Sample records for corrosion test facility

  1. Replaceable blade turbine and stationary specimen corrosion testing facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. Santoro; F. D. Calfo

    1985-01-01

    A facility was constructed to provide relatively low-cost testing of hot-section turbine blade and vane materials under hot-corrosion conditions more akin to service environments. The facility consists of a small combustor whose pressurized gas flow can be directed to either a test section consisting of three small cascaded specimens or to a partial admittance single-stage axial-flow turbine. The turbine rotor

  2. Characterization of the Facility for Atmospheric Corrosion Testing (FACT) at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Greenholt, C.J.; Sorensen, N.R.; Poulter, G.A.; Guilinger, T.R.

    1993-06-01

    The capability to perform atmospheric corrosion testing of materials and components now exists at Sandia resulting from the installation of a system called the Facility for Atmospheric Corrosion Testing (FACT). This report details the design, equipment, operation, maintenance, and future modifications of the system. This report also presents some representative data acquired from testing copper in environments generated by the FACT.

  3. Multisystem corrosion monitoring in a cyclic reheat test facility: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, D.M.; Cox, W.M.; Gearey, D.

    1988-04-01

    The work described in this report was the first stage of an EPRI-sponsored corrosion investigation utilizing the CAPCIS electrochemical monitoring system installed in a cyclic reheat test facility on a flue gas slipstream at the Scholz Steam Plant of Gulf Power Company. The primary reasons for incorporating the continuous corrosion monitoring system in the cyclic reheat investigation were that unexpectedly high corrosion rates had been observed in earlier tests at certain locations within the test exchanger and the precise reasons for these high rates of attack were not well understood. The corrosion behavior was not typical of the limited service experience on full scale units and the reasons for this required clarification. Controlled temperature weight loss and electrochemical probes were installed in the unit in place of three of the 1-inch diameter heat exchanger tubes. The corrosion behavior of Inconel Alloy 625 over the temperature range 260/degree/ to 120/degree/F (127/degree/ to 49/degree/C) was evaluated at mid-stream and sidewall locations. The efects on corrosion of operational variables and cleaning procedures were also evaluated. The severe corrosion attack sustained on the Inconel Alloy 625 was proved to result from a combination of effects which included the flue gas flow pattern, local cool-spots within the unit and preferential locations at which ash deposits could accumulate. 5 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Hot Corrosion Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The Hot Corrosion Test Facility (HCTF) at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory (SPL) is a high-velocity, pressurized burner rig currently used to evaluate the environmental durability of advanced ceramic materials such as SiC and Si3N4. The HCTF uses laboratory service air which is preheated, mixed with jet fuel, and ignited to simulate the conditions of a gas turbine engine. Air, fuel, and water systems are computer-controlled to maintain test conditions which include maximum air flows of 250 kg/hr (550 lbm/hr), pressures of 100-600 kPa (1-6 atm), and gas temperatures exceeding 1500 C (2732 F). The HCTF provides a relatively inexpensive, yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials, and the injection of a salt solution provides the added capability of conducting hot corrosion studies.

  5. Superheater/intermediate temperature air heater tube corrosion tests in the MHD coal fired flow facility (Montana Rosebud POC tests)

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.

    1996-01-01

    Nineteen alloys have been exposed for approximately 1000 test hours as candidate superheater and intermediate temperature air heater tubes in a U.S. DOE facility dedicated to demonstrating Proof of Concept for the bottoming or heat and seed recovery portion of coal fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generating plants. Corrosion data have been obtained from a test series utilizing a western United States sub-bituminous coal, Montana Rosebud. The test alloys included a broad range of compositions ranging from carbon steel to austenitic stainless steels to high chromium nickel-base alloys. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO-containing deposits, developed principally, oxide scales by an oxidation/sulfidation mechanism. In addition to being generally porous, these scales were frequently spalled and/or non-compact due to a dispersed form of outward growth by oxide precipitation in the adjacent deposit. Austenitic alloys generally had internal penetration as trans Tranular and/or intergranular oxides and sulfides. While only two of the alloys had damage visible without magnification as a result of the relatively short exposure, there was some concern about Iona-term corrosion performance owing to the relatively poor quality scales formed. Comparison of data from these tests to those from a prior series of tests with Illinois No. 6, a high sulfur bituminous coal, showed less corrosion in the present test series with the lower sulfur coal. Although K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}was the principal corrosive agent as the supplier of sulfur, which acted to degrade alloy surface scales, tying up sulfur as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} prevented the occurrence of complex alkali iron trisulfates responsible for severe or catastrophic corrosion in conventional power plants with certain coals and metal temperatures.

  6. Superheater/intermediate temperature airheater tube corrosion tests in the MHD Coal Fired Flow Facility (Eastern Coal Phase)

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.K.

    1993-11-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained for tub is exposed for 1500--2000 hours in a proof-of-concept magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation test facility to conditions representative of superheater and intermediate temperature air heater (ITAH) components. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-rich deposits, were corroded more than in most pulverized coal fired superheater service, but much less than the highly aggressive liquid phase attack encountered in conventional plants with certain coals and temperatures. Results indicated that, with parabolic corrosion kinetics, type 310 and 253MA stainless steels should be usable to 1400F at hot end of ITAH. At final superheater temperatures, 2.25 and 5 Cr steels were indicated to have parabolic corrosion rates generally below a 0.5 mm/yr criterion, based on corrosion scale thickness. However, unknown amounts of scale loss from spallation made this determination uncertain. Stainless steels 304H, 316H, and 321H had parabolic rates variably above the criterion, but may be servicable under less cyclic conditions. Corrosion rates derived from scale thickness and intergranular corrosion depth measurements are reported, along with scale morphologies and compositions. Implications of results on commercial MHD utilization of the alloys are discussed, as well as the indicated need for more corrosion resistant alloys or coatings under the most severe exposure conditions.

  7. Using corrosion tests effectively

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1987-01-01

    Just how useful are corrosion test methods in determining reasonable estimates of equipment service life. Today there is a wide selection of corrosion tests which can make it difficult to compare results. It requires an intelligent interpretation to know when the results are meaningful. Misinterpretation could cause unscheduled corrosion failures resulting in production shutdowns, associated financial losses, hazards to personnel

  8. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  9. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Rozeveld; D. B. Chamberlain

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase,

  10. Atlas 5013 tank corrosion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, W. M.; Girton, L. D.; Treadway, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    The type and cause of corrosion in spot welded joints were determined by X-ray and chemical analysis. Fatigue and static tests showed the degree of degradation of mechanical properties. The corrosion inhibiting effectiveness of WD-40 compound and required renewal period by exposing typical joint specimens were examined.

  11. SIMULATED BOILING WATER REACTOR AND SUPERHEAT REACTOR CORROSION FACILITY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Fitzsimmons; W. L. Pearl; M. Siegler

    1963-01-01

    A versatile boiling water and superheated steam facility was developed ; for out-of-pile corrosion testing of materials that are being used and considered ; for application in boiling water reactor (BWR) and superheat reactor (SHR) ; systems. The following capabilities were achieved: simulation of the various ; environments (other than irradiation) that would contact materials in a Dresden ; type

  12. NETL- Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-16

    NETL's Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany studies how new and old materials will stand up to new operating conditions. Work done in the lab supports NETL's oxy-fuel combustion oxidation work, refractory materials stability work, and the fuels program, in particular the hydrogen membrane materials stability work, to determine how best to upgrade existing power plants.

  13. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    DOEpatents

    Ohi, James (Denver, CO); De La Cruz, Jose L. (San Antonio, TX); Lacey, Paul I. (Wexford, IE)

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  14. Research and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

  15. Corrosive gas environmental testing for electrical contacts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randy Gore; R. Witska; J. R. Kirby; J. Chao

    1989-01-01

    Corrosive gas environmental tests are used to predict the reliability of electrical connectors used in data system products under conditions found in business office environments. A corrosive gaseous environmental acceleration test called G1(T) is evaluated through variations in testing conditions, in particular for those which differ from outside testing standards used in the connector industry. An investigation of those features

  16. Corrosive gas environmental testing for electrical contacts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RANDY R. GORE; RICH WITSKA; J. RAY KIRBY; JAMES L. CHAO

    1990-01-01

    Corrosive gas environmental tests are used to predict reliability of electrical connectors used in data system products under conditions found in business office environments. IBM's corrosive gaseous environmental acceleration test, called G1(T), were evaluated for variations in testing conditions, in particular for those which differ from outside testing standards used in the connector industry. The purpose was to determine those

  17. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  18. Universal Test Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mike Laughery

    1994-01-01

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific

  19. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-12-14

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys.

  20. Fabrication and testing of corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Riester, L.

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub n} to sodium corrosion mandates that corrosion resistant coatings be developed to protect silicon-based turbine engine components. Materials with good corrosion resistance and thermal expansions that nearly match SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been identified. Corrosion testing of hot-pressed pellets of these compounds has identified the most promising materials. Development of chemical vapor deposition system to apply these materials has been initiated. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

    1994-11-01

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented.

  2. Pressurized burner test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Maloney; T. S. Norton; M. A. Hadley

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy`s METC has recently completed construction and commissioning of a new high-pressure combustion research facility. Utilities servicing the facility enable combustion tests at scales up to 3 MW (10 MM Btu\\/h) and pressures in excess of 3000 kPa (30 atm). These include a preheated, high-pressure air supply that can deliver up to 1.7 kg\\/s (3.7 lbs\\/s)

  3. Mitigation of microbiologically influenced corrosion in natural gas storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, D.H.; Lockwood, S.; Lee, A. [Bioindustrial Technologies, Inc., Georgetown, TX (United States); Skultety, R.; Keas, K. [Southern California Gas Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A gas storage field which had experienced microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of downhole components and surface piping was treated with biocides and corrosion inhibitors to control the MIC. Wells treated with glutaraldehyde showed a rapid decline in bacteria levels whether the biocide was atomized into the gas supply tubing or injected downhole. The quaternary amine biocide tested had little effect on bacteria levels. Laboratory tests of these biocides using fluids from the storage field confirmed the effectiveness of the glutaraldehyde and ineffectiveness (at manufacturer`s suggested dosages) of the quaternary amine. Laboratory and field tests of compatibility between biocides and corrosion and scale inhibitors demonstrated that some corrosion inhibitors affect the ability of glutaraldehyde to control associated microorganisms but not bulk liquid phase microorganisms. Other corrosion inhibitors had no effect on the efficacy of glutaraldehyde. Since the quaternary amine did not control the microorganisms without added corrosion inhibitors, compatibilities could not be determined.

  4. Asian Test Beam Facilities

    E-print Network

    Satoru Uozumi

    2010-06-18

    In Japan, China and Russia, there are several test beam lines available or will become available in near future. Those are open for users who need electron, muon and charged pion beams with energies of 1-50 GeV for any tests of small-size detectors. In this manuscript I present a current status of those test beam facilities in the Asian region.

  5. Pressurized burner test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.J.; Norton, T.S.; Hadley, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s METC has recently completed construction and commissioning of a new high-pressure combustion research facility. Utilities servicing the facility enable combustion tests at scales up to 3 MW (10 MM Btu/h) and pressures in excess of 3000 kPa (30 atm). These include a preheated, high-pressure air supply that can deliver up to 1.7 kg/s (3.7 lbs/s) of combustion air, and a high-pressure, natural gas compressor that can deliver 0.8 kg/s (.19 lbs/s). In the summer of 1994 METC`s syngas generator is scheduled to come on line, at which time combustion tests on a range of fuel gases from low to medium to high heating values will be possible. The syngas generator will simulate a range of fuel gas compositions characteristic of coal gasification product streams. As part of the combustion facility, a high-pressure burner test facility is currently being constructed to support the development of gas turbine combustion systems fired on natural gas and coal-derived gaseous fuels containing fuel-bound nitrogen. The facility, illustrated in Figure 1, is a 61-centimeter (24-inch) diameter, refractory-lined vessel of modular construction, offering the flexibility to test a variety of NO{sub x} control concepts. Burner test modules are sandwiched between gas inlet and sampling plenums with a maximum combustion test zone of 2.2 m (90 inches) in length. Modules are custom designed for specific burners.

  6. Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Molecke, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the bedded salt at the WIPP. This test program started on July 22, 1986 and has achieved its projected five-year lifetime. All in situ samples have been retrieved and sent to multiple laboratories for posttest analyses. Most of the analyses on metal samples have been completed and the results are summarized in this paper. The tested metal alloys proposed for waste canister or overpack use included titanium alloys (grade-2 and grade-12), Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, austenitic stainless steels (304L, 316, and NS 24/AISI 309), carbon steels (Belgian C and ASTM A216/WCA), copper, and lead. After five-years of test exposure immersed in WIPP brine A and/or salt at about 90[degree]C, the corrosion-resistant materials (Ti; Inconel, Hastelloy) exhibited very little corrosion. The austenitic stainless steels suffered pitting, crevice corrosion, and some evidence of stress corrosion cracking. The carbon steels, copper, and lead exhibited both extensive general and localized attack. Details of the test, analyses, and results obtained will be discussed.

  7. Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Molecke, M.A.

    1992-12-31

    Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the bedded salt at the WIPP. This test program started on July 22, 1986 and has achieved its projected five-year lifetime. All in situ samples have been retrieved and sent to multiple laboratories for posttest analyses. Most of the analyses on metal samples have been completed and the results are summarized in this paper. The tested metal alloys proposed for waste canister or overpack use included titanium alloys (grade-2 and grade-12), Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, austenitic stainless steels (304L, 316, and NS 24/AISI 309), carbon steels (Belgian C and ASTM A216/WCA), copper, and lead. After five-years of test exposure immersed in WIPP brine A and/or salt at about 90{degree}C, the corrosion-resistant materials (Ti; Inconel, Hastelloy) exhibited very little corrosion. The austenitic stainless steels suffered pitting, crevice corrosion, and some evidence of stress corrosion cracking. The carbon steels, copper, and lead exhibited both extensive general and localized attack. Details of the test, analyses, and results obtained will be discussed.

  8. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K. [Texaco R& D, Beacon, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  9. Integrated Test Facility (ITF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed in the Thermostructural Laboratory, now also resides in the ITF. In preparing a research aircraft for flight testing, it is vital to measure its structural frequencies and mode shapes and compare results to the models used in design analysis. The final function performed in the ITF is routine aircraft maintenance. This includes preflight and post-flight instrumentation checks and the servicing of hydraulics, avionics, and engines necessary on any research aircraft. Aircraft are not merely moved to the ITF for automated testing purposes but are housed there throughout their flight test programs.

  10. Integrated Test Facility (ITF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed in the Thermostructural Laboratory, now also resides in the ITF. In preparing a research aircraft for flight testing, it is vital to measure its structural frequencies and mode shapes and compare results to the models used in design analysis. The final function performed in the ITF is routine aircraft maintenance. This includes preflight and post-flight instrumentation checks and the servicing of hydraulics, avionics, and engines necessary on any research aircraft. Aircraft are not merely moved to the ITF for automated testing purposes but are housed there throughout their flight test programs.

  11. TESTS SPEED EVALUATING MATERIAL'S RESISTANCE TO RADIOLOGICAL CORROSION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. E. Salo; N. B. Garden

    1959-01-01

    A spot-test method was developed for rapidly checking radiological ; corrosion resistance. The test actually consists of a series of test: chemical ; corrosion, radiological contamination and decontamination, and irradiation. ; (W.L.H.);

  12. Low emissions combustor test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Maloney; M. S. Hadley; T. S. Norton

    1993-01-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is in the process of constructing a low emissions combustor test and research (LECTR) facility designed to support the development of low emissions gas turbine combustion systems fired on natural gas and coal derived gaseous fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The LECTR facility is a major test station located within METC`s new combustion facility.

  13. A3 Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulreix, Lionel J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

  14. PFBC HGCU Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is the thirteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Fourth Quarter of CY 1992. The following are highlights of the activities that occurred during this report period: Initial operation of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) occurred during this quarter. The following table summarizes the operating dates and times. HGCU ash lockhopper valve plugged with ash. Primary cyclone ash pluggage. Problems with the coal water paste. Unit restarted warm 13 hours later. HGCU expansion joint No. 7 leak in internal ply of bellows. Problems encountered during these initial tests included hot spots on the APP, backup cyclone and instrumentation spools, two breakdowns of the backpulse air compressor, pluggage of the APF hopper and ash removal system, failure (breakage) of 21 filter candles, leakage of the inner ply of one (1) expansion joint bellows, and numerous other smaller problems. These operating problems are discussed in detail in a subsequent section of this report. Following shutdown and equipment inspection in December, design modifications were initiated to correct the problems noted above. The system is scheduled to resume operation in March, 1993.

  15. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  16. A facile approach to fabricate superhydrophobic and corrosion resistant surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guijuan; Wang, Zhaojie; Zhao, Xixia; Feng, Juan; Wang, Shutao; Zhang, Jun; An, Changhua

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have fabricated superhydrophobic CuO nanostructured surfaces by a simple solution-immersion process and a subsequent chemical modification with various thiol groups. The morphology of the CuO nanostructures on the copper foil could be easily controlled by simply changing the reaction time. The influences of reaction time and the thiol groups on hydrophobic properties have been discussed in detail. It is shown that the chemically modified CuO nanostructured surfaces present remarkable superhydrophobic performance and non-sticking behaviour. Furthermore, a lower corrosion current density (icorr) and a higher corrosion potential (Ecorr) of the prepared superhydrophobic surface was observed in comparison with the bare Cu foil by immersing in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution, indicating a good corrosion resistance capability. Our work provides a general, facile and low-cost route towards the preparation of superhydrophobic surface, which has potential applications in the fields of self-cleaning, anti-corrosion, and oil–water separation.

  17. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  18. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Fusion Test Facilities John Sheffield

    E-print Network

    Fusion Test Facilities John Sheffield ISSE - University of Tennessee FPA meeting Livermore December Stambaugh, and their colleagues #12;Destructive Testing · It is common practice to test engineered components to destruction prior to deployment of a system e.g., - Automobile crash tests - Airplane wing

  20. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in the performance assessment for the SDA. The corrosion on the carbon steel, beryllium, and aluminum were more evident with a clear difference in corrosion performance between the 4-ft and 10-ft levels. Notable surface corrosion products were evident as well as numerous pit initiation sites. Since the corrosion of the beryllium and aluminum is characterized by pitting, the geometrical character of the corrosion becomes more significant than the general corrosion rate. Both pitting factor and weight loss data should be used together. For six-year exposure, the maximum carbon steel corrosion rate was 0.3643 MPY while the maximum beryllium corrosion rate was 0.3282 MPY and the maximum aluminum corrosion rate was 0.0030 MPY.

  1. Test Laboratory Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located inside the boundaries of 40,000 acre Redstone Arsenal military reservation, has over 50 test facilities across 400+ acres, many inside an additional secure, fenced area. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate test facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength/dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  2. Materials exposure test facilities for varying low-Btu coal-derived gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. V. Nakaishi; L. K. Carpenter; L. W. Hawkins

    1981-01-01

    The test facilities of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center's ceramic corrosion\\/erosion study are described. Two facilities have been designed and fabricated and will be operated simultaneously to expose ceramic materials to the products of combustion of coal-derived gas. The dynamic test facility will operate to expose ceramic specimens to products of combustion at a temperature of 1427 C and a

  3. Corrosion study for a radioactive waste vitrification facility

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.; Jenkins, C.F.

    1993-10-01

    A corrosion monitoring program was setup in a scale demonstration melter system to evaluate the performance of materials selected for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the DOE`s Savannah River Site. The system is a 1/10 scale prototypic version of the DWPF. In DWPF, high activity radioactive waste will be vitrified and encapsulated for long term storage. During this study twenty-six different alloys, including DWPF reference materials of construction and alternate higher alloy materials, were subjected to process conditions and environments characteristic of the DWPF except for radioactivity. The materials were exposed to low pH, elevated temperature (to 1200{degree}C) environments containing abrasive slurries, molten glass, mercury, halides and sulfides. General corrosion rates, pitting susceptibility and stress corrosion cracking of the materials were investigated. Extensive data were obtained for many of the reference materials. Performance in the Feed Preparation System was very good, whereas coupons from the Quencher Inlet region of the Melter Off-Gas System experienced localized attack.

  4. License Plate Cosmetic Corrosion Test of Automotive Coated Steel Sheet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. E. Townsend; M. W. Simpson; W. B. van der Linde; D. C. McCune

    1999-01-01

    A new standard laboratory test (SAE J2334) for evaluation of the cosmetic corrosion resistance of autobody steel sheet has been developed through the joint efforts of the Society of Automotive Engineers Automotive Corrosion Prevention Committee (SAE\\/ACAP) and the Auto\\/Steel Partnership (A\\/SP) Corrosion Task Force. Results from this test gave an excellent correlation with those of on-vehicle tests conducted for 5

  5. The iron powder test for naphthenic acid corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, J.L.; Yepez, O.; Specht, M.I.; Lorenzo, R. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1999-11-01

    In the course of an ongoing investigation into the phenomenon of naphthenic acid corrosion, a new test method has evolved and is currently being further developed to substitute the total acid number (TAN or neutralization number) as an indicator for naphthenic acid corrosion potential. It can also be used to complement conventional autoclave corrosion tests in high temperature environments, which are based on weight loss of steel coupons. In this new method an oil sample reacts with pure iron powder within an autoclave heated to the testing temperature. The result is based on the amount of dissolved iron found in the oil sample. The oil sample can dissolve an amount of iron for a given time at a given temperature, depending on the naphthenic acid corrosion, since these acids react with iron to produce oil soluble iron naphthenates. This paper describes the method, compares it with conventional crude corrosiveness testing, and proposes it as a new way of measuring naphthenic acid corrosion potential.

  6. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

  7. (abstract) Cryogenic Telescope Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchik, T. S.; Chave, R. G.; Nash, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    An optical test Dewar is being constructed with the unique capability to test mirrors of diameter less than or equal to 1 m, f less than or equal to 6, at temperatures from 300 to 4.2 K with a ZYGO Mark IV interferometer. The design and performance of this facility will be presented.

  8. Synthetic seawater as stress-corrosion test medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Seawater minimizes pitting corrosion of aluminum-alloy test samples. Of three corrosion-inhibiting methods evaluated using (a) chromate inhibitors in saltwater, (b) surface treating sample via anodizing or alodine treatment, and (c) synthetic seawater, synthetic seawater was most effective test medium, since it is more uniform than fresh seawater.

  9. Test Facilities Capability Handbook. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taliancich, Paula (Editor); Bruce, Robert (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is located in Southern Mississippi near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line. SSC is chartered as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Center of Excellence for large space transportation propulsion system testing. This charter has led to many unique test facilities, capabilities and advanced technologies provided through the supporting infrastructure. SSC has conducted projects in support of such diverse activities as liquid, and hybrid rocket testing and development; material development; non-intrusive plume diagnostics; plume tracking; commercial remote sensing; test technology and more. On May 30, 1996 NASA designated SSC the lead Center for rocket propulsion testing, giving the Center total responsibility for conducting and/or managing all NASA rocket engine testing. Test services are now available not only for NASA but also for the DoD, other government agencies, academia, and industry. This handbook was developed to provide a summary of the capabilities that exist within SSC. It is intended as a primary resource document, which will provide the reader with the top-level capabilities and characteristics of the numerous test facilities, test support facilities, laboratories, and services. Due to the nature of continually evolving programs and test technologies, descriptions of the Center's current capabilities are provided. Periodic updates and revisions of this document will be made to maintain is completeness and accuracy.

  10. Corrosion testing of urea-formaldehyde foam insulating material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Weil; A. Graviano; K. Sheppard

    1980-01-01

    Two tests of the corrosiveness of urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam insulating materials were compared. One test, the Timm test, had test coupons foamed in place. In the second, the Canadian test, blocks of foam already set were placed in contact with test coupons. The Timm test uses 10 gage thick coupons, while the Canadian test specifies 3 mil thick ones. Two

  11. Corrosion testing of urea-formaldehyde foam insulating material

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, R.; Graviano, A.; Sheppard, K.

    1980-09-01

    Two tests of the corrosiveness of urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam insulating materials were compared. One test, the Timm test, had test coupons foamed in place. In the second, the Canadian test, blocks of foam already set were placed in contact with test coupons. The Timm test uses 10 gage thick coupons, while the Canadian test specifies 3 mil thick ones. Two samples of UF foam were tested by the Timm and the Canadian tests. The electrical-resistance probes showed that the corrosion rate against steel was initially quite high, of the order of 12 to 20 mpy (mils per year). After about 20 days, the rate was almost zero. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates of steel coupons were of the order to 0.5 to 2 mpy when averaged over the 28 or 56 day test period. The greater corrosion rate of the thick coupons in the Canadian test as well as poor reproducibility of the corrosion rates was attributed primarily to variations in the contact areas between the sample and the UF foam. The corrosion rates of galvanized steel coupons in the Canadian test in several cases exceeded the failure value. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates averaged over the whole test period were quite low. The corrosion rates of copper and aluminum in both tests were quite low. On the basis of the results of this study the following recommendations for a corrosion-test procedure for UF foam were made: two corrosion tests should be conducted, one for foam while curing and one after it has stabilized; the Timm test for corrosiveness while curing should be used, but for only 1 to 2 days; the test for corrosiveness after stabilizing should be of the accelerated type such as the Canadian one. To insure a constant-contact area, thicker coupons should be used; and the coupons for both tests should have a controlled part of the area not in contact with the foam to simulate field conditions.

  12. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin II Accelerated Corrosion Tests and the Behavior of High-Strength Aluminum Alloys of Different Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    The permanence, with respect to corrosion, of light aluminum alloy sheets of the duralumin type, that is, heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si is discussed. Alloys of this type are subject to surface corrosion and corrosion of the interior by intercrystalline paths. Results are given of accelerated corrosion tests, tensile tests, the effect on corrosion of various alloying elements and heat treatments, electrical resistance measurements, and X-ray examinations.

  13. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  14. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100/sup 0/C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 ..mu..m/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions.

  15. Design on highway accelerated loading testing facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhiguang Guan; Mingxing Lin; Xuguang Wang; Jiwei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated loading testing facility gains importance for proofing evaluations of structure designs as well as the final evaluation of new pavement materials and functions. So a highway accelerated loading testing facility is developed, which has self-owned intellectual property. The facility is made up of machine frame, a mobile car and a frame for dragging cable. The facility can test and

  16. Evaluation of corrosion testing techniques for selection of corrosion resistant alloys for sour gas service

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B. [Camco, Houston, TX (United States); Hibner, E.L. [Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Slow strain rate (SSR) and C-ring stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests have historically been used to screen alloys for sour gas environments. The relevance of these testing techniques in predicting actual field corrosion behavior was evaluated for age-hardenable nickel base alloy 925 (UNS N09925) and alloy 718 (UNS N07718). While SSR testing provides an acceptable accelerated screening tool for ranking alloys in sour oil field environments, C-ring SCC testing ranks alloys higher in sour environments than SSR testing.

  17. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY (SATURN V IN BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. Erosion/corrosion concerns in feed preparation systems at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.T.; Chandler, C.T.; Daugherty, W.L.; Imrich, K.J.; Jenkins, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950`s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the high level radioactive waste resulting from these processes as a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF, after having undergone extensive testing, has been approved for operations and is currently immobilizing radioactive waste. To ensure reliability of the DWPF remote canyon processing equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed prior to radioactive operations to determine to what extent erosion/corrosion would impact design life of equipment. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections on critical equipment and follow-up inspections after completion of DWPF cold chemical demonstration runs. Non-destructive examination (NDE) techniques were used to assess erosion/corrosion as well as evaluation of corrosion coupon racks. These results were used to arrive at predicted equipment life for selected feed preparation equipment. It was concluded with the exception of the coil and agitator for the slurry mix evaporator (SME), which are exposed to erosive glass frit particles, all of the equipment should meet its design life.

  19. Pilot-plant testing of materials proposed for use as NWCF feed and fuel nozzle caps. [New Waste Calcining Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Birrer, S.A.

    1980-12-01

    Results of a series of tests performed on materials proposed for use at New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) fuel and feed nozzle caps are described. Results show that Haynes Alloys 25 and 188 and Inconel Alloys 617, 625, and 690 have acceptable corrosion and erosion rates based upon the high-temperature oxidation, erosion, and corrosion tests conducted.

  20. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  1. Amine corrosion inhibitor successful in tests at Mobil's Paulsboro refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-03

    Mobil Oil Corp. has successfully completed a test of an amine unit corrosion inhibition system at its 100,000-b/d refinery in Paulsboro, NJ. The system, the Amine Guard ST system is used to inhibit corrosion of diethanolamine (DEA) sweetening units that treat process streams from the fluid catalytic cracker (FCC), a hydrodesulfurization unit (HDU), and lube oil dewaxing (LDW) units at the refinery. Use of the corrosion-inhibition system has allowed an increase in the DEA concentration to 55 wt %, a reduction of the DEA circulation rate by 40%, and a reduction in regeneration steam of 35%.

  2. Design of accelerated corrosion tests for electronic components in automotive applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Eriksson; Bo Carlsson; I. O. Wallinder

    2001-01-01

    Two new accelerated laboratory corrosion tests for electronic components in automotive applications have been developed, based on the use of metallic copper as a meter for corrosivity. The accelerated tests are designed so that they reproduce the same kind of corrosion effects as observed with exposure of copper in real vehicle environments. The test cycle that best simulates the corrosion

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  4. The Revamping of an Ignition Test Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberly A. Kearns

    2002-01-01

    The revamping of an Ignition Test Facility, located in the Research Combustion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. The history of how the test cell has adapted efficiently to a variety of test programs is discussed. The addition of a second test stand for ignition and small-scale rocket testing is detailed. An overview of the facility and

  5. Cold Flow Verification Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsi, A.; Shadle, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    The cold flow verification test facility consists of a 15-foot high, 3-foot diameter, domed vessel made of clear acrylic in two flanged sections. The unit can operate up to pressures of 14 psig. The internals include a 10-foot high jetting fluidized bed, a cylindrical baffle that hangs from the dome, and a rotating grate for control of continuous solids removal. The fluid bed is continuously fed solids (20 to 150 lb/hr) through a central nozzle made up of concentric pipes. It can either be configured as a half or full cylinder of various dimensions. The fluid bed has flow loops for separate air flow control for conveying solids (inner jet, 500 to 100000 scfh) , make-up into the jet (outer jet, 500 to 8000 scfh), spargers in the solids removal annulus (100 to 2000 scfh), and 6 air jets (20 to 200 scfh) on the sloping conical grid. Additional air (500 to 10000 scfh) can be added to the top of the dome and under the rotating grate. The outer vessel, the hanging cylindrical baffles or skirt, and the rotating grate can be used to study issues concerning moving bed reactors. There is ample allowance for access and instrumentation in the outer shell. Furthermore, this facility is available for future Cooperative Research and Development Program Manager Agreements (CRADA) to study issues and problems associated with fluid- and fixed-bed reactors. The design allows testing of different dimensions and geometries.

  6. Drop Test at Lunar Landing Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Langley drop test facility where aircraft crashes can be simulated. The grid screen at the left of the facility is used as a backdrop for the impacts to allow engineers to measure angles and impact speeds. This facility was originally built to test a lunar lander simulator.

  7. The New LOTIS Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. M.; Cuzner, G.; Eugeni, C.; Hutchison, S. B.; Merrick, A. J.; Robins, G. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Ceurden, B.; Hagen, J.; Kenagy, K.; Martin, H. M.; Tuell, M.; Ward, M.; West, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Large Optical Test and Integration Site (LOTIS) at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company in Sunnyvale, CA is designed for the verification and testing of optical systems. The facility consists of an 88 foot temperature stabilized vacuum chamber that also functions as a class 10k vertical flow cleanroom. Many problems were encountered in the design and construction phases. The industry capability to build large chambers is very weak. Through many delays and extra engineering efforts, the final product is very good. With 11 Thermal Conditioning Units and precision RTD s, temperature is uniform and stable within 1oF, providing an ideal environment for precision optical testing. Within this chamber and atop an advanced micro-g vibration-isolation bench is the 6.5 meter diameter LOTIS Collimator and Scene Generator, LOTIS alignment and support equipment. The optical payloads are also placed on the vibration bench in the chamber for testing. This optical system is designed to operate in both air and vacuum, providing test imagery in an adaptable suite of visible/near infrared (VNIR) and midwave infrared (MWIR) point sources, and combined bandwidth visible-through-MWIR point sources, for testing of large aperture optical payloads. The heart of the system is the LOTIS Collimator, a 6.5m f/15 telescope, which projects scenes with wavefront errors <85 nm rms out to a 0.75 mrad field of view (FOV). Using field lenses, performance can be extended to a maximum field of view of 3.2 mrad. The LOTIS Collimator incorporates an extensive integrated wavefront sensing and control system to verify the performance of the system.

  8. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Sasscer, D.S.; Ernst, R.; Morgan, T.O.; Rivera, C.; Scott, A.C.; Summerson, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    In a cooperative research effort between The Puerto Rico Center of Energy and Environment Research, Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation and The Trane Company, a six month study was made of the seawater corrosion performance of various aluminum materials to test their suitability for use in seawater heat exchangers. The materials tested included bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger extrusions from a brazed aluminium, plate-fin heat exchanger developed by The Trane Company. The test materials were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr).

  9. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  10. Infrared sensor test methodology and facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jere J.; Dawbarn, Ronald

    1990-01-01

    As the Air Force Systems Command designated Center of Expertise for Space Simulation Testing, AEDC has defined a test methodology for the ground testing of infrared sensor systems. This test methodology and the test facilities envisioned to implement it has been addressed in another report. The progress on the implementation of that test methodology is reported and the status of the test facilities presently existing or under construction to implement it is described.

  11. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  12. The Revamping of an Ignition Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearns, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    The revamping of an Ignition Test Facility, located in the Research Combustion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. The history of how the test cell has adapted efficiently to a variety of test programs is discussed. The addition of a second test stand for ignition and small-scale rocket testing is detailed. An overview of the facility and the current test programs is offered. Planned upgrades for the future are outlined.

  13. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  14. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  15. Engineering Test Facilities Having the facilities to develop and test spaceflight hardware

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Engineering Test Facilities Having the facilities to develop and test spaceflight hardware onsite is a key ingredient to LASP's success. Our extensive test and calibration facilities enable our in-house engineers to work closely with scientists and mission operations staff in "test-like-you-fly" scenarios. Our

  16. Characteristics of Independent Turbine Testing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, C.; Voigt, R.L.; Gulliver, J.S.; Arndt, R.E.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Independent Turbine Testing Facility (ITTF) located at the St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic Laboratory has recently undergone extensive upgrading, funded by a grant from the small hydropower program of the US Department of Energy. Shakedown of the upgraded facility has been completed. The facility shakedown provides definitive answers regarding its capabilities and operational characteristics. This paper desires the upgraded facility, its resultant capabilities and characteristics, as well as its usefulness to the hydropower community. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Transonic turbine blade cascade testing facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent G. Verhoff; William P. Camperchioli; Isaac Lopez

    1992-01-01

    NASA LeRC has designed and constructed a new state-of-the-art test facility. This facility, the Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade, is used to evaluate the aerodynamics and heat transfer characteristics of blade geometries for future turbine applications. The facility's capabilities make it unique: no other facility of its kind can combine the high degree of airflow turning, infinitely adjustable incidence angle, and

  18. Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Power Systems Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Situ, Cindy H.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides a detailed description of the Johnson Space Center's Power Systems Facility located in the Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Facilities and the resources used to support power and battery systems testing are also shown. The contents include: 1) Power Testing; 2) Power Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 3) Source/Load; 4) Battery Facilities; 5) Battery Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 6) Battery Testing; 7) Performance Test Equipment; 8) Battery Test Environments; 9) Battery Abuse Chambers; 10) Battery Abuse Capabilities; and 11) Battery Test Area Resources.

  19. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  20. Optical testing cryogenic thermal vacuum facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick W. Dohogne; Warren A. Carpenter

    1990-01-01

    The construction of a turnkey cryogenic vacuum test facility was recently completed. The facility will be used to measure and record the surface profile of large diameter and 540 kg optics under simulated space conditions. The vacuum test chamber is a vertical stainless steel cylinder with a 3.5 diameter and a 7 m tangent length. The chamber was designed to

  1. Lead Coolant Test Facility Development Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz

    2005-06-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on May 25, 2005, to discuss the development of a next generation lead or lead-alloy coolant test facility. Attendees included representatives from the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) program, Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, and several universities. Several participants gave presentations on coolant technology, existing experimental facilities for lead and lead-alloy research, the current LFR design concept, and a design by Argonne National Laboratory for an integral heavy liquid metal test facility. Discussions were focused on the critical research and development requirements for deployment of an LFR demonstration test reactor, the experimental scope of the proposed coolant test facility, a review of the Argonne National Laboratory test facility design, and a brief assessment of the necessary path forward and schedule for the initial stages of this development project. This report provides a summary of the presentations and roundtable discussions.

  2. [Corrosion testing of high level radioactive waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Alloys under consideration as candidates for the high level nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain were exposed to a range of corrosion conditions and their performance measured. The alloys tested were Incoloy 825, 70/30 Copper-Nickel, Monel 400, Hastelloy C- 22, and low carbon steel. The test conditions varied were: temperature, concentration, agitation, and crevice simulation. Only in the case of carbon steel was significant attack noted. This attack appeared to be transport limited.

  3. Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  4. Durability Tests of a Fiber Optic Corrosion Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Kai Tai; Leung, Christopher K.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively. PMID:22737030

  5. Buffet test in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Hergert, Dennis W.; Butler, Thomas W.; Herring, Fred M.

    1992-01-01

    A buffet test of a commercial transport model was accomplished in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. This aeroelastic test was unprecedented for this wind tunnel and posed a high risk to the facility. This paper presents the test results from a structural dynamics and aeroelastic response point of view and describes the activities required for the safety analysis and risk assessment. The test was conducted in the same manner as a flutter test and employed onboard dynamic instrumentation, real time dynamic data monitoring, automatic, and manual tunnel interlock systems for protecting the model. The procedures and test techniques employed for this test are expected to serve as the basis for future aeroelastic testing in the National Transonic Facility. This test program was a cooperative effort between the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company and the NASA Langley Research Center.

  6. CIF (Consolidated Incineration Facility) offgas components test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1990-01-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is planned for start-up at the Savannah River Site in 1993. The CIF has a unique offgas system design utilizing state-of-the-art technology and experience gained from other radioactive\\/hazardous waste incinerators. A high efficiency steam-atomized offgas scrubber with separate quench and scrubber liquid recirculation loops will be used. The Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1:10

  7. IEA Grimethorpe 2 x 2M PFBC facility: turbine materials testing in a cascade loop

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Minchener; J. S. Anderson; G. Erbe; P. J. Mainhardt; R. L. Mc Carron; R. A. Mountford

    1984-01-01

    The Grimethorpe pressurised fluidised bed combustor (PFBC) facility of the International Energy Agency is equipped with an off-gas loop in which gas turbine blades are being exposed to assess the potential for erosion, corrosion, or deposition in a PFBC gas turbine. The flue gas from the PFBC is passed through four stages of cyclones before entering the cascade test section.

  8. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing...

  9. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing...

  10. Status of the Large Coil Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; May, J.R.; Miller, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is serving as the focus for international collaboration in the development of superconducting toroidal field coils. The United States is providing the test facility and three test coils. EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland are each providing one coil, to be tested in a six-coil compact torus. Construction of the LCTF was completed in November 1983 within the $35.75 million budget established in December 1980. Concurrently with the later stages of construction, the vacuum system, the liquid nitrogen system, and the helium refrigeration system were operated in acceptance and performance tests. Two test coils with bath-cooled windings were received and installed by October 1983. Shakedown of the integrated facility systems and limited testing of the two coils are beginning in December 1983. Preparations have been made for installation of the other four test coils, which are now nearing completion in Europe and the United States.

  11. Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-05-01

    Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

  12. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    It is desirable to employ a corrosion screening test for catalyst or support candidates for the fuel cell cathode before entering upon optimization of the candidate or of the catalytic electrode. To this end, corrosion test electrodes, intended for complete immersion and maximum wetting, have been made with 30 to 40 vol. pct Teflon; with perovskites this is about 10 to 15 pct. The candidates were synthesized by methods intended for single-phase product without special emphasis on high surface area, although the substances tested were no coarser than 2 m squared/g. A typical loading was 25 mg/cm sq of the pure substance, usually on gold screen, a few mm squared of which were left bare for contacting. Contact to the gold lead wire was made by welding with a micro-torch or a spot-welder. Corrosion testing consisted of obtaining current-voltage data under flowing inert gas in the potential region for reduction of O2. The electrode was immersed in 30 pct KOH. Observations were made at 20 C and 80 C, and the results compared with data from gold standards. Results with some perovskites, pyrochlores, spinels, and interstitial compounds will be discussed.

  13. Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Sheppard; R. Weil; A. Desjarlais

    1988-01-01

    The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which

  14. Description of Liquid Nitrogen Experimental Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; Jacobs, Richard E.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

    1991-01-01

    The Liquid Nitrogen Test Facility is a unique test facility for ground-based liquid nitrogen experimentation. The test rig consists of an insulated tank of approximately 12.5 cubic ft in volume, which is supplied with liquid nitrogen from a 300 gal dewar via a vacuum jacketed piping system. The test tank is fitted with pressure and temperature measuring instrumentation, and with two view ports which allow visual observation of test conditions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility, the initial test program is briefly described. The objective of the test program is to measure the condensation rate by injecting liquid nitrogen as a subcooled spray into the ullage of a tank 50 percent full of liquid nitrogen at saturated conditions. The condensation rate of the nitrogen vapor on the subcooled spray can be analytically modeled, and results validated and corrected by experimentally measuring the vapor condensation on liquid sprays.

  15. Description of liquid nitrogen experimental test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, J. M.; Jacobs, R. E.; Saiyed, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    The Liquid Nitrogen Test Facility is a unique test facility for ground-based liquid nitrogen experimentation. The test rig consists of an insulated tank of approximately 12.5 cubic ft in volume, which is supplied with liquid nitrogen from a 300 gal dewar via a vacuum jacketed piping system. The test tank is fitted with pressure and temperature measuring instrumentation, and with two view ports which allow visual observation of test conditions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility, the initial test program is briefly described. The objective of the test program is to measure the condensation rate by injecting liquid nitrogen as a subcooled spray into the ullage of a tank 50 percent full of liquid nitrogen at saturated conditions. The condensation rate of the nitrogen vapor on the subcooled spray can be analytically modeled, and results validated and corrected by experimentally measuring the vapor condensation on liquid sprays.

  16. Buffet test in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Hergert, Dennis W.; Butler, Thomas W.; Herring, Fred M.

    1992-01-01

    A buffet test of a commercial transport model was accomplished in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. This aeroelastic test was unprecedented for this wind tunnel and posed a high risk for the facility. Presented here are the test results from a structural dynamics and aeroelastic response point of view. The activities required for the safety analysis and risk assessment are described. The test was conducted in the same manner as a flutter test and employed on-board dynamic instrumentation, real time dynamic data monitoring, and automatic and manual tunnel interlock systems for protecting the model.

  17. Cryogenics for the superconducting module test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    A group of laboratories and universities, with Fermilab taking the lead, are constructing a superconducting cryomodule test facility (SMTF) in the Meson Detector Building (MDB) area at Fermilab. The facility will be used for testing and validating designs for both pulsed and CW systems. A multi phase approach is taken to construct the facility. For the initial phase of the project, cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule will be supplied from the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. A cryogenic distribution system to supply cryogens from CTF to MDB is under construction. This paper describes plans, status and challenges of the initial phase of the SMTF cryogenic system.

  18. Low Emissions Combustor Test and Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Casleton, K.H.; Maloney, D.J.; Norton, T.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) recently built and began operation of a Low Emissions Combustor Test and Research (LECTR) facility with the primary objective of providing test facilities and engineering support to METC customers through programs such as the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) University-Industry Consortium and through CRADA participation with industrial partners. The LECTR is a versatile test facility with capabilities for evaluating a variety of low emissions combustion concepts at temperatures and pressures representative of gas turbine applications. The LECTR design incorporates a set of flanged sections or modules including an inlet plelnum, combustor test sections, a gas sampling section, and a quench section. The high pressure and mass flow capabilities of the LECTR facility make it uniquely suited for evaluation of advanced combustion concepts at combustion scales up to 3 MW (10 MMBtu/h).

  19. Mechanical Components Branch Test Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center formulates, conducts, and manages research focused on propulsion systems for both present and advanced aeronautical and space vehicles. The branch is comprised of research teams that perform basic research in three areas: mechanical drives, aerospace seals, and space mechanisms. Each team has unique facilities for testing aerospace hardware and concepts. This report presents an overview of the Mechanical Components Branch test facilities.

  20. Radiation effects test facility at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Foster; S. L. Casey; A. L. Johnson; P. Miesle; N. Sifri; A. H. Skees; K. M. Murray

    1997-01-01

    The beam line end station, associated instrumentation and dosimetry used at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility for radiation effects research and testing with up to 200 MeV protons are described. Access to beam for radiation effects studies is greatly enhanced by the capability to share beam with other users on a millisecond time scale. Use of shared beam mandates that

  1. An overview of current activities at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. P. Cameron; P. C. Klimas

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a description of the United States Department of Energy's National Solar Thermal Test Facility, highlighting current test programs. In the central receiver area, research underway supports commercialization of molten nitrate salt technology, including receivers, thermal energy transport, and corrosion experiments. Concentrator research includes large-area, glass-metal heliostats and stretched-membrane heliostats and dishes. Test activities in support of dish-Stirling

  2. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-12-14

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 97}Mo, and {sup 90}Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the {sup 99}Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup.

  3. Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

    2011-09-02

    Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

  4. Corrosion experiences during the deep steam preliminary field test

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Johnson, D.R.

    1981-03-01

    Rod specimens of 1018 carbon steel, 1095 carbon steel drill rod and 303 Se stainless steel were exposed to steam environments generated at test sites in Sandia's Area III and in the Kern River Field, Bakersfield, California, by prototype steam generators. The test environment was nominally steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide at 188/sup 0/C (370/sup 0/F) and 340 psia. It was found that in mildly basic steam all three materials performed adequately for substantial exposure times (approximately 25 days). An initial effort to introduce SO/sub 2/ gas into the generator feedwater (used as a marker gas) caused the steam discharge to become mildly acidic. During this exposure period the corrosion rates for the carbon steel and drill rod became unacceptably high. Rates were particularly high at the junction with the stainless steel specimen holder where galvanic effects (dissimilar metal couples) enhanced corrosion. The 303 Se stainless steel material did not suffer from this coupling in that the 304L stainless steel holder and 303 Se stainless steel specimen have similar electrochemical potentials. The results show that stainless steel does have adequate corrosion resistance in mildly acidic steam atmospheres. When SO/sub 2/ in high concentrations was added to the steam (for reservoir interaction determinations), the corrosive attack on all three materials became severe. Even after short exposure times (8 days steam, < 1 day steam plus SO/sub 2/), the carbon steels had disappeared and the stainless steel was severely pitted. Chromel-alumel thermocouples with stainless steel sheaths also were severely attacked by this high SO/sub 2/ environment.

  5. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  6. Recommendations for erosion-corrosion allowance for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, W.C.; Brehm, W.F.; Larrick, A.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Divine, J.R. [ChemMet, Ltd., West Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility carbon steel tanks will contain mixer pumps that circulate the waste. On the basis of flow characteristics of the system and data from the literature, an erosion allowance of 0.075 mm/y (3 mil/year) was recommended for the tank bottoms, in addition to the 0.025 mm/y (1 mil/year) general corrosion allowance.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium cladding tubes: I. Proximate local SCC testing method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. B. Rozhnov; V. A. Belov; S. A. Nikulin; V. G. Khanzhin

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) methods of testing zirconium cladding tubes are analyzed. A proximate method is proposed for estimating SCC of fuel claddings claddings in a iodine-containing environment with a limited contact zone between a metal and corrosive medium and simultaneous measurement of acoustic emission (AE) from forming corrosion defects. Criteria of estimating the SCC resistance of the tubes

  8. Corrosion of iron by iodide-oxidizing bacteria isolated from brine in an iodine production facility.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Satoshi; Ito, Kimio; Iino, Takao; Tomoe, Yasuyoshi; Mori, Koji; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2014-10-01

    Elemental iodine is produced in Japan from underground brine (fossil salt water). Carbon steel pipes in an iodine production facility at Chiba, Japan, for brine conveyance were found to corrode more rapidly than those in other facilities. The corroding activity of iodide-containing brine from the facility was examined by immersing carbon steel coupons in "native" and "filter-sterilized" brine samples. The dissolution of iron from the coupons immersed in native brine was threefold to fourfold higher than that in the filter-sterilized brine. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that iodide-oxidizing bacteria (IOBs) were predominant in the coupon-containing native brine samples. IOBs were also detected in a corrosion deposit on the inner surface of a corroded pipe. These results strongly suggested the involvement of IOBs in the corrosion of the carbon steel pipes. Of the six bacterial strains isolated from a brine sample, four were capable of oxidizing iodide ion (I(-)) into molecular iodine (I(2)), and these strains were further phylogenetically classified into two groups. The iron-corroding activity of each of the isolates from the two groups was examined. Both strains corroded iron in the presence of potassium iodide in a concentration-dependent manner. This is the first report providing direct evidence that IOBs are involved in iron corrosion. Further, possible mechanisms by which IOBs corrode iron are discussed. PMID:24863130

  9. Coal cleaning test facility: 1985 plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. R. Torak; J. W. Parkinson; R. G. Moorhead; N. Hoffman; J. R. Cavalet; A. K. Bhowmick; D. J. Akers; R. J. Jenko

    1985-01-01

    The activities at EPRI's Coal Cleaning Test Facility (CCTF) are divided into two major categories: a standard suite of tests which define Coal Cleanability Characterization and Development and Demonstration (D and D) projects. EPRI began conducting Coal Cleanability Characterizations on nationally important steam coals in 1983. These characterizations are a series of laboratory and pilot-scale investigations designed to determine a

  10. High pressure turbomachinery ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Patrick E.

    1992-01-01

    Turbomachinery test facilities are at present scarce to non-existent world-wide. The turbomachinery test facility at Stennis Space Center will provide for advanced development and research and development capabilities for liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen propellant rocket engine components. The facility will provide ultra-high pressure via gas generators to deliver the needed turbine drive on various turbomachinery. State of the art process control systems will provide the vital pressure, temperature and flow requirements during tests. These systems will better control adverse transient conditions during start-up and shutdown, and by using advanced control theory, as well as incorporate test article health monitoring. Also, digital data acquisition systems will obtain high frequency (up to 20 KHz) and low frequency (up to 1 KHz) data during the test. Pressures of up to 15,000 psi will be generated to pressurize high pressure tanks supplying cryogens to various test article inlets thus pushing turbopump materials and manufacturing processes to their limits. By planning for future projects the test facility will be easily adaptable to multi-program test configurations over a range of thermodynamic positions.

  11. Temporary (mobile) storage testing facilities

    E-print Network

    for certification in a controlled laboratory environment. It is the only system in the world that is fully is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy reduce certification testing time and costs while providing system engineers with a better under

  12. Standard test method for measuring pH of soil for use in corrosion testing

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the pH of a soil in corrosion testing. The principle use of the test is to supplement soil resistivity measurements and thereby identify conditions under which the corrosion of metals in soil may be accentuated (see G 57 - 78 (1984)). 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.

    2010-12-16

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development of the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in alkaline solutions.

  14. SRL incinerator components test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1982-01-01

    A full-scale (5 kg waste\\/hour) controlled-air incinerator, the ICTF, is presently being tested with simulated waste as part of a program to develop technology for incineration of Savannah River Plant solid transuranic wastes. This unit is designed specifically to incinerate relatively small quantities of solid combustible waste that are contaminated up to 10⁵ times the present nominal 10 nCi\\/g threshold

  15. Test facilities for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    During the past several years there has been a tremendous amount of progress on Linear Collider technology world wide. This research has led to the construction of the test facilities described in this report. Some of the facilities will be complete as early as the end of 1996, while others will be finishing up around the end 1997. Even now there are extensive tests ongoing for the enabling technologies for all of the test facilities. At the same time the Linear Collider designs are quite mature now and the SLC is providing the key experience base that can only come from a working collider. All this taken together indicates that the technology and accelerator physics will be ready for a future Linear Collider project to begin in the last half of the 1990s.

  16. Corrosion test on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Van Konynenburg; P. G. Curtis

    1996-01-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials in order to assist in selecting materials for package design and to help in designing longer-term corrosion tests. The corrosion solution was buffered near pH4, was in contact with air, and contained chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for

  17. SCAT--New test method for determining pitting corrosion rates. [Stray Current Accelerated Test

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, H. (Mitchell Energy Corp., The Woodlands, TX (United States))

    1993-09-01

    A test procedure is described that has been used to determine if casing (tubulars) from various mills will corrode in a general or pitting-type pattern. The equipment required to run the test is relatively inexpensive and gives meaningful results in one to two weeks. The Stray Current Accelerated Test (SCAT) accelerates the corrosion rate for quick materials evaluation. Casings subjected to the SCAT test have been compared to actual failed casings and found to be almost identical.

  18. Standard practice for conducting atmospheric corrosion tests on metals

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and defines conditions for exposure of metals and alloys to the weather. It sets forth the general procedures that should be followed in any atmospheric test. It is presented as an aid in conducting atmospheric corrosion tests so that some of the pitfalls of such testing may be avoided. As such, it is concerned mainly with panel exposures to obtain data for comparison purposes. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  20. Assessment of a hot hydrogen nuclear propulsion fuel test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.H.; Howe, S.D.; Wantuck, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    Subsequent to the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), several studies and review groups have identified nuclear thermal propulsion as a high priority technology for development. To achieve the goals of SEI to place man on Mars, a nuclear rocket will operate at near 2700K and in a hydrogen environment at near 60 atmospheres. Under these conditions, the operational lifetime of the rocket will be limited by the corrosion rate at the hydrogen/fuel interface. Consequently, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been evaluating requirements and design issues for a test facility. The facility will be able to directly heat fuel samples by electrical resistance, microwave deposition, or radio frequency induction heating to temperatures near 3000K. Hydrogen gas at variable pressure and temperatures will flow through the samples. The thermal gradients, power density, and operating times envisioned for nuclear rockets will be duplicated as close as reasonable. The post-sample flow stream will then be scrubbed and cooled before reprocessing. The baseline design and timetable for the facility will be discussed. 7 refs.

  1. Corrosion

    E-print Network

    Patel, R.N

    1969-01-01

    , such as stainless-steel and brass. Avoid electric contact between dissimilar metals to prevent galvanic corrosion. 1 f, possible use similar materials throughout the entire structure, or insulate different materials from one another. 6. Avoid sharp bends... resistance, electric and heat conductivity, but they are fragile. good is attacked by aggressive environment. Alteration of Environment (&1 ) Changing mediums:- Altering the environment provides a versatile means for reducing corrosion. Typical change...

  2. Low power arcjet test facility impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl; Lichon, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    Performance characterization of a flight-type 1.4 kW arcjet system were conducted at the Rocket Research Company (RRC) in Redmond, WA, and at the NASA LeRC in Cleveland, OH. The objectives of these tests were as follows: to compare low-power arcjet performance at two different test facilities; to compare arcjet performance obtained with a 2:1 mixture of gaseous hydrogen and nitrogen and hydrazine; and to quantify the effects of test cell pressure on thruster operating characteristics. Performance and thruster temperature distributions were measured at thruster input power levels and propellant mass flow rates ranging from 1274 to 1370 W and from 3.2 x 10(exp -5) to 5.1 x 10(exp -5) kg/s, respectively. Specific impulses measured at the two facilities, at comparable test cell pressures, using gaseous hydrogen-nitrogen propellant mixtures agreed to within 1 percent over the range of operating conditions tested. The specific impulses measured using hydrazine propellant were higher than that for the cold hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures. Agreement between by hydrazine and gas mixture data was good, however, when the differences in propellant enthalpies at the thruster inlet were considered. Specific impulse showed a strong dependence on test facility pressure, and was 3 to 4 percent higher below 0.1 Pa than for test cell pressures above 5 Pa.

  3. Low-power arcjet test facility impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. E.; Lichon, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    Performance characterizations of a flight-type 1.4 kW arcjet system were conducted. Performance and thruster temperature distributions were measured at thruster input power levels and propellant mass flow rates ranging from 1274 to 1370 W and from 3.2 x 10 exp -5 to 5.1 x 10 exp -5 kg/s, respectively. Specific impulses measured at the two facilities, at comparable test cell pressures, using gaseous hydrogen-nitrogen propellant mixtures agreed to within 1 percent over the range of operating conditions tested. The specific impulses measured using hydrazine propellant were higher than that for the cold hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures. Agreement between the hydrazine and gas mixture data was good, however, when the differences in propellant ethalpies at the thruster inlet were considered. Specific impulse showed a strong dependence on test facility pressure, and was 3 to 4 percent higher below 0.1 Pa than for test cell pressures above 5 Pa.

  4. Lightning test facility for light combat aircraft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. N. A. P. Rao; K. N. Shamanna; G. R. Nagabhushana

    1997-01-01

    With the increased use of composites and sensitive electronic systems on board a fighter aircraft, there is a necessity to design the aircraft structure and systems to withstand lightning strike-both direct and indirect. A comprehensive lightning test facility has been established in Bangalore by ADA and IISc as part of the light combat aircraft programme for carrying out various lightning

  5. Central Receiver Test Facility, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Moeller; T. D. Brumleve; C. Grosskreutz; L. O. Seamons

    1980-01-01

    The Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) was constructed at Albuquerque, NM for the U.S. Dept of Energy (DOE) and is operated by Sandia Laboratories. A primary goal of the CRTF is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of receivers and other components for proposed large scale, solar powered, electrical generation or process heat plants. A

  6. Propeller acoustics test facility (capability description)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Shahady; S. W. Kizirnis; R. M. McGregor

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the development of a research facility to investigate fan and propeller noise generation mechanisms. A 3500 horsepower electric whirl rig was modified to allow both near- and far-field acoustic testing. The rig is located in a large building with acoustically-treated walls. Reverberation time and sound pressure level measurements were conducted to determine the acoustic characteristics of the

  7. The Test and Evaluation Facility, Cincinnati, Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Test and Evaluation Facility (T&E) is located on the grounds of Cincinnati?s Mill Creek wastewater treatment plant. There, studies are conducted on new treatment technologies for contaminants in water and wastewater for EPA?s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NR...

  8. Hot helium flow test facility summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study conducted to assess the feasibility and cost of modifying an existing circulator test facility (CTF) at General Atomic Company (GA). The CTF originally was built to test the Delmarva Power and Light Co. steam-driven circulator. This circulator, as modified, could provide a source of hot, pressurized helium for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) component testing. To achieve this purpose, a high-temperature impeller would be installed on the existing machine. The projected range of tests which could be conducted for the project is also presented, along with corresponding cost considerations.

  9. ANL Solids\\/Gas Flow Test Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. R. Dates; J. P. Bobis

    1982-01-01

    The Solids\\/Gas Flow Test Facility (S\\/GFTF) has been designed and constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to promote development, testing, evaluation, and calibration of instruments, not currently available but ultimately needed, for advanced large-scale coal-conversion and combustion plants. This instrument effort is part of a program in instrumentation and process control for coal conversion at ANL funded by the United

  10. Wisconsin test facility pattem and steering measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PETER R. BANNISTER

    1972-01-01

    During August\\/September 1971, NUSC\\/NL performed pattern and steering measurements on both the NS and EW Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF) antennas. The 45 and 75 Hz near field pattern measurements were made at 13 different locations in Eastern Minnesota and Southern Wisconsin (covering approximately120degof arc), while the far field steering tests were taken in Mars Hill, Maine and Swansboro, North Carolina.

  11. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  12. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  13. Irradiation Facilities at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-12-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC – formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950s with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world’s data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities1. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens.

  14. Atmospheric corrosion tests in Brazilian Legal Amazon - field and laboratory tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. R. M. Miranda; L. Sathler; R. Nogueira; S. L. D. C. Brasil

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the first results concerning tests carried out to evaluate the atmospheric corrosion in Brazilian Legal Amazon, as part of the SIVAM - Amazon Surveillance System. The aim of the present work is to determine and select materials as well as anti-rust paints, which will be employed to protect metallic structures of radar towers, equipment and buildings. Five

  15. Advanced nozzle and engine components test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Delroso, Richard L.; Delrosario, Ruben

    1992-01-01

    A test facility for conducting scaled advanced nozzle and engine component research is described. The CE-22 test facility, located in the Engine Research Building of the NASA Lewis Research Center, contains many systems for the economical testing of advanced scale-model nozzles and engine components. The combustion air and altitude exhaust systems are described. Combustion air can be supplied to a model up to 40 psig for primary air flow, and 40, 125, and 450 psig for secondary air flow. Altitude exhaust can be simulated up to 48,000 ft, or the exhaust can be atmospheric. Descriptions of the multiaxis thrust stand, a color schlieren flow visualization system used for qualitative flow analysis, a labyrinth flow measurement system, a data acquisition system, and auxiliary systems are discussed. Model recommended design information and temperature and pressure instrumentation recommendations are included.

  16. A test facility to calibrate EUV detectors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, G.; Naletto, G.; Tondello, G.

    1992-12-01

    A new test facility has been realized in the authors' laboratories to calibrate detectors in the ultraviolet region between 300 Å and 2500 Å. It consists of a vacuum normal incidence Johnson-Onaka monochromator with a set of interchangeable gratings and several UV lamps to optimally cover the whole spectral range. A pair of NIST calibrated photodiodes allows an absolute measurement of the photon flux outcoming from the monochromator, and thus it is possible to evaluate the quantum efficiency of the detectors under test. Moreover, other characteristic parameter of UV detectors can be evaluated, like for example the spatial resolution and the uniformity response. The results of the quantum efficiency measurements of an EEV ion implanted CCD are shown. Finally, the possible improvements necessary to optimize this test facility are discussed.

  17. Advanced nozzle and engine components test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Del Roso, Richard L.; Del Rosario, Ruben

    1992-01-01

    A test facility for conducting scaled advanced nozzle and engine component research is described. The CE-22 test facility, located in the Engine Research Building of the NASA Lewis Research Center, contains many systems for the economical testing of advanced scale-model nozzles and engine components. The combustion air and altitude exhaust systems are described. Combustion air can be supplied to a model up to 40 psig for primary air flow, and 40, 125, and 450 psig for secondary air flow. Altitude exhaust can be simulated up to 48,000 ft, or the exhaust can be atmospheric. Descriptions of the multiaxis thrust stand, a color schlieren flow visualization system used for qualitative flow analysis, a labyrinth flow measurement system, a data acquisition system, and auxiliary systems are discussed. Model recommeded design information and temperature and pressure instrumentation recommendations are included.

  18. Optical testing cryogenic thermal vacuum facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohogne, Patrick W.; Carpenter, Warren A.

    1990-11-01

    The construction of a turnkey cryogenic vacuum test facility was recently completed. The facility will be used to measure and record the surface profile of large diameter and 540 kg optics under simulated space conditions. The vacuum test chamber is a vertical stainless steel cylinder with a 3.5 diameter and a 7 m tangent length. The chamber was designed to maximize optical testing quality by minimizing the vibrations between the laser interferometer and the test specimen. This was accomplished by designing the chamber for a high natural frequency and vibration isolating the chamber. An optical test specimen is mounted on a movable presentation stage. During thermal vacuum testing, the specimen may be positioned to + or - 0.00025 cm accuracy with a fine adjustment mechanism. The chamber is evacuated by a close coupled Roots-type blower and rotary vane pump package and two cryopumps. The chamber is equipped with an optically dense gaseous nitrogen cooled thermal shroud. The thermal shroud is used to cool or warm the optical test specimen at a controlled rate. A control system is provided to automatically evacuate the chamber and cooldown the test specimen to the selected control temperature.

  19. Optical testing cryogenic thermal vacuum facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohogne, Patrick W.; Carpenter, Warren A.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of a turnkey cryogenic vacuum test facility was recently completed. The facility will be used to measure and record the surface profile of large diameter and 540 kg optics under simulated space conditions. The vacuum test chamber is a vertical stainless steel cylinder with a 3.5 diameter and a 7 m tangent length. The chamber was designed to maximize optical testing quality by minimizing the vibrations between the laser interferometer and the test specimen. This was accomplished by designing the chamber for a high natural frequency and vibration isolating the chamber. An optical test specimen is mounted on a movable presentation stage. During thermal vacuum testing, the specimen may be positioned to + or - 0.00025 cm accuracy with a fine adjustment mechanism. The chamber is evacuated by a close coupled Roots-type blower and rotary vane pump package and two cryopumps. The chamber is equipped with an optically dense gaseous nitrogen cooled thermal shroud. The thermal shroud is used to cool or warm the optical test specimen at a controlled rate. A control system is provided to automatically evacuate the chamber and cooldown the test specimen to the selected control temperature.

  20. Prototype oxide breeder tests in the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Pitner; B. C. Gneiting; R. B. Baker; S. L. Hecht

    1994-01-01

    Four prototype irradiation tests were conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility to investigate the performance of a 2-yr mixed-oxide fuel system using titanium-stabilized stainless steel cladding and duct material for application in a commercial-scale liquid-metal reactor plant. Three of the tests were irradiated to the point of cladding breach to establish the lifetime capability of this fuel design. Details

  1. Instrument Thermal Test Bed - A unique two phase test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore; Didion, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The Instrument Thermal Test Bed (ITTB) is a modular, large-scale test facility which provides a medium for ground testing and flight qualification of spacecraft thermal control components and system configurations. The initial 'shade-down' operations are discussed herein. Operational parameters and performance characteristics were determined and quantified on a preliminary basis. The ITTB was successfully operated at evaporator power loads ranging from 600 W to 9600 W as well as in both capillary pumped and series hybrid pumped modes.

  2. Hydrogen water chemistry to mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking: In-reactor tests: Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. G. Ljungberg; J. Lejon; B. Rebensdorff

    1988-01-01

    In-reactor studies of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in sensitized Type 304 stainless steel were performed during operation under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) in the Swedish Ringhals-1 BWR. Techniques used were constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests and corrosion potential (ECP) measurements. Objective of the tests was to identify and investigate factors other than oxygen concentration in the water, which

  3. CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 & 316L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-06-27

    The Effluent Treatment Facility has developed a method to regenerate spent resin from the groundwater pump and treat intercepting chrome(VI) plumes (RPP-RPT-32207, Laboratory Study on Regeneration of Spent DOWEX 21K 16-20 Mesh Ion Exchange Resin). Subsequent laboratory studies have shown that the chrome(VI) may be reduced to chrome(III) by titrating with sodium metabisulfite to an oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of +280 mV at a pH of 2. This test plan describes the use of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization techniques to ascertain the electrochemical corrosion and pitting propensity of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing the solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiver tank or concentrate tank.

  4. Corrosion testing of Type 304L stainless steel for waste tank applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    AISI Type 304L stainless steel will be the material of construction for hazardous waste storage tanks. The corrosion behavior of 304L was characterized in simulated waste solutions using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and long term immersion tests. The results were correlated to assess the use of corrosion characteristics determined by electrochemical techniques for predicting long term corrosion behavior. The corrosion behaviors of Type A537 carbon steel and Incoloy 825 were also evaluated. A good correlation was found between the results from the electrochemical techniques and the immersion tests.

  5. Corrosion testing of Type 304L stainless steel for waste tank applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1991-12-31

    AISI Type 304L stainless steel will be the material of construction for hazardous waste storage tanks. The corrosion behavior of 304L was characterized in simulated waste solutions using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and long term immersion tests. The results were correlated to assess the use of corrosion characteristics determined by electrochemical techniques for predicting long term corrosion behavior. The corrosion behaviors of Type A537 carbon steel and Incoloy 825 were also evaluated. A good correlation was found between the results from the electrochemical techniques and the immersion tests.

  6. Corrosion of glass, ceramics and ceramic superconductors: Principles, testing, characterization and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Zoitos, B.K. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This book contains a series of essays that elaborate on the mechanisms by which corrosion occurs, and test methods and their applications for a variety of glasses and ceramics. The first third of the book is devoted to theory, testing and the characteristics of corrosion, focusing primarily on glass as the most corrodible material. The second third contains detailed discussion of corrosion during particular important applications of glasses. The last part of the book concentrates on crystalline ceramic materials. Overall the book is comprehensive and approaches corrosion behavior from a theoretical point of view.

  7. Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities

    E-print Network

    Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities 44th AIAA Aerospace Activity (NATA) · Summary #12;Goals Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities · Increase vision and plan · NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) commitment to sustain facilities

  8. PFBC test facility is ready in Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Friedlander

    1982-01-01

    Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) technology has the potential of producing large-scale coal-based power at a lower cost than burning pulverized coal and without complex back-end flue-gas desulfurization. Outlined here is a PFBC combined-cycle development program and a component-test facility (CTF) in Malmoe, Sweden. The CTF, representing a full-sized scale-up of components, is the final developmental step before building a commercial-sized

  9. Safety assessment for the rf Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, A.; Beane, F. (eds.)

    1984-08-01

    The Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) is a part of the Magnetic Fusion Program's rf Heating Experiments. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program (MFP) is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. RFTF is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power. This report was compiled as a summary of the analysis done to ensure the safe operation of RFTF.

  10. Modular High Current Test Facility at LLNL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. K. Tully; D. A. Goerz; R. D. Speer; T. J. Ferriera

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the 1 MA, 225 kJ test facility in operation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The capacitor bank is constructed from three parallel 1.5 mF modules. The modules are capable of switching simultaneously or sequentially via solid dielectric puncture switches. The bank nominally operates up to 10 kV and reaches peak current with all three cabled modules

  11. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  12. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  13. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  14. An overview of current activities at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, C. P.; Klimas, P. C.

    This paper is a description of the United States Department of Energy's National Solar Thermal Test Facility, highlighting current test programs. In the central receiver area, research underway supports commercialization of molten nitrate salt technology, including receivers, thermal energy transport, and corrosion experiments. Concentrator research includes large-area, glass-metal heliostats and stretched-membrane heliostats and dishes. Test activities in support of dish-Stirling systems with reflux receivers are described. Research on parabolic troughs includes characterization of several receiver configurations. Other test facility activities include solar detoxification experiments, design assistance testing of commercially-available solar hardware, and non-DOE-funded work, including thermal exposure tests and testing of volumetric and PV central receiver concepts.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium cladding tubes: I. Proximate local SCC testing method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. B. Rozhnov; V. A. Belov; S. A. Nikulin; V. G. Khanzhin

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) methods of testing zirconium cladding tubes are analyzed. A proximate method is proposed\\u000a for estimating SCC of fuel claddings claddings in a iodine-containing environment with a limited contact zone between a metal\\u000a and corrosive medium and simultaneous measurement of acoustic emission (AE) from forming corrosion defects. Criteria of estimating\\u000a the SCC resistance of the tubes

  16. Testing of general and localized corrosion of magnesium alloys: A critical review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward Ghali; Wolfgang Dietzel; Karl-Ulrich Kainer

    2004-01-01

    The degradation of materials generally occurs via corrosion, fatigue, and wear. Once a magnesium (Mg) alloy is chosen for\\u000a a certain application, corrosion testing is generally required as a function of the expected service environment, the type\\u000a of corrosion expected in service, and the type of surface protection, depending on the material and its use in the intended\\u000a surface. In

  17. Field corrosion testing and performance of cable shielding materials in soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Haynes; R. Baboian

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of corrosion resistance in cable-shielding materials, describes the mechanisms of shielding corrosion that occur in buried telephone cable, and evaluates the results of the six-year REA Horry Cooperative buried telephone cable corrosion test. In this study, both active and static cables were included. Withdrawals were made over a six-year period. These cables were evaluated for

  18. Process Test Plan for 4TH Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-06-20

    Instrumentation and cabinets for the 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102 corrosion monitoring systems will be upgraded in FY 2000. The bulk of the field work involved in this task will involve placement of the corrosion monitoring data collection hardware closer to the risers that house the existing corrosion probes. This will be accomplished by placing a new climate controlled cabinet by the risers containing corrosion probes on these two tanks (one cabinet per tank). Once installed the systems will feed data back to a centralized corrosion monitoring station in the 241-AN-271 instrument building. The upgraded systems will be operated under the bounds of this Process Test Plan (PTP) for six principle reasons. These reasons were established prior to installing the original systems in 1997 (241-AN-107) and 1998 (241-AN-102). They are as follows: (1) Acquire corrosion data on the waste in 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102. (2) Provide supporting data to the site's Integrity Assessment program. (3) Demonstrate that corrosion monitoring by evaluation of electrochemical noise data is possible in waste tank systems, particularly with regard to the detection of general corrosion and (if present) pitting and stress corrosion cracking. (4) Demonstrate the durability of the design of the corrosion monitoring equipment. (5) Extend tank life and reduce annual operations cost. (6) Provide basis to control corrosion in double shell tanks though the use of direct corrosion monitoring rather than waste sampling and analysis. The designs of the existing corrosion probes in 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102 were reviewed and documented prior to the original installation activities in 1997 and 1998. Initial programmatic documentation for Hanford's corrosion monitoring program was also established prior to the original installation activities.

  19. Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.

    1997-05-01

    This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process.

  20. Modular High Current Test Facility at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Speer, R D; Ferriera, T J

    2008-05-20

    This paper describes the 1 MA, 225 kJ test facility in operation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The capacitor bank is constructed from three parallel 1.5 mF modules. The modules are capable of switching simultaneously or sequentially via solid dielectric puncture switches. The bank nominally operates up to 10 kV and reaches peak current with all three cabled modules in approximately 30 {micro}s. Parallel output plates from the bank allow for cable or busbar interfacing to the load. This versatile bank is currently in use for code validation experiments, railgun related activities, switch testing, and diagnostic development.

  1. The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility under Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jerome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-François; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Abad, Jose; Fischer, Gert; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko

    2013-12-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project has received most of its subsystems in Garching and the ESO Integration Hall has become the central operation location for the next phase of the project. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM will now undergo a series of tests on ASSIST to qualify its optical performance which launches the System Test Phase of the AOF. The tests will validate the AO modules operation with the DSM: first the GRAAL adaptive optics module for Hawk-I in natural guide star AO mode on-axis and then its Ground Layer AO mode. This will be followed by the GALACSI (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and then the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO). We will report on the status of the subsystems at the time of the conference but also on the performance of the delivered ASSIST test bench, the DSM and the 20 Watt Sodium fiber Laser pre-production unit which has validated all specifications before final manufacturing of the serial units. We will also present some considerations and tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  2. Startup Testing of the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Polzin, David L.

    2010-06-30

    This paper is one in a series documenting the current effort to retrieve, secure, and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors. . Information from this testing is being retrieved under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program conducted by the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) of the DOE. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to be designed, constructed, and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  3. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  4. SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 The TESLA Test Facility FEL team

    E-print Network

    SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 The TESLA Test Facility FEL team June 2002, TESLA-FEL 2002-01 #12;SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 Abstract The last description of the TESLA Test Facility FEL has been written in 1995 (TESLA- FEL report 95-03). Since then, many changes have developed

  5. A modified ASTM G-75 abrasion test helps select candidate alloys for service in a corrosive and abrasive slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.A.; Morrison, W.S.; Jenkins, C.F. (Corrosion Testing Labs., Inc., Wilmington, DE (USA); Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The design of a hazardous waste immobilization facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) set material requirements for both abrasion resistance and corrosion resistance in process equipment. Standard ASTM slurry wear test G75 was modified to permit evaluation and comparison of abrasive resistance of candidate materials of construction in the laboratory. However, corrosion was found to contribute significantly to overall metal loss during the testing. Consequently, the abrasive slurry used for the testing was modified by adjusting its chemistry to include appropriate corrosive species. The Miller numbers obtained in the modified G75 Miller abrasion test are described. Pilot plant observations for Type 304L austenitic stainless steel were available. These data were used to generate a Morrison-Miller Ratio'' in order to determine anticipated field abrasion properties for other alloys. Hardness for many of the alloys fell in a narrow range about Rockwell B90, but performance varied significantly in response to slurry chemistry. This effect if synergistic may often be overlooked in the selection process, and it needs to be addressed. Some pilot plant testing of other alloys is essential to confirm the calculated abrasion rates and the approach of using the Morrison-Miller ratio. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Space power distribution system technology. Volume 3: Test facility design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Cannady, M. D.; Cassinelli, J. E.; Farber, B. F.; Lurie, C.; Fleck, G. W.; Lepisto, J. W.; Messner, A.; Ritterman, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The AMPS test facility is a major tool in the attainment of more economical space power. The ultimate goals of the test facility, its primary functional requirements and conceptual design, and the major equipment it contains are discussed.

  7. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John

    2014-01-31

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  8. 52 megajoule electric gun test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coradeschi, T.; Colombo, G.; Davis, A.; Puterbaugh, R.; Bernhardt, T.; Dobbie, C.; Gaywood, P.; Harris, E.; McNab, I.

    1993-01-01

    The Electric Armaments Division at the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center has constructed an advanced, high energy, electric gun test facility on the grounds of Picatinny Arsenal in northern New Jersey. A 52 megajoule, capacitor-based, pulsed power supply, consisting of sixteen individual 3.25 MJ modules, has been installed. Pulse forming networks have been designed to provide appropriate pulses for both ET and EM railgun loads. A 120 mm ET launch fixture has been installed and a 90 mm EM railgun is to be installed in summer 1992. A 900-sq ft control and data acquisition center is installed in Building 717A. The layout of the facility, design of the pulse power supply and configuration of the diagnostic systems are discussed.

  9. Small engine components test facility compressor testing cell at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokopp, Richard A.; Gronski, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    LeRC has designed and constructed a new test facility. This facility, called the Small Engine Components Facility (SECTF) is used to test gas turbines and compressors at conditions similar to actual engine conditions. The SECTF is comprised of a compressor testing cell and a turbine testing cell. Only the compressor testing cell is described. The capability of the facility, the overall facility design, the instrumentation used in the facility, and the data acquisition system are discussed in detail.

  10. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the IGT HYGAS coal-gasification pilot plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1981-01-01

    Corrosion monitoring of test materials was conducted in the operating environment of the IGT HYGAS pilot plant between 1974 and 1980. Metals were exposed in the coal pretreater, pretreater quench system, coal slurry mix tank, multistage gasifier, gasifier quench system, and spent char mix tank. Austenitic alloy Types 304 and 316 were found to be superior in corrosion performance compared

  11. NASA Plum Brook's B-2 test facility-Thermal vacuum and propellant test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudlac, Maureen; Weaver, Harold; Cmar, Mark

    2012-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA's third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of upper stage chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77K. The modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/m2. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface.

  12. NASA Plum Brook's B-2 Test Facility: Thermal Vacuum and Propellant Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudlac, Maureen T.; Weaver, Harold F.; Cmar, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA's third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of upper stage chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77 K. The modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/sq m. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface.

  13. CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENTMACROCELL TESTS

    E-print Network

    Texas at Austin, University of

    -corrosion cells. Concrete was contaminated with chlorides by ponding salt water in a cyclic wet and dry regime of the corrosion performance of fabricated coated bars embedded in concrete prisms and subjected to chlorides. The coated bars were embedded in concrete prisms and linked electrically to uncoated bars to set up macro

  14. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  15. The Brookhaven accelerator test facility injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Kirk, H.G.; Pellegrini, C.; McDonald, K.T.; Russell, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) consists of a 50-MeV/c electron linac and a high-brightness RF-gun both operating at 2856 MHz. An extremely short (a few picoseconds) electron pulse with low transverse emittance is generated by the RF-gun. In order to preserve both longitudinal and transverse emittances, great care must be taken in transporting the electron beam from the RF-gun to the linac. We describe the injection line, present first- and second-order lattice studies of the injection line, and study nonlinear effects on the emittance. 11 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Liska, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10/sup 21/ to 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/.

  17. Facile approach in the development of icephobic hierarchically textured coatings as corrosion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momen, G.; Farzaneh, M.

    2014-04-01

    An anti-corrosion superhydrophobic film with water contact angle greater than 160° on aluminum alloy 6061 substrate was fabricated simply through the spin-coating method applied to Al2O3 nanoparticles doped in silicone rubber solution. The as-obtained sample was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and water contact angle/surface energy measurement. The corrosion behaviour of such coating in the NaCl solutions was investigated using the potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the developed superhydrophobic surface is improved greatly due to the composite wetting states or interfaces with numerous air pockets between its surface and the NaCl solution. This superhydrophobic coating could serve as an effective barrier against aggressive medium. Ice adhesion strength of the as-prepared superhydrophobic coating was also evaluated by measuring its ice adhesion force which was found to have reduced by 4.8 times compared to that of aluminum substrate as reference test.

  18. Hanford tanks initiative test facility functions and requirements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krieg; Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-01-01

    This document presents the functions and requirements for a test facility for testing single-shell tank waste retrieval equipment and systems for the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) project. This effort includes review of previous test facility functions and requirements and conducting a workshop to develop specific functions and requirements for HTI testing needs. Functions and requirements for testing future retrieval systems

  19. LONG-TERM CORROSION TESTING OF CANDIDATE MATERIALS FOR HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE CONTAINMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J. C.; Doughty, S.; Gdowski, G. E.; Gordon, S.; King, K.; McCright, R. D.; Wang, F.

    1997-10-01

    Preliminary results are presented from the long-term corrosion test program of candidate materials for the high-level radioactive waste packages that would be emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The present waste package design is based on a multi-barrier concept having an inner container of a corrosion resistant material and an outer container of a corrosion allowance material. Test specimens have been exposed to simulated bounding environments that may credibly develop in the vicinity of the waste packages. Corrosion rates have been calculated for weight loss and crevice specimens, and U-bend specimens have been examined for evidence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Galvanic testing has been started recently and initial results are forthcoming. Pitting characterization of test specimens will be conducted in the coming year. This test program is expected to continue for a minimum of five years so that long-term corrosion data can be determined to support corrosion model development, performance assessment, and waste package design.

  20. Facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with excellent mechanical abrasion and corrosion resistance on copper substrate by a novel method.

    PubMed

    Su, Fenghua; Yao, Kai

    2014-06-11

    A novel method for controllable fabrication of a superhydrophobic surface with a water contact angle of 162 ± 1° and a sliding angle of 3 ± 0.5° on copper substrate is reported in this Research Article. The facile and low-cost fabrication process is composed from the electrodeposition in traditional Watts bath and the heat-treatment in the presence of (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetradecyl) triethoxysilane (AC-FAS). The superhydrophobicity of the fabricated surface results from its pine-cone-like hierarchical micro-nanostructure and the assembly of low-surface-energy fluorinated components on it. The superhydrophobic surface exhibits high microhardness and excellent mechanical abrasion resistance because it maintains superhydrophobicity after mechanical abrasion against 800 grit SiC sandpaper for 1.0 m at the applied pressure of 4.80 kPa. Moreover, the superhydrophobic surface has good chemical stability in both acidic and alkaline environments. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy test shows that the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface has excellent corrosion resistance that can provide effective protection for the bare Cu substrate. In addition, the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface has self-cleaning ability. It is believed that the facile and low-cost method offer an effective strategy and promising industrial applications for fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces on various metallic materials. PMID:24796223

  1. Thermal barrier coatings - Burner rig hot corrosion test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Stecura, S.; Gedwill, M. A.; Zaplatynsky, I.; Levine, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    A Mach 0.3 burner rig test program was conducted to examine the sensitivity of thermal barrier coatings to Na- and V-contaminated combustion gases simulating potential utility gas turbine environments. Coating life of the standard ZrO2-12Y2O3/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y (composition in wt %) NASA thermal barrier coating system which was developed for aircraft gas turbines was significantly reduced in such environments. Two thermal barrier coating systems, Ca2SiO4/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y and ZrO2-8Y2O3/Ni-16.4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y and a less insulative cermet coating system, 50 vol % MgO-50 vol % Ni-19.6Cr-17.1Al-0.97Y/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y, were identified as having much improved corrosion resistance compared to the standard coating.

  2. Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

    1998-02-01

    Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

  3. Evaluating the effects of test methods and fluids compositions on the performance of corrosion inhibitors electrochemically

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.J. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    In an attempt to answer the question ``can carbon steel be adequately protected from corrosion by use of corrosion inhibitors due to the high CO{sub 2} concentration``, the authors initiated a project to identify the best commercial corrosion inhibitor by conducting a series of performance evaluation tests. They solicited the inhibitors from various chemical suppliers and evaluated their performance using various test methods in test fluid compositions simulating field conditions. Inhibitor performance was evaluated using electrochemical techniques including EIS and DC in the Rotating Cylinder Electrode (RCE) system and the conventional weight loss methods. Various tests were conducted for the purpose of determining the effect of velocity, chemical partition, and dispersibility on inhibitor performance in various test fluids. Physical characteristics testing including emulsion tendency and brine dispersibility were also conducted. Results show that some commercial corrosion inhibitors can be used to protect carbon steel in high CO{sub 2} concentration. There are significant performance differences among commercial products in various test methods and fluid compositions. Results show the importance of multiple performance evaluations when selecting corrosion inhibitors for particular field applications. An inhibitor that out performs others under various testing conditions would have a much greater chance to protect against corrosion in the field.

  4. Integrated Disposal Facility FY2010 Glass Testing Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Windisch, Charles F.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Serne, R Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.

    2010-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility (e.g., source term). Vitrifying the low-activity waste at Hanford is expected to generate over 1.6 × 105 m3 of glass (Puigh 1999). The volume of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at Hanford is the largest in the DOE complex and is one of the largest inventories (approximately 0.89 × 1018 Bq total activity) of long-lived radionuclides, principally 99Tc (t1/2 = 2.1 × 105), planned for disposal in a low-level waste (LLW) facility. Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessement (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, in order to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2010 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of low-activity waste glasses. The emphasis in FY2010 was the completing an evaluation of the most sensitive kinetic rate law parameters used to predict glass weathering, documented in Bacon and Pierce (2010), and transitioning from the use of the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases to Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases computer code for near-field calculations. The FY2010 activities also consisted of developing a Monte Carlo and Geochemical Modeling framework that links glass composition to alteration phase formation by 1) determining the structure of unreacted and reacted glasses for use as input information into Monte Carlo calculations, 2) compiling the solution data and alteration phases identified from accelerated weathering tests conducted with ILAW glass by PNNL and Viteous State Laboratory/Catholic University of America as well as other literature sources for use in geochemical modeling calculations, and 3) conducting several initial calculations on glasses that contain the four major components of ILAW-Al2O3, B2O3, Na2O, and SiO2.

  5. A facile method to prepare superhydrophobic fluorinated polysiloxane/ZnO nanocomposite coatings with corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Yongquan; Yang, Chuanning; Hu, Chuanbo; Zheng, Yansheng; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report a simple and inexpensive method for fabricating fluorinated polysiloxane/ZnO nanocomposite coatings on the steel substrates. The surface wettability and topology of coating were characterized by contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The results showed that the hydrophobic sbnd CH3 and sbnd CH2sbnd groups were introduced into ZnO particles via modification, the ZnO nanoparticles were modified from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. When the weight ratio of modified-ZnO to fluorinated polysiloxane was 13:7, the contact angle of nanocomposite coating was 166°, and a sliding angle of 4°, coating surface with hierarchical micro/nano-structures. In addition, the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface has excellent durability and corrosion resistance. It is believed that the facile and low-cost method offer an effective strategy and promising industrial applications for fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces on steel materials.

  6. Corrosion resistance tests on NiTi shape memory alloy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gianni Rondelli

    1996-01-01

    The corrosion performances of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) in human body simulating fluids were evaluated in comparison with other implant materials. As for the passivity current in potentiostatic conditions, taken as an index of ion release, the values are about three times higher for NiTi than for Ti6Al4V and austenitic stainless steels. Regarding the localized corrosion, while plain potentiodynamic

  7. In vitro corrosion testing of PVD coatings applied to a surgical grade Co–Cr–Mo alloy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Bolton; X. Hu

    2002-01-01

    Toxic effects and biological reaction of metallic corrosion and wear products are an important concern for metal on metal artificial joints. Corrosion tests were conducted to study the susceptibility to pitting and localized corrosion, with three coatings, CrN, TiN and DLC, applied to a wrought high carbon Co–Cr–Mo alloy substrate material. Corrosion testing involved the measurement of potential time transients

  8. Design and development of a high-temperature sodium compatibility testing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hvasta, M. G.; Nolet, B. K.; Anderson, M. H. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison - ERB 841, WI 53705 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The use of advanced alloys within sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) has been identified as a means of increasing plant efficiency and reducing construction costs. In particular, alloys such as NF-616, NF-709 and HT-UPS are promising because they exhibit greater strength than traditional structural materials such as 316-SS. However, almost nothing is known about the sodium compatibility of these new alloys. Therefore, research taking place at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison is focused on studying the effects of sodium corrosion on these materials under prototypic SFR operating conditions (600 [ deg. C], V Na=10 [m/s], C 0{approx} 1 [wppm]). This paper focuses on the design and construction of the testing facility with an emphasis on moving magnet pumps (MMPs). Corrosion data from a preliminary 500 [hr] natural convection test will also be presented. (authors)

  9. High-temperature gas stream cleanup test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ontko, J.; Chiang, T.

    1995-12-01

    The high-temperature gas stream cleanup facility at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center will provide a versatile platform for testing novel hot gas cleanup filtration concepts. The facility will be available for joint ventures with CRADA partners.

  10. NASA Johnson Space Center: White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin; Kowalski, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the testing facilities and laboratories available at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The mission of WSTF is to provide the expertise and infrastructure to test and evaluate spacecraft materials, components and propulsion systems that enable the safe exploration and use of space. There are nine rocket test stands in two major test areas, six altitude test stands, three ambient test stands,

  11. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TEST RESULTS FOR TANK 241-SY-102 SUPERNATE GRAB SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-04-09

    This report describes the electrochemical corrosion scans and conditions for testing of SY-102 supernatant samples taken December 2004. The testing was performed because the tank was under a Justification for Continued Operation allowing the supernatant composition to be outside the chemistry limits of Administrative Control 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation program'. A new electrochemical working electrode of A516 Grade 60 carbon steel was used for each scan; all scans were measured against a saturated calomel electrode, with carbon counter electrodes, and all scans were carried out at 50 C. The samples were scanned twice, once as received and once sparged with argon to deoxygenate the sample. For those scans conducted after argon purging, the corrosion rates ranged from 0.012 to 0.019 mpy. A test for stress corrosion cracking was carried out on one sample (2SY-04-07) with negative results.

  12. Fabrication of superhydrophobic aluminium alloy surface with excellent corrosion resistance by a facile and environment-friendly method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Libang; Che, Yanhui; Liu, Yanhua; Qiang, Xiaohu; Wang, Yanping

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a facile and environment-friendly method for preparing the superhydrophobic aluminium alloy surface with excellent corrosion resistance. The superhydrophobic aluminium alloy surface is fabricated by the boiling water treatment and stearic acid (STA) modification. Results show that the boiling water treatment endows the aluminium alloy surface with a porous and rough structure, while STA modification chemically grafts the long hydrophobic alkyl chains onto the aluminium alloy surface. Just grounded on the micro- and nano-scale hierarchical structure along with the hydrophobic chemical composition, the superhydrophobic aluminium alloy surface is endued the excellent corrosion resistance.

  13. The Bushing Test Facility: A new megavolt-class, meter-scale vacuum insulation test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, J.M.; Smith, J.D.; Honig, E.M.; Ingwersen, P.M.; Umphres, J.D.; Anderson, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Construction of the Bushing Test Facility (BTF) was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the fall of 1989. The BTF is a new megavolt-class, meter-scale vacuum insulation test facility built to meet two primary objectives: (1) to qualify high-voltage vacuum feedthrough bushings before their installation in the electron-beam diodes of the Aurora KrF laser amplifiers and (2) to investigate fundamental issues related to surface flashover and electrical breakdown in vacuum, thereby enabling us to improve the performance and reliability of high-voltage components for future laser systems. The BTF voltage source is a low-energy (<4.4-kJ), 1-MV Marx generator whose output pulse width is variable from 100 ns to a few microseconds. The large BTF test chamber (2.1 m in diameter and 1.5 m long) allows full-sized Aurora bushings or other large-scale vacuum insulators to be tested at background pressures down to about 10{sup {minus}7} torr. This paper will further describe the facility, its experimental checkout and first bushing tests, and the plans for future vacuum insulation research. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  14. NASA White Sands Test Facility Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory - Duration: 7 minutes, 52 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Tour the NASA White Sands Test Facility's Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory in Las Cruces, New Mexico. To learn more about White Sands Test Facility, go to http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wstf/home/...

  15. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  16. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING OF TANKS 241-AN-102 & 241-AP-107 & 241-AP-108 IN SUPPORT OF ULTRASONIC TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

    2008-11-20

    This report presents the results of the corrosion rates that were measured using electrochemical methods for tanks 241-AN-102 (AN-102), 241-AP-107 (AP 107), and 241-AP-108 (AP-108) performed under test plant RPP-PLAN-38215. The steel used as materials of construction for AN and AP tank farms was A537 Class 1. Test coupons of A537 Class 1 carbon steel were used for corrosion testing in the AN-107, AP-107, and AP-108 tank waste. Supernate will be tested from AN-102, AP-107, and Ap-108. Saltcake testing was performed on AP-108 only.

  17. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG testing will utilize a higher fidelity point kinetics model to control core power transients, and reactivity feedback will be based on localized feedback coefficients and several independent temperature measurements taken within the core block. This paper presents preliminary test results and discusses the methodology that will be implemented in follow-on DDG testing and the additional instrumentation required to implement high fidelity dynamic testing.

  18. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear and Advanced Propulsion Branch, ER-11, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States); Morton, T. J. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG testing will utilize a higher fidelity point kinetics model to control core power transients, and reactivity feedback will be based on localized feedback coefficients and several independent temperature measurements taken within the core block. This paper presents preliminary test results and discusses the methodology that will be implemented in follow-on DDG testing and the additional instrumentation required to implement high fidelity dynamic testing.

  19. Corrosion tests of canister and overpack materials in simulated basalt groundwater. [Hastelloy G and C-276

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results indicate that the environment expected in a repository in basalt is not highly corrosive to the materials tested. Comparisons of weight change data between two simulated basalt groundwater compositions indicate that variations in oxygen fugacity had a minor effect on corrosion of nickel, titanium, and zirconium alloys. The corrosion of cupronickel alloy, however, was drastically reduced when a lower oxygen fugacity was maintained. Effectiveness of a hydrogen/argon sparge to maintain a low oxygen fugacity in a simulated groundwater was demonstrated. 5 tables.

  20. USDI DCS technical support: Mississippi Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preble, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the technical support effort is to provide hardware and data processing support to DCS users so that application of the system may be simply and effectively implemented. Technical support at Mississippi Test Facility (MTF) is concerned primarily with on-site hardware. The first objective of the DCP hardware support was to assure that standard measuring apparatus and techniques used by the USGS could be adapted to the DCS. The second objective was to try to standardize the miscellaneous variety of parameters into a standard instrument set. The third objective was to provide the necessary accessories to simplify the use and complement the capabilities of the DCP. The standard USGS sites have been interfaced and are presently operating. These sites are stream gauge, ground water level and line operated quality of water. Evapotranspiration, meteorological and battery operated quality of water sites are planned for near future DCP operation. Three accessories which are under test or development are the Chu antenna, solar power supply and add-on memory. The DCP has proven to be relatively easy to interface with many monitors. The large antenna is awkward to install and transport. The DCS has met the original requirements well; it has and is proving that an operation, satellite-based data collection system is feasible.

  1. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B. [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Koettig, T. [ESS - European Spallation Source, Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-01-29

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  2. A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials

    E-print Network

    Samec, K.; Kadi, Y.; Luis, R.; Romanets, Y.; Behzad, M.; Aleksan, R.; Bousson, S.

    2014-01-01

    The EU’s FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the DEMO fusion reactor for ITER, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550°C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum. The entire “TMIF” facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility.

  3. OPSys: optical payload systems facility for testing space coronagraphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Fineschi; G. Crescenzio; G. Massone; G. Capobianco; L. Zangrilli; E. Antonucci; F. Anselmi

    2011-01-01

    The Turin Astronomical Observatory, Italy, has implemented in ALTEC, Turin, a new Optical Payload Systems (OPSys) facility for testing of contamination sensitive optical space flight instrumentation. The facility is specially tailored for tests on solar instruments like coronagraphs. OPSys comprises an ISO 7 clean room for instrument assembly and a relatively large (4.4 m3) optical test and calibration vacuum chamber:

  4. LOOP TESTING OF INCONEL, NICKEL, MONEL AND BIMETAL HEAT EXCHANGERS. ANPP CORROSION PROGRAM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. McGrew; E. Jules

    1961-01-01

    A description is given of corrosion tests performed on 12 test vessels. ; Two sets of model heat exchangers (a set consists of a steam generator and ; superheater) and eight miniature heat exchangers were tested dynamically in a ; pressurized water loop. One set of model heat exchangers had bimetal tubes ; (stainless steel in the primary, carbon steel

  5. A Technique for Dynamic Corrosion Testing in Liquid Lead Alloys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Paul Loewen; Cliff Bybee Davis; Philip Elsworth Mac Donald

    2001-01-01

    An experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials to be used in liquid lead alloy cooled reactors has been designed. This experimental project is part of a larger research effort between Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology to investigate the suitability of

  6. CORROSION TESTING OF ADVANCED COATINGS FOR MILITARY HYDRAULIC ACTUATORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert B. Mason; Martin Konrad; Paulo Legaspi; Mark F. Singleton; Bruce Sartwell; Don Skelton

    Military organizations employ a large fleet of hydraulic-based vehicles and systems in routine operations. Hydraulic systems are critical to the operability of tactical forklifts, air defense artillery systems, cranes, armored vehicles, and aircraft. Hydraulic actuators are often coated with electrolytic hard chrome, which is effective for wear resistance but provides minimal corrosion resistance. Commercial and emerging coating technologies are available

  7. Space Simulation, 7th. [facilities and testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Space simulation facilities and techniques are outlined that encompass thermal scale modeling, computerized simulations, reentry materials, spacecraft contamination, solar simulation, vacuum tests, and heat transfer studies.

  8. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D purposes.

  9. Hanford tanks initiative test facility functions and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, S.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-01

    This document presents the functions and requirements for a test facility for testing single-shell tank waste retrieval equipment and systems for the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) project. This effort includes review of previous test facility functions and requirements and conducting a workshop to develop specific functions and requirements for HTI testing needs. Functions and requirements for testing future retrieval systems that follow HTI are also identified.

  10. Battery test facility hardware, software, and system operation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    Division 2525 Battery Test Laboratory is a fully automated battery testing facility used in evaluating various battery technologies. The results of these tests are used to verify developers' claims, characterize prototypes, and assist in identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each technology. The Test Facility consists of a central computer and nine remote computer controlled battery test systems. Data acquired during the battery testing process is sent to the central computer system. The test data is then stored in a large database for future analysis. The central computer system is also used in configuring battery tests. These test configurations are then sent to their appropriate remote battery test sites. The Battery Test Facility can perform a variety of battery tests, which include the following: Life Cycle Testing; Parametric Testing at various temperature levels, cutoff parameters, charge rates, and discharge rates; Constant Power Testing at various power levels; Peak Power Testing at various State-of-Charge levels; Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule Tests (SFUDS79). The Battery Test Facility is capable of charging a battery either by constant current, constant voltage, step current levels, or any combination of them. Discharge cycles can be by constant current, constant resistance, constant power, step current levels, or also any combination of them. The Battery Test Facility has been configured to provide the flexibility to evaluate a large variety of battery technologies. These technologies include Lead-Acid, Sodium/Sulfur, Zinc/Bromine, Nickel/Hydrogen, Aluminum/Air, and Nickel/Cadmium batteries.

  11. Battery test facility hardware, software, and system operation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    Division 2525 Battery Test Laboratory is a fully automated battery testing facility used in evaluating various battery technologies. The results of these tests are used to verify developers` claims, characterize prototypes, and assist in identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each technology. The Test Facility consists of a central computer and nine remote computer controlled battery test systems. Data acquired during the battery testing process is sent to the central computer system. The test data is then stored in a large database for future analysis. The central computer system is also used in configuring battery tests. These test configurations are then sent to their appropriate remote battery test sites. The Battery Test Facility can perform a variety of battery tests, which include the following: Life Cycle Testing; Parametric Testing at various temperature levels, cutoff parameters, charge rates, and discharge rates; Constant Power Testing at various power levels; Peak Power Testing at various State-of-Charge levels; Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule Tests (SFUDS79). The Battery Test Facility is capable of charging a battery either by constant current, constant voltage, step current levels, or any combination of them. Discharge cycles can be by constant current, constant resistance, constant power, step current levels, or also any combination of them. The Battery Test Facility has been configured to provide the flexibility to evaluate a large variety of battery technologies. These technologies include Lead-Acid, Sodium/Sulfur, Zinc/Bromine, Nickel/Hydrogen, Aluminum/Air, and Nickel/Cadmium batteries.

  12. Field test corrosion experiences when co-firing straw and coal: 10 year status within Elsam

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, R.B.; Montgomery, M.; Larsen, O.H. [Elsam Engineering, Kolding (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    In Denmark, straw is utilised for the generation of energy and district heating in power plants. Combustion of straw gives rise to high contents of potassium chloride and some sulphur dioxide in the flue gas. These compounds can lead to deposits with high content of potassium chloride and potassium sulphate on superheater tubes resulting in increased corrosion rates. From field experimental results this paper show, that by co-firing straw with coal, corrosion rates can be brought down to an acceptable level. This paper firstly deals with the results from a demonstration program co-firing coal and straw at the 150 MW pulverized coal fired boiler Studstrup unit 1. Two exposure series lasting 3000 hours each were performed for co-firing 10 and 20% of straw (% energy basis) with coal. Using built in test tubes in the hot end of the actual superheaters and air/water cooled corrosion probes, the corrosion during these experiments was monitored. Various ferritic and austenitic materials were investigated at steam temperatures ranging from 520 to 580{degree}C and flue gas temperatures ranging from 925 to 1100{degree}C. The results obtained in the demonstration program led to the rebuilding of the 350 MW pulverized coal fired boiler, Studstrup unit 4, into a co-firing boiler with straw in 2002. During the rebuilding, test tube sections of X20CrMoV12 1 and TP347H FG were built into the superheater and the reheater loops. The temperature ranges during these exposures was for the steam from 470 to 575{degree}C and for the flue gas from 1025 to 1300{degree}C. All these test tubes have been removed during the last three years at one year intervals for corrosion studies. The corrosion studies performed on all investigated tubes included measurements of the corrosion attack, light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the corrosion products.

  13. Laboratory corrosion tests for simulating fireside wastage of superheater materials in waste incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, N. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Amagasaki (Japan); Kawahara, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Fukuda, Y. [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Kure (Japan); Hosoda, T. [Japan Research and Development Center for Metals, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were performed to clarify the effects of relative amounts of fused salts in tube deposits on corrosion rates of superheater materials in WTE plants. All test exposures were at 550 C and of 100 hour duration. The nine synthetic ashes used as corrodents consisted of mixtures of chlorides, sulfates and oxides. The test materials were alloy steel T22, stainless steels TP347H, TP310HCbN, and alloys HR11N and 625. The gas atmosphere consisted of 500 to 3000 ppm HCl-30ppm SO{sub 2}-10%O{sub 2}-10%CO{sub 2}-20%H{sub 2}O-bal.N{sub 2}. Generally, the relative amount of fused salts in non-fused ash constituents at 550 C increased with increasing the chlorine content of the ashes. The corrosion rate of T22 steel did not depend directly on ash chlorine content, but for ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rate depended on the calculated amount of fused salt at 500 C. The corrosion rates of TP347H steel and alloy 625 were maximum for ashes of 6--8 wt%Cl. For ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rates of T22 steel, stainless steels, and alloys increased with ashes having higher amounts of fused salts. Increased HCl content of the gas caused higher corrosion of the stainless steels and high-nickel alloys, but there was no clear corrosion-exacerbating effect with T22 steel.

  14. Counting test facility for the Borexino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranucci, G.; Meroni, E.

    2014-05-01

    A fundamental breakthrough which opened the way to the realization of the Borexino detector was the demonstration of exceptionally low, unprecedented radioactive contaminations in the liquid scintillator, obtained with its pilot prototype Counting Test Facility. Though of limited dimension, with its 4.8 m3 of active liquid core, CTF has however been a key milestone not only for Borexino, but also for the entire field of the ultra-low background searches. Here, we succinctly remind the motivations, which concurred to lay down the project, as well as the specific radiopurity challenge, which guided the design. After the description of the technical elements of the detector, the main outcomes are summarized, both regarding optical and purity scintillator properties, with special emphasis on the exceptional achievements in term of ultra-low traces of radioactive contaminants. The discussion is completed with the description of how CTF was employed for the pre-qualification of the entire inventory of the Borexino scintillator, confirming also in the final phase of its life its essential role for the success of the overall Borexino solar neutrino program.

  15. New acoustic test facility at Georgia Tech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesel, Van; Cunefare, Kenneth

    2002-11-01

    Georgia Tech's Integrated Acoustics Laboratory (IAL) is a state of the art research facility dedicated to the study of acoustics and vibration. The centerpiece of the laboratory is a 24 ft x24 ft x20 ft full anechoic chamber, which has been in operation since 1998. The IAL is currently expanding to include a reverberation room and hemi-anechoic chamber, designed and built by Acoustic Systems. These two chambers will be joined by an 8 ft x8 ft transmission loss opening, allowing for a detailed measurement and analysis of complex barriers. Both chambers will accommodate vehicles and similarly large structures. The reverberation room will have adequate volume for standardized absorption measurements. Each chamber will be equipped with dedicated multichannel data acquisition systems and instrumentation for the support of simultaneous research in all areas of the laboratory. The new test chambers are funded by a grant from the Ford Motor Company and are planned to be completed and fully functional by 1 January 2003.

  16. Health maintenance facility system effectiveness testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.; Gosbee, John; Bueker, Richard; Kupra, Debra; Ruta, Mary

    1993-01-01

    The Medical Simulations Working Group conducted a series of medical simulations to evaluate the proposed Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) Preliminary Design Review (PDR) configuration. The goal of these simulations was to test the system effectiveness of the HMF PDR configurations. The objectives of the medical simulations are to (1) ensure fulfillment of requirements with this HMF design, (2) demonstrate the conformance of the system to human engineering design criteria, and (3) determine whether undesirable design or procedural features were introduced into the design. The simulations consisted of performing 6 different medical scenarios with the HMF mockup in the KRUG laboratory. The scenarios included representative medical procedures and used a broad spectrum of HMF equipment and supplies. Scripts were written and simulations performed by medical simulations working group members under observation from others. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, debriefings, and videotapes. Results were extracted and listed in the individual reports. Specific issues and recommendations from each simulation were compiled into the individual reports. General issues regarding the PDR design of the HMF are outlined in the summary report.

  17. Space chemical propulsion test facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especiallly encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. This paper presents an overview of the Lewis test facilities. These facilities are clustered into three test areas: the Rocket Engine Test Facilities (RETF), the Rocket Laboratory (RL), and the Cryogenic Components Laboratory (CCL).

  18. Operating characteristics of the Langley Mach 7 Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, R. W.; Torrence, M. G.; Sabol, A. P.; Mueller, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Operating characteristics of the Langley Mach 7 Scramjet Test Facility are described. The facility is designed for testing airframe integrated scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engine models. Features include duplication of the flight Mach number total enthalpy, flight altitude simulation, and simulation of engine airframe integration effects such a bow shock wave precompression and boundary layer ingestion by the engine. Data obtained from facility calibration and from tests of a hydrogen burning, airframe integrated scramjet are discussed. An adverse interaction between the facility flow and the scramjet engine flow during combustion of the fuel is described.

  19. THE MOBILE WINDOW THERMAL TEST FACILITY (MoWiTT)

    E-print Network

    Klems, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Window Thermal Test Facility Instrumentation. (b) chambersthermal cycle. Therefore a dynamic modeling of the chamberthermal performance of small, high performance windows necessi- tates very accurate determination of the losses through the test chamber

  20. Corrosion: Understanding the basics

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.R. [ed.

    2000-07-01

    This new book presents a practical how to approach to understanding and solving the problems of corrosion of structural materials. Although it is written mainly for those having a limited technical background in corrosion, it also provides more experienced engineers with a useful overview of the principles of corrosion and can be used as a general guide for developing a corrosion-control program. Contents include: the effects and economic impact of corrosion; basic concepts important to corrosion; principles of aqueous corrosion; forms of corrosion: recognition and prevention; types of corrosive environments; corrosion characteristics of structural materials; corrosion control by proper design; corrosion control by materials selection; corrosion control by protective coatings and inhibitors; corrosion control by cathodic and anodic protection; corrosion testing and monitoring; techniques for diagnosis of corrosion failures; and glossary of corrosion-related terms.

  1. Safety analysis of the 700-horsepower combustion test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Berkey

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the 700 h.p. Combustion Test Facility located in Building 93 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Extensive safety related measures have been incorporated into the design, construction, and operation of the Combustion Test Facility. These include: nitrogen addition to the coal storage bin, slurry hopper, roller

  2. Two-phase pump performance program: pump test facility description

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Couture; J. D. Fishburn; J. J. Klebauskas; H. M. Payne; E. Richardson; A. A. Schuetz

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of the Two-Phase Pump Performance Project Test Facility, which is located at the Kreisinger Development Laboratory of Combustion Engineering, Inc., in Windsor, Connecticut. The text outlines and describes the physical system which constitutes the facility, as well as the specific pump being tested in the EPRI program. Considerable emphasis is given to a description of the

  3. Outdoor ESTER test facility for advanced technologies PV modules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angelo Spena; Cristina Cornaro; Stefano Serafini

    2008-01-01

    In the paper the new outdoor test facility ESTER (Solar Energy TEst and Research) for PV modules of various technologies is presented. The facility has been partially funded by the Regione Lazio, Italy, in the framework of the Centre for Hybrid and Organic Solar Energy (CHOSE). This structure is intended to give support to the improvement of reliable and durable

  4. The test facility for the KSTAR superconducting magnets at SAIT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Baang; S. H. Baek; H. J. Choi; E. J. Chung; Y. B. Chang; J. H. Kim; J. S. Kim; K. Kim; M. K. Kim; S. B. Kim; Y. J. Kim; S. I. Lee; S. Y. Lee; Y. H. Lee; K. R. Park; C. Winter; C. S. Yoon

    2000-01-01

    SSTF (Samsung Superconductor Test Facility) has been built with the primary goal of testing the KSTAR TF (Toroidal Field) and PF (Poloidal Field) magnets as well as CICC (Cable-in-Conduit Conductor) and superconducting strands in the most relevant manner. The facility is located at SAIT (Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology) near the KSTAR project home site. Two helium liquefiers of 120

  5. Status of fuel, blanket, and absorber testing in the fast flux test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. B. Baker; F. E. Bard; R. D. Leggett; A. L. Pitner

    1992-01-01

    On December 2, 1980, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reached its full design power of 400 MW for the first time. From the start, the FFTF provided a modern liquid-metal reactor (LMR) test facility recognized for excellence, innovation, and efficiency of operation. Its unique instrumentation and special test capabilities have allowed the facility to stay at the cutting edge

  6. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Sasscer; R. Ernst; T. O. Morgan; C. Rivera; A. C. Scott; T. J. Summerson

    1984-01-01

    In a cooperative research effort between The Puerto Rico Center of Energy and Environment Research, Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation and The Trane Company, a six month study was made of the seawater corrosion performance of various aluminum materials to test their suitability for use in seawater heat exchangers. The materials tested included bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes

  7. Field Testing of Rapid Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Control of Steel in Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E.; Alexander, Joshua B.; Kupwade-Patil,Kunal; Calle, Luz Marina

    2009-01-01

    This work field tested the use of electrokinetics for delivery of concrete sealing nanoparticles concurrent with the extraction of chlorides. Several cylinders of concrete were batched and placed in immersion at the Kennedy Space Center Beach Corrosion Test Site. The specimens were batched with steel reinforcement and a 4.5 wt.% (weight percent) content of sodium chloride. Upon arrival at Kennedy Space Center, the specimens were placed in the saltwater immersion pool at the Beach Corrosion Test Site. Following 30 days of saltwater exposure, the specimens were subjected to rapid chloride extraction concurrent with electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment. The treatments were operated at up to eight times the typical current density in order to complete the treatment in 7 days. The findings indicated that the short-term corrosion resistance of the concrete specimens was significantly enhanced as was the strength of the concrete.

  8. Standard test method for initial screening of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for steel in concrete

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effects of chemical admixtures on the corrosion of metals in concrete. This test method can be used to evaluate materials intended to inhibit chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete. It can also be used to evaluate the corrosivity of admixtures by themselves or in a chloride environment. This test is not applicable for emulsions. 1.2 &solely-SI-units; 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  9. Argonne`s new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne`s AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  10. Vapor Space Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    As part of an integrated program to better understand corrosion in the high level waste tanks, Hanford has been investigating corrosion at the liquid/air interface (LAI) and at higher areas in the tank vapor space. This current research evaluated localized corrosion in the vapor space over Hanford double shell tank simulants to assess the impact of ammonia and new minimum nitrite concentration limits, which are part of the broader corrosion chemistry limits. The findings from this study showed that the presence of ammonia gas (550 ppm) in the vapor space is sufficient to reduce corrosion over the short-term (i.e. four months) for a Hanford waste chemistry (SY102 High Nitrate). These findings are in agreement with previous studies at both Hanford and SRS which showed ammonia gas in the vapor space to be inhibitive. The presence of ammonia in electrochemical test solution, however, was insufficient to inhibit against pitting corrosion. The effect of the ammonia appears to be a function of the waste chemistry and may have more significant effects in waste with low nitrite concentrations. Since high levels of ammonia were found beneficial in previous studies, additional testing is recommended to assess the necessary minimum concentration for protection of carbon steel. The new minimum R value of 0.15 was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion in the vapor space. The pitting that occurred, however, did not progress over the four-month test. Pits appeared to stop growing, which would indicate that pitting might not progress through wall.

  11. Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

  12. Corrosion tests of 316L and Hastelloy C-22 in simulated tank waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Danielson; SG Pitman

    2000-02-23

    Both the 316L stainless steel and Hastelloy{reg_sign} C-22 gave satisfactory corrosion performance in the simulated test environments. They were subjected to 100 day weight loss corrosion tests and electrochemical potentiodynamic evaluation. This activity supports confirmation of the design basis for the materials of construction of process vessels and equipment used to handle the feed to the LAW-melter evaporator. BNFL process and mechanical engineering will use the information derived from this task to select material of construction for process vessels and equipment.

  13. Corrosion inhibitor testing and selection for exploration and production: A user's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kapusta, S.D.

    1999-06-01

    Inhibitor users need simple, reliable, and representative tests to select the best product from a number of candidates. This article describes a procedure that can help users test and select inhibitors for carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide (CO[sub 2]/H[sub 2]S) corrosion in oil and gas production, in a fast and cost-effective manner. The selection is based on two criteria: performance (effectiveness) against corrosion, and compatibility with other chemicals. The compatibility of the inhibitor with the injection and production systems must be confirmed.

  14. FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

  15. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote earth field sensing magnetometer and servo control building; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils are 42-foot in diameter and a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils accommodates spacecraft access to the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  16. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  17. Realistic development and testing of fission systems at a non-nuclear testing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfroy, Tom; van Dyke, Melissa; Dickens, Ricky; Pedersen, Kevin; Lenard, Roger; Houts, Mike

    2000-01-01

    The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on a module has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center in the Propellant Energy Source Testbed (PEST). This paper discusses the experimental facilities and equipment used for performing resistance heated tests. Recommendations are made for improving non-nuclear test facilities and equipment for simulated testing of nuclear systems. .

  18. Realistic Development and Testing of Fission System at a Non-Nuclear Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Tom; VanDyke, Melissa; Dickens, Ricky; Pedersen, Kevin; Lenard, Roger; Houts, Mike

    2000-01-01

    The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on a module has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center in the Propellant Energy Source Testbed (PEST). This paper discusses the experimental facilities and equipment used for performing resistance heated tests. Recommendations are made for improving non-nuclear test facilities and equipment for simulated testing of nuclear systems.

  19. Electronic warfare testing at the Benefield anechoic facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emad F. Ali; Pat Dubria; Bob Barker

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the test capabilities of the Benefield Anechoic Facility (BAF) and its mission to support avionics and electronic warfare (EW) test and evaluation (T&E) of current and future generation manned and unmanned aerospace vehicles. Testing at the BAF can provide the dense, complex, and realistic signal environment necessary to evaluate integrated systems\\/subsystems to meet both Development Test and

  20. Space power facility for testing large space optical systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerry Carek

    2006-01-01

    The space power facility is located at NASA's Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. It is the world's largest space simulation test facility with a test chamber that is 30.5m (100ft) in diameter by 37.2m (122ft) high. It has been used to test a variety of large space flight hardware and space systems for NASA, other government

  1. Test facility for relativistic beam pickups

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; Konecny, R.; Kramer, S.L.; Suddeth, D.

    1983-03-01

    Calibration of beam signal pickup devices is an important but frequently difficult activity associated with the construction of accelerator systems. This is especially true for pickups used in stochastic cooling systems. Here the sensitivity and phase as functions of beam position are frequently critical, fundamental parameters of the system design. The most frequently used method for bench-calibration of pickup devices is that of passing a (usually thin) wire through the device. Electrical excitation of the wire, as a TEM line, simulates a beam and the transfer function of the device is measured directly. As many people have discovered, this procedure can frequently lead to incorrect predictions of pickup response to particle beams. These deficiencies have been eliminated in a facility at ANL which uses a relativistic electron beam to calibrate beam pickups. The facility is extensively used in the development of pickups, and is the primary calibration facility for pickups designed for the FNAL TeV-I antiproton source.

  2. Materials evaluations with the pulsed black liquor burner test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A. [Stone and Webster Engineering Co., Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    A pulsed burner was designed to provide sufficient heat to convert a fluidized bed of black Kraft liquor into combustible gas which would be used to produce process steam. The pulsed burner design provides a significant increase in the heat transfer capability and consequently significantly increases the efficiency of the conversion process. High temperature corrosion tests were performed in a fluidized bed of black Kraft liquor using a pulsed burner process to determine the optimum materials for use in a commercial application. The materials tested included three different austenitic stainless steels, Type 446 martensitic stainless steel, a high temperature carbon steel, 153MA, and four nickel base alloys. All materials performed well with no corrosion attributed to the environment created by the decomposition of a black Kraft liquor. This behavior was contrary to what was expected due to the high concentration of H{sub 2}S present in the high temperature, 562 C, atmosphere.

  3. Alleviation of Facility/Engine Interactions in an Open-Jet Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Emami, Saied

    2001-01-01

    Results of a series of shakedown tests to eliminate facility/engine interactions in an open-jet scramjet test facility are presented. The tests were conducted with the NASA DFX (Dual-Fuel eXperimental scramjet) engine in the NASA Langley Combustion Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) in support of the Hyper-X program, The majority of the tests were conducted at a total enthalpy and pressure corresponding to Mach 5 flight at a dynamic pressure of 734 psf. The DFX is the largest engine ever tested in the CHSTF. Blockage, in terms of the projected engine area relative to the nozzle exit area, is 81% with the engine forebody leading edge aligned with the upper edge of the facility nozzle such that it ingests the nozzle boundary layer. The blockage increases to 95% with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. down in the core flow. Previous engines successfully tested in the CHSTF have had blockages of no more than 51%. Oil flow studies along with facility and engine pressure measurements were used to define flow behavior. These results guided modifications to existing aeroappliances and the design of new aeroappliances. These changes allowed fueled tests to be conducted without facility interaction effects in the data with the engine forebody leading edge positioned to ingest the facility nozzle boundary layer. Interaction effects were also reduced for tests with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. into the core flow, however some interaction effects were still evident in the engine data. A new shroud and diffuser have been designed with the goal of allowing fueled tests to be conducted with the engine forebody leading edge positioned in the core without facility interaction effects in the data. Evaluation tests of the new shroud and diffuser will be conducted once ongoing fueled engine tests have been completed.

  4. Accelerated corrosion testing, evaluation and durability design of bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Pereira, Ruben Mario

    2003-06-01

    In the last few years, the effectiveness of cement grout in galvanized or polyethylene ducts, the most widely used corrosion protection system for multistrand bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons, has been under debate, due to significant tendon corrosion damage, several reported failures of individual tendons as well as a few collapses of non-typical structures. While experience in the USA has been generally good, some foreign experience has been less than satisfactory. This dissertation is part of a comprehensive research program started in 1993, which has the objectives to examine the use of post-tensioning in bridge substructures, identify durability concerns and existing technology, develop and carry out an experimental testing program, and conclude with durability design guidelines. Three experimental programs were developed: A long term macrocell corrosion test series, to investigate corrosion protection for internal tendons in precast segmental construction; a long term beam corrosion test series, to examine the effects of post-tensioning on corrosion protection as affected by crack width; and, a long term column corrosion test series, to examine corrosion protection in vertical elements. Preliminary design guidelines were developed previously in the overall study by the initial researchers, after an extensive literature review. This dissertation scope includes continuation of exposure testing of the macrocell, beam and column specimens, performing comprehensive autopsies of selected specimens and updating the durability design guidelines based on the exposure testing and autopsy results. After autopsies were performed, overall findings indicate negative durability effects due to the use of mixed reinforcement, small concrete covers, galvanized steel ducts, and industry standard or heat-shrink galvanized duct splices. The width of cracks was shown to have a direct negative effect on specimen performance. Grout voids were found to be detrimental to the durability of both galvanized ducts and strand. Relying on epoxy and galvanized bar coatings was also found inappropriate because of local attack. On the other hand, very positive effects were found with the use of high performance concrete, high post-tensioning levels, plastic ducts, and sound epoxy filling at the joints.

  5. C-ring stress corrosion test for Inconel 600 and Inconel 690 sleeve joint welded by Nd:YAG laser

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jae-Do Kim; Ju-Hong Moon

    2004-01-01

    C-ring stress corrosion test for Inconel 600 and Inconel 690 sleeve joint welded by Nd:YAG laser were carried out to evaluate the applicability of the technique in the repair of heat exchanger tube of nuclear power plant. Corrosion test were carried out mainly in caustic solution. The applied stresses range between 207 and 414 MPa at 348 °C and the

  6. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  7. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curits, P.C.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90{degrees}C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron- absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. the stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on it chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high- chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. the results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  8. 21 CFR 58.219 - Reinstatement of a disqualified testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Reinstatement of a disqualified testing facility. 58.219 Section 58.219...LABORATORY STUDIES Disqualification of Testing Facilities § 58.219 Reinstatement of a disqualified testing facility. A testing...

  9. Localized corrosion testing of CRA materials in elevated temperature sour gas environments

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, P.; Oldfield, J.W. [Cortest Labs. Ltd., Sheffield (United Kingdom); Al-Maslamani, M. [Qatar General Petroleum Corp., Doha (Qatar)

    1999-11-01

    An exposure test program has been undertaken to investigate the localized corrosion resistance of Alloys 28, 825, G3 and 625 in two simulated sour gas environments at 150 C. The chloride levels in these test environments, containing 30 psi (0.21 MPa) H{sub 2}S and 101 psi (0.70 MPa) CO{sub 2}, were 150 ppm and 30,000 ppm. The general corrosion rate of each material was found to be negligible in each test. Alloy 825 alone was susceptible to minor pitting and crevice initiation in the 150 ppm chloride environment. Increasing the chloride level to 30,000 ppm resulted in more severe crevice attack of Alloy 825 and crevice corrosion of Alloy 28. Alloys G3 and 625 were not susceptible to localized corrosion in either test environment. The exposure tests were supported by complementary electrochemical polarization curves in the low chloride environment. The curves did not exhibit clearly defined passive regions, which were masked by additional anodic current from the oxidation of H{sub 2}S.

  10. An Injector Test Facility for the LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E., (ed.); /SLAC

    2007-03-14

    SLAC is in the privileged position of being the site for the world's first 4th generation light source as well as having a premier accelerator research staff and facilities. Operation of the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility will require innovations in electron injectors to provide electron beams of unprecedented quality. Upgrades to provide ever shorter wavelength x-ray beams of increasing intensity will require significant advances in the state-of-the-art. The BESAC 20-Year Facilities Roadmap identifies the electron gun as ''the critical enabling technology to advance linac-based light sources'' and recognizes that the sources for next-generation light sources are ''the highest-leveraged technology'', and that ''BES should strongly support and coordinate research and development in this unique and critical technology''.[1] This white paper presents an R&D plan and a description of a facility for developing the knowledge and technology required to successfully achieve these upgrades, and to coordinate efforts on short-pulse source development for linac-based light sources.

  11. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) program: facility description report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, A G [ed.

    1984-09-01

    A new boiling water reactor safety test facility (FIST, Full Integral Simulation Test) is described. It will be used to investigate small breaks and operational transients and to tie results from such tests to earlier large-break test results determined in the TLTA. The new facility's full height and prototypical components constitute a major scaling improvement over earlier test facilities. A heated feedwater system, permitting steady-state operation, and a large increase in the number of measurements are other significant improvements. The program background is outlined and program objectives defined. The design basis is presented together with a detailed, complete description of the facility and measurements to be made. An extensive component scaling analysis and prediction of performance are presented.

  12. An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design

    SciTech Connect

    Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

    1993-10-25

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

  13. VICS-120 - A tube-vehicle system test facility.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marte, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a large test facility for carrying out research in support of the aerodynamic and ventilation section of a handbook on subway design. The facility described is vertically oriented and has a test section with a nominal inside diameter of 2 in. and a length of 109 ft. It is capable of operating at Reynolds numbers up to full-scale (60,000,000) under open-end tube conditions. The facility is distinguished by a high degree of flexibility in configuration and operational limits. Details are given concerning the plenum assembly, the test section tubes, the scaffold, the instrumentation, the model launcher, the model arrestor, and the models themselves. A step-by-step account is given of the operation of the facility, and a brief sample of the type of data obtained from the facility is presented.

  14. LIMESTONE WET-SCRUBBING TEST RESULTS AT THE EPA ALKALI SCRUBBING TEST FACILITY. CAPSULE REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This capsule report discusses the highlights of the first detailed engineering progress report. It describes the test facility and test program and presents results to date of the limestone wet-scrubbing testing. In addition, the realiability and operability of the test facility ...

  15. Sub-categorisation of skin corrosive chemicals by the EpiSkin™ reconstructed human epidermis skin corrosion test method according to UN GHS: revision of OECD Test Guideline 431.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Grandidier, M H; Cotovio, J

    2014-03-01

    The EpiSkin™ skin corrosion test method was formally validated and adopted within the context of OECD TG 431 for identifying corrosive and non-corrosive chemicals. The EU Classification, Labelling and Packaging Regulation (EU CLP) system requires the sub-categorisation of corrosive chemicals into the three UN GHS optional subcategories 1A, 1B and 1C. The present study was undertaken to investigate the usefulness of the validated EpiSkin™ test method to identify skin corrosive UN GHS Categories 1A, 1B and 1C using the original and validated prediction model and adapted controls for direct MTT reduction. In total, 85 chemicals selected by the OECD expert group on skin corrosion were tested in three independent runs. The results obtained were highly reproducible both within (>80%) and between (>78%) laboratories when compared with historical data. Moreover the results obtained showed that the EpiSkin™ test method is highly sensitive (99%) and specific (80%) in discriminating corrosive from non-corrosive chemicals and allows reliable and relevant identification of the different skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories, with high accuracies being obtained for both UN GHS Categories 1A (83%) and 1B/1C (76%) chemicals. The overall accuracy of the test method to subcategorise corrosive chemicals into three or two UN GHS subcategories ranged from 75% to 79%. Considering those results, the revised OECD Test Guideline 431 permit the use of EpiSkin™ for subcategorising corrosive chemicals into at least two classes (Category 1A and Category 1B/1C). PMID:24211528

  16. GUIDELINES FOR STACK TESTING AT MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives guidance for stack testing at municipal waste combustion (MWC) facilities. State and local environmental agencies have been required to develop regulations for MWCs in response to a significant expansion in the number of MWC facilities currently in operation or i...

  17. Project W-049H disposal facility test report

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, D.I.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report (ATR) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the equipment installed in the Disposal Facility has been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria.

  18. 702AZ aging waste ventilation facility year 2000 test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, W.D.

    1998-07-22

    This test procedure was developed to determine if the 702AZ Tank Ventilation Facility system is Year 2000 Compliant. The procedure provides detailed instructions for performing the operations necessary and documenting the results. This verification procedure will document that the 702AZ Facility Systems are year 2000 compliant and will correctly meet the criteria established in this procedure.

  19. MECHANICAL ASPECTS OF ANTI-CORROSIVE COATINGS PERFORMANCE TESTS Alex A. Volinsky

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    a short period of time. Failure will definitely happen if the interface between the pipe surface and its ABSTRACT Protective coating corrosion failure is a complicated process that involves various phenomena which are hard to test for separately. An adequately protected pipe can be in service for a relatively

  20. HASTELLOY X FORCED CONVECTION NaK CORROSION LOOP TESTS, HXLM-1 AND 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaw

    1958-01-01

    To obtain information on the corrosion resistance of Hastelloy X to NaK, ; two type 316 stainless steel test loops with Inconel pump cells were modified to ; incorporate Hastelloy X heater legs. Each loop contained a heater and cooler ; section so that temperature gradients could be established in the NaK in the ; direction of flow. By-pass type

  1. Design and construction of model steam generators for corrosion testing of alternative materials. [PWR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Krupowicz; J. E. Casteel; B. W. Kinyon

    1981-01-01

    This topical report describes the design and construction of two model steam generators which were built to test the corrosion resistance of contemporary and alternative steam generator materials under secondary water conditions. The models include several new design features rendering them more representative of actual steam generators. Extensive thermal and hydraulic analyses of the models are also presented and discussed.

  2. Qualification tests and facilities for the ITER superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzone, P.; Wesche, R.; Stepanov, B.; Cau, F.; Bagnasco, M.; Calvi, M.; Herzog, R.; Vogel, M.

    2009-06-01

    All the ITER superconductors are tested as short length samples in the SULTAN test facility at CRPP. Twenty-four TF conductor samples with small layout variations were tested since February 2007 with the aim of verifying the design and qualification of the manufacturers. The sample assembly and the measurement techniques at CRPP are discussed. Starting in 2010, another test facility for ITER conductors, named EDIPO, will be operating at CRPP to share with SULTAN the load of the samples for the acceptance tests during the construction of ITER.

  3. Terminal configured vehicle program: Test facilities guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The terminal configured vehicle (TCV) program was established to conduct research and to develop and evaluate aircraft and flight management system technology concepts that will benefit conventional take off and landing operations in the terminal area. Emphasis is placed on the development of operating methods for the highly automated environment anticipated in the future. The program involves analyses, simulation, and flight experiments. Flight experiments are conducted using a modified Boeing 737 airplane equipped with highly flexible display and control equipment and an aft flight deck for research purposes. The experimental systems of the Boeing 737 are described including the flight control computer systems, the navigation/guidance system, the control and command panel, and the electronic display system. The ground based facilities used in the program are described including the visual motion simulator, the fixed base simulator, the verification and validation laboratory, and the radio frequency anechoic facility.

  4. Graphic displays for large aerodynamic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    A combination of software and hardware for a time-sharing computer is described which allows the user to obtain an on-line data display in the control room of a large research facility. Display and hard copy of alphanumeric data as well as graphical data can be obtained as desired by the user. In addition, a number of utility programs provide for on-line graphic editing, program control, data manipulation, and off-line microfilm processing.

  5. NASA Lewis Research Center's combustor test facilities and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Jean

    1995-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) presently accommodates a total of six combustor test facilities with unique capabilities. The facilities are used to evaluate combustor and afterburner concepts for future engine applications, and also to test the survivability and performance of innovative high temperature materials, new instrumentation, and engine components in a realistic jet engine environment. The facilities provide a variety of test section interfaces and lengths to allow for flametube, sector and component testing. The facilities can accommodate a wide range of operating conditions due to differing capabilities in the following areas: inlet air pressure, temperature, and flow; fuel flow rate, pressure, and fuel storage capacity; maximum combustion zone temperature; cooling water flow rate and pressure; types of exhaust - atmospheric or altitude; air heater supply pressure; and types of air heaters - vitiated or nonvitiated. All of the facilities have provisions for standard gas (emissions) analysis, and a few of the facilities are equipped with specialized gas analysis equipment, smoke and particle size measurement devices, and a variety of laser systems. This report will present some of the unique features of each of the high temperature/high pressure combustor test facilities at NASA LeRC.

  6. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  7. 40 CFR 160.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 160.15 Inspection...application for a research or marketing permit any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor that...

  8. 40 CFR 792.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 792.15 Inspection...present a risk of injury to health or the environment any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor...

  9. 40 CFR 792.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 792.15 Inspection...present a risk of injury to health or the environment any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor...

  10. 40 CFR 160.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 160.15 Inspection...application for a research or marketing permit any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor that...

  11. 40 CFR 160.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 160.15 Inspection...application for a research or marketing permit any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor that...

  12. 40 CFR 792.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 792.15 Inspection...present a risk of injury to health or the environment any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor...

  13. 40 CFR 792.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 792.15 Inspection...present a risk of injury to health or the environment any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor...

  14. 40 CFR 792.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 792.15 Inspection...present a risk of injury to health or the environment any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor...

  15. 40 CFR 160.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 160.15 Inspection...application for a research or marketing permit any data developed by a testing facility or sponsor that...

  16. 4. BUILDING NO. 213, ORDNANCE FACILITY (FUZE TESTING & LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BUILDING NO. 213, ORDNANCE FACILITY (FUZE TESTING & LOADING), LOOKING NORTHWEST AT NORTHEAST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES OF BUILDING. - Picatinny Arsenal, 200 Area, Shell Component Loading, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  17. DETAIL VIEW OF ELECTRONICS TEST AREA, FLIGHT KITS FACILITY, ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF ELECTRONICS TEST AREA, FLIGHT KITS FACILITY, ROOM NO. 1N12, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. POLLUTANTS FROM SYNTHETIC FUELS PRODUCTION: FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND PRELIMINARY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the facility construction and gives results of preliminary tests for a project that seeks a fundamental understanding of the factors and conditions that cause the production of environmental pollutants in synthetic fuels processes. Tasks include: operation of...

  19. INTESPACE's new thermal-vacuum test facility: SIMMER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond Duprat; Andre Mouton

    1992-01-01

    The development of an European satellite market over the last 10 years, the industrialization of space applications, and the new requirements from satellite prime contractors have led INTESPACE to increase the test center's environmental testing capacities through the addition of a new thermal-vacuum test facility of impressive dimensions referred to as the SIMMER. The SIMMER is a simulator specifically created

  20. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  1. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L. (Convanta)

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  2. Design for the National RF Test Facility at ORNL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L. Gardner; D. J. Hoffman; W. R. Becraft; C. W. Blue; S. K. Combs; W. K. Dagenhart; H. H. Haselton; P. H. Hayes; J. A. Moeller; L. W. Owen

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual and preliminary engineering design for the National RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been completed. The facility will comprise a single mirror configuration embodying two superconducting development coils from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program on either side of a cavity designed for full-scale antenna testing. The coils are capable of generating a 1.2-T

  3. Standard Practice for Making and Using U-Bend Stress-Corrosion Test Specimens

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for making and using U-bend specimens for the evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in metals. The U-bend specimen is generally a rectangular strip which is bent 180° around a predetermined radius and maintained in this constant strain condition during the stress-corrosion test. Bends slightly less than or greater than 180° are sometimes used. Typical U-bend configurations showing several different methods of maintaining the applied stress are shown in Fig. 1. 1.2 U-bend specimens usually contain both elastic and plastic strain. In some cases (for example, very thin sheet or small diameter wire) it is possible to form a U-bend and produce only elastic strain. However, bent-beam (Practice G 39 or direct tension (Practice G 49)) specimens are normally used to study stress-corrosion cracking of strip or sheet under elastic strain only. 1.3 This practice is concerned only with the test specimen and not the environmental aspects of stress-corrosion testing which are discus...

  4. Corrosion inhibitor testing and selection for exploration and production: A user`s perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kapusta, S.D. [Shell Global Solutions, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-11-01

    The selection of corrosion inhibitors for field use is often based on laboratory and field testing of candidate products. At present, there are no universally accepted tests to compare the performance and other properties of candidate products. This paper describes a test protocol that can help inhibitor users with the testing and selection of inhibitors for use against CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S corrosion in oil and gas production, and that allows the screening of a large number of candidates, in a relatively cost-effective manner. The selection is based on two criteria: performance (effectiveness) against corrosion at the expected conditions, and compatibility with the injection and production systems, and with other chemicals. Performance is mostly affected by two factors: temperature, and to a lesser extent flow velocity. On that basis, three levels of increasing testing requirements have been defined: conditions green, yellow, and red. Under mild or well-established conditions (low pressure and temperature, existing operations) performance testing may not be required; however, compatibility testing is always recommended.

  5. Coupon holder for corrosion test downhole in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M.B.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes a wellbore having a downhole pump at the lower end of a production tubing string, a sucker rod string positioned within a production tubing and connected to reciprocate the downhole pump, the combination with the sucker rod string of an apparatus for measuring the rate of corrosion downhole in the borehole. It comprises a main body having opposed ends, means for forming a connection at the opposed ends by which the main body is series connected within the rod string to thereby suspend the apparatus downhole in the borehole, and further comprising; an axial chamber formed by an interior wall surface in the main body; radial ports extending through a sidewall of the main body and communicating the axial chamber with the exterior of the main body; wherein, the radial ports are oblated and include a lower curved end which is sloped downwardly and outwardly with respect to the longitudinal axis whereby reciprocation of the apparatus forces well fluid to flow through the chamber into contact with the coupon; the main body being comprised of an upper member and a lower member; means threadedly attaching the upper and lower members together in a removable manner; the chamber being a bore formed in the lower member; the insulating means being mounted to an end wall of the upper member; the end wall also defining the upper end of the chamber, the coupon extending downwardly into the bore formed in the lower member.

  6. Controls, astrophysics, and structures experiment in space ground test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukley, Angelia P.; Jones, Victoria L.

    This paper describes the initial configuration of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Controls/Structures Interaction Advanced Development Facility (CSI ADF), which is a ground test facility (GTF) for the proposed Controls, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES). The laboratory has been developed for the purpose of implementing, testing, and evaluating CSI modeling, control system design, failure analysis, and system identification techniques on a representative large space structure. The facility has been configured to represent as closely as possible an actual flight article.

  7. Some important considerations in the development of stress corrosion cracking test methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Novak, S. R.; Williams, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of some of the precaution needs the development of fracture-mechanics based test methods for studying stress corrosion cracking involves. Following a review of pertinent analytical fracture mechanics considerations and of basic test methods, the implications for test corrosion cracking studies of the time-to-failure determining kinetics of crack growth and life are examined. It is shown that the basic assumption of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics analyses must be clearly recognized and satisfied in experimentation and that the effects of incubation and nonsteady-state crack growth must also be properly taken into account in determining the crack growth kinetics, if valid data are to be obtained from fracture-mechanics based test methods.

  8. Performance of laser glazed Zr02 TBCs in cyclic oxidation and corrosion burner test rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of laser glazed zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was evaluated in cyclic oxidation and cyclic corrosion tests. Plasma sprayed zirconia coatings of two thicknesses were partially melted with a CO2 laser. The power density of the focused laser beam was varied from 35 to 75 W/sq mm, while the scanning speed was about 80 cm per minute. In cyclic oxidation tests, the specimens were heated in a burner rig for 6 minutes and cooled for 3 minutes. It is indicated that the laser treated samples have the same life as the untreated ones. However, in corrosion tests, in which the burner rig flame contained 100 PPM sodium fuel equivalent, the laser treated samples exhibit nearly a fourfold life improvement over that of the reference samples vary. In both tests, the lives of the samples inversely with the thickness of the laser melted layer of zirconia.

  9. Development of robotics facility docking test hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T. E.; Winkler, R. V.

    1984-01-01

    Design and fabricate test hardware for NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are reported. A docking device conceptually developed was fabricated, and two docking targets which provide high and low mass docking loads were required and were represented by an aft 61.0 cm section of a Hubble space telescope (ST) mockup and an upgrading of an existing multimission modular spacecraft (MSS) mockup respectively. A test plan is developed for testing the hardware.

  10. Increased capabilities of the Langley Mach 7 Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S. R.; Guy, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental research program which explored the potential for expanding the operating range of NASA Langley's Mach 7 Scramjet Test Facility is described. The facility uses electric arc-heated air as the test gas and is configured for testing airframe-integrated scramjet engine models at conditions duplicating flight velocities and temperatures. Previous scramjet testing in this facility was limited to a single simulated flight condition of Mach 6.9 at 115,300 ft. altitude. The present arc heater research demonstrated that the facility can be used for scramjet testing at simulated flight conditions from Mach 4 (at altitudes from 77,000 to 114,000 ft.) to Mach 7 (at altitudes from 108,000 to 149,000 ft.). Flow quality was established from the uniformity of measured total temperature profiles. In addition, nitrogen oxide levels in the test stream were determined for relating engine test data to expected flight performance. The test frequency and reliability of the facility were also improved by a novel redesign of the heater downstream electrode and by defining limits for stable arc operation.

  11. Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) facility. Summary safety report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemann, R. T.

    1981-07-01

    As a test of a water-conserving way of cooling thermal power plants, a large-scale test of dry/wet cooling using the ammonia phase-change system, designated the Advanced Concepts Test (ACT), is being constructed at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Kern Station at Bakersfield. A summary of the safety analyses and considerations that have been done for the facility is presented. These show that the ACT facility is an industrially safe system, and that the safety precautions taken assure that no one will be injured during the course of the testing. The application of industrial codes, safety management, an operational and emergency procedures is discussed.

  12. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the IGT HYGAS coal-gasification pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, A.O.

    1981-12-01

    Corrosion monitoring of test materials was conducted in the operating environment of the IGT HYGAS pilot plant between 1974 and 1980. Metals were exposed in the coal pretreater, pretreater quench system, coal slurry mix tank, multistage gasifier, gasifier quench system, and spent char mix tank. Austenitic alloy Types 304 and 316 were found to be superior in corrosion performance compared to Type 410 and carbon steel in the coal pretreater environment. Pack aluminized coatings on carbon steel A-515 prevented attack of the substrate; hairline cracks were always observed in the coating but never penetrating the diffusion zone. Throughout the HYGAS quench systems (gasifier and coal pretreater), the 300 series austenitic stainless steels showed consistently better corrosion resistance than other test materials in all test locations. This was also true in the slurry and char mix tanks. Equivalent linear corrosion rates were less than 1 mpy (0.03 mm/y); mild pitting was encountered in some cases. Of the alloys tested in the lower gasifier stages, alloys IN-671, IN-800, and Types 310, 309, and 446 were consistently better performers. Pack aluminized alloys (Type 310, IN-800) showed no improved corrosion resistance. All refractories were exposed as 9 in. (228.6 mm) straight bricks and used as headers to brick up a manway with only their ends exposed to the gasifier environment. Dense refractories were little affected by exposure, but lightweight refractories deteriorated. In general, the physical properties and abrasion resistance of the high-alumina (90% or greater) dense refractories were degraded by exposure while those of medium-alumina (50 to 60%) dense refractories were enhanced. Any of the dense refractories would have been suitable for lining the gasifier, but a medium-alumina castable would have been the optimum selection because of its lower cost.

  13. Electromagnetic Interference/Compatibility (EMI/EMC) Control Test and Measurement Facility: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the EMI/EMC Test Facility. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  14. Design of an automated EMC test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dhiraj K Singh; S. P. Nagesha; D. C. Pande; S. Karthikeyan

    2003-01-01

    The automation in the EMC measurements is always preferred from the conventional manual measurements, due to the repeatability and accuracy of the test results. There is a regular change in the EMI\\/EMC standards, particularly in military standards with the advancement in the technologies in the test and measurement instrumentation and also the proliferation of sophisticated electronics in the equipment design.

  15. System model of a natural circulation integral test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, Mark R.

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics (NE/RHP) at Oregon State University (OSU) has been developing an innovative modular reactor plant concept since being initiated with a Department of Energy (DoE) grant in 1999. This concept, the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR), is an integral pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant that utilizes natural circulation flow in the primary and employs advanced passive safety features. The OSU MASLWR test facility is an electrically heated integral effects facility, scaled from the MASLWR concept design, that has been previously used to assess the feasibility of the concept design safety approach. To assist in evaluating operational scenarios, a simulation tool that models the test facility and is based on both test facility experimental data and analytical methods has been developed. The tool models both the test facility electric core and a simulated nuclear core, allowing evaluation of a broad spectrum of operational scenarios to identify those scenarios that should be explored experimentally using the test facility or design-quality multi-physics tools. Using the simulation tool, the total cost of experimentation and analysis can be reduced by directing time and resources towards the operational scenarios of interest.

  16. NASA Lewis Research Center's Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemets, Steve A.; Ehlers, Robert C.; Parrott, Edith

    1995-01-01

    The Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility (PCMTF) in the Engine Research Building (ERB) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is one of two unique combustor facilities that provide a nonvitiated air supply to two test stands, where the air can be used for research combustor testing and high-temperature materials testing. Stand A is used as a research combustor stand, whereas stand B is used for cyclic and survivability tests of aerospace materials at high temperatures. Both stands can accommodate in-house and private industry research programs. The PCMTF is capable of providing up to 30 lb/s (pps) of nonvitiated, 450 psig combustion air at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1150 g F. A 5000 gal tank located outdoors adjacent to the test facility can provide jet fuel at a pressure of 900 psig and a flow rate of 11 gal/min (gpm). Gaseous hydrogen from a 70,000 cu ft (CF) tuber is also available as a fuel. Approximately 500 gpm of cooling water cools the research hardware and exhaust gases. Such cooling is necessary because the air stream reaches temperatures as high as 3000 deg F. The PCMTF provides industry and Government with a facility for studying the combustion process and for obtaining valuable test information on advanced materials. This report describes the facility's support systems and unique capabilities.

  17. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground-testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  18. Corrosion testing in a hazardous waste incinerator and waste heat boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Yanisch, V. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Materials of construction were evaluated for corrosion service, and for intermediate temperature and high temperature service in a hazardous waste incinerator and associated waste heat boiler. An aqueous corrosion test program was conducted in the waste heat boiler quench chamber. Test results indicate that alloys with nickel or cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum perform best. Some alloys have small additions of copper and tungsten. Alloy Nicrofer 5923 hMO performed best in these tests and contains low carbon, no iron or tungsten. Other good performing alloys are Haynes Alloy Ultimet, Inconel 686, Nicrofer 3127 hMO, Inconel 622, Haynes Alloy H9M, Haynes Alloy G 30, and Haynes Alloy C 22. This is based upon an average of 3 tests on each sample of 0.15 mm/yr. (6 MPY mils per year) or less corrosion. Intermediate temperature testing was conducted half way through the boiler at a temperature of about 480 C (900 F). Alloys such as HR 160, SAN 28, HR 120, Nicrofer 3228 NbCe, Incoloy 825, Incoloy 800 and Haynes Alloy 556 did very well in this test with corrosion rates of 0.033 mm/yr. (1.3 MPY) or less. In the 815 C (1500 F) environment located just prior to the boiler super heater section, tests show that alloys containing nickel and chromium plus cobalt, silicon or tungsten perform best. These include Duraloy Super 22H, RA85H, RA333, 310 S.S., Avesta 253MA and HR 160. Although these alloys are not as super as the authors would like them to be, they are adequate, with projected wastage rates of 0.83 to 1.48 mm/yr. (33 to 59 MPY).

  19. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the Westinghouse 15 ton\\/day Coal Gasification Process Development Unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yurkewycz

    1985-01-01

    Two periods of in-plant exposures of candidate materials in the Westinghouse PDU have been completed. Coupons were exposed in the gasifier, hot-gas cyclone, quench scrubber, and gas cooler vessels. Corrosion monitoring of test materials is currently being conducted in the Westinghouse Coal Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU) coal gasification pilot plant. The corrosion data presented are from work during 1981

  20. Wind Tunnel Based Anemometer Testing Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Benson Luther

    Measured estimates of the wind resource available at a site are performed with the use of an anemometer. The accuracy of the wind measurements is vital to determining the wind resource of wind farms, which is why great care must be taken in calibrating anemometers. The purpose of this project was to prepare the University of California, Davis (UCD) Aeronautical Wind Tunnel (AWT) for automatically calibrating anemometers with the use of a virtual instrument (VI) created in LabVIEW that measures the wind tunnel and anemometer quantities and controls the wind tunnel speed. The initial calibration was conducted using an RM Young propeller type anemometer that has been benchmarked by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and is used by the industry to compare anemometer calibration facilities. A second verification of the wind tunnel's readiness to calibrate anemometers was performed using a pitot-static probe manufactured by United Senor Corporation.

  1. LSST Summit Testing and Facility Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebag, Jacques; Krabbendam, V. L.; Claver, C. F.; Andrew, J.; Barr, J.; Neill, D.; LSST Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The LSST facility design layout atop the El Peñón summit in Northern Chile makes use of the natural terrain to provide efficient use of space and natural ventilation. Initial numerical fluid models of the site and the 30-m cylindrical dome indicate good flow across the terrain and more than 50 dome air changes per hour in median wind conditions. The recent geotechnical survey data shows exceptional bedrock quality that contributes to an 8.3 hz first natural frequency of the telescope analyzed on the pier and foundation. The ongoing survey of weather and astronomical conditions is providing data for engineering and is adding to the database that guides operational planning and performance predictions.

  2. The installation, testing, and lessons learned of the TF40B Gas Turbine Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.S.; Harris, H. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Carderock Div.

    1996-04-01

    The TF40B Gas Turbine Test Facility is the only dedicated Landing Craft, Air Cushion main propulsion engine test complex available to the US Navy. This facility, located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division (NSWCCD) in Philadelphia, PA, began operation in August, 1992. Since then, the test engine has logged approximately 230 starts and 350 operating hours. This paper will present the installation, testing, and lessons learned of the TF40B test facility. The installation section will discuss the modifications made to the existing test facility to accept the TF40B engine. The test section will include the Foreign Object Damage (FOD) screen evaluation, both on-line and crank wash detergent fluid evaluations, cold weather fuel testing, engine vent line testing and Aerojet 5 oil evaluation. The lessons learned section will include problems related to the electric starter, waterbrake, inlet and exhaust systems, data acquisition system, instrumentation control panel, and the test cell equipment arrangement.

  3. Single-Crystal NiAl-X Alloys Tested for Hot Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Single-crystal nickel aluminide (NiAl) has been investigated extensively throughout the last several years as a potential structural material in aero-gas turbine engines. The attractive features of NiAl in comparison to Ni-base superalloys include a higher melting point, lower density, higher thermal conductivity, and excellent oxidation resistance. However, NiAl suffers from a lack of ductility and fracture toughness at low temperatures and a low creep strength at high temperatures. Alloying additions of hafnium (Hf), gallium (Ga), titanium (Ti), and chromium (Cr) have each shown some benefit to the mechanical properties over that of the binary alloy. However, the collective effect of these alloying additions on the environmental resistance of NiAl-X was unclear. Hence, the present study was undertaken to examine the hot corrosion behavior of these alloys. A companion study examined the cyclic oxidation resistance of these alloys. Several single-crystal NiAl-X alloys (where X is Hf, Ti, Cr, or Ga) underwent hot corrosion testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Samples were tested for up to 300 1-hr cycles at a temperature of 900 C. It was found that increasing the Ti content from 1 to 5 at.% degraded the hot corrosion behavior. This decline in the behavior was reflected in high weight gains and large corrosion mound formation during testing (see the figures). However, the addition of 1 to 2 at.% Cr to alloys containing 4 to 5 at.% Ti appeared to greatly reduce the susceptibility of these alloys to hot corrosion attack and negated the deleterious effect of the increased Ti addition.

  4. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to field conditions at one of the most severely corrosive environments in North America.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented.

  6. SSC string test facility for superconducting magnets: Testing capabilities and program for collider magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kraushaar, P.; Burgett, W.; Dombeck, T.; McInturff, A.; Robinson, W.; Saladin, V.

    1993-05-01

    The Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) R&D Testing Facility has been established at the SSC Laboratory to test Collider and High Energy Booster (HEB) superconducting magnet strings. The facility is operational and has had two testing periods utilizing a half cell of collider prototypical magnets with the associated spool pieces and support systems. This paper presents a description of the testing capabilities of the facility with respect to components and supporting subsystems (cryogenic, power, quench protection, controls and instrumentation), the planned testing program for the collider magnets.

  7. Development of a Large Scale, High Speed Wheel Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondoleon, Anthony; Seltzer, Donald; Thornton, Richard; Thompson, Marc

    1996-01-01

    Draper Laboratory, with its internal research and development budget, has for the past two years been funding a joint effort with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the development of a large scale, high speed wheel test facility. This facility was developed to perform experiments and carry out evaluations on levitation and propulsion designs for MagLev systems currently under consideration. The facility was developed to rotate a large (2 meter) wheel which could operate with peripheral speeds of greater than 100 meters/second. The rim of the wheel was constructed of a non-magnetic, non-conductive composite material to avoid the generation of errors from spurious forces. A sensor package containing a multi-axis force and torque sensor mounted to the base of the station, provides a signal of the lift and drag forces on the package being tested. Position tables mounted on the station allow for the introduction of errors in real time. A computer controlled data acquisition system was developed around a Macintosh IIfx to record the test data and control the speed of the wheel. This paper describes the development of this test facility. A detailed description of the major components is presented. Recently completed tests carried out on a novel Electrodynamic (EDS) suspension system, developed by MIT as part of this joint effort are described and presented. Adaptation of this facility for linear motor and other propulsion and levitation testing is described.

  8. Corrosion Testing of Low-Activity Waste Glasses Fiscal Year 1998 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    BP McGrail; CW Lindenmeier; HT Schaef; PF Martin

    1998-11-25

    Analytical results are presented on the chemical composition and other physical properties of a glass, given the identification BNFL-A-S98, made at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory' that is representative of the low-activity waste glass composition proposed by BNFL, Inc.* for immobilization of envelope A double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site. This glass was prepared for use in a testing program to be conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and at Argonne National Laboratory for the purpose of characterizing its long-term corrosion behavior. Detailed examination of the glass microstructure using transmission electron microscopy showed structural features indicative of amorphous phase separation. A remelt was performed on a smaller batch (100 g) to ensure rapid cooling. The glass microstructure was reexamined and showed no evidence of phase separation. Selected long-term (some to 860 d) product consistency tests were terminated, and the leachates were analyzed on tests with three other representative low-activity waste glass formulations (L8- 1, L8-3, and L8-7). The results showed no evidence of corrosion rate acceleration at three times the duration of tests where another well-studied glass, LD6-5412, had been completely altered under identical test conditions. These tests (and others not discussed in this report) provide clear evidence that low-activity waste glasses with at least 20 mass% Na20 can be made that have excellent long-term corrosion resistance. However, glass composition has a large impact on long-term behavior and so careful experiments with several different techniques are essential to ensuring that a particular glass will have good long-term corrosion resistance.

  9. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the BI-GAS coal-gasification pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Yurkewycz, R.; Firestone, R.F.

    1982-02-01

    Corrosion monitoring of test materials was conducted in the BI-GAS coal gasification pilot plant from 1976 through 1981. Montana Rosebud subbituminous coal was processed at pressures of 750 psia (5175 kPa). Metals were exposed at low to moderate temperatures (700/sup 0/F (371/sup 0/C)) in the coal preparation area, gasifier slag quench, and the product gas scrubbing system. Refractories and metals were evaluated in the gasifier high temperature (1372/sup 0/F (744/sup 0/C)-1915/sup 0/F (1046/sup 0/C)) test sites at the top of stage II. In the moderate temperature aqueous environments, alloys 26-1, Types 329, 304, 316, 405, and IN-825 were superior in performance to Monel 400, carbon steel A515, and 2-1/4Cr-1Mo. Stress corrosion cracking was not observed in welded U-bend samples (A515, 304, 316, 329, 26-1). First-exposure gasifier corrosion test results generally indicated that uncoated alloys with 23.0 to 26.2 wt % Cr and less than 30 wt % Ni exhibited the best performance. Alloy Types 446 and 310 experienced the least corrosion attack with linear corrosion rates less than 20 mpy (0.51 mm/y); marginal performing alloys were Type 314, 22-13-5, and RA-333. During the second exposure, all uncoated alloys incurred acceptable corrosion losses. Alloys with Co, Cr, and Ni (N155, 556) in approximately equal proportions, at concentrations of approx. 20 wt %, ranked higher in performance than alloys such as Type 310, IN-800, Cru-25, and RA-333. Gasifier exposure of pack-aluminized alloys IN-800(A1) and Type 310(A1)showed that the coating provided corrosion protection. Cracks in the bulk coating were filled with Fe-Al rich oxides. The refractories were changed very little by exposure with two exceptions: tar was removed from a tar-impregnated brick, and a lightweight insulating castable deteriorated greatly.

  10. Space simulation in the Neutral Buoyancy Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, Bernadette; Lomax, W. Curtis; Smith, Douglas D.

    1993-01-01

    Various methods have been to simulate reduced gravity environments for space systems research and development. Neutral buoyancy has been the most universally used simulation of zero-g. This paper describes the facilities, personnel and experimental work that are associated with the Neutral Buoyancy Test Facility (NBTF) at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). This facility provides a unique underwater environment for the researcher to simulate reduced gravity activities and evaluate the performances of space-related equipment. The NBTF's small size gives it several advantages over larger water facilities. Second, the facility is used for research purposes only, eliminating any scheduling conflicts with astronaut training. Lastly, the small volume of water allows the researcher to more easily vary the water temperature. This feature is ideal for investigations of astronaut thermal comfort and regulation. Recent investigations have used the NBTF for reduced gravity simulation of locomotion and load-carrying, among other interesting research endeavors.

  11. An oxidation and erosion test facility for cooled panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartwout, W. H.; Erdos, J. I.; Engers, R. J.; Prescott, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Panel Oxidation and Erosion Testbed (POET) facility under construction at GASL to provide the required test environment is described. The POET facility comprises three major element including a vitiated air heater, a supersonic nozzle, and a test section. A hydrogen-fueld vitiated air heater will provide the oxidizing and erosive environment. The flow through the test section characterized by low supersonic speed and Mach number of 1.4 will maximize the local heat transfer rate and the local surface shear stress.

  12. Large-Scale Cryogen Systems and Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. G.; Sass, J. P.; Hatfield, W. H.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has completed initial construction and verification testing of the Integrated Systems Test Facility (ISTF) Cryogenic Testbed. The ISTF is located at Complex 20 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The remote and secure location is ideally suited for the following functions: (1) development testing of advanced cryogenic component technologies, (2) development testing of concepts and processes for entire ground support systems designed for servicing large launch vehicles, and (3) commercial sector testing of cryogenic- and energy-related products and systems. The ISTF Cryogenic Testbed consists of modular fluid distribution piping and storage tanks for liquid oxygen/nitrogen (56,000 gal) and liquid hydrogen (66,000 gal). Storage tanks for liquid methane (41,000 gal) and Rocket Propellant 1 (37,000 gal) are also specified for the facility. A state-of-the-art blast proof test command and control center provides capability for remote operation, video surveillance, and data recording for all test areas.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is

  14. The test facility for the ITER TF model coil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Komarek; E Salpietro

    1998-01-01

    The TF model coil (TFMC) is one of the seven large R&D projects for the ITER EDA. The TFMC will include most of the technical features and manufacturing approaches foreseen for the full size TF coils and it will be tested in a most relevant manner. This testing will take place 1998\\/99 in the TOSKA facility of FZK, which is

  15. Wisconsin Test Facility Transmitting Antenna Pattern and Steering Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PETER R. BANNISTER; FREDERICK J. WILLIAMS; ALAN L. DAHLVIG; WILLIAM A. KRAIMER

    1974-01-01

    During August and September 1971, the New London Laboratory, Naval Underwater Systems Center, performed pattern and steering measurements on the Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF) antennas. The pattern measurements were made at 13 locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin (covering approximately 120° of arc), while the far-field steering tests were taken in Maine and North Carolina. To be certain that the receiving

  16. ERDA/Lewis research center photovoltaic systems test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Johnson, J. A.; Knapp, W. D.; Rigo, H.; Stover, J.; Suhay, R.

    1977-01-01

    A national photovoltaic power systems test facility (of initial 10-kW peak power rating) is described. It consists of a solar array to generate electrical power, test-hardware for several alternate methods of power conversion, electrical energy storage systems, and an instrumentation and data acquisition system.

  17. Experience with superconducting cavity operation in the TESLA Test Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Pekeler

    1999-01-01

    A description of the TESLA Test Facility, which has been set up at DESY by the TESLA Collaboration, is given. Measurements of the superconducting 9-cell cavities in vertical and horizontal test cryostats are presented, as well as the experience with the first two accelerator modules in the TTF linac. Future cavity R&D efforts are described

  18. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY...minimize stress concentration on the pipe. (c) Each bared test lead wire...insulating material compatible with the pipe coating and the insulation on the...

  19. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY...minimize stress concentration on the pipe. (c) Each bared test lead wire...insulating material compatible with the pipe coating and the insulation on the...

  20. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY...minimize stress concentration on the pipe. (c) Each bared test lead wire...insulating material compatible with the pipe coating and the insulation on the...

  1. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY...minimize stress concentration on the pipe. (c) Each bared test lead wire...insulating material compatible with the pipe coating and the insulation on the...

  2. Corrosion experiences during the deep steam preliminary field test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. J. Weirick; D. R. Johnson

    1981-01-01

    Rod specimens of 1018 carbon steel, 1095 carbon steel drill rod and 303 Se stainless steel were exposed to steam environments generated at test sites in Sandia's Area III and in the Kern River Field, Bakersfield, California, by prototype steam generators. The test environment was nominally steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide at 188°C (370°F) and 340 psia. It was found

  3. The NASA high pressure facility and turbine test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepka, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is presently constructing a test facility for developing turbine-cooling and combustor technology for future-generation aircraft gas-turbine engines. Prototype engine hardware will be investigated in this facility at gas-stream conditions up to 2480 K average turbine inlet temperature and 4.14 million N/sq m turbine inlet pressure. The facility will have the unique features of fully automated control and data acquisition through the use of an integrated system of minicomputers and programmable controllers, which will result in more effective use of operating time and operators and will provide a built-in self-protection safety system. The facility, turbine rig, and turbine-cooling test program are described.

  4. National RF Test Facility as a multipurpose development tool

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Berry, L.A.; Blue, C.W.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Loring, C.M. Jr.; Moeller, F.A.; Ponte, N.S.

    1983-01-01

    Additions and modifications to the National RF Test Facility design have been made that (1) focus its use for technology development for future large systems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), (2) expand its applicability to technology development in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ECRF) at 60 GHz, (3) provide a facility for ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) 60-GHz ring physics studies, and (4) permit engineering studies of steady-state plasma systems, including superconducting magnet performance, vacuum vessel heat flux removal, and microwave protection. The facility will continue to function as a test bed for generic technology developments for ICRF and the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF). The upgraded facility is also suitable for mirror halo physics experiments.

  5. Test Based Microgravity Analysis for the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Yu, Albert Y.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2003-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a two rack facility dedicated to combustion and fluids science in a microgravity (near zero-g) environment on board the International Space Station (ISS). An important aspect of performing on-orbit research is maintaining the rack microgravity environment by minimizing vibroacoustic disturbances generated within the science payload. This paper discusses recent rack-level acoustic emission testing to characterize the science payload microgravity environment. Measurements are compared with FCF microgravity science requirements.

  6. Conceptual design of the MHD Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Rigo, H. S.; Pearson, C. V.; Warinner, D. K.; Hatch, A. M.; Borden, M.; Giza, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the MHD engineering test facility, a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commerical feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates are included and the engineering issues that should be reexamined are identified.

  7. Australian national networked tele-test facility for integrated systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kamran Eshraghian; Stefan W. Lachowicz; Sholeh Eshraghian

    2001-01-01

    The Australian Commonwealth government recently announced a grant of $4.75 million as part of a $13.5 million program to establish a world class networked IC tele-test facility in Australia. The facility will be based on a state-of-the-art semiconductor tester located at Edith Cowan University in Perth that will operate as a virtual centre spanning Australia. Satellite nodes will be located

  8. Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Botke, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Malone, R.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Z.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yu, L.H.

    1992-10-01

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program.

  9. Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Botke, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Malone, R.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Z.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yu, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program.

  10. Enhanced capability of the Combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, Kenneth E.; Andrews, Earl H.; Eggers, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) is described together with its modifications. The expanded simulation capabilities of the facility are documented. Nozzle exit surveys and tunnel calibration information are presented. It is noted that these modifications included a new heat-sink nickel liner heater, a new Mach 4.7 nozzle, and a new 70-ft vacuum sphere exhaust system. It is found that the facility in the air ejector mode of operation performed similarly to that prior to the addition of the vacuum sphere ducting.

  11. Corrosion characterization of durable silver coatings by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and accelerated environmental testing.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chung-Tse; Fuqua, Peter D; Barrie, James D

    2006-03-01

    Highly reflective front-surface silver mirrors are needed for many optical applications. While various protective dielectric coating schemes have been developed, the long-term durability of Ag mirrors is still of great concern in the optics community for a variety of applications under harsh environments. The corrosion protection behavior of a SiNx-coated silver-mirror coating scheme was tested with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and accelerated environmental testing, including humidity and salt fog tests. The EIS data obtained were fitted with different equivalent circuit models. The results suggested that the 100A thick SiNx coating produced by rf magnetron sputtering was porous and acted as a leaky capacitor on the Ag film, whereas the addition of a NiCrNx interlayer as thin as 3A between SiNx and Ag films resulted in a much denser SiNx coating with a low-frequency impedance value of 2 orders of magnitude higher than that without the interlayer. Humidity and salt fog testing of different silver coatings showed similar results. The 100A SiNx/3A-NiCrNx/Ag coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance against the corrosive environments used in this study. PMID:16539267

  12. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  13. Cryogenic Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey; Baker, Mark; Carpenter, Jay; Eng, Ron; Haight, Harlan; Hogue, William; McCracken, Jeff; Siler, Richard; Wright, Ernie

    2006-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray & Cryogenic Test Facility (XRCF) has been performing sub-liquid nitrogen temperature testing since 1999. Optical wavefront measurement, thermal structural deformation, mechanism functional & calibration, and simple cryo-conditioning tests have been completed. Recent modifications have been made to the facility in support of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program. The chamber's payload envelope and the facility s refrigeration capacity have both been increased. Modifications have also been made to the optical instrumentation area improving access for both the installation and operation of optical instrumentation outside the vacuum chamber. The facility's capabilities, configuration, and performance data will be presented.

  14. Langley Ground Facilities and Testing in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Kegelman, Jerome T.; Kilgore, William A.

    2010-01-01

    A strategic approach for retaining and more efficiently operating the essential Langley Ground Testing Facilities in the 21st Century is presented. This effort takes advantage of the previously completed and ongoing studies at the Agency and National levels. This integrated approach takes into consideration the overall decline in test business base within the nation and reduced utilization in each of the Langley facilities with capabilities to test in the subsonic, transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic speed regimes. The strategy accounts for capability needs to meet the Agency programmatic requirements and strategic goals and to execute test activities in the most efficient and flexible facility operating structure. The structure currently being implemented at Langley offers agility to right-size our capability and capacity from a national perspective, to accommodate the dynamic nature of the testing needs, and will address the influence of existing and emerging analytical tools for design. The paradigm for testing in the retained facilities is to efficiently and reliably provide more accurate and high-quality test results at an affordable cost to support design information needs for flight regimes where the computational capability is not adequate and to verify and validate the existing and emerging computational tools. Each of the above goals are planned to be achieved, keeping in mind the increasing small industry customer base engaged in developing unpiloted aerial vehicles and commercial space transportation systems.

  15. Hydrogen water chemistry to mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking: In-reactor tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Lejon, J.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1988-05-01

    In-reactor studies of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in sensitized Type 304 stainless steel were performed during operation under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) in the Swedish Ringhals-1 BWR. Techniques used were constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests and corrosion potential (ECP) measurements. Objective of the tests was to identify and investigate factors other than oxygen concentration in the water, which affect IGSCC. Results show that hydrogen peroxide and sulfate in the water severely enhance IGSCC, and thus need to be controlled to fully mitigate IGSCC by HWC. Hydrogen in recirculation water was mildly beneficial, and nitrate was fairly harmless. HWC arrests existing IGSCC cracks, but if HWC is stopped the cracks eventually become reactivated. No difference in IGSCC propensity was found between unfilmed steel and steel prefilmed in the HWC environment for eight weeks. 40 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada test site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William B. Boyer; Larry J. Burke; Bernard J. Gomez; Leonard Livingston; Daniel S. Nelson; Douglas C. Smathers

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two

  17. Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada Test Site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Boyer; L. J. Burke; B. J. Gomez; L. Livingston; D. S. Nelson; D. C. Smathers

    1996-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two

  18. No corrosion caused by coal chlorine found in AFBC pilot scale tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K.; Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Liu, K.; Smith, S.

    2000-07-01

    Measurements of deposition and corrosion were made in the freeboard of a 3 m inner diameter pilot scale atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) during seven 1,000-hours tests using coals with chlorine (Cl) contents ranging from 0.026% up to 0.47% and sulfur contents ranging from 0.897{approximately}4.4%. Uncooled coupons of alloys 304, 309, 347 and a cooled tube of A210C medium carbon steel were exposed to the hot flue gases to investigate the effects of different coal compositions on deposition and corrosion behavior, if any. The uncooled coupons were installed at the tope of the freeboard to simulate the superheater tube conditions (1,020--1,100 F surface temperature), while the temperature of the cooled A210C test tube was controlled to match the conditions of the evaporator tubes. Specimens were removed for examination after 250, 500, 750, 1,000 hours of exposure and analyzed for deposit formation and corrosion. No chlorine was found in the corrosion scale or on the metal surfaces after any of the tests. High sulfur contents were found in the outer parts of the deposits, and appeared to be associated with calcium and magnesium suggesting that the fly ash may react further after being deposited on the surface of the metal. It was concluded that the limestone bed in the AFBC not only can capture the sulfur but also can effectively capture chlorine. This effect helps being the Cl in the AFBC flue gas down to a level of <50 ppm which is significantly lower than the 300{approximately}400 ppm expected from combustion of the coal in the absence of limestone. This reduction in chlorine species in the gas phase has possible implications for decreased corrosion problems not only in the freeboard, but also in the cold end of the boiler. No evidence was found in these tests that metal wastage or corrosion was accelerated, either directly or indirectly, by chlorine in the coal.

  19. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the BI-GAS coal-gasification pilot plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Yurkewycz; R. F. Firestone

    1982-01-01

    Corrosion monitoring of test materials was conducted in the BI-GAS coal gasification pilot plant from 1976 through 1981. Montana Rosebud subbituminous coal was processed at pressures of 750 psia (5175 kPa). Metals were exposed at low to moderate temperatures (700°F (371°C)) in the coal preparation area, gasifier slag quench, and the product gas scrubbing system. Refractories and metals were evaluated

  20. Corrosion testing of a degraded moderator: L-Area Tuff Tanks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mickalonis

    2000-01-01

    Based on test results, storage of the degraded moderator in 55-gallon 304L drums (0.065 inches thick) would not cause failure by general corrosion for up to 5 plus years storage. Acidic degraded moderator was temporarily stored in Tuff Tanks located in L-area. The moderator characteristics included a DâO content of 5.02--5.33%, a pH of 1.25--1.31, a conductivity of 29,300--31,200 m

  1. Standard Practice for Recording Data from Atmospheric Corrosion Tests of Metallic-Coated Steel Specimens

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for recording data of atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic-coated steel specimens. Its objective is the assurance of (1) complete identification of materials before testing, (2) objective reporting of material appearance during visual inspections, and (3) adequate photographic, micrographic, and chemical laboratory examinations at specific stages of deterioration, and at the end of the tests. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.W. Kang; D.E. Anderson; I.E. Campisi; M. Champion; M.T. Crofford; R.E. Fuja; P.A. Gurd; S. Hasan; K.-U. Kasemir; M.P. McCarthy; D. Stout; J.Y. Tang; A.V. Vassioutchenko; M. Wezensky; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; T. Powers; M. Stirbet

    2005-05-16

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components.

  3. Flat panel display test and evaluation: procedures, standards, and facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Timothy W.; Daniels, Reginald; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1997-07-01

    This paper addresses flat panel display test and evaluation via a discussion of procedures, standards and facilities. Procedures need to be carefully developed and documented to ensure that test accomplished in separate laboratories produce comparable results. The tests themselves must not be a source of inconsistency in test results when such comparisons are made in the course of procurements or new technology prototype evaluations. Standards are necessary to expedite the transition of the new display technologies into applications and to lower the costs of custom parts applied across disparate applications. The flat panel display industry is in the course of ascertaining and formulating such standards as they are of value to designers, manufacturers, marketers and users of civil and military products and equipment. Additionally, in order to inform the DoD and industry, the test and evaluation facilities of the Air Force Research Laboratory Displays Branch are described. These facilities are available to support procurements involving flat panel displays and to examine new technology prototypes. Finally, other government display testing facilities within the Navy and the Army are described.

  4. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...lab pack will be sent to a combustion facility in compliance with the alternative...Administrator. (b) Treatment facilities must test their wastes according to...or operator of the treatment facility must test an extract of the...

  5. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...lab pack will be sent to a combustion facility in compliance with the alternative...Administrator. (b) Treatment facilities must test their wastes according to...or operator of the treatment facility must test an extract of the...

  6. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...lab pack will be sent to a combustion facility in compliance with the alternative...Administrator. (b) Treatment facilities must test their wastes according to...or operator of the treatment facility must test an extract of the...

  7. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...lab pack will be sent to a combustion facility in compliance with the alternative...Administrator. (b) Treatment facilities must test their wastes according to...or operator of the treatment facility must test an extract of the...

  8. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...lab pack will be sent to a combustion facility in compliance with the alternative...Administrator. (b) Treatment facilities must test their wastes according to...or operator of the treatment facility must test an extract of the...

  9. Optimisation of altitude test facilities through tuning of air ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, T. M. T.; Manohar, D. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    The operational capabilities of a Liquid Apogee Motor are evaluated on ground under nozzle full flow condition. Such conditions are simulated in the Altitude Simulation Facilities in which highly expanded nozzles are tested. Salient features of a simple altitude test facility using two stage air ejectors are described. The configuration of the diffuser-ejector system is arrived at based on supersonic and subsonic compressible fluid theory and few empirical relationship. A detailed study on the tuning of the stage ejectors has been carried out and the results are presented. The pumping characteristics of air ejectors and its operation capabilities are also discussed in detail.

  10. Prediction equations for corrosion rates of a A-537 and A-516 steels in Double Shell Slurry, Future PUREX, and Hanford Facilities Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; Mackey, D.B.; Bates, D.J.; Pool, K.H.

    1985-06-01

    Even though the interest in the corrosion of radwaste tanks goes back to the mid-1940's when waste storage was begun, and a fair amount of corrosion work has been done since then, the changes in processes and waste types have outpaced the development of new data pertinent to the new double shell tanks. As a consequence, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began a development of corrosion data on a broad base of waste compositions in 1980. The objective of the program was to provide operations personnel with corrosion rate data as a function of waste temperature and composition. The work performed in this program examined A-537 tank steel in Double Shell Slurry and Future PUREX Wastes, at temperatures between 40 and 180/sup 0/C as well as in Hanford Facilities Waste at 25 and 50/sup 0/C. In general, the corrosion rates were less than 1 mpy (0.001 in./y) and usually less than 0.5 mpy. Excessive corrosion rates (>1 mpy) were only found in dilute waste compositions or in concentrated caustic compositions at temperatures above 140/sup 0/C. Stress corrosion cracking was only observed under similar conditions. The results are presented as polynomial prediction equations with examples of the output of existing computer codes. The codes are not provided in the text but are available from the authors. 12 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of a steady state MPD thruster test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.; Doss, E.D.; Kilgore, O.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of multimegawatt MPD thrusters depends, to a great extent, on testing them under steady state high altitude space conditions. Steady state testing is required to provide thermal characteristics, life cycle, erosion, and other essential data. the major technical obstacle for ground testing of MPD thrusters in a space simulation facility is the inability of state-of-the-art vacuum systems to handle the tremendous pumping speeds required for multimegawatt MPD thrusters. This is true for other types of electric propulsion devices as well. This paper discusses the results of the first phase of an evaluation of steady state MPD thruster test facilities. The first phase addresses the conceptual design of vacuum systems required to support multimegawatt MPD thruster testing. Three advanced pumping system concepts were evaluated and are presented here.

  12. Assessment of the National Transonic Facility for Laminar Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Jeffrey D.; Sutanto, Mary I.; Witkowski, David P.; Watkins, A. Neal; Rivers, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    A transonic wing, designed to accentuate key transition physics, is tested at cryogenic conditions at the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley. The collaborative test between Boeing and NASA is aimed at assessing the facility for high-Reynolds number testing of configurations with significant regions of laminar flow. The test shows a unit Reynolds number upper limit of 26 M/ft for achieving natural transition. At higher Reynolds numbers turbulent wedges emanating from the leading edge bypass the natural transition process and destroy the laminar flow. At lower Reynolds numbers, the transition location is well correlated with the Tollmien-Schlichting-wave N-factor. The low-Reynolds number results suggest that the flow quality is acceptable for laminar flow testing if the loss of laminar flow due to bypass transition can be avoided.

  13. High-temperature acoustic test facilities and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome

    1994-09-01

    The Wright Laboratory is the Air Force center for air vehicles, responsible for developing advanced technology and incorporating it into new flight vehicles and for continuous technological improvement of operational air vehicles. Part of that responsibility is the problem of acoustic fatigue. With the advent of jet aircraft in the 1950's, acoustic fatigue of aircraft structure became a significant problem. In the 1960's the Wright Laboratory constructed the first large acoustic fatigue test facilities in the United States, and the laboratory has been a dominant factor in high-intensity acoustic testing since that time. This paper discusses some of the intense environments encountered by new and planned Air Force flight vehicles, and describes three new acoustic test facilities of the Wright Laboratory designed for testing structures in these dynamic environments. These new test facilities represent the state of the art in high-temperature, high-intensity acoustic testing and random fatigue testing. They will allow the laboratory scientists and engineers to test the new structures and materials required to withstand the severe environments of captive-carry missiles, augmented lift wings and flaps, exhaust structures of stealth aircraft, and hypersonic vehicle structures well into the twenty-first century.

  14. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  15. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

    2008-03-16

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  16. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  17. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  18. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  19. A simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Jeffery D.; Knaur, James A.; Moore, Truman W., Jr.; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Details of a simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles, motors, and explosive components are described. The test facility is designed to simulate the high current, continuing current, and high rate-of-rise current components of an idealized direct strike lightning waveform. The Lightning Test Facility was in operation since May, 1988, and consists of: 3 separate capacitor banks used to produce the lightning test components; a permanently fixed large steel safety cage for retaining the item under test (should it be ignited during testing); an earth covered bunker housing the control/equipment room; a charge/discharge building containing the charging/discharging switching; a remotely located blockhouse from which the test personnel control hazardous testing; and interconnecting cables.

  20. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  1. Cryogenic vertical test facility for the SRF cavities at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Than, R.; Liaw, CJ; Porqueddu, R.; Grau, M.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tallerico, T.; McIntyre, G.; Lederle, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.

    2011-03-28

    A vertical test facility has been constructed to test SRF cavities and can be utilized for other applications. The liquid helium volume for the large vertical dewar is approximate 2.1m tall by 1m diameter with a clearance inner diameter of 0.95m after the inner cold magnetic shield installed. For radiation enclosure, the test dewar is located inside a concrete block structure. The structure is above ground, accessible from the top, and equipped with a retractable concrete roof. A second radiation concrete facility, with ground level access via a labyrinth, is also available for testing smaller cavities in 2 smaller dewars. The cryogenic transfer lines installation between the large vertical test dewar and the cryo plant's sub components is currently near completion. Controls and instrumentations wiring are also nearing completion. The Vertical Test Facility will allow onsite testing of SRF cavities with a maximum overall envelope of 0.9 m diameter and 2.1 m height in the large dewar and smaller SRF cavities and assemblies with a maximum overall envelope of 0.66 m diameter and 1.6 m height.

  2. SP-100 Ground Engineering Systems: Test facility control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, W.F.; Henshall, J.B.; Hampsten, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    One of the major objectives of the current phase of the SP-100 program is to demonstrate the performance of a full-scale, prototypic nuclear subsystem of a 100 kWe space nuclear power supply. Such a test is planned at the SP-100 Test Site located at US Department of Energy facilities near Richland, Washington. Considerations involved in selecting a design for the central, integrated facility control system which will control and monitor the performance of the nuclear subsystem and supporting facility systems are discussed. These considerations have been translated into the design of a modern, commerically available, microprocessor based control and monitoring system, using color graphics techniques for the operator interface.

  3. RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility

    E-print Network

    Harms, E; Chase, B; Cullerton, E; Hocker, A; Jensen, C; Joireman, P; Klebaner, A; Kubicki, T; Kucera, M; Legan, A; Leibfritz, J; Martinez, A; McGee, M; Nagaitsev, S; Nezhevenko, O; Nicklaus, D; Pfeffer, H; Pischalnikov, Y; Prieto, P; Reid, J; Schappert, W; Tupikov, V; Varghese, P; Branlard, J

    2012-01-01

    Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab.

  4. Thermoacoustic fatigue testing facility for space shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, C. E.; Grandle, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a reusable space shuttle by NASA in the next decade depends in part on the design of a satisfactory thermal protection system (TPS). The booster and orbiter parts of the shuttle require TPS panels which will withstand thermoacoustic fatigue. The Langley Research Center has begun tests on early panel designs in a new acoustic fatigue facility which is capable of simulating the combined elevated temperature and acoustic environments which these panels are expected to experience. The capabilities of the facility and computer system are outlined, and problems encountered in establishing the test methods are discussed. Tests of a Haynes 25 TPS panel are described, and representative data from tests of the panel at 650 C are included.

  5. Direct sunlight facility for testing and research in HCPV

    SciTech Connect

    Sciortino, Luisa, E-mail: luisa.sciortino@unipa.it; Agnello, Simonpietro, E-mail: luisa.sciortino@unipa.it; Bonsignore, Gaetano; Cannas, Marco; Gelardi, Franco Mario; Napoli, Gianluca; Spallino, Luisa [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 PA (Italy); Barbera, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 PA, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo G. S. Vaiana, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 PA (Italy); Buscemi, Alessandro; Montagnino, Fabio Maria; Paredes, Filippo [IDEA s.r.l., Contrada Molara, Zona Industriale III Fase, 90018 Termini Imerese (Panama) (Italy); Candia, Roberto; Collura, Alfonso; Di Cicca, Gaspare; Cicero, Ugo Lo; Varisco, Salvo [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo G. S. Vaiana, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 PA (Italy)

    2014-09-26

    A facility for testing different components for HCPV application has been developed in the framework of 'Fotovoltaico ad Alta Efficienza' (FAE) project funded by the Sicilian Regional Authority (PO FESR Sicilia 2007/2013 4.1.1.1). The testing facility is equipped with an heliostat providing a wide solar beam inside the lab, an optical bench for mounting and aligning the HCPV components, electronic equipments to characterize the I-V curves of multijunction cells operated up to 2000 suns, a system to circulate a fluid in the heat sink at controlled temperature and flow-rate, a data logging system with sensors to measure temperatures in several locations and fluid pressures at the inlet and outlet of the heat sink, and a climatic chamber with large test volume to test assembled HCPV modules.

  6. Power Systems Development Facility: Filter element evaluation during combustion testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Davidson; X. Guan; H. Hendrix; B. Shirley

    1999-01-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored engineering scale demonstration of two advanced coal-fired power systems. Particulate cleanup is achieved by utilizing High Temperature, High Pressure (HTHP) gas filtration systems. The PSDF was designed at sufficient scale so that advanced power systems and components could be tested in an integrated fashion to provide confidence

  7. A modular approach to an engineering test facility and beyond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Johnson; D. Rudberg

    1979-01-01

    The concept of using a new baseload coal-fired power plant as a bottoming plant for a MHD\\/steam generator engineering test facility is examined. Consideration is given to three possible system configurations with increasing levels of combustion gas coupling. The first configuration allows the interaction of only the steam and water flows, duplicating many components and resulting in an expensive system

  8. A 250 MWt MHD Engineering Test Facility \\/ETF\\/ system design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Marston; C. S. Cook; L. Terrey; B. Zauderer

    1979-01-01

    A conceptual design study was performed to establish a Reference Design for the MHD Engineering Test Facility. The design is for a complete 250 MW (thermal) MHD\\/Steam plant for component and system development and long term operation as a demonstration plant. Selection of individual components must be made considering the impact on other components and overall system operation and with

  9. Mirror fusion test facility electrical systems, status and plans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1981-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTR), a single cell, large scale mirror machine has been under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) sine October 1977 and was due to be completed October 1981. New machine has been designed to make maximum use of the systems constructed for MFTR with minimum modification. The electrical systems required for MFTF included; magnet

  10. Space power facility readiness for Space Station power system testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger L. Smith

    1995-01-01

    This document provides information which shows that the NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Power Facility (SPF) will be ready to execute the Space Station electric power system thermal vacuum chamber testing. The SPF is located at LeRC West (formerly the Plum Brook Station), Sandusky, Ohio. The SPF is the largest space environmental chamber in the world, having an inside horizontal

  11. Psychological Testing in Outpatient Mental Health Facilities: A National Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Piotrowski; John W. Keller

    1989-01-01

    We surveyed psychological testing trends in outpatient mental health centers, clinics, and services in the United States. The sample was obtained from the National Directory of Mental Health and the National Registry of Community Mental Health Services. Of 900 facilities with a psychologist on staff, 413 (46%) returned questionnaires. The MMPI and the Wechsler scales were the instruments most frequently

  12. 10. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ARVFS TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ARVFS TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, FRAME, AND SHIELDING TANK. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-6171, TAKEN NOVEMBER 10, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.N.

    1997-01-17

    This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

  14. Weather automation studies at the Otis Weather Test Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Chisholm

    1978-01-01

    A description of the Otis Weather Test Facility (WTF) is presented, taking into account the distribution of surface-based and tower-mounted instrumentation at the WTF, the automation of the rotating beam ceilometer, the present weather decision tree, and slant visual range techniques. A demonstration model of a Modular Automated Weather System (MAWS) is also considered. The versatility of MAWS results from

  15. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Bacchus; O. E. Hill; R. Harold Whitesides

    1992-01-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for

  16. Continued on page 7 Busy Future for Fuel Test Facility

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    as a PhD student with the objective of providing a facility to test a prototypic uranium-molyb- denum (U-Mo) alloy fuel for high performance research reactors. In 2004, the National Nuclear Security Administration the use of high-enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Still unconverted are 28 high

  17. Fast Flux Test Facility fuel and test management: The first 10 years

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Campbell, L.R.; Dobbin, K.D.; Tang, E.L.

    1991-07-01

    Core design and fuel and test management have been performed efficiently at the Fast Flux Test Facility. No outages have been extended to adjust core loadings. Development of mixed oxide fuels for advanced liquid metal breeder reactors has been carried out successfully. In fact, the fuel performance is extraordinary. Failures have been so infrequent that further development and refinement of fuel requirements seem appropriate and could lead to a significant reduction in projected electrical busbar costs. The Fast Flux Test Facility is also involved in early metal fuel development tests and appears to be an ideal test bed for any further fuel development or refinement testing. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Skylab Medical Experiments Altitude Test /SMEAT/ facility design and operation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinners, A. H., Jr.; Correale, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the design approaches and test facility operation methods used to successfully accomplish a 56-day test for Skylab to permit evaluation of selected Skylab medical experiments in a ground test simulation of the Skylab environment with an astronaut crew. The systems designed for this test include the two-gas environmental control system, the fire suppression and detection system, equipment transfer lock, ground support equipment, safety systems, potable water system, waste management system, lighting and power system, television monitoring, communications and recreation systems, and food freezer.

  19. INTESPACE's new thermal-vacuum test facility: SIMMER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duprat, Raymond; Mouton, Andre

    1992-01-01

    The development of an European satellite market over the last 10 years, the industrialization of space applications, and the new requirements from satellite prime contractors have led INTESPACE to increase the test center's environmental testing capacities through the addition of a new thermal-vacuum test facility of impressive dimensions referred to as the SIMMER. The SIMMER is a simulator specifically created for the purpose of conducting acceptance tests of satellites and of large structures of the double launching ARIANE IV or half ARIANE V classes. The chamber is 8.3 meters long with a diameter of 10 meters. The conceptual design of a chamber in the horizontal plane and at floor level is in a view to simplify test preparation and to permit final electrical checks of the spacecraft in its actual test configuration prior to the closing of the chamber. The characteristics of the SIMMER complies with the requirements being currently defined in terms of thermal-vacuum tests: (1) thermal regulation (temperatures cycling between 100 K and 360 K); (2) clean vacuum (10(exp -6) mbar); (3) 600 measurement channels; and (4) 100 000 cleanliness class. The SIMMER is located in INTESPACE's space vehicle test complex in which a large variety of environmental test facilities are made available for having a whole test program completed under one and a same roof.

  20. Software Manages Documentation in a Large Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurneck, Joseph M.

    2001-01-01

    The 3MCS computer program assists and instrumentation engineer in performing the 3 essential functions of design, documentation, and configuration management of measurement and control systems in a large test facility. Services provided by 3MCS are acceptance of input from multiple engineers and technicians working at multiple locations;standardization of drawings;automated cross-referencing; identification of errors;listing of components and resources; downloading of test settings; and provision of information to customers.

  1. SP100 Ground Engineering Systems: Test facility control systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. F. Carlson; J. B. Henshall; K. L. Hampsten

    1988-01-01

    One of the major objectives of the current phase of the SP-100 program is to demonstrate the performance of a full-scale, prototypic nuclear subsystem of a 100 kWe space nuclear power supply. Such a test is planned at the SP-100 Test Site located at U.S. Department of Energy facilities near Richland, Washington. Considerations involved in selecting a design for the

  2. Knowledge Preservation at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

    2012-01-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. The technologies employed in designing and constructing this reactor, along with information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, are currently being secured and archived by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy. This report is one in a series documenting the overall project efforts to retrieve and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors

  3. Knowledge Preservation at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

    2011-11-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. The technologies employed in designing and constructing this reactor, along with information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, are currently being secured and archived by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy. This report provides a status update documenting the overall project efforts to retrieve and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors.

  4. A unique facility for V/STOL aircraft hover testing. [Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, R. G.; Murphy, R. D.; Gillespie, E. A.; Lane, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    The Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) was modified to obtain static force and moment data and to allow assessment of aircraft handling qualities during dynamic tethered hover flight. Test probe procedures were also established. Static lift and control measurements obtained are presented along with results of limited dynamic tethered hover flight.

  5. Psychrometric Testing Facility Restoration and Cooling Capacity Testing

    E-print Network

    Cline, Vincent E.

    2010-10-12

    capacity methods for each test Test No. Avg Total CC (Btu/h) Avg Refrigerant CC (Btu/h) Percent Difference (%) 1A 24091 23951 0.58 1B 25683 25223 1.79 2A 23881 23626 1.07 2B 25654 25289 1.42 3A 24046 23720 1.36 3B 25532 25289 0.../h) A Total 24091 23881 24046 24006 110.8 B Total 25683 25654 25532 25632 79.8 A Refrigerant 23951 23626 23720 23766 167.6 B Refrigerant 25223 25289 25285 25282 37.0 A Sensible 16629 16767 16278 16558 252.1 B Sensible 17122 16957...

  6. Psychrometric Testing Facility Restoration and Cooling Capacity Testing 

    E-print Network

    Cline, Vincent E.

    2010-10-12

    ..................................................................................... 28 5.4 Mass Flow Meter ..................................................................................... 28 5.5 Refrigerant Temperature ......................................................................... 29 5.6 Evaporator Exit... voltage. 17 17 Table 4 Required test condition variations not covered in Table 2 Test Evap Exit DB ?F Evap Exit WB ?F OD WB ?F Ex Res Air, in/H2O Voltage ?% 1A 0.32 0.29 0.45 0.087 2.2 2A 0.31 0.07 0.56 0.095 2.2 3A 0.29 0.14 0.22 0...

  7. High-temperature combustor liner tests in structural component response test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Jet engine combustor liners were tested in the structural component response facility at NASA Lewis. In this facility combustor liners were thermally cycled to simulate a flight envelope of takeoff, cruise, and return to idle. Temperatures were measured with both thermocouples and an infrared thermal imaging system. A conventional stacked-ring louvered combustor liner developed a crack at 1603 cycles. This test was discontinued after 1728 cycles because of distortion of the liner. A segmented or float wall combustor liner tested at the same heat flux showed no significant change after 1600 cycles. Changes are being made in the facility to allow higher temperatures.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A JOINT TEST PROTOCOL FOR VALIDATION OF TREATMENTS OR MATERIALS FOR PREVENTING CORROSION TO COMPONENTS AND STRUCTURES FOR DOD MATERIEL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence A. Gintert; Donald R. Skelton; Ralph P. I. Adler

    The impact of corrosion degradation on the maintenance costs and readiness for Department of Defense (DoD) materiel and equipment encourages a high priority on the evaluation of new or alternate techniques and materials for improved corrosion control. The development of a series of Joint Test Protocols (JTPs) for validation of alternatives to current corrosion protection methods used on a variety

  9. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO{sub 2} corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Modification of Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility for Rapid Testing of Cable-In Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, D. R.; Miller, J. R.; Martovetsky, N.; Kenney, S. J.

    2010-04-01

    This document describes proposed design modifications to the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency that will allow rapid test and changeout of central solenoid (CS) conductor samples and more precise and reliable characterization than is presently achievable elsewhere. Typically CS testing at the CSMC Test Facility is followed by testing at the SULTAN facility in Switzerland. The SULTAN facility has very short in-field length and a short length between the high field zone and the joints. This makes it difficult to obtain uniform distribution of current in the cable at low voltage levels, which defines the current sharing temperature. In a working magnet, like the ITER CS, there is a long length of conductor in the highest field, which provides a more uniform current distribution near current sharing. The modified facility will serve as an economical tool for ITER conductor testing. The test item will be a three turn sample, about 15 m long, placed in the background field of the CSMC. This new mode of operation will reduce the time of cooldown, warmup, and installation of the sample into the CSMC facility, which should significantly reduce the testing cost per sample.

  11. Runway Incursion Prevention System Testing at the Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.

    2005-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) integrated with a Synthetic Vision System concept (SVS) was tested at the Reno/Tahoe International Airport (RNO) and Wallops Flight Facility (WAL) in the summer of 2004. RIPS provides enhanced surface situational awareness and alerts of runway conflicts in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using a Gulfstream-V (G-V) aircraft as the test platform and a NASA test aircraft and a NASA test van as incurring traffic. The purpose of the study, from the RIPS perspective, was to evaluate the RIPS airborne incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts, focusing on crossing runway incursion scenarios. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, WAL flight test activities, and WAL test results.

  12. A passive solar test facility for Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, P.K.

    1983-06-01

    A passive solar test facility has been designed for Dammam, Saudi Arabia. It will be located on the campus of King Faisal University, adjacent to the Persian Gulf. This maritime desert climate is terribly sevre, and one for which it is a formidable challenge to design a year around thermally efficient building. This facility incorporates seven different passive strategies: proper orientation, operable shading for windows, flow-through ventilation, externally insulated thermal mass, wind tower with direct evaporative cooling, indirect evaporative cooling through a double shell, and solar water heating. Construction should begin in June of 1983. Upon completion, the building will be monitored for at least two years.

  13. Column test-rig facility for column scanning studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Rasif M.; Roslan, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Distillation columns are considered as one of the most critical components in oil and gas plants. The plant performance depends on the ability of these columns to function as intended. Defective columns may lead to serious consequences to the plant operation, and hence the quality of product. In order to perform any inspection techniques to distillation column for NDT practitioner, the best facility was designed when the adjustable defeats of distillation column test rig has been developed. The paper discussed the development and the function of this facility.

  14. Column test-rig facility for column scanning studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Rasif M.; Roslan, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Distillation columns are considered as one of the most critical components in oil and gas plants. The plant performance depends on the ability of these columns to function as intended. Defective columns may lead to serious consequences to the plant operation, and hence the quality of product. In order to perform any inspection techniques to distillation column for NDT practitioner, the best facility was designed when the adjustable defeats of distillation column test rig has been developed. The paper discussed the development and the function of this facility.

  15. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

  16. Plans for an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Erik [CERN; Bruning, O S [CERN; Calaga, Buchi Rama Rao [CERN; Schirm, Karl-Martin [CERN; Torres-Sanchez, R [CERN; Valloni, Alessandra [CERN; Aulenbacher, Kurt [Mainz; Bogacz, Slawomir [JLAB; Hutton, Andrew [JLAB; Klein, M [University of Liverpool

    2014-12-01

    The baseline electron accelerator for LHeC and one option for FCC-he is an Energy Recovery Linac. To prepare and study the necessary key technologies, CERNhas started – in collaboration with JLAB and Mainz University – the conceptual design of an ERL Test Facility (ERL-TF). Staged construction will allow the study under different conditions with up to 3 passes, beam energies of up to about 1 GeV and currents of up to 50 mA. The design and development of superconducting cavity modules, including coupler and HOM damper designs, are also of central importance for other existing and future accelerators and their tests are at the heart of the current ERL-TF goals. However, the ERL-TF could also provide a unique infrastructure for several applications that go beyond developing and testing the ERL technology at CERN. In addition to experimental studies of beam dynamics, operational and reliability issues in an ERL, it could equally serve for quench tests of superconducting magnets, as physics experimental facility on its own right or as test stand for detector developments. This contribution will describe the goals and the concept of the facility and the status of the R&D.

  17. The initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking in AISI 4340 and 3.5 Ni?Cr?Mo?V rotor steel in constant load tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Oehlert; A. Atrens

    1996-01-01

    Constant load tests with smooth tensile specimens of AISI 4340 and 3.5 Ni?Cr?Mo?V rotor steel were carried out to investigate the influence of prior creep on the initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). SCC did initiate without any significant pitting corrosion or general corrosion. A period of prior creep in a non-SCC environment resulted in significantly reduced localised corrosion along

  18. Overview of NASA White Sands Test Facility Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines the White Sands Test Facility testing of Composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV). A COPV is typically a metallic liner overwrapped with a fiber epoxy matrix. There is a weight advantage over the traditional all metal design. The presentation shows pictures of the facilities at White Sands, and then examines some of the testing performed. The tests include fluids compatibility, and Kevlar COPV. Data for the Kevlar tests are given, and an analysis is reviewed. There is also a comparison between Carbon COPVs and the Kevlar COPVs.

  19. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  20. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. 86...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.161-00 Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. The...

  1. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. 86...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.161-00 Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. The...

  2. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. 86...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.161-00 Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. The...

  3. Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

  4. Groundwater Remediation and Alternate Energy at White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Holger

    2008-01-01

    White Sands Test Facility Core Capabilities: a) Remote Hazardous Testing of Reactive, Explosive, and Toxic Materials and Fluids; b) Hypergolic Fluids Materials and Systems Testing; c) Oxygen Materials and System Testing; d) Hypervelocity Impact Testing; e)Flight Hardware Processing; and e) Propulsion Testing. There is no impact to any drinking water well. Includes public wells and the NASA supply well. There is no public exposure. Groundwater is several hundred feet below ground. No air or surface water exposure. Plume is moving very slowly to the west. Plume Front Treatment system will stop this westward movement. NASA performs on-going monitoring. More than 200 wells and zones are routinely sampled. Approx. 850 samples are obtained monthly and analyzed for over 300 different hazardous chemicals.

  5. Optimization of combustion by fuel testing in a NO x reduction test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerry J. Hesselmann

    1997-01-01

    Combustion data for a wide range of coals were obtained in a 160 kWth NOx reduction test facility (NRTF). Parametric testing was undertaken under conditions of single-stage combustion, furnace air staging and natural gas reburning. From these tests, detailed information directly applicable to large utility furnaces on the effects of coal characteristics, excess air, stoichiometry and residence time on NOx,

  6. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility (MSSTF) project test results: Phase 4A MSSTF system operation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Harrison; W. H. McCulloch

    1978-01-01

    The results of testing the Department of Energy's Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility (MSSTF) at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico are summarized. The system is a dispersed power system that collects solar energy and supplies both the electrical and thermal energy demands of a representative load. Testing was done between July 1976 and March 1978. The Phase IVA MSSTF studied

  7. LPT. Shield test facility test building interior (TAN646). Camera points ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility test building interior (TAN-646). Camera points down into interior of north pool. Equipment on wall is electronical bus used for post-1970 experiment. Personnel ladder at right. INEEL negative no. HD-40-9-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Preliminary safety evaluation (PSE) for Sodium Storage Facility at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.R.

    1994-09-30

    This evaluation was performed for the Sodium Storage Facility (SSF) which will be constructed at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the area adjacent to the South and West Dump Heat Exchanger (DHX) pits. The purpose of the facility is to allow unloading the sodium from the FFTF plant tanks and piping. The significant conclusion of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) is that the only Safety Class 2 components are the four sodium storage tanks and their foundations. The building, because of its imminent risk to the tanks under an earthquake or high winds, will be Safety Class 3/2, which means the building has a Safety Class 3 function with the Safety Class 2 loads of seismic and wind factored into the design.

  9. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amber L. Montoya; Katrina Wagner; Teresa Lynn Goering; Susan I. Koss; Stephanie A. Salinas

    2005-01-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support

  10. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  11. Assembly and installation of the large coil test facility test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, C.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) was built to test six tokamak-type superconducting coils, with three to be designed and built by US industrial teams and three provided by Japan, Switzerland, and Euratom under an international agreement. The facility is designed to test these coils in an environment which simulates that of a tokamak. The heart of this facility is the test stand, which is made up of four major assemblies: the Gravity Base Assembly, the Bucking Post Assembly, the Torque Ring Assembly, and the Pulse Coil Assembly. This paper provides a detailed review of the assembly and installation of the test stand components and the handling and installation of the first coil into the test stand.

  12. Cryosorption Pumps for a Neutral Beam Injector Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dremel, M.; Mack, A.; Day, C.; Jensen, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-04-27

    We present the experiences of the manufacturing and the operating of a system of two identical cryosorption pumps used in a neutral beam injector test facility for fusion reactors. Calculated and measured heat loads of the cryogenic liquid helium and liquid nitrogen circuits of the cryosorption pumps are discussed. The design calculations concerning the thermo-hydraulics of the helium circuit are compared with experiences from the operation of the cryosorption pumps. Both cryopumps are integrated in a test facility of a neutral beam injector that will be used to heat the plasma of a nuclear fusion reactor with a beam of deuterium or hydrogen molecules. The huge gas throughput into the vessel of the test facility results in challenging needs on the cryopumping system.The developed cryosorption pumps are foreseen to pump a hydrogen throughput of 20 - 30 mbar{center_dot}l/s. To establish a mean pressure of several 10-5 mbar in the test vessel a pumping speed of about 350 m3/s per pump is needed. The pressure conditions must be maintained over several hours pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels, which necessitates a very high pumping capacity. A possibility to fulfill these requirements is the use of charcoal coated cryopanels to pump the gasloads by adsorption. For the cooling of the cryopanels, liquid helium at saturation pressure is used and therefore a two-phase forced flow in the cryopump system must be controlled.

  13. Gas Test Loop Facilities Alternatives Assessment Report Rev 1

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Skerjanc; William F. Skerjanc

    2005-07-01

    An important task in the Gas Test Loop (GTL) conceptual design was to determine the best facility to serve as host for this apparatus, which will allow fast-flux neutron testing in an existing nuclear facility. A survey was undertaken of domestic and foreign nuclear reactors and accelerator facilities to arrive at that determination. Two major research reactors in the U.S. were considered in detail, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), each with sufficient power to attain the required neutron fluxes. HFIR routinely operates near its design power limit of 100 MW. ATR has traditionally operated at less than half its design power limit of 250 MW. Both of these reactors should be available for at least the next 30 years. The other major U.S. research reactor, the Missouri University Research Reactor, does not have sufficient power to reach the required neutron flux nor do the smaller research reactors. Of the foreign reactors investigated, BOR-60 is perhaps the most attractive. Monju and BN 600 are power reactors for their respective electrical grids. Although the Joyo reactor is vigorously campaigning for customers, local laws regarding transport of radioactive material mean it would be very difficult to retrieve test articles from either Japanese reactor for post irradiation examination. PHENIX is scheduled to close in 2008 and is fully booked until then. FBTR is limited to domestic (Indian) users only. Data quality is often suspect in Russia. The only accelerator seriously considered was the Fuel and Material Test Station (FMTS) currently proposed for operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum in FMTS is similar to that found in a fast reactor, but it has a pronounced high-energy tail that is atypical of fast fission reactor spectra. First irradiation in the FMTS is being contemplated for 2008. Detailed review of these facilities resulted in the recommendation that the ATR would be the best host for the GTL.

  14. Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST): MIST Facility Functional Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, T F; Koksal, C G; Moskal, T E; Rush, G C; Gloudemans, J R [Babcock and Wilcox Co. (USA)

    1991-04-01

    The Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST) is part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox designed plants. MIST is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST was specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the Once Through Integral System (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and OTIS are used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST Functional Specification documents as-built design features, dimensions, instrumentation, and test approach. It also presents the scaling basis for the facility and serves to define the scope of work for the facility design and construction. 13 refs., 112 figs., 38 tabs.

  15. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 2: Air breathing engine test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Heckart, M. V.; Brown, K. R.

    1971-01-01

    The inventory covers free jet and direct connect altitude cells, sea level static thrust stands, sea level test cells with ram air, and propulsion wind tunnels. Free jet altitude cells and propulsion wind tunnels are used for evaluation of complete inlet-engine-exhaust nozzle propulsion systems under simulated flight conditions. These facilities are similar in principal of operation and differ primarily in test section concept. The propulsion wind tunnel provides a closed test section and restrains the flow around the test specimen while the free jet is allowed to expand freely. A chamber of large diameter about the free jet is provided in which desired operating pressure levels may be maintained. Sea level test cells with ram air provide controlled, conditioned air directly to the engine face for performance evaluation at low altitude flight conditions. Direct connect altitude cells provide a means of performance evaluation at simulated conditions of Mach number and altitude with air supplied to the flight altitude conditions. Sea level static thrust stands simply provide an instrumented engine mounting for measuring thrust at zero airspeed. While all of these facilities are used for integrated engine testing, a few provide engine component test capability.

  16. Corrosion testing of a degraded moderator: L-Area Tuff Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    2000-03-13

    Based on test results, storage of the degraded moderator in 55-gallon 304L drums (0.065 inches thick) would not cause failure by general corrosion for up to 5 plus years storage. Acidic degraded moderator was temporarily stored in Tuff Tanks located in L-area. The moderator characteristics included a D{sub 2}O content of 5.02--5.33%, a pH of 1.25--1.31, a conductivity of 29,300--31,200 m mhos/cm, tritium activity of 114--141 m Ci/mL, and levels of approximately 6,000 ppm for chloride and 500 ppm for chromium. The compatibility of the degraded with AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) was investigated in this study. Following ASTM standard practice, coupon immersion tests were conducted in both treated and untreated moderator. Treatment included the addition of either a 40 wt % NaOH solution, distilled water to serially dilute the chloride, or concentrated nitric acid to increase the nitrate concentration. Type 304L stainless steel exposed to the Tuff Tank moderator was found from these tests to: have a general corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year (mpy) for 304L plate, which bounds that of the 304L storage drum, passivate at chloride concentrations up to 5,000 ppm for 304L sheet, resist corrosion for nitrate/chloride ratios ranging from 0.1 to 1,000, and be susceptible to crevice corrosion. Based on these test results, storage of the degraded moderator in 55-gallon 304L drums (0.065 inch thick) would not cause failure by general corrosion for up to 5+ years storage. The chloride concentration, [Cl], in the degraded moderator has been measured up to 6000 ppm. The potential or risk for aggressive localized attack of 304L increases with [Cl] concentration. A qualitative range is as follows: [Cl{sup minus}] < 150 ppm, excellent resistance, very low risk; 150 < [Cl{sup minus}] < 350 ppm, good resistance, low risk; 350 < [Cl{sup minus}] < 600 ppm, reasonable resistance, medium risk. The degraded moderator should be treated to reduce the chloride concentration to reduce the potential for localized corrosion and the risk for a leakage failure of the drum. A good practice would be to reduce the [Cl] concentration to below 250 ppm, the site standard for stainless steel. The monitoring program of these drums should continue as part of the Moderator Storage Program. More frequent inspections is a good practice as storage time increases. Long-term surveillance testing with creviced samples in actual degraded moderator should be performed in conjunction with the monitoring program, especially if the intended storage time is to exceed several years or chloride concentrations exceed 250 ppm.

  17. Hospital waste shredder test series at the DONLEE Pilot Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Robert; Sak, James

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the coal firing and coal and noninfectious hospital waste co-firing testing and emissions rates for the tests conducted at the DONLEE pilot plant facility during mid-December 1991 through early March 1992. The emissions obtained during these tests are in turn used to predict the emission rates for the proof-of-concept facility that is to be built at the Lebanon Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In addition, the reliability and performance of the waste shredding/feeding system were evaluated from this testing.

  18. Hospital waste shredder test series at the DONLEE Pilot Test Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the coal firing and coal and noninfectious hospital waste co-firing testing and emissions rates for the tests conducted at the DONLEE pilot plant facility during mid-December 1991 through early March 1992. The emissions obtained during these tests are in turn used to predict the emission rates for the proof-of-concept facility that is to be built at the Lebanon Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In addition, the reliability and performance of the waste shredding/feeding system were evaluated from this testing.

  19. Spacecraft propulsion systems test capability at the NASA White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Pleddie; Gorham, Richard

    The NASA White Sands Facility (WSTF), a component insallation of the Johnson Space Center, is located on a 94-square-mile site in southwestern New Mexico. WSTF maintains many unique capabilities to support its mission to test and evaluate spacecraft materials, components, and propulsion systems to enable the safe human exploration and utilization of space. WSTF has tested over 340 rocket engines with more than 2.5 million firings to date. Included are propulsion system testing for Apollo, Shuttle, and now Space Station as well as unmanned spacecraft such as Viking, Pioneer, and Mars Observer. This paper describes the current WSTF propulsion test facilities and capabilities.

  20. Cathodic corrosion as a facile and effective method to prepare clean metal alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Paramaconi; Tichelaar, Frans D; Koper, Marc T M; Yanson, Alexei I

    2011-11-01

    The cathodic corrosion method described here is a simple, clean, and fast way of synthesizing nanoalloys with high catalytic performance. Using a series of Pt-Rh alloys as an example, we show that this one-step method can convert a bulk alloy electrode into an aqueous suspension of nanoparticles, retaining the composition and crystal lattice structure of the starting alloy. Compared to pure metals, these alloy nanocatalysts are more active toward CO and methanol oxidation and nitrate reduction reactions. Nanoparticles made of PtRu, PtIr, PtNi, AuCo, AuCu, and FeCo bulk alloys demonstrate the universality of this synthesis method. PMID:21981303

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING RADIO-FREQUENCY MODULES TEST FACILITY OPERATING EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

    2008-03-16

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R and D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service the SRF R and D needs. The project's first stage has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single-cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at Meson Detector Building (MDB) results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  2. X-29 High Alpha Test in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Pamela J.; Owens, Lewis R.; Wahls, Richard A.; Williams, Susan

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the X-29A research program at the National Transonic Facility. This wind tunnel test leveraged the X-29A high alpha flight test program by enabling ground-to-flight correlation studies with an emphasis on Reynolds number effects. The background and objectives of this test program, as well as the comparison of high Reynolds number wind tunnel data to X-29A flight test data are presented. The effects of Reynolds number on the forebody pressures at high angles of attack are also presented. The purpose of this paper is to document this test and serve as a reference for future ground-to-flight correlation studies, and high angle-of-attack investigations. Good ground-to-flight correlations were observed for angles of attack up to 50 deg, and Reynolds number effects were also observed.

  3. Corrosion performance of alternative steam-generator materials and designs. Volume 1. Summary of corrosion tests of alternative materials and designs in two model steam generators. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Krupowicz; R. M. Rentler

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion results obtained from the post-test non-destructive and destructive examinations of two alternative-materials model steam generators are summarized and compared in this final report. The models operated under representative thermal and hydraulic and accelerated (high contaminant concentration) steam generator secondary water-chemistry conditions. One model was faulted with seawater to a level of 30 ppM chloride for 282 steaming days; the

  4. Test facility for solar-cell reference conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1976-01-01

    A test facility, intended primarily for long-term monitoring of the global insolation and its components and the concurrent solar cell performance under a wide variety of measureable atmospheric and weather conditions, is described. Instruments for the measurement of insolation, cell performance, turbidity, water vapor, and cloud cover are described. Preliminary evaluation of the hourly data base generated over a two-month period for a range of sky conditions from clear to overcast is presented.

  5. A high resolution cavity BPM for the CLIC Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chritin, N.; Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; /CERN; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In frame of the development of a high resolution BPM system for the CLIC Main Linac we present the design of a cavity BPM prototype. It consists of a waveguide loaded dipole mode resonator and a monopole mode reference cavity, both operating at 15 GHz, to be compatible with the bunch frequencies at the CLIC Test Facility. Requirements, design concept, numerical analysis, and practical considerations are discussed.

  6. Summary of the Wisconsin Test Facility effective earth conductivity measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter R. Bannister

    1976-01-01

    The effective conductivity of the geoelectrically complex Wisconsin Test Facility area has been measured by a number of different methods during the past few years. These methods include the H\\/I induction method, the wave impedance measurement technique (employing lightning discharges as the source), and two direct current methods ,the four-terminal-array in-line dipole and Schlumberger techniques). The principal results obtained from

  7. Status of Centralized Environmental Creep Testing Facility Preparation and Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL

    2006-10-01

    Because the ASME Codes do not cover environmental issues that are crucial in the design and construction of VHTR system, investigation of long-term impure helium effects on metallurgical stability and properties becomes very important. The present report describes the development of centralized environmental creep testing facility, its close collaborations with the experiments in low velocity helium recirculation loop, important lessons learned, upgrades in system design in FY06, and current status of the development.

  8. OPERATING EXPERIENCE WITH SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES AT THE TESLA TEST FACILITY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolf-Dietrich Möller

    A description of the TESLA Test Facility (1), which has been set up at DESY by the T eV Energy Superconducting Accelerator (TESLA) (2) collaboration, will be given as it is now after five years of installation and operation. The experience with the first three modules, each containing 8 superconducting 9-cell cavities, installed and operated in the TTF-linac will be

  9. Low toxicity corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, P.; Naraghi, A.R.; Saffer, C.E. [Champion Technologies, Inc., Fresno, TX (United States)

    1996-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and testing of low toxicity corrosion inhibitors. New chemistries have been investigated with respect to corrosion protection and impact on the marine environment. The resulting chemicals, while they are effective corrosion inhibitors, present significant improvements in terms of environmental properties over current products. The discussion includes results of the corrosion inhibition, toxicity, biodegradability and partitioning studies.

  10. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the General Electric GEGAS 25 ton/day coal gasification process development unit

    SciTech Connect

    Yurkewycz, R.

    1985-01-31

    Alloys were evaluated in the GEGAS 25 ton/day coal gasification pilot plant operating at 300 psig (2.1 MPa gauge). The exposure period lasted for approximately 500 h under gasification conditions. Coupons were exposed in the gasifier (below the bottom grate and in the off-gas) and spray-quench vessel. Ferritic alloy 18Cr-2Mo was the best performing alloy (<20 mpy (0.5 mm/y)) in the air-superheated steam (temperature range: 500/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/ to 538/sup 0/C)) environment in the ash pit below the grate assembly. Austenitic alloys Types 304 and 316 underwent stress-corrosion cracking. Irregular corrosion and pitting attack were the modes of corrosion for martenstic alloy Type 410, low-alloy steels 5Cr-0.5Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo, and carbon steel A515. Their corrosion rates were >100 mpy (2.5 mm/y). In the gasifier off-gas test location, alloys Incoloy 800, Incoloy 825, and 20Cb-3 gave the best corrosion performance in the low-Btu product gas. Alloys 18-18-2, 18Cr-2Mo, and Type 321 experienced corrosion losses due to scaling; intergranular corrosion was experienced by Types 304 and 316. Operating temperatures ranged from 1000/sup 0/ to 1200/sup 0/F (538/sup 0/ to 649/sup 0/C). Process conditions were much milder for alloy coupons in the spray-quench vessel during 500 h exposure. High-alloy steels (18-18-2, 18Cr-2Mo, Types 304 and 316) experienced little corrosion at 350/sup 0/ to 400/sup 0/F (177/sup 0/ to 204/sup 0/C) in the vapor phase. The performances of carbon steel A515 and cast iron A278 were unacceptable since corrosion rates were >30 mpy (0.8 mm/y). 13 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Space Propulsion Research Facility (B-2): An Innovative, Multi-Purpose Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gerald M.; Weaver, Harold F.; Kudlac, Maureen T.; Maloney, Christian T.; Evans, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is designed to hot fire rocket engines or upper stage launch vehicles with up to 890,000 N force (200,000 lb force), after environmental conditioning of the test article in simulated thermal vacuum space environment. As NASA s third largest thermal vacuum facility, and the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of propellant, it is uniquely suited to support developmental testing associated with large lightweight structures and Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, as well as non-traditional propulsion test programs such as Electric and In-Space propulsion. B-2 has undergone refurbishment of key subsystems to support the NASA s future test needs, including data acquisition and controls, vacuum, and propellant systems. This paper details the modernization efforts at B-2 to support the Nation s thermal vacuum/propellant test capabilities, the unique design considerations implemented for efficient operations and maintenance, and ultimately to reduce test costs.

  12. Safety review of Fast Flux Test Facility irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Van Keuren, J.C.; Stepnewski, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy facilities are required to operate within the boundaries established in a facility-specific final safety analysis report (FSAR). The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-MW(thermal) sodium-cooled reactor operated for the DOE by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The FFTF FSAR was based on a reference core loading that did not include irradiation experiments. In order to permit the irradiation of experiments, special safety review procedures are required. This paper describes the safety review criteria and the procedures used for the safety evaluation of experiments and summarizes the results to date. Over 100 experiments have been irradiated in the FFTF. Experiments have included advanced oxide, carbide, nitride, and metal fuel tests with a variety of different designs and cladding and duct materials. Nonfuel material tests and control rod experiments have also been irradiated. Documented, auditable, comprehensive safety evaluations have been performed for all experiments, confirming compliance with all safety limits.

  13. Testing hot cell shielding in the fuel conditioning facility.

    PubMed

    Courtney, J C; Klann, R T

    1997-01-01

    A comprehensive shield test program for a hot cell complex, the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, has been completed with minimum radiation exposure to participants. The recently modified shielding design for two hot cells and their associated transfer paths for irradiated materials was analyzed and tested for attenuating gamma rays from mixed fission product sources. Testing was accomplished using 0.37 TBq (10 Ci) and 518 TBq (14,000 Ci) 60Co sources. Of specific concern were radiation levels around wall penetrations and the interface between transport casks and the cell floor. Detailed measurements were made for surfaces that bound the hot cells, a transfer tunnel between the two cells, and storage pits that extend below the floors of both cells. In addition to surface measurements, dose equivalent rates in adjacent corridors were determined when the larger source was exposed. Results indicate that with some administrative controls, the facility shields are adequate to meet the design criterion that limits annual dose to less than 10 mSv (1 rem) for facility workers. PMID:8972838

  14. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Facilities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; Raymond V. Furstenau

    2007-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These different capabilities include passive sealed capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. The ATR has enhanced capabilities in experiment monitoring and control systems for instrumented and/or temperature controlled experiments. The control systems utilize feedback from thermocouples in the experiment to provide a custom blended flowing inert gas mixture to control the temperature in the experiments. Monitoring systems have also been utilized on the exhaust gas lines from the experiment to monitor different parameters, such as fission gases for fuel experiments, during irradiation. ATR’s unique control system provides axial flux profiles in the experiments, unperturbed by axially positioned control components, throughout each reactor operating cycle and over the duration of test programs requiring many years of irradiation. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 1.6 cm (0.625 inches) to 12.7 cm (5.0 inches) over an active core length of 122 cm (48.0 inches). Thermal and fast neutron fluxes can be adjusted radially across the core depending on the needs of individual test programs. This paper will discuss the different irradiation capabilities available and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. Examples of different experiments will also be discussed to demonstrate the use of the capabilities and facilities at ATR for performing irradiation experiments.

  15. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  16. Report on Electrochemcial Corrosion Testing of 241-SY-102 Grab Samples from the 2012 Grab Sampling Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrwas, Richard B.; Lamothe, Margaret E.

    2013-05-30

    This report describes the results of the electrochemical testing performed on tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples that were collected in support of corrosion mitigation. The objective of the work presented here was to determine corrosion resistance of tank SY-102 to the grab samples collected using electrochemical methods up to 50°C as well as to satisfy data quality objectives. Grab samples were collected at multiple elevations from Riser 003. The electrochemical corrosion testing was planned to consist of linear polarization resistance testing (LPR) and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) testing at 50°C. The temperature would be lowered to 40 °C and the test repeated if the CPP curve indicated pitting corrosion at 50°C. Ifno pitting was indicated by the CPP curve, then a duplicate scan would be repeated at 50°C to confirm the first result. The testing would be complete if the duplicate CPP scan was consistent with the first. This report contains the CPP results of the testing of grab sample 2SY-12-03 and 2SY-12-03DUP composite sample tested under these conditions. There was no indication of pitting at 50°C, and the duplicate scan was in agreement with the first scan. Since no further testing was required, a third scan with a shorter rest time was performed and is present in this report.

  17. Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

    2009-08-01

    The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

  18. Facility for generating crew waste water product for ECLSS testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buitekant, Alan; Roberts, Barry C.

    1990-01-01

    An End-use Equipment Facility (EEF) has been constructed which is used to simulate water interfaces between the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and man systems. The EEF is used to generate waste water to be treated by ECLSS water recovery systems. The EEF will also be used to close the water recovery loop by allowing test subjects to use recovered hygiene and potable water during several phases of testing. This paper describes the design and basic operation of the EEF.

  19. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1990-01-01

    The design of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is presented including the design goals and computational results. The heart of the system is a radiofrequency electron gun utilizing a photo-excited metal cathode followed by a conventional electron linac. The Nd:YAG laser used to drive the cathode with 6 ps long pulses can be synchronized to a high peak power CO{sub 2} laser in order to study laser acceleration of electrons. Current operational status of the project will be presented along with early beam tests.

  20. Development of a Test Facility for Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Sao-Dung; Lin, Amy; Campbell, Melissa; Smith, Frederick; Curley, Su

    2007-01-01

    Development of new air revitalization system (ARS) technology can initially be performed in a subscale laboratory environment, but in order to advance the maturity level, the technology must be tested in an end-to-end integrated environment. The Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation Facility (ARTEF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center serves as a ground test bed for evaluating emerging ARS technologies in an environment representative of spacecraft atmospheres. At the center of the ARTEF is a hypobaric chamber which serves as a sealed atmospheric chamber for closed loop testing. A Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) was custom-built to simulate the consumption of oxygen, and production of carbon dioxide, moisture and heat of up to eight persons. A multitude of gas analyzers and dew point sensors are used to monitor the chamber atmosphere upstream and downstream of a test article. A robust vacuum system is needed to simulate the vacuum of space. A reliable data acquisition and control system is required to connect all the subsystems together. This paper presents the capabilities of the integrated test facility and some of the issues encountered during the integration.

  1. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  2. Development of an underwater spin facility for combined environment testing

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Nusser, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    In response to a request from the US Government, Sandia National Laboratories has developed an instrumentation system to monitor the conditions along an underwater, rotating drive shaft. It was desired to study the structural integrity and signal acquisition capabilities of the Shaft Instrumentation System (SIS) in an environment which closely simulates the actual deployment conditions. In this manner, the SIS response to ill-defined conditions, such as flow field turbulence or temperature fluctuations, could be determined. An Underwater Spin Facility was developed in order to verify the operation of the instrumentation and telemetric data acquisition system in a combined environment of external pressure, transient axial loads and centrifugal force. The main components of the Underwater Spin Facility are a large, five foot diameter pressure vessel, a dynamically sealed shaft, a drive train assembly and a shaker table interface which is used to apply the axial loads. This paper presents a detailed description of the design of the Underwater Spin Facility. It also discusses the SIS certification test program in order to demonstrate the successful performance of the Underwater Spin Facility. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Atomic Oxygen Lamp Cleaning Facility Fabricated and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sechkar, Edward A.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Atomic Oxygen Lamp Cleaning Facility was designed to produce an atomic oxygen plasma within a metal halide lamp to remove carbon-based contamination. It is believed that these contaminants contribute to the high failure rate realized during the production of these lamps. The facility is designed to evacuate a metal halide lamp and produce a radio frequency generated atomic oxygen plasma within it. Oxygen gas, with a purity of 0.9999 percent and in the pressure range of 150 to 250 mtorr, is used in the lamp for plasma generation while the lamp is being cleaned. After cleaning is complete, the lamp can be backfilled with 0.9999-percent pure nitrogen and torch sealed. The facility comprises various vacuum components connected to a radiation-shielded box that encloses the bulb during operation. Radiofrequency power is applied to the two parallel plates of a capacitor, which are on either side of the lamp. The vacuum pump used, a Leybold Trivac Type D4B, has a pumping speed of 4-m3/hr, has an ultimate pressure of <8x10-4, and is specially adapted for pure oxygen service. The electronic power supply, matching network, and controller (500-W, 13.56-MHz) used to supply the radiofrequency power were purchased from RF Power Products Inc. Initial test results revealed that this facility could remove the carbon-based contamination from within bulbs.

  4. Experimental Validation: Subscale Aircraft Ground Facilities and Integrated Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Roger M.; Hostetler, Robert W., Jr.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Belcastro, Celeste M.; Belcastro, Christine M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental testing is an important aspect of validating complex integrated safety critical aircraft technologies. The Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) Testbed is being developed at NASA Langley to validate technologies under conditions that cannot be flight validated with full-scale vehicles. The AirSTAR capability comprises a series of flying sub-scale models, associated ground-support equipment, and a base research station at NASA Langley. The subscale model capability utilizes a generic 5.5% scaled transport class vehicle known as the Generic Transport Model (GTM). The AirSTAR Ground Facilities encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for the GTM testbed. The ground facilities support remote piloting of the GTM aircraft, and include all subsystems required for data/video telemetry, experimental flight control algorithm implementation and evaluation, GTM simulation, data recording/archiving, and audio communications. The ground facilities include a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, capable of deployment to remote sites when conducting GTM flight experiments. The ground facilities also include a laboratory based at NASA LaRC providing near identical capabilities as the mobile command/operations center, as well as the capability to receive data/video/audio from, and send data/audio to the mobile command/operations center during GTM flight experiments.

  5. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas grins, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  6. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Gray, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California, The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a 'National Asset' by the DoD, The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  7. Corrosion Test Results for Inconel 600 vs Inconel-Stainless UG Bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    The Conversion Project (CP) of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involves converting slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U to a stable form for safe storage. The operation is performed within a few vessels interconnected by valves and 1/2-in. metal tubing. During this conversion, a particularly toxic and corrosive by-product is formed, namely aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF). The production of HF is a result of the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6} and subsequent steam treatments of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. For each mole of UF{sub 6} converted, 6 mol of HF are produced. The HF that forms during conversion combines with water to produce approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt % HF. As this mixture is transferred within the process system, the tubing and valves are exposed to high concentrations of HF in liquid and vapor form. Of particular concern in the system are the almost 30 valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. For these valves, a vendor-supplied UG valve was installed. UG valves consist of an Alloy 400 (Monel) body and stem tip and Alloy 600 (Inconel) bellows. These valves have been used under experimental conditions that simulate the CP. It has been established that they have a finite life when exposed to a HF and air environment. Most failures were seen around the flange at the bottom of the bellows, and it was suspected that this flange and the weld material were not Inconel. In December 2001, the vendor confirmed that this flange was not Inconel but instead was stainless steel 316. After discussions between the vendor and ORNL staff involved with the CP effort, it was decided that the entire wetted area of the bellows would be fabricated from Alloy 600. In March 2002, four newly fabricated bellows assemblies were received from the vendor for the purposes of corrosion testing in HF. This report presents results from the corrosion tests conducted to determine if the new design of the bellows would enhance their corrosion resistance.

  8. ROSA/AP600 testing: Facility modifications and initial test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kukita, Y.; Yonomoto, T.; Asaka, H.; Nakamura, H.; Kumamaru, H.; Anoda, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Boucher, T.J.; Ortiz, M.G.; Shaw, R.A.; Schultz, R.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have entered a cooperative research agreement to perform a series of high-pressure integral tests on the safety response of the Westinghouse AP600 design using the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of JAERI. The primary objective of this test series is to provide thermal/hydraulic data of phenomena that would be expected during an AP600 transient; that data will then be used for assessment of safety analysis codes. The USNRC funded the necessary facility modifications which have been completed.

  9. Modification of Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility for Rapid Testing of CICC

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Daniel R [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, John L [ORNL] [ORNL; Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL] [ORNL; Kenney, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    This document describes preliminary design modifications to the CSMC Test Facility in JAEA, Naka, Japan that will allow rapid test and change-out of CS conductor samples while simultaneously achieving more precise and reliable characterization of those samples than is presently achievable elsewhere. The current philosophy for CS conductor testing is to test an Insert in CSMC followed by SULTAN testing. The SULTAN facility has very short length in field and a short length between the High Field Zone and the joints. This makes it difficult to obtain uniform distribution of current in the cable at low voltage levels, which defines the current sharing temperature. In a real magnet, like ITER CS, there is a long length of conductor in the highest field. Such conditions provide a more uniform current distribution near current sharing. The modified facility will serve as an economical tool for ITER conductor testing. The test item will be a three turn sample, approximately 15 m long, placed in the background field of the CSMC. This new mode of operation will reduce the time of cool-down, warm-up and installation of the sample into the CSMC facility, which should significantly reduce the cost of a test per sample.

  10. High-Temperature Gas-Stream Cleanup Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, D.; Chiang, Ta-Kuan, Schultz, J.

    1996-12-31

    In support of METC`s hot-gas filter development program, the high- temperature, gas-stream cleanup test facility was designed to: investigate conventional and novel approaches to high-temperature filtration; conduct detailed parametric studies that characterize particulate control devices under well-controlled conditions; and screen new materials for other high-temperature applications, such as heat exchanger tubes. This new facility utilizes a natural gas-fueled combustor to produce high-temperature process gas, and a screw feeder to inject ash, or other fine media, into the gas stream. The vessel that surrounds the particulate control devices has an inside diameter of roughly 0.20 meters (8 inches) and is about 3 meters (10 feet) long. Three commercial-size filter elements can be tested simultaneously, and the facility is capable of operating over a wide range of conditions. Operating temperatures can vary from 540 to 870{degrees}C (1,000 to 1,600 {degrees}F), and the operating pressure can vary from 0 to 400 kPa (0 to 60 psig).

  11. Evaluation of Geopolymer Concrete for Rocket Test Facility Flame Deflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Montes, Carlos; Islam, Rashedul; Allouche, Erez

    2014-01-01

    The current paper presents results from a combined research effort by Louisiana Tech University (LTU) and NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a new alumina-silicate based cementitious binder capable of acting as a high performance refractory material with low heat ablation rate and high early mechanical strength. Such a binder would represent a significant contribution to NASA's efforts to develop a new generation of refractory 'hot face' liners for liquid or solid rocket plume environments. This project was developed as a continuation of on-going collaborations between LTU and SSC, where test sections of a formulation of high temperature geopolymer binder were cast in the floor and walls of Test Stand E-1 Cell 3, an active rocket engine test stand flame trench. Additionally, geopolymer concrete panels were tested using the NASA-SSC Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) thruster, where supersonic plume environments were generated on a 1ft wide x 2ft long x 6 inch deep refractory panel. The DTF operates on LOX/GH2 propellants producing a nominal thrust of 1,200 lbf and the combustion chamber conditions are Pc=625psig, O/F=6.0. Data collected included high speed video of plume/panel area and surface profiles (depth) of the test panels measured on a 1-inch by 1-inch giving localized erosion rates during the test. Louisiana Tech conducted a microstructure analysis of the geopolymer binder after the testing program to identify phase changes in the material.

  12. 21 CFR 58.47 - Facilities for handling test and control articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01... false Facilities for handling test and control articles...47 Section 58.47 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...58.47 Facilities for handling test and control...

  13. The ERDA/LeRC Photovoltaic Systems Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The ERDA/LeRC Photovoltaic Systems Test Facility (STF) provides a vital support function to the overall ERDA National Solar Photovoltaic Program. It allows preliminary investigation and checkout of components, subsystems, and complete photovoltaic systems before installation in actual service. The STF can also be used to determine optimum system configurations and operating modes. A facility description is presented, taking into account the solar cell array, the energy storage equipment, the power conditioning equipment, electric utility distribution network and loads, and instrumentation and data acquisition systems. Safety procedures which have been set up for maintenance and inspection of the solar array are discussed. Attention is also given to a number of investigations regarding the effect of environmental factors on solar cell array operation.

  14. Pyroprocessing of Fast Flux Test Facility Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    B.R. Westphal; G.L. Fredrickson; G.G. Galbreth; D. Vaden; M.D. Elliott; J.C. Price; E.M. Honeyfield; M.N. Patterson; L. A. Wurth

    2013-10-01

    Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electrorefined uranium products exceeded 99%.

  15. ICH antenna development on the ORNL RF test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Haste, G.R.; Hoffman, D.J.; Livesey, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    A compact resonant loop antenna is installed on the ORNL Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF). Facility characteristics include a steady-state magnetic field of approx. =0.5 T at the antenna, microwave-generated plasmas with n/sub e/approx. =10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub e/approx. =8 eV, and 100 kW of 25-MHz rf power. The antenna is tunable from approx.22--75 MHz, is designed to handle greater than or equal to1 MW of rf power, and can be moved 5 cm with respect to the port flange. Antenna characteristics reported and discussed include the effect of magnetic field on rf voltage breakdown at the capacitor, the effects of magnetic field and plasma on rf voltage breakdown between the radiating element and the Faraday shield, the effects of graphite on Faraday shield losses, and the efficiency of coupling to the plasma.

  16. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  17. ICH antenna development on the ORNL RF Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Haste, G.R.; Hoffman, D.J.; Livesey, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A compact resonant loop antenna is installed on the ORNL Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF). Facility characteristics include a steady-state magnetic field of {approx} 0.5 T at the antenna, microwave-generated plasmas with n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} {approx} 8 eV, and 100 kW of 25-MHz rf power. The antenna is tunable from {approximately}22--75 MHz, is designed to handle {ge}1 MW of rf power, and can be moved 5 cm with respect to the port flange. Antenna characteristics reported and discussed include the effect of magnetic field on rf voltage breakdown at the capacitor, the effects of magnetic field and plasma on rf voltage breakdown between the radiating element and the Faraday shield, the effects of graphite on Faraday shield losses, and the efficiency of coupling to the plasma. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    E-print Network

    McGee, M W; Martinez, A; Pischalnikov, Y; Schappert, W

    2012-01-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule #1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  19. NASA/Princeton digital avionics flight test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, D. R.; Bryant, W. H.; Stengel, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a general-aviation digital avionics flight-test facility being jointly developed by the Flight Dynamics Laboratory of Princeton University and NASA/Langley Research Center. This facility consists of the Princeton avionics research aircraft (ARA) and NASA/Langley's digital avionics research (DARE) system. The ARA is a fully instrumented five-degree-of-freedom fly-by-wire aircraft. The DARE system contains a state-of-the-art flight computer system and receiving equipment that permits use of the NASA/Wallops Flight Center's position-tracking ground-based display-generation and ground-to-air digital-data-link equipment. The DARE/ARA system will be used for flight evaluation of advanced control, guidance, and display concepts developed as part of NASA/Langley Research Center's general aviation terminal area operations program.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Corrosion testing of type 304L stainless steel in tuff groundwater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Haberman, J.H.

    1987-11-01

    The stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of Type 304L stainless steel (SS) to elevated temperatures in tuff rock and tuff groundwater environments was determined under irradiated and nonirradiated conditions using U-bend specimens and slow-strain-rate tests. The steel was tested both in the solution-annealed condition and after sensitization heat treatments. The material was found to be susceptible to SCC in both the solution-annealed and solution-annealed-and-sensitized conditions when exposed to an irradiated crushed tuff rock environment containing air and water vapor at 90{sup 0}C. A similar exposure at 50{sup 0}C did not result in failure after a 25-month test duration. Specimens of sensitized 304 SS conditioned with a variety of sensitization heat treatments resisted failure during a test of 1-year duration in which a nonirradiated environment of tuff rock and groundwater held at 200{sup 0}C was allowed to boil to dryness on a cyclical basis. All specimens of sensitized 304 SS exposed to this environment failed. Slow-strain-rate studies were performed on 304L, 304, and 316L SS specimens. The 304L SS was tested in J-13 well water at 150{sup 0}C, and the 316L SS at 95{sup 0}C. Neither material showed evidence of SCC in these tests. Sensitized 304 SS did exhibit SCC in J-13 well water in tests conducted at 150{sup 0}C. 12 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. An Integration Testing Facility for the CERN Accelerator Controls System

    E-print Network

    Stapley, N; Bau, J C; Deghaye, S; Dehavay, C; Sliwinski, W; Sobczak, M

    2009-01-01

    A major effort has been invested in the design, development, and deployment of the LHC Control System. This large control system is made up of a set of core components and dependencies, which although tested individually, are often not able to be tested together on a system capable of representing the complete control system environment, including hardware. Furthermore this control system is being adapted and applied to CERN's whole accelerator complex, and in particular for the forthcoming renovation of the PS accelerators. To ensure quality is maintained as the system evolves, and toimprove defect prevention, the Controls Group launched a project to provide a dedicated facility for continuous, automated, integration testing of its core components to incorporate into its production process. We describe the project, initial lessons from its application, status, and future directions.

  3. Analyses of Control Surface Seal Tested in the Ames Arc Jet Tunnel (Panel Test Facility)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alton J. Reich; Mahesh Athavale; Patrick H. Dunlap Jr.; Bruce M. Steinetz; Daniel P. Breen; Malcolm G. Robbie

    2002-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Rope Seal; 2) Improvements to porous medial simulation in CFD-ACE+; 3) Porous media heat transfer validation case-stead-state and transient flat plate; 4) Simulation of GRC cold flow seal test fixture; 5) Simulation of calibration plate in the Panel Test Facility (PTF); and 6) Simulation of rope seal test in the PTF. This paper is in viewgraph

  4. Three-axis electron-beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Ebihara, B. T.

    1981-03-01

    An electron beam test facility, which consists of a precision multidimensional manipulator built into an ultra-high-vacuum bell jar, was designed, fabricated, and operated at Lewis Research Center. The position within the bell jar of a Faraday cup which samples current in the electron beam under test, is controlled by the manipulator. Three orthogonal axes of motion are controlled by stepping motors driven by digital indexers, and the positions are displayed on electronic totalizers. In the transverse directions, the limits of travel are approximately + or - 2.5 cm from the center with a precision of 2.54 micron (0.0001 in.); in the axial direction, approximately 15.0 cm of travel are permitted with an accuracy of 12.7 micron (0.0005 in.). In addition, two manually operated motions are provided, the pitch and yaw of the Faraday cup with respect to the electron beam can be adjusted to within a few degrees. The current is sensed by pulse transformers and the data are processed by a dual channel box car averager with a digital output. The beam tester can be operated manually or it can be programmed for automated operation. In the automated mode, the beam tester is controlled by a microcomputer (installed at the test site) which communicates with a minicomputer at the central computing facility. The data are recorded and later processed by computer to obtain the desired graphical presentations.

  5. Electromagnetic test-facility characterization: An identification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zicker, J. E.; Candy, J. V.

    1982-12-01

    The response of an object subjected to high energy, transient electromagnetic (EM) fields sometimes called electromagnetic pulses (EMP), is an important issue in the survivability of electronic systems (e.g., aircraft), especially when the field is generated by a high altitude nuclear burst. The characterization of transient response information is a matter of national concern. Techniques to: (1) improve signal processing at a test facility; and (2) parameterize a particular object response are discussed. The application of identification based signal processing techniques to improve signal levels is considered. Models of test equipment are identified and used to deconvolve the input/output sequences for the object under test. A parametric model of the object is identified from this data. The model can be used to extrapolate the response to these threat level EMP. Also discussed is the development of a facility simulator (EMSIM) useful for experimental design and calibration and a deconvolution algorithm (DECONV) useful for removing probe effects from the measured data.

  6. Semi-span model testing in the national transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokani, Ndaona

    1994-01-01

    The present work was motivated by an ongoing research program at NASA Langley Research Center to develop a semi-span testing capability for the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This test technique is being investigated as a means to design and optimize high-lift devices at flight Reynolds numbers in a ground test facility. Even though the freestream Mach numbers of interest are around .20, the flow around a transport wing with high lift devices deployed may contain regions of compressible flow. Thus to properly model the flow physics, a compressible flow solver may be required. However, the application of a compressible flow solver at low Mach numbers can be problematic. The objective of this phase of the project is to directly compare the performance of two widely used three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes solvers at low Mach numbers to both experimental data and to results obtained from an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. The geometries of interest are two isolated wings with different leading edge sweep angles. The compressible Navier-Stokes solvers chosen, TLNS3D-MB and CFL3D, which were developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), represent the current state-of-the-art in compressible 3-D Navier-Stokes solvers. The incompressible Navier-Stokes solver, INS3D-UP, developed recently at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), represents the current state-of-the-art in incompressible Navier-Stokes solvers.

  7. Three-axis electron-beam test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Ebihara, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    An electron beam test facility, which consists of a precision multidimensional manipulator built into an ultra-high-vacuum bell jar, was designed, fabricated, and operated at Lewis Research Center. The position within the bell jar of a Faraday cup which samples current in the electron beam under test, is controlled by the manipulator. Three orthogonal axes of motion are controlled by stepping motors driven by digital indexers, and the positions are displayed on electronic totalizers. In the transverse directions, the limits of travel are approximately + or - 2.5 cm from the center with a precision of 2.54 micron (0.0001 in.); in the axial direction, approximately 15.0 cm of travel are permitted with an accuracy of 12.7 micron (0.0005 in.). In addition, two manually operated motions are provided, the pitch and yaw of the Faraday cup with respect to the electron beam can be adjusted to within a few degrees. The current is sensed by pulse transformers and the data are processed by a dual channel box car averager with a digital output. The beam tester can be operated manually or it can be programmed for automated operation. In the automated mode, the beam tester is controlled by a microcomputer (installed at the test site) which communicates with a minicomputer at the central computing facility. The data are recorded and later processed by computer to obtain the desired graphical presentations.

  8. Upgrade of the BATMAN test facility for H- source development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, B.; Fröschle, M.; Falter, H.-D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.

    2015-04-01

    The development of a radio frequency (RF) driven source for negative hydrogen ions for the neutral beam heating devices of fusion experiments has been successfully carried out at IPP since 1996 on the test facility BATMAN. The required ITER parameters have been achieved with the prototype source consisting of a cylindrical driver on the back side of a racetrack like expansion chamber. The extraction system, called "Large Area Grid" (LAG) was derived from a positive ion accelerator from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) using its aperture size (ø 8 mm) and pattern but replacing the first two electrodes and masking down the extraction area to 70 cm2. BATMAN is a well diagnosed and highly flexible test facility which will be kept operational in parallel to the half size ITER source test facility ELISE for further developments to improve the RF efficiency and the beam properties. It is therefore planned to upgrade BATMAN with a new ITER-like grid system (ILG) representing almost one ITER beamlet group, namely 5 × 14 apertures (ø 14 mm). Additionally to the standard three grid extraction system a repeller electrode upstream of the grounded grid can optionally be installed which is positively charged against it by 2 kV. This is designated to affect the onset of the space charge compensation downstream of the grounded grid and to reduce the backstreaming of positive ions from the drift space backwards into the ion source. For magnetic filter field studies a plasma grid current up to 3 kA will be available as well as permanent magnets embedded into a diagnostic flange or in an external magnet frame. Furthermore different source vessels and source configurations are under discussion for BATMAN, e.g. using the AUG type racetrack RF source as driver instead of the circular one or modifying the expansion chamber for a more flexible position of the external magnet frame.

  9. Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

    1993-10-01

    At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

  10. Solvent extraction studies with low-burnup Fast Flux Test Facility fuel in the Solvent Extraction Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Bigelow, J.E.; Bond, W.D.; Chattin, F.R.; King, L.J.; Kitts, F.G.; Ross, R.G.; Stacy, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    A batch of irradiated Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel was processed for the first time in the Solvent Extraction Test Facility (SETF) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during Campaign 7. The average burnup of the fuel was only 0.2 atom %, but the cooling time was short enough ({similar_to}2 years) so that {sup 95}Zr was detected in the feed. This short cooling permitted our first measurement of {sup 95}Zr decontamination factors (DFs) without having to use tracers. No operational problems were noted in the operation of the extraction-scrubbing contactor, and low uranium and plutonium losses (< 0.01%) were measured. Fission product DFs were improved noticeably by increasing the number of scrub stages from six to eight. Two flowsheet options for making pure uranium and plutonium products (total partitioning) were tested. Each flowsheet used hydroxylamine nitrate for reducing plutonium. Good products were obtained (uranium DFs of > 10{sup 3} and plutonium DFs of > 10{sup 4}), but each flowsheet was troubled with plutonium reoxidation. Adding hydrazine and lowering the plutonium concentration lessened the problem but did not eliminate it. About 370 g of plutonium was recovered from these tests, purified by anion exchange, converted to PuO{sub 2}, and transferred to the fuel refabrication program. 7 references.

  11. Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D

    SciTech Connect

    L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

    2008-01-01

    A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and crevice corrosion cracking of the U-bend coupons; the minimal corrosion found on the cross-bead plates; and the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion found on the welded tubes. In general, the austenitic Type 301, 304 and 316 samples showed little if any corrosion after 33+-years in the soil, whereas the ferritic alloys-Type 409 and 434– showed a spectrum of corrosion.

  12. Common Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, Phillip W., Sr.; Davis, Dawn M.; Turowski, Mark P.; Holladay, Wendy T.; Hughes, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the commercial space launch industry and NASA's more recent resumption of operation of Stennis Space Center's large test facilities after thirty years of contractor control resulted in a need for a non-proprietary data acquisition systems (DAS) software to support government and commercial testing. The software is designed for modularity and adaptability to minimize the software development effort for current and future data systems. An additional benefit of the software's architecture is its ability to easily migrate to other testing facilities thus providing future commonality across Stennis. Adapting the software to other Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Centers such as MSFC, White Sands, and Plumbrook Station would provide additional commonality and help reduce testing costs for NASA. Ultimately, the software provides the government with unlimited rights and guarantees privacy of data to commercial entities. The project engaged all RPT Centers and NASA's Independent Verification & Validation facility to enhance product quality. The design consists of a translation layer which provides the transparency of the software application layers to underlying hardware regardless of test facility location and a flexible and easily accessible database. This presentation addresses system technical design, issues encountered, and the status of Stennis development and deployment.

  13. Selected Applications of Planar Imaging Velocimetry in Combustion Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Christian; Stockhausen, Guido; Voges, Melanie; Klinner, Joachim; Schodl, Richard; Hassa, Christoph; Schürmans, Bruno; Güthe, Felix

    This chapter provides an overview on the application of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) in combustion test facilities that are operated at pressures of up to 10 bar. Emphasis is placed on the experimental aspects of each application rather than the interpretation of the acquired flow-field data because many of the encountered problems and chosen solution strategies are unique to this area of velocimetry application. In particular, imaging configurations, seeding techniques, data-acquisition strategies as well as pre- and postprocessing methodologies are outlined.

  14. OFF-Stagnation point testing in plasma facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viladegut, A.; Chazot, O.

    2015-06-01

    Reentry space vehicles face extreme conditions of heat flux when interacting with the atmosphere at hypersonic velocities. Stagnation point heat flux is normally used as a reference for Thermal Protection Material (TPS) design; however, many critical phenomena also occur at off-stagnation point. This paper adresses the implementation of an offstagnation point methodology able to duplicate in ground facility the hypersonic boundary layer over a flat plate model. The first analysis using two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations is carried out to understand the limitations of this methodology when applying it in plasma wind tunnel. The results from the testing campaign at VKI Plasmatron are also presented.

  15. Model boiler testing to evaluate inhibitors for caustic induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Daret, J. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Hague (France); Paine, J.P.N. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Partridge, M.J. [Dominion Engineering Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A series of model boiler tests, using a mixture of precracked and non-precracked (virgin) tube-to-tube support plate intersections was performed. The testing supported the qualification of inhibitors for mitigating the secondary side corrosion of alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Many utilities suspect that the caustic impurities come from the feedwater. Candidate inhibitors included boric acid (as a reference), cerous acetate, and two forms of titanium dioxide: a laboratory produced titania-silica sol-gel, and manometer sized anatase The latter was combined with a 150 C pre-soaking with a titanium lactate, and was tested with and without a zeta potential treatment by sodium aluminate. Effectiveness of boric acid to prevent and retard caustic induced intergranular corrosion was confirmed in all crevice configurations (open and packed). The cerous acetate treatment multiplied by two to four the time necessary to detect a primary-to-secondary leak on virgin tubes, and reduced the propagation rate on precracked tubes. Cerium was found intimately mixed, as cerianite, with the free span and crevice deposits, when the crevices were sufficiently accessible. Due to its very low solubility and large particle size, the titania-silica sol-gel was unable to penetrate the crevices and had no effect on the degradation process. The nanometric particle size titania treatment and/or the preceding soaking with soluble titanium lactate drastically increased the titanium concentration in free span and open crevice deposit (with no added sodium aluminate, titania reacted with magnetite to form ilmenite) and showed undeniable capacity to prevent tubing degradation. Its effectiveness, in the case of packed crevices and for arresting cracks, was not so conclusive.

  16. THE INTEGRATED EQUIPMENT TEST FACILITY AT OAK RIDGE AS A NONPROLIFERATION TEST LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The apparent renaissance in nuclear power has resulted in a new focus on nonproliferation measures. There is a lot of activity in development of new measurement technologies and methodologies for nonproliferation assessment. A need that is evolving in the United States is for facilities and test loops for demonstration of new technologies. In the late 1970s, the Fuel Recycle Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged in advanced reprocessing technology development. As part of the program, the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was constructed as a test bed for advanced technology. The IET was a full-scale demonstration facility, operable on depleted uranium, with a throughput capacity for 0.5 Mt/d. At the front end, the facility had a feed surge vessel, input accountability tank, and feed vessel for the single cycle of solvent extraction. The basic solvent extraction system was configured to use centrifugal contactors for extraction and scrub and a full-size pulsed column for strip. A surge tank received the solvent extraction product solution and fed a continuous operating thermo-syphon-type product evaporator. Product receiving and accountability vessels were available. Feed material could be prepared using a continuous rotary dissolve or by recycling the product with adjustment as new feed. Continuous operations 24/7 could be realized with full chemical recovery and solvent recycle systems in operation. The facility was fully instrumented for process control and operation, and a full solution monitoring application had been implemented for safeguards demonstrations, including actual diversion tests for sensitivity evaluation. A significant effort for online instrument development was a part of the program at the time. The fuel recycle program at Oak Ridge ended in the early 1990s, and the IET facility was mothballed. However, the equipment and systems remain and could be returned to service to support nonproliferation demonstrations. This paper discusses the status of the facility and operations.

  17. Preserving physics knowledge at the fast flux test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, D.; Omberg, R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Makenas, B. J. [Ares Corporation, M/S A3-06, 825 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Nielsen, D. L.; Nelson, J. V. [Indian Eyes, LLC, 2815 Saint Andrews Loop, Pasco, WA 99301 (United States); Polzin, D. L. [CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company, M/S S2-42, P.O. Box 1600, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    One of the goals of the Dept. of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy, initiated under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) and continued under the Advanced Reactor Concepts Program (ARC) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) that could support the development of an environmentally and economically sound nuclear fuel cycle. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent LMR to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992, and was designed as a fully instrumented test reactor with on-line, real time test control and performance monitoring of components and tests installed in the reactor. The 10 years of operation of the FFTF provided a very useful framework for testing the advances in LMR safety technology based on passive safety features that may be of increased importance to new designs after the events at Fukushima. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, and startup of the reactor, as well as on preserving information obtained from 10 years of successful operating history and extensive irradiation testing of fuels and materials. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has sequestered reports, files, tapes, and drawings to allow for secure retrieval. A disciplined and orderly approach has been developed to respond to client's requests for documents and data in order to minimize the search effort and ensure that future requests for this information can be readily accommodated. (authors)

  18. Consolidated Incineration Facility metals partitioning test. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.

    1993-08-31

    Test burns were conducted at Energy and Environmental Research Corporation`s rotary kiln simulator, the Solid Waste Incineration Test Facility, using surrogate CIF wastes spiked with hazardous metals and organics. The primary objective for this test program was measuring heavy metals partition between the kiln bottom ash, scrubber blowdown solution, and incinerator stack gas. Also, these secondary waste streams were characterized to determine waste treatment requirements prior to final disposal. These tests were designed to investigate the effect of several parameters on metals partitioning: incineration temperature; waste chloride concentration; waste form (solid or liquid); and chloride concentration in the scrubber water. Tests were conducted at three kiln operating temperatures. Three waste simulants were burned, two solid waste mixtures (paper, plastic, latex, and one with and one without PVC), and a liquid waste mixture (containing benzene and chlorobenzene). Toxic organic and metal compounds were spiked into the simulated wastes to evaluate their fate under various combustion conditions. Kiln offgases were sampled for volatile organic compounds (VOC), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC), polychlorinated dibenz[p]dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF), metals, particulate loading and size distribution, HCl, and combustion products. Stack gas sampling was performed to determine additional treatment requirements prior to final waste disposal. Significant test results are summarized below.

  19. Space simulation techniques and facilities for SAX STM test campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Pietro; Raimondo, Giacomo; Messidoro, Piero

    1994-11-01

    SAX is a satellite for X-Ray astronomy. It is a major element of the overall basic Science Program of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and is being developed with the contribution of the Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programs (NIVR). The scientific objectives of SAX are to carry out systematic and comprehensive observations of celestial X-Ray sources over the 0.1 - 300 KeV energy range with special emphasis on spectral and timing measurements. The satellite will also monitor the X-Ray sky to investigate long-term source variability and to permit localization and study of X-Ray transients. Alenia Spazio is developing the satellite that is intended for launch in the second half of 1995 in a low, near-equatorial Earth orbit. At system level a Structural Thermal Model (STM) has been conceived to verify the environmental requirements by validating the mechanical and thermal analytical models and qualifying satellite structure and thermal control. In particular, the following tests have been carried out in Alenia Spazio, CEA/CESTA and ESTEC facilities: Modal Survey, Centrifuge, Acoustic, Sinusoidal/Random Vibration and Thermal Balance. The paper, after a short introduction of the SAX satellite, summarizes the environmental qualification program performed on the SAX STM. It presents test objectives, methodologies and relevant test configurations. Peculiar aspects of the test campaign are highlighted. Problems encountered and solutions adopted in performing the tests are described as well. Furthermore, test results are presented and assessed.

  20. TYPE 316 STAINLESS STEEL FORCED CONVECTION SODIUM CORROSION LOOP TESTS SSSA- 1A1, SSSA-2C2, SSSA-3C3 AND SSSA-5F1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaw

    1958-01-01

    Na was pumped through 4 test loops constructed of 316 stainless steel to ; determine the resistance of this material to corrosion and mass transfer. ; Resuits are tabulated for operating temperatures of 1050 and 1600 deg F. It was ; tentatively concluded that stainless steel has moderately good mass transfer and ; corrosion resistance; however, since the tests were

  1. Maintenance implementation plan for the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.A.

    1997-01-30

    This plan implements the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program (1994), at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The FFTF is a research and test reactor located near Richland, Washington, and is operated under contract for the DOE by the B&W Hanford Company (BWHC). The intent of this Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is to describe the manner in which the activities of the maintenance function are executed and controlled at the FFTF and how this compares to the requirements of DOE 4330.4B. The MIP ii a living document that is updated through a Facility Maintenance Self- Assessment Program. During the continuing self-assessment program, any discrepancies found are resolved to meet DOE 4330.4B requirements and existing practices. The philosophy of maintenance management at the FFTF is also describe within this MIP. This MIP has been developed based on information obtained from various sources including the following: * A continuing self-assessment against the requirements of the Conduct of Maintenance Order * In-depth reviews conducted by the members of the task team that assembled this MIP * Inputs from routine audits and appraisals conducted at the facility The information from these sources is used to identify those areas in which improvements could be made in the manner in which the facility conducts maintenance activities. The action items identified in Rev. 1 of the MIP have been completed. The MIP is arranged in six sections. Section I is this Executive Summary. Section 2 describes the facility and its 0683 history. Section 3 describes the philosophy of the graded approach and how it is applied at FFTF. Section 3 also discusses the strategy and the basis for the prioritizing resources. Section 4 contains the detailed discussion of `the elements of DOE 4330.4B and their state of implementation. Section 5 is for waivers and requested deviations from the requirements of the order. Section 6 contains a copy of the Maintenance Self-Assessment Schedule for the FFTF. In January 1997, the Secretary of Energy declared that DOE-HQ planned to place the FFTF in a hot standby condition.

  2. The OSU Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility: Standard Fuel Element Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wade R. Marcum; Brian G. Woods; Ann Marie Phillips; Richard G. Ambrosek; James D. Wiest; Daniel M. Wachs

    2001-10-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or standard fuel element (SFE), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates due to hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the fuel development program and will take place at OSU in the Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF). Discussion of a preliminary test matrix, SFE design, measurement and instrumentation techniques, and facility description are detailed in this paper.

  3. Accelerated tests for long-term prediction of corrosion in austenitic stainless steels and Ni-Fe-Cr-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, N.; Dunn, D.; Cragnolino, G. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1996-10-01

    The effect of applied potential and chloride concentration on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) and Ni-base alloys was studied. The repassivation potential, E{sub rp} for deep pits was the same as that for crevice corrosion. Laboratory tests over a two-year period and field experience have shown that the E{sub rp} is a conservative parameter to predict the occurrence of both these failure modes. For type 316L SS, the U-bend SCC test was found to be more conservative than the slow strain rates tests under controlled potential conditions for a variety of chloride concentrations. No SCC was observed below the E{sub rp}. The E{sub rp} was also found to correlate with boiling nitric acid test results and the degree of sensitization of alloy 825. The difficulties in using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests for assessing localized corrosion, of highly alloyed materials such as alloy C-22 are pointed out. This study is important for high-level nuclear waste disposal programs.

  4. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Calvin H. Delegard; Andrew J. Schmidt; Adam P. Poloski

    2007-01-01

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created

  5. Pressurized helium II-cooled magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.P.; Lambertson, G.R.; Gilbert, W.S.; Meuser, R.B.; Caspi, S.; Schafer, R.V.

    1980-06-01

    A facility for testing superconducting magnets in a pressurized bath of helium II has been constructed and operated. The cryostat accepts magnets up to 0.32 m diameter and 1.32 m length with current to 3000 A. In initial tests, the volume of helium II surrounding the superconducting magnet was 90 liters. Minimum temperature reached was 1.7 K at which point the pumping system was throttled to maintain steady temperature. Helium II reservoir temperatures were easily controlled as long as the temperature upstream of the JT valve remained above T lambda; at lower temperatures control became difficult. Positive control of the temperature difference between the liquid and cold sink by means of an internal heat source appears necessary to avoid this problem. The epoxy-sealed vessel closures, with which we have had considerable experience with normal helium vacuum, also worked well in the helium II/vacuum environment.

  6. Computer model to simulate testing at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Hannon, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the processes involved in the operation of the National Transonic Facility (NTF), a large cryogenic wind tunnel at the Langley Research Center. The simulation was verified by comparing the simulated results with previously acquired data from three experimental wind tunnel test programs in the NTF. The comparisons suggest that the computer model simulates reasonably well the processes that determine the liquid nitrogen (LN2) consumption, electrical consumption, fan-on time, and the test time required to complete a test plan at the NTF. From these limited comparisons, it appears that the results from the simulation model are generally within about 10 percent of the actual NTF test results. The use of actual data acquisition times in the simulation produced better estimates of the LN2 usage, as expected. Additional comparisons are needed to refine the model constants. The model will typically produce optimistic results since the times and rates included in the model are typically the optimum values. Any deviation from the optimum values will lead to longer times or increased LN2 and electrical consumption for the proposed test plan. Computer code operating instructions and listings of sample input and output files have been included.

  7. Knowledge Preservation at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2011-12-30

    One of the goals of the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) that could support the development of an environmentally and economically sound nuclear fuel cycle. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent LMR to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992, and was designed as a fully instrumented test reactor with on-line, real time test control and performance monitoring of components and tests installed in the reactor. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, and startup of the reactor, as well as on preserving information obtained from 10 years of successful operating history and extensive irradiation testing of fuels and materials. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has sequestered reports, files, tapes, and drawings to allow for secure retrieval. A disciplined and orderly approach has been developed to respond to client's requests for documents and data in order to minimize the search effort and ensure that future requests for this information can be readily accommodated.

  8. Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, understand, and innovate scientific and technical solutions for the challenges facing DEMO, by addressing the multi-scale synergistic interactions involving fusion plasma material interactions, tritium fuel cycle, power extraction, and the nuclear effects on materials. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of 19 MW. If and when this research operation is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and 76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate- plasmas would minimize plasma-induced disruptions, helping to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all components using extensive remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for all internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post with RH-compatible bi-directional sliding joints. Such device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum seal welds behind the internal and shielding components. If these further goals could be achieved, the FNSF would provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, at higher neutron fluence and duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF strategy would be complementary to the ITER and the Broader Approach programs, and thereby help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program. The key physics and technology research needed in the next decade to manage the potential risks of this FNSF are identified.

  9. FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY (FNSF) BEFORE UPGRADE TO COMPONENT TEST FACILITY (CTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Canik, John [ORNL; Diem, Stephanie J [ORNL; Milora, Stanley L [ORNL; Park, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Fogarty, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Lumsdaine, Arnold [ORNL; Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL; Yoder, III, Graydon L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, and understand the complex challenges of fusion plasma material interactions, nuclear material interactions, tritium fuel management, and power extraction. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode, Q<1)), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of ~19 MW. If and when this research is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and ~76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate-plasmas are used to minimize or eliminate plasma-induced disruptions, to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all internal components using remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for the internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post. These device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum weld seals behind the internal and shielding components. If these goals could be achieved, the FNSF would further provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, for 6 MW-yr/m2 and 30% duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF would thereby complement the ITER Program, and support and help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program. The key physics and technology research needed in the next decade to manage the potential risks of this FNSF are identified.

  10. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    HALGREN DL

    2010-03-12

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  11. Design, fabrication, and testing of the pulse coils for the Large Coil Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chipley, K.K.; Parrelli, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) will be able to test up to six large superconducting coils similar to those required for a tokamak reactor. In order to simulate the transient vertical field that will be part of the magnetic environment of an operating tokamak reactor, a set of pulse coils will be used in the facility. This set of two coils can be positioned in the bore of any of the test coils to provide a transient magnetic field to that particular coil. This paper describes the final design of the pulse coils and discusses the fabrication techniques used to build these coils. An extensive testing program has been carried out during fabrication to ensure that the coils will function satisfactorily.

  12. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  13. PFBC HGCU test facility technical progress report. First Quarter, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This is the eighteenth Technical Progress Report submitted in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. During this quarter, the Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up System operated for 835 hours during six separate test runs. The system was starting into a seventh run at the end of the quarter. Highlights of this period are summarized below: the longest run during the quarter was approximately 333 hours; filter pressure drop was stable during all test runs this quarter using spoiling air to the primary cyclone upstream of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF); the tempering air system was commissioned this quarter which enabled the unit to operate at full load conditions while limiting the gas temperature in the APF to 1,400 F; during a portion of the one run, the tempering air was removed and the filter operated without problems up to 1,450 F; ash sampling was performed by Battelle personnel upstream and downstream of the APF and ash loading and particle size distribution data were obtained, a summary report is included; a hot area on the APF head was successfully repaired in service; a hot spot on the top of an expansion joint was successfully repaired by drilling holes from the inside of the pipe and pumping in refractory insulation; a corrosion inspection program for the HGCU system was issued giving recommendations for points to inspect; filter internal inspections following test runs 13 and 17 revealed a light coating (up to 1/4 inch thick) of residual ash on the candles and some ash bridging between the dust sheds and inner rows of candles. Data from these inspections are included with this report.

  14. Corrosion test plan to guide canister material selection and design for a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ballou, L.B.

    1983-11-01

    Corrosion rates and the mode of corrosion attack form a most important basis for selection of canister materials and design of a nuclear waste package. Type 304L stainless steel was selected as the reference material for canister fabrication because of its generally excellent corrosion resistance in water, steam and air. However, 304L may be susceptible to localized and stress-assisted forms of corrosion under certain conditions. Alternative alloys are also investigated; these alloys were chosen because of their improved resistance to these forms of corrosion. The fabrication and welding processes, as well as the glass pouring operation for defense and commercial high-level wastes, may influence the susceptibility of the canister to localized and stress forms of corrosion. 12 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  15. TEST PLAN AND PROCEDURE FOR THE EXAMINATION OF TANK 241-AY-101 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    WYRWAS RB; PAGE JS; COOKE GS

    2012-04-19

    This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

  16. Thermal vacuum life test facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, R.L.; Goebel, C.J.; Amos, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy (DOE) assigned Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility, now operated by EG G Mound Applied Technologies, the responsibility for assembling and testing General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Assembled and tested were five RTGs, which included four flight units and one non-flight qualification unit. Figure 1 shows the RTG, which was designed by General Electric AstroSpace Division (GE/ASD) to produce 285 W of electrical power. A detailed description of the processes for RTG assembly and testing is presented by Amos and Goebel (1989). The RTG performance data are described by Bennett, et al. (1986). The flight units will provide electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Galileo mission to Jupiter (two RTGs) and the joint NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Ulysses mission to study the polar regions of the sun (one RTG). The remaining flight unit will serve as the spare for both missions, and a non-flight qualification unit was assembled and tested to ensure that performance criteria were adequately met. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Facility at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Michael; Martinez, Alex; Bossert, Rick; Dalesandro, Andrew; Geynisman, Michael; Hansen, Benjamin; Klebaner, Arkadiy; Makara, Jerry; Pei, Liujin; Richardson, Dave; Soyars, William; Theilacker, Jay

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current progress and near-future plans for the cryogenic system at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at Fermilab, which includes the helium compressors, refrigerators, warm vacuum compressors, gas and liquid storage, and a distribution system. CMTF will house the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), which is the front end of the proposed Project X. PXIE includes one 162.5 MHz half wave resonator (HWR) cryomodule and one 325 MHz single spoke resonator (SSR) cryomodule. Both cryomodules contain superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities and superconducting magnets operated at 2.0 K. CMTF will also support the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), which is located in the adjacent New Muon Lab (NML) building. A cryomodule test stand (CMTS1) located at CMTF will be used to test 1.3 GHz cryomodules before they are installed in the ASTA cryomodule string. A liquid helium pump and transfer line will be used to provide supplemental liquid helium to ASTA.

  18. Cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    White, Michael; Martinez, Alex; Bossert, Rick; Dalesandro, Andrew; Geynisman, Michael; Hansen, Benjamin; Klebaner, Arkadiy; Makara, Jerry; Pei, Liujin; Richardson, Dave; Soyars, William; Theilacker, Jay [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    This paper provides an overview of the current progress and near-future plans for the cryogenic system at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at Fermilab, which includes the helium compressors, refrigerators, warm vacuum compressors, gas and liquid storage, and a distribution system. CMTF will house the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), which is the front end of the proposed Project X. PXIE includes one 162.5 MHz half wave resonator (HWR) cryomodule and one 325 MHz single spoke resonator (SSR) cryomodule. Both cryomodules contain superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities and superconducting magnets operated at 2.0 K. CMTF will also support the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), which is located in the adjacent New Muon Lab (NML) building. A cryomodule test stand (CMTS1) located at CMTF will be used to test 1.3 GHz cryomodules before they are installed in the ASTA cryomodule string. A liquid helium pump and transfer line will be used to provide supplemental liquid helium to ASTA.

  19. The operator interface for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, N.C.

    1986-12-01

    The uncertain and most likely changing nature of a large experimental facility like MFTF, as well as its large number of control and monitor points, ruled against the traditional hardware approach involving walls of knobs, dials, oscilloscopes, and strip chart recorders. Rather, from the beginning, project management specified computer control of all systems, and operation of the complete MFTF under an integrated computer control system became a major engineering goal. The Integrated Controls and Diagnostics (ICADS) group was charged with the design and implementation of this control system. We designed a control system with an extremely flexible operator interface which uses computer generated CRT displays for output and pointing devices such as touch sensitive CRT overlays, mice, and joysticks for input. Construction of MFTF was completed at the end of 1985 within the project budget of $241.6M and was followed immediately by a 5 month long acceptance test. During this period (known as PACE test) operators, engineers, and physicists successfully used our computer control system daily to test MFTF. Much of their willingness to forsake the traditional hands-on hardware approach to testing was a result of the powerful and flexible operator interface to the MFTF control system. In this paper, we describe the operator interface with emphasis on the displays, the touch screens, and the mouse. We also report the experiences of users and, in particular, stress those aspects of the user interface they strongly liked and disliked.

  20. Proposed near field sonar test facility Naval Air Rework Facility, Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Trott; A. L. Vanburen

    1975-01-01

    A sonar calibration facility is designed for helicopter dipped sonar test and evaluation. Special requirements were: minimize space requirement, minimize ambient noise for low signal hydrophone calibration, treat water to increase cavitation threshold for source calibration. The nearfield calibration array technique provides an accurate, efficient calibration facility that can economically meet these special requirements.