems and solutions associated with recommissioning the facility under a relatively limited budget are included. The unique attributes of the shake table are discussed. The original mission and performance requirements are compared to current expanded mission and performance capabilities. Potential upgrades to further improve the capabilities of the test facility as an adjunct to the CNPE are considered. Additional uses for the facility are proposed, including seismic qualification testing of devices unique to enrichment technologies and associated hazardous waste treatment and disposal processes. In summary, the STF restart in conjunction with CNPE has added a vital, and unique facility to the list of current national resources utilized for earthquake engineering research and development. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Wynn, C.C. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Brewer, D.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01

149

High pressure turbomachinery ground test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Turbomachinery test facilities are at present scarce to non-existent world-wide. The turbomachinery test facility at Stennis Space Center will provide for advanced development and research and development capabilities for liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen propellant rocket engine components. The facility will provide ultra-high pressure via gas generators to deliver the needed turbine drive on various turbomachinery. State of the art process control systems will provide the vital pressure, temperature and flow requirements during tests. These systems will better control adverse transient conditions during start-up and shutdown, and by using advanced control theory, as well as incorporate test article health monitoring. Also, digital data acquisition systems will obtain high frequency (up to 20 KHz) and low frequency (up to 1 KHz) data during the test. Pressures of up to 15,000 psi will be generated to pressurize high pressure tanks supplying cryogens to various test article inlets thus pushing turbopump materials and manufacturing processes to their limits. By planning for future projects the test facility will be easily adaptable to multi-program test configurations over a range of thermodynamic positions.

Scheuermann, Patrick E.

1992-01-01

150

40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Testing facility management...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS...Personnel § 160.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility...

2012-07-01

151

40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Testing facility management...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS...Personnel § 160.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility...

2010-07-01

152

40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Testing facility management...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS...Personnel § 792.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility...

2013-07-01

153

40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Testing facility management...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS...Personnel § 160.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility...

2013-07-01

154

40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Testing facility management...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS...Personnel § 792.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility...

2012-07-01

155

40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Testing facility management...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS...Personnel § 792.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility...

2011-07-01

156

40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Testing facility management...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS...Personnel § 160.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility...

2011-07-01

157

40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.  

...2014-07-01 false Testing facility management...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS...Personnel § 792.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility...

2014-07-01

158

A Technique for Dynamic Corrosion Testing in Liquid Lead Alloys  

SciTech Connect

An experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials to be used in liquid lead alloy cooled reactors has been designed. This experimental project is part of a larger research effort between Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology to investigate the suitability of lead, lead-bismuth, and other lead alloys for cooling fast reactors designed to produce low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The INEEL forced convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The gas flow rates, heat input, and shroud and vessel dimensions have been adjusted so that a controlled coolant flow rate, temperature, and oxygen potential are created within the downcomer located between the shroud and vessel wall. The ATHENA computer code was used to design the experimental apparatus and estimate the fluid conditions. The corrosion cell will test steel that is commercially available in the U. S. to temperatures above 650oC.

Loewen, Eric Paul; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2001-04-01

159

Integrated Disposal Facility FY2011 Glass Testing Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility (e.g., source term). Vitrifying the low-activity waste at Hanford is expected to generate over 1.6 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} of glass (Certa and Wells 2010). The volume of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at Hanford is the largest in the DOE complex and is one of the largest inventories (approximately 8.9 x 10{sup 14} Bq total activity) of long-lived radionuclides, principally {sup 99}Tc (t{sub 1/2} = 2.1 x 10{sup 5}), planned for disposal in a low-level waste (LLW) facility. Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, in order to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2011 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of low-activity waste glasses.

Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Windisch, Charles F.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-29

160

LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development of the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in alkaline solutions.

Zapp, P.

2010-12-16

161

Cyrogenic testing of 100 m superconducting power transmission test facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This follow-up study to the 1980 tests of a three-expander configuration are the final tests of the cryogenic system designed to cool the facility for testing 100 m superconducting power transmission cables. The system was modified to incorporate a fourth turbo expander remote from the refrigerator at the far end of the load. The system is described with a flow

R. J. Gibbs; J. E. Jensen; R. A. Thomas

1982-01-01

162

Startup of Large Coil Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils.

Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

1984-01-01

163

Standard practice for conducting atmospheric corrosion tests on metals  

E-print Network

1.1 This practice covers and defines conditions for exposure of metals and alloys to the weather. It sets forth the general procedures that should be followed in any atmospheric test. It is presented as an aid in conducting atmospheric corrosion tests so that some of the pitfalls of such testing may be avoided. As such, it is concerned mainly with panel exposures to obtain data for comparison purposes. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01

164

Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the

N. R. Sorensen; M. A. Molecke

1992-01-01

165

Modular Test Facility for HTS Insert Coils  

Microsoft Academic Search

The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields in the range of 40-50 T. In this paper we will present a modular test facility developed to investigate very high fields using double pancake coils made of commercially available 2G HTS materials. The conductor performance is presented, together with magnetic calculations and

V. Lombardo; A. Bartalesi; E. Barzi; M. Lamm; D. Turrioni; A. V. Zlobin

2010-01-01

166

Central receiver test facility assembly building  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The passively solar heated Assembly Building located at the Central Receiver Test Facility and its performance during a one-year data acquisition period are described. The effect of the air changes per hour on the solar savings fraction as well as the performance of the south facing thermal storage wall when supplementally illuminated are detailed.

Maxwell, C. R.; Holmes, J. T.

1982-01-01

167

The Test and Evaluation Facility, Cincinnati, Ohio  

EPA Science Inventory

The Test and Evaluation Facility (T&E) is located on the grounds of Cincinnati?s Mill Creek wastewater treatment plant. There, studies are conducted on new treatment technologies for contaminants in water and wastewater for EPA?s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NR...

168

Hot helium flow test facility summary report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a study conducted to assess the feasibility and cost of modifying an existing circulator test facility (CTF) at General Atomic Company (GA). The CTF originally was built to test the Delmarva Power and Light Co. steam-driven circulator. This circulator, as modified, could provide a source of hot, pressurized helium for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) component testing. To achieve this purpose, a high-temperature impeller would be installed on the existing machine. The projected range of tests which could be conducted for the project is also presented, along with corresponding cost considerations.

Not Available

1980-06-01

169

Test facilities for high power electric propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electric propulsion has applications for orbit raising, maneuvering of large space systems, and interplanetary missions. These missions involve propulsion power levels from tenths to tens of megawatts, depending upon the application. General facility requirements for testing high power electric propulsion at the component and thrust systems level are defined. The characteristics and pumping capabilities of many large vacuum chambers in the United States are reviewed and compared with the requirements for high power electric propulsion testing.

Sovey, James S.; Vetrone, Robert H.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Myers, Roger M.; Parkes, James E.

1991-01-01

170

ANL Solids\\/Gas Flow Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Solids\\/Gas Flow Test Facility (S\\/GFTF) has been designed and constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to promote development, testing, evaluation, and calibration of instruments, not currently available but ultimately needed, for advanced large-scale coal-conversion and combustion plants. This instrument effort is part of a program in instrumentation and process control for coal conversion at ANL funded by the United

L. R. Dates; J. P. Bobis

1982-01-01

171

Assessment of a hot hydrogen nuclear propulsion fuel test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subsequent to the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), several studies and review groups have identified nuclear thermal propulsion as a high priority technology for development. To achieve the goals of SEI to place man on Mars, a nuclear rocket will operate at near 2700 K and in a hydrogen environment at near 60 atmospheres. Under these conditions, the operational lifetime of the rocket will be limited by the corrosion rate at the hydrogen/fuel interface. Consequently, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been evaluating requirements and design issues for a test facility. The facility will be able to directly heat fuel samples by electrical resistance, microwave deposition, or radio frequency induction heating to temperatures near 3000 K. Hydrogen gas at variable pressure and temperatures will flow through the samples. The thermal gradients, power density, and operating times envisioned for nuclear rockets will be duplicated as close as reasonable. The post sample flow stream will then be scrubbed and cooled before reprocessing. The baseline design and timetable for the facility will be discussed.

Watanabe, H. H.; Howe, S. D.; Wantuck, P. J.

172

Assessment of a hot hydrogen nuclear propulsion fuel test facility  

SciTech Connect

Subsequent to the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), several studies and review groups have identified nuclear thermal propulsion as a high priority technology for development. To achieve the goals of SEI to place man on Mars, a nuclear rocket will operate at near 2700K and in a hydrogen environment at near 60 atmospheres. Under these conditions, the operational lifetime of the rocket will be limited by the corrosion rate at the hydrogen/fuel interface. Consequently, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been evaluating requirements and design issues for a test facility. The facility will be able to directly heat fuel samples by electrical resistance, microwave deposition, or radio frequency induction heating to temperatures near 3000K. Hydrogen gas at variable pressure and temperatures will flow through the samples. The thermal gradients, power density, and operating times envisioned for nuclear rockets will be duplicated as close as reasonable. The post-sample flow stream will then be scrubbed and cooled before reprocessing. The baseline design and timetable for the facility will be discussed. 7 refs.

Watanabe, H.H.; Howe, S.D.; Wantuck, P.J.

1991-01-01

173

CIF (Consolidated Incineration Facility) offgas components test facility  

SciTech Connect

The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is planned for start-up at the Savannah River Site in 1993. The CIF has a unique offgas system design utilizing state-of-the-art technology and experience gained from other radioactive/hazardous waste incinerators. A high efficiency steam-atomized offgas scrubber with separate quench and scrubber liquid recirculation loops will be used. The Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1:10 scale CIF offgas system, will evaluate operating performance of the proposed CIF system design. The primary objectives for the OCTF include demonstration of system operability, equipment performance evaluation, and CIF start-up support. The OCTF will also demonstrate to the public our commitment to operate the CIF in a manner that meets all environmental emission requirements. The CIF will treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes, and reduce the volume of low-level beta-gamma contaminated wastes. This facility can process 560,000 ft{sup 3}/yr of variability in physical and chemical characteristics of the waste feed, a rotary kiln with a secondary combustion chamber and wet offgas scrubbing system was selected. This design will insure maximum processing versatility. 1 fig.

Burns, D.B.

1990-11-01

174

A rapid stress-corrosion test for aluminum alloys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stressed alloy specimens are immersed in a salt-dichromate solution at 60 degrees C. Because of the minimal general corrosion of these alloys in this solution, stress corrosion failures are detected by low-power microscopic examination.

Helfrich, W. J.

1968-01-01

175

Facilities for the study of behaviour in corrosive atmospheres and their application to thermal and photovoltaic converters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The various materials used for flat plate collectors and solar cells and modules for domestic use in Europe are reviewed, together with the available environmental hazards to the devices and test equipment used to verify the long-term behavior of the solar energy conversion systems. The flat plates feature coatings on the absorber surface and a fluid flow to transfer the heat. Solar cells considered consist mainly of Si materials, both polycrystalline and monocrystalline, metallic electrical contacts, and the module material encapsulating the cells. Corrosive effects on the equipment are caused by hot and humid weather, salts in the air, temperature cycling, and acid droplets formed from hydrocarbon-based fuel burning. The AT-1 test facility is described, noting its capability of simulating exposure to cyclic damp heat, SO2, salt mist, and atmospheric ozone.

Weisgerber, P.

176

Jet-in-slit test for reproducing flow-induced localized corrosion on copper alloys  

SciTech Connect

Valve seat rings of water taps made of copper alloys occasionally suffer corrosion damage as a result of water quality and fluid flow. Examination of the damage mechanisms and development of a testing method for selecting durable materials were requested. To solve these problems, 10 copper alloys were examined using three test methods under accelerated, but well-known experimental conditions: the ISO 6509 dezincification test for pure corrosion, the vibratory cavitation test with eccentric stationary specimen for cavitation erosion-corrosion, and the jet-in-slit test agreed with rankings determined by experiences of field engineers who have dealt with these problems under practical conditions. It was concluded that damage on the valve seats was caused by flow-induced localized corrosion. The jet-in-slit test was recommended as a reliable method in selecting durable valve seat materials. To explain the excellent coincidence with field performance in the jet-in-slit test, the mechanism of corrosion rate acceleration, characteristics of flow-induced localized corrosion, and composition of the protective corrosion products layer were investigated. Under the test conditions, the corrosion reaction mechanism was found to be the same as in the field, but the corrosion rate was accelerated.

Matsumura, M.; Noishiki, K. [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Sakamoto, A. [Mitsui Petrochemical Industries, Ltd., Yamaguchi (Japan)

1998-01-01

177

HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

2005-08-01

178

Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for erosion conducted for a direct impingement flow geometry. Reasonably good agreement between the experimental and predicted erosion-corrosion penetration rates was found.

Rincon, Hernan E.

179

Advanced nozzle and engine components test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test facility for conducting scaled advanced nozzle and engine component research is described. The CE-22 test facility, located in the Engine Research Building of the NASA Lewis Research Center, contains many systems for the economical testing of advanced scale-model nozzles and engine components. The combustion air and altitude exhaust systems are described. Combustion air can be supplied to a model up to 40 psig for primary air flow, and 40, 125, and 450 psig for secondary air flow. Altitude exhaust can be simulated up to 48,000 ft, or the exhaust can be atmospheric. Descriptions of the multiaxis thrust stand, a color schlieren flow visualization system used for qualitative flow analysis, a labyrinth flow measurement system, a data acquisition system, and auxiliary systems are discussed. Model recommeded design information and temperature and pressure instrumentation recommendations are included.

Beltran, Luis R.; Del Roso, Richard L.; Del Rosario, Ruben

1992-01-01

180

Advanced nozzle and engine components test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test facility for conducting scaled advanced nozzle and engine component research is described. The CE-22 test facility, located in the Engine Research Building of the NASA Lewis Research Center, contains many systems for the economical testing of advanced scale-model nozzles and engine components. The combustion air and altitude exhaust systems are described. Combustion air can be supplied to a model up to 40 psig for primary air flow, and 40, 125, and 450 psig for secondary air flow. Altitude exhaust can be simulated up to 48,000 ft, or the exhaust can be atmospheric. Descriptions of the multiaxis thrust stand, a color schlieren flow visualization system used for qualitative flow analysis, a labyrinth flow measurement system, a data acquisition system, and auxiliary systems are discussed. Model recommended design information and temperature and pressure instrumentation recommendations are included.

Beltran, Luis R.; Delroso, Richard L.; Delrosario, Ruben

1992-01-01

181

Optical testing cryogenic thermal vacuum facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The construction of a turnkey cryogenic vacuum test facility was recently completed. The facility will be used to measure and record the surface profile of large diameter and 540 kg optics under simulated space conditions. The vacuum test chamber is a vertical stainless steel cylinder with a 3.5 diameter and a 7 m tangent length. The chamber was designed to maximize optical testing quality by minimizing the vibrations between the laser interferometer and the test specimen. This was accomplished by designing the chamber for a high natural frequency and vibration isolating the chamber. An optical test specimen is mounted on a movable presentation stage. During thermal vacuum testing, the specimen may be positioned to + or - 0.00025 cm accuracy with a fine adjustment mechanism. The chamber is evacuated by a close coupled Roots-type blower and rotary vane pump package and two cryopumps. The chamber is equipped with an optically dense gaseous nitrogen cooled thermal shroud. The thermal shroud is used to cool or warm the optical test specimen at a controlled rate. A control system is provided to automatically evacuate the chamber and cooldown the test specimen to the selected control temperature.

Dohogne, Patrick W.; Carpenter, Warren A.

1990-01-01

182

Behavior of painted steel and aluminum sheet in laboratory corrosion tests  

SciTech Connect

Cold rolled steel, electrogalvanized steel (60 g/m{sup 2} coating), and three aluminum-alloy (2036, 5182, and 6111) sheet products were painted with a full automotive paint system. These materials were tested in two laboratory cyclic corrosion test environments, namely, GM9540Ps(B) and CCT-4. Resistance to cosmetic corrosion was measured in terms of underfilm paint delamination on scribed, flat panels. Crevice corrosion resistance was determined in terms of pitting on lapped panels of like materials, and galvanic corrosion resistance in terms of pitting on lapped panels of unlike materials. Cosmetic corrosion of the aluminum alloys was found to be much better than that of cold rolled, and slightly better than that of electrogalvanized steel. The CCT-IV test was found to be more severe than GM9540P(B) for cosmetic corrosion, but GM9540P(B) was more severe for galvanic corrosion. Galvanic current measurements indicate that the difference is related to the salt solutions used in each test. Aluminum alloys were found to be prone to crevice corrosion and to galvanic corrosion when coupled to steel. These results indicate that comparative evaluations of the corrosion resistance of these materials must take into account the possibility of crevice and galvanic effects.

Townsend, H.E. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States). Homer Research Labs.

1995-11-01

183

Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two secure control centers. This system also includes an automated ground truth capability that consists of differential Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receivers on test vehicles and live TV coverage of critical road sections. Finally there is a high-speed, secure computer network link between the control centers and the Air Force`s Theater Air Command and Control Simulation Facility in Albuquerque NM. The second capability is Bunker 2-300. It is a facility for evaluating advanced sensor systems for monitoring activities in underground cut-and-cover facilities. The main part of the facility consists of an underground bunker with three large rooms for operating various types of equipment. This equipment includes simulated chemical production machinery and controlled seismic and acoustic signal sources. There has been a thorough geologic and electromagnetic characterization of the region around the bunker. Since the facility is in a remote location, it is well-isolated from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference.

Boyer, W.B.; Burke, L.J.; Gomez, B.J.; Livingston, L.; Nelson, D.S.; Smathers, D.C.

1996-12-31

184

A Test Facility for Electric Microthrusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The test facility for electric microthrusters at the European Space Research and Technology Centre is described. The microbalance which is used to directly measure thrust and propellant mass flow rate is able to resolve thrusts of 10?7 N. Within a working range of 5×10?5?5×10?4 N it is estimated that thrust measurements may be made to an accuracy of ±2%.

A. G. Bailey; J. E. Bracher; H. G. Helmke; H. J. von Rohden

1972-01-01

185

CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 & 316L STAINLESS STEEL  

SciTech Connect

The Effluent Treatment Facility has developed a method to regenerate spent resin from the groundwater pump and treat intercepting chrome(VI) plumes (RPP-RPT-32207, Laboratory Study on Regeneration of Spent DOWEX 21K 16-20 Mesh Ion Exchange Resin). Subsequent laboratory studies have shown that the chrome(VI) may be reduced to chrome(III) by titrating with sodium metabisulfite to an oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of +280 mV at a pH of 2. This test plan describes the use of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization techniques to ascertain the electrochemical corrosion and pitting propensity of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing the solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiver tank or concentrate tank.

DUNCAN, J.B.

2007-06-27

186

The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility under Test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Adaptive Optics Facility project has received most of its subsystems in Garching and the ESO Integration Hall has become the central operation location for the next phase of the project. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM will now undergo a series of tests on ASSIST to qualify its optical performance which launches the System Test Phase of the AOF. The tests will validate the AO modules operation with the DSM: first the GRAAL adaptive optics module for Hawk-I in natural guide star AO mode on-axis and then its Ground Layer AO mode. This will be followed by the GALACSI (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and then the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO). We will report on the status of the subsystems at the time of the conference but also on the performance of the delivered ASSIST test bench, the DSM and the 20 Watt Sodium fiber Laser pre-production unit which has validated all specifications before final manufacturing of the serial units. We will also present some considerations and tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jerome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-François; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Abad, Jose; Fischer, Gert; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko

2013-12-01

187

Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities  

E-print Network

Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities 44th AIAA Aerospace Activity (NATA) · Summary #12;Goals Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities · Increase vision and plan · NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) commitment to sustain facilities

188

Corrosion tests in brine and steam from the Salton Sea KGRA  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines tested 13 alloys for resistance to general corrosion, pitting corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking in the brine and steam environments produced from geothermal well Magmamax 1 in the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resources Area in California. The tests provided seven process environments. The alloys most resistant to corrosion in all environments were Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, and stainless steel alloy 29-4. Hastelloys G and S were highly resistant to all types of corrosion decreases with time. The stainless steel alloys 430, E-Brite 26-1, and 6X had good resistance to general corrosion but were susceptible to pitting. Unstressed type 316 L stainless steel exhibited severe cracking. The 1020 carbon and 4130 alloy steels were the least resistant.

Carter, J.P.; McCawley, F.X.

1982-03-01

189

Use of Integrated Test Facilities Adjacent to the Contained Test Facility at INEL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Air Force (USAF) and the Department of Energy have been pursuing for a number of years the development of nuclear power systems that could be used for space nuclear thermal propulsion, space nuclear electrical propulsion, space power systems, and bimodal systems that provide both power and propulsion capability. While federal development of space nuclear systems has waned in recent years as current world economic realities take effect, general interest in space continues to capture those with a vision to the future. This vision that nuclear power and propulsion systems are the key to eventual complete utilization and commercialization of space has led the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to study the feasibility of developing an integrated space nuclear test facility. The INEL approached this issue using existing nuclear facilities with system engineering techniques, to ensure that any modification for one test program would not impact the use of the facility for other space nuclear system. From studies performed over the last couple of years, the Test Area North (TAN) facilities, including the Contained Test Facility (CTF), could be used to support space nuclear power testing at minimum incremental cost for each system with cost sharing for nuclear test across a number of programs, thus no single program would bear the entire cost of a nuclear test complex.

Hill, Thomas J.; Landman, William H.; Ramsthaler, Jack H.; Reed, William C.

1994-07-01

190

Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes, and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr). Pitting did not occur in bare 3003 and 3004 samples during the six month test. Pitting did occur to varying degrees in the Alclad and zinc diffusion treated material, but did not penetrate to the base metal. Biofouling countermeasures (intermittent chlorination and brushing) did not affect the corrosion rates to any significant extent. Intermittent chlorination at a level of 0.5 ppm for 28 minutes daily controlled microbiofouling of the samples but did not prevent the development of a macrobiofouling community in areas of the plumbing with low flow.

Sasscer, D. S.; Morgan, T. O.; Rivera, C.; Ernst, R.; Scott, A. C.; Summerson, T. J.

1982-01-01

191

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01

192

Cyrogenic testing of 100 m superconducting power transmission test facility  

SciTech Connect

This follow-up study to the 1980 tests of a three-expander configuration are the final tests of the cryogenic system designed to cool the facility for testing 100 m superconducting power transmission cables. The system was modified to incorporate a fourth turbo expander remote from the refrigerator at the far end of the load. The system is described with a flow schematic. The tests performed and their results are presented with turbine operating conditions presented in a table. Summary and conclusions are followed by a discussion concerning the thermometry used on the cable and the + or - 10 mK accuracy quoted.

Gibbs, R.J.; Jensen, J.E.; Thomas, R.A.

1982-01-01

193

Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing Facility (PCAT) The Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing facility (PCAT) at Oak Ridge National  

E-print Network

Accelerated Testing facility (PCAT) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee environmental conditions. The tests provide both the manufacturer and utilities with conductor performance dataPowerline Conductor Accelerated Testing Facility (PCAT) Overview: The Powerline Conductor

194

Testing of general and localized corrosion of magnesium alloys: A critical review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The degradation of materials generally occurs via corrosion, fatigue, and wear. Once a magnesium (Mg) alloy is chosen for\\u000a a certain application, corrosion testing is generally required as a function of the expected service environment, the type\\u000a of corrosion expected in service, and the type of surface protection, depending on the material and its use in the intended\\u000a surface. In

Edward Ghali; Wolfgang Dietzel; Karl-Ulrich Kainer

2004-01-01

195

Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin V : Results of Weather-Exposure Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a series of weather exposure tests of sheet duralumin, upon which accelerated corrosion tests in the laboratory by the wet-and-dry corrosion method in a sodium chloride solution has already been carried out, a close parallelism between the results of the two kinds of tests was found to exist. The exposure tests showed that the lack of permanence of sheet duralumin is largely, if not entirely, due to corrosion. A corrosion attack of an intercrystalline nature is very largely responsible for the degree of embrittlement produced. The rate of embrittlement was greatly accelerated by a marine atmosphere and by the tropical climate. Variations in corrosion and embrittlement are noted in relation to heat treatment, cold working, and types of protective coatings.

Rawdon, Henry S

1929-01-01

196

A high-Reynolds-number seal test facility: Facility description and preliminary test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A facility has been developed for testing the leakage and rotordynamic characteristics of interstage-seal configurations for the HPFTP (High Pressure Fuel Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). Axial Reynolds numbers on the order of 400,000 are realized in the test facility by using a Dupont freon fluid called Halon (CBrF3). The kinematic viscosity of Halon is of the same order as the liquid hydrogen used in the HPFTP. Initial testing has focused on the current flight configurations (a three-segment, stepped unit) and a convergent-taper candidate.

Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C.; Noyes, T.; Dressman, J. B.

1982-01-01

197

Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the work of the Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) at NASA Johnson Space Center. It is one of the Space Human Factors Laboratories in the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (SF3) at NASA Johnson Space Center The primary focus pf the UTAF is to perform Human factors evaluation and usability testing of crew / vehicle interfaces. The presentation reviews the UTAF expertise and capabilities, the processes and methodologies, and the equipment available. It also reviews the programs that it has supported detailing the human engineering activities in support of the design of the Orion space craft, testing of the EVA integrated spacesuit, and work done for the design of the lunar projects of the Constellation Program: Altair, Lunar Electric Rover, and Outposts

Wong, Douglas T.

2010-01-01

198

CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENTMACROCELL TESTS  

E-print Network

this contract, including any art, method, process, machine, manufacture, design or composition of matter, or any. Corrosion currents flowing from coated steel to uncoated steel were monitored over a period of 4.5 years. The corrosion rate of coated bars was determined and compared to that of uncoated bars. Forensic examinations

Texas at Austin, University of

199

Field Test of High Temperature Corrosion Sensors in a Waste to Energy Plant  

SciTech Connect

A field trial of electrochemical corrosion rate sensors was conducted over a five month period to monitor fireside corrosion in a waste to energy (WTE) plant. The unique 3-electrode air-cooled corrosion sensors, each including a thermocouple to monitor sensor temperature, were installed in four different ports at approximately the same level of the WTE boiler. A total of twelve sensors were tested, six with electrodes using the carbon steel boiler tube material, and six using the nickel-chromium weld overlay alloy for the electrodes. Corrosion rates and temperatures of the sensors were monitored continuously through the trial. Measurements of sensor thickness loss were used to calibrate the electrochemical corrosion rates. Air cooling of the sensors was found to be necessary in order to bring the sensors to the temperature of the boiler tubes, to better match the corrosion rate of the tubes, and to increase survivability of the sensors and thermocouples. Varying the temperature of the sensors simulated corrosion rates of boiler tubes with steam temperatures above and below that in the actual WTE plant. Temperatures of two of the sensors were successfully held at various controlled temperatures close to the steam temperature for a three hour test period. Corrosion rates of the two materials tested were similar although of different magnitude. An expression relating the corrosion rate of the boiler tube material to the corrosion rate of weld overlay was determined for a 7 day period in the middle of the field trial. Results from the field trial suggest that corrosion rate sensors controlled to the outer waterwall temperature can successfully monitor fireside corrosion in WTE plants and be used as a process control variable by plant operators.

Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Williamson, K.M.

2008-03-16

200

An overview of current activities at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is a description of the United States Department of Energy's National Solar Thermal Test Facility, highlighting current test programs. In the central receiver area, research underway supports commercialization of molten nitrate salt technology, including receivers, thermal energy transport, and corrosion experiments. Concentrator research includes large-area, glass-metal heliostats and stretched-membrane heliostats and dishes. Test activities in support of dish-Stirling systems with reflux receivers are described. Research on parabolic troughs includes characterization of several receiver configurations. Other test facility activities include solar detoxification experiments, design assistance testing of commercially-available solar hardware, and non-DOE-funded work, including thermal exposure tests and testing of volumetric and PV central receiver concepts.

Cameron, C. P.; Klimas, P. C.

201

SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 The TESLA Test Facility FEL team  

E-print Network

SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 The TESLA Test Facility FEL team June 2002, TESLA-FEL 2002-01 #12;SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 Abstract The last description of the TESLA Test Facility FEL has been written in 1995 (TESLA- FEL report 95-03). Since then, many changes have developed

202

NASA Plum Brook's B-2 test facility-Thermal vacuum and propellant test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA's third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of upper stage chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77K. The modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/m2. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface.

Kudlac, Maureen; Weaver, Harold; Cmar, Mark

2012-06-01

203

NASA Plum Brook's B-2 Test Facility: Thermal Vacuum and Propellant Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA's third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of upper stage chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77 K. The modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/sq m. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface.

Kudlac, Maureen T.; Weaver, Harold F.; Cmar, Mark D.

2012-01-01

204

Fast Flux Test Facility noise data management  

SciTech Connect

An extensive collection of spectra from an automated data collection system at the Fast Flux Test Facility has features from neutron data extracted and managed by database software. Inquiry techniques, including screening, applied to database results show the influences of control rods on wideband noise and, more generally, abilities to detect diverse types of off-normal noise. Uncovering a temporary 0.1-Hz resonance shift gave additional diagnostic information on a 13-Hz mechanical motion characterized by the interference of two resonances. The latter phenomenon is discussed generically for possible application to other reactor types.

Not Available

1987-01-01

205

PFBC test facility is ready in Sweden  

SciTech Connect

Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) technology has the potential of producing large-scale coal-based power at a lower cost than burning pulverized coal and without complex back-end flue-gas desulfurization. Outlined here is a PFBC combined-cycle development program and a component-test facility (CTF) in Malmoe, Sweden. The CTF, representing a full-sized scale-up of components, is the final developmental step before building a commercial-sized powerplant in that country. 5 figures, 3 tables.

Friedlander, G.D.

1982-05-01

206

FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility  

SciTech Connect

A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10/sup 21/ to 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/.

Liska, D.J.

1980-01-01

207

DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect

An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy) for an inhibited waste to a range of 5 to 23.4 mpy, depending on sludge chemistry. F-area-based effluents were, in general, more corrosive. Effective corrosion control measures included evaporation, hydroxide additions and mixing with supernates containing a representative supernate chemistry (5 M hydroxide and 1.5 M nitrite). Corrosion rates with these measures were generally 0.2 mpy. The A537 carbon steel was found to be susceptible to pitting when the corrosion control measure involved mixing the ECC effluent with a supernate chemistry having minimal inhibitor concentrations (0.5 M hydroxide and 0.3 M nitrite). Corrosion rates in this case were near 1 mpy.

Mickalonis, J.

2011-08-29

208

Space power distribution system technology. Volume 3: Test facility design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AMPS test facility is a major tool in the attainment of more economical space power. The ultimate goals of the test facility, its primary functional requirements and conceptual design, and the major equipment it contains are discussed.

Decker, D. K.; Cannady, M. D.; Cassinelli, J. E.; Farber, B. F.; Lurie, C.; Fleck, G. W.; Lepisto, J. W.; Messner, A.; Ritterman, P. F.

1983-01-01

209

Performance of zinc phosphate coatings obtained by cathodic electrochemical treatment in accelerated corrosion tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The formation of zinc phosphate coating by cathodic electrochemical treatment and evaluation of its corrosion resistance is addressed. The corrosion behaviour of cathodically phosphated mild steel substrate in 3.5% sodium chloride solution exhibits the stability of these coatings, which lasts for a week's time with no red rust formation. Salt spray test convincingly proves the white rust formation in the

S. Jegannathan; T. S. N. Sankara Narayanan; K. Ravichandran; S. Rajeswari

2005-01-01

210

Portable corrosion electrochem ica l test system ba sed on v irtua l in strumen t  

Microsoft Academic Search

A portable computerized system fo r corrosion rate measurement was established, which consists of a poten2 tiostat based on inverting amp lification circuit and a lap top computer equipped w ith an N I DAQ26024E multifunction card and suitable app lication software. This system is named V irtual CETS ( short for corrosion electrochem ical test system ) . The

Song Shizhe

211

SLAC rf photocathode gun test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A high brightness electron injector is a necessary component for x-ray FELs. A dedicated rf gun test facility is being developed at SLAC to measure the phase space distribution from a photocathode rf gun generated electron beam. This Gun Test Facility will allow optimization of the beam brightness by independently adjusting parameters such as accelerating field, laser pulse shape and total charge. The test facility is comprised of a single S-band klystron, 3 m SLAC linac section, analyzing magnet, diagnostic section, a cathode drive laser and the gun under test. The laser is comprised of a Nd:YLF oscillator and a Nd:glass regenerative amplifier. The light incident on the cathode is capable of both normal and near grazing incidence and is currently frequency quadrupled into the UV. In the near future a Nd:glass oscillator will be installed which will be capable of generating pulses as short as 200 fs. This oscillator will be used to make emittance measurements as a function of the laser pulse width and shape. Both oscillators will be phase-locked to the 24th sub-harmonic of the linac frequency. Emittance measurements will be made downstream of the linac at an electron beam energy of approximately 30 - 50 MeV using a quad scan with a beam profile screen and/or a wire scanner to measure the spot size. A current transformer and a Faraday cup will be used to measure the charge while a streak camera or a transition radiator can be used to measure the micropulse width. The first gun to undergo testing will be the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized cavity gun with a copper cathode. With field gradients in the gun as high as 150 MV/m, using solenoidal emittance compensation and spatial and temporal flat top laser pulses, PARMELA simulations predict normalized emittances of less than 1.5 pi mm-mrad with 10 ps long pulses and 1 nC of charge after acceleration in a 3 meter linac section to about 30 MeV. Appropriate additional acceleration can further reduce the emittance below 1 pi mm-mrad.

Schmerge, John F.; Reis, David A.; Hernandez, Mike; Meyerhofer, David D.; Miller, Roger H.; Palmer, Dennis T.; Weaver, Jim N.; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, A. D.

1997-05-01

212

Facile approach in the development of icephobic hierarchically textured coatings as corrosion barrier  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An anti-corrosion superhydrophobic film with water contact angle greater than 160° on aluminum alloy 6061 substrate was fabricated simply through the spin-coating method applied to Al2O3 nanoparticles doped in silicone rubber solution. The as-obtained sample was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and water contact angle/surface energy measurement. The corrosion behaviour of such coating in the NaCl solutions was investigated using the potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the developed superhydrophobic surface is improved greatly due to the composite wetting states or interfaces with numerous air pockets between its surface and the NaCl solution. This superhydrophobic coating could serve as an effective barrier against aggressive medium. Ice adhesion strength of the as-prepared superhydrophobic coating was also evaluated by measuring its ice adhesion force which was found to have reduced by 4.8 times compared to that of aluminum substrate as reference test.

Momen, G.; Farzaneh, M.

2014-04-01

213

Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

Domack, Marcia S.

1987-01-01

214

Thermal barrier coatings: Burner rig hot corrosion test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Mach 0.3 burner rig test program was conducted to examine the sensitivity of thermal barrier coatings to Na and V contaminated combustion gases simulating potential utility gas turbine environments. Coating life of the standard ZrO2-12Y2O3/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y NASA thermal barrier coating system which was developed for aircraft gas turbines was significantly reduced in such environments. Two thermal barrier coating systems, Ca2SiO4/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y and ZrO2-8Y2O3/Ni-16.4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y and a less insulative cermet coating system, 50 volume percent MgO-50 volume percent Ni-19.6Cr-17.1Al-0.97Y/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y, were identified as having much improved corrosion resistance compared to the standard coating.

Hodge, P. E.; Stecura, S.; Gedwill, M. A.; Zaplatynsky, I.; Levine, S. R.

1978-01-01

215

Vibration Testing for Detecting Internal Corrosion Habib Ammari  

E-print Network

structures. They are either critical to the safety of the pipeline like corrosion, welding cracks, pits, etc and size the defects for repair or replacement management. H.A. is partially supported by the Brain Pool

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

216

Corrosion resistance tests on NiTi shape memory alloy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The corrosion performances of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) in human body simulating fluids were evaluated in comparison with other implant materials. As for the passivity current in potentiostatic conditions, taken as an index of ion release, the values are about three times higher for NiTi than for Ti6Al4V and austenitic stainless steels. Regarding the localized corrosion, while plain potentiodynamic

Gianni Rondelli

1996-01-01

217

Integrated Disposal Facility FY2010 Glass Testing Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility (e.g., source term). Vitrifying the low-activity waste at Hanford is expected to generate over 1.6 × 105 m3 of glass (Puigh 1999). The volume of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at Hanford is the largest in the DOE complex and is one of the largest inventories (approximately 0.89 × 1018 Bq total activity) of long-lived radionuclides, principally 99Tc (t1/2 = 2.1 × 105), planned for disposal in a low-level waste (LLW) facility. Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessement (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, in order to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2010 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of low-activity waste glasses. The emphasis in FY2010 was the completing an evaluation of the most sensitive kinetic rate law parameters used to predict glass weathering, documented in Bacon and Pierce (2010), and transitioning from the use of the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases to Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases computer code for near-field calculations. The FY2010 activities also consisted of developing a Monte Carlo and Geochemical Modeling framework that links glass composition to alteration phase formation by 1) determining the structure of unreacted and reacted glasses for use as input information into Monte Carlo calculations, 2) compiling the solution data and alteration phases identified from accelerated weathering tests conducted with ILAW glass by PNNL and Viteous State Laboratory/Catholic University of America as well as other literature sources for use in geochemical modeling calculations, and 3) conducting several initial calculations on glasses that contain the four major components of ILAW-Al2O3, B2O3, Na2O, and SiO2.

Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Windisch, Charles F.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Serne, R Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.

2010-09-30

218

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-print Network

Facility Layout #12;Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility Federal Transit Administration Mr. Marcel Belanger, Program Manager Equipment Overview The facility

Lee, Dongwon

219

Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program  

SciTech Connect

Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

1998-02-01

220

Behavior of painted steel and aluminum sheet in laboratory automotive corrosion tests  

SciTech Connect

Because of environmental concern and government pressure, automakers are exploring ways to increase the fuel economy of vehicles. Mass reduction can be achieved by substituting plastics, aluminum, or high-strength steel for ordinary grades of steel in the autobody. Estimates of fuel economy increases range from 3% to 7% for each 10% reduction in mass. The use of aluminum for mass reduction currently is receiving considerable attention. Cold-rolled steel, electrogalvanized steel (60 g/m{sup 2} coating), and three aluminum alloy sheet products (Al 2036, Al 5182, and Al 6111) were painted with a full automotive paint system. These materials were tested in two laboratory cyclic corrosion test environments, GM9540P(B) and CCT-IV. Resistance to cosmetic corrosion was measured in terms of underfilm paint delamination on scribed, flat panels. Crevice corrosion resistance was determined in terms of pitting on lapped panels of like materials, and galvanic corrosion resistance was determined in terms of pitting on lapped panels of unlike materials. Cosmetic corrosion of the aluminum alloys was found to be much better than that of cold-rolled steel and slightly better than that of electrogalvanized steel. The CCT-IV test was found to be more severe than GM9540P(B) for cosmetic corrosion, but GM9540P(B) was more severe for galvanic corrosion. Galvanic current measurements indicated the difference was related to the salt solutions used in each test. The aluminum alloys were prone to crevice corrosion and to galvanic corrosion when coupled to steel. Results indicated that comparative evaluations of the corrosion resistance of these materials must take into account the possibility of crevice and galvanic effects.

Townsend, H.E. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States). Homer Research Labs.

1996-01-01

221

Fast Flux Test Facility core system  

SciTech Connect

A review of Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) core system accomplishments provides an excellent road map through the maze of issues that faced reactor designers 10 years ago. At that time relatively large uncertainties were associated with fuel pin and fuel assembly performance, irradiation of structural materials, and performance of absorber assemblies. The extensive core systems irradiation program at the US Department of Energy's Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has addressed each of these principal issues. As a result of the progress made, the attention of long-range LMR planners and designers can shift away from improving core systems and focus on reducing capital costs to ensure the LMR can compete economically in the 21st century with other nuclear reactor concepts. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Ethridge, J.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Baker, R.B.; Leggett, R.D.; Pitner, A.L.; Waltar, A.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-11-01

222

SLAC low emittance accelerator test facility  

SciTech Connect

SLAC is proposing to build a new Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) capable of producing a 50 MeV electron beam with an extremely low geometric tranverse emittance (1.5 x 10/sup -10/ rad.m) for the purpose of testing new methods of acceleration. The low emittance will be achieved by assembling a linear accelerator using one standard SLAC three-meter section and a 400 kV electron gun with a very small photocathode (40 microns in diameter). The photocathode will be illuminated from the back by short bursts (on the order of 6 ps) of visible laser light which will produce bunches of about 10/sup 5/ electrons. Higher currents could be obtained by illuminating the cathode from the front. The gun will be mounted directly against the accelerator section. Calculations show that in the absence of an rf buncher, injection of these 400 keV small radius electron bunches roughly 30/sup 0/ ahead of crest produces negligible transverse emittance growth due to radial rf forces. Acceleration of the electrons up to 50 MeV followed by collimation, energy slits and focusing will provide a 3.2 mm long waist of under 1.5 ..mu..m in diameter where laser acceleration and other techniques can be tested.

Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Sinclair, C.K.

1986-05-01

223

Design and testing of corrosion damaged prestressed concrete joists: the Pescara Benchmark  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental campaign named the Pescara benchmark and devoted to study the dynamic behaviour of corroded p.c. joists has been conducted. The steel corrosion reduces the area of the reinforcement and causes cracking of concrete so that r/c members are subjected to loss of strength and stiffness. It is of interest to evaluate the corrosion level at which the damage can be detected through signal processing procedures and how close such level is to the r/c member safety limits. Joists of current industrial production having different steel to concrete ratios are tested in different laboratory conditions. Dynamic tests involve either free vibrations and forced vibrations due to a moving mass simulating actual traffic loads in railway bridges. The paper discusses the rationale of the tests including the set up of the artificial corrosion, the static characterization of the joist and the dynamic tests in the different stages of corrosion experienced.

Di Evangelista, A.; De Leonardis, A.; Valente, C.; Zuccarino, L.

2011-07-01

224

Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

2006-01-01

225

Design and development of a high-temperature sodium compatibility testing facility  

SciTech Connect

The use of advanced alloys within sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) has been identified as a means of increasing plant efficiency and reducing construction costs. In particular, alloys such as NF-616, NF-709 and HT-UPS are promising because they exhibit greater strength than traditional structural materials such as 316-SS. However, almost nothing is known about the sodium compatibility of these new alloys. Therefore, research taking place at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison is focused on studying the effects of sodium corrosion on these materials under prototypic SFR operating conditions (600 [ deg. C], V Na=10 [m/s], C 0{approx} 1 [wppm]). This paper focuses on the design and construction of the testing facility with an emphasis on moving magnet pumps (MMPs). Corrosion data from a preliminary 500 [hr] natural convection test will also be presented. (authors)

Hvasta, M. G.; Nolet, B. K.; Anderson, M. H. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison - ERB 841, WI 53705 (United States)

2012-07-01

226

Los Alamos studies of the Nevada test site facilities for the testing of nuclear rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Nevada test site geographic location; location of NRDA facilities, area 25; assessment program plan; program goal, scope, and process -- the New Nuclear Rocket Program; nuclear rocket engine test facilities; EMAD Facility; summary of final assessment results; ETS-1 Facility; and facilities cost summary.

Hynes, Michael V.

1993-01-01

227

Nuclear thermal propulsion test facility requirements and development strategy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) subpanel of the Space Nuclear Propulsion Test Facilities Panel evaluated facility requirements and strategies for nuclear thermal propulsion systems development. High pressure, solid core concepts were considered as the baseline for the evaluation, with low pressure concepts an alternative. The work of the NTP subpanel revealed that a wealth of facilities already exists to support NTP development, and that only a few new facilities must be constructed. Some modifications to existing facilities will be required. Present funding emphasis should be on long-lead-time items for the major new ground test facility complex and on facilities supporting nuclear fuel development, hot hydrogen flow test facilities, and low power critical facilities.

Allen, George C.; Warren, John; Clark, J. S.

1991-01-01

228

KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

1973-01-01

229

Tri-Service Thermal Flash Test Facility. Summary Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the status of the Tri-Service Thermal Nuclear Flash Test Facility. It describes the improvements in facility capabilities that were incorporated during the the past 12 months to enhance thermal flash simulation. The report also summa...

B. H. Wilt, R. A. Servais, N. J. Olson

1980-01-01

230

Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility at MSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph shows an overall view of the Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The 20-by 24-ft heliostat mirror, shown at the left, has dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on an 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror (right). The concentrator mirror then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber, shown at the front of concentrator mirror. Researchers at MSFC have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than chemical a combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propell nt. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

1999-01-01

231

EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation.

HALGREN DL

2008-07-30

232

Fabrication of superhydrophobic aluminium alloy surface with excellent corrosion resistance by a facile and environment-friendly method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work develops a facile and environment-friendly method for preparing the superhydrophobic aluminium alloy surface with excellent corrosion resistance. The superhydrophobic aluminium alloy surface is fabricated by the boiling water treatment and stearic acid (STA) modification. Results show that the boiling water treatment endows the aluminium alloy surface with a porous and rough structure, while STA modification chemically grafts the long hydrophobic alkyl chains onto the aluminium alloy surface. Just grounded on the micro- and nano-scale hierarchical structure along with the hydrophobic chemical composition, the superhydrophobic aluminium alloy surface is endued the excellent corrosion resistance.

Feng, Libang; Che, Yanhui; Liu, Yanhua; Qiang, Xiaohu; Wang, Yanping

2013-10-01

233

DOE reports on feasibility of generic oil shale test facility  

SciTech Connect

In order to assess whether an oil shale test facility would be of significant use to private sector oil shale developers, the US DOE has studied the past history of oil shale development and its potential for replacing petroleum supplies. A generic test facility's primary function would be to test concepts of mining, retorting, upgrading, and environmental aspects at the engineering scale. This paper summarizes the US oil shale resources, gives a technology analysis, and discusses the potential for a test facility.

Not Available

1987-03-01

234

NASA Johnson Space Center: White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the testing facilities and laboratories available at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The mission of WSTF is to provide the expertise and infrastructure to test and evaluate spacecraft materials, components and propulsion systems that enable the safe exploration and use of space. There are nine rocket test stands in two major test areas, six altitude test stands, three ambient test stands,

Aggarwal, Pravin; Kowalski, Robert R.

2011-01-01

235

Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG testing will utilize a higher fidelity point kinetics model to control core power transients, and reactivity feedback will be based on localized feedback coefficients and several independent temperature measurements taken within the core block. This paper presents preliminary test results and discusses the methodology that will be implemented in follow-on DDG testing and the additional instrumentation required to implement high fidelity dynamic testing.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

2006-01-01

236

Using the NPSS Environment to Model an Altitude Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An altitude test facility was modeled using Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). This altitude test facility model represents the most detailed facility model developed in the NPSS architecture. The current paper demonstrates the use of the NPSS system to define the required operating range of a component for the facility. A significant number of additional component models were easily developed to complete the model. Discussed in this paper are the additional components developed and what was done in the development of these components.

Lavelle, Thomas M.; Owen, Albert K.; Huffman, Brian C.

2013-01-01

237

A Capable and Temporary Test Facility on a Shoestring Budget: The MSL Touchdown Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Science Laboratory mission (MSL) has undertaken a developmental Touchdown Test Program that utilizes a full-scale rover vehicle and an overhead winch system to replicate the skycrane landing event. Landing surfaces consisting of flat and sloped granular media, planar, rigid surfaces, and various combinations of rocks and slopes were studied. Information gathered from these tests was vital for validating the rover analytical model, validating certain design or system behavior assumptions, and for exploring events and phenomenon that are either very difficult or too costly to model in a credible way. This paper describes this test program, with a focus on the creation of test facility, daily test operations, and some of the challenges faced and lessons learned along the way.

White, Christopher V.; Frankovich, John K.; Yates, Philip; Wells, George, Jr.; Robert, Losey

2008-01-01

238

Health maintenance facility system effectiveness testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Medical Simulations Working Group conducted a series of medical simulations to evaluate the proposed Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) Preliminary Design Review (PDR) configuration. The goal of these simulations was to test the system effectiveness of the HMF PDR configurations. The objectives of the medical simulations are to (1) ensure fulfillment of requirements with this HMF design, (2) demonstrate the conformance of the system to human engineering design criteria, and (3) determine whether undesirable design or procedural features were introduced into the design. The simulations consisted of performing 6 different medical scenarios with the HMF mockup in the KRUG laboratory. The scenarios included representative medical procedures and used a broad spectrum of HMF equipment and supplies. Scripts were written and simulations performed by medical simulations working group members under observation from others. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, debriefings, and videotapes. Results were extracted and listed in the individual reports. Specific issues and recommendations from each simulation were compiled into the individual reports. General issues regarding the PDR design of the HMF are outlined in the summary report.

Lloyd, Charles W.; Gosbee, John; Bueker, Richard; Kupra, Debra; Ruta, Mary

1993-01-01

239

A SUPERCONDUCTING RF VERTICAL TEST FACILITY AT DARESBURY LABORATORY  

Microsoft Academic Search

A superconducting RF vertical test facility (VTF) has been constructed at Daresbury Laboratory for the testing of superconducting RF cavities at 2K. When fully operational, the facility will be capable of testing a 9-cell 1.3 GHz Tesla type cavity. The facility is initially to be configured to perform phase synchronisation experiments between a pair of single cell 3.9GHz ILC crab

P. A. Corlett; R. Bate; C. D. Beard; B. Fell; P. Goudket; S. Pattalwar; G. Burt; A. C. Dexter; M. I. Tahir

240

Argonne`s new Wakefield Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a

1992-01-01

241

Space Simulation, 7th. [facilities and testing techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space simulation facilities and techniques are outlined that encompass thermal scale modeling, computerized simulations, reentry materials, spacecraft contamination, solar simulation, vacuum tests, and heat transfer studies.

1973-01-01

242

A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials  

E-print Network

The EU’s FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the DEMO fusion reactor for ITER, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550°C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum. The entire “TMIF” facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility.

Samec, K.; Kadi, Y.; Luis, R.; Romanets, Y.; Behzad, M.; Aleksan, R.; Bousson, S.

2014-01-01

243

Internal corrosion monitoring of subsea production flowlines -- probe design and testing  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses one technique for acquiring subsea corrosion rate data. Subsea monitoring provides the advantage of measuring the corrosion inhibitor efficacy at the point of injection, rather than inferring performance from platform measurements. The internal condition of pipelines can be monitored in a variety of ways. The optimum monitoring technique will change with pipeline age, location, accessibility, and operating conditions. More importantly, the applicable methods may change based on the type of information required. For evaluation of corrosion inhibitor performance a high-sensitivity corrosion monitor is required. A prototype dual-element, electric-resistance probe has been evaluated for pressure and temperature stability under simulated Britannia subsea operating conditions. The probe functioned well under all conditions over an extensive test period. As expected, temperature had the greatest impact on the stability of the corrosion measurements. Interpretation of the relative response of the dual probes to the variety of test conditions is useful in evaluating the validity of field data and the functionality of the probe. Issues, revealed by the testing program, included anomalous data points and fluid behind the probe elements. The anomalous data were easily identifiable, but disrupted the automated calculation of the corrosion rate. A loose connection caused the anomalous data points. Ingress of fluid behind the probe element is still a concern for long term exposures.

Joosten, M.W.; Kolts, J.; Humble, P.G. [Conoco, Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States); Blakset, T.J. [CorrOcean a.s., Trondheim (Norway); Keilty, D.M. [Britannia Operators Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31

244

Rapid corrosion test for zirconium and zirconium alloy weldments  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of determining corrosion resistance of a zircaloy weld and heat affected zones. It comprises: immersing the zircaloy weld and heat affected zones into a fused salt bath having a temperature above about 400{degrees} C; controlling the temperature of the fused salt bath and duration of the immersion to produce an essentially black oxide film in corrosion resistant zircaloy weld and heat affected zones, while producing a white oxide scale in noncorrosion resistant zircaloy welds and heat affected zones; removing the zircaloy weld and heat affected zones from the salt bath after the duration; and evaluating the oxide produced on the zircaloy weld and heat affected zones for the presence of a white scaling oxide.

Parker, D.W.; Parker, M.A.; Sabol, G.P.; Lloyd, I.K.

1990-02-20

245

Laboratory corrosion tests for simulating fireside wastage of superheater materials in waste incinerators  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory corrosion tests were performed to clarify the effects of relative amounts of fused salts in tube deposits on corrosion rates of superheater materials in WTE plants. All test exposures were at 550 C and of 100 hour duration. The nine synthetic ashes used as corrodents consisted of mixtures of chlorides, sulfates and oxides. The test materials were alloy steel T22, stainless steels TP347H, TP310HCbN, and alloys HR11N and 625. The gas atmosphere consisted of 500 to 3000 ppm HCl-30ppm SO{sub 2}-10%O{sub 2}-10%CO{sub 2}-20%H{sub 2}O-bal.N{sub 2}. Generally, the relative amount of fused salts in non-fused ash constituents at 550 C increased with increasing the chlorine content of the ashes. The corrosion rate of T22 steel did not depend directly on ash chlorine content, but for ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rate depended on the calculated amount of fused salt at 500 C. The corrosion rates of TP347H steel and alloy 625 were maximum for ashes of 6--8 wt%Cl. For ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rates of T22 steel, stainless steels, and alloys increased with ashes having higher amounts of fused salts. Increased HCl content of the gas caused higher corrosion of the stainless steels and high-nickel alloys, but there was no clear corrosion-exacerbating effect with T22 steel.

Otsuka, N. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Amagasaki (Japan); Kawahara, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Fukuda, Y. [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Kure (Japan); Hosoda, T. [Japan Research and Development Center for Metals, Tokyo (Japan)

1999-11-01

246

DOE LeRC photovoltaic systems test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The facility was designed and built and is being operated as a national facility to serve the needs of the entire DOE National Photovoltaic Program. The object of the facility is to provide a place where photovoltaic systems may be assembled and electrically configured, without specific physical configuration, for operation and testing to evaluate their performance and characteristics. The facility as a breadboard system allows investigation of operational characteristics and checkout of components, subsystems and systems before they are mounted in field experiments or demonstrations. The facility as currently configured consist of 10 kW of solar arrays built from modules, two inverter test stations, a battery storage system, interface with local load and the utility grid, and instrumentation and control necessary to make a flexible operating facility. Expansion to 30 kW is planned for 1978. Test results and operating experience are summaried to show the variety of work that can be done with this facility.

Cull, R. C.; Forestieri, A. F.

1978-01-01

247

Battery test facility hardware, software, and system operation  

SciTech Connect

Division 2525 Battery Test Laboratory is a fully automated battery testing facility used in evaluating various battery technologies. The results of these tests are used to verify developers' claims, characterize prototypes, and assist in identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each technology. The Test Facility consists of a central computer and nine remote computer controlled battery test systems. Data acquired during the battery testing process is sent to the central computer system. The test data is then stored in a large database for future analysis. The central computer system is also used in configuring battery tests. These test configurations are then sent to their appropriate remote battery test sites. The Battery Test Facility can perform a variety of battery tests, which include the following: Life Cycle Testing; Parametric Testing at various temperature levels, cutoff parameters, charge rates, and discharge rates; Constant Power Testing at various power levels; Peak Power Testing at various State-of-Charge levels; Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule Tests (SFUDS79). The Battery Test Facility is capable of charging a battery either by constant current, constant voltage, step current levels, or any combination of them. Discharge cycles can be by constant current, constant resistance, constant power, step current levels, or also any combination of them. The Battery Test Facility has been configured to provide the flexibility to evaluate a large variety of battery technologies. These technologies include Lead-Acid, Sodium/Sulfur, Zinc/Bromine, Nickel/Hydrogen, Aluminum/Air, and Nickel/Cadmium batteries.

Rodriguez, G.P.

1991-09-01

248

Battery test facility hardware, software, and system operation  

SciTech Connect

Division 2525 Battery Test Laboratory is a fully automated battery testing facility used in evaluating various battery technologies. The results of these tests are used to verify developers` claims, characterize prototypes, and assist in identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each technology. The Test Facility consists of a central computer and nine remote computer controlled battery test systems. Data acquired during the battery testing process is sent to the central computer system. The test data is then stored in a large database for future analysis. The central computer system is also used in configuring battery tests. These test configurations are then sent to their appropriate remote battery test sites. The Battery Test Facility can perform a variety of battery tests, which include the following: Life Cycle Testing; Parametric Testing at various temperature levels, cutoff parameters, charge rates, and discharge rates; Constant Power Testing at various power levels; Peak Power Testing at various State-of-Charge levels; Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule Tests (SFUDS79). The Battery Test Facility is capable of charging a battery either by constant current, constant voltage, step current levels, or any combination of them. Discharge cycles can be by constant current, constant resistance, constant power, step current levels, or also any combination of them. The Battery Test Facility has been configured to provide the flexibility to evaluate a large variety of battery technologies. These technologies include Lead-Acid, Sodium/Sulfur, Zinc/Bromine, Nickel/Hydrogen, Aluminum/Air, and Nickel/Cadmium batteries.

Rodriguez, G.P.

1991-09-01

249

Argonne`s new Wakefield Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne`s AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

Simpson, J.D.

1992-07-20

250

The ECVAM International Validation Study on In Vitro Tests for Skin Corrosivity. 2. Results and Evaluation by the Management Team  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a follow-up to a prevalidation study on in vitro tests for replacing the in vivo rabbit test for skin corrosivity, an international validation study was conducted during 1996 and 1997 under the auspices of ECVAM. The main objectives of the study were to: (a) identify tests capable of discriminating corrosives from non-corrosives for selected types of chemicals and\\/or all

J. H. Fentem; G. E. B. Archer; M. Balls; P. A. Botham; R. D. Curren; L. K. Earl; D. J. Esdaile; H.-G. Holzhütter; M. Liebsch

1998-01-01

251

Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid that Contains Dissolved Iron  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid (OA) will be used to chemically clean the tanks after waste retrieval is completed. The waste tanks at SRS were constructed from carbon steel materials and thus are vulnerable to corrosion in acidic media. In addition to structural impacts, the impact of corrosion on the hydrogen generated during the process must be assessed. Electrochemical and coupon immersion tests were used to investigate the corrosion mechanism at anticipated process conditions. The testing showed that the corrosion rates were dependent upon the reduction of the iron species that had dissolved in solution. Initial corrosion rates were elevated due to the reduction of the ferric species to ferrous species. At later times, as the ferric species depleted, the corrosion rate decreased. On the other hand, the hydrogen evolution reaction became more dominant.

Wiersma, Bruce J.; Mickalonis, John I.; Subramanian, Karthik H.

2012-10-11

252

49 CFR 195.575 - Which facilities must I electrically isolate and what inspections, tests, and safeguards are...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.575 Which facilities must I electrically...of a pipeline is necessary to facilitate the application of corrosion control. (c) You must inspect and electrically...

2010-10-01

253

49 CFR 195.575 - Which facilities must I electrically isolate and what inspections, tests, and safeguards are...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.575 Which facilities must I electrically...of a pipeline is necessary to facilitate the application of corrosion control. (c) You must inspect and electrically...

2011-10-01

254

49 CFR 195.575 - Which facilities must I electrically isolate and what inspections, tests, and safeguards are...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.575 Which facilities must I electrically...of a pipeline is necessary to facilitate the application of corrosion control. (c) You must inspect and electrically...

2012-10-01

255

49 CFR 195.575 - Which facilities must I electrically isolate and what inspections, tests, and safeguards are...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.575 Which facilities must I electrically...of a pipeline is necessary to facilitate the application of corrosion control. (c) You must inspect and electrically...

2013-10-01

256

10 CFR 61.81 - Tests at land disposal facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01...61.81 Section 61.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests...tests of: (1) Radioactive wastes and facilities used for...

2012-01-01

257

10 CFR 61.81 - Tests at land disposal facilities.  

10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01...61.81 Section 61.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests...tests of: (1) Radioactive wastes and facilities used for...

2014-01-01

258

10 CFR 61.81 - Tests at land disposal facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01...61.81 Section 61.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests...tests of: (1) Radioactive wastes and facilities used for...

2013-01-01

259

10 CFR 61.81 - Tests at land disposal facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01...61.81 Section 61.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests...tests of: (1) Radioactive wastes and facilities used for...

2011-01-01

260

10 CFR 61.81 - Tests at land disposal facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01...61.81 Section 61.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests...tests of: (1) Radioactive wastes and facilities used for...

2010-01-01

261

Fragment hazard zone analyses for explosive test facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analytical procedures for establishing the fragment hazard zone for explosive test facilities are presented. Environment, safety, and health regulations require that a hazard zone analysis be conducted for every explosive test facility. Analyses are presented for explosively driven missile fragment trajectories resultant from cased explosive configurations. Fragment trajectory parameter data are presented in graphical form for three different fragment

M. G. Vigil

1992-01-01

262

Rayleigh Scattering for Measuring Flow in a Nozzle Testing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-engine-component test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust. A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-enginecomponent test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust

Gomez, Carlos R.; Panda, Jayanta

2006-01-01

263

GE underwater test facility studies in zero G simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The underwater test facility (UTF) is described as an indoor controlled environment test facility designed specifically for zero G simulation, hydrospace manned and unmanned equipment development, and personnel training for both space and underwater exploration. Programs conducted in the UTF include: human engineering criteria for maintenance and repairs of space stations, astronaut performance, helmet distortion, underwater telemetry, and blood transfusion.

Fry, R. H.

1972-01-01

264

Jet-in-Slit Test for Reproducing Flow-Induced Localized Corrosion on Copper Alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Valve seat rings of water taps made of copper alloys occasionally suffer corrosion damage as a result of water quality and fluid flow. Examination of the damage mechanisms and development of a testing method for selecting durable materials were requested. To solve these problems, 10 copper alloys were examined using three test methods under accelerated, but well-known experimental conditions: the

M. Matsumura; K. Noishiki; A. Sakamoto

1998-01-01

265

Thermal-structural test facilities at NASA Dryden  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) has renewed interest in hypersonic flight and hot-structures technology development for both the airframe and engine. The NASA Dryden Thermostructures Research Facility is a unique national facility that was designed to conduct thermal-mechanical tests on aircraft and aircraft components by simulating the flight thermal environment in the laboratory. The layout of the facility is presented, which includes descriptions of the high-bay test area, the instrumentation laboratories, the mechanical loading systems, and the state-of-the-art closed-loop thermal control system. The hot-structures test capability of the facility is emphasized by the Mach-3 thermal simulation conducted on the YF-12 airplane. The Liquid-Hydrogen Structural Test Facility, which is presently in the design phase, will provide the capability of thermally testing structures containing hydrogen.

Deangelis, V. Michael; Anderson, Karl F.

1992-01-01

266

Test facility for relativistic beam pickups  

SciTech Connect

Calibration of beam signal pickup devices is an important but frequently difficult activity associated with the construction of accelerator systems. This is especially true for pickups used in stochastic cooling systems. Here the sensitivity and phase as functions of beam position are frequently critical, fundamental parameters of the system design. The most frequently used method for bench-calibration of pickup devices is that of passing a (usually thin) wire through the device. Electrical excitation of the wire, as a TEM line, simulates a beam and the transfer function of the device is measured directly. As many people have discovered, this procedure can frequently lead to incorrect predictions of pickup response to particle beams. These deficiencies have been eliminated in a facility at ANL which uses a relativistic electron beam to calibrate beam pickups. The facility is extensively used in the development of pickups, and is the primary calibration facility for pickups designed for the FNAL TeV-I antiproton source.

Simpson, J.; Konecny, R.; Kramer, S.L.; Suddeth, D.

1983-03-01

267

Corrosion: Understanding the basics  

SciTech Connect

This new book presents a practical how to approach to understanding and solving the problems of corrosion of structural materials. Although it is written mainly for those having a limited technical background in corrosion, it also provides more experienced engineers with a useful overview of the principles of corrosion and can be used as a general guide for developing a corrosion-control program. Contents include: the effects and economic impact of corrosion; basic concepts important to corrosion; principles of aqueous corrosion; forms of corrosion: recognition and prevention; types of corrosive environments; corrosion characteristics of structural materials; corrosion control by proper design; corrosion control by materials selection; corrosion control by protective coatings and inhibitors; corrosion control by cathodic and anodic protection; corrosion testing and monitoring; techniques for diagnosis of corrosion failures; and glossary of corrosion-related terms.

Davis, J.R. [ed.

2000-07-01

268

An Injector Test Facility for the LCLS  

SciTech Connect

SLAC is in the privileged position of being the site for the world's first 4th generation light source as well as having a premier accelerator research staff and facilities. Operation of the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility will require innovations in electron injectors to provide electron beams of unprecedented quality. Upgrades to provide ever shorter wavelength x-ray beams of increasing intensity will require significant advances in the state-of-the-art. The BESAC 20-Year Facilities Roadmap identifies the electron gun as ''the critical enabling technology to advance linac-based light sources'' and recognizes that the sources for next-generation light sources are ''the highest-leveraged technology'', and that ''BES should strongly support and coordinate research and development in this unique and critical technology''.[1] This white paper presents an R&D plan and a description of a facility for developing the knowledge and technology required to successfully achieve these upgrades, and to coordinate efforts on short-pulse source development for linac-based light sources.

Colby, E., (ed.); /SLAC

2007-03-14

269

Photovoltaic-systems test facilities: existing capabilities compilation  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities (PV-STFs) are used to evaluate complete photovoltaic systems, subsystems, and their interfaces. A general description of PV-STFs presently operated under the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaics Program is presented, as well as descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities reflecting current understanding of those having test capabilities appropriate to PV hardware development. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. This compilation indicates the range of system and subsystem test capabilities presently available to serve the needs of both the National Photovoltaics Program and the private sector photovoltaics industry.

None

1982-03-01

270

Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

1993-01-01

271

Characterizing Corrosion Effects of Weak Organic Acids Using a Modified Bono Test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To meet environmental requirements and achieve benefits of cost-effective manufacturing, no-clean fluxes (NCFs) or low-solids fluxes have become popular in present electronic manufacturing processes. Weak organic acids (WOAs) as the activation ingredients in NCFs play an important role, especially in the current lead-free and halogen-free soldering technology era. However, no standard or uniform method exists to characterize the corrosion effects of WOAs on actual metallic circuits of printed wiring boards (PWBs). Hence, the development of an effective quantitative test method for evaluating the corrosion effects of WOAs on the PWB's metallic circuits is imperative. In this paper, the modified Bono test, which was developed to quantitatively examine the corrosion properties of flux residues, is used to characterize the corrosion effects of five WOAs (i.e., abietic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and malic acid) on PWB metallic circuits. Experiments were performed under three temperature/humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH, 60°C/93% RH, and 40°C/93% RH) using two WOA solution concentrations. The different corrosion effects among the various WOAs were best reflected in the testing results at 40°C and 60°C. Optical microscopy was used to observe the morphology of the corroded copper tracks, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization was performed to determine the dendrite composition.

Zhou, Yuqin; Turbini, Laura J.; Ramjattan, Deepchand; Christian, Bev; Pritzker, Mark

2013-12-01

272

FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

2013-01-01

273

A new test procedure for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete  

PubMed

A new test method is described for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete, more specifically in sewer conditions. The aim of the new test method is the development of an accelerated and reproducible procedure for monitoring the resistance of different types of concrete with regard to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion. This experimental procedure reflects worst case conditions by providing besides H2S, also an enrichment of thiobacilli and biologically produced sulfur. By simulating the cyclic processes occurring in sewer pipes, significant differences between concrete mixtures could be detected after 51 days. Concrete modified by a styrene-acrylic ester polymer demonstrated a higher resistance against biogenic sulfuric acid attack. PMID:11068828

Vincke; Verstichel; Monteny; Verstraete

1999-01-01

274

Materials evaluations with the pulsed black liquor burner test facility  

SciTech Connect

A pulsed burner was designed to provide sufficient heat to convert a fluidized bed of black Kraft liquor into combustible gas which would be used to produce process steam. The pulsed burner design provides a significant increase in the heat transfer capability and consequently significantly increases the efficiency of the conversion process. High temperature corrosion tests were performed in a fluidized bed of black Kraft liquor using a pulsed burner process to determine the optimum materials for use in a commercial application. The materials tested included three different austenitic stainless steels, Type 446 martensitic stainless steel, a high temperature carbon steel, 153MA, and four nickel base alloys. All materials performed well with no corrosion attributed to the environment created by the decomposition of a black Kraft liquor. This behavior was contrary to what was expected due to the high concentration of H{sub 2}S present in the high temperature, 562 C, atmosphere.

Stein, A. [Stone and Webster Engineering Co., Boston, MA (United States)

1997-08-01

275

Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys  

SciTech Connect

Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

Cockeram, B.V.

1999-11-01

276

Space Power Facility-Capabilities for Space Environmental Testing Within a Single Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this paper is to describe the current and near-term environmental test capabilities of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Space Power Facility (SPF) located at Sandusky, Ohio. The paper will present current and near-term capabilities for conducting electromagnetic interference and compatibility testing, base-shake sinusoidal vibration testing, reverberant acoustic testing, and thermal-vacuum testing. The paper will also present modes of transportation, handling, ambient environments, and operations within the facility to conduct those tests. The SPF is in the midst of completing and activating new or refurbished capabilities which, when completed, will provide the ability to conduct most or all required full-scale end-assembly space simulation tests at a single test location. It is envisioned that the capabilities will allow a customer to perform a wide range of space simulation tests in one facility at reasonable cost.

Sorge, Richard N.

2013-01-01

277

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test specification  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-01-12

278

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test specification  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-02-02

279

Fast Flux Test Facility sodium pump operating experience - mechanical  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Heat Transport System (HTS) pumps were designed, fabricated, tested, and installed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Plant during the period from September 1970 through July 1977. Since completion of the installation and sodium fill in December 1978, the FFTF Plant pumps have undergone extensive testing and operation with HTS testing and reactor operation. Steady-state hydraulic and mechanical

Buonamici

1987-01-01

280

CU-LASP Test Facilities ! and Instrument Calibration Capabilities"  

E-print Network

CU-LASP Test Facilities ! and Instrument Calibration Capabilities" Ginger Drake Calibration Group of LASP's vacuum chambers · Ideal for performing top-level instrument tests ­ Thermal Vacuum tests ­ In-band light testing (EUV-IR) · Independently temperature- controlled shroud and platen · Optional 4-axis

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

281

Electronic warfare testing at the Benefield anechoic facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the test capabilities of the Benefield Anechoic Facility (BAF) and its mission to support avionics and electronic warfare (EW) test and evaluation (T&E) of current and future generation manned and unmanned aerospace vehicles. Testing at the BAF can provide the dense, complex, and realistic signal environment necessary to evaluate integrated systems\\/subsystems to meet both Development Test and

Emad F. Ali; Pat Dubria; Bob Barker

1997-01-01

282

Field stress corrosion tests in brine environments of the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion research is being conducted to determine suitable construction materials for geothermal resource recovery plants. As part of this research, a 30-day stress corrosion test was conducted at the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area on seven iron- and nickel-base alloys in four brine and steam process streams using wellhead brine from geothermal well Magmamax 1. The tests showed transgranular cracking of AISI 316L stainless steel and intergranular and transgranular cracking of AISI 430 stainless steel in all four process streams. E-Brite 26-1 exhibited intergranular and transgranular cracking in three of the four process streams. Carbon steel, Inconel 625 and Hastelloys G and C-276 show no evidence of stress corrosion cracking.

Carter, J.P.; Cramer, S.D.

1980-01-01

283

Realistic development and testing of fission systems at a non-nuclear testing facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on a module has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center in the Propellant Energy Source Testbed (PEST). This paper discusses the experimental facilities and equipment used for performing resistance heated tests. Recommendations are made for improving non-nuclear test facilities and equipment for simulated testing of nuclear systems. .

Godfroy, Tom; van Dyke, Melissa; Dickens, Ricky; Pedersen, Kevin; Lenard, Roger; Houts, Mike

2000-01-01

284

Realistic Development and Testing of Fission System at a Non-Nuclear Testing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on a module has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center in the Propellant Energy Source Testbed (PEST). This paper discusses the experimental facilities and equipment used for performing resistance heated tests. Recommendations are made for improving non-nuclear test facilities and equipment for simulated testing of nuclear systems.

Godfroy, Tom; VanDyke, Melissa; Dickens, Ricky; Pedersen, Kevin; Lenard, Roger; Houts, Mike

2000-01-01

285

Kauai Test Facility two experiment rocket campaign. [Kauai Test Facility; Two Experiment Rocket Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Kauai Test Facility (KTF) is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility located at Barking Sands, on the west coast of the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The KTF has a rocket preparation and launching capability for both rail-launched and vertical-launched capability for both rail-launched and vertical-launched rockets. Launches primarily support high altitude scientific research and re-entry vehicle systems and carry experimental non-nuclear payloads. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared for the Two Experiment Rocket Campaign, during which the STRYPI/LACE (STRYPI is not an acronym -- its the name of the rocket; LACE is the acronym for Low Altitude Compensation Experiment) and the RAP-501 (Rocket Accelerated Penetration) will be flown in conjunction from the KTF in February 1991 to reduce costs. There have been numerous rocket campaigns at the KTF in prior years that have used the same motors to be used in the current two experiment rocket campaign. The main difference noted in this environmental documentation is that the two rockets have not previously been flown in conjunction. Previous National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) approvals of launches using these motors were limited to different and separate campaigns with diverse sources of funding. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-01

286

Alleviation of Facility/Engine Interactions in an Open-Jet Scramjet Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of a series of shakedown tests to eliminate facility/engine interactions in an open-jet scramjet test facility are presented. The tests were conducted with the NASA DFX (Dual-Fuel eXperimental scramjet) engine in the NASA Langley Combustion Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) in support of the Hyper-X program, The majority of the tests were conducted at a total enthalpy and pressure corresponding to Mach 5 flight at a dynamic pressure of 734 psf. The DFX is the largest engine ever tested in the CHSTF. Blockage, in terms of the projected engine area relative to the nozzle exit area, is 81% with the engine forebody leading edge aligned with the upper edge of the facility nozzle such that it ingests the nozzle boundary layer. The blockage increases to 95% with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. down in the core flow. Previous engines successfully tested in the CHSTF have had blockages of no more than 51%. Oil flow studies along with facility and engine pressure measurements were used to define flow behavior. These results guided modifications to existing aeroappliances and the design of new aeroappliances. These changes allowed fueled tests to be conducted without facility interaction effects in the data with the engine forebody leading edge positioned to ingest the facility nozzle boundary layer. Interaction effects were also reduced for tests with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. into the core flow, however some interaction effects were still evident in the engine data. A new shroud and diffuser have been designed with the goal of allowing fueled tests to be conducted with the engine forebody leading edge positioned in the core without facility interaction effects in the data. Evaluation tests of the new shroud and diffuser will be conducted once ongoing fueled engine tests have been completed.

Albertson, Cindy W.; Emami, Saied

2001-01-01

287

Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90{degrees}C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron- absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. the stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on it chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high- chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. the results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curits, P.C.; Summers, T.S.E.

1998-03-01

288

Accelerated corrosion testing, evaluation and durability design of bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last few years, the effectiveness of cement grout in galvanized or polyethylene ducts, the most widely used corrosion protection system for multistrand bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons, has been under debate, due to significant tendon corrosion damage, several reported failures of individual tendons as well as a few collapses of non-typical structures. While experience in the USA has been generally good, some foreign experience has been less than satisfactory. This dissertation is part of a comprehensive research program started in 1993, which has the objectives to examine the use of post-tensioning in bridge substructures, identify durability concerns and existing technology, develop and carry out an experimental testing program, and conclude with durability design guidelines. Three experimental programs were developed: A long term macrocell corrosion test series, to investigate corrosion protection for internal tendons in precast segmental construction; a long term beam corrosion test series, to examine the effects of post-tensioning on corrosion protection as affected by crack width; and, a long term column corrosion test series, to examine corrosion protection in vertical elements. Preliminary design guidelines were developed previously in the overall study by the initial researchers, after an extensive literature review. This dissertation scope includes continuation of exposure testing of the macrocell, beam and column specimens, performing comprehensive autopsies of selected specimens and updating the durability design guidelines based on the exposure testing and autopsy results. After autopsies were performed, overall findings indicate negative durability effects due to the use of mixed reinforcement, small concrete covers, galvanized steel ducts, and industry standard or heat-shrink galvanized duct splices. The width of cracks was shown to have a direct negative effect on specimen performance. Grout voids were found to be detrimental to the durability of both galvanized ducts and strand. Relying on epoxy and galvanized bar coatings was also found inappropriate because of local attack. On the other hand, very positive effects were found with the use of high performance concrete, high post-tensioning levels, plastic ducts, and sound epoxy filling at the joints.

Salas Pereira, Ruben Mario

2003-06-01

289

Localized corrosion testing of CRA materials in elevated temperature sour gas environments  

SciTech Connect

An exposure test program has been undertaken to investigate the localized corrosion resistance of Alloys 28, 825, G3 and 625 in two simulated sour gas environments at 150 C. The chloride levels in these test environments, containing 30 psi (0.21 MPa) H{sub 2}S and 101 psi (0.70 MPa) CO{sub 2}, were 150 ppm and 30,000 ppm. The general corrosion rate of each material was found to be negligible in each test. Alloy 825 alone was susceptible to minor pitting and crevice initiation in the 150 ppm chloride environment. Increasing the chloride level to 30,000 ppm resulted in more severe crevice attack of Alloy 825 and crevice corrosion of Alloy 28. Alloys G3 and 625 were not susceptible to localized corrosion in either test environment. The exposure tests were supported by complementary electrochemical polarization curves in the low chloride environment. The curves did not exhibit clearly defined passive regions, which were masked by additional anodic current from the oxidation of H{sub 2}S.

Felton, P.; Oldfield, J.W. [Cortest Labs. Ltd., Sheffield (United Kingdom); Al-Maslamani, M. [Qatar General Petroleum Corp., Doha (Qatar)

1999-11-01

290

The effect of testing temperature on corrosion–erosion resistance of martensitic stainless steels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conventional AISI 420 and high-nitrogen martensitic stainless steels were tested under corrosion–erosion conditions in slurry composed by substitute ocean water and quartz particles. The tests were performed at 0, 25, and 70°C, with mean impact angles of 20 and 90°. Polarization tests in H2SO4 solution containing chloride ions were also carried out at the same temperatures. Both conventional and high-nitrogen

D. H. Mesa; A. Toro; A. Sinatora; A. P. Tschiptschin

2003-01-01

291

An automated deep sea simulation facility for testing electronic components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Can off-the-shelf electronic components be used in the deep ocean without protection from the very high hydrostatic pressure? This paper describes a test philosophy and a unique facility designed to answer this question and to determine the mechanisms of failure that are encountered under severe pressure. The facility consists of three pressure vessels, each having 150 electrical penetrators and a

JACK HOLZSCHUH

1971-01-01

292

30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF FACILITY, INCLUDING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK, AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-2. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151971. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

293

Project W-049H disposal facility test report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report (ATR) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the equipment installed in the Disposal Facility has been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria.

Buckles, D.I.

1995-01-01

294

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments  

E-print Network

and thermal hydraulic calculations for the rod-shaped tungsten target were performed. The maximum surface). This is only a 0.2% change in surface temperature and, as corrosion rate is proportional to temperature

295

Development of robotics facility docking test hardware  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design and fabricate test hardware for NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are reported. A docking device conceptually developed was fabricated, and two docking targets which provide high and low mass docking loads were required and were represented by an aft 61.0 cm section of a Hubble space telescope (ST) mockup and an upgrading of an existing multimission modular spacecraft (MSS) mockup respectively. A test plan is developed for testing the hardware.

Loughead, T. E.; Winkler, R. V.

1984-01-01

296

Preconceptual design of the new production reactor circulator test facility  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of a new circulator test facility for the New Production Reactor Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. The report addresses the preconceptual design of a stand-alone test facility with all the required equipment to test the Main Circulator/shutoff valve and Shutdown Cooling Circulator/shutoff valve. Each type of circulator will be tested in its own full flow, full power helium test loop. Testing will cover the entire operating range of each unit. The loop will include a test vessel, in which the circulator/valve will be mounted, and external piping. The external flow piping will include a throttle valve, flowmeter, and heat exchanger. Subsystems will include helium handling, helium purification, and cooling water. A computer-based data acquisition and control system will be provided. The estimated costs for the design and construction of this facility are included. 2 refs., 15 figs.

Thurston, G.

1990-06-01

297

LIMESTONE WET-SCRUBBING TEST RESULTS AT THE EPA ALKALI SCRUBBING TEST FACILITY. CAPSULE REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

This capsule report discusses the highlights of the first detailed engineering progress report. It describes the test facility and test program and presents results to date of the limestone wet-scrubbing testing. In addition, the realiability and operability of the test facility ...

298

Performance of Multifunctional UV (MUV) Curable Corrosion Coating Systems to Aerospace Military Test Criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

A coating system incorporating corrosion inhibiting compounds into an ultraviolet (UV) light curable polymeric matrix, referred to as a multifunctional UV (MUV) coating, has been developed. The performance of the coating system was evaluated on high strength aluminum alloys, which are commonly used on military aircraft. The MUV coatings were deposited on test panels with chromate or cerium-based conversion coatings.

A. Thomas; D. Heller; W. Gammill; W. Fahrenholtz; M. O'Keefe; J. DeAntoni; B. Curatolo; Light Curable Coatings

299

Corrosion and Degradation of Test Materials in the BI-GAS Coal-Gasification Pilot Plant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Corrosion monitoring of test materials was conducted in the BI-GAS coal gasification pilot plant from 1976 through 1981. Montana Rosebud subbituminous coal was processed at pressures of 750 psia (5175 kPa). Metals were exposed at low to moderate temperatu...

R. Yurkewycz, R. F. Firestone

1982-01-01

300

Sub-categorisation of skin corrosive chemicals by the EpiSkin™ reconstructed human epidermis skin corrosion test method according to UN GHS: revision of OECD Test Guideline 431.  

PubMed

The EpiSkin™ skin corrosion test method was formally validated and adopted within the context of OECD TG 431 for identifying corrosive and non-corrosive chemicals. The EU Classification, Labelling and Packaging Regulation (EU CLP) system requires the sub-categorisation of corrosive chemicals into the three UN GHS optional subcategories 1A, 1B and 1C. The present study was undertaken to investigate the usefulness of the validated EpiSkin™ test method to identify skin corrosive UN GHS Categories 1A, 1B and 1C using the original and validated prediction model and adapted controls for direct MTT reduction. In total, 85 chemicals selected by the OECD expert group on skin corrosion were tested in three independent runs. The results obtained were highly reproducible both within (>80%) and between (>78%) laboratories when compared with historical data. Moreover the results obtained showed that the EpiSkin™ test method is highly sensitive (99%) and specific (80%) in discriminating corrosive from non-corrosive chemicals and allows reliable and relevant identification of the different skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories, with high accuracies being obtained for both UN GHS Categories 1A (83%) and 1B/1C (76%) chemicals. The overall accuracy of the test method to subcategorise corrosive chemicals into three or two UN GHS subcategories ranged from 75% to 79%. Considering those results, the revised OECD Test Guideline 431 permit the use of EpiSkin™ for subcategorising corrosive chemicals into at least two classes (Category 1A and Category 1B/1C). PMID:24211528

Alépée, N; Grandidier, M H; Cotovio, J

2014-03-01

301

The usefulness of the validated SkinEthic™ RHE test method to identify skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories.  

PubMed

The SkinEthic™ Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) test method has been adopted within the context of OECD TG 431 for distinguishing corrosive and non-corrosive chemicals. The EU CLP classification system requires subcategorising of corrosive chemicals into the three UN GHS subcategories 1A, 1B and 1C. Since the SkinEthic™ RHE method was originally validated to discriminate corrosives from non-corrosives, the present study was undertaken to investigate its usefulness to discriminate skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories. In total 84 substances were tested in three independent runs and two prediction models (PM) were assessed, representing a pre-defined validated prediction model (PM-A) and an alternative one defined post-hoc (PM-B). The results obtained with both PM were reproducible, as shown by the ?92.9% concordance of classification between runs for discriminating corrosives versus non-corrosives, and the ?85% concordance for discriminating the GHS subcategories versus non-corrosives. Moreover results confirmed a high sensitivity of the SkinEthic™ RHE method to predict corrosives (94.9%) and good specificity (?73.7%) independent of the PM applied. Regarding the identification of UN GHS corrosive subcategories, PM-A resulted in 86.1% correct classifications of the GHS subcategory 1A. When using the PM-B, the identification of GHS subcategory 1B-and-1C substances improved, with 63.4% correct sub-categorisation. If considering the 30 reference chemicals as recommended in the recently revised OECD TG 431 (2013), PM-A and PM-B achieved 78.9% and 83.3% accuracy respectively for the identification of GHS subcategories and non-corrosives. They correctly predicted 90% of GHS subcategory 1A and 80% of GHS non-corrosive substances independent of the PM used. In conclusion, the SkinEthic™ RHE test method is highly reproducible and sensitive for discriminating corrosive from non-corrosive substances. Furthermore it allows reliable identification of skin corrosive GHS subcategory 1B-and-1C substances using the PM-A and PM-B, and of GHS subcategories 1A using the PM-B. Due to its high sensitivity, the test method provides high safety standards for skin corrosion testing. PMID:24389111

Alépée, Nathalie; Robert, Clément; Tornier, Carine; Cotovio, José

2014-06-01

302

NASA Lewis Research Center's combustor test facilities and capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) presently accommodates a total of six combustor test facilities with unique capabilities. The facilities are used to evaluate combustor and afterburner concepts for future engine applications, and also to test the survivability and performance of innovative high temperature materials, new instrumentation, and engine components in a realistic jet engine environment. The facilities provide a variety of test section interfaces and lengths to allow for flametube, sector and component testing. The facilities can accommodate a wide range of operating conditions due to differing capabilities in the following areas: inlet air pressure, temperature, and flow; fuel flow rate, pressure, and fuel storage capacity; maximum combustion zone temperature; cooling water flow rate and pressure; types of exhaust - atmospheric or altitude; air heater supply pressure; and types of air heaters - vitiated or nonvitiated. All of the facilities have provisions for standard gas (emissions) analysis, and a few of the facilities are equipped with specialized gas analysis equipment, smoke and particle size measurement devices, and a variety of laser systems. This report will present some of the unique features of each of the high temperature/high pressure combustor test facilities at NASA LeRC.

Bianco, Jean

1995-01-01

303

Field Lysimeter Test Facility for protective barriers: Experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

This document was first written in October 1986 and has been used to guide the design of the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) and to promote discussions between research and engineering staff regarding the selection of barrier treatments for inclusion in the FLTF. The construction of the lysimeter facility was completed June 28, 1987. This document describes the facility, the treatments placed in each lysimeter, types of measurements made in each lysimeter, and a brief discussion of project activities related to quality assurance, safety, and funding requirements. The treatment description and figures have been updated to reflect the lysimeter facility as constructed. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Kirkham, R.R.; Gee, G.W.; Downs, J.L.

1987-12-01

304

Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Hulvey, R.K.

1995-11-01

305

10 CFR 26.125 - Licensee testing facility personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...chemical or biological sciences, medical technology, or equivalent. He or she shall also have training and experience in the theory and practice of the procedures used in the licensee testing facility, and a thorough understanding of quality control...

2010-01-01

306

CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

2011-10-14

307

Wind Tunnel Based Anemometer Testing Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measured estimates of the wind resource available at a site are performed with the use of an anemometer. The accuracy of the wind measurements is vital to determining the wind resource of wind farms, which is why great care must be taken in calibrating anemometers. The purpose of this project was to prepare the University of California, Davis (UCD) Aeronautical Wind Tunnel (AWT) for automatically calibrating anemometers with the use of a virtual instrument (VI) created in LabVIEW that measures the wind tunnel and anemometer quantities and controls the wind tunnel speed. The initial calibration was conducted using an RM Young propeller type anemometer that has been benchmarked by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and is used by the industry to compare anemometer calibration facilities. A second verification of the wind tunnel's readiness to calibrate anemometers was performed using a pitot-static probe manufactured by United Senor Corporation.

Gilbert, Benson Luther

308

FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) Fission Gas Monitor Computer System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a liquid-metal-cooled, fast neutron test reactor located on the Hanford Site. A dual computer system has been developed to monitor the reactor cover gas to detect and characterize any fuel or test pin fission gas releases. The system acquires gamma spectra data, identifies isotopes, calculates specific isotope and overall cover gas activity, presents

J. A. Hubbard; G. T. Taylor

1987-01-01

309

The ERDA/LeRC photovoltaic systems test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test facility was designed, and built to provide a place where photovoltaic systems may be assembled and electrically configured, to evaluate system performance and characteristics. The facility consists of a solar cell array of an initial 10-kW peak power rating, test hardware for several alternate methods of power conditioning, a variety of loads, an electrical energy storage system, and an instrumentation and data acquisition system.

Forestieri, A. F.

1977-01-01

310

Control of tritium at the fast flux test facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is located on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The facility features a 400 MW(t) three-loop sodium-cooled, mixed-oxide-fueled reactor that was designed for irradiation testing of fuels and materials to support the commercial development of liquid metal fast reactors.

Prevo

1989-01-01

311

Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is

J. P. Zbasnik; D. N. Cornish; R. M. Scanlan; A. M. Jewell; R. L. Leber; A. R. Rosdahl; M. R. Chaplin

1980-01-01

312

Multi-axis transient vibration testing of space objects: Test philosophy, test facility, and control strategy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

IABG has been using various servohydraulic test facilities for many years for the reproduction of service loads and environmental loads on all kinds of test objects. For more than 15 years, a multi-axis vibration test facility has been under service, originally designed for earthquake simulation but being upgraded to the demands of space testing. First tests with the DFS/STM showed good reproduction accuracy and demonstrated the feasibility of transient vibration testing of space objects on a multi-axis hydraulic shaker. An approach to structural qualification is possible by using this test philosophy. It will be outlined and its obvious advantages over the state-of-the-art single-axis test will be demonstrated by example results. The new test technique has some special requirements to the test facility exceeding those of earthquake testing. Most important is the high reproduction accuracy demanded for a sophisticated control system. The state-of-the-art approach of analog closed-loop control circuits for each actuator combined with a static decoupling network and an off-line iterative waveform control is not able to meet all the demands. Therefore, the future over-all control system is implemented as hierarchical full digital closed-loop system on a highly parallel transputer network. The innermost layer is the digital actuator controller, the second one is the MDOF-control of the table movement. The outermost layer would be the off-line iterative waveform control, which is dedicated only to deal with the interaction of test table and test object or non-linear effects. The outline of the system will be presented.

Lachenmayr, Georg

1992-01-01

313

Performance of laser glazed Zr02 TBCs in cyclic oxidation and corrosion burner test rigs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of laser glazed zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was evaluated in cyclic oxidation and cyclic corrosion tests. Plasma sprayed zirconia coatings of two thicknesses were partially melted with a CO2 laser. The power density of the focused laser beam was varied from 35 to 75 W/sq mm, while the scanning speed was about 80 cm per minute. In cyclic oxidation tests, the specimens were heated in a burner rig for 6 minutes and cooled for 3 minutes. It is indicated that the laser treated samples have the same life as the untreated ones. However, in corrosion tests, in which the burner rig flame contained 100 PPM sodium fuel equivalent, the laser treated samples exhibit nearly a fourfold life improvement over that of the reference samples vary. In both tests, the lives of the samples inversely with the thickness of the laser melted layer of zirconia.

Zaplatynsky, I.

1982-01-01

314

Study Plan for Material Corrosion Test in Lead and Bismuth Eutectic at High Temperature  

SciTech Connect

A concept of steam lift pump type lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor (SLPLFR) is proposed as high temperature and high efficiency Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors. Fe-Al alloy-surface treated steels and ceramics of SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC composites have been chosen as candidates of cladding and structural materials, respectively. A corrosion test plan is proposed, where compatibility of steels applied with Al-Fe alloy-surface treatment and the ceramics will be tested in high temperature Pb-Bi flow. A conceptual design of a test apparatus for the corrosion test is provided. (authors)

Toru Nakazima; Abu Khalid Rivai; Koji Hata; Vaclav Dostal; Minoru Takahashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2006-07-01

315

Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) facility. Summary safety report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a test of a water-conserving way of cooling thermal power plants, a large-scale test of dry/wet cooling using the ammonia phase-change system, designated the Advanced Concepts Test (ACT), is being constructed at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Kern Station at Bakersfield. A summary of the safety analyses and considerations that have been done for the facility is presented. These show that the ACT facility is an industrially safe system, and that the safety precautions taken assure that no one will be injured during the course of the testing. The application of industrial codes, safety management, an operational and emergency procedures is discussed.

Allemann, R. T.

1981-07-01

316

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan  

SciTech Connect

The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy`s dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode.

Hulvey, R.K.

1997-03-06

317

High vacuum facility for hydrazine thruster testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An ongoing modification is described of a large vacuum chamber to accommodate the ignition of an arcjet hydrazine thruster while maintaining a vacuum level of 1 x 10(exp -5) torr or less. The vacuum facility consists of a 20 ft stainless steel vacuum tank with an internal LN2 shroud, four 35 in. cryopumps and an 8 in. turbopump. To maintain a vacuum level of 1 x 10(exp -5) torr or less, 900 sq ft of liquid helium (LHe) shroud surface was installed to maintain the vacuum level and pumping requirements. A vacuum level of 1 x 10(exp -5) torr or less will allow the hydrazine thrust to exit the thruster nozzle and radiate into a space type environment so that the plume flow field can be analyzed and compared to the analytical model density distribution profile. Some other arcjet thruster characteristics measured are the electromagnetic interference (EMI) and exhaust contamination. This data is used to evaluate if the arcjet thruster with its high specific impulse in comparison to current chemical propulsion thruster can be used for the next generation of communication satellites.

Neary, Patrick F.

1990-01-01

318

Corrosion of aluminum and copper thin films under simulated atmospheric conditions in laboratory tests  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion characteristics of Al and Cu thin films have been studied in cyclic fog tests using tap water fog and fog created with 0.1% NaCl solution in tap water. Likewise, their corrosion features have been analyzed in continuous immersion testing in the laboratory in distilled water, tap water, in 0.1% NaCl and 3.5% NaCl solutions in distilled water. The corrosion potentials and the corrosion currents of these thin films change and reach steady state values after some time. However, steady state is not realized in 3.5% NaCl solutions. The corrosion current density data have been used to calculate lifetime of 1 {mu}m thick thin films of Al and Cu in the various tests, and assuming that the fog test data would hold under normal exposure conditions, life spans for these thin film sensor elements in actual exterior exposure have also been calculated. According to estimates, an Al-TF of about 1 {mu}m would last about 9 months in exterior exposure in chloride containing atmospheres, such as in the coastal regions, but would survive nearly 2 years in normal atmospheres not having acidic or chloride pollutants. On the contrary, 1 {mu}m thick Cu-TF would last only for about 2.5 months in chloride-laden environments, but would last for about 2 years in normal atmospheres. However, Cu-TF would be corroded off faster in slightly alkaline atmospheric condensate under total immersion situation. Lifetime estimates are presented and discussed.

Li, W.; Raman, A. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Diwan, R.; Bhattacharya, P.K. [Southern Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1998-12-31

319

A test method to evaluate stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels  

Microsoft Academic Search

An accelerated laboratory test method was developed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of kraft continuous digesters. The method uses circular patch test welds made from 38-mm-thick ASTM A516 Grade 70 steel plate. The specimens were exposed to a 110 C solution containing 40 gLNaOH and 20 gLNaâS at a controlled electrochemical potential. Several different welding procedures were evaluated

D. Singbeil; A. Garner

1988-01-01

320

STEELDAY EVENT: INDUSTRIAL GALVANIZERS TAMPA FACILITY TOUR Visitors will learn about steel corrosion and how to prevent it using hot-dip galvanizing. They will also tour the facility and see the hot-dip galvanizing process first  

E-print Network

corrosion and how to prevent it using hot-dip galvanizing. They will also tour the facility and see the hotSTEELDAY EVENT: INDUSTRIAL GALVANIZERS TAMPA FACILITY TOUR Visitors will learn about steel-dip galvanizing process first hand. No high heels or open-toed shoes please. About your host Industrial

Arslan, Hüseyin

321

WIND TURBINE DRIVETRAIN TEST FACILITY DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Turbine Drivetrain Test Facility (WTDTF) is a state-of-the-art industrial facility used for testing wind turbine drivetrains and generators. Large power output wind turbines are primarily installed for off-shore wind power generation. The facility includes two test bays: one to accommodate turbine nacelles up to 7.5 MW and one for nacelles up to 15 MW. For each test bay, an independent data acquisition system (DAS) records signals from various sensors required for turbine testing. These signals include resistance temperature devices, current and voltage sensors, bridge/strain gauge transducers, charge amplifiers, and accelerometers. Each WTDTF DAS also interfaces with the drivetrain load applicator control system, electrical grid monitoring system and vibration analysis system.

Mcintosh, J.

2012-01-03

322

NASA Lewis Research Center's Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility (PCMTF) in the Engine Research Building (ERB) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is one of two unique combustor facilities that provide a nonvitiated air supply to two test stands, where the air can be used for research combustor testing and high-temperature materials testing. Stand A is used as a research combustor stand, whereas stand B is used for cyclic and survivability tests of aerospace materials at high temperatures. Both stands can accommodate in-house and private industry research programs. The PCMTF is capable of providing up to 30 lb/s (pps) of nonvitiated, 450 psig combustion air at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1150 g F. A 5000 gal tank located outdoors adjacent to the test facility can provide jet fuel at a pressure of 900 psig and a flow rate of 11 gal/min (gpm). Gaseous hydrogen from a 70,000 cu ft (CF) tuber is also available as a fuel. Approximately 500 gpm of cooling water cools the research hardware and exhaust gases. Such cooling is necessary because the air stream reaches temperatures as high as 3000 deg F. The PCMTF provides industry and Government with a facility for studying the combustion process and for obtaining valuable test information on advanced materials. This report describes the facility's support systems and unique capabilities.

Nemets, Steve A.; Ehlers, Robert C.; Parrott, Edith

1995-01-01

323

Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

Vernier, Robert; Bonalosky, Todd; Slavin, James

2004-01-01

324

Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground-testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

2004-01-01

325

Electromagnetic Interference/Compatibility (EMI/EMC) Control Test and Measurement Facility: User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the EMI/EMC Test Facility. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Scully, Robert C.

2011-01-01

326

The NAL-ISRO acoustic test facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Indian Space Programme has the goals of launching a number of communication and remote sensing satellites for various\\u000a uses. The acoustic exposure testing of such space bound components and systems on ground is mandatory to check their ability\\u000a to withstand the extreme noise fields encountered during the trans-atmospheric flight to their final destinations in space.\\u000a This paper outlines the

S Balakrishna; Ranjan Moodithaya; S Nagabhushana

1993-01-01

327

Research and test facilities for development of technologies and experiments with commercial applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of NASA'S agency-wide goals is the commercial development of space. To further this goal NASA is implementing a policy whereby U.S. firms are encouraged to utilize NASA facilities to develop and test concepts having commercial potential. Goddard, in keeping with this policy, will make the facilities and capabilities described in this document available to private entities at a reduced cost and on a noninterference basis with internal NASA programs. Some of these facilities include: (1) the Vibration Test Facility; (2) the Battery Test Facility; (3) the Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator Facility; (4) the High Voltage Testing Facility; (5) the Magnetic Field Component Test Facility; (6) the Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility; (7) the High Capacity Centrifuge Facility; (8) the Acoustic Test Facility; (9) the Electromagnetic Interference Test Facility; (10) the Space Simulation Test Facility; (11) the Static/Dynamic Balance Facility; (12) the High Speed Centrifuge Facility; (13) the Optical Thin Film Deposition Facility; (14) the Gold Plating Facility; (15) the Paint Formulation and Application Laboratory; (16) the Propulsion Research Laboratory; (17) the Wallops Range Facility; (18) the Optical Instrument Assembly and Test Facility; (19) the Massively Parallel Processor Facility; (20) the X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Auger Microscopy/Spectroscopy Laboratory; (21) the Parts Analysis Laboratory; (22) the Radiation Test Facility; (23) the Ainsworth Vacuum Balance Facility; (24) the Metallography Laboratory; (25) the Scanning Electron Microscope Laboratory; (26) the Organic Analysis Laboratory; (27) the Outgassing Test Facility; and (28) the Fatigue, Fracture Mechanics and Mechanical Testing Laboratory.

1989-01-01

328

Corrosion in a temperature gradient  

SciTech Connect

High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L. (Convanta)

2003-01-01

329

Standard practice for conducting wire-on-bolt test for atmospheric galvanic corrosion  

E-print Network

1.1 This practice covers the evaluation of atmospheric galvanic corrosion of any anodic material that can be made into a wire when in contact with a cathodic material that can be made into a threaded rod. 1.2 When certain materials are used for the anode and cathode, this practice has been used to rate the corrosivity of atmospheres. 1.3 The wire-on-bolt test was first described in 1955 (1), and has since been used extensively with standard materials to determine corrosivity of atmospheres under the names CLIMAT Test (CLassify Industrial and Marine ATmospheres) (2-5) and ATCORR (ATmospheric CORRosivity) (6-9). 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations p...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01

330

Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.  

PubMed

This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion. PMID:24099841

Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

2014-04-01

331

T-111 Rankine system corrosion test loop, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are given of a program whose objective was to determine the performance of refractory metal alloys in a two loop Rankine test system. The test system consisted of a circulating lithium circuit heated to 1230 C maximum transferring heat to a boiling potassium circuit with a 1170 C superheated vapor temperature. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected refractory alloys to perform from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

Harrison, R. W.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

1975-01-01

332

Development of a Large Scale, High Speed Wheel Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Draper Laboratory, with its internal research and development budget, has for the past two years been funding a joint effort with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the development of a large scale, high speed wheel test facility. This facility was developed to perform experiments and carry out evaluations on levitation and propulsion designs for MagLev systems currently under consideration. The facility was developed to rotate a large (2 meter) wheel which could operate with peripheral speeds of greater than 100 meters/second. The rim of the wheel was constructed of a non-magnetic, non-conductive composite material to avoid the generation of errors from spurious forces. A sensor package containing a multi-axis force and torque sensor mounted to the base of the station, provides a signal of the lift and drag forces on the package being tested. Position tables mounted on the station allow for the introduction of errors in real time. A computer controlled data acquisition system was developed around a Macintosh IIfx to record the test data and control the speed of the wheel. This paper describes the development of this test facility. A detailed description of the major components is presented. Recently completed tests carried out on a novel Electrodynamic (EDS) suspension system, developed by MIT as part of this joint effort are described and presented. Adaptation of this facility for linear motor and other propulsion and levitation testing is described.

Kondoleon, Anthony; Seltzer, Donald; Thornton, Richard; Thompson, Marc

1996-01-01

333

Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments  

SciTech Connect

Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented.

Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

1986-06-01

334

Interim Total Containment Test Fire Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents the results of a test program conducted within a confinement chamber called the Interim Total Containment Test Fire Facility. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of the chamber to contain the blast loads and hazardous fragments generated by the largest high explosive (HE) charge expected to be fired within the chamber. 11 references, 7 figures, 5

A. G. Papp; J. L. Nunley; G. T. West

1984-01-01

335

200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

Crane, A.F.

1995-10-26

336

Radiological operating experience at FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fast Flux Test Facility has been in operation for approximately five years, including about one thousand days of full power operation of the Fast Test Reactor. During that time the collective dose equivalents received by operating personnel have been about two orders of magnitude lower than those typically received at commercial light water reactors. No major contamination problems have

W. L. Bunch; P. R. Prevo

1986-01-01

337

Fast Flux Test Facility passive safety reactivity feedback measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of experiments conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) measured the reactivity change between approximately 200 reactor states. The test data have been evaluated to determine the thermal hydraulic parameters of the reactor at those states. Auxiliary measurements have been analyzed to convert the measured control rod position changes to reactivity and to correct for burnup effects.

B. J. Knutson; R. A. Harris; D. H. Nguyen; R. P. Omberg

1988-01-01

338

Active test of separation facility at Rokkasho reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect

During the second and third steps of Active Test at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), the performances of the Separation Facility have been checked; (A) diluent washing efficiency, (B) plutonium stripping efficiency, (C) decontamination factor of fission products and (D) plutonium and uranium leakage into raffinate and spent solvent. Test results were equivalent to or better than expected. (authors)

Iseki, Tadahiro; Inaba, Makoto; Takahashi, Naoki [Separation Section, Plant Operation Department, Reprocessing Plant, Reprocessing Business Division, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited, 4-108, Aza Okitsuke, Oaza Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori-ken (Japan)

2007-07-01

339

ERDA/Lewis research center photovoltaic systems test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A national photovoltaic power systems test facility (of initial 10-kW peak power rating) is described. It consists of a solar array to generate electrical power, test-hardware for several alternate methods of power conversion, electrical energy storage systems, and an instrumentation and data acquisition system.

Forestieri, A. F.; Johnson, J. A.; Knapp, W. D.; Rigo, H.; Stover, J.; Suhay, R.

1977-01-01

340

Experimental test facility for evaluation of controls and control strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental test facility has been constructed to evaluate the operation and performance of controls for active hydronic solar energy systems. The experimental system serves to test the relative performance of different controllers and alternative control algorithms for a variety of input meteorological conditions and output load demands. The experimental system consists of a collector loop heat input simulator, a

M. L. Warren; S. R. Schiller; M. Wahlig

1980-01-01

341

SSC string test facility for superconducting magnets: Testing capabilities and program for collider magnets  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) R&D Testing Facility has been established at the SSC Laboratory to test Collider and High Energy Booster (HEB) superconducting magnet strings. The facility is operational and has had two testing periods utilizing a half cell of collider prototypical magnets with the associated spool pieces and support systems. This paper presents a description of the testing capabilities of the facility with respect to components and supporting subsystems (cryogenic, power, quench protection, controls and instrumentation), the planned testing program for the collider magnets.

Kraushaar, P.; Burgett, W.; Dombeck, T.; McInturff, A.; Robinson, W.; Saladin, V.

1993-05-01

342

Lead Coolant Test Facility - Design Concept and Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements are identified in this paper: (1) Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger; (2) Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core; (3) Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control; (4) Demonstrate Safe Operation; and (5) Provision for Future Testing Across these five broad areas are supported by twenty-one specific requirements. The purpose of this facility is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli Khericha, Ph. D.

2011-08-01

343

Test Based Microgravity Analysis for the Fluids and Combustion Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a two rack facility dedicated to combustion and fluids science in a microgravity (near zero-g) environment on board the International Space Station (ISS). An important aspect of performing on-orbit research is maintaining the rack microgravity environment by minimizing vibroacoustic disturbances generated within the science payload. This paper discusses recent rack-level acoustic emission testing to characterize the science payload microgravity environment. Measurements are compared with FCF microgravity science requirements.

McNelis, Mark E.; Yu, Albert Y.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

2003-01-01

344

Ground test facility for SEI nuclear rocket engines  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) has been identified as a critical technology in support of the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). In order to safely develop a reliable, reusable, long-lived flight engine, facilities are required that will support ground tests to qualify the nuclear rocket engine design. Initial nuclear fuel element testing will need to be performed in a facility that supports a realistic thermal and neutronic environment in which the fuel elements will operate at a fraction of the power of a flight weight reactor/engine. Ground testing of nuclear rocket engines is not new. New restrictions mandated by the National Environmental Protection Act of 1970, however, now require major changes to be made in the manner in which reactor engines are now tested. These new restrictions now preclude the types of nuclear rocket engine tests that were performed in the past from being done today. A major attribute of a safely operating ground test facility is its ability to prevent fission products from being released in appreciable amounts to the environment. Details of the intricacies and complications involved with the design of a fuel element ground test facility are presented in this report with a strong emphasis on safety and economy.

Harmon, C.D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.; Shipers, L.R.

1992-08-01

345

Standard guide for conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes  

E-print Network

1.1 This guide covers conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests to characterize the behavior of two dissimilar metals in electrical contact in an electrolyte under low-flow conditions. It can be adapted to wrought or cast metals and alloys. 1.2 This guide covers the selection of materials, specimen preparation, test environment, method of exposure, and method for evaluating the results to characterize the behavior of galvanic couples in an electrolyte. Note 1—Additional information on galvanic corrosion testing and examples of the conduct and evaluation of galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes are given in Refs (1) through (7). 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicabil...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1981-01-01

346

Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

2010-01-01

347

Design description of the large coil test facility pulse coil  

SciTech Connect

The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being constructed to test up to six large superconducting coils of the configuration needed for tokamak reactors. In order to subject these test coils to conditions which simulate the magnetic environment of an operating tokamak, it is necessary to provide transient vertical fields at the test coil. The LCTF does this by means of a pulse coil set which can be positioned in the bore of each coil. The coils are tested one at a time while the remaining five test coils provide a background toroidal field. Since the pulse coil set is a part of the facility and not considered as a developmental item, it is designed to utilize conventional coil materials and fabrication techniques. The operating environment and magnitude of the induced loads make this coil set somewhat unique. This paper discusses the required operating parameters, the operating environment and loads, as well as the design features of the coils.

Hussung, R.O.; Queen, C.C. Jr.; Chipley, K.K.

1981-10-01

348

Cryogenic Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray & Cryogenic Test Facility (XRCF) has been performing sub-liquid nitrogen temperature testing since 1999. Optical wavefront measurement, thermal structural deformation, mechanism functional & calibration, and simple cryo-conditioning tests have been completed. Recent modifications have been made to the facility in support of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program. The chamber's payload envelope and the facility s refrigeration capacity have both been increased. Modifications have also been made to the optical instrumentation area improving access for both the installation and operation of optical instrumentation outside the vacuum chamber. The facility's capabilities, configuration, and performance data will be presented.

Kegley, Jeffrey; Baker, Mark; Carpenter, Jay; Eng, Ron; Haight, Harlan; Hogue, William; McCracken, Jeff; Siler, Richard; Wright, Ernie

2006-01-01

349

Corrosion resistance study of Fe Mn Al C alloys using immersion and potentiostatic tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interaction of the Fe-32.7Mn-6.59Al-1.26Si-0.25C (wt.%) and Fe-32.3Mn-8.54Al-1.31Si-0.54C (wt.%) alloys with the environment was evaluated. Potentiostatic and total immersion tests, planned and analyzed by the statistic model of fixed effects were used for the evaluation of corrosion in gasoline, alcohol fuel, lactic acid solution (40 wt.%), sodium chloride solution (3 wt.%), and boiler water. Potentiostatic tests in 1N H 2SO 4 medium presented that the alloys showed a tendency towards passivation. The role that aluminum and silicon play in alloy corrosion mechanism was discussed.

Lins, Vanessa F. C.; Freitas, Marta Afonso; Silva, Evando M. Paula e.

2005-08-01

350

Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The performance of the self-pumping exhaust diffuser was verified down to exhaust pressures of 1.379 x 10 exp 4 Pa. The facility was successfully operated over the entire range of design pressures and flowrates and is available for national use by industry and government agencies requiring facilities capable of testing SRM cold flow models to support development programs or resolve problems arising on operational flight systems.

Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

1992-02-01

351

Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The major emphasis during this reporting period was finishing the conceptual design for the test facility and discussions on the potential expansion of the test facility. Results are discussed for the following subtasks of conceptual design: design bases; quasifier/combustor and hot stream design; balance of plant designs; and particulate collection.

Not Available

1991-01-01

352

Good Laboratory Practices of Materials Testing at NASA White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An approach to good laboratory practices of materials testing at NASA White Sands Test Facility is presented. The contents include: 1) Current approach; 2) Data analysis; and 3) Improvements sought by WSTF to enhance the diagnostic capability of existing methods.

Hirsch, David; Williams, James H.

2005-01-01

353

Psychrometric Testing Facility Restoration and Cooling Capacity Testing  

E-print Network

voltage. 17 17 Table 4 Required test condition variations not covered in Table 2 Test Evap Exit DB ?F Evap Exit WB ?F OD WB ?F Ex Res Air, in/H2O Voltage ?% 1A 0.32 0.29 0.45 0.087 2.2 2A 0.31 0.07 0.56 0.095 2.2 3A 0.29 0.14 0.22 0... voltage. 17 17 Table 4 Required test condition variations not covered in Table 2 Test Evap Exit DB ?F Evap Exit WB ?F OD WB ?F Ex Res Air, in/H2O Voltage ?% 1A 0.32 0.29 0.45 0.087 2.2 2A 0.31 0.07 0.56 0.095 2.2 3A 0.29 0.14 0.22 0...

Cline, Vincent E.

2010-10-12

354

Switch evaluation test system for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Flashlamp pumped lasers use pulsed power switches to commute energy stored in capacitor banks to the flashlamps. The particular application in which the authors are interested is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), being designed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). To lower the total cost of these switches, SNL has a research program to evaluate large closing switches. The target value of the energy switched by a single device is 1.6 MJ, from a 6 mF, 24kV capacitor bank. The peak current is 500 kA. The lifetime of the NIF facility is 24,000 shots. There is no switch today proven at these parameters. Several short-lived switches (100`s of shots) exist that can handle the voltage and current, but would require maintenance during the facility life. Other type devices, notably ignitrons, have published lifetimes in excess of 20,000 shots, but at lower currents and shorter pulse widths. The goal of the experiments at SNL is to test switches with the full NIF wave shape, and at the correct voltage. The SNL facility can provide over 500 kA at 24 kV charge voltage. the facility has 6.4 mF total capacitance, arranged in 25 sub-modules. the modular design makes the facility more flexible (for possible testing at lower current) and safer. For pulse shaping (the NIF wave shape is critically damped) there is an inductor and resistor for each of the 25 modules. Rather than one large inductor and resistor, this lowers the current in the pulse shaping components, and raises their value to those more easily attained with lumped inductors and resistors. The authors show the design of the facility, and show results from testing conducted thus far. They also show details of the testing plan for high current switches.

Savage, M.E.; Simpson, W.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). High Energy Plasma Physics Dept.; Sharpe, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). High Energy Plasma Physics Dept.]|[Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reynolds, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). High Energy Plasma Physics Dept.]|[Tektronix, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-07-01

355

R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule.

Not Available

1980-10-01

356

Standard Practice for Recording Data from Atmospheric Corrosion Tests of Metallic-Coated Steel Specimens  

E-print Network

1.1 This practice covers a procedure for recording data of atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic-coated steel specimens. Its objective is the assurance of (1) complete identification of materials before testing, (2) objective reporting of material appearance during visual inspections, and (3) adequate photographic, micrographic, and chemical laboratory examinations at specific stages of deterioration, and at the end of the tests. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01

357

Dresden 1 Radiation Level Reduction Program. Intergranular corrosion tests of sensitized Type304 stainless steel in Dow NS1, and stress corrosion cracking tests of Type304 stainless steel and carbon and low alloy steels in Dow copper rinse solution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the extent of intergranular attack on sensitized Type-304 stainless steel by a proprietary Dow Chemical solvent, NS-1, which is to be used in the chemical cleaning of the Dresden 1 primary system. In addition, tests were performed to evaluate stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel and post-weld heat-treated ASTM A336-F1, A302-B, and

1978-01-01

358

Accelerated-life testing of sintered filters for high-temperature corrosive environments  

SciTech Connect

Thermal waste treatment systems generate harsh off-gas environments in the event of an excursion from normal operating conditions. These harsh environments consist of chlorine and other halogens, sulfur, salts, and.erosive particles at temperatures approaching 450 C. An accelerated-life tester was developed to generate these corrosive environments and to provide a means for testing a variety of new and promising materials for use in thermal waste treatment systems. This paper discusses the use of the accelerated-life tester to investigate corrosion of sintered ceramic (silicon carbide) and stainless steel alloy (SS316B) filters. Each filter sample was characterized by measurement of weight change, and by results obtained from surface analytical techniques. In this Phase 1 investigation, porous sintered silicon carbide (SiC) filter elements were found to be relatively inert to the test environment. Under identical exposure conditions, SS316B filter elements were found to corrode significantly. These tests confirmed that porous sintered SiC is a promising filter material for use in hot corrosive HCl-containing gas environments.

Quick, N.R. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Golden, CO (United States); Weber, L.D. [Pall Corp., Port Washington, NY (United States)

1995-12-31

359

The LLNL HFTF (High-Field Test Facility): A flexible superconducting test facility for fusion magnet development  

SciTech Connect

The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) is a flexible and, in many ways, unique facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for providing the test capabilities needed to develop the superconducting magnet systems of the next generation fusion machines. The superconducting coil set in HFTF has been operated successfully at LLNL, but in its original configuration, its utility as a test facility was somewhat restricted and cryogenic losses were intolerable. A new cryostat for the coil set allows the magnet system to remain cold indefinitely so the system is available on short notice to provide high fields (about 11 T) inside a reasonably large test volume (0.3-m diam). The test volume is physically and thermally isolated from the coil volume, allowing test articles to be inserted and removed without disturbing the coil cryogenic volume, which is maintained by an on-line refrigerator. Indeed, with the proper precautions, it is even unnecessary to drop the field in the HFTF during such an operation. The separate test volume also allows reduced temperature operation without the expense and complication of subcooling the entire coil set (about 20-t cold mass). The HFTF has thus become a key facility in the LLNL magnet development program, where the primary goal is to demonstrate the technology for producing fields to 15 T with winding-pack current densities of 40 A.mm/sup -2/ in coils sized for fusion applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.

1987-09-17

360

Assessment of the National Transonic Facility for Laminar Flow Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A transonic wing, designed to accentuate key transition physics, is tested at cryogenic conditions at the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley. The collaborative test between Boeing and NASA is aimed at assessing the facility for high-Reynolds number testing of configurations with significant regions of laminar flow. The test shows a unit Reynolds number upper limit of 26 M/ft for achieving natural transition. At higher Reynolds numbers turbulent wedges emanating from the leading edge bypass the natural transition process and destroy the laminar flow. At lower Reynolds numbers, the transition location is well correlated with the Tollmien-Schlichting-wave N-factor. The low-Reynolds number results suggest that the flow quality is acceptable for laminar flow testing if the loss of laminar flow due to bypass transition can be avoided.

Crouch, Jeffrey D.; Sutanto, Mary I.; Witkowski, David P.; Watkins, A. Neal; Rivers, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.

2010-01-01

361

Evaluation of a steady state MPD thruster test facility  

SciTech Connect

The successful development of multimegawatt MPD thrusters depends, to a great extent, on testing them under steady state high altitude space conditions. Steady state testing is required to provide thermal characteristics, life cycle, erosion, and other essential data. the major technical obstacle for ground testing of MPD thrusters in a space simulation facility is the inability of state-of-the-art vacuum systems to handle the tremendous pumping speeds required for multimegawatt MPD thrusters. This is true for other types of electric propulsion devices as well. This paper discusses the results of the first phase of an evaluation of steady state MPD thruster test facilities. The first phase addresses the conceptual design of vacuum systems required to support multimegawatt MPD thruster testing. Three advanced pumping system concepts were evaluated and are presented here.

Reed, C.B.; Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.; Doss, E.D.; Kilgore, O.

1985-01-01

362

Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

2006-06-01

363

Corrosion-erosion test of SS316L grain boundary engineering material (GBEM) in lead bismuth flowing loop  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To evaluate the lifetime of structural materials utilized in a spallation neutron source, corrosion tests in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) have been done at JAEA. Austenitic steels are preferable as the structural material for ADS. However, previous studies have revealed that austenitic steel SS316 shows severe corrosion-erosion in LBE because of LBE penetration through grain boundaries and separation of grains. So it was considered that GBE (grain-boundary engineered) materials may be effective to improve the corrosion resistance of austenitic steels in LBE. In this study, the results of corrosion tests on austenitic steel SS316L-BM (base metal) and SS316L-GBEM (grain-boundary-engineered material) under flowing LBE conditions will be reported. The corrosion test was performed using the JAEA lead-bismuth material corrosion loop (JLBL-1). The experimental conditions were as follows: The high and low temperature parts of the loop were 450 °C and 350 °C, respectively. The flow velocity at the test specimens was about 0.7 m/s. The oxygen concentration in LBE was not controlled and was estimated to have been very low. After the 3600 h of operation, macroscopic, SEM, and SIM observations and EDX analysis were carried out. The results showed that the corrosion depth and LBE penetration through the grain boundaries of the 316SS-GBEM were smaller than those of the 316SS-BM.

Saito, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Kenji; Hamaguchi, Dai; Tezuka, Masao; Miyagi, Masanori; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

2012-12-01

364

Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

2008-04-01

365

Environmental Control and Life Support Systems Test Facility at MSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space Station (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. Scientists and engineers at the MSFC are working together to provide the ISS with systems that are safe, efficient and cost-effective. These compact and powerful systems are collectively called the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, or simply, ECLSS. This is an exterior view of the U.S. Laboratory Module Simulator containing the ECLSS Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) testing facility at MSFC. At the bottom right is the data acquisition and control computers (in the blue equipment racks) that monitor the testing in the facility. The ITCS simulator facility duplicates the function, operation, and troubleshooting problems of the ITCS. The main function of the ITCS is to control the temperature of equipment and hardware installed in a typical ISS Payload Rack.

2001-01-01

366

Local electrochemical impedance at the cut-edge of coil-coated galvanized steel after corrosion testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cut edge corrosion of polyester-coated galvanized steel was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Measurements were performed on specimens which had been tested in an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test. The samples were subjected to 208 wet and dry cycles in an exposure cabinet (26 days) with an artificial acid rain solution. Subsequently, the local impedance response of 50.3 mm2 areas

I Dehri; R. L Howard; S. B Lyon

1999-01-01

367

Direct sunlight facility for testing and research in HCPV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A facility for testing different components for HCPV application has been developed in the framework of "Fotovoltaico ad Alta Efficienza" (FAE) project funded by the Sicilian Regional Authority (PO FESR Sicilia 2007/2013 4.1.1.1). The testing facility is equipped with an heliostat providing a wide solar beam inside the lab, an optical bench for mounting and aligning the HCPV components, electronic equipments to characterize the I-V curves of multijunction cells operated up to 2000 suns, a system to circulate a fluid in the heat sink at controlled temperature and flow-rate, a data logging system with sensors to measure temperatures in several locations and fluid pressures at the inlet and outlet of the heat sink, and a climatic chamber with large test volume to test assembled HCPV modules.

Sciortino, Luisa; Agnello, Simonpietro; Barbera, Marco; Bonsignore, Gaetano; Buscemi, Alessandro; Candia, Roberto; Cannas, Marco; Collura, Alfonso; Di Cicca, Gaspare; Gelardi, Franco Mario; Cicero, Ugo Lo; Montagnino, Fabio Maria; Napoli, Gianluca; Paredes, Filippo; Spallino, Luisa; Varisco, Salvo

2014-09-01

368

Beam Diagnostics for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility is presently under construction at BNL. The goals of this test facility are first to demonstrate stable intense CW electron beam with parameters typical for the RHIC e-cooling project (and potentially for eRHIC), second to test novel elements of the ERL (high current CW photo-cathode, superconducting RF cavity with HOM dampers, and feedback systems), and finally to test lattice dependence of stability criteria. Planned diagnostics include position monitors, loss monitors, transverse profile monitors (both optical and wires), scrapers/halo monitors, a high resolution differential current monitor, phase monitors, an energy spread monitor, and a fast transverse monitor (for beam break-up studies and the energy feedback system). We discuss diagnostics challenges that are unique to this project, and present preliminary system specifications. In addition, we include a brief discussion of the timing system.

Cameron, Peter; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Dawson, William; Degen, Chris; DellaPenna, Al; Gassner, David; Kesselman, Martin; Kewish, Jorg; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Mead, Joseph; Oerter, Brian; Russo, Tom; Vetter, Kurt; Yakimenko, Vitaly

2004-11-01

369

Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels  

E-print Network

1 Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels Solar Thermal heater w/ digital control panel Source: Solar Force Corporation Auxiliary - Heat pump water heater 50 Panels National Institute of Standards and Technology Engineering Laboratory #12;NZERTF Gaithersburg, MD

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

370

10. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ARVFS TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ARVFS TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, FRAME, AND SHIELDING TANK. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-6171, TAKEN NOVEMBER 10, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

371

Fast Flux Test Facility core restraint system performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Characterizing Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) core restraint system performance has been ongoing since the first operating cycle. Characterization consists of prerun analysis for each core load, in-reactor and postirradiation measurements of subassembly withdrawal loads and deformations, and using measurement data to fine tune predictive models. Monitoring FFTF operations and performing trend analysis has made it possible to gain insight

S. L. Hecht; R. G. Trenchard

1990-01-01

372

29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151970. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

373

A NEW TESTING FACILITY TO CHARACTERIZE ESD HAZARDS  

E-print Network

A NEW TESTING FACILITY TO CHARACTERIZE ESD HAZARDS IN INDUSTRIAL BAGHOUSE FILTERS S. Mauger, L: samuel.mauger@ineris.fr lionel.perrette@ineris.fr ABSTRACT Baghouse filters are common dust collection other powders and bags in order to build a safety electrostatic concept for baghouse filters. 1. CONTEXT

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

374

The background magnets of the Samsung Superconductor Test Facility (SSTF)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The background magnet system of SSTF (Samsung Superconductor Test Facility) for KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) is now under design. The main coil (MC) is split solenoids and the gap can be changed from 0 to 750 mm. The ID of MC is 750 mm. It will be wound using a CICC (cable-in-conduit conductor) designed for the central solenoid

Sungkeun Baang; Keeman Kim; Yongjin Kim; Hyunki Park; Sangbo Kim; Qiuliang Wang; M. P. Alexeev; O. P. Anashkin; D. P. Ivanov; V. E. Keilin; I. A. Kovalev; S. L. Kruglov; V. V. Lysenko; S. M. Miklyaev; I. O. Shchegolev; V. I. Shcherbakov; S. Shevchenko; I. O. Shugaev; M. I. Surin

2001-01-01

375

RF generalization and control for the TESLA TEST FACILITY  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The RF needs for the TESLA Test Facility a DESY are described. Possible klystron-modulator schemes, the waveguide RF distribution system, phase and amplitude control, beam loading, and a scheme to cope with detuning of the cavities due to Lorentz forces are described. Finally, some persectives for the development of new RF sources are discussed. (AIP)

Gamp, Alexander

1995-07-01

376

CRYOGENIC CONTROLS FOR FERMILAB'S SRF CAVITIES AND TEST FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A new superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities test facility is now operational at Fermilab's Meson Detector Building (MDB). The Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF), located in a separate building 500 m away, supplies the facility with cryogens. The design incorporates ambient temperature pumping for superfluid helium production, as well as three 0.6 kW at 4.5 K refrigerators, five screw compressors, a helium purifier, helium and nitrogen inventory, cryogenic distribution system, and a variety of test cryostats.To control and monitor the vastly distributed cryogenic system, a flexible scheme has been developed. Both commercial and experimental physics tools are used. APACS+, a process automation control system from Siemens-Moore, is at the heart of the design. APACS+ allows engineers to configure an ever evolving test facility while maintaining control over the plant and distribution system. APACS+ nodes at CTF and MDB are coupled by a fiber optic network. DirectLogic205 PLCs by KOYO are used as the field level interface to most I/O.The top layer of this system uses EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) as a SCADA/HMI. Utilities for graphical display, control loop setting, real time/historical plotting and alarming have been implemented by using the world-wide library of applications for EPICS.OPC client/server technology is used to bridge across each different platform.This paper presents this design and its successful implementation.

Norris, B.; Bossert, R.; Klebaner, A.; Lackey, S.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.; Sirotenko, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

2008-03-16

377

Cryogenic Controls for Fermilab's Srf Cavities and Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities test facility is now operational at Fermilab's Meson Detector Building (MDB). The Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF), located in a separate building 500 m away, supplies the facility with cryogens. The design incorporates ambient temperature pumping for superfluid helium production, as well as three 0.6 kW at 4.5 K refrigerators, five screw compressors, a helium purifier, helium and nitrogen inventory, cryogenic distribution system, and a variety of test cryostats. To control and monitor the vastly distributed cryogenic system, a flexible scheme has been developed. Both commercial and experimental physics tools are used. APACS+™, a process automation control system from Siemens-Moore, is at the heart of the design. APACS+™ allows engineers to configure an ever evolving test facility while maintaining control over the plant and distribution system. APACS+™ nodes at CTF and MDB are coupled by a fiber optic network. DirectLogic205 PLCs by KOYO® are used as the field level interface to most I/O. The top layer of this system uses EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) as a SCADA/HMI. Utilities for graphical display, control loop setting, real time/historical plotting and alarming have been implemented by using the world-wide library of applications for EPICS. OPC client/server technology is used to bridge across each different platform. This paper presents this design and its successful implementation.

Norris, B.; Bossert, R.; Klebaner, A.; Lackey, S.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.; Sirotenko, V.

2008-03-01

378

New Mexico Water Testing Facilities Laboratory Certification for  

E-print Network

-754-6671 HM ­ Heavy Metals SUR ­ Giardia, Cryptosporidium, MPA SOC ­ Synthetic Organic Chemicals MNew Mexico Water Testing Facilities Laboratory Certification for Analyte Group (s) Phone Number-863-2001 Hall Environmental Analysis Lab Albuquerque, NM HM, SOC, VOC, IO, DBP, SD, PBcU, M, E 505-345-3975 City

Johnson, Eric E.

379

Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

Wagner, R.N.

1997-01-17

380

Skylab Medical Experiments Altitude Test /SMEAT/ facility design and operation.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the design approaches and test facility operation methods used to successfully accomplish a 56-day test for Skylab to permit evaluation of selected Skylab medical experiments in a ground test simulation of the Skylab environment with an astronaut crew. The systems designed for this test include the two-gas environmental control system, the fire suppression and detection system, equipment transfer lock, ground support equipment, safety systems, potable water system, waste management system, lighting and power system, television monitoring, communications and recreation systems, and food freezer.

Hinners, A. H., Jr.; Correale, J. V.

1973-01-01

381

Fast Flux Test Facility sodium pump operating experience - mechanical  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Transport System (HTS) pumps were designed, fabricated, tested, and installed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Plant during the period from September 1970 through July 1977. Since completion of the installation and sodium fill in December 1978, the FFTF Plant pumps have undergone extensive testing and operation with HTS testing and reactor operation. Steady-state hydraulic and mechanical performances have been and are excellent. In all, FFTF primary and secondary pumps have operated in sodium for approximately 75,000 hours and 79,000 hours, respectively, to August 24, 1987.

Buonamici, R.

1987-11-01

382

Five years operating experience at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 Mw(t), loop-type, sodium-cooled, fast neutron reactor. It is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the United States Department of Energy at Richland, Washington. The FFTF is a multipurpose test reactor used to irradiate fuels and materials for programs such as Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) research, fusion research, space power systems,

R. J. Baumhardt; R. A. Bechtold

1987-01-01

383

Knowledge Preservation at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. The technologies employed in designing and constructing this reactor, along with information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, are currently being secured and archived by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy. This report provides a status update documenting the overall project efforts to retrieve and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors.

Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

2011-11-30

384

Knowledge Preservation at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. The technologies employed in designing and constructing this reactor, along with information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, are currently being secured and archived by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy. This report is one in a series documenting the overall project efforts to retrieve and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors

Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

2012-01-30

385

Corrosion 99: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

NONE

1999-11-01

386

Corrosion 99: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

Not Available

1999-01-01

387

Maintenance Implementation Plan for the Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The maintenance program for the 400 Area, Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF)Plant and plant support facilities includes the reactor plant, reactor support systems and equipment, Maintenance and Storage Facility, plant buildings, and building support systems. These are the areas of the facility that are covered by this plan. The personnel support facilities and buildings are maintained and supported by another department within Westinghouse Hanford, and are not included here. The FFTF maintenance program conducts the corrective and preventive maintenance necessary to ensure the operational reliability and safety of the reactor plant and support equipment. This comprehensive maintenance program also provides for maximizing the useful life of plant equipment and systems to realize the most efficient possible use of resources. The long-term future of the FFTF is uncertain; in the near term, the facility is being placed in standby. As the plant transitions from operating status to standby, the scope of the maintenance program will change from one of reactor operational reliability and life extension to preservation.

Crawford, C.N.; Duffield, M.F.

1992-06-01

388

Corrosion test selection for aluminum autobody sheet with chromium-free pretreatments  

SciTech Connect

Three accelerated laboratory corrosion tests have been shown to cause the same relative order of degradation for six pretreatments on four aluminum autobody sheet alloys. Two of the pretreatments, one containing chromium and one without chromium, were consistently better than the other four. Two of the pretreatments, one a traditional zinc phosphate and one a so-called iron phosphate, were consistently poorer than the other four. Additional testing of the more promising pretreatments, including long-term atmospheric field exposures, will be necessary.

Snodgrass, J.S.; Weir, J.R. [Reynolds Metals Co., Richmond, VA (United States). Corporate Research and Development

1995-11-01

389

Hydrologic test plan for the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic tests are planned at seven wells that will be drilled at the proposed Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility (ERDF). These wells are supporting hydrologic, geologic, and hydrochemical characterization at this new facility. Hydrologic testing will consist of instantaneous slug tests, slug interference tests, step-drawdown tests, and constant rate discharge tests (generally single-well). These test results and later groundwater monitoring data will be used to determine groundwater flow directions, flow rates, and the chemical makeup of the groundwater below the proposed ERDF. The seven wells will be drilled in two phases. In Phase I four wells will be drilled and tested: Two to the top of the uppermost aquifer (water table) and two as characterization boreholes to the top of basalt. The Phase I wells are located in the northern portion of the proposed ERDF site (699-32-72, 699-SDF-6, -7 and -8) (Figure 1). If Phase II drilling proceeds, the remaining three wells will be installed and tested (two deep and one shallow). A phased approach to drilling is warranted because of current uncertainty in the land use requirements at the proposed ERDF.

Swanson, L.C.

1993-09-30

390

Runway Incursion Prevention System Testing at the Wallops Flight Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) integrated with a Synthetic Vision System concept (SVS) was tested at the Reno/Tahoe International Airport (RNO) and Wallops Flight Facility (WAL) in the summer of 2004. RIPS provides enhanced surface situational awareness and alerts of runway conflicts in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using a Gulfstream-V (G-V) aircraft as the test platform and a NASA test aircraft and a NASA test van as incurring traffic. The purpose of the study, from the RIPS perspective, was to evaluate the RIPS airborne incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts, focusing on crossing runway incursion scenarios. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, WAL flight test activities, and WAL test results.

Jones, Denise R.

2005-01-01

391

A unique flight test facility: Description and results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Dryden Flight Research Facility has developed a unique research facility for conducting aerodynamic and fluid mechanics experiments in flight. A low aspect ratio fin, referred to as the flight test fixture (FTF), is mounted on the underside of the fuselage of an F-104G aircraft. The F-104G/FTF facility is described, and the capabilities are discussed. The capabilities include (1) a large Mach number envelope (0.4 to 2.0), including the region through Mach 1.0; (2) the potential ability to test articles larger than those that can be tested in wind tunnels; (3) the large chord Reynolds number envelope (greater than 40 million); and (4) the ability to define small increments in friction drag between two test surfaces. Data are presented from experiments that demonstrate some of the capabilities of the FTF, including the shuttle thermal protection system airload tests, instrument development, and base drag studies. Proposed skin friction experiments and instrument evaluation studies are also discussed.

Meyer, R. R., Jr.

1982-01-01

392

A mission profile life test facility. [for mercury ion thrusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test facility is being prepared for a 16,000 hour mission profile life test of multiple electric propulsion thrust subsystems. The facility will be capable of simultaneously operating three 2.7 kW, 30 cm mercury ion thrusters and their power processing. The facility will permit conduction of a program of long-term tests to document thruster characteristics as a function of time and operating point to allow prediction of thruster performance for any mission profile. The thruster will be tested in a 7m by 10m vacuum chamber. Each thruster will be installed in a separate lock chamber so that it can be extended into, or extracted from the main chamber without violating the vacuum integrity of the other thruster. The thrusters will exhaust into a 3m by 5m frozen mercury target. The target and an array of cryopanels to collect sputtered target material will be liquid nitrogen chilled. Power processor units will be tested in an adjacent 1.5m by 2m vacuum chamber and will be temperature controlled by simulated heat pipes.

James, E.; Vetrone, R.; Bechtel, R.

1978-01-01

393

ESO adaptive optics facility progress and first laboratory test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Adaptive Optics Facility project is completing the integration of its systems at ESO Headquarters in Garching. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM has undergone a series of tests on ASSIST in 2013 which have validated its optical performance and launched the System Test Phase of the AOF. This has been followed by the performance evaluation of the GRAAL natural guide star mode on-axis and will continue in 2014 with its Ground Layer AO mode. The GALACSI module (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO) will then be tested. The AOF has also taken delivery of the second scientific thin shell mirror and the first 22 Watt Sodium laser Unit. We will report on the system tests status, the performances evaluated on the ASSIST bench and advancement of the 4Laser Guide Star Facility. We will also present the near future plans for commissioning on the telescope and some considerations on tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jérome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-Francois; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Haguenauer, Pierre; Abad, Jose A.; Fischer, Gerhard; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Reyes Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan M.; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Ernstberger, Bernhard; Friedenauer, Axel

2014-07-01

394

Modification of Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility for Rapid Testing of Cable-In Conductors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document describes proposed design modifications to the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency that will allow rapid test and changeout of central solenoid (CS) conductor samples and more precise and reliable characterization than is presently achievable elsewhere. Typically CS testing at the CSMC Test Facility is followed by testing at the SULTAN facility in Switzerland. The SULTAN facility has very short in-field length and a short length between the high field zone and the joints. This makes it difficult to obtain uniform distribution of current in the cable at low voltage levels, which defines the current sharing temperature. In a working magnet, like the ITER CS, there is a long length of conductor in the highest field, which provides a more uniform current distribution near current sharing. The modified facility will serve as an economical tool for ITER conductor testing. The test item will be a three turn sample, about 15 m long, placed in the background field of the CSMC. This new mode of operation will reduce the time of cooldown, warmup, and installation of the sample into the CSMC facility, which should significantly reduce the testing cost per sample.

Hatfield, D. R.; Miller, J. R.; Martovetsky, N.; Kenney, S. J.

2010-04-01

395

Real-time optical measurement of alkali species in air for jet engine corrosion testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurement of the corrosion potential of engines that must operate in a marine environment is a critical step in procuring new aircraft for the U.S. Navy. Such testing is performed in special engine test cells in which engines are exposed to a saline aerosol. Development of an on-line, non-intrusive measurement can reduce the cost to the Navy of engine testing by reducing the time that the test cell must be operated. We have recently completed a feasibility study for a method of measuring of sodium concentration in aqueous aerosols using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. This technique is real-time and non-intrusive. In preliminary tests, we have demonstrated the ability to detect from 10 to 6,400 ppb sodium in air. Sub-part-per billion levels of sodium in air can be detected by this method and the measurement was linear over two orders of magnitude in concentration.

Holtzclaw, K. W.; Moore, J.; Senior, C. L.

1993-01-01

396

Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

2008-01-01

397

Air pollution control system testing at the DOE offgas components test facility  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) leads an extensive technical support program designed to obtain incinerator and air pollution control equipment performance data to support facility start-up and operation. A key component of this technical support program includes the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a pilot-scale offgas system test bed. The primary goal for this test facility is to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the planned CIF Air Pollution Control System (APCS). To accomplish this task, the OCTF has been equipped with a 1/10 scale CIF offgas system equipment components and instrumentation. In addition, the OCTF design maximizes the flexibility of APCS operation and facility instrumentation and sampling capabilities permit accurate characterization of all process streams throughout the facility. This allows APCS equipment performance to be evaluated in an integrated system under a wide range of possible operating conditions. This paper summarizes the use of this DOE test facility to successfully demonstrate APCS operability and maintainability, evaluate and optimize equipment and instrument performance, and provide direct CIF start-up support. These types of facilities are needed to permit resolution of technical issues associated with design and operation of systems that treat and dispose combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive waste throughout and DOE complex.

Burns, D.B.; Speed, D.; VanPelt, W.; Burns, H.H.

1997-06-01

398

Reactor physics results from fast flux test facility operation  

SciTech Connect

Criticality was first achieved with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) a little more than 10 yr ago on February 9, 1980. Although the FFTF was designed and built primarily for testing fuels, materials, and components for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor program, it has, over its first 10 yr of operation, provided valuable information in many other areas. This paper provides a summary of the contributions to the physics of liquid-metal reactors (LMRs) obtained from operation of and testing in the FFTF, with emphasis on some of the more significant and interesting accomplishments.

Harris, R.A.; Bennett, R.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

1990-01-01

399

Preliminary safety evaluation (PSE) for Sodium Storage Facility at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This evaluation was performed for the Sodium Storage Facility (SSF) which will be constructed at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the area adjacent to the South and West Dump Heat Exchanger (DHX) pits. The purpose of the facility is to allow unloading the sodium from the FFTF plant tanks and piping. The significant conclusion of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) is that the only Safety Class 2 components are the four sodium storage tanks and their foundations. The building, because of its imminent risk to the tanks under an earthquake or high winds, will be Safety Class 3/2, which means the building has a Safety Class 3 function with the Safety Class 2 loads of seismic and wind factored into the design.

Bowman, B.R.

1994-09-30

400

Groundwater Remediation and Alternate Energy at White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

White Sands Test Facility Core Capabilities: a) Remote Hazardous Testing of Reactive, Explosive, and Toxic Materials and Fluids; b) Hypergolic Fluids Materials and Systems Testing; c) Oxygen Materials and System Testing; d) Hypervelocity Impact Testing; e)Flight Hardware Processing; and e) Propulsion Testing. There is no impact to any drinking water well. Includes public wells and the NASA supply well. There is no public exposure. Groundwater is several hundred feet below ground. No air or surface water exposure. Plume is moving very slowly to the west. Plume Front Treatment system will stop this westward movement. NASA performs on-going monitoring. More than 200 wells and zones are routinely sampled. Approx. 850 samples are obtained monthly and analyzed for over 300 different hazardous chemicals.

Fischer, Holger

2008-01-01

401

Thermal Vacuum Facility for Testing Thermal Protection Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thermal vacuum facility for testing launch vehicle thermal protection systems by subjecting them to transient thermal conditions simulating re-entry aerodynamic heating is described. Re-entry heating is simulated by controlling the test specimen surface temperature and the environmental pressure in the chamber. Design requirements for simulating re-entry conditions are briefly described. A description of the thermal vacuum facility, the quartz lamp array and the control system is provided. The facility was evaluated by subjecting an 18 by 36 in. Inconel honeycomb panel to a typical re-entry pressure and surface temperature profile. For most of the test duration, the average difference between the measured and desired pressures was 1.6% of reading with a standard deviation of +/- 7.4%, while the average difference between measured and desired temperatures was 7.6% of reading with a standard deviation of +/- 6.5%. The temperature non-uniformity across the panel was 12% during the initial heating phase (t less than 500 sec.), and less than 2% during the remainder of the test.

Daryabeigi, Kamran; Knutson, Jeffrey R.; Sikora, Joseph G.

2002-01-01

402

Cryosorption Pumps for a Neutral Beam Injector Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the experiences of the manufacturing and the operating of a system of two identical cryosorption pumps used in a neutral beam injector test facility for fusion reactors. Calculated and measured heat loads of the cryogenic liquid helium and liquid nitrogen circuits of the cryosorption pumps are discussed. The design calculations concerning the thermo-hydraulics of the helium circuit are compared with experiences from the operation of the cryosorption pumps. Both cryopumps are integrated in a test facility of a neutral beam injector that will be used to heat the plasma of a nuclear fusion reactor with a beam of deuterium or hydrogen molecules. The huge gas throughput into the vessel of the test facility results in challenging needs on the cryopumping system. The developed cryosorption pumps are foreseen to pump a hydrogen throughput of 20 - 30 mbar?l/s. To establish a mean pressure of several 10-5 mbar in the test vessel a pumping speed of about 350 m3/s per pump is needed. The pressure conditions must be maintained over several hours pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels, which necessitates a very high pumping capacity. A possibility to fulfill these requirements is the use of charcoal coated cryopanels to pump the gasloads by adsorption. For the cooling of the cryopanels, liquid helium at saturation pressure is used and therefore a two-phase forced flow in the cryopump system must be controlled.

Dremel, M.; Mack, A.; Day, C.; Jensen, H.

2006-04-01

403

Gas Test Loop Facilities Alternatives Assessment Report Rev 1  

SciTech Connect

An important task in the Gas Test Loop (GTL) conceptual design was to determine the best facility to serve as host for this apparatus, which will allow fast-flux neutron testing in an existing nuclear facility. A survey was undertaken of domestic and foreign nuclear reactors and accelerator facilities to arrive at that determination. Two major research reactors in the U.S. were considered in detail, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), each with sufficient power to attain the required neutron fluxes. HFIR routinely operates near its design power limit of 100 MW. ATR has traditionally operated at less than half its design power limit of 250 MW. Both of these reactors should be available for at least the next 30 years. The other major U.S. research reactor, the Missouri University Research Reactor, does not have sufficient power to reach the required neutron flux nor do the smaller research reactors. Of the foreign reactors investigated, BOR-60 is perhaps the most attractive. Monju and BN 600 are power reactors for their respective electrical grids. Although the Joyo reactor is vigorously campaigning for customers, local laws regarding transport of radioactive material mean it would be very difficult to retrieve test articles from either Japanese reactor for post irradiation examination. PHENIX is scheduled to close in 2008 and is fully booked until then. FBTR is limited to domestic (Indian) users only. Data quality is often suspect in Russia. The only accelerator seriously considered was the Fuel and Material Test Station (FMTS) currently proposed for operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum in FMTS is similar to that found in a fast reactor, but it has a pronounced high-energy tail that is atypical of fast fission reactor spectra. First irradiation in the FMTS is being contemplated for 2008. Detailed review of these facilities resulted in the recommendation that the ATR would be the best host for the GTL.

William J. Skerjanc; William F. Skerjanc

2005-07-01

404

The initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking in AISI 4340 and 3.5 Ni?Cr?Mo?V rotor steel in constant load tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Constant load tests with smooth tensile specimens of AISI 4340 and 3.5 Ni?Cr?Mo?V rotor steel were carried out to investigate the influence of prior creep on the initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). SCC did initiate without any significant pitting corrosion or general corrosion. A period of prior creep in a non-SCC environment resulted in significantly reduced localised corrosion along

A. Oehlert; A. Atrens

1996-01-01

405

FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) Integrated Leak Rate Test Computer System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a liquid-metal-cooled test reactor located on the Hanford Site. The FFTF is the only reactor of this type designed and operated with the intent of meeting the licensing requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Unique characteristics of the FFTF that present special challenges related to leak rate testing include thin wall containment

Hubbard

1987-01-01

406

LPT. Shield test facility assembly and test building (TAN646), south ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

LPT. Shield test facility assembly and test building (TAN-646), south end of EBOR helium wing. Camera facing north. Monorail protrudes from upper-level door. Rust marks on concrete wall are from stack. Metal shed is post-1970 addition. INEEL negative no. HD-40-8-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

407

A VERSATILE HIGH PERFORMANCE TESTING FACILITY TOWARDS REAL-TIME DYNAMIC HYBRID TESTING  

E-print Network

in a few earth- quake engineering laboratories worldwide. However, full-scale laboratory seismic testingA VERSATILE HIGH PERFORMANCE TESTING FACILITY TOWARDS REAL-TIME DYNAMIC HYBRID TESTING A-based data fusion processing and control systems, and a multi- million dollar laboratory expansion

Bruneau, Michel

408

Advanced burner-rig test for oxidation–corrosion resistance evaluation of MCrAlY\\/superalloys systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Protective coatings are used on gas turbine components to enable them to survive in engine-operating conditions. This study presents a recently developed cyclic burner-rig test that is used to simulate helicopter engine conditions and to assess the oxidation and hot corrosion behaviour of MCrAlY coatings on nickel-base superalloys. A diluted sea-salt solution is atomised into the burner-rig to simulate hot-corrosion.

Aymeric Raffaitin; Fabrice Crabos; Eric Andrieu; Daniel Monceau

2006-01-01

409

Non-animal testing strategies for assessment of the skin corrosion and skin irritation potential of ingredients and finished products  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dermatotoxicologist today is faced with a dilemma. Protection of workers and consumers from skin toxicities (irritation and allergy) associated with exposure to products, and the ingredients they contain, requires toxicological skin testing prior to manufacture, transport, or marketing. Testing for skin corrosion or irritation has traditionally been conducted in animals, particularly in rabbits via the long established Draize test

M. K. Robinson; C. Cohen; A. de Brugerolle de Fraissinette; M. Ponec; E. Whittle; J. H. Fentem

2002-01-01

410

Twenty-five-year corrosion tests of 55% Al-Zn alloy coated steel sheet  

SciTech Connect

Long-term atmospheric corrosion tests of steel sheet hot-dip coated with a series of aluminum-zinc alloy compositions were conducted in a wide range of environments. In a severe marine environment, coatings containing 44.6% or more aluminum lasted about three times as long as conventional galvanized with the same coating thickness. In moderate marine, rural, and industrial environments, coatings containing 44.6% or more aluminum remained intact after 25 years and have already lasted twice as long as conventional galvanized.

Townsend, H.E. (Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States))

1993-04-01

411

Superconducting Radio-Frequency Modules Test Facility Operating Experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service the SRF R&D needs. The project's first stage has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single-cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at Meson Detector Building (MDB) results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.

2008-03-01

412

SUPERCONDUCTING RADIO-FREQUENCY MODULES TEST FACILITY OPERATING EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R and D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service the SRF R and D needs. The project's first stage has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single-cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at Meson Detector Building (MDB) results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

2008-03-16

413

Full-scale thrust reverser testing in an altitude facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle designed and fabricated by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft was installed on a PW1128 turbofan engine and tested during thrust reverser operation in an altitude facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. A unique collection system was used to capture the thrust reverser exhaust gas and transport it to the primary exhaust collector. Tests were conducted at three flight conditions with varying amounts of thrust reverse at each condition. Some reverser exhaust gas spillage by the collection system was encountered but engine performance was unaffected at all flight conditions tested. Based on the results of this test program, the feasibility of altitude testing of advanced multi-function exhaust nozzle systems has been demonstrated.

Mehalic, Charles M.; Lottig, Roy A.

1987-01-01

414

Full-scale thrust reverser testing in an altitude facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle designed and fabricated by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft was installed on a PW1128 turbofan engine and tested during thrust reverser operation in an altitude facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. A unique collection system was used to capture the thrust reverser exhaust gas and transport it to the primary exhaust collector. Tests were conducted at three flight conditions with varying amounts of thrust reverse at each condition. Some reverser exhaust gas spillage by the collection system was encountered but engine performance was unaffected at all flight conditions tested. Based on the results of this test program, the feasibility of altitude testing of advanced multifunction exhaust nozzle systems has been demonstrated.

Mehalic, Charles M.; Lottig, Roy A.

1987-01-01

415

Hanford tank initiative test facility site selection study  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) project is developing equipment for the removal of hard heel waste from the Hanford Site underground single-shell waste storage tanks. The HTI equipment will initially be installed in the 241-C-106 tank where its operation will be demonstrated. This study evaluates existing Hanford Site facilities and other sites for functional testing of the HTI equipment before it is installed into the 241-C-106 tank.

Staehr, T.W.

1997-04-03

416

The superconducting transformer of the Samsung Superconductor Test Facility (SSTF)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the frames of designing the SSTF (Samsung Superconductor Test Facility) for the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research), the 50 kA transformer charging a CICC (cable-in-conduit conductor) short sample for one second is now under design. The primary winding conductor consists of six NbTi and six stainless steel strands tabled around a low RRR rectangular copper core, which was

Sungkeun Baang; Hyunjung Choi; Keeman Kim; Sangbo Kim; Yongjin Kim; Hyunki Park; Qiuliang Wang; A. I. Boev; D. P. Ivanov; V. E. Keilin; I. A. Kovalev; S. L. Kruglov; V. V. Lysenko; I. O. Shchegolev; V. I. Shcherbakov; I. O. Shugaev; M. I. Surin

2001-01-01

417

World-Wide Benchmarking of ITER Strand Test Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The world-wide procurement of Nb3Sn and NbTi for the ITER superconducting magnet systems will involve eight to ten strand suppliers from six Domestic Agencies (DAs) on three continents. To ensure accurate and consistent measurement of the physical and superconducting properties of the composite strand, a strand test facility benchmarking effort was initiated in August 2008. The objectives of this effort

Matthew C. Jewell; Thierry Boutboul; Luc-Rene Oberli; Fang Liu; Yu Wu; Alexander Vostner; Takaaki Isono; Yoshikazu Takahashi; Soo-Hyeon Park; Alexander Shikov; Alexandra Vorobieva; Nicolai Martovetsky; Kazutaka Seo; Denis Bessette; Arnaud Devred

2010-01-01

418

ORNL facilities for testing first-wall components  

SciTech Connect

Future long-impulse magnetic fusion devices will have operating characteristics similar to those described in the design studies of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), the Fusion Engineering Device (FED), and the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). Their first-wall components (pumped limiters, divertor plates, and rf waveguide launchers with Faraday shields) will be subjected to intense bombardment by energetic particles exhausted from the plasma, including fusion products. These particles are expected to have particle energies of approx.100 eV, particle fluxes of approx.10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/, and heat fluxes of approx.1 kW/cm/sup 2/ CW to approx.100 kW/cm/sup 2/ transient. No components are available to simultaneously handle these particle and heat fluxes, survive the resulting sputtering erosion, and remove exhaust gas without degrading plasma quality. Critical issues for research and development of first-wall components have been identified in the INTOR Activity. Test facilities are needed to qualify candidate materials and develop components. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), existing neutral beam and wave heating test facilities can be modified to simulate first-wall environments with heat fluxes up to 30 kW/cm/sup 2/, particle fluxes of approx.10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/, and pulse lengths up to 30 s, within test volumes up to approx.100 L. The characteristics of these test facilities are described, with particular attention to the areas of particle flux, heat flux, particle energy, pulse length, and duty cycle, and the potential applications of these facilities for first-wall component development are discussed.

Tsai, C.C.; Becraft, W.R.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Menon, M.M.; Stirling, W.L.

1985-01-01

419

Automated reactivity anomaly surveillance in the Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The automated technique for monitoring core reactivity during power operation used at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is described. This technique relies on comparing predicted to measured rod positions to detect any anomalous (or unpredicted) core reactivity changes. It is implemented on the Plant Data System (PDS) computer and, thus, provides rapid indication of any abnormal core conditions. The prediction algorithms use thermal-hydraulic, control rod position and neutron flux sensor information to predict the core reactivity state.

Knutson, B.J.; Harris, R.A.; Honeyman, D.J.; Shook, A.T.; Krohn, C.N.

1985-01-01

420

Tri-Service Thermal Radiation Test Facility Technical Support Plan (TSP) Instructions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Requirements for detailed test planning, facility and personnel safety, and security requirements to be followed in using the Tri-Service Thermal Radiation Test Facility (TRTF) are described in this technical support document. Details of proposed testing ...

N. J. Olson

1997-01-01

421

Laboratory testing on welded duplex stainless steel line pipe internal corrosion resistance  

SciTech Connect

Duplex 22% Cr stainless steel (ss) was recommended, at the basic design stage, as the most cost-performing material for intrafield flowlines conveying multiphase sour production from subsea well-heads to production platform. Due to aggressiveness of the production environment [H{sub 2}S partial pressure (pH{sub 2}S) = 14 mbar, CO{sub 2} partial pressure (pCO{sub 2}) = 40 bar, NaCl = 100 g/l, T = 135 C], and partially to the lack of definitive information on the corrosion resistance of welded duplex, some laboratory testing was deemed necessary and performed. The paper presents testing results dealing with localized corrosion and sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance of base material and girth-welded seamless tubes 22% Cr duplex, both wrought and centrifugally cast. The last one was considered because of possible procurement difficulties of the first one when required in small quantities and large diameters as in the case of production manifolds. It is concluded that the material can be used in the test environment as girth weld line pipe provided suitable welding technique is adopted.

Condanni, D. [AGIP SpA, Milan (Italy); Barteri, M. [C.S.M., Rome (Italy)

1996-12-01

422

A Framework for Intelligent Rocket Test Facilities with Smart Sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A long-term center goal at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is the formulation and implementation of a framework for an Intelligent Rocket Test Facility (IRTF), which incorporates distributed smart sensor elements. The IRTF is to provide reliable, high-confident measurements. Specific objectives include: 1. Definition of a framework and architecture that supports implementation of highly autonomous methodologies founded on basic physical principles and embedded knowledge. 2. Modeling of autonomous sensors and processes as self-sufficient, evolutionary elements. 3. Development of appropriate communications protocols to enable the complex interactions that must take place to allow timely and high-quality flow of of information among all the autonomous elements of the system. 4. Development of lab-scale prototypes of key system elements. Though our application is next-generation rocket test facilities, applications for the approach are much wider and include monitoring of shuttle launch operations, air and spacecraft operations and health monitoring, and other large-scale industrial system operations such as found in processing and manufacturing plans. Elements of prototype IRTF have been implemented in preparation for advanced development and validation using rocket test stand facilities as SSC. This work has identified issues that are important to further development of complex network and should be of interest to other working with sensor networks.

Figueroa, Fernando; Solano, Wanda; Morris, Jon; Mandayam, Shreekanth; Polikar, Robi

2003-01-01

423

Design for the National RF Test Facility at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual and preliminary engineering design for the National RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been completed. The facility will comprise a single mirror configuration embodying two superconducting development coils from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program on either side of a cavity designed for full-scale antenna testing. The coils are capable of generating a 1.2-T field at the axial midpoint between the coils separated by 1.0 m. The vacuum vessel will be a stainless steel, water-cooled structure having an 85-cm-radius central cavity. The facility will have the use of a number of continuous wave (cw), radio-frequency (rf) sources at levels including 600 kW at 80 MHz and 100 kW at 28 GHz. Several plasma sources will provide a wide range of plasma environments, including densities as high as approx. 5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and temperatures on the order of approx. 10 eV. Furthermore, a wide range of diagnostics will be available to the experimenter for accurate appraisal of rf testing.

Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Blue, C.W.; Combs, S.K.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Hayes, P.H.; Moeller, J.A.; Owen, L.W.

1983-01-01

424

Space Propulsion Research Facility (B-2): An Innovative, Multi-Purpose Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is designed to hot fire rocket engines or upper stage launch vehicles with up to 890,000 N force (200,000 lb force), after environmental conditioning of the test article in simulated thermal vacuum space environment. As NASA s third largest thermal vacuum facility, and the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of propellant, it is uniquely suited to support developmental testing associated with large lightweight structures and Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, as well as non-traditional propulsion test programs such as Electric and In-Space propulsion. B-2 has undergone refurbishment of key subsystems to support the NASA s future test needs, including data acquisition and controls, vacuum, and propellant systems. This paper details the modernization efforts at B-2 to support the Nation s thermal vacuum/propellant test capabilities, the unique design considerations implemented for efficient operations and maintenance, and ultimately to reduce test costs.

Hill, Gerald M.; Weaver, Harold F.; Kudlac, Maureen T.; Maloney, Christian T.; Evans, Richard K.

2011-01-01

425

Hospital waste shredder test series at the DONLEE Pilot Test Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the coal firing and coal and noninfectious hospital waste co-firing testing and emissions rates for the tests conducted at the DONLEE pilot plant facility during mid-December 1991 through early March 1992. The emissions obtained during these tests are in turn used to predict the emission rates for the proof-of-concept facility that is to be built at the Lebanon Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In addition, the reliability and performance of the waste shredding/feeding system were evaluated from this testing.

Not Available

1992-09-01

426

Hospital waste shredder test series at the DONLEE Pilot Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the coal firing and coal and noninfectious hospital waste co-firing testing and emissions rates for the tests conducted at the DONLEE pilot plant facility during mid-December 1991 through early March 1992. The emissions obtained during these tests are in turn used to predict the emission rates for the proof-of-concept facility that is to be built at the Lebanon Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In addition, the reliability and performance of the waste shredding/feeding system were evaluated from this testing.

Not Available

1992-09-01

427

The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Facilities and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These different capabilities include passive sealed capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. The ATR has enhanced capabilities in experiment monitoring and control systems for instrumented and/or temperature controlled experiments. The control systems utilize feedback from thermocouples in the experiment to provide a custom blended flowing inert gas mixture to control the temperature in the experiments. Monitoring systems have also been utilized on the exhaust gas lines from the experiment to monitor different parameters, such as fission gases for fuel experiments, during irradiation. ATR’s unique control system provides axial flux profiles in the experiments, unperturbed by axially positioned control components, throughout each reactor operating cycle and over the duration of test programs requiring many years of irradiation. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 1.6 cm (0.625 inches) to 12.7 cm (5.0 inches) over an active core length of 122 cm (48.0 inches). Thermal and fast neutron fluxes can be adjusted radially across the core depending on the needs of individual test programs. This paper will discuss the different irradiation capabilities available and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. Examples of different experiments will also be discussed to demonstrate the use of the capabilities and facilities at ATR for performing irradiation experiments.

S. Blaine Grover; Raymond V. Furstenau

2007-03-01

428

Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

2009-08-01

429

Facility for generating crew waste water product for ECLSS testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An End-use Equipment Facility (EEF) has been constructed which is used to simulate water interfaces between the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and man systems. The EEF is used to generate waste water to be treated by ECLSS water recovery systems. The EEF will also be used to close the water recovery loop by allowing test subjects to use recovered hygiene and potable water during several phases of testing. This paper describes the design and basic operation of the EEF.

Buitekant, Alan; Roberts, Barry C.

1990-01-01

430

Design and operation of an outdoor microalgae test facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project covered in this report is to establish and operate a facility in the American Southwest to test the concept of producing microalgae on a large scale. This microalgae would then be used as a feedstock for producing liquid fuels. The site chosen for this project was an existing water research station in Roswell, New Mexico; the climate and water resources are representative of those in the Southwest. For this project, researchers tested specific designs, modes of operation, and strains of microalgae; proposed and evaluated modifications to technological concepts; and assessed the progress toward meeting cost objectives.

Weissman, J.C.; Tillett, D.M.; Goebel, R.P. (Microbial Products, Inc., Vacaville, CA (USA))

1989-10-01

431

The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The design of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is presented including the design goals and computational results. The heart of the system is a radiofrequency electron gun utilizing a photo-excited metal cathode followed by a conventional electron linac. The Nd:YAG laser used to drive the cathode with 6 ps long pulses can be synchronized to a high peak power CO{sub 2} laser in order to study laser acceleration of electrons. Current operational status of the project will be presented along with early beam tests.

Batchelor, K.

1990-01-01

432

Fast Flux Test Facility passive safety reactivity feedback measurements  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) measured the reactivity change between approximately 200 reactor states. The test data have been evaluated to determine the thermal hydraulic parameters of the reactor at those states. Auxiliary measurements have been analyzed to convert the measured control rod position changes to reactivity and to correct for burnup effects. The data are now available for studies of the temperature reactivity feedbacks in liquid metal reactors. Preliminary comparisons with a feedback algorithm developed from normal FFTF operation indicate that the functional form of feedbacks can be extrapolated to offnormal conditions. 1 ref., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Knutson, B.J.; Harris, R.A.; Nguyen, D.H.; Omberg, R.P.

1988-03-01

433

Status of fuel, blanket, and absorber testing in the fast flux test facility  

SciTech Connect

On December 2, 1980, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reached its full design power of 400 MW for the first time. From the start, the FFTF provided a modern liquid-metal reactor (LMR) test facility recognized for excellence, innovation, and efficiency of operation. Its unique instrumentation and special test capabilities have allowed the facility to stay at the cutting edge of technology. Prototypical size and core environment allow the FFTF to demonstrate core components and directly support design optimization of LMRs. Since December 1980, the FFTF has irradiated > 64,000 mixed-oxide driver and test fuel pins, > 1,000 metal-fueled pins, > 100 carbide-fueled pins, and > 35 nitride-fueled pins (supporting the U.S. space reactor program). This paper reviews the status of one of the major activities at the FFTF for its first 12 yr of operation - DOE-sponsored testing and development of fuel, blanket, and absorber assemblies for commercial LMRs.

Baker, R.B.; Bard, F.E.; Leggett, R.D.; Pitner, A.L. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01

434

Development of a Test Facility for Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of new air revitalization system (ARS) technology can initially be performed in a subscale laboratory environment, but in order to advance the maturity level, the technology must be tested in an end-to-end integrated environment. The Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation Facility (ARTEF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center serves as a ground test bed for evaluating emerging ARS technologies in an environment representative of spacecraft atmospheres. At the center of the ARTEF is a hypobaric chamber which serves as a sealed atmospheric chamber for closed loop testing. A Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) was custom-built to simulate the consumption of oxygen, and production of carbon dioxide, moisture and heat of up to eight persons. A multitude of gas analyzers and dew point sensors are used to monitor the chamber atmosphere upstream and downstream of a test article. A robust vacuum system is needed to simulate the vacuum of space. A reliable data acquisition and control system is required to connect all the subsystems together. This paper presents the capabilities of the integrated test facility and some of the issues encountered during the integration.

Lu, Sao-Dung; Lin, Amy; Campbell, Melissa; Smith, Frederick; Curley, Su

2007-01-01

435

Radiation shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The results of radiation shielding studies for the vertical test cryostat VTS1 at Fermilab performed with the codes FISHPACT and MARS15 are presented and discussed. The analysis is focused on operations with two RF cavities in the cryostat. The vertical cavity test facility (VCTF) for superconducting RF cavities in Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab has been in operation since 2007. The facility currently consists of a single vertical test cryostat VTS1. Radiation shielding for VTS1 was designed for operations with single 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities, and the shielding calculations were performed using a simplified model of field emission as the radiation source. The operations are proposed to be extended in such a way that two RF cavities will be in VTS1 at a time, one above the other, with tests for each cavity performed sequentially. In such a case the radiation emitted during the tests from the lower cavity can, in part, bypass the initially designed shielding which can lead to a higher dose in the building. Space for additional shielding, either internal or external to VTS1, is limited. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the radiation shielding was performed. An essential part of the present analysis is in using realistic models for cavity geometry and spatial, angular and energy distributions of field-emitted electrons inside the cavities. The calculations were performed with the computer codes FISHPACT and MARS15.

Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

2010-03-01

436

Powerline Conductor Operational Testing Facility (PCOT) The Powerline Conductor Operational Testing Facility (PCOT), currently planned for  

E-print Network

/cables under test at the transmission system operator's discretion. Loading can be controlled at the Roane feels that the power system security is at risk. The operational flexibility of PCOT allows advanced be experienced on a conventional power system. The extensive instrumentation that PCOT will employ provides

437

Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials  

E-print Network

1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01

438

Experimental Validation: Subscale Aircraft Ground Facilities and Integrated Test Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental testing is an important aspect of validating complex integrated safety critical aircraft technologies. The Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) Testbed is being developed at NASA Langley to validate technologies under conditions that cannot be flight validated with full-scale vehicles. The AirSTAR capability comprises a series of flying sub-scale models, associated ground-support equipment, and a base research station at NASA Langley. The subscale model capability utilizes a generic 5.5% scaled transport class vehicle known as the Generic Transport Model (GTM). The AirSTAR Ground Facilities encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for the GTM testbed. The ground facilities support remote piloting of the GTM aircraft, and include all subsystems required for data/video telemetry, experimental flight control algorithm implementation and evaluation, GTM simulation, data recording/archiving, and audio communications. The ground facilities include a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, capable of deployment to remote sites when conducting GTM flight experiments. The ground facilities also include a laboratory based at NASA LaRC providing near identical capabilities as the mobile command/operations center, as well as the capability to receive data/video/audio from, and send data/audio to the mobile command/operations center during GTM flight experiments.

Bailey, Roger M.; Hostetler, Robert W., Jr.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Belcastro, Celeste M.; Belcastro, Christine M.

2005-01-01

439

Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

2010-01-01

440

Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas grins, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

2008-01-01