Science.gov

Sample records for corrugated pipe culverts

  1. 15. Culvert and corrugated pipe with place of a thousand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Culvert and corrugated pipe with place of a thousand drips in background looking S. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  2. Singing Corrugated Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1974-01-01

    Presents theoretical and experimental observations made with a musical toy called Hummer consisting of a corrugated flexible plastic tube about three-feet long and one-inch diam open at both ends. Included are descriptions of three new instruments: the Water Pipe, the Gas-Pipe Corrugahorn Bugle, and the Gas-Pipe Blues Corrugahorn. (CC)

  3. Lower San Fernando corrugated metal pipe failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bardet, J.P.; Davis, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    During the January 17, 1994, Northridge earthquake, a 2.4 m diameter corrugated metal pipe was subjected to 90 m of extensive lateral crushing failure at the Lower San Fernando Dam. The dam and outlet works were reconstructed after the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake. In 1994, the dam underwent liquefaction upstream of the reconstructed berm. The pipe collapsed on the west side of the liquefied zone and a large sinkhole formed over the drain line. The failure of this drain line provides a unique opportunity to study the seismic response of buried drains and culverts.

  4. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  5. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  6. Corrugated Pipe as a Beam Dechirper

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2012-04-20

    We have studied the use of a metallic pipe with small corrugations for the purpose of passively dechirping, through its wakefield, a short, intense electron bunch. The corrugated pipe is attractive for this purpose because its wake: (i) has near maximal possible amplitude for a given aperture and (ii) has a relatively large oscillation wave length, even when the aperture is small. We showed how the corrugated structure can satisfy dechirping requirements encountered in the NGLS project at LBNL. We found that a linear chirp of -40 MeV/mm can be induced by an NGLS-like beam, by having it pass through a corrugated, metallic pipe of radius 3 mm, length 8.2 m, and corrugation parameters full depth 450 {mu}m and period 1000 {mu}m. This structure is about 15 times as effective in the role of dechirper as an S-band accelerator structure used passively.

  7. Analysis of brook trout spatial behavior during passage attempts in corrugated culverts using near-infrared illumination video imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergeron, Normand E.; Constantin, Pierre-Marc; Goerig, Elsa; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    We used video recording and near-infrared illumination to document the spatial behavior of brook trout of various sizes attempting to pass corrugated culverts under different hydraulic conditions. Semi-automated image analysis was used to digitize fish position at high temporal resolution inside the culvert, which allowed calculation of various spatial behavior metrics, including instantaneous ground and swimming speed, path complexity, distance from side walls, velocity preference ratio (mean velocity at fish lateral position/mean crosssectional velocity) as well as number and duration of stops in forward progression. The presentation summarizes the main results and discusses how they could be used to improve fish passage performance in culverts.

  8. Study of the use of truck tire beads as drainage pipe and analysis of the economics of tire disposal in Oklahoma. Part 1. Culverts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.W.; Gattis, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    In an attempt to find alternate ways of dealing with waste truck tires, a private tire recycling company developed a pipe from the tire bead and sidewall. The tire-pipe has seen limited use as a roadway drainage culvert. To encourage wider use of this product, an evaluation of pipe performance was performed. The evaluation consisted of (1) inspections of existing installations; (2) structural tests; and (3) leakage tests. The study found that the majority of installations were performing well. Compared with corrugated steel and fiberglass pipes, the tire-pipe exhibited favorable structural performance. An individual tire-pipe section was found to be watertight. However, when tested in the open-air (not in the ground), the tire-pipe joints were found to leak. Development of an improved end connection would improve the utility of the tire-pipe.

  9. Experiments on sound generation in corrugated pipes with flow.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Ulf R; Wiik, Geir A

    2007-03-01

    The article reports acoustic measurements on short corrugated pipes with flow. Such pipes might generate high sound levels associated with length resonances. One of the main objectives of the study was to estimate the location of the effective sources by studying the energy flow through the pipes. It was found that a short section of corrugations will only produce sound effectively when placed at the inflow end, while for fully corrugated pipes, the sound-producing regions are located around the pressure maxima of the observed standing waves. It was further found that the net energy flow is in the upstream direction for nearly the complete length of pipe. PMID:17407869

  10. Flow Pressure Loss through Straight Annular Corrugated Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Joseph R.; Kirk, Daniel R.; Marsell, Brandon; Roth, Jacob; Schallhorn, Paul A.; Pitchford, Brian; Weber, Chris; Bulk, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Pressure loss through annular corrugated pipes, using fully developed gaseous nitrogen representing purge pipes in spacecraft fairings, was studied to gain insight into a friction factor coefficient for these pipes. Twelve pipes were tested: four Annuflex, four Masterflex and two Titeflex with ¼”, 3/8”, ½” and ¾” inner diameters. Experimental set-up was validated using smooth-pipe and showed good agreement to the Moody diagram. Nitrogen flow rates between 0-200 standard cubic feet per hour were used, producing approximate Reynolds numbers from 300-23,000. Corrugation depth varied from 0.248 = E/D = 0.349 and relative corrugation pitch of 0.192 = P/D = 0.483. Differential pressure per unit length was measured and calculated using 8-9 equidistant pressure taps. A detailed experimental uncertainty analysis, including correlated bias error terms, is presented. Results show larger differential pressure losses than smooth-pipes with similar inner diameters resulting in larger friction factor coefficients.

  11. Terahertz Radiation from a Pipe with Small Corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2012-01-26

    We have studied through analytical and numerical methods the use of a relativistic electron bunch to drive a metallic beam pipe with small corrugations for the purpose of generating terahertz radiation. For the case of a pipe with dimensions that do not change along its length, we have shown that - with reasonable parameters - one can generate a narrow-band radiation pulse with frequency {approx}1 THz, and total energy of a few milli-Joules. The pulse length tends to be on the order of tens of picoseconds. We have also shown that, if the pipe radius is tapered along its length, the generated pulse will end up with a frequency chirp; if the pulse is then made to pass through a compressor, its final length can be reduced to a few picoseconds and its peak power increased to 1 GW. We have also shown that wall losses tend to be significant and need to be included in the structure design.

  12. Pressure drop of slush nitrogen flow in converging-diverging pipes and corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Okuyama, Jun; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are solid-liquid, two-phase fluids. As a functional thermal fluid, there are high expectations for use of slush fluids in various applications such as fuels for spacecraft engines, clean-energy fuels to improve the efficiency of transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. Experimental flow tests were performed using slush nitrogen to elucidate pressure-drop characteristics of converging-diverging (C-D) pipes and corrugated pipes. In experimental results regarding pressure drop in two different types of C-D Pipes, i.e., a long-throated pipe and a short-throated pipe, each having an inner diameter of 15 mm, pressure drop for slush nitrogen in the long-throated pipe at a flow velocity of over 1.3 m/s increased by a maximum of 50-60% as compared to that for liquid nitrogen, while the increase was about 4 times as compared to slush nitrogen in the short-throated pipe. At a flow velocity of over 1.5 m/s in the short-throated pipe, pressure drop reduction became apparent, and it was confirmed that the decrease in pressure drop compared to liquid nitrogen was a maximum of 40-50%. In the case of two different types of corrugated pipes with an inner diameter of either 12 mm or 15 mm, a pressure-drop reduction was confirmed at a flow velocity of over 2 m/s, and reached a maximum value of 37% at 30 wt.% compared to liquid nitrogen. The greater the solid fractions, the smaller the pipe friction factor became, and the pipe friction factor at the same solid fraction showed a constant value regardless of the Reynolds number. From the observation of the solid particles' behavior using a high-speed video camera and the PIV method, the pressure-drop reduction mechanisms for both C-D and corrugated pipes were demonstrated.

  13. Surface Impedance Formalism for a Metallic Beam Pipe with Small Corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, K.L.F.; /SLAC

    2012-08-30

    A metallic pipe with wall corrugations is of special interest in light of recent proposals to use such a pipe for the generation of terahertz radiation and for energy dechirping of electron bunches in free electron lasers. In this paper we calculate the surface impedance of a corrugated metal wall and show that it can be reduced to that of a thin layer with dielectric constant {epsilon} and magnetic permeability {mu}. We develop a technique for the calculation of these constants, given the geometrical parameters of the corrugations. We then calculate, for the specific case of a round metallic pipe with small corrugations, the frequency and strength of the resonant mode excited by a relativistic beam. Our analytical results are compared with numerical simulations, and are shown to agree well.

  14. Flow noise in a corrugated pipe in terms of the theory of instability waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Mironov, M. A.; Yakovets, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    An air flow through a pipe with a corrugated inner surface is accompanied by the generation of a tone (multitone), i.e., coherent, acoustic signal. The main processes giving rise to such a generation include the forced excitation of the active medium in the resonator (the pipe) and the feedback, which leads to nonlinear amplification of one or several resonator harmonics because of the nonlinear competition of waves. The medium in the pipe becomes active owing to the processes that accompany the air flow about the corrugated wall. The purpose of the present study is to provide qualitative explanations based on a simple example for the possibility of multitone sound generation, as well as for the known experimental data.

  15. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-18

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  16. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-01

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  17. Wakefield computations for a corrugated pipe as a beam dechirper for FEL applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C. K.; Bane, K. L.F.

    2015-06-09

    A beam “dechirper” based on a corrugated, metallic vacuum chamber has been proposed recently to cancel residual energy chirp in a beam before it enters the undulator in a linac-based X-ray FEL. Rather than the round geometry that was originally proposed, we consider a pipe composed of two parallel plates with corrugations. The advantage is that the strength of the wake effect can be tuned by adjusting the separation of the plates. The separation of the plates is on the order of millimeters, and the corrugations are fractions of a millimeter in size. The dechirper needs to be meters long in order to provide sufficient longitudinal wakefield to cancel the beam chirp. Considerable computation resources are required to determine accurately the wakefield for such a long structure with small corrugation gaps. Combining the moving window technique and parallel computing using multiple processors, the time domain module in the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P allows efficient determination of the wakefield through convergence studies. In this paper, we will calculate the longitudinal, dipole and quadrupole wakefields for the dechirper and compare the results with those of analytical and field matching approaches.

  18. 1. View east at west facade of culvert outlet headwall, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View east at west facade of culvert outlet headwall, above which part of the canal bank has been removed. Foreground to background: streambed and coffer dam (mound in center) that was used in dewatering the culvert; intake pipes (extreme left and right) for dewatering pumps; deteriorated culvert outlet headwall with upper portion of wall fallen away; horizontal masonry cutoff wall extending above the culvert outlet partially up the canal bank (cutoff wall was exposed by removal of part of canal bank); towpath at top of canal bank. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Six Mile Run Culvert, .2 mile South of Blackwells Mills Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  19. Brook trout passage performance through culverts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerig, Elsa; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Bergeron, Normand

    2016-01-01

    Culverts can restrict access to habitat for stream-dwelling fishes. We used passive integrated transponder telemetry to quantify passage performance of >1000 wild brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) attempting to pass 13 culverts in Quebec under a range of hydraulic and environmental conditions. Several variables influenced passage success, including complex interactions between physiology and behavior, hydraulics, and structural characteristics. The probability of successful passage was greater through corrugated metal culverts than through smooth ones, particularly among smaller fish. Trout were also more likely to pass at warmer temperatures, but this effect diminished above 15 °C. Passage was impeded at higher flows, through culverts with steep slopes, and those with deep downstream pools. This study provides insight on factors influencing brook trout capacity to pass culverts as well as a model to estimate passage success under various conditions, with an improved resolution and accuracy over existing approaches. It also presents methods that could be used to investigate passage success of other species, with implications for connectivity of the riverscape.

  20. 7. VIEW OF A DOUBLE CULVERT IN RAILROAD GRADE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF A DOUBLE CULVERT IN RAILROAD GRADE, LOOKING WEST. THIS CULVERT HAS BEEN IN PLACE SINCE 1933, WHEN IT WAS MARKED ON MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AS-BUILT PLANS. IT LOOKS LIKE THE PIPE ON THE RIGHT (NORTH) IS NOT ORIGINAL. - Great Northern Railroad Bed, From Big Sandy to Verona, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  1. 24. WEST CONFEDERATE AVENUE, DOUBLE CULVERT APPEARS TO BE "BOX", ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. WEST CONFEDERATE AVENUE, DOUBLE CULVERT APPEARS TO BE "BOX", BUT IS PIPE WITH SQUARE HEAD WALL OPENING. NOTE ARCHED TOP STYLE USED BY CCC. VIEW SE. - Gettysburg National Military Park Tour Roads, Gettysburg, Adams County, PA

  2. Singing Corrugated Pipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadwell, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes different techniques used to measure air flow velocity. The two methods used were Crawford's Wastebasket and a video camera. The results were analyzed and compared to the air flow velocity predicted by Bernoulli's principle. (ZWH)

  3. Application of a multistate model to estimate culvert effects on movement of small fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, J.R.; Hagler, M.M.; Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely acknowledged that culverted road-stream crossings may impede fish passage, effects of culverts on movement of nongame and small-bodied fishes have not been extensively studied and studies generally have not accounted for spatial variation in capture probabilities. We estimated probabilities for upstream and downstream movement of small (30-120 mm standard length) benthic and water column fishes across stream reaches with and without culverts at four road-stream crossings over a 4-6-week period. Movement and reach-specific capture probabilities were estimated using multistate capture-recapture models. Although none of the culverts were complete barriers to passage, only a bottomless-box culvert appeared to permit unrestricted upstream and downstream movements by benthic fishes based on model estimates of movement probabilities. At two box culverts that were perched above the water surface at base flow, observed movements were limited to water column fishes and to intervals when runoff from storm events raised water levels above the perched level. Only a single fish was observed to move through a partially embedded pipe culvert. Estimates for probabilities of movement over distances equal to at least the length of one culvert were low (e.g., generally ???0.03, estimated for 1-2-week intervals) and had wide 95% confidence intervals as a consequence of few observed movements to nonadjacent reaches. Estimates of capture probabilities varied among reaches by a factor of 2 to over 10, illustrating the importance of accounting for spatially variable capture rates when estimating movement probabilities with capture-recapture data. Longer-term studies are needed to evaluate temporal variability in stream fish passage at culverts (e.g., in relation to streamflow variability) and to thereby better quantify the degree of population fragmentation caused by road-stream crossings with culverts. ?? American Fisheries Society 2009.

  4. Criticality assessment of TRU burial ground culverts

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1990-09-26

    An effort to assess the criticality risks of {sup 239}Pu in TRU Burial Ground Culverts has been underway for several years. The concern arose from discrepancies in two types of monitors that have been used to assay the {sup 239}Pu waste prior to storage in 55-gallon drums that are placed in the culverts. One type is the solid waste monitor (SWM), which is based on gamma-ray measurements; the other is the neutron coincidence monitor, which is based on neutron measurements. The NCC was put into routine service after 1985 and has generally yielded higher 239 Pu assays than the SWM. Culverts with pre-1986 waste only had SWM assays of {sup 239}Pu; thus, it was questioned whether their actual {sup 239}Pu loadings could be high enough to pose criticality concerns. Studies to characterize the culvert criticality potential have included appraisal of NCC vs SWM, neutron measurements atop the culverts, gamma-ray measurements atop the culverts, and probabilistic risk analyses. Overall, these studies have implied that the culverts are critically safe; however, their results have not been examined collectively. The present report uses the collective information of the preceding studies to arrive at a more complete assessment of the culvert criticality aspects. A conservative k{sub eff} is estimated for an individual suspicious culvert and a PRA is evaluated for its {open_quotes}worst{close_quotes} drum. These two pieces of information form the basis of the appraisal, but other evidence is also included as support.

  5. Acoustical studies on corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Rajavel

    Corrugated tubes and pipes offer greater global flexibility combined with local rigidity. They are used in numerous engineering applications such as vacuum cleaner hosing, air conditioning systems of aircraft and automobiles, HVAC control systems of heating ducts in buildings, compact heat exchangers, medical equipment and offshore gas and oil transportation flexible riser pipelines. Recently there has been a renewed research interest in analyzing the flow through a corrugated tube to understand the underlying mechanism of so called whistling, although the whistling in such a tube was identified in early twentieth century. The phenomenon of whistling in a corrugated tube is interesting because an airflow through a smooth walled tube of similar dimensions will not generate any whistling tones. Study of whistling in corrugated tubes is important because, it not only causes an undesirable noise problem but also results in flow-acoustic coupling. Such a coupling can cause significant structural vibrations due to flow-acoustic-structure interaction. This interaction would cause flow-induced vibrations that could result in severe damage to mechanical systems having corrugated tubes. In this research work, sound generation (whistling) in corrugated tubes due to airflow is analyzed using experimental as well as Computational Fluid Dynamics-Large Eddy Simulation (CFD-LES) techniques. Sound generation mechanisms resulting in whistling have been investigated. The whistling in terms of frequencies and sound pressure levels for different flow velocities are studied. The analytical and experimental studies are carried out to understand the influence of various parameters of corrugated tubes such as cavity length, cavity width, cavity depth, pitch, Reynolds numbers and number of corrugations. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretically calculated, computationally predicted and experimentally measured whistling frequencies and sound pressure levels

  6. ECOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR PRIORITIZATION OF CULVERT REPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Culvert passage issues are gaining national and international focus, because they are implicated in the decline of particular species and in the more general loss of biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems. In the Pacific Northwest, inadequate fish passage at culverts is recognized...

  7. Wakefield potentials of corrugated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.

    2015-10-01

    A corrugated structure, which is used in "dechirper" devices, is usually a pipe or two plates with small corrugations (bumps) on the walls. There is a good single-mode description of the wake potentials excited by a relativistic bunch if the wave length of the mode is much longer than the distance between the bumps in the pipe. However, ultrashort bunches, which are now used in free electron lasers, excite much higher frequency fields and the corresponding wake potentials will be very different from the single-mode description. We have made analyses of these wake potentials based on a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations. It was confirmed that the behavior of the wakefields of ultrashort bunches in corrugated structures is not much different from the fields excited usually in accelerating structures where the wake potentials are described by the exponential function. For a practical application we present results for the SLAC "dechirper." We also carried out calculations for a similar device, that was installed and measured at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Korea. We find very good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Cleaning process for corrugated aluminum electrical transmission line enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Gary K.

    1984-07-24

    A process for preparing the interior of a corrugated pipe or sheath comprises the steps of placing a predetermined amount of a tumbling abrasive material into the sheath, and then rotating the sheath.

  9. 3. View southwest at dewatered culvert outlet headwall, with part ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View southwest at dewatered culvert outlet headwall, with part of canal bank removed in back (left) of headwall. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  10. 71. Meadow Creek Culvert. This is an example of a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Meadow Creek Culvert. This is an example of a triple arch concrete box culvert with stone facing mimicking rigid frame structures. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  11. 4. View southeast at culvert outlet with part of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View southeast at culvert outlet with part of the canal bank removed. Right to left: dewatered streambed and coffer dam; tops of culvert barrels and curved wingwalls exposed; horizontal masonry cutoff wall partially up the canal bank. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Six Mile Run Culvert, .2 mile South of Blackwells Mills Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  12. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1990-01-01

    A corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations, provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE.sub.11 mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminum of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R.sub.0 from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R.sub.1 less than R.sub.0 at centers +b and -b from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric corrugations. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  13. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.

    1990-03-06

    This patent describes a corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations which provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE{sub 11} mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminum of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R{sub 0} from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R{sub 1} less than R{sub 0} at centers + b and {minus} B from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric corrugations. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  14. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.

    1989-02-15

    A corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations, provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE{sub 11} mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminium of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R{sub 0} from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R{sub 1} less than R{sub 0} at centers +b and {minus}b from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric waveguides. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  15. Profiles in garbage: Corrugated boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1997-12-01

    Corrugated boxes (also known as old corrugated containers, or OCC) are used to ship products to factories, warehouses, retail stores, offices, and homes. The primary market for OCC is the paperboard industry, which uses OCC for corrugated medium, linerboard, recycled paperboard, and other paper products. In addition, 2.6 million tons of OCC were exported in 1996. OCC provided 37% of the scrap paper that was exported in 1996. Some corrugated boxes can be reused before recycling. Corrugated boxes are easily and highly recyclable. Large producers such as grocery store warehouses and factories have recycled their corrugated boxes for some time. If shredded properly, uncoated corrugated boxes are easily compostable.

  16. 1. View southeast at northwest facade of dewatered culvert outlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View southeast at northwest facade of dewatered culvert outlet headwall, above which part of the canal bank has been removed. Buttresses and upper portion of headwall (above arches) are nineteenth-century additions to the lower, original headwall. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  17. 21. Old Crosscut Canal, Indian School Road Culvert, Plan and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Old Crosscut Canal, Indian School Road Culvert, Plan and Elevation, July 1974. See AZ-21-10 for photograph of the completed culvert. Source: city of Phoenix Engineering Department. - Old Crosscut Canal, North Side of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Properties of cutoff corrugated surfaces for corrugated horn design. [corrugation shape and density effects on scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentzer, C. A.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Corrugated horns involve a junction between the corrugated surface and a conducting ground plane. Proper horn design requires an understanding of the electromagnetic properties of the corrugated surface and this junction. An integral equation solution has been used to study the influence of corrugation density and tooth thickness on the power loss, surface current, and the scattering from a ground plane/corrugated surface junction.

  19. 78 FR 5715 - Construction and Maintenance-Culvert Pipe Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... (39 FR 35152). According to Sec. 635.117(d), as in effect in 1974, Appendix A * * * sets forth the... installations. On September 10, 1976, this section was redesignated as 23 CFR 635.411 (41 FR 36204) and remained.... To implement this provision, the FHWA issued a final rule on November 15, 2006 (71 FR 66450),...

  20. Fish Movement Ecology in High Gradient Headwater Streams: Its Relevance to Fish Passage Restoration through Stream Culvert Barriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Robert L.; Dunham, Jason B.

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Restoration of fish passage through culvert barriers has emerged as a major issue in the Pacific Northwest and nationwide. The problem has many dimensions, including the huge number of potential barriers, uncertainty about which structures are actually barriers, the benefits and risks involved with restoration, and the financial costs and timelines. This report attempts to address what we call 'thinking outside of the pipe' in terms of fish passage information needs. This means understanding the value of each potential passage restoration project in the context of other possible projects, and to view individual restoration projects within a larger landscape of habitats and population processes. In this report we provide a brief review of some essential characteristics of animal movement and examples from a focal group of fishes in Washington State: salmon, trout, and char. While several other fishes and many other species use streams where culvert passage barriers may occur, it is the salmonids that are by far the most widespread and in most cases extending furthest into the headwaters of stream networks in Washington. We begin this report by outlining some basic characteristics of animal movement and then apply that foundation to the case of salmonid fishes. Next we consider the consequences of disrupting fish movement with human-constructed barriers, such as culverts. Finally, this body of evidence is summarized and we propose a short list of what we view as high priority information needs to support more effective restoration of fish passage through culverts.

  1. 7. View north at back (canal side) of culvert inlet, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View north at back (canal side) of culvert inlet, with canal bank completely removed. Background to foreground: back of inlet headwall with tops of high inlet barrels exposed; vertical transition wall between high inlet barrels and low, interior, inlet barrels; tops of low interior barrels; vertical heartening planks and low cutoff wall at site of former canal edge of canal bank; dewatered canal bed and plank sheathing on top of culvert barrels beneath canal bed. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  2. 8. A COMPLETED CULVERT ON THE POWER CANAL LOCATED ABOUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. A COMPLETED CULVERT ON THE POWER CANAL LOCATED ABOUT FOUR MILES EAST OF ROOSEVELT Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, March 29, 1905 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  3. 9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE NEAR GIANT SLIDE TRAIL MARKER ON AROUND-THE-MOUNTAIN LOOP. - Rockefeller Carriage Roads, Mount Desert Island, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  4. Juniata Street Culvert. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Juniata Street Culvert. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 60.77. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  5. 2. TEN MILE RIVER CULVERT WITH DODGEVILLE MILL IN BACKGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. TEN MILE RIVER CULVERT WITH DODGEVILLE MILL IN BACKGROUND. DODGEVILLE, BRISTOL CO., MA. Sec. 4116, MP 195.55. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  6. 9. VIEW OF THE PRESSURE CULVERT STILLING BASIN, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF THE PRESSURE CULVERT STILLING BASIN, LOOKING NORTH. NOTE THE LEVEE TO THE RIGHT. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  7. 11. VIEW OF FLOOD GATE FOR THE PRESSURE CULVERT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF FLOOD GATE FOR THE PRESSURE CULVERT AND THE SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  8. 6. View southwest, culvert inlet with canal bank completely removed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View southwest, culvert inlet with canal bank completely removed. Left to right: back of headwall; tops of high inlet barrels; vertical transition wall between high inlet barrels and low, interior, inlet barrels; tops of low interior barrels; vertical heartening planks and low cutoff wall along former edge of canal bank; dewatered canal bed. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  9. Dealing with uncertainty when assessing fish passage through culvert road crossings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Gregory B.; Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, Byron J.; Straight, Carrie A.; Hagler, Megan M.; Peterson, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the passage of aquatic organisms through culvert road crossings has become increasingly common in efforts to restore stream habitat. Several federal and state agencies and local stakeholders have adopted assessment approaches based on literature-derived criteria for culvert impassability. However, criteria differ and are typically specific to larger-bodied fishes. In an analysis to prioritize culverts for remediation to benefit imperiled, small-bodied fishes in the Upper Coosa River system in the southeastern United States, we assessed the sensitivity of prioritization to the use of differing but plausible criteria for culvert impassability. Using measurements at 256 road crossings, we assessed culvert impassability using four alternative criteria sets represented in Bayesian belief networks. Two criteria sets scored culverts as either passable or impassable based on alternative thresholds of culvert characteristics (outlet elevation, baseflow water velocity). Two additional criteria sets incorporated uncertainty concerning ability of small-bodied fishes to pass through culverts and estimated a probability of culvert impassability. To prioritize culverts for remediation, we combined estimated culvert impassability with culvert position in the stream network relative to other barriers to compute prospective gain in connected stream habitat for the target fish species. Although four culverts ranked highly for remediation regardless of which criteria were used to assess impassability, other culverts differed widely in priority depending on criteria. Our results emphasize the value of explicitly incorporating uncertainty into criteria underlying remediation decisions. Comparing outcomes among alternative, plausible criteria may also help to identify research most needed to narrow management uncertainty.

  10. Dealing With Uncertainty When Assessing Fish Passage Through Culvert Road Crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory B.; Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, Byron J.; Straight, Carrie A.; Hagler, Megan M.; Peterson, James T.

    2012-09-01

    Assessing the passage of aquatic organisms through culvert road crossings has become increasingly common in efforts to restore stream habitat. Several federal and state agencies and local stakeholders have adopted assessment approaches based on literature-derived criteria for culvert impassability. However, criteria differ and are typically specific to larger-bodied fishes. In an analysis to prioritize culverts for remediation to benefit imperiled, small-bodied fishes in the Upper Coosa River system in the southeastern United States, we assessed the sensitivity of prioritization to the use of differing but plausible criteria for culvert impassability. Using measurements at 256 road crossings, we assessed culvert impassability using four alternative criteria sets represented in Bayesian belief networks. Two criteria sets scored culverts as either passable or impassable based on alternative thresholds of culvert characteristics (outlet elevation, baseflow water velocity). Two additional criteria sets incorporated uncertainty concerning ability of small-bodied fishes to pass through culverts and estimated a probability of culvert impassability. To prioritize culverts for remediation, we combined estimated culvert impassability with culvert position in the stream network relative to other barriers to compute prospective gain in connected stream habitat for the target fish species. Although four culverts ranked highly for remediation regardless of which criteria were used to assess impassability, other culverts differed widely in priority depending on criteria. Our results emphasize the value of explicitly incorporating uncertainty into criteria underlying remediation decisions. Comparing outcomes among alternative, plausible criteria may also help to identify research most needed to narrow management uncertainty.

  11. Corrugation of roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Both, Joseph A.; Hong, Daniel C.; Kurtze, Douglas A.

    2001-12-01

    We present a one dimensional model for the development of corrugations in roads subjected to compressive forces from a flux of cars. The cars are modeled as damped harmonic oscillators translating with constant horizontal velocity across the surface, and the road surface is subject to diffusive relaxation. We derive dimensionless coupled equations of motion for the positions of the cars and the road surface H( x, t), which contain two phenomenological variables: an effective diffusion constant Δ( H) that characterizes the relaxation of the road surface, and a function a( H) that characterizes the plasticity or erodibility of the road bed. Linear stability analysis shows that corrugations grow if the speed of the cars exceeds a critical value, which decreases if the flux of cars is increased. Modifying the model to enforce the simple fact that the normal force exerted by the road can never be negative seems to lead to restabilized, quasi-steady road shapes, in which the corrugation amplitude and phase velocity remain fixed.

  12. An Improved Method of Manufacturing Corrugated Boxes: Lateral Corrugator

    SciTech Connect

    Frank C. Murray Ph.D.; , Roman Popil Ph.D.; Michael Shaepe

    2008-12-18

    Paper physicists have known that a corrugated box constructed from outer liner sheets having a predominant fiber orientation aligned with the corrugating flute direction would have higher stiffness and crush resistance (per unit of fiber weight) than the conventional box construction. Such increased performance per unit of fiber weight could result in fiber reduction and energy savings for boxes having equivalent performance specifications. The goal of this project was to develop and demonstrate a commercially viable lateral corrugating process. This included designing and building a pilot lateral corrugator, testing and evaluating pilot machine made boxes, and developing a strategy for commercialization.

  13. Feasibility of culvert IED detection using thermal neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.; McFee, John E.; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Andrews, Hugh Robert; Mosquera, Cristian; Roberts, William C.

    2012-06-01

    Bulk explosives hidden in culverts pose a serious threat to the Canadian and allied armies. Culverts provide an opportunity to conceal insurgent activity, avoid the need for detectable surface disturbances, and limit the applicability of conventional sub-surface sensing techniques. Further, in spite of the large masses of explosives that can be employed, the large sensor{target separation makes detection of the bulk explosive content challeng- ing. Defence R&D Canada { Sueld and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives for over 15 years. The next generation TNA sensor, known as TNA2, incorporates a number of improvements that allow for increased sensor-to-target dis- tances, making it potentially feasible to detect large improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in culverts using TNA. Experiments to determine the ability of TNA2 to detect improvised explosive devices in culverts are described, and the resulting signal levels observed for relevant quantities of explosives are presented. Observations conrm that bulk explosives detection using TNA against a culvert-IED is possible, with large charges posing a detection challenge at least as dicult as that of a deeply buried anti-tank landmine. Because of the prototype nature of the TNA sensor used, it is not yet possible to make denitive statements about the absolute sensitivity or detection time. Further investigation is warranted.

  14. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-50 Stormwater Runoff Culvert, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-001

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2008-04-15

    The 100-F-50 waste site, part of the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, is a steel stormwater runoff culvert that runs between two railroad grades in the south-central portion of the 100-F Area. The culvert exiting the west side of the railroad grade is mostly encased in concrete and surrounded by a concrete stormwater collection depression partially filled with soil and vegetation. The drain pipe exiting the east side of the railroad grade embankment is partially filled with soil and rocks. The 100-F-50 stormwater diversion culvert confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to no action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  15. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  16. 35. Photo of concrete arch culvert constructed by Puget Sound ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photo of concrete arch culvert constructed by Puget Sound Construction Company, 1911, for the Northern Pacific Railroad, over flume. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  17. 7. VIEW OF WEAPONS DELIVERY ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WEAPONS DELIVERY ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL NO. 1 DRAIN, LOOKING 522 EAST OF NORTH. - Truckee-Carson Irrigation District, Lower Diagonal No. 1 Drain, Bounded by West Gate Road & Weapons Delivery Road, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  18. 6. VIEW OF WEST GATE ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF WEST GATE ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL NO. 1 DRAIN, LOOKING 2502 EAST OF NORTH. - Truckee-Carson Irrigation District, Lower Diagonal No. 1 Drain, Bounded by West Gate Road & Weapons Delivery Road, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  19. 5. VIEW OF WEST GATE ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF WEST GATE ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL NO. 1 DRAIN, LOOKING 323' EAST OF NORTH. - Truckee-Carson Irrigation District, Lower Diagonal No. 1 Drain, Bounded by West Gate Road & Weapons Delivery Road, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  20. Flood magnitude and frequency of Main Ditch at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44 and at the Conrail culvert downstream, West Deptford Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods at Main Ditch at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44 at milepost 8.3 and at the Conrail culvert 0.21 miles downstream, in West Deptford Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. Flood-magnitude and -frequency estimates, as well as drainage-basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimates are 285 cubic feet per second at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44 and 345 cubic feet per second at the Conrail culvert.

  1. Culvert Analysis Program Graphical User Interface 1.0--A preprocessing and postprocessing tool for estimating flow through culvert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D. Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The peak discharge of a flood can be estimated from the elevation of high-water marks near the inlet and outlet of a culvert after the flood has occurred. This type of discharge estimate is called an “indirect measurement” because it relies on evidence left behind by the flood, such as high-water marks on trees or buildings. When combined with the cross-sectional geometry of the channel upstream from the culvert and the culvert size, shape, roughness, and orientation, the high-water marks define a water-surface profile that can be used to estimate the peak discharge by using the methods described by Bodhaine (1968). This type of measurement is in contrast to a “direct” measurement of discharge made during the flood where cross-sectional area is measured and a current meter or acoustic equipment is used to measure the water velocity. When a direct discharge measurement cannot be made at a streamgage during high flows because of logistics or safety reasons, an indirect measurement of a peak discharge is useful for defining the high-flow section of the stage-discharge relation (rating curve) at the streamgage, resulting in more accurate computation of high flows. The Culvert Analysis Program (CAP) (Fulford, 1998) is a command-line program written in Fortran for computing peak discharges and culvert rating surfaces or curves. CAP reads input data from a formatted text file and prints results to another formatted text file. Preparing and correctly formatting the input file may be time-consuming and prone to errors. This document describes the CAP graphical user interface (GUI)—a modern, cross-platform, menu-driven application that prepares the CAP input file, executes the program, and helps the user interpret the output

  2. Turtles and culverts, and alternative energy development: an unreported but potentially significant mortality threat to the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, J.E.; Ennen, J.R.; Madrak, S.; Grover, B.

    2011-01-01

    Culverts are often used to increase the permeability of roaded landscapes for wildlife, including turtles. Although the benefits of culverts as safe passages for turtles are well documented, under some conditions culverts can entrap them and cause mortality. Here we report a culvert-related mortality in the federally threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) at a wind energy facility in California and offer simple recommendations to mitigate the negative effects of culverts for wildlife in general.

  3. Culvert analysis program for indirect measurement of discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.

    1993-01-01

    A program based on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) methods for indirectly computing peak discharges through culverts allows users to employ input data formats used by the water surface profile program (WSPRO). The program can be used to compute discharge rating surfaces or curves that describe the behavior of flow through a particular culvert or to compute discharges from measurements of upstream of the gradually varied flow equations and has been adapted slightly to provide solutions that minimize the need for the user to determine between different flow regimes. The program source is written in Fortran 77 and has been run on mini-computers and personal computers. The program does not use or require graphics capability, a color monitor, or a mouse.

  4. 24. CULVERT WITH CONCRETE HEADWALL AND SIDEWALLS CARRYING THE LATERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CULVERT WITH CONCRETE HEADWALL AND SIDEWALLS CARRYING THE LATERAL UNDER 8TH AVENUE. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  5. Shape optimization of corrugated airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sambhav; Bhatt, Varun Dhananjay; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The effect of corrugations on the aerodynamic performance of a Mueller C4 airfoil, placed at a 5° angle of attack and Re=10{,}000, is investigated. A stabilized finite element method is employed to solve the incompressible flow equations in two dimensions. A novel parameterization scheme is proposed that enables representation of corrugations on the surface of the airfoil, and their spontaneous appearance in the shape optimization loop, if indeed they improve aerodynamic performance. Computations are carried out for different location and number of corrugations, while holding their height fixed. The first corrugation causes an increase in lift and drag. Each of the later corrugations leads to a reduction in drag. Shape optimization of the Mueller C4 airfoil is carried out using various objective functions and optimization strategies, based on controlling airfoil thickness and camber. One of the optimal shapes leads to 50 % increase in lift coefficient and 23 % increase in aerodynamic efficiency compared to the Mueller C4 airfoil.

  6. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeao; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-01-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels. Experimental studies usually…

  7. Strain variation in corrugated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanye; Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Christopher, Jason; Paiella, Roberto; Swan, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-destructive technique for analyzing strain in graphene. Recently there has been interest in making corrugated graphene devices with varying spatial wavelengths Λ for plasmonic and THz applications. Transferring graphene onto corrugated substrates introduces strain, which if there was perfect clamping (high fraction) would cause a periodic strain variation. However, the strain variation for pattern size smaller than the diffraction limit λ makes it hard to precisely model the strain distribution. Here we present a detailed study on how strain varies in corrugated graphene with sub-diffraction limit periodicity Λ < λ. Mechanically exfoliated graphene was deposited onto sinusoidal shape silicon dioxide gratings with Λ=400 nm period using the pick and place transfer technique. We observed that the graphene is not rigidly clamped, but partially slides to relieve the strain. We model the linewidth variation to extract the local strain variation as well as the sliding in the presence of charge puddling in graphene. The method gives us a better understanding on graphene slippage and strain distribution in graphene on a corrugated substrate with sub-diffraction limit spatial period.

  8. Aeroacoustics of the swinging corrugated tube: voice of the Dragon.

    PubMed

    Nakiboğlu, Güneş; Rudenko, Oleksii; Hirschberg, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    When one swings a short corrugated pipe segment around one's head, it produces a musically interesting whistling sound. As a musical toy it is called a "Hummer" and as a musical instrument, the "Voice of the Dragon." The fluid dynamics aspects of the instrument are addressed, corresponding to the sound generation mechanism. Velocity profile measurements reveal that the turbulent velocity profile developed in a corrugated pipe differs notably from the one of a smooth pipe. This velocity profile appears to have a crucial effect both on the non-dimensional whistling frequency (Strouhal number) and on the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations. Using a numerical model based on incompressible flow simulations and vortex sound theory, excellent predictions of the whistling Strouhal numbers are achieved. The model does not provide an accurate prediction of the amplitude. In the second part of the paper the sound radiation from a Hummer is discussed. The acoustic measurements obtained in a semi-anechoic chamber are compared with a theoretical radiation model. Globally the instrument behaves as a rotating (Leslie) horn. The effects of Doppler shift, wall reflections, bending of the tube, non-constant rotational speed on the observed frequency, and amplitude are discussed. PMID:22280698

  9. 6. VIEW OF A RUSTED, HEAVYGAUGE METAL CULVERT (TY31776) PLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF A RUSTED, HEAVY-GAUGE METAL CULVERT (TY-3177-6) PLACED AT A SMALL DRAW WHERE KINGS CANYON ROAD WILL BE INSLOPED AND THE CULVERT WILL BE REMOVED. LOCATED AT MILEPOST 0.05 (ACCORDING TO THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE RECORD FOR TY-3177). FACING SOUTH 76ø WEST (256ø). - Kings Canyon Road, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  10. Movement and survival of an amphibian in relation to sediment and culvert design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeycutt, R.K; Lowe, W.H.; Hossack, Blake R.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat disturbance from stream culverts can affect aquatic organisms by increasing sedimentation or forming barriers to movement. Land managers are replacing many culverts to reduce these negative effects, primarily for stream fishes. However, these management actions are likely to have broad implications for many organisms, including amphibians in small streams. To assess the effects of culverts on movement and survival of the Idaho giant salamander (Dicamptodon aterrimus), we used capture-mark-recapture surveys and measured sediment in streams with 2 culvert types (i.e., unimproved culverts, improved culverts) and in streams without culverts (i.e., reference streams). We predicted culverts would increase stream sediment levels, limit movement, and reduce survival of Idaho giant salamanders. We also determined the effect of sediment levels on survival of salamanders because although sediment is often associated with distribution and abundance of stream amphibians, links with vital rates remain unclear. To estimate survival, we used a spatial Cormack–Jolly–Seber (CJS) model that explicitly incorporated information on movement, eliminating bias in apparent survival estimated from traditional (i.e., non-spatial) CJS models caused by permanent emigration beyond the study area. To demonstrate the importance of using spatial data in studies of wildlife populations, we compared estimates from the spatial CJS to estimates of apparent survival from a traditional CJS model. Although high levels of sediment reduced survival of salamanders, culvert type was unrelated to sediment levels or true survival of salamanders. Across all streams, we documented only 15 movement events between study reaches. All movement events were downstream, and they occurred disproportionately in 1 stream, which precluded measuring the effect of culvert design on movement. Although movement was low overall, the variance among streams was high enough to bias estimates of apparent survival

  11. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  12. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-12-31

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  13. MONITORING CULVERT PASSAGE OF JUVENILE SALMONIDS WITH PIT TAGS AND STATIONARY AND PORTABLE PIT-TAG READERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Federal land management agencies in the PNW face increasing pressure to replace culverts that do not pass all life history stages of anadromous salmon and trout. Prioritization of culverts for replacement is often based on the physical parameters of culverts, and not on how fish...

  14. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Grot, Stephen

    2013-09-30

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  15. Assessing Juvenile Salmonid Passage Through Culverts: Field Research in Support of Protocol Development

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Greg D.; Evans, Nathan R.; Pearson, Walter H.; Southard, John A.

    2001-10-30

    The primary goal of our research this spring/ summer was to refine techniques and examine scenarios under which a standardized protocol could be applied to assess juvenile coho salmon (O. kisutch) passage through road culverts. Field evaluations focused on capture-mark- recapture methods that allowed analysis of fish movement patterns, estimates of culvert passability, and potential identification of cues inducing these movements. At this stage, 0+ age coho salmon fry 30 mm to 65 mm long (fork length) were the species and age class of interest. Ultimately, the protocol will provide rapid, statistically rigorous methods for trained personnel to perform standardized biological assessments of culvert passability to a number of juvenile salmon species. Questions to be addressed by the research include the following: ? Do hydraulic structures such as culverts restrict habitat for juvenile salmonids? ? How do existing culverts and retrofits perform relative to juvenile salmonid passage? ? Do some culvert characteristics and hydraulic conditions provide better passage than others? ? Does the culvert represent a barrier to certain size classes of fish? Recommendations addressed issues of study site selection, initial capture, marking, recapture/observations, and estimating movement.

  16. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeão; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-09-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels.1-4 Experimental studies usually involve expensive and sophisticated equipment that is out of reach of school laboratory facilities.3-6 In this paper we show how to investigate quantitatively the sounds produced by a flexible sound tube corrugated on the inside by using educational equipment readily available in school laboratories, such as the oscilloscope, the microphone, the anemometer, and the air pump. We show that it is possible for students to study the discontinuous spectrum of sounds produced by a flexible corrugated tube and go even further, computing the speed of sound in air with a simple experimental procedure.

  17. Biaxially corrugated flexible sheet material

    DOEpatents

    Schmertz, John C.

    1991-04-16

    A flexible biaxially corrugated sheet material is formed from a plurality of identical trapezium segments which are arranged in a plurality of long strips a single segment wide. Adjacent strips are mirror images of each other and connected along adjoining sides with the angles of the four corners of adjacent segments being alternately less than 360.degree. and greater than 360.degree. along the length of a strip such that the sheet material has an undulating configuration, and is inherently curved and cannot lie in a flat plane.

  18. Credit PSR. View looks northwest (318°) at concrete culvert wings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit PSR. View looks northwest (318°) at concrete culvert wings from which effluents from Imhoff Tank in background emerged into open sewage canal - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Imhoff Tank, Southwest of E Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Square concrete culvert and concrete retaining wall, 1/2 mile east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Square concrete culvert and concrete retaining wall, 1/2 mile east of Indigo Tunnel, milepost 128. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  20. Helically corrugated circular waveguides as antenna feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jecko, F.; Papiernik, A.

    1983-07-01

    Rotation of the plane of polarization of the TE(11)-mode is predicted and observed in a helically corrugated circular waveguide. Rotation is suppressed by a longitudinal deformation produced on the corrugation. This modified structure can be used as an antenna feeder with low losses.

  1. Aeroacoustic interaction in a corrugated duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kop'ev, V. F.; Mironov, M. A.; Solntseva, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    The sound generation by an air flow in a corrugated tube is studied experimentally for different values of the corrugation pitch and different tube lengths. The Strouhal numbers of sound generated in different tubes with different flow velocities lie within 0.4-0.6. As the flow velocity increases, the Strouhal number decreases. The effect of sound absorption by an air flow in a corrugated duct is described: in a corrugated tube with a flow, at frequencies below the generation frequency, the absorption of sound produced by an external source is observed. A semiempirical model of aeroacoustic interaction in a corrugated tube is proposed. The model provides a qualitative agreement with the experiment.

  2. Flood magnitude and frequency of Little Mantual Creek at the culvert at milepost 7.8 on New Jersey Route 44, and at the Conrail culvert 0.20 miles downstream, West Deptford Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods at Little Mantua Creek at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44 at milepost 7.8 and at the Conrail culvert 0.20 miles downstream, in West Deptford Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. Flood-magnitude and -frequency estimates, as well as drainage-basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimates are 249 cubic feet per second at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44, and 243 cubic feet per second at the Conrail culvert.

  3. Mechanical Analysis of Trapezoidal Corrugated Composite Skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabezi, P.; Golzar, M.

    2013-08-01

    Using of the corrugated skins and morphing technology is a good idea to provide the desired performance and improve aerodynamic efficiency. Corrugated structures and skins are flexible in the direction of corrugation and stiff in the transverse direction. In this paper a simple analytical model for the effective stiffness of the trapezoidal corrugated composites is developed in symmetrical and unsymmetrical lay-up. The elongation and effective stiffness in longitudinal and transverse directions of trapezoidal corrugated skins and flat composites are extracted using strain energy and Castiglione's theorem. Various dimensions of trapezoidal element for unidirectional and plain woven fabrics of E-glass/Epoxy are investigated. Trapezoidal corrugated composites were modelled by commercial FEM software ABAQUS and compared to analytical model. Analytical model is validated by experimental results from bending and tensile tests. Finally, load-displacement curves in the tensile and bending tests are studied and their different stages of behavior are identified. Results of FEM, experimental and analytical simulation show that how the corrugated composite skins can afford obviously larger deformation than the flat one and they are good solution to use in the morphing applications.

  4. The characterization of tandem and corrugated wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Broering, Timothy; Hord, Kyle; Prater, Russell

    2014-02-01

    Dragonfly wings have two distinct features: a tandem configuration and wing corrugation. Both features have been extensively studied with the aim to understand the superior flight performance of dragonflies. In this paper we review recent development of tandem and corrugated wing aerodynamics. With regards to the tandem configuration, this review will focus on wing/wing and wing/vortex interactions at different flapping modes and wing spacing. In addition, the aerodynamics of tandem wings under gusty conditions will be reviewed and compared with isolated wings to demonstrate the gust resistance characteristics of flapping wings. Regarding corrugated wings, we review their structural and aerodynamic characteristics.

  5. Brownian transport in corrugated channels with inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Hänggi, P.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, F.; Schmid, G.

    2012-08-01

    Transport of suspended Brownian particles dc driven along corrugated narrow channels is numerically investigated in the regime of finite damping. We show that inertial corrections cannot be neglected as long as the width of the channel bottlenecks is smaller than an appropriate particle diffusion length, which depends on the the channel corrugation and the drive intensity. With such a diffusion length being inversely proportional to the damping constant, transport through sufficiently narrow obstructions turns out to be always sensitive to the viscosity of the suspension fluid. The inertia corrections to the transport quantifiers, mobility, and diffusivity markedly differ for smoothly and sharply corrugated channels.

  6. Estimates for Pu-239 loadings in burial ground culverts based on fast/slow neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.; Hochel, R.C.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.A.

    1989-08-15

    This report provides guideline estimates for Pu-239 mass loadings in selected burial ground culverts. The relatively high recorded Pu-239 contents of these culverts have been appraised as suspect relative to criticality concerns, because they were assayed only with the solid waste monitor (SWM) per gamma-ray counting. After 1985, subsequent waste was also assayed with the neutron coincidence counter (NCC), and a comparison of the assay methods showed that the NCC generally yielded higher assays than the SWM. These higher NCC readings signaled a need to conduct non-destructive/non-intrusive nuclear interrogations of these culverts, and a technical team conducted scoping measurements to illustrate potential assay methods based on neutron and/or gamma counting. A fast/slow neutron method has been developed to estimate the Pu-239 in the culverts. In addition, loading records include the SWM assays of all Pu-239 cuts of some of the culvert drums and these data are useful in estimating the corresponding NCC drum assays from NCC vs SWM data. Together, these methods yield predictions based on direct measurements and statistical inference.

  7. Method and apparatus for corrugating strips

    DOEpatents

    Day, J.R.; Curtis, C.H.

    1981-10-27

    The invention relates to a method and a machine for transversely corrugating a continuous strip of metallic foil. The product foil comprises a succession of alternately disposed corrugations, each defining in a cross section, a major segment of a circle. The foil to be corrugated is positioned to extend within a vertical passage in the machine. The walls of the passage are heated to promote the desired deformation of the foil. Foil-deforming rollers are alternately passed obliquely across the passage to respectively engage transverse sections of the foil. The rollers and their respective section of deformed foil comprise a stacked assembly which is moved incrementally through the heated passageway. As the assembly emerges from the passageway, the rollers spill from the corrugated foil and are recovered for re-use.

  8. Method and apparatus for corrugating strips

    DOEpatents

    Day, Jack R.; Curtis, Charles H.

    1983-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a machine for transversely corrugating a continuous strip of metallic foil. The product foil comprises a succession of alternately disposed corrugations, each defining in cross section, a major segment of a circle. The foil to be corrugated is positioned to extend within a vertical passage in the machine. The walls of the passage are heated to promote the desired deformation of the foil. Foil-deforming rollers are alternately passed obliquely across the passage to respectively engage transverse sections of the foil. The rollers and their respective section of deformed foil comprise a stacked assembly which is moved incrementally through the heated passageway. As the assembly emerges from the passageway, the rollers spill from the corrugated foil and are recovered for re-use.

  9. Evolutionary design of corrugated horn antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoorfar, F.; Manshadi, V.; Jamnejad, A.

    2002-01-01

    An evolutionary progranirnitzg (EP) algorithm is used to optimize pattern of a corrugated circularhorn subject to various constraints on return loss and antenna beamwidth and pattern circularity and low crosspolarization. The EP algorithm uses a Gaussian mutation operator. Examples on design synthesis of a 45 section corrugated horn, with a total of 90 optimization parameters, are presented. The results show excellent and efficient optimization of the desired horn parameters.

  10. CORRECTING UNRELIABLE VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN SHORT CULVERTS AND CANAL REACHES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water management increasingly depends on good water flow measurement. Too frequently, flow disturbances from upstream elbows, the well pump, or other pipe fittings, produce distorted flow profiles that are detrimental to the proper installation and operation of common flow meters used in...

  11. Surface-Water Exchange through Culverts beneath State Road 9336 within Everglades National Park, 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Stewart, Marc A.; Nowacki, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected hydrologic data between June 2004 and December 2005 to investigate the temporal and spatial nature of flow exchanges through culverts beneath State Road 9336 within Everglades National Park. Continuous data collected during the study measured flow velocity, water level, salinity, conductivity, and water-temperature in or near seven culverts between Pa-hay-okee Overlook access road and Nine Mile Pond. The two culverts east of Pa-hay-okee Overlook access road flowed into Taylor Slough Basin from 87 to 96 percent of the study period, whereas flows through five culverts between Pa-hay-okee Overlook access road and Nine Mile Pond flowed into Shark River Slough Basin from 70 to 99 percent of the study period. Synoptic flow discharges measured at all culverts during three intensive field efforts revealed a net discharge into Taylor Slough Basin from Shark River Slough Basin through culverts between Royal Palm Road and Pa-hay-okee Overlook access road, and into Shark River Slough Basin from Taylor Slough Basin through culverts between Pa-hay-okee Overlook access road and Nine Mile Pond. Data collected during the study and presented in this report provided additional knowledge of the magnitude, direction, and nature of flow exchanges through the road culverts.

  12. Time-resolved measurement of quadrupole wakefields in corrugated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chao; Fu, Feichao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Shi, Libin; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhen; Xiang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Corrugated structures have recently been widely used for manipulating electron beam longitudinal phase space and for producing THz radiation. Here we report on time-resolved measurements of the quadrupole wakefields in planar corrugated structures. It is shown that while the time-dependent quadrupole wakefield produced by a planar corrugated structure causes significant growth in beam transverse emittance, it can be effectively canceled with a second corrugated structure with orthogonal orientation. The strengths of the time-dependent quadrupole wakefields for various corrugated structure gaps are also measured and found to be in good agreement with theories. Our work should forward the applications of corrugated structures in many accelerator based scientific facilities.

  13. High frequency scattering from corrugated stratified cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, Kamal; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    Interest in applying radar remote sensing for the study of forested areas led to the development of a model for scattering from corrugated stratified dielectric cylinders. The model is used to investigate the effect of bark and its roughness on scattering from tree trunks and branches. The outer layer of the cylinder (bark) is assumed to be a low-loss dielectric material and to have a regular (periodic) corrugation pattern. The inner layers are treated as lossy dielectrics with smooth boundaries. A hybrid solution based on the moment method and the physical optics approximation is obtained. In the solution, the corrugations are replaced with polarization currents that are identical to those of the local tangential periodic corrugated surface, and the stratified cylinder is replaced with equivalent surface currents. New expressions for the equivalent physical-optics currents are used which are more convenient than the standard ones. It is shown that the bark layer and its roughness both reduce the radar cross-section. It is also demonstrated that the corrugations can be replaced by an equivalent anisotropic layer.

  14. CONTEXT VIEW, SHOWING STRUCTURE NO. 57.3X (CULVERT) AT RIGHT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW, SHOWING STRUCTURE NO. 57.3X (CULVERT) AT RIGHT AND STRUCTURE NO. 57.24X (BRIDGE) IN DISTANCE AT LEFT. MAIN TRACK 1 RUNS ALONG THE TOP OF THE FEATURES. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. 12 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 57.3X, Between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Ultrasonic geometrical characterization of periodically corrugated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F

    2013-04-01

    Accurate characterization of the characteristic dimensions of a periodically corrugated surface using ultrasonic imaging technique is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The possibility of accurately characterizing the characteristic dimensions is discussed. The condition for accurate characterization and the quantitative relationship between the accuracy and its determining parameters are given. The strategies to avoid diffraction effects instigated by the periodical nature of a corrugated surface are also discussed. Major causes of erroneous measurements are theoretically discussed and experimentally illustrated. A comparison is made between the presented results and the optical measurements, revealing acceptable agreement. This work realistically exposes the capability of the proposed ultrasonic technique to accurately characterize the lateral and vertical characteristic dimensions of corrugated surfaces. Both the general principles developed theoretically as well as the proposed practical techniques may serve as useful guidelines to peers. PMID:23294990

  16. Imaging Buried Culverts Using Ground Penetrating Radar: Comparing 100 MHZ Through 1 GHZ Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Aziz, A.; Stewart, R. R.; Green, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    *Aziz, A A aabdulaziz@uh.edu Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA Stewart, R R rrstewart@uh.edu Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA *Green, S L slgreen@yahoo.com Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA A 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, using three different frequency antennae, was undertaken to image buried steel culverts at the University of Houston's La Marque Geophysical Observatory 30 miles south of Houston, Texas. The four culverts, under study, support a road crossing one of the area's bayous. A 32 m by 4.5 m survey grid was designed on the road above the culverts and data were collected with 100 MHz, 250 MHz, and 1 GHz antennae. We used an orthogonal acquisition geometry for the three surveys. Inline sampling was from 1.0 cm to 10 cm (from 1 GHz to 100 MHz antenna) with inline and crossline spacings ranging from 0.2 m to 0.5 m. We used an initial velocity of 0.1 m/ns (from previous CMP work at the site) for the display purposes. The main objective of the study was to analyze the effect of different frequency antennae on the resultant GPR images. We are also interested in the accuracy and resolution of the various images, in addition to developing an optimal processing flow.The data were initially processed with standard steps that included gain enhancement, dewow and temporal-filtering, background suppression, and 2D migration. Various radar velocities were used in the 2D migration and ultimately 0.12 m/ns was used. The data are complicated by multipathing from the surface and between culverts (from modeling). Some of this is ameliorated via deconvolution. The top of each of the four culverts was evident in the GPR images acquired with the 250 MHz and 100 MHz antennas. For 1 GHz, the top of the culvert was not clear due to the signal's attenuation. The 250 MHz

  17. An Analysis of Stream Culvert Fish Passage on the Navy Railroad Line between Bremerton and Shelton, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    May, Christopher W.; Miller, Martin C.; Southard, John A.

    2004-10-25

    The Navy railroad service line runs between Shelton, Bremerton, and Silverdale, and is used by the Navy to transfer freight to its facilities. It is also used by commercial clients to ship service items and bulk cargo for municipalities along portions of the route. Culverts of various size and construction convey streams and stormwater runoff under the railroad line. These allow transfer of water and, in some cases allow for passage of juvenile and adult salmon into waters upstream of the culverts. As part of this project, 21 culverts along a 34-mile reach (Shelton to Bremerton) of this railroad were surveyed to evaluate their function and ability to allow salmon to utilize the streams. The culverts and attached watersheds were evaluated using criteria developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to assign a Priority Index (PI) to barriers present on each fish-bearing stream. The PI is a relative numeric rating indicator, assigned using consistent criteria related to the degree of potential habitat gained by removing barriers and improving the function of the watershed. Of the 21 culverts evaluated, five were found to be complete fish-passage barriers and six were found to be partial barriers, primarily to juvenile salmon. Three of these culverts had PI ratings above 10 and five others had ratings between 7 and 10. Corrective action can be taken based on any PI rating, but the WDFW normally assigns lower priority to projects with PI scores lower than 15. Several of the stream and culverts had previously been evaluated for structural integrity and function and have been scheduled for repair. A narrative indicating the condition of the culvert has been prepared as well as a table indicating the PI scores and a summary of recommendations for action for each culvert.

  18. Dynamic test of a corrugated steel keyworker blast shelter MISTY PICTURE. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, R.L.; Slawson, T.R.; Harris, A.L.

    1987-11-01

    The 18-man blast shelter was tested dynamically on May 14, 1987 in the MISTY PICTURE event at White Sands Missile Range, NM. The main section of the shelter was fabricated from a 9-foot-diameter, 27.5-foot-long section of 10-gage, galvanized, corrugated steel culvert. The shelter included a vertical entryway and air intake and exhaust stacks. The shelter design was found to be conservative during a previous 50-psi validation test, and some constructibility problems were encountered with the entryway-to-shelter connections. This test was conducted to validate the modifications made to the shelter design. The modifications were made to reduce construction costs and improve constructibility. Primary modifications included: replacing the stiffened endwalls with lighter-weight unstiffened plates, connecting the entryway to an endwall rather than to the main section of the shelter, and the inclusion of an emergency exit. The structure was located at the anticipated 200-psi peak overpressure level. Post-test inspection revealed that the main section of the shelter suffered very little damage during the test. Due to the failure of the emergency exit cover plate, it was necessary to determine if enough pressure entered the shelter to affect its structural response. This test also investigated the shock environment inside the shelter.

  19. Plasmonic corrugated cylinder-cone terahertz probe.

    PubMed

    Yao, Haizi; Zhong, Shuncong

    2014-08-01

    The spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) effect on the electromagnetic field distribution near the tip of a periodically corrugated metal cylinder-cone probe working at the terahertz regime was studied. We found that radially polarized terahertz radiation could be coupled effectively through a spoof SPP into a surface wave and propagated along the corrugated surface, resulting in more than 20× electric field enhancement near the tip of probe. Multiple resonances caused by the antenna effect were discussed in detail by finite element computation and theoretical analysis of dispersion relation for spoof SPP modes. Moreover, the key figures of merit such as the resonance frequency of the SPP can be flexibly tuned by modifying the geometry of the probe structure, making it attractive for application in an apertureless background-free terahertz near-field microscope. PMID:25121543

  20. Corrugation of Relativistic Magnetized Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Ramos, Oscar; Gremillet, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    As a shock front interacts with turbulence it develops corrugation, which induces outgoing wave modes in the downstream plasma. For a fast shock wave, the incoming wave modes can either be fast magnetosonic waves originating downstream, outrunning the shock, or eigenmodes of the upstream plasma drifting through the shock. Using linear perturbation theory in relativistic MHD, this paper provides a general analysis of the corrugation of relativistic magnetized fast shock waves resulting from their interaction with small amplitude disturbances. Transfer functions characterizing the linear response for each of the outgoing modes are calculated as a function of the magnetization of the upstream medium and as a function of the nature of the incoming wave. Interestingly, if the latter is an eigenmode of the upstream plasma, we find that there exists a resonance at which the (linear) response of the shock becomes large or even diverges. This result may have profound consequences on the phenomenology of astrophysical relativistic magnetized shock waves.

  1. Relating temperature dependence of atom scattering spectra to surface corrugation.

    PubMed

    Hayes, W W; Manson, J R

    2011-12-01

    It is suggested that a measurement of the temperature dependence of the most probable intensity of energy-resolved atom-surface scattering spectra can reveal the strength of the surface corrugation. To support this conjecture, a classical mechanical theory of atom scattering from a corrugated surface, valid in the weak corrugation limit, is developed. The general result for the scattering probability is expressed in terms of spatial integrals over the impact parameter within a surface unit cell. For the case of a one-dimensional corrugation, approximate expressions for the scattering probability are obtained in terms of analytic closed form expressions. As an indicator of its relation to experimental measurements, calculations using a one-dimensional corrugation model are compared with data for Ar scattering from a molten Ga surface and an approximate value of the corrugation height parameter is extracted. PMID:22085838

  2. Performance of zigzag corrugated furrows in Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán Cañas, J.; Chipana, R.; Moreno-Pérez, M. F.; Chipana, G.

    2012-04-01

    In Bolivia, irrigation area is estimated in more than 250000 ha, being surface irrigation the most common method. In highland areas (Altiplano) and in interandean valleys, traditional and ancestral irrigation systems such as flood irrigation, contour furrows, zigzag corrugated furrows, suka kollus and irrigation by kanis, are the most important. In the case of very steep terrains and shallow soils, the zigzag corrugated irrigation method is very frequent. This irrigation method has been used for a long time but their low application efficiency and the shortage of water justify this work devoted to their characterization and to study their performance. The experimental study was conducted southeast of the city of La Paz in the community of Cebollino located at 2600 meters above sea level. Furrow characteristics vary in function of crop type and soil slope, so that the larger the slope the greater the separation between furrows. In our case, the crop chosen was the lettuce and the experimental plot had an area of 800 m2 with a slope ranging between 14 and 18%. Blocks of corrugated furrows were identified and experimental measures were made during each irrigation, once per week, in the central blocks to avoid border effects. To determine advance curves 15 stations were used spaced 18 m. At each station, advance and recession time and infiltration depth were measured. Inlet and outlet flow were controlled each 5 min. To calculate the reference evapotranspiration, the Hargraves-Samani equation was used. Due to the very high terrain slopes, the advance curve takes a linear form rather than the typical exponential form. This hinders the proper calculation of the parameters of the Kostiakov-Lewis equation used to determine the infiltrated depth values. The inlet flow range, along irrigation events, between 0.01 and 0.085 L/s due to the uncontrolled use of water in fields located upstream. The large variability of inflow flow difficult irrigation management especially in

  3. The effects of road crossings on prairie stream habitat and function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouska, Wesley W.; Keane, Timothy; Paukert, Craig P.

    2010-01-01

    Improperly designed stream crossing structures may alter the form and function of stream ecosystems and habitat and prohibit the movement of aquatic organisms. Stream sections adjoining five concrete box culverts, five low-water crossings (concrete slabs vented by one or multiple culverts), and two large, single corrugated culvert vehicle crossings in eastern Kansas streams were compared to reference reaches using a geomorphologic survey and stream classification. Stream reaches were also compared upstream and downstream of crossings, and crossing measurements were used to determine which crossing design best mimicked the natural dimensions of the adjoining stream. Four of five low-water crossings, three of five box culverts, and one of two large, single corrugated pipe culverts changed classification from upstream to downstream of the crossings. Mean riffle spacing upstream at low-water crossings (8.6 bankfull widths) was double that of downstream reaches (mean 4.4 bankfull widths) but was similar upstream and downstream of box and corrugated pipe culverts. There also appeared to be greater deposition of fine sediments directly upstream of these designs. Box and corrugated culverts were more similar to natural streams than low-water crossings at transporting water, sediments, and debris during bankfull flows.

  4. Disappointment and regret enhance corrugator reactivity in a gambling task

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yin; Clark, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how the corrugator and zygomaticus respond to decision outcomes (i.e., gains and losses). We used a gambling task in which participants were presented with obtained followed by non-obtained outcomes. Activity at the corrugator site was sensitive to decision outcomes, such that higher obtained losses (disappointment) and higher non-obtained gains (regret) both heightened corrugator reactivity. Activity at the zygomaticus site was not responsive to obtained or non-obtained outcomes, but did show sensitivity to emotional images in the same participants, in the form of a positive linear relationship with self-reported emotional valence. Corrugator activity was negatively related to emotional valence. The findings indicate the sensitivity of corrugator to objective decision outcomes and also counterfactual comparisons, highlighting the utility of facial electromyography in research on decision making and gambling behavior. PMID:25345723

  5. Corrugated Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors and Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, K. K.; Chen, C. J.; Rohkinson, L. P.; Das, N. C.; Jhabvala, M.

    1999-01-01

    Quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) have many advantages in infrared detection, mainly due to the mature Ill-V material technology. The employment of the corrugation structure further advances the technology by providing a simple, yet efficient light-coupling scheme. A C-QWIP enjoys the same flexibility as a detector with intrinsic normal incident absorption. In this paper, we will discuss the utilities of C-QWIPs in different applications, including two-color detection and polarization-sensitive detection. Besides practical applications, C-QWIPs are also useful in detector characterization. They can be used for measuring the absorption coefficient of light propagating parallel to the layers under bias and providing information on the energy resolved photoconductive gain. These two quantities have never been measured before. Based on the corrugation design, we have made several modifications that further improve the detector sensitivity without increasing its complexity. Other than the C-QWIP structure, we also continue searching for other sensitive detector architectures. In a quantum grid infrared photodetector, 3-dimensional electron confinement can be achieved, with which the detector is able to absorb light in all directions. At the same time, the photoconductive gain can also be improved. We further improve the design using a blazed structure. All the experimental results are supported by a rigorous electromagnetic modal transmission-line theory developed especially for these types of structures. Preliminary thermal imaging using C-QWIP FPAs validates the advantages of the present approach.

  6. Biased Brownian motion in extremely corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, S.; Schmid, G.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Hänggi, P.

    2011-12-01

    Biased Brownian motion of point-size particles in a three-dimensional tube with varying cross-section is investigated. In the fashion of our recent work, Martens et al. [Phys. Rev. E 83, 051135 (2011)] we employ an asymptotic analysis to the stationary probability density in a geometric parameter of the tube geometry. We demonstrate that the leading order term is equivalent to the Fick-Jacobs approximation. Expression for the higher order corrections to the probability density is derived. Using this expansion orders, we obtain that in the diffusion dominated regime the average particle current equals the zeroth order Fick-Jacobs result corrected by a factor including the corrugation of the tube geometry. In particular, we demonstrate that this estimate is more accurate for extremely corrugated geometries compared with the common applied method using a spatially-dependent diffusion coefficient D(x, f) which substitutes the constant diffusion coefficient in the common Fick-Jacobs equation. The analytic findings are corroborated with the finite element calculation of a sinusoidal-shaped tube.

  7. Corrugation Profile for the Quasioptical Polarization Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koposova, E. V.; Lubyako, L. V.

    2014-07-01

    We consider and classify the regime of separation of two orthogonally polarized E and H waves by using a reflecting metal diffraction grating, which sends all the energy of an incident wave with one polarization to the specular order of diffraction, and that of an incident wave with the other polarization, to the (-1)st order of diffraction (in this case, the autocollimation regime is used). The conditions of existence of such a regime are studied in the simplest cases (generalization of the approach presented in [1, 2] to the case of a sinusoidal surface), along with the possibility to construct more complex (nonsinusoidal) corrugation profiles, for which the specified regime has certain advantages, e.g., a wider bandwidth. Examples of such profiles are presented. The studies are performed on the basis of numerical solution of the problem of diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave by a perfectly conducting corrugated surface within the framework of the integral-equation method employing the authors' computer visualization code.

  8. Pipe support

    DOEpatents

    Pollono, Louis P.

    1979-01-01

    A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled piping runs such as those used in nuclear systems. A section of the pipe to be supported is encircled by a tubular inner member comprised of two walls with an annular space therebetween. Compacted load-bearing thermal insulation is encapsulated within the annular space, and the inner member is clamped to the pipe by a constant clamping force split-ring clamp. The clamp may be connected to pipe hangers which provide desired support for the pipe.

  9. Pipe Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of attention to plumbing in college facilities, offering examples from various campuses. Addresses preventive maintenance, technology, and piping materials, including the debate between cast iron and PVC for drain pipes. (EV)

  10. Iron line variability of discoseismic corrugation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David; Butsky, Iryna

    2013-10-01

    Using a fast semi-analytic raytracing code, we study the variability of relativistically broadened Fe-Kα lines due to discoseismic oscillations concentrated in the innermost regions of accretion discs around black holes. The corrugation mode, or c-mode, is of particular interest as its natural frequency corresponds well to the ˜0.1-15 Hz range observed for low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) for lower spins. Comparison of the oscillation phase dependent variability and quasi-periodic oscillation-phase stacked Fe-Kα line observations will allow such discoseismic models to be confirmed or ruled out as a source of particular LFQPOs. The spectral range and frequency of the variability of the Fe-Kα line due to c-modes can also potentially be used to constrain the black hole spin if observed with sufficient temporal and spectral resolution.

  11. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Corrugated Insulating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Etsuro; Kato, Masayasu; Tomikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kaneko

    The effective thermal conductivity of corrugated insulating materials which are made by polypropylene or polycarbonate have been measured by employing steady state comparison method for several specimen having various thickness and specific weight. The thermal conductivity of them evaluated are also by using the thermal resistance models, and are compared with above measured values and raw materials' conductivity. The main results obtained in this paper are as follows: (1) In regard to the specimen in this paper, the effective thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature, but the increasing rate of them is small. (2) There are considerable differences between the measured values and the predicted ones that are estimated by using the thermal resistance model in which heat flow by conduction only. This differences increase with increasing specimens' thickness. This difference become extinct by considering the coexistence heat flow of conduction and radiation in the air phase of specimen. (3) The thermal resistance of specimen increases linearly with increasing specimens' thickness.

  12. Fatigue testing of corrugated and Teflon hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M.; Swanson, Theodore D.; Costello, Frederick A.

    1990-01-01

    Single and two-phase heat transport systems for the thermal control of large space facilities require fluid lines that traverse joints and either rotate or move in some other manner. Flexible hoses are being considered as one means of traversing these joints. To test the resilience of flexible hoses to bending stress, a test assembly was constructed to determine the number of flexing cycles the hoses could withstand before losing their ability to maintain a constant pressure. Corrugated metal hoses and Teflon hoses were tested at different pressures with nitrogen gas. The metal hoses had lives ranging from 30,000 to 100,000 flexing cycles. But, even after 400,000 cycles, the Teflon hoses remained essentially intact, though some leakage in the convoluted Teflon is noted.

  13. Demonstration of angle-dependent Casimir force between corrugations.

    PubMed

    Banishev, A A; Wagner, J; Emig, T; Zandi, R; Mohideen, U

    2013-06-21

    The normal Casimir force between a sinusoidally corrugated gold coated plate and a sphere was measured at various angles between the corrugations using an atomic force microscope. A strong dependence on the orientation angle of the corrugation is found. The measured forces were found to deviate from the proximity force approximation and are in agreement with the theory based on the gradient expansion including correlation effects of geometry and material properties. We analyze the role of temperature. The obtained results open new opportunities for control of the Casimir effect in micromechanical systems. PMID:23829717

  14. Pulse propagation and electron acceleration in a corrugated plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Palastro, J P; Antonsen, T M; Morshed, S; York, A G; Milchberg, H M

    2008-03-01

    A preformed plasma channel provides a guiding structure for laser pulses unbound by the intensity thresholds of standard waveguides. The recently realized corrugated plasma channel [Layer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 035001 (2007)] allows for the guiding of laser pulses with subluminal spatial harmonics. These spatial harmonics can be phase matched to high energy electrons, making the corrugated plasma channel ideal for the acceleration of electrons. We present a simple analytic model of pulse propagation in a corrugated plasma channel and examine the laser-electron beam interaction. Simulations show accelerating gradients of several hundred MeV/cm for laser powers much lower than required by standard laser wakefield schemes. PMID:18517531

  15. 49 CFR 1242.15 - Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast, track laying and surfacing, and road property damaged... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Way and Structures § 1242.15 Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges...

  16. 49 CFR 1242.15 - Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast, track laying and surfacing, and road property damaged... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Way and Structures § 1242.15 Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges...

  17. The influence of the microtexture, corrugation inclination angle, and perforation of corrugated surfaces on the character of liquid spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A. N.; Li, X.; Li, H.; Gao, X.; Volodin, O. A.; Surtaev, A. S.; Serdyukov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    The spreading of liquid nitrogen film over the surface of single structured packing elements has been experimentally studied. Comparative analysis of experimental data showed the influence of a horizontal microtexture, perforation, and inclination angle of large corrugation ribs on the character of liquid film spreading over the corrugated surface at various values of the film-flow Reynolds number. Experimental data are also presented on the dependence of the relative fraction of liquid retained in a single irrigated channel in corrugated plates of various thicknesses on the extent of irrigation.

  18. 1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  19. Hydrodynamics of Gas-Liquid Counterflow Through Corrugated Parallel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, V.F.

    1999-11-05

    Structured packings utilized in today's distillation packed towers consist of stacked units of many vertically oriented parallel corrugated plates. The V-shaped corrugations are oriented at a fixed angle with respect to the vertical direction, and the corrugation angle in adjacent plates are oriented in reverse direction. Points of contact, at the crests of the corrugations, between adjacent plates, form an unconsolidated porous medium with known topology. Modern structured packings have been gaining acceptance in several separation processes, particularly distillation where gas/vapor and liquid flow countercurrently through the packing. In addition, structured packings have been credited with relatively low pressure drop, high efficiency, low holdup, and higher capacity; the packing also can be made corrosion resistive.

  20. 7. DETAIL VIEW UNDER BRIDGE OF CORRUGATED STEEL, BEAMS, RODS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW UNDER BRIDGE OF CORRUGATED STEEL, BEAMS, RODS, AND ABUTMENT - Price River Bridge, Spanning Price River, 760 North Street in Carbonville, 1 mile northwest of Price, Carbonville, Carbon County, UT

  1. Spoof plasmon radiation using sinusoidally modulated corrugated reactance surfaces.

    PubMed

    Panaretos, Anastasios H; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we theoretically investigate the feasibility of creating leaky wave antennas capable of converting spoof plasmons to radiating modes. Spoof plasmons are surface waves excited along metallic corrugated surfaces and they are considered the microwave and THz equivalent of optical surface plasmon polaritons. Given that a corrugated surface is essentially a reactance surface, the proposed design methodology relies on engineering a corrugated surface so that it exhibits a sinusoidally modulated reactance profile. Through such non-uniform periodic reactance surfaces, guided surface waves can efficiently couple into free-space radiating modes. This requires the development of a realistic methodology that effectively maps the necessary sinusoidal reactance variation to a sinusoidal variation corresponding to the depth of the grooves. Both planar and cylindrical corrugated surfaces are examined and it is numerically demonstrated that the corresponding sinusoidally modulated leaky wave structures can very efficiently convert guided spoof plasmons to radiating modes. PMID:26906820

  2. A Wideband Profiled Corrugated Horn for Multichroic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Lingzhen; Tong, Cheuk-yu Edward; Wollack, Edward J.; Chuss, David T.

    2015-01-01

    A wideband profiled corrugated feedhorn was developed for multichroic applications. This feedhorn features a return loss of better than -25 dB and cross polarization peaks below -30 dB, over a fractional bandwidth of greater than 50%. Its performance is close to that of the ring-loaded corrugated feedhorn; however, the design presented is much easier to fabricate at millimeter wavelengths.

  3. Bandwidth Study of the Microwave Reflectors with Rectangular Corrugations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; He, Wenlong; Donaldson, Craig R.; Cross, Adrian W.

    2016-09-01

    The mode-selective microwave reflector with periodic rectangular corrugations in the inner surface of a circular metallic waveguide is studied in this paper. The relations between the bandwidth and reflection coefficient for different numbers of corrugation sections were studied through a global optimization method. Two types of reflectors were investigated. One does not consider the phase response and the other does. Both types of broadband reflectors operating at W-band were machined and measured to verify the numerical simulations.

  4. Theoretical study of corrugated plates: Shearing of a trapezoidally corrugated plate with trough lines permitted to curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Libove, C.

    1971-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the elastic shearing of a trapezoidally corrugated plate with discrete attachments at the ends of the corrugations. Numerical results on effective shear stiffness, stresses, and displacements are presented for selected geometries and end-attachment conditions. It is shown that the frame-like deformation of the cross-sections, which results from the absence of continuous end attachments, can lead to large transverse bending stresses and large reductions in shearing stiffness.

  5. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Phoenix Refrigeration Systems, Inc.'s heat pipe addition to the Phoenix 2000, a supermarket rooftop refrigeration/air conditioning system, resulted from the company's participation in a field test of heat pipes. Originally developed by NASA to control temperatures in space electronic systems, the heat pipe is a simple, effective, heat transfer system. It has been used successfully in candy storage facilities where it has provided significant energy savings. Additional data is expected to fully quantify the impact of the heat pipes on supermarket air conditioning systems.

  6. Pipe connector

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Thomas E.; Pardini, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A safety test facility for testing sodium-cooled nuclear reactor components includes a reactor vessel and a heat exchanger submerged in sodium in the tank. The reactor vessel and heat exchanger are connected by an expansion/deflection pipe coupling comprising a pair of coaxially and slidably engaged tubular elements having radially enlarged opposed end portions of which at least a part is of spherical contour adapted to engage conical sockets in the ends of pipes leading out of the reactor vessel and in to the heat exchanger. A spring surrounding the pipe coupling urges the end portions apart and into engagement with the spherical sockets. Since the pipe coupling is submerged in liquid a limited amount of leakage of sodium from the pipe can be tolerated.

  7. Detection of rail corrugation based on fiber laser accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Du, Yanliang; Sun, Baochen; Ma, Huaixiang; Li, Fang

    2013-09-01

    Efficient inspection methods are necessary for detection of rail corrugation to improve the safety and ride quality of railway operations. This paper presents a novel fiber optic technology for detection of rail corrugation based on fiber laser accelerometers (FLAs), tailored to the measurement of surface damage on rail structures. The principle of detection of rail corrugation using double integration of axle-box acceleration is presented. Then we present the theoretical model and test results of FLAs which are installed on the bogie to detect the vertical axle-box acceleration of the train. Characteristics of high sensitivity and large dynamic range are achieved when using fiber optic interferometric demodulation. A flexible inertial algorithm based on double integration and the wavelet denoising method is proposed to accurately estimate the rail corrugation. A field test is carried out on the Datong-Qinhuangdao Railway in north China. The test results are compared with the results of a rail inspection car, which shows that the fiber laser sensing system has a good performance in monitoring rail corrugation.

  8. Finite-temperature Casimir force between perfectly metallic corrugated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sarabadani, Jalal; Miri, MirFaez

    2011-09-15

    We study the Casimir force between two corrugated plates due to thermal fluctuations of a scalar field. For arbitrary corrugations and temperature T, we provide an analytical expression for the Casimir force, which is exact to second order in the corrugation amplitude. We study the specific case of two sinusoidally corrugated plates with corrugation wavelength {lambda}, lateral displacement b, and mean separation H. We find that the lateral Casimir force is F{sub l}(T,H)sin(2{pi}b/{lambda}). In other words, at all temperatures, the lateral force is a sinusoidal function of the lateral shift. In the limit {lambda}>>H, F{sub l}(T{yields}{infinity},H){proportional_to}k{sub B}TH{sup -4}{lambda}{sup -1}. In the opposite limit {lambda}<

  9. Aerodynamic Performances of Corrugated Dragonfly Wings at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, Masatoshi; He, Guowei; Hu, Hui

    2006-11-01

    The cross-sections of dragonfly wings have well-defined corrugated configurations, which seem to be not very suitable for flight according to traditional airfoil design principles. However, previous studies have led to surprising conclusions of that corrugated dragonfly wings would have better aerodynamic performances compared with traditional technical airfoils in the low Reynolds number regime where dragonflies usually fly. Unlike most of the previous studies of either measuring total aerodynamics forces (lift and drag) or conducting qualitative flow visualization, a series of wind tunnel experiments will be conducted in the present study to investigate the aerodynamic performances of corrugated dragonfly wings at low Reynolds numbers quantitatively. In addition to aerodynamics force measurements, detailed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements will be conducted to quantify of the flow field around a two-dimensional corrugated dragonfly wing model to elucidate the fundamental physics associated with the flight features and aerodynamic performances of corrugated dragonfly wings. The aerodynamic performances of the dragonfly wing model will be compared with those of a simple flat plate and a NASA low-speed airfoil at low Reynolds numbers.

  10. Piping Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Burns & McDonnell provide architectural and engineering services in planning, design and construction of a wide range of projects all over the world. In design analysis, company regularly uses COSMIC computer programs. In computer testing piping design of a power plant, company uses Pipe Flexibility Analysis Program (MEL-21) to analyze stresses due to weight, temperature, and pressure found in proposed piping systems. Individual flow rates are put into the computer, then computer calculates the pressure drop existing across each component; if needed, design corrections or adjustments can be made and rechecked.

  11. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  12. The effects of construction on water quality: a case study of the culverting of Abram Creek.

    PubMed

    Houser, Darci L; Pruess, Heidi

    2009-08-01

    While sediment is a leading cause of impaired water, studies have shown that construction activities incorporating best management practices (BMPs) can be conducted without lasting detrimental effects on water quality. This paper examines the water quality impacts of a construction project involving the culverting of a creek to allow for the construction of a runway at an airport in Cleveland, Ohio. Sampling parameters included total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, conductivity, and temperature. To assess the effects of the construction project conducted using appropriate BMPs, weekly water quality samples were taken upstream and downstream from the construction site. The samples were categorized as baseline, active construction, and post-construction to isolate the effects of the construction activities. t tests were used to compare upstream and downstream data for each of the parameters and ANOVA was used to compare the individual water quality parameters in the three sampling periods to see if there were significant increases or decreases of the water quality parameters within the phases. Results of ANOVA indicate there were no statistically significant differences between upstream and downstream in the mean sample results for TSS, conductivity, and pH when comparing the three phases. While the descriptive statistics conducted on the data illustrated minor variation in the upstream, downstream, and between phase comparisons, the results of the t tests helped to strengthen the theory that construction projects utilizing appropriate BMPs can yield minimal impact on overall water quality of surrounding water bodies. PMID:18629442

  13. Corrugated capillary as THz Cherenkov Smith-Purcell radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekomtsev, K. V.; Aryshev, A. S.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Ponomarenko, A. A.; Sukharev, V. M.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we discussed Particle In Cell electromagnetic simulations and mechanical design of dielectric capillaries that produce THz Cherenkov Smith-Purcell radiation (ChSPR), arising when a femtosecond electron multi-bunch beam propagates through corrugated and non-corrugated dielectric capillaries with metallic radiation reflectors. We investigated the influence of the four-bunch beam on the SPR field spectrum and on the ChSPR power spectrum, and the influence of the non-central beam propagation on the ChSPR power spectrum. We also discussed the design and assembly of the capillaries, constructed as sets of cylindrical rings.

  14. Mode switching in a gyrotron with azimuthally corrugated resonator.

    PubMed

    Nusinovich, G S; Sinitsyn, O V; Antonsen, T M

    2007-05-18

    The operation of a gyrotron having a cylindrical resonator with an azimuthally corrugated wall is analyzed. In such a device, wall corrugation cancels the degeneracy of the modes with azimuthally standing patterns. The coupling between these modes depends on the radius of electron beam. It is shown that such a gyrotron can be easily switched from one mode to another. When the switching is done with the repetition frequency equal to the rotational frequency of magnetic islands, this sort of operation can be used for suppression of neoclassical tearing modes in large-scale tokamaks and stellarators. PMID:17677705

  15. Mode Switching in a Gyrotron with Azimuthally Corrugated Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Sinitsyn, O. V.; Antonsen, T. M. Jr.

    2007-05-18

    The operation of a gyrotron having a cylindrical resonator with an azimuthally corrugated wall is analyzed. In such a device, wall corrugation cancels the degeneracy of the modes with azimuthally standing patterns. The coupling between these modes depends on the radius of electron beam. It is shown that such a gyrotron can be easily switched from one mode to another. When the switching is done with the repetition frequency equal to the rotational frequency of magnetic islands, this sort of operation can be used for suppression of neoclassical tearing modes in large-scale tokamaks and stellarators.

  16. Laser Welded Corrugated Steel Panels in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kananen, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Keskitalo, M.; Hietala, M.; Järvenpää, A.; Holappa, K.; Saine, K.; Teiskonen, J.

    Corrugated core steel panels are an effective way to reduce weight and increase stiffness of steel structures. In numerous applications, these panels have shown very promising commercial possibilities. This study presents the design, manufacturing and commercializing process for two practical examples: Case 1) a fly wheel cover for a diesel engine and Case 2) rotationally symmetrical panel for an electric motor. Test materials of various kinds were used for corrugated cores and skin plates: conventional low-carbon steel grade EN 10130 and ferritic stainless steel grade 1.4509 with plate the thicknesses of 0.5, 0.6 and 0.75 mm. To manufacture different kinds of corrugated core steel panels, flexible manufacturing tools and cost-effective processes are needed. The most important criterion for laser welding panels was the capability of forming tools for producing high quality geometry for the core. Laser welding assembly showed that the quality of the core in both studied cases was good enough for welding the lap joints properly. Developed panels have been tested in industrial applications with excellent feedback. If thickness of a corrugated panel structure is not a limiting issue, these panels are good solution on application where stiffness and lighter weight are required as well as vibrational aspect considered.

  17. A corrugated termination shock in pulsar wind nebulae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin

    2016-08-01

    > Successful phenomenological models of pulsar wind nebulae assume efficient dissipation of the Poynting flux of the magnetized electron-positron wind as well as efficient acceleration of the pairs in the vicinity of the termination shock, but how this is realized is not yet well understood. This paper suggests that the corrugation of the termination shock, at the onset of nonlinearity, may lead towards the desired phenomenology. Nonlinear corrugation of the termination shock would convert a fraction of order unity of the incoming ordered magnetic field into downstream turbulence, slowing down the flow to sub-relativistic velocities. The dissipation of turbulence would further preheat the pair population on short length scales, close to equipartition with the magnetic field, thereby reducing the initial high magnetization to values of order unity. Furthermore, it is speculated that the turbulence generated by the corrugation pattern may sustain a relativistic Fermi process, accelerating particles close to the radiation reaction limit, as observed in the Crab nebula. The required corrugation could be induced by the fast magnetosonic modes of downstream nebular turbulence; but it could also be produced by upstream turbulence, either carried by the wind or seeded in the precursor by the accelerated particles themselves.

  18. Unitary formalism for scattering from a hard corrugated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. C.; Celli, V.; Coopersmith, M.; Haller, M.

    1982-07-01

    We obtain two coupled integral equations for the diffraction of waves from a hard corrugated surface. This rearrangement is shown to be equivalent to the integral equation for the scattering amplitude obtained by an application of the Rayleigh method. The formalism presented here, analogous to K-matrix theory, makes the unitarity of the theory apparent at each stage of approximation.

  19. Mechanical behavior of Kenaf/Epoxy corrugated sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhori, S.; Hassan, M. Z.; Daud, Y.; Sarip, S.; Rahman, N.; Ismail, Z.; Aziz, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents the response of kenaf/epoxy corrugated sandwich structure during quasi-static test. Force-displacements curves have been deducted to determine the deformation pattern and collapse behavior of the structure. Kenaf/epoxy sandwich structures skins fabricated by using hand layup technique and the corrugated core were moulded by using steel mould. Different thicknesses of corrugated core web with two sizes of kenaf fibers were used. The corrugated core is then bonded with the skins by using poly-epoxy resin and has been cut into different number of cells. The specimens then tested under tensile and compression at different constant speeds until the specimens fully crushed. Tensile tests data showed the structure can be considered brittle when it breaking point strain, ε less than 0.025. In compression test, the specimens fail due to dominated by stress concentration that initiated by prior cracks. Also, the specimens with more number of cells and thicker core web have higher strength and the ability to absorb higher energy.

  20. CLOSED PROCESS WATER LOOP IN NSSC CORRUGATING MEDIUM MANUFACTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last 5 years, the Green Bay Packaging corrugating medium mill has converted to an essentially closed process water system. The mill is a net consumer of water. This is due to the greater amount of water carried out of the system with the sheet compared to the lower water...

  1. Linearly Polarized Modes of a Corrugated Metallic Waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, E.J.; Tax, David; Bigelow, Timothy; Rasmussen, David A

    2010-01-01

    A linearly polarized (LP(mn)) mode basis set for oversized, corrugated, metallic waveguides is derived for the special case of quarter-wavelength-depth circumferential corrugations. The relationship between the LP(mn) modes and the conventional modes (HE(mn), EH(mn), TE(0n), TM(0n)) of the corrugated guide is shown. The loss in a gap or equivalent miter bend in the waveguide is calculated for single-mode and multimode propagation on the line. In the latter case, it is shown that modes of the same symmetry interfere with one another, causing enhanced or reduced loss, depending on the relative phase of the modes. If two modes with azimuthal (m) indexes that differ by one propagate in the waveguide, the resultant centroid and the tilt angle of radiation at the guide end are shown to be related through a constant of the motion. These results describe the propagation of high-power linearly polarized radiation in overmoded corrugated waveguides.

  2. Bending of five-layer beams with crosswise corrugated main core

    SciTech Connect

    Magnucka-Blandzi, Ewa; Walczak, Zbigniew

    2015-03-10

    The subject of the study is one orthotropic thin-walled sandwich beam with trapezoidal core and two-layer facings. The outer layers of facings are flat, but inner layers are trapezoidal corrugated. The main core of the beam is also trapezoidal corrugated – in perpendicular direction to the corrugation of inner layers of facings. The beam is with lengthwise corrugated layers and crosswise corrugated main core. The mathematical and physical model of this beam is formulated, and also the field of displacements. The system of equilibrium equations is analytically derived using the energy method. The obtained solutions will be verified numerically (FEM)

  3. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than $57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was $28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  4. Condensation of refrigerants flowing inside smooth and corrugated tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, D.L.; Conklin, J.C.; Vineyard, E.A.

    1995-07-01

    Because heat exchanger thermal performance has a direct fluence on the overall cycle performance of vapor-compression refrigeration machinery,enhanced heat transfer surfaces are of interest to improve the efficiency of heat pumps and air conditioners. We investigated R-22 and a nonazeotropic refrigerant mixture (NARM) of 75% R-143a and 25% R-124 (by mass) to study their thermal performance in a condenser made of conventional smooth tubes and another condenser made of corrugated, or spirally indented, tubes. We investigated the condensing heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics in an experimental test loop model of a domestic beat pump system employing a variable speed compressor. The refrigerant circulates inside the central tube and the water circulates in the annulus. At refrigerant mass fluxes of approximately 275--300 kg/m{sup 2}s, the measured irreversible pressure drop of the corrugated surface was 23% higher than that of the smooth surface for the R-22. At refrigerant mass fluxes of 350-370 kg/m{sup 2}s, the irreversible pressure drop of the corrugated surface was 36% higher than that of the smooth surface for the NARM. The average heat transfer coefficient for the corrugated surface for R-22 was roughly 40% higher than that for the smooth tube surface at refrigerant mass fluxes of 275--295 kg/m{sup 2}s. The average heat transfer coefficient for the corrugated surface for the NARM was typically 70% higher than that for the smooth tube surface at refrigerant mass fluxes of 340--385 kg/m{sup 2}s.

  5. Optimization of photonics for corrugated thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Olivier; Vigneron, Jean Pol; Agustsson, Otto; Decroupet, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    The amount of solar energy reaching the active (photovoltaic) layer in a thin-film solar cell can be increased by reducing the Fresnel reflection losses at the interfaces. By using corrugated interfaces (at the wavelength scale), adiabatic propagation of the electromagnetic radiation is achieved over a broad wavelength range throughout the structure, which leads to an increase in the light that is absorbed in the active layer and, ultimately, to the improvement of the photovoltaic conversion efficiency. In this article, we have considered the case of corrugated thin-film solar cell structures and we have studied theoretically the optimization of such structures from the point of view of photonics. The focus was put on periodic pyramidal interface corrugations because they were similar to those existing at the surface of corrugated transparent electrodes on which active layers can be deposited. Because of their technological importance, we chose to work with fluorine-doped tin oxide as front electrode material and with amorphous silicon as active material. Using an original three dimensional transfer matrix method, we solved the electromagnetic wave propagation problem in the general case of laterally periodic stratified media and we compared this solution with effective medium approximated solution. On the basis of typical pyramid sizes, we demonstrated, through numerical simulations, the optimization of the global light energy intake by means of corrugations of increasing complexity. The best structures were found to be based on pyramid arrays having subwavelength periods and aspect ratio values close to one. Typically, a pyramidal structure with base and height both equal to 300 nm led to a global energy intake equal to I =0.98 (integrated over the spectral range 400-710 nm), which represented a 24% improvement in comparison with the global energy intake of a planar structure (I =0.79).

  6. Corrugated Organic Light Emitting Diodes Using Low Tg Electron Transporting Materials.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Liu, Shuyi; Fu, Xiangyu; Pan, Zhenxing; Chen, Ying; So, Franky; Schanze, Kirk S

    2016-06-29

    A corrugated organic light emitting diode (OLED) with enhanced light extraction is realized by incorporating a corrugated composite electron transport layer (ETL) consisting of two ETLs with different glass transition temperatures. The morphology of the corrugated structure is characterized with atomic force microscopy. The results show that the corrugation can be controlled by the layer thicknesses and annealing temperature. Compared with the control planar device, the corrugated OLED shows a more than 35% enhancement in current efficiency from 31 cd/A to 43 cd/A and a 20% enhancement in external quantum efficiency from 10% to 12% at 100 cd/m(2). In addition, the corrugated OLED also has a greatly improved operational stability. The LT90 lifetime of a device operated at 1000 cd/m(2) is improved greater than 100-fold in the corrugated OLED. PMID:27245622

  7. Test of superplastically formed corrugated aluminum compression specimens with beaded webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Randall C.; Royster, Dick M.; Bales, Thomas T.; James, William F.; Shinn, Joseph M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Corrugated wall sections provide a highly efficient structure for carrying compressive loads in aircraft and spacecraft fuselages. The superplastic forming (SPF) process offers a means to produce complex shells and panels with corrugated wall shapes. A study was made to investigate the feasibility of superplastically forming 7475-T6 aluminum sheet into a corrugated wall configuration and to demonstrate the structural integrity of the construction by testing. The corrugated configuration selected has beaded web segments separating curved-cap segments. Eight test specimens were fabricated. Two specimens were simply a single sheet of aluminum superplastically formed to a beaded-web, curved-cap corrugation configuration. Six specimens were single-sheet corrugations modified by adhesive bonding additional sheet material to selectively reinforce the curved-cap portion of the corrugation. The specimens were tested to failure by crippling in end compression at room temperature.

  8. Porus electrode comprising a bonded stack of pieces of corrugated metal foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An electrode suitable for use in an electrochemical cell is described. The electrode is composed of a porous conductive support with a bonded stack of pieces of thin corrugated nickel foil where the corrugations are oriented approximately perpendicular to the sides of the electrode and form an array of passages through the electrode. Active material such as cadmium hydroxide or nickel hydroxide is uniformly distributed within the passages. The support may comprise also a piece of thin flat nickel foil between adjacent pieces of the corrugated foil, forming a barrier between the passages formed on each side of it. Typically the corrugations in the odd corrugated layers are oriented at a small angle from the perpendicular in one direction and the corrugations in the even corrugated layers are oriented at a small angle from the perpendicular in the opposite direction.

  9. Piping Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A complex of high pressure piping at Stennis Space Center carries rocket propellants and other fluids/gases through the Center's Component Test Facility. Conventional clamped connectors tend to leak when propellant lines are chilled to extremely low temperatures. Reflange, Inc. customized an existing piping connector to include a secondary seal more tolerant of severe thermal gradients for Stennis. The T-Con connector solved the problem, and the company is now marketing a commercial version that permits testing, monitoring or collecting any emissions that may escape the primary seal during severe thermal transition.

  10. Pipe gripper

    DOEpatents

    Moyers, S.M.

    1975-12-16

    A device for gripping the exterior surface of a pipe or rod is described which has a plurality of wedges, each having a concave face which engages the outer surface of the pipe and each having a smooth face opposing the concave face. The wedges are seated on and their grooved concave faces are maintained in circular alignment by tapered axial segments of an opening extending through a wedge-seating member. The wedges are allowed to slide across the tapered axial segments so that such a sliding movement acts to vary the diameter of the circular alignment.

  11. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Heat Pipes were originally developed by NASA and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the 1960s to dissipate excessive heat build- up in critical areas of spacecraft and maintain even temperatures of satellites. Heat pipes are tubular devices where a working fluid alternately evaporates and condenses, transferring heat from one region of the tube to another. KONA Corporation refined and applied the same technology to solve complex heating requirements of hot runner systems in injection molds. KONA Hot Runner Systems are used throughout the plastics industry for products ranging in size from tiny medical devices to large single cavity automobile bumpers and instrument panels.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide removal from sediment and water in box culverts/storm drains by iron-based granules.

    PubMed

    Sun, J L; Shang, C; Kikkert, G A

    2013-01-01

    A renewable granular iron-based technology for hydrogen sulfide removal from sediment and water in box culverts and storm drains is discussed. Iron granules, including granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), granular ferric oxide (GFO) and rusted waste iron crusts (RWIC) embedded in the sediment phase removed aqueous hydrogen sulfide formed from sedimentary biological sulfate reduction. The exhausted iron granules were exposed to dissolved oxygen and this regeneration process recovered the sulfide removal capacities of the granules. The recovery is likely attributable to the oxidation of the ferrous iron precipitates film and the formation of new reactive ferric iron surface sites on the iron granules and sand particles. GFH and RWIC showed larger sulfide removal capacities in the sediment phase than GFO, likely due to the less ordered crystal structures on their surfaces. This study demonstrates that the iron granules are able to remove hydrogen sulfide from sediment and water in box culverts and storm drains and they have the potential to be regenerated and reused by contacting with dissolved oxygen. PMID:24355850

  13. Direct Acceleration of Electrons in a Corrugated Plasma Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M.; Morshed, S.; York, A. G.; Layer, B.; Aubuchon, M.; Milchberg, H. M.; Froula, D. H.

    2009-01-22

    Direct laser acceleration of electrons provides a low power tabletop alternative to laser wakefield accelerators. Until recently, however, direct acceleration has been limited by diffraction, phase matching, and material damage thresholds. The development of the corrugated plasma channel [B. Layer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 035001 (2007)] has removed all of these limitations and promises to allow direct acceleration of electrons over many centimeters at high gradients using femtosecond lasers [A. G. York et al., Phys Rev. Lett 100, 195001 (2008), J. P. Palastro et al., Phys. Rev. E 77, 036405 (2008)]. We present a simple analytic model of laser propagation in a corrugated plasma channel and examine the laser-electron beam interaction. Simulations show accelerating gradients of several hundred MeV/cm for laser powers much lower than required by standard laser wakefield schemes. In addition, the laser provides a transverse force that confines the high energy electrons on axis, while expelling low energy electrons.

  14. Progress Toward Corrugated Feed Horn Arrays in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J.; Yoon, K. W.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Cho, H. M.; Hilton, G. C.; Niemack, M. D.; Irwin, K. D.

    2009-12-16

    We are developing monolithic arrays of corrugated feed horns fabricated in silicon for dual-polarization single-mode operation at 90, 145 and 220 GHz. The arrays consist of hundreds of platelet feed horns assembled from gold-coated stacks of micro-machined silicon wafers. As a first step, Au-coated Si waveguides with a circular, corrugated cross section were fabricated; their attenuation was measured to be less than 0.15 dB/cm from 80 to 110 GHz at room temperature. To ease the manufacture of horn arrays, electrolytic deposition of Au on degenerate Si without a metal seed layer was demonstrated. An apparatus for measuring the radiation pattern, optical efficiency, and spectral band-pass of prototype horns is described. Feed horn arrays made of silicon may find use in measurements of the polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  15. Optimization of the leading edge segment of a corrugated wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Manas; Chahl, Javaan

    2014-03-01

    Insect wings consist of flat plates of membranes stiffened by spars. The effect of this structure is that the wings appear as corrugated surfaces when considered on chordwise sections. We know that aerodynamically efficient insects such as a dragonfly engage in fixed wing flight modes for extended periods. The analysis in the literature has shown that the aerodynamic efficiency (cl/cd) of a corrugated aerofoil is sensitive to Reynolds number (Re) and angle-of-attack (AoA), yet the conclusions established are on the basis of flow analysis on a single baseline shape only. The sample size of the aerofoils must be extended further so that the influence and merits of corrugated shape features can be established. In this work, a design-of-experiments (DoE) approach is applied to induce systematic shape perturbations on a select, off-the-shelf baseline shape one feature at a time over a set number of increments. At each shape increment, the aerodynamic forces are established using a high fidelity CFD solver. The design space is modeled at a Re of 20,000 and 34,000 and at flow angle of 4.0° to represent a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) in glide. The results confirmed the importance of the leading and trailing edge deflections on cl/cd. At Re = 20, 000, cl/cd of a corrugated aerofoil with deflection at the leading edge region only is 16% higher than the baseline shape, and 39% higher than the flat plate. At Re = 34, 000, cl/cd performance is sensitive to the trailing edge deflection. At the optimum deflection setting, cl/cd is 18% higher than the baseline shape and 23% higher than the flat plate. The results confirm that the leading and trailing edge deflections are critical to cl/cd for a MAV in glide.

  16. Optimization of a corrugated stiffened composite panel under uniaxial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, B. L.; Sobel, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    An approach of structural optimization has been used to optimize the weight of a simply supported, corrugated hat stiffened composite panel under uniaxial compression. The approach consists of the employment of nonlinear mathematical programming techniques to reach an optimum solution. Some simplifying assumptions are made in the stress analysis to obtain faster convergence to an optimum solution. With these simplifying assumptions the number of unknown design parameters is reduced to twelve.

  17. Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Kemeny, George A.; Cookson, Alan H.

    1981-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

  18. PROCESSING OF NANOSTRUCTURED COPPER BY REPETITIVE CORRUGATION AND STRAIGHTENING (RCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.T.; Jiang, H.

    2000-10-01

    A new process, Repetitive Corrugation and Straightening (RCS), has been developed to create bulk, nanostructured copper. In this investigation, a high purity (99.99%). copper bar measuring 6 x 6 x 50 mm with an average grain size of 765 {micro}m was used as the starting material. It was repetitively corrugated and straightened for 14 times with 90{degree} rotations along its longitudinal axis between consecutive corrugation-straightening cycles. The copper was cooled to below room temperature before each RCS cycle. The grain size obtained after the RCS process was in the range of twenty to a few hundred nanometers, and microhardness was increased by 100%. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium grain boundaries are observed. This work demonstrates the capability of the RCS process in refining grain size of metal materials. The RCS process can be easily adapted to large-scale industrial production and has the potential to pave the way to large-scale structural applications of nanostructured materials.

  19. Heat pipe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A bibliography of heat pipe technology to provide a summary of research projects conducted on heat pipes is presented. The subjects duscussed are: (1) heat pipe applications, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) design and fabrication, (4) testing and operation, (5) subject and author index, and (6) heat pipe related patents.

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Strength of Multiweb Beams with Corrugated Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Allister F

    1956-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the strength of multiweb beams with corrugated webs are reported. Included in the investigation were two types of connection between the web and the skin. A comparison between the structural efficiency of corrugated-web and channel-web multiweb beams is presented, and it is shown that, for a considerable range of the structural index, corrugated-web beams can be built which are structurally more efficient than channel-web beams.

  1. Flood magnitude and frequency of Jacks Run at the culvert on U.S. Route 206, Southampton Township, Burlington County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Flood magnitude and frequency of Jacks Run at the culvert on U.S. Route 206, Southampton Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the rational method. Flood magnitude and frequency estimates, as well as basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimate is 29 cubic feet per second.

  2. Outcoupling efficiency of OLEDs with 2D periodical corrugation at the cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Sergei; Bogdanova, Maria; Teslyuk, Anton

    2016-03-01

    We study theoretically the optical performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with 2D periodical corrugation at the cathode. We show how emergence of radiative surface plasmon resonances at the 2D corrugated cathode leads to the enhancement of the outcoupling efficiency of the OLED, which is primarily due to the outcoupling of emission generated by vertically oriented emitting excitons in the emission layer. We analyze the outcoupling efficiency of the OLED as a function of geometrical parameters of the corrugation and establish design rules for optimal outcoupling enhancement with the 2D corrugation at the cathode.

  3. Assessment of scour-critical data collected at selected bridges and culverts in South Carolina, 1990-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurley, N.M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Data at bridges and culverts were collected at 3,506 stream crossings in South Carolina during 1990-92. The data include general information unique to the structure; structural data; and hydraulic, geomorphic, and vegetation information. The data are stored in the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina District Bridge-Scour Data Base. Observed- and potential-scour indexes were computed from the applicable data variables. Sites with observed-scour indexes exceeding ten and (or) potential-scour indexes exceeding 20 are considered to have significant scour-related problems. Of the 3,506 sites inspected, 257 sites had an observed-scour index exceeding ten, 214 sites had a potential-scour index exceeding 20, and 85 sites had observed- and potential-scour indexes exceeding both threshold values.

  4. Dispersion of helically corrugated waveguides: analytical, numerical, and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Burt, G; Samsonov, S V; Ronald, K; Denisov, G G; Young, A R; Bratman, V L; Phelps, A D R; Cross, A W; Konoplev, I V; He, W; Thomson, J; Whyte, C G

    2004-10-01

    Helically corrugated waveguides have recently been studied for use in various applications such as interaction regions in gyrotron traveling-wave tubes and gyrotron backward-wave oscillators and as a dispersive medium for passive microwave pulse compression. The paper presents a summary of various methods that can be used for analysis of the wave dispersion of such waveguides. The results obtained from an analytical approach, simulations with the three-dimensional numerical code MAGIC, and cold microwave measurements are analyzed and compared. PMID:15600525

  5. Three-dimensional train track model for study of rail corrugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X. S.; Wen, Z. F.; Wang, K. Y.; Zhou, Z. R.; Liu, Q. Y.; Li, C. H.

    2006-06-01

    Rail corrugation is a main factor causing the vibration and noise from the structures of railway vehicles and tracks. A calculation model is put forward to analyse the effect of rail corrugation with different depths and wavelengths on the dynamical behaviour of a passenger car and a curved track in detail. Also the evolution of initial corrugation with different wavelengths is investigated. In the numerical analysis, Kalker's non-Hertzian rolling contact theory is modified and used to calculate the frictional work density on the contact area of the wheel and rail in rolling contact. The material loss per unit area is assumed to be proportional to the frictional work density to determine the wear depth of the contact surfaces of the curved rails. The combined influences of the corrugation development and the vertical and lateral coupled dynamics of the passenger car and the curved track are taken into account. The numerical results indicate that: (1) the corrugation with high passing frequencies has a great influence on the dynamical performance of the wheelset and track, but little on the car-body and the bogie frame; (2) the deeper the corrugation depth is, the greater the influence and the rail material wear are; but the longer the corrugation wavelength is, the smaller the influence and the wear are; and (3) the initial corrugation with a fixed wavelength on the rail running surface decreases with increasing number of the passenger car passages.

  6. A comprehensive track model for the improvement of corrugation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J.; Vadillo, E. G.; Santamaría, J.

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents a detailed model of the railway track based on wave propagation, suitable for corrugation studies. The model analyses both the vertical and the transverse dynamics of the track. Using the finite strip method (FSM), only the cross-section of the rail must be meshed, and thus it is not necessary to discretise a whole span in 3D. This model takes into account the discrete nature of the support, introducing concepts pertaining to the theory of periodic structures in the formulation. Wave superposition is enriched taking into account the contribution of residual vectors. In this way, the model obtains accurate results when a finite section of railway track is considered. Results for the infinite track have been compared against those presented by Gry and Müller. Aside from the improvements provided by the model presented in this paper, which Gry's and Müller's models do not contemplate, the results arising from the comparison prove satisfactory. Finally, the calculated receptances are compared against the experimental values obtained by the authors, demonstrating a fair degree of adequacy. Finally, these receptances are used within a linear model of corrugation developed by the authors.

  7. Imaging Local Electronic Corrugations and Doped Regions in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    B Schultz; C Patridge; V Lee; C Jaye; P Lysaght; C Smith; J Barnett; D Fischer; D Prendergast; S Banerjee

    2011-12-31

    Electronic structure heterogeneities are ubiquitous in two-dimensional graphene and profoundly impact the transport properties of this material. Here we show the mapping of discrete electronic domains within a single graphene sheet using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy in conjunction with ab initio density functional theory calculations. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging provides a wealth of detail regarding the extent to which the unoccupied levels of graphene are modified by corrugation, doping and adventitious impurities, as a result of synthesis and processing. Local electronic corrugations, visualized as distortions of the {pi}*cloud, have been imaged alongside inhomogeneously doped regions characterized by distinctive spectral signatures of altered unoccupied density of states. The combination of density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging, and in situ near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy experiments also provide resolution of a longstanding debate in the literature regarding the spectral assignments of pre-edge and interlayer states.

  8. Simulation of terahertz generation in corrugated plasma waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Andrew J.; Palastro, John; Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2011-05-15

    We simulate the response of a corrugated plasma channel to an ultrashort laser pulse in two dimensions with the goal of demonstrating the production of terahertz frequency electromagnetic modes. Corrugated channels support electromagnetic modes that have a Floquet-type dispersion relation and thus consist of a sum of spatial harmonics with subluminal phase velocities. This allows the possibility of phase matching between the ponderomotive potential associated with the laser pulse and the electromagnetic modes of the channel. Since the bandwidth of an ultrashort pulse includes terahertz frequencies, significant excitation of terahertz radiation is possible. Here we consider realistic density profiles to obtain predictions of the terahertz power output and mode structure for a channel with periodic boundary conditions. We then estimate pulse depletion effects from our simulation results. The fraction of laser energy converted to terahertz is independent of laser pulse energy in the linear regime, and we find it to be around 1%. Extrapolating to a pulse energy of 0.5 J gives a terahertz power output of 6 mJ with a pulse depletion length of less than 20 cm.

  9. The biofouling potential of flow on corrugated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miño, Gastón L.; Rusconi, Roberto; Kantsler, Vasily; Stocker, Roman

    2015-11-01

    Both natural and man-made surfaces are rarely smooth, and are instead often characterized by geometric heterogeneity or roughness over a broad range of scales. Because of the predicted importance of the local interaction between microorganisms and surfaces, roughness at the microbial scale can be an important element in determining the outcome of microbe-surface interactions, which represent the first step in biofilm formation and biofouling. In microbial habitats this interaction often occurs in flowing fluids, which can be important because regions with high hydrodynamic shear can induce a strong reorientation of bacteria towards surfaces, promoting attachment. Here we study the combination of flow and surface topography using video microscopy of Escherichia coli in corrugated microfluidic channels. We report that flow preferentially promotes attachment to specific regions of a corrugated surface, as result of the hydrodynamics of bacteria swimming in flow. We compute from the data a ``Local Biofouling Potential'' (LBP) and compare this successfully with predictions of a mathematical model, yielding one step towards the ability to mechanistically predict and thus ultimately either prevent or induce biofouling.

  10. Corrugated Waveguide Mode Content Analysis Using Irradiance Moments

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Idei, Hiroshi; Temkin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel, relatively simple method for determining the mode content of the linearly polarized modes of a corrugated waveguide using the moments of the intensity pattern of the field radiated from the end of the waveguide. This irradiance moment method is based on calculating the low-order irradiance moments, using measured intensity profiles only, of the radiated field from the waveguide aperture. Unlike the phase retrieval method, this method does not use or determine the phase distribution at the waveguide aperture. The new method was benchmarked numerically by comparison with sample mode mixtures. The results predict less than ±0.7% error bar in the retrieval of the mode content. The method was also tested using high-resolution experimental data from beams radiated from 63.5 mm and 19 mm corrugated waveguides at 170 and 250 GHz, respectively. The results showed a very good agreement of the mode content retrieved using the irradiance moment method versus the phase retrieval technique. The irradiance moment method is most suitable for cases where the modal power is primarily in the fundamental HE11 mode, with <8% of the power in high-order modes. PMID:25821260

  11. Ultrasonic pipe assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Graham H.; Morrow, Valerie L.; Levie, Harold; Kane, Ronald J.; Brown, Albert E.

    2003-12-23

    An ultrasonic pipe or other structure assessment system includes an ultrasonic transducer positioned proximate the pipe or other structure. A fluid connection between the ultrasonic transducer and the pipe or other structure is produced. The ultrasonic transducer is moved relative to the pipe or other structure.

  12. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  13. Short cracks in piping and piping welds

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Brust, F.; Francini, R.; Ghadiali, N.; Kilinski, T.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Landow, M.; Marschall, C.W.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. )

    1992-04-01

    This is the second semiannual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds research program. The program began in March 1990 and will extend for 4 years. The intent of this program is to verify and improve fracture analyses for circumferentially cracked large-diameter nuclear piping with crack sizes typically used in leak-before-break analyses or in-service flaw evaluations. Only quasi-static loading rates are evaluated since the NRC's International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program is evaluating the effects of seismic loading rates on cracked piping systems. Progress for through-wall-cracked pipe involved (1) conducting a 28-inch diameter stainless steel SAW and 4-inch diameter French TP316 experiments, (2) conducting a matrix of FEM analyses to determine GE/EPRI functions for short TWC pipe, (3) comparison of uncracked pipe maximum moments to various analyses and FEM solutions, (4) development of a J-estimation scheme that includes the strength of both the weld and base metals. Progress for surface-cracked pipe involved (1) conducting two experiments on 6-inch diameter pipe with d/t = 0.5 and {Theta}/{pi} = 0.25 cracks, (2) comparisons of the pipe experiments to Net-Section-Collapse predictions, and (3) modification of the SC.TNP and SC.TKP J-estimation schemes to include external surface cracks.

  14. Plane-wave diffraction at the periodically corrugated boundary of vacuum and a negative-phase-velocity material.

    PubMed

    Depine, Ricardo A; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2004-05-01

    Considering the diffraction of a plane wave by a periodically corrugated half-space, we show that the transformation of the refracting medium from positive (negative) phase velocity to negative (positive) phase velocity type has an influence on the diffraction efficiencies. This effect increases with increasing corrugation depth, owing to the presence of evanescent waves in the troughs of the corrugated interface. PMID:15244981

  15. Flood magnitude and frequency of Black Creek at the culvert on New Jersey Route 94, Vernon Township, Sussex County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods at Black Creek tributary at the culvert on New Jersey Route 94 at milepost 43.0 in Vernon Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. Estimates of flood magnitude and frequency calculated by the Special Report 38 method, as well as drainage-basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimate is 261 cubic feet per second.

  16. Flood magnitude and frequency of Little Timber Creek at the culvert on Interstate Route 295, Haddon Heights Township, Camden County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods at the Little Timber Creek at the culvert on Interstate 295, at milepost 28.9, in Haddon Heights Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. Flood-magnitude and -frequency estimates, as well as drainage-basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimate is 770 cubic feet per second.

  17. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Person, Abraham

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  18. Study on rail corrugation of a metro tangential track with Cologne-egg type fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, X. L.; Chen, G. X.; Yang, H. G.; Zhang, Q.; Ouyang, H.; Zhu, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    In Chinese metro lines, rail corrugation on both tangential and tight curved tracks with Cologne-egg type fasteners is very severe. Based on the viewpoint of friction-induced vibration causing rail corrugation, the rail corrugation on a tangential track with Cologne-egg type fasteners is studied in this paper. A vibration model of an elastic multiple-wheelset-track system with Cologne-egg type fasteners is established. Both the complex eigenvalue analysis and the transient dynamic analysis are performed to study the stability and the dynamic performance of the wheelset-track system. The simulation results show that a low rail support stiffness value is responsible for rail corrugation on the tangential track. When the Cologne-egg fasteners characterised by a lower stiffness value are replaced with the DTVI2 fasteners characterised by a higher stiffness value, rail corrugation disappears. However, rail corrugation on tight curved tracks cannot be suppressed using the same replacement. The above conclusions are consistent with the corrugation occurrences in actual metro tracks.

  19. Numerical investigation of the aerodynamic and structural characteristics of a corrugated wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hord, Kyle

    Previous experimental studies on static, bio-inspired corrugated wings have shown that they produce favorable aerodynamic properties such as delayed stall compared to streamlined wings and flat plates at high Reynolds numbers (Re ≥ 4x104). The majority of studies have been carried out with scaled models of dragonfly forewings from the Aeshna Cyanea in either wind tunnels or water channels. In this thesis, the aerodynamics of a corrugated airfoil was studied using computational fluid dynamics methods at a low Reynolds number of 1000. Structural analysis was also performed using the commercial software SolidWorks 2009. The flow field is described by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on an overlapping grid using the pressure-Poisson method. The equations are discretized in space with second-order accurate central differences. Time integration is achieved through the second-order Crank-Nicolson implicit method. The complex vortex structures that form in the corrugated airfoil valleys and around the corrugated airfoil are studied in detail. Comparisons are made with experimental measurements from corrugated wings and also with simulations of a flat plate. Contrary to the studies at high Reynolds numbers, our study shows that at low Reynolds numbers the wing corrugation does not provide any aerodynamic benefit compared to a smoothed flat plate. Instead, the corrugated profile generates more pressure drag which is only partially offset by the reduction of friction drag, leading to more total drag than the flat plate. Structural analysis shows that the wing corrugation can increase the resistance to bending moments on the wing structure. A smoothed structure has to be three times thicker to provide the same stiffness. It was concluded the corrugated wing has the structural benefit to provide the same resistance to bending moments with a much reduced weight.

  20. Geometrical properties of turbulent premixed flames and other corrugated interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesset, F.; Maurice, G.; Halter, F.; Mazellier, N.; Chauveau, C.; Gökalp, I.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the geometrical properties of turbulent flame fronts and other interfaces. Toward that end, we use an original tool based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), which is applied to the interface spatial coordinates. The focus is mainly on the degree of roughness of the flame front, which is quantified through the scale dependence of its coverage arclength. POD is first validated by comparing with the caliper technique. Fractal characteristics are extracted in an unambiguous fashion using a parametric expression which appears to be impressively well suited for representing Richardson plots. Then it is shown that, for the range of Reynolds numbers investigated here, the scale-by-scale contribution to the arclength does not comply with scale similarity, irrespectively of the type of similarity which is invoked. The finite ratios between large and small scales, referred to as finite Reynolds number effects, are likely to explain this observation. In this context, the Reynolds number that ought to be achieved for a proper inertial range to be discernible, and for scale similarity to be likely to apply, is calculated. Fractal characteristics of flame folding are compared to available predictions. It is confirmed that the inner cutoff satisfactorily correlates with the Kolmogorov scale while the outer cutoff appears to be proportional to the integral length scale. However, the scaling for the fractal dimension is much less obvious. It is argued that much higher Reynolds numbers have to be reached for drawing firm statements about the evolution (or constancy) of the fractal dimension with respect to flame and flow parameters. Finally, a heuristic phenomenology of corrugated interfaces is highlighted. The degree of generality of the latter phenomenology is confirmed by comparing the folding of different interfaces including a turbulent-nonturbulent interface, a liquid jet destabilized by a surrounding air jet, a cavitating flow, and an isoscalar

  1. A nonlinear investigation of corrugation instabilities in magnetic accretion shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Accretion shock waves are present in many important astrophysical systems and have been a focus of research for decades. These investigations provide a large body of understanding as to the nature, characteristics, and evolutionary behaviors of accretion shock waves over a wide range of conditions. However, largely absent are investigations into the properties of accretion shock waves in the presence of strong magnetic fields. In such cases these strong magnetic fields can significantly alter the stability behaviors and evolution of the accretion shock wave through the production and propagation of magnetic waves as well as magnetically constrained advection. With strong magnetic fields likely found in a number of accretion shock systems, such as compact binary and protostellar systems, a better understanding of the behaviors of magnetic accretion shock waves is needed. A new magnetohydrodynamics simulation tool, IMOGEN, was developed to carry out an investigation of instabilities in strong, slow magnetic accretion shocks by modelling their long-term, nonlinear evolution. IMOGEN implements a relaxed, second-order, total variation diminishing, monotonic upwind scheme for conservation laws and incorporates a staggered-grid constrained transport scheme for magnetic advection. Through the simulated evolution of magnetic accretion shocks over a wide range of initial conditions, it has been shown, for sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, that magnetic accretion shocks are generally susceptible to corrugation instabilities, which arise in the presence of perturbations of the initial shock front. As these corrugation instabilities grow, they manifestas magnetic wave propagation in the upstream region of the accretion column, which propagate away from the accretion shock front, and as density columns, or fingers, that grow into the higher density downstream flow, defined and constrained by current loops created during the early evolution of the instability.

  2. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOEpatents

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  3. Gyrokinetic simulations of off-axis minimum-q profile corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R.E.; Austin, M.E.; Burrell, K.H.; Candy, J.

    2006-05-15

    Quasiequilibrium radial 'profile corrugations' in the electron temperature gradient are found at lowest-order singular surfaces in global gyrokinetic code simulations of both monotonic-q and off-axis minimum-q discharges. The profile corrugations in the temperature and density gradients are time-averaged components of zonal flows. The m/n=2/1 electron temperature gradient corrugation is measurably large and appears to trigger an internal transport barrier as the off-axis minimum-q=2 surfaces enter the plasma.

  4. Experimental and analytical determination of vibration characteristics of corrugated, flexibly supported, heat-shield panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and analytical natural frequencies, nodal patterns, and typical modal displacements for a corrugated, flexibly supported, heat-shield panel are discussed. Good correlation was found between the experimental data and NASTRAN analytical results for the corrugated panel over a relatively wide frequency spectrum covered in the investigation. Of the two experimental techniques used for mode shape and displacement measurements (a noncontacting displacement sensor system and a holographic technique using a helium-neon, continuous-wave laser), the holographic technique was found, in the present investigation, to be faster and better suited for determining a large number of complex nodal patterns of the corrugated panel.

  5. Bending of five-layer beams with lengthwise corrugated main core

    SciTech Connect

    Magnucka-Blandzi, Ewa; Walczak, Zbigniew

    2015-03-10

    The paper is devoted to one orthotropic thin-walled sandwich beam with trapezoidal core and two-layer facings. The inner layers of the facings are also corrugated. The orientation of the corrugations of the inner layers of the facings is perpendicular to trapezoidal corrugation of the beam core. The mathematical and physical model of this beam is formulated, and also the field of displacements. Basing on the principle of the total potential energy the system of equilibrium equations is derived. The analytical solutions will be verified numerically with the use of the finite element method (MES)

  6. Heat pipe flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.

    1973-01-01

    OAO 3 heat pipe flight experiments to check out weightlessness behavior are reported. Tested were a hollow channel screen system with helical grooves, a heat pipe with a wicking system of horizontal grooves, and a spiral artery pipe with multichannel fluid return to the evaporator. Flight experiment data proved that all heat pipe geometries containing wicking systems provided uninterrupted fluid return to the condensators during weightlessness and sufficient cooling for isothermalizing optical instruments onboard OAO.

  7. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design. PMID:27035269

  8. Plasmonic modes in a conductor-corrugated gap-dielectric system at telecommunication wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Wei; Jiang, Xunya

    2016-04-01

    We propose a conductor-corrugated gap-dielectric structure to realize broadband plasmonic modes at telecommunication wavelength. The structure consists of a corrugated low-index dielectric gap layer sandwiched by high-index dielectric and conductor layers. The electric field of the plasmonic modes is primarily concentrated in the corrugated gap, which not only reduces the metal absorption resulting in long propagation length but also causes good field confinement. It is proved that periodic modulation introduced into the gap can significantly increase the cutoff gap thickness of the structure. The effective medium theory and numerical simulation demonstrate that the cutoff gap thickness can be further increased by decreasing the filling factor of the low-index dielectric in the corrugated gap. Meanwhile, the scattering effects induced by the periodic modulation are also investigated. The results not only provide a new understanding of the surface plasmonic modes but also benefit the designing of compact devices.

  9. Development of a model for flaming combustion of double-wall corrugated cardboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Mark B.

    Corrugated cardboard is used extensively in a storage capacity in warehouses and frequently acts as the primary fuel for accidental fires that begin in storage facilities. A one-dimensional numerical pyrolysis model for double-wall corrugated cardboard was developed using the Thermakin modeling environment to describe the burning rate of corrugated cardboard. The model parameters corresponding to the thermal properties of the corrugated cardboard layers were determined through analysis of data collected in cone calorimeter tests conducted with incident heat fluxes in the range 20--80 kW/m 2. An apparent pyrolysis reaction mechanism and thermodynamic properties for the material were obtained using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The fully-parameterized bench-scale model predicted burning rate profiles that were in agreement with the experimental data for the entire range of incident heat fluxes, with more consistent predictions at higher heat fluxes.

  10. Reconciling the electronic and geometric corrugations of the hexagonal boron nitride and graphene nanomeshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, William C.; Meunier, Vincent; Xu, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Rh(111) and graphene on Ru(0001) illustrate a trend of divergence between the density functional theory (DFT) calculated geometric corrugation, and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measured apparent corrugation, of metal-supported 2D films that feature chemically distinct regions. Notably, the geometric and apparent corrugations differ by up to 2 Å for boron nitride/Rh(111), whereas both the DFT-simulated and the experimentally observed STM images agree in the apparent corrugation over a wide range of bias voltages. The disparity is due to unequal contributions of the low/high-lying atoms to the local density of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level. This phenomenon has important implications for the structural characterization of certain supported 2D films, which are being explored for novel electronic and material applications.

  11. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, N.; Samanta, Amiya K.; Roy, Dilip Kr. Singha; Thanikal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  12. Bending Tests of Circular Cylinders of Corrugated Aluminum-alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckwalter, John C; Reed, Warren D; Niles, Alfred S

    1937-01-01

    Bending tests were made of two circular cylinders of corrugated aluminum-alloy sheet. In each test failure occurred by bending of the corrugations in a plane normal to the skin. It was found, after analysis of the effect of short end bays, that the computed stress on the extreme fiber of a corrugated cylinder is in excess of that for a flat panel of the same basic pattern and panel length tested as a pin-ended column. It is concluded that this increased strength was due to the effects of curvature of the pitch line. It is also concluded from the tests that light bulkheads closely spaced strengthen corrugated cylinders very materially.

  13. 5. Detail, 5panel door and corrugated metal siding, Oil House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail, 5-panel door and corrugated metal siding, Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, southwest facade, view to northeast (210mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  14. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design. PMID:27035269

  15. 14. DETAIL OF SOUTHWEST FRONT OF WAREHOUSE, SHOWING CORRUGATED PLASTER/ASBESTOS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF SOUTHWEST FRONT OF WAREHOUSE, SHOWING CORRUGATED PLASTER/ASBESTOS WALLS, WINDOWS AND ROOF. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, International Harvester Company Showroom, Office & Warehouse, 10 South Main Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  16. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design.

  17. Overall thermal performance of flexible piping under simulated bending conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Demko, J. A.

    2002-05-01

    Flexible, vacuum-insulated transfer lines for low-temperature applications have higher thermal losses than comparable rigid lines. Typical flexible piping construction uses corrugated tubes, inner and outer, with a multilayer insulation (MLI) system in the annular space. Experiments on vacuum insulation systems in a flexible geometry were conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. The effects of bending were simulated by causing the inner tube to be eccentric with the outer tube. The effects of spacers were simulated in a controlled way by inserting spacer tubes for the length of the cylindrical test articles. Two material systems, standard MLI and a layered composite insulation (LCI), were tested under the full range of vacuum levels using a liquid nitrogen boiloff calorimeter to determine the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value). The results indicate that the flexible piping under simulated bending conditions significantly degrades the thermal performance of the insulation system. These data are compared to standard MLI for both straight and flexible piping configurations. The definition of an overall k-value for actual field installations (koafi) is described for use in design and analysis of cryogenic piping systems.

  18. Overall Thermal Performance of Flexible Piping Under Simulated Bending Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Demko, J. A.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flexible, vacuum-insulated transfer lines for low-temperature applications have higher thermal losses than comparable rigid lines. Typical flexible piping construction uses corrugated tubes, inner and outer, with a multilayer insulation (MLI) system in the annular space. Experiments on vacuum insulation systems in a flexible geometry were conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. The effects of bending were simulated by causing the inner tube to be eccentric with the outer tube. The effects of spacers were simulated in a controlled way by inserting spacer tubes for the length of the cylindrical test articles. Two material systems, standard MLI and a layered composite insulation (LCI), were tested under the full range of vacuum levels using a liquid nitrogen boiloff calorimeter to determine the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value). The results indicate that the flexible piping under simulated bending conditions significantly degrades the thermal performance of the insulation system. These data are compared to standard MLI for both straight and flexible piping configurations. The definition of an overall k-value for actual field installations (k(sub oafi)) is described for use in design and analysis of cryogenic piping systems.

  19. Heat pipes. [technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development and use of heat pipes are described, including space requirements and contributions. Controllable heat pipes, and designs for automatically maintaining a selected constant temperature, are discussed which would add to the versatility and usefulness of heat pipes in industrial processing, manufacture of integrated circuits, and in temperature stabilization of electronics.

  20. Numerical analysis of sandwich beam with corrugated core under three-point bending

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenbeck, Leszek; Grygorowicz, Magdalena; Paczos, Piotr

    2015-03-10

    The strength problem of sandwich beam with corrugated core under three-point bending is presented.The beam are made of steel and formed by three mutually orthogonal corrugated layers. The finite element analysis (FEA) of the sandwich beam is performed with the use of the FEM system - ABAQUS. The relationship between the applied load and deflection in three-point bending is considered.

  1. Numerical and Experimental Investigations on Mechanical Behavior of Composite Corrugated Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayyani, Iman; Ziaei-Rad, Saeed; Salehi, Hamid

    2012-06-01

    Tensile and flexural characteristics of corrugated laminate panels were studied using numerical and analytical methods and compared with experimental data. Prepreg laminates of glass fiber plain woven cloth were hand-laid by use of a heat gun to ease the creation of the panel. The corrugated panels were then manufactured by using a trapezoidal machined aluminium mould. First, a series of simple tension tests were performed on standard samples to evaluate the material characteristics. Next, the corrugated panels were subjected to tensile and three-point bending tests. The force-displacement graphs were recorded. Numerical and analytical solutions were proposed to simulate the mechanical behavior of the panels. In order to model the energy dissipation due to delamination phenomenon observed in tensile tests in all members of corrugated core, plastic behavior was assigned to the whole geometry, not only to the corner regions. Contrary to the literature, it is shown that the three-stage mechanical behavior of composite corrugated core is not confined to aramid reinforced corrugated laminates and can be observed in other types such as fiber glass. The results reveal that the mechanical behavior of the core in tension is sensitive to the variation of core height. In addition, for the first time, the behavior of composite corrugated core was studied and verified in bending. Finally, the analytical and numerical results were validated by comparing them with experimental data. A good degree of correlation was observed which showed the suitability of the finite element model for predicting the mechanical behavior of corrugated laminate panels.

  2. Propagation of Lamb waves in one-dimensional radial phononic crystal plates with periodic corrugations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinggang; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Kunpeng; Chen, Weihua

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the propagation characteristics of Lamb waves in one-dimensional radial phononic crystal plates with periodic corrugations. The dispersion relations, the power transmission spectra, and the displacement fields of the eigenmodes are calculated by using the finite element method based on two-dimensional axial symmetry models in cylindrical coordinates. The axial symmetry model is validated by three-dimensional finite element model in rectangular coordinates. The effects of the geometrical parameters on the band gaps are further explored numerically. Numerical results show that several complete band gaps with a variable bandwidth exist for Lamb waves in the proposed structures. The formation mechanism of opening the acoustic band gaps is attributed to the coupling between the Lamb modes and the corrugation mode. The band gaps are significantly dependent upon the geometrical parameters such as the corrugation height, the corrugation width, and the plate thickness. Significantly, as the increase of corrugation height, band width shifts, new band gaps appear, the bands become flat, and the corrugation mode plays a more prominent role in the opening of Lamb wave band gaps. These properties of Lamb waves in the radial phononic crystal plates can potentially be applied to optimize band gaps, generate filters, and design acoustic devices.

  3. Numerical analysis of bio-inspired corrugated airfoil at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha Protim; Rahman, Md. Masudur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the aerodynamic performance of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil at the chord Reynolds number of Rec=80,000 to explore the potential advantages of such airfoils at low Reynolds numbers. This study represents the transient nature of corrugated airfoils at low Reynolds number where flow is assumed to be laminar, unsteady, incompressible and two dimensional. The simulations include a sharp interface Cartesian grid based meshing employed with laminar viscous model. The flow field surrounding the corrugated airfoil has been analyzed using structured grid Finite Volume Method (FVM) based on Navier-Stokes equation. All parameters used in flow simulation are expressed in non-dimensional quantities for better understanding of flow behavior, regardless of dimensions or the fluid that is used. The simulated results revealed that the corrugated airfoil provides high lift with moderate drag and prevents large scale flow separation at higher angles of attack. This happens due to the negative shear drag produced by the recirculation zones which occurs in the valleys of the corrugated airfoils. The existence of small circulation bubbles sitting in the valleys prevents large scale flow separation thus increasing the aerodynamic performance of the corrugated airfoil.

  4. Geometrical properties of turbulent premixed flames and other corrugated interfaces.

    PubMed

    Thiesset, F; Maurice, G; Halter, F; Mazellier, N; Chauveau, C; Gökalp, I

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the geometrical properties of turbulent flame fronts and other interfaces. Toward that end, we use an original tool based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), which is applied to the interface spatial coordinates. The focus is mainly on the degree of roughness of the flame front, which is quantified through the scale dependence of its coverage arclength. POD is first validated by comparing with the caliper technique. Fractal characteristics are extracted in an unambiguous fashion using a parametric expression which appears to be impressively well suited for representing Richardson plots. Then it is shown that, for the range of Reynolds numbers investigated here, the scale-by-scale contribution to the arclength does not comply with scale similarity, irrespectively of the type of similarity which is invoked. The finite ratios between large and small scales, referred to as finite Reynolds number effects, are likely to explain this observation. In this context, the Reynolds number that ought to be achieved for a proper inertial range to be discernible, and for scale similarity to be likely to apply, is calculated. Fractal characteristics of flame folding are compared to available predictions. It is confirmed that the inner cutoff satisfactorily correlates with the Kolmogorov scale while the outer cutoff appears to be proportional to the integral length scale. However, the scaling for the fractal dimension is much less obvious. It is argued that much higher Reynolds numbers have to be reached for drawing firm statements about the evolution (or constancy) of the fractal dimension with respect to flame and flow parameters. Finally, a heuristic phenomenology of corrugated interfaces is highlighted. The degree of generality of the latter phenomenology is confirmed by comparing the folding of different interfaces including a turbulent-nonturbulent interface, a liquid jet destabilized by a surrounding air jet, a cavitating flow, and an isoscalar

  5. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  6. Superradiance of short electron pulses in regular and corrugated waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N.S.; Konoplev, I.V.; Sergeev, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    The report is devoted to theoretical and experimental study of superradiance of short electron pulses moving through waveguide systems. It is suggested that electrons oscillate or in undulator field (undulator SR) or in homogeneous magnetic field (cyclotron SR). We studied specific regimes of SR which may occur due to peculiarities of waveguide dispersion. Among them there are regimes of radiation near cut-off frequency as well as regimes of group synchronism. At the last operating regimes an electron bunch longitudinal velocity coincide with group velocity of e.m. wave. It is found the increasing of the SR instability grows rate and energy extraction efficiency in such regimes. It is also possible to observe the same enhancement using external feedback in periodically corrugated waveguide when Bragg resonance condition with forward propagated e.m. wave is fulfill. For experimental observation of cyclotron SR we intend to use compact subnanosecond accelerator RADAN 303B on the base of the high voltage generator with special subnansecond transformer. Accelerator generates short 0.3ns electron pulses with current about 1kA and particles energy 200keV. Design of magnetic confound system provide possibility to install an active locker to impose to electrons cyclotron rotation with pitch-factor about 1-1.5. According to numerical simulation at the mm and submm wavebands it is possible to achieve radiation pick power about 5-10MW with pulse duration less than 1ns.

  7. Corrugated Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector Focal Plane Array Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, A.; Choi, K. K.; Das, N. C.; La, A.; Jhabvala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The corrugated quantum-well infrared photodetector (C-QWIP) uses total internal reflection to couple normal incident light into the optically active quantum wells. The coupling efficiency has been shown to be relatively independent of the pixel size and wavelength thus making the C-QWIP a candidate for detectors over the entire infrared spectrum. The broadband coupling efficiency of the C-QWIP makes it an ideal candidate for multiwavelength detectors. We fabricated and tested C-QWIP focal plane arrays (FPAs) with cutoff wavelengths of 11.2 and 16.2 micrometers. Each FPA has 256 x 256 pixels that are bump-bonded to a direct injection readout circuit. Both FPAs provided infrared imagery with good aesthetic attributes. For the 11.2-micrometers FPA, background-limited performance (BLIP) was observed at 60 K with f/3 optics. For the 16.2-micrometers FPA, BLIP was observed at 38 K. Besides the reduction of dark current in C-QWIP structures, the measured internal quantum efficiency (eta) remains to be high. The values for responsivity and quantum efficiency obtained from the FPA results agree well with those measured for single devices.

  8. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  9. Corrugator activity confirms immediate negative affect in surprise.

    PubMed

    Topolinski, Sascha; Strack, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of surprise entails a complex of immediate responses, such as cognitive interruption, attention allocation to, and more systematic processing of the surprising stimulus. All these processes serve the ultimate function to increase processing depth and thus cognitively master the surprising stimulus. The present account introduces phasic negative affect as the underlying mechanism responsible for this switch in operating mode. Surprising stimuli are schema-discrepant and thus entail cognitive disfluency, which elicits immediate negative affect. This affect in turn works like a phasic cognitive tuning switching the current processing mode from more automatic and heuristic to more systematic and reflective processing. Directly testing the initial elicitation of negative affect by surprising events, the present experiment presented high and low surprising neutral trivia statements to N = 28 participants while assessing their spontaneous facial expressions via facial electromyography. High compared to low surprising trivia elicited higher corrugator activity, indicative of negative affect and mental effort, while leaving zygomaticus (positive affect) and frontalis (cultural surprise expression) activity unaffected. Future research shall investigate the mediating role of negative affect in eliciting surprise-related outcomes. PMID:25762956

  10. Corrugator activity confirms immediate negative affect in surprise

    PubMed Central

    Topolinski, Sascha; Strack, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of surprise entails a complex of immediate responses, such as cognitive interruption, attention allocation to, and more systematic processing of the surprising stimulus. All these processes serve the ultimate function to increase processing depth and thus cognitively master the surprising stimulus. The present account introduces phasic negative affect as the underlying mechanism responsible for this switch in operating mode. Surprising stimuli are schema-discrepant and thus entail cognitive disfluency, which elicits immediate negative affect. This affect in turn works like a phasic cognitive tuning switching the current processing mode from more automatic and heuristic to more systematic and reflective processing. Directly testing the initial elicitation of negative affect by surprising events, the present experiment presented high and low surprising neutral trivia statements to N = 28 participants while assessing their spontaneous facial expressions via facial electromyography. High compared to low surprising trivia elicited higher corrugator activity, indicative of negative affect and mental effort, while leaving zygomaticus (positive affect) and frontalis (cultural surprise expression) activity unaffected. Future research shall investigate the mediating role of negative affect in eliciting surprise-related outcomes. PMID:25762956

  11. 65. FIRE SUPPRESSION PIPES BEHIND FLAME BUCKET. PIPES TO UMBILICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. FIRE SUPPRESSION PIPES BEHIND FLAME BUCKET. PIPES TO UMBILICAL MAST IN LOWER LEFT CORNER; PIPES TO LAUNCHER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER; PIPES TO FLAME BUCKET IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTOGRAPH. POTABLE WATER PIPING IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. Miniature Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center to Thermacore Inc. have fostered the company work on devices tagged "heat pipes" for space application. To control the extreme temperature ranges in space, heat pipes are important to spacecraft. The problem was to maintain an 8-watt central processing unit (CPU) at less than 90 C in a notebook computer using no power, with very little space available and without using forced convection. Thermacore's answer was in the design of a powder metal wick that transfers CPU heat from a tightly confined spot to an area near available air flow. The heat pipe technology permits a notebook computer to be operated in any position without loss of performance. Miniature heat pipe technology has successfully been applied, such as in Pentium Processor notebook computers. The company expects its heat pipes to accommodate desktop computers as well. Cellular phones, camcorders, and other hand-held electronics are forsible applications for heat pipes.

  13. Piping inspection instrument carriage

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1993-09-20

    This invention is comprised of a pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler or other locomotion means for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has means mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and means for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has means for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  14. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  15. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  16. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  17. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, Richard M.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Henning, Carl D.; Lennon, Joseph P.; Pastrnak, John W.; Smith, Joseph A.

    1994-01-01

    An attachment mechanism for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection.

  18. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

    1994-12-13

    An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

  19. Underground radial pipe network

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.

    1984-04-24

    The network, useful in conducting fluids to underground sites, is an assembly of flexible pipes or tubes, suspended from and connected to a drill pipe. The flexible pipes, assembled in a bundle, are spring biased to flare outwardly in an arcuate manner when a releasable cap on the distal end of the bundle is removed. The assembled bundle is inserted into and lowered down a bore hole. When the cap is released, the pipes flare radially and outwardly. Fluid, pumped into and through the assembly, can be directed into the underground formation for various purposes.

  20. Heat Pipe Materials Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.; Fleischman, G. L.; Luedke, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program to evaluate noncondensable gas generation in ammonia heat pipes was completed. A total of 37 heat pipes made of aluminum, stainless steel and combinations of these materials were processed by various techniques, operated at different temperatures and tested at low temperature to quantitatively determine gas generation rates. In order of increasing stability are aluminum/stainless combination, all aluminum and all stainless heat pipes. One interesting result is the identification of intentionally introduced water in the ammonia during a reflux step as a means of surface passivation to reduce gas generation in stainless-steel/aluminum heat pipes.

  1. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  2. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  3. Pipe crawler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Gregory L.; Erickson, Scott A.; Blackmon, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    A pipe crawler apparatus particularly useful for 3-inch and 4-inch diameter pipes is provided. The pipe crawler apparatus uses a gripping apparatus in which a free end of a piston rod is modified with a bearing retaining groove. Bearings, placed within the groove, are directed against a camming surface of three respective pivoting support members. The non-pivoting ends of the support members carry a foot-like gripping member that, upon pivoting of the support member, engages the interior wall of the pipe.

  4. Heat Pipe Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, William B.; Simon, Justin I.; Webb, A. Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    When volcanism dominates heat transport, a terrestrial body enters a heat-pipe mode, in which hot magma moves through the lithosphere in narrow channels. Even at high heat flow, a heat-pipe planet develops a thick, cold, downwards-advecting lithosphere dominated by (ultra-)mafic flows and contractional deformation at the surface. Heat-pipes are an important feature of terrestrial planets at high heat flow, as illustrated by Io. Evidence for their operation early in Earth's history suggests that all terrestrial bodies should experience an episode of heat-pipe cooling early in their histories.

  5. Heat pipe investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The OAO-C spacecraft has three circular heat pipes, each of a different internal design, located in the space between the spacecraft structural tube and the experiment tube, which are designed to isothermalize the structure. Two of the pipes are used to transport high heat loads, and the third is for low heat loads. The test problems deal with the charging of the pipes, modifications, the mobile tilt table, the position indicator, and the heat input mechanisms. The final results showed that the techniques used were adequate for thermal-vacuum testing of heat pipes.

  6. Linear analysis of a backward wave oscillator with triangular corrugated slow wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Md. Ghulam; Sagor, Rakibul Hasan; Amin, Md. Ruhul

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a backward wave oscillator (BWO) with triangularly corrugated periodic metallic slow wave structure (TrCSWS) driven by an infinitely thin annular electron beam is studied using linear theory. The electron beam is assumed to be guided by a strong magnetic field. The triangular axial profile of the SWS is approximated by a Fourier series in order to apply the linear Rayleigh-Fourier (R-F) theory that has long been used in the theoretical analysis of BWOs with sinusoidally corrugated SWS (SCSWS). The dispersion equation for various beam parameters has been solved and the temporal growth rate (TGR) of the electromagnetic wave for the fundamental TM_{01} mode is calculated numerically. The TGR values for different beam parameters have been compared with those of the BWO with SCSWS, semi-circularly corrugated SWS (SCCSWS) and trapezoidally corrugated SWS (TCSWS). In order to compare the TGR values, the amplitude of corrugation of the TrCSWS is varied so that its dispersion curve of TM_{01} mode almost coincides with that of the SCSWS and TCSWS. The study reveals that the performance (in terms of TGR) of the proposed BWO with TrCSWS is comparable to that of other BWOs with SCSWS and TCSWS for the same set of beam parameters and it provides significantly better performance than SCCSWS. So, the proposed TrCSWS that can easily be constructed may replace SCSWS, SCCSWS or TCSWS as their viable alternative.

  7. An experimental study of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil for micro air vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeffery T.; Hu, Hui

    2010-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil compared with a smooth-surfaced airfoil and a flat plate at the chord Reynolds number of Re C = 58,000-125,000 to explore the potential applications of such bio-inspired corrugated airfoils for micro air vehicle designs. In addition to measuring the aerodynamic lift and drag forces acting on the tested airfoils, a digital particle image velocimetry system was used to conduct detailed flowfield measurements to quantify the transient behavior of vortex and turbulent flow structures around the airfoils. The measurement result revealed clearly that the corrugated airfoil has better performance over the smooth-surfaced airfoil and the flat plate in providing higher lift and preventing large-scale flow separation and airfoil stall at low Reynolds numbers (Re C < 100,000). While aerodynamic performance of the smooth-surfaced airfoil and the flat plate would vary considerably with the changing of the chord Reynolds numbers, the aerodynamic performance of the corrugated airfoil was found to be almost insensitive to the Reynolds numbers. The detailed flow field measurements were correlated with the aerodynamic force measurement data to elucidate underlying physics to improve our understanding about how and why the corrugation feature found in dragonfly wings holds aerodynamic advantages for low Reynolds number flight applications.

  8. Diffraction of homogeneous and inhomogeneous plane waves on a doubly corrugated liquid/solid interface.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Nico F; Degrieck, Joris; Briers, Rudy; Leroy, Oswald

    2005-08-01

    This paper extends the theory of the diffraction of sound on 1D corrugated surfaces to 2D corrugated surfaces. Such surfaces, that are egg crate shaped, diffract incoming sound into all polar directions, which is fundamentally different from 1D corrugated surfaces. A theoretical justification is given for extending the classical grating equation to the case of incident inhomogeneous waves, for 1D corrugated surfaces as well as for 2D corrugated surfaces. Even though the present paper presents a theory which is valid for all angles of incidence, special attention is given to the particular case of the stimulation of surface waves by normal incident sound. The most interesting conclusion is that, depending on the frequency and the incident inhomogeneity, Scholte-Stoneley waves and leaky Rayleigh waves can be generated in different directions. This effect might be of particular interest in the development of surface acoustic wave devices and the basic idea of this steering effect can be of importance for planar actuators. PMID:15913694

  9. Designing the inner surface corrugations of hollow fibers to enhance CO2 absorption efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fashandi, Hossein; Zarrebini, Mohammad; Ghodsi, Ali; Saghafi, Reza

    2016-08-15

    For the first time, a low cost strategy is introduced to enhance the efficiency of CO2 absorption using gas-liquid membrane contactors. This is implemented by designing the corrugations in the inner layer of poly(vinyl chloride) hollow fibers (PVC HFs) through changing the bore fluid composition. In fact, the number of corrugations in the HF inner layer is engineered via changing the phase separation time within the inner layer. Such that expedited phase separation leads to highly corrugated inner layer. In contrast, decelerated phase separation is responsible for reduced number of inner layer corrugations. Phase separation causes the initial polymer solution with low viscoelastic moduli to be transferred into polymer-rich domains with high viscoelastic moduli. These domains resist against stretching-induced radial forces toward the center of HF; therefore, the inner layer of HF buckles. Delayed phase separation defers formation of polymer-rich domains and hence, HF with less corrugated inner surface is expected. The phase separation within the HF inner layer is controlled through changing the rate of solvent/nonsolvent exchange. This is conducted by variation the solvent content in the bore fluid; as higher as solvent content, as slower as solvent/nonsolvent exchange. PMID:27179177

  10. Measurement and correlation of aerodynamic heating to surface corrugation stiffened structures in thick turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, H. J.; Masek, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    The flow conditions for which heating distributions were measured on corrugated surfaces and wavy walls in turbulent boundary layers are shown, along with the ratio of the displacement thickness to the roughness height versus the local edge Mach number for an equivalent smooth surface. The present data are seen to greatly extend the range of data available on corrugated surfaces in turbulent boundary layers. These data were obtained by testing fullscale corrugation roughened panels in the wall boundary layer of a supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel. The experimental program used to obtain the data is described. The data are analyzed and correlated in terms of the pertinent flow and geometric parameters. The developed correlations are compared with the available thin boundary layer data, as well as with previously published correlation techniques.

  11. Demonstration of nonlinear-energy-spread compensation in relativistic electron bunches with corrugated structures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feichao; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Zhao, Lingrong; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Chao; Liu, Shengguang; Shi, Libin; Yan, Lixin; Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Gu, Qiang; Huang, Dazhang; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xingtao; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Zhentang; Stupakov, Gennady; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2015-03-20

    High quality electron beams with flat distributions in both energy and current are critical for many accelerator-based scientific facilities such as free-electron lasers and MeV ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopes. In this Letter, we report on using corrugated structures to compensate for the beam nonlinear energy chirp imprinted by the curvature of the radio-frequency field, leading to a significant reduction in beam energy spread. By using a pair of corrugated structures with orthogonal orientations, we show that the quadrupole wakefields, which, otherwise, increase beam emittance, can be effectively canceled. This work also extends the applications of corrugated structures to the low beam charge (a few pC) and low beam energy (a few MeV) regime and may have a strong impact in many accelerator-based facilities. PMID:25839281

  12. Impact-damaged graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a study of the effects of impact damage on compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich graphite-thermoplastic panels are presented. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them, and semi-sandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered in this study. Panels were designed, fabricated and tested. The panels were made using the manufacturing process of thermoforming, a less-commonly used technique for fabricating composite parts. Experimental results for unimpacted control panels and panels subjected to impact damage prior to loading are presented. Little work can be found in the literature about these configurations of thermoformed panels.

  13. Ohmic Losses During Scattering of a Plane Electromagnetic Wave by a Metal Corrugated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koposova, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    We estimate the ohmic losses in the case of scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a metal corrugated surface. Comparative analysis of the losses is performed for different regimes of wave incidence and scattering (self-collimation and different incidence angles), and their dependence on the amplitude and shape of the corrugation profile is studied. The study is based on numerical solving of the integral equation which describes the diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave by a corrugated interface between two dielectrics. Metal is regarded as a dielectric with purely imaginary dielectric permittivity of a great value which is determined by metal conductivity. The waves with E polarization (i.e., the waves with the electric-field vector directed along the grooves), which are used in echelette gyrotron cavities, are studied in detail.

  14. Error-related electromyographic activity over the corrugator supercilii is associated with neural performance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Elkins-Brown, Nathaniel; Saunders, Blair; Inzlicht, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Emerging research in social and affective neuroscience has implicated a role for affect and motivation in performance monitoring and cognitive control. No study, however, has investigated whether facial electromyography (EMG) over the corrugator supercilii-a measure associated with negative affect and the exertion of effort-is related to neural performance monitoring. Here, we explored these potential relationships by simultaneously measuring the error-related negativity, error positivity (Pe), and facial EMG over the corrugator supercilii muscle during a punished, inhibitory control task. We found evidence for increased facial EMG activity over the corrugator immediately following error responses, and this activity was related to the Pe for both between- and within-subject analyses. These results are consistent with the idea that early, avoidance-motivated processes are associated with performance monitoring, and that such processes may also be related to orienting toward errors, the emergence of error awareness, or both. PMID:26470645

  15. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  16. These Pipes Are "Happening"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The author is blessed with having the water pipes for the school system in her office. In this article, the author describes how the breaking of the pipes had led to a very worthwhile art experience for her students. They practiced contour and shaded drawing techniques, reviewed patterns and color theory, and used their reasoning skills--all while…

  17. Corrugated velocity pattern in spiral galaxies: NGC 278, NGC 1058, NGC 2500 and UGC 3574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Gil, M. C.; Alfaro, E. J.; Pérez, E.

    2011-11-01

    We report the detection in Hα emission of a radial corrugation pattern in the vertical velocity field of a sample of nearby face-on, spiral galaxies. We obtain long-slit spectra with the double arm ISIS spectrograph, attached to the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. The existence of corrugations has been already reported, e.g. Alfaro et al. (2001), Matthews & Uson (2008). Corrugations are closely link, as cause/effect, to the large scale star formation processes: density waves, tidal interactions, galactic bores, collisions of high velocity clouds with disk, etc. Which mechanism is the origin of disk corrugations is still an open problem. In this work not only the existence of radial and azimuthal corrugations are clearly observed, we report a first systematic study on the velocity corrugations in a sample of nearly face-on spiral galaxies. NGC 278 and NGC 1058 show a similar behavior to NGC 5427 (Alfaro et al. 2001), with a clear displacement between the velocities and emission line peaks. Where the approaching velocity peaks occur in the convex border of the arms, and the receding maxima are located behind the Hα emission maxima, in the concave side. This kinematical behavior is similar to the one expected in a galactic bore generated by the interaction of a spiral density wave with a thick gaseous disk. NGC 2500 and UGC 3574 do not show so clear this last relation between the velocity and emission line peaks, a possible cause should a fainter and discontinuous Hα emission. Oddly, these two pairs of galaxies also differ between them in their ionization mechanism features obtained from diagnostic diagrams.

  18. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, Mark

    1991-01-01

    A pipe crawler having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by "inchworm"-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward.

  19. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, M.

    1991-05-28

    A pipe crawler is described having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm'-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figures.

  20. Tests of Large Airfoils in the Propeller Research Tunnel, Including Two with Corrugated Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald H

    1930-01-01

    This report gives the results of the tests of seven 2 by 12 foot airfoils (Clark Y, smooth and corrugated, Gottingen 398, N.A.C.A. M-6, and N.A.C.A. 84). The tests were made in the propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Reynolds numbers up to 2,000,000. The Clark Y airfoil was tested with three degrees of surface smoothness. Corrugating the surface causes a flattening of the lift curve at the burble point and an increase in drag at small flying angles.

  1. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and effectiveness in corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, Bayram; İpek, Osman

    2016-06-01

    In this study, heat transfer rate and effectiveness of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were investigated experimentally. Chevron angles of plate heat exchangers are β = 30° and β = 60°. For this purpose, experimentally heating system used plate heat exchanger was designed and constructed. Thermodynamic analysis of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were carried out. The heat transfer rate and effectiveness values are calculated. The experimental results are shown that heat transfer rate and effectiveness values for β = 60° is higher than that of the other. Obtained experimental results were graphically presented.

  2. Structural efficiency studies of corrugated compression panels with curved caps and beaded webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Mills, C. T.; Prabhakaran, R.; Jackson, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    Curved cross-sectional elements are employed in structural concepts for minimum-mass compression panels. Corrugated panel concepts with curved caps and beaded webs are optimized by using a nonlinear mathematical programming procedure and a rigorous buckling analysis. These panel geometries are shown to have superior structural efficiencies compared with known concepts published in the literature. Fabrication of these efficient corrugation concepts became possible by advances made in the art of superplastically forming of metals. Results of the mass optimization studies of the concepts are presented as structural efficiency charts for axial compression.

  3. Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2014-06-23

    Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

  4. Casimir force on a surface with shallow nanoscale corrugations: geometry and finite conductivity effects.

    PubMed

    Bao, Y; Guérout, R; Lussange, J; Lambrecht, A; Cirelli, R A; Klemens, F; Mansfield, W M; Pai, C S; Chan, H B

    2010-12-17

    We measure the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a silicon plate with nanoscale, rectangular corrugations with a depth comparable to the separation between the surfaces. In the proximity force approximation (PFA), both the top and bottom surfaces of the corrugations contribute to the force, leading to a distance dependence that is distinct from a flat surface. The measured Casimir force is found to deviate from the PFA by up to 10%, in good agreement with calculations based on scattering theory that includes both geometry effects and the optical properties of the material. PMID:21231564

  5. Elastic stability of superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper concerns the elastic buckling behavior of a newly developed superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plate. Uniaxial buckling loads were calculated for this type of sandwich plate with simply supported edges by using orthotropic sandwich plate theory. The buckling behavior of this sandwich plate was then compared with that of an SPF/DB unidirectionally corrugated core sandwich plate under conditions of equal structural density. It was found that the buckling load for the former was considerably higher than that of the latter.

  6. Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded corrugated sandwich core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formulas and associated graphs for evaluating the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core, are presented. A comparison of structural stiffnesses of the sandwich core and a honeycomb core under conditions of equal sandwich core density was made. The stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (that is, triangular truss core) is lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former has higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

  7. Determination of the geometric corrugation of graphene on SiC(0001) by grazing incidence fast atom diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zugarramurdi, A.; Debiossac, M.; Lunca-Popa, P.; Mayne, A. J.; Borisov, A. G.; Mu, Z.; Roncin, P.; Khemliche, H.; Momeni, A.

    2015-03-09

    We present a grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (GIFAD) study of monolayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). This system shows a Moiré-like 13 × 13 superlattice above the reconstructed carbon buffer layer. The averaging property of GIFAD results in electronic and geometric corrugations that are well decoupled; the graphene honeycomb corrugation is only observed with the incident beam parallel to the zigzag direction while the geometric corrugation arising from the superlattice is revealed along the armchair direction. Full-quantum calculations of the diffraction patterns show the very high GIFAD sensitivity to the amplitude of the surface corrugation. The best agreement between the calculated and measured diffraction intensities yields a corrugation height of 0.27 ± 0.03 Å.

  8. Piping stress handbook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Helguero, V.

    1986-01-01

    This abridged volume contains the following: Coefficients of thermal expansion. Allowable stress range for ANSI/ASME Power Piping Code B31.1. Stress intensification and flexibility factors. Pressure and stress ratios. Design criteria for allowable loads, moment, and stresses. Properties of pipe. Weight and dimensions of pipe and components. Pipe support selection and design. Fundamentals of expansion joints. Index.

  9. Experimenting with a "Pipe" Whistle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Olga

    2012-01-01

    A simple pipe whistle can be made using pieces of PVC pipe. The whistle can be used to measure the resonant frequencies of open or closed pipes. A slightly modified version of the device can be used to also investigate the interesting dependence of the sound frequencies produced on the orifice-to-edge distance. The pipe whistle described here…

  10. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.