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Sample records for corrugated pipe culverts

  1. 15. Culvert and corrugated pipe with place of a thousand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Culvert and corrugated pipe with place of a thousand drips in background looking S. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  2. Characterization of Turbulent Open Channel Flow in a Full-Scale Spiral Corrugated Culvert

    SciTech Connect

    Guensch, Greg R.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Tritico, Hans; Pearson, Walter H.

    2004-02-26

    A micro-Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) was used to characterize the three-dimensional velocity and turbulence characteristics in a full-scale culvert with spiral corrugations. The culvert was set up in a test bed constructed to examine juvenile salmon passage success in various culvert types. The test culvert was 12.2 m long and 1.83m in diameter, and set at a 1.14% slope. The corrugations were 2.54 cm deep by 7.62 cm peak to peak with a 5° right-handed pitch. Tailwater elevation was adjustable with a stop-log system and was set slightly above the water surface level at the culvert exit. Cross-sectional grids of ADV measurements were taken at discharges of 28, 57, 113, 227, and 453 lps at 9 locations within the culvert barrel and just inside the headwater and tailwater tanks. Results indicated that the spiral corrugations induced asymmetries in the velocity and turbulence distributions. These asymmetries caused a Reduced Velocity Zone (RVZ) on the right side of the culvert as seen looking upstream, which could aid small fish during upstream passage. Velocity and turbulence levels in the RVZ were found to be less than in mid channel or on the left side of the culvert, and the difference became greater at increased flow rates. Lateral and vertical velocity components were very small relative to the axial component, while lateral and vertical turbulence intensities were comparable to the axial component. Inlet loss coefficients were calculated as well and ranged from 0.32 to 0.42. Relationships between the average velocity and the velocity and turbulence intensity in the RVZ were developed, which may be useful for evaluating whether the barrel of a culvert is passable for juvenile fish.

  3. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  4. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  5. Mean Flow and Turbulence Characteristics of a Full-Scale Spiral Corrugated Culvert with Implications to Fish Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Guensch, Gregory R.; Tritico, Hans; Pearson, Walter H.

    2007-08-01

    A micro-Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) was used to differentiate certain three-dimensional velocity and turbulence characteristics in a full-scale culvert with spiral corrugations. The culvert was set up in a test bed constructed to examine juvenile salmon passage success in various culvert types. The test culvert was 12.2 m long and 1.83m in diameter and set at a 1.14% slope. The corrugations were 2.54 cm deep by 7.62 cm peak to peak with a 5° right handed pitch. Tailwater elevation was adjustable with a stop-log system and was set slightly above the water surface level at the culvert exit. Cross-sectional grids of ADV measurements were taken at discharges of 28, 57, 113, 227, and 453 lps at 9 locations within the culvert barrel and just inside the headwater and tailwater tanks. Results indicated that the spiral corrugations caused asymmetries in the velocity and turbulence distributions creating a Reduced Velocity Zone (RVZ) on the right side of the culvert as seen looking upstream, which small fish could utilize to aide their upstream passage. Velocity and turbulence magnitudes in the RVZ were found to be less than in mid-channel or on the left of the culvert, and the difference became greater at increased flow rates. In addition, lateral and vertical velocity components within the RVZ were small relative to the downstream axial component, while lateral and vertical turbulence intensities were comparable to the axial component. Vorticity was found to be largest in amplitude near the culvert walls, and changed sign left of the culvert centerline. Inlet loss coefficients were calculated as well and ranged from 0.32 to 0.42. Relationships between velocity and turbulence intensity in the RVZ and average velocity were developed, which may be useful for evaluating the conditions under which the barrel of a culvert is passable for juvenile fish.

  6. Corrugated Pipe as a Beam Dechirper

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2012-04-20

    We have studied the use of a metallic pipe with small corrugations for the purpose of passively dechirping, through its wakefield, a short, intense electron bunch. The corrugated pipe is attractive for this purpose because its wake: (i) has near maximal possible amplitude for a given aperture and (ii) has a relatively large oscillation wave length, even when the aperture is small. We showed how the corrugated structure can satisfy dechirping requirements encountered in the NGLS project at LBNL. We found that a linear chirp of -40 MeV/mm can be induced by an NGLS-like beam, by having it pass through a corrugated, metallic pipe of radius 3 mm, length 8.2 m, and corrugation parameters full depth 450 {mu}m and period 1000 {mu}m. This structure is about 15 times as effective in the role of dechirper as an S-band accelerator structure used passively.

  7. Study of the use of truck tire beads as drainage pipe and analysis of the economics of tire disposal in Oklahoma. Part 1. Culverts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.W.; Gattis, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    In an attempt to find alternate ways of dealing with waste truck tires, a private tire recycling company developed a pipe from the tire bead and sidewall. The tire-pipe has seen limited use as a roadway drainage culvert. To encourage wider use of this product, an evaluation of pipe performance was performed. The evaluation consisted of (1) inspections of existing installations; (2) structural tests; and (3) leakage tests. The study found that the majority of installations were performing well. Compared with corrugated steel and fiberglass pipes, the tire-pipe exhibited favorable structural performance. An individual tire-pipe section was found to be watertight. However, when tested in the open-air (not in the ground), the tire-pipe joints were found to leak. Development of an improved end connection would improve the utility of the tire-pipe.

  8. Stability of steady flow through an axially corrugated pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, S. A.; Blackburn, H. M.

    2011-11-01

    The linear stability of steady flow in pipes with circular cross-section and sinusoidal axial variation in diameter is studied by finding global eigenmodes with axial wavelength commensurate with that of the wall corrugation, chosen to be equal to one pipe mean radius. The maximum peak-to-peak height of corrugation considered is approximately 8% of the mean diameter. At low corrugation amplitude and at low Reynolds numbers, the base flow remains attached to the wall, while at larger amplitudes and Reynolds numbers, an axisymmetric separation bubble forms within the corrugation. For all Reynolds numbers considered, flows remain stable to axisymmetric perturbations, but become unstable to standing-wave modes of low azimuthal wavenumber, with critical Reynolds number first falling, then increasing with increasing corrugation height. Both attached and separated flows exhibit similar types of instability modes, which in the case of separated flow are most energetic near the reattachment line of the base flow. The leading instability modes consist of counter-rotating vortices situated near the pipe wall.

  9. Terahertz Radiation from a Pipe with Small Corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2012-01-26

    We have studied through analytical and numerical methods the use of a relativistic electron bunch to drive a metallic beam pipe with small corrugations for the purpose of generating terahertz radiation. For the case of a pipe with dimensions that do not change along its length, we have shown that - with reasonable parameters - one can generate a narrow-band radiation pulse with frequency {approx}1 THz, and total energy of a few milli-Joules. The pulse length tends to be on the order of tens of picoseconds. We have also shown that, if the pipe radius is tapered along its length, the generated pulse will end up with a frequency chirp; if the pulse is then made to pass through a compressor, its final length can be reduced to a few picoseconds and its peak power increased to 1 GW. We have also shown that wall losses tend to be significant and need to be included in the structure design.

  10. Responses of buried corrugated metal pipes to earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.A.; Bardet, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    This study describes the results of field investigations and analyses carried out on 61 corrugated metal pipes (CMP) that were shaken by the 1994 Northridge earthquake. These CMPs, which include 29 small-diameter (below 107 cm) CMPs and 32 large-diameter (above 107 cm) CMPs, are located within a 10 km{sup 2} area encompassing the Van Normal Complex in the Northern San Fernando Valley, in Los Angeles, California. During the Northridge earthquake, ground movements were extensively recorded within the study area. Twenty-eight of the small-diameter CMPs performed well while the 32 large-diameter CMPs underwent performances ranging from no damage to complete collapse. The main cause of damage to the large-diameter CMPs was found to be the large ground strains. Based on this unprecedented data set, the factors controlling the seismic performance of the 32 large-diameter CMPs were identified and framed into a pseudostatic analysis method for evaluating the response of large diameter flexible underground pipes subjected to ground strain. The proposed analysis, which is applicable to transient and permanent strains, is capable of describing the observed performance of large-diameter CMPs during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. It indicates that peak ground velocity is a more reliable parameter for analyzing pipe damage than is peak ground acceleration. Results of this field investigation and analysis are useful for the seismic design and strengthening of flexible buried conduits.

  11. Pressure drop of slush nitrogen flow in converging-diverging pipes and corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Okuyama, Jun; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are solid-liquid, two-phase fluids. As a functional thermal fluid, there are high expectations for use of slush fluids in various applications such as fuels for spacecraft engines, clean-energy fuels to improve the efficiency of transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. Experimental flow tests were performed using slush nitrogen to elucidate pressure-drop characteristics of converging-diverging (C-D) pipes and corrugated pipes. In experimental results regarding pressure drop in two different types of C-D Pipes, i.e., a long-throated pipe and a short-throated pipe, each having an inner diameter of 15 mm, pressure drop for slush nitrogen in the long-throated pipe at a flow velocity of over 1.3 m/s increased by a maximum of 50-60% as compared to that for liquid nitrogen, while the increase was about 4 times as compared to slush nitrogen in the short-throated pipe. At a flow velocity of over 1.5 m/s in the short-throated pipe, pressure drop reduction became apparent, and it was confirmed that the decrease in pressure drop compared to liquid nitrogen was a maximum of 40-50%. In the case of two different types of corrugated pipes with an inner diameter of either 12 mm or 15 mm, a pressure-drop reduction was confirmed at a flow velocity of over 2 m/s, and reached a maximum value of 37% at 30 wt.% compared to liquid nitrogen. The greater the solid fractions, the smaller the pipe friction factor became, and the pipe friction factor at the same solid fraction showed a constant value regardless of the Reynolds number. From the observation of the solid particles' behavior using a high-speed video camera and the PIV method, the pressure-drop reduction mechanisms for both C-D and corrugated pipes were demonstrated.

  12. Surface Impedance Formalism for a Metallic Beam Pipe with Small Corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, K.L.F.; /SLAC

    2012-08-30

    A metallic pipe with wall corrugations is of special interest in light of recent proposals to use such a pipe for the generation of terahertz radiation and for energy dechirping of electron bunches in free electron lasers. In this paper we calculate the surface impedance of a corrugated metal wall and show that it can be reduced to that of a thin layer with dielectric constant {epsilon} and magnetic permeability {mu}. We develop a technique for the calculation of these constants, given the geometrical parameters of the corrugations. We then calculate, for the specific case of a round metallic pipe with small corrugations, the frequency and strength of the resonant mode excited by a relativistic beam. Our analytical results are compared with numerical simulations, and are shown to agree well.

  13. On whistling of pipes with a corrugated segment: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Oleksii; Nakiboğlu, Güneş; Holten, Ad; Hirschberg, Avraham

    2013-12-01

    Corrugated pipes are commonly used because of their local rigidity combined with global flexibility. The flow through such a pipe can induce strong whistling tones, which is an environmental nuisance and can be a threat to the mechanical integrity of the system. This paper considers the use of a composite pipe: a shorter corrugated pipe segment embedded between smooth pipe segments. Such a pipe retains some flexibility, while the acoustical damping in the smooth pipe reduces whistling tones. Whistling is the result of coherent vortex shedding at the cavities in the wall. This vortex shedding is synchronized by longitudinal acoustic waves traveling along the pipe. The acoustic waves trigger the vortex shedding, which reinforces the acoustic field for a critical range of the Strouhal number values. A linear theory for plane wave propagation and the sound production is proposed, which allows a prediction of the Mach number at the threshold of whistling in such pipes. A semi-empirical approach is chosen to determine the sound source in this model. This source corresponds to a fluctuating force acting on the fluid as a consequence of the vortex shedding. The functional form of the Strouhal number dependency of the dimensionless sound source amplitude is based on numerical simulations. The magnitude of the source and the Strouhal number range in which it can drive whistling are determined by matching the model to results for a specific corrugated pipe segment length. This semi-empirical source model is then applied to composite pipes with different corrugated segment lengths. In addition, the effect of inlet acoustical convective losses due to flow separation is considered. The Mach number at the threshold of whistling is predicted within a factor 2.

  14. Flow noise in a corrugated pipe in terms of the theory of instability waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Mironov, M. A.; Yakovets, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    An air flow through a pipe with a corrugated inner surface is accompanied by the generation of a tone (multitone), i.e., coherent, acoustic signal. The main processes giving rise to such a generation include the forced excitation of the active medium in the resonator (the pipe) and the feedback, which leads to nonlinear amplification of one or several resonator harmonics because of the nonlinear competition of waves. The medium in the pipe becomes active owing to the processes that accompany the air flow about the corrugated wall. The purpose of the present study is to provide qualitative explanations based on a simple example for the possibility of multitone sound generation, as well as for the known experimental data.

  15. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-18

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  16. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-01

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  17. Wakefield computations for a corrugated pipe as a beam dechirper for FEL applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C. K.; Bane, K. L.F.

    2015-06-09

    A beam “dechirper” based on a corrugated, metallic vacuum chamber has been proposed recently to cancel residual energy chirp in a beam before it enters the undulator in a linac-based X-ray FEL. Rather than the round geometry that was originally proposed, we consider a pipe composed of two parallel plates with corrugations. The advantage is that the strength of the wake effect can be tuned by adjusting the separation of the plates. The separation of the plates is on the order of millimeters, and the corrugations are fractions of a millimeter in size. The dechirper needs to be meters long in order to provide sufficient longitudinal wakefield to cancel the beam chirp. Considerable computation resources are required to determine accurately the wakefield for such a long structure with small corrugation gaps. Combining the moving window technique and parallel computing using multiple processors, the time domain module in the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P allows efficient determination of the wakefield through convergence studies. In this paper, we will calculate the longitudinal, dipole and quadrupole wakefields for the dechirper and compare the results with those of analytical and field matching approaches.

  18. Response of reinforced concrete and corrugated steel pipes to surface load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Geoff R.

    Full-scale simulated live load tests were conducted in a controlled laboratory setting using a single-axle frame on 600-mm-inner-diameter reinforced concrete pipe (RCP) and corrugated steel pipe (CSP) when buried in dense, well-graded sand and gravel. Measurements of the RCP at nominal and working forces and beyond are reported for 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m of soil cover above the pipe crown. The RCP experienced no cracking when buried at 0.3 m under nominal and working CL-625 and CL-800 single-axle design loads. At these loads, the vertical contraction of the pipe diameter was less than 0.08 and 0.10 mm and the largest tensile strains in the pipe were 75 and 100 muepsilon (50-60% of the cracking strain), respectively. A 0.15 (+/-0.05)-mm-wide axial crack developed at the inner crown in the presence of a 6 kNm/m circumferential bending moment (70% of the theoretical ultimate moment capacity) at the fully factored CL-625 load. This crack did not propagate or widen from 3 series of cyclic load-unload tests. At 1300 kN of applied load the change in pipe diameter was less than 3.5 mm. Increasing soil cover from 0.3 to 0.6 to 0.9 m reduced the circumferential crown bending moment from 6.0 to 3.9 to 2.1 kNm/m, respectively, at 400 kN of axle load. A 1.6- and a 2.8-mm-thick CSP were also subjected to axle loading. No yielding or limit states occurred in the 1.6-mm-thick CSP when buried 0.9-m-deep. However, at 0.6 m of cover a 300 kN axle load caused local yielding at the pipe crown. Increasing soil cover from 0.6 to 0.9 m decreased the vertical diameter change from -3.0 to -1.2 mm and the crown bending moment from 0.7 to 0.2 kNm/m (75% and 20% of the yield moment), respectively, at a 250 kN axle load. Deflections of the thicker CSP were less than the thinner pipe below the CL-625 single-axle load, however further increases in applied load produced a greater response in the thicker pipe, likely due to a haunch support issue. Shallow axle loading produced a greater 3-dimensional response and a larger bending effect in both CSPs.

  19. 1. View east at west facade of culvert outlet headwall, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View east at west facade of culvert outlet headwall, above which part of the canal bank has been removed. Foreground to background: streambed and coffer dam (mound in center) that was used in dewatering the culvert; intake pipes (extreme left and right) for dewatering pumps; deteriorated culvert outlet headwall with upper portion of wall fallen away; horizontal masonry cutoff wall extending above the culvert outlet partially up the canal bank (cutoff wall was exposed by removal of part of canal bank); towpath at top of canal bank. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Six Mile Run Culvert, .2 mile South of Blackwells Mills Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  20. Brook trout passage performance through culverts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerig, Elsa; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Bergeron, Normand

    2016-01-01

    Culverts can restrict access to habitat for stream-dwelling fishes. We used passive integrated transponder telemetry to quantify passage performance of >1000 wild brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) attempting to pass 13 culverts in Quebec under a range of hydraulic and environmental conditions. Several variables influenced passage success, including complex interactions between physiology and behavior, hydraulics, and structural characteristics. The probability of successful passage was greater through corrugated metal culverts than through smooth ones, particularly among smaller fish. Trout were also more likely to pass at warmer temperatures, but this effect diminished above 15 °C. Passage was impeded at higher flows, through culverts with steep slopes, and those with deep downstream pools. This study provides insight on factors influencing brook trout capacity to pass culverts as well as a model to estimate passage success under various conditions, with an improved resolution and accuracy over existing approaches. It also presents methods that could be used to investigate passage success of other species, with implications for connectivity of the riverscape.

  1. 7. VIEW OF A DOUBLE CULVERT IN RAILROAD GRADE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF A DOUBLE CULVERT IN RAILROAD GRADE, LOOKING WEST. THIS CULVERT HAS BEEN IN PLACE SINCE 1933, WHEN IT WAS MARKED ON MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AS-BUILT PLANS. IT LOOKS LIKE THE PIPE ON THE RIGHT (NORTH) IS NOT ORIGINAL. - Great Northern Railroad Bed, From Big Sandy to Verona, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  2. Special type culvert headwall, Culvert No. 109 Outlet, oblique view, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Special type culvert headwall, Culvert No. 109 Outlet, oblique view, view to southeast - Route No. 1-Overton-Lake Mead Road, Culverts and Headwalls, 6 miles south of Overton, Overton, Clark County, NV

  3. Straight type culvert headwall, Culvert No. 105 Inlet, oblique view, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Straight type culvert headwall, Culvert No. 105 Inlet, oblique view, view to northeast - Route No. 1-Overton-Lake Mead Road, Culverts and Headwalls, 6 miles south of Overton, Overton, Clark County, NV

  4. Special type culvert headwall, Culvert No. 124 Outlet, oblique view, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Special type culvert headwall, Culvert No. 124 Outlet, oblique view, view to southwest - Route No. 1-Overton-Lake Mead Road, Culverts and Headwalls, 6 miles south of Overton, Overton, Clark County, NV

  5. 24. WEST CONFEDERATE AVENUE, DOUBLE CULVERT APPEARS TO BE "BOX", ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. WEST CONFEDERATE AVENUE, DOUBLE CULVERT APPEARS TO BE "BOX", BUT IS PIPE WITH SQUARE HEAD WALL OPENING. NOTE ARCHED TOP STYLE USED BY CCC. VIEW SE. - Gettysburg National Military Park Tour Roads, Gettysburg, Adams County, PA

  6. 64. Paynes Creek Culvert. This concrete box culvert is a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. Paynes Creek Culvert. This concrete box culvert is a typical example of a concrete box culvert finished with rusticated stone. Its arches reflect the rigid frame structures. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  7. North concrete portal of Culvert No. 1423, Purslane Run Culvert, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North concrete portal of Culvert No. 1423, Purslane Run Culvert, which connects to C&O Canal Culvert No. 211, looking east. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  8. Singing Corrugated Pipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadwell, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes different techniques used to measure air flow velocity. The two methods used were Crawford's Wastebasket and a video camera. The results were analyzed and compared to the air flow velocity predicted by Bernoulli's principle. (ZWH)

  9. Application of a multistate model to estimate culvert effects on movement of small fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, J.R.; Hagler, M.M.; Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely acknowledged that culverted road-stream crossings may impede fish passage, effects of culverts on movement of nongame and small-bodied fishes have not been extensively studied and studies generally have not accounted for spatial variation in capture probabilities. We estimated probabilities for upstream and downstream movement of small (30-120 mm standard length) benthic and water column fishes across stream reaches with and without culverts at four road-stream crossings over a 4-6-week period. Movement and reach-specific capture probabilities were estimated using multistate capture-recapture models. Although none of the culverts were complete barriers to passage, only a bottomless-box culvert appeared to permit unrestricted upstream and downstream movements by benthic fishes based on model estimates of movement probabilities. At two box culverts that were perched above the water surface at base flow, observed movements were limited to water column fishes and to intervals when runoff from storm events raised water levels above the perched level. Only a single fish was observed to move through a partially embedded pipe culvert. Estimates for probabilities of movement over distances equal to at least the length of one culvert were low (e.g., generally ???0.03, estimated for 1-2-week intervals) and had wide 95% confidence intervals as a consequence of few observed movements to nonadjacent reaches. Estimates of capture probabilities varied among reaches by a factor of 2 to over 10, illustrating the importance of accounting for spatially variable capture rates when estimating movement probabilities with capture-recapture data. Longer-term studies are needed to evaluate temporal variability in stream fish passage at culverts (e.g., in relation to streamflow variability) and to thereby better quantify the degree of population fragmentation caused by road-stream crossings with culverts. ?? American Fisheries Society 2009.

  10. Acoustical studies on corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Rajavel

    Corrugated tubes and pipes offer greater global flexibility combined with local rigidity. They are used in numerous engineering applications such as vacuum cleaner hosing, air conditioning systems of aircraft and automobiles, HVAC control systems of heating ducts in buildings, compact heat exchangers, medical equipment and offshore gas and oil transportation flexible riser pipelines. Recently there has been a renewed research interest in analyzing the flow through a corrugated tube to understand the underlying mechanism of so called whistling, although the whistling in such a tube was identified in early twentieth century. The phenomenon of whistling in a corrugated tube is interesting because an airflow through a smooth walled tube of similar dimensions will not generate any whistling tones. Study of whistling in corrugated tubes is important because, it not only causes an undesirable noise problem but also results in flow-acoustic coupling. Such a coupling can cause significant structural vibrations due to flow-acoustic-structure interaction. This interaction would cause flow-induced vibrations that could result in severe damage to mechanical systems having corrugated tubes. In this research work, sound generation (whistling) in corrugated tubes due to airflow is analyzed using experimental as well as Computational Fluid Dynamics-Large Eddy Simulation (CFD-LES) techniques. Sound generation mechanisms resulting in whistling have been investigated. The whistling in terms of frequencies and sound pressure levels for different flow velocities are studied. The analytical and experimental studies are carried out to understand the influence of various parameters of corrugated tubes such as cavity length, cavity width, cavity depth, pitch, Reynolds numbers and number of corrugations. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretically calculated, computationally predicted and experimentally measured whistling frequencies and sound pressure levels generated by flow through corrugated tubes. The computational studies are also extended for noise control through design of corrugated tubes such as design of leading and trailing edge spoilers, slanted walls for the cavities and presence of solid strip in the cavities of corrugations. Applications of this work to improve acoustical design of corrugated tubes are also discussed.

  11. 3. AERIAL VIEW OF SAW MILL RIVER CULVERT. NEPPERHAN AVENUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW OF SAW MILL RIVER CULVERT. NEPPERHAN AVENUE IS AT LEFT, SLIGHTLY FILLED SAW MILL RIVER CULVERT IS ON RIGHT. - Old Croton Aqueduct, Saw Mill River Culvert, Spanning Nepperhan Avenue, Yonkers, Westchester County, NY

  12. ECOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR PRIORITIZATION OF CULVERT REPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Culvert passage issues are gaining national and international focus, because they are implicated in the decline of particular species and in the more general loss of biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems. In the Pacific Northwest, inadequate fish passage at culverts is recognized...

  13. Culvert Testing Program for Juvenile Salmonid Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H. ); Richmond, Marshall C. ); Schafer, Jim

    2002-01-01

    In partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has undertaken a phased program conducted by an interdisciplinary team of experts to address the hydraulic and behavioral issues associated with juvenile salmonid fish passage through culvert systems. Juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) is the initial test subject. This program addresses the testing and assessment of culvert designs, along with associated measurements of hydraulic conditions and fish behavior, occurring in full-scale physical models of culvert systems deployed in an experimental test bed. The proposed approach includes the use of three kinds of models. First, a conceptual model of fish passage is developed to guide the design of hydraulic and behavioral testing and to interpret the results. Second, mathematical models of culvert hydraulics provide information to design the full-scale test facility and to guide design of the hydraulic a nd behavioral testing program. Third, full-scale physical models of culverts in a test bed are used to evaluate fish passage quantitatively. Using the knowledge and data from previous studies, this program will encompass the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a full-scale, controlled culvert test bed. Experiments in the testing apparatus will measure the hydraulic conditions (mean velocity, turbulence, and water depth) associated with various culvert designs under various slopes and flow regimes and then relate these measures to repeatable, quantitative measures of fish passage success. After construction in late spring, 2001, preliminary trials will be conducted in summer 2001.

  14. User's guide to the culvert analysis program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.

    1995-01-01

    This user's guide contains information on using the culvert analysis program (CAP). The procedure used is based on that presented in Techniques of Water- Resources Investigations of the United States Geological Survey, book 3, chapter A3, "Measurement of Peak Discharge at Culverts by Indirect Methods." The program uses input files that have formats compatible with those used by the Water-Surface Profile (WSPRO) program. The program can be used to compute rating surfaces or curves that describe the behavior of flow through a culvert or to compute discharges from measurements of upstream and downstream water-surface elevations.

  15. Wakefield potentials of corrugated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.

    2015-10-01

    A corrugated structure, which is used in "dechirper" devices, is usually a pipe or two plates with small corrugations (bumps) on the walls. There is a good single-mode description of the wake potentials excited by a relativistic bunch if the wave length of the mode is much longer than the distance between the bumps in the pipe. However, ultrashort bunches, which are now used in free electron lasers, excite much higher frequency fields and the corresponding wake potentials will be very different from the single-mode description. We have made analyses of these wake potentials based on a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations. It was confirmed that the behavior of the wakefields of ultrashort bunches in corrugated structures is not much different from the fields excited usually in accelerating structures where the wake potentials are described by the exponential function. For a practical application we present results for the SLAC "dechirper." We also carried out calculations for a similar device, that was installed and measured at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Korea. We find very good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. 71. Meadow Creek Culvert. This is an example of a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Meadow Creek Culvert. This is an example of a triple arch concrete box culvert with stone facing mimicking rigid frame structures. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  17. 3. View southwest at dewatered culvert outlet headwall, with part ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View southwest at dewatered culvert outlet headwall, with part of canal bank removed in back (left) of headwall. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  18. 4. View southeast at culvert outlet with part of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View southeast at culvert outlet with part of the canal bank removed. Right to left: dewatered streambed and coffer dam; tops of culvert barrels and curved wingwalls exposed; horizontal masonry cutoff wall partially up the canal bank. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Six Mile Run Culvert, .2 mile South of Blackwells Mills Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  19. A corrugated horn antenna using V-shape corrugations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentzer, C. A.; Peters, L., Jr.; Beck, F. B.

    1975-01-01

    Corrugated horns use corrugations on the E-plane walls that are operating in the cutoff condition. In this paper, attention is focused on replacing the rectangular shaped corrugation with a V-shaped corrugation. The properties of the V corrugations are obtained using an integral equation solution; the results of the computational studies indicate that for operation of the V corrugations in the forbidden zone the depth of the corrugations lie between 0.3125 to 0.625 times the wavelength in contrast to the rectangular corrugations where the corresponding depth is 0.25 to 0.5 times the wavelength. The radiation patterns and impedance of two identical rectangular horns with corrugated E-plane walls using either V or rectangular corrugations are directly compared.

  20. Profiles in garbage: Corrugated boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1997-12-01

    Corrugated boxes (also known as old corrugated containers, or OCC) are used to ship products to factories, warehouses, retail stores, offices, and homes. The primary market for OCC is the paperboard industry, which uses OCC for corrugated medium, linerboard, recycled paperboard, and other paper products. In addition, 2.6 million tons of OCC were exported in 1996. OCC provided 37% of the scrap paper that was exported in 1996. Some corrugated boxes can be reused before recycling. Corrugated boxes are easily and highly recyclable. Large producers such as grocery store warehouses and factories have recycled their corrugated boxes for some time. If shredded properly, uncoated corrugated boxes are easily compostable.

  1. 21. Old Crosscut Canal, Indian School Road Culvert, Plan and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Old Crosscut Canal, Indian School Road Culvert, Plan and Elevation, July 1974. See AZ-21-10 for photograph of the completed culvert. Source: city of Phoenix Engineering Department. - Old Crosscut Canal, North Side of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 1. View southeast at northwest facade of dewatered culvert outlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View southeast at northwest facade of dewatered culvert outlet headwall, above which part of the canal bank has been removed. Buttresses and upper portion of headwall (above arches) are nineteenth-century additions to the lower, original headwall. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  3. 8. VIEW OF A THIRD CULVERT ALONG THE RAILROAD GRADE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF A THIRD CULVERT ALONG THE RAILROAD GRADE, LOOKING WEST. THERE ARE NUMEROUS CULVERTS IN THE GRADE ACCORDING TO THE 1933 AS-BUILT PLANS, BUT NO OTHERS WERE OBVIOUS IN A DRIVE-THROUGH OF THE AREA. - Great Northern Railroad Bed, From Big Sandy to Verona, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  4. 78 FR 5715 - Construction and Maintenance-Culvert Pipe Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... (39 FR 35152). According to Sec. 635.117(d), as in effect in 1974, Appendix A * * * sets forth the... installations. On September 10, 1976, this section was redesignated as 23 CFR 635.411 (41 FR 36204) and remained.... To implement this provision, the FHWA issued a final rule on November 15, 2006 (71 FR 66450),...

  5. Fish Movement Ecology in High Gradient Headwater Streams: Its Relevance to Fish Passage Restoration through Stream Culvert Barriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Robert L.; Dunham, Jason B.

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Restoration of fish passage through culvert barriers has emerged as a major issue in the Pacific Northwest and nationwide. The problem has many dimensions, including the huge number of potential barriers, uncertainty about which structures are actually barriers, the benefits and risks involved with restoration, and the financial costs and timelines. This report attempts to address what we call 'thinking outside of the pipe' in terms of fish passage information needs. This means understanding the value of each potential passage restoration project in the context of other possible projects, and to view individual restoration projects within a larger landscape of habitats and population processes. In this report we provide a brief review of some essential characteristics of animal movement and examples from a focal group of fishes in Washington State: salmon, trout, and char. While several other fishes and many other species use streams where culvert passage barriers may occur, it is the salmonids that are by far the most widespread and in most cases extending furthest into the headwaters of stream networks in Washington. We begin this report by outlining some basic characteristics of animal movement and then apply that foundation to the case of salmonid fishes. Next we consider the consequences of disrupting fish movement with human-constructed barriers, such as culverts. Finally, this body of evidence is summarized and we propose a short list of what we view as high priority information needs to support more effective restoration of fish passage through culverts.

  6. 7. View north at back (canal side) of culvert inlet, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View north at back (canal side) of culvert inlet, with canal bank completely removed. Background to foreground: back of inlet headwall with tops of high inlet barrels exposed; vertical transition wall between high inlet barrels and low, interior, inlet barrels; tops of low interior barrels; vertical heartening planks and low cutoff wall at site of former canal edge of canal bank; dewatered canal bed and plank sheathing on top of culvert barrels beneath canal bed. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  7. 4. HISTORIC VIEW OF OLD MASSACHUSSETTS AVENUE CULVERT WITH TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. HISTORIC VIEW OF OLD MASSACHUSSETTS AVENUE CULVERT WITH TUNNEL OPENING, THROUGH WHICH THE PARKWAY PASSED, PRE-1940. MLK LIBRARY. - Massachusetts Avenue Bridge, Spanning Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 8. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM OUTLET CULVERT AND WING RETAINING WALLS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM OUTLET CULVERT AND WING RETAINING WALLS, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Twin Pots Dam, Ashley National Forest, 10.1 miles North of Mountain Home, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  9. Contextual view showing drainage culvert in foreground boarding east side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view showing drainage culvert in foreground boarding east side of knoll with eucalyptus windbreak. Camera facing 278" southwest. - Goerlitz House, 9893 Highland Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. 9. Double arch culvert on Laurel Creek Road looking ENE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Double arch culvert on Laurel Creek Road looking ENE. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Cades Cove Road & Laurel Creek Road, From Townsend Wye to Cades Cove, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  11. 8. Double arch culvert on Laurel Creek Road looking WSW. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Double arch culvert on Laurel Creek Road looking WSW. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Cades Cove Road & Laurel Creek Road, From Townsend Wye to Cades Cove, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  12. 7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CULVERT UNDER LATROBE ROAD WEST OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CULVERT UNDER LATROBE ROAD WEST OF THE WHITE ROCK RD. INTERSECTION; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Placerville Road, White Rock Road between Clarksville & White Rock, El Dorado Hills, El Dorado County, CA

  13. 9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE NEAR GIANT SLIDE TRAIL MARKER ON AROUND-THE-MOUNTAIN LOOP. - Rockefeller Carriage Roads, Mount Desert Island, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  14. 7. EAST PORTAL OF CONCRETE LINED CULVERT LOCATED 30 YARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. EAST PORTAL OF CONCRETE LINED CULVERT LOCATED 30 YARDS WEST OF HAPPY ISLES BRIDGE. NOTE ROCK & CONCRETE FLOOR. - Happy Isles Bridge, Spanning Merced River on Service road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  15. 11. VIEW OF FLOOD GATE FOR THE PRESSURE CULVERT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF FLOOD GATE FOR THE PRESSURE CULVERT AND THE SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  16. 9. VIEW OF THE PRESSURE CULVERT STILLING BASIN, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF THE PRESSURE CULVERT STILLING BASIN, LOOKING NORTH. NOTE THE LEVEE TO THE RIGHT. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  17. 6. View southwest, culvert inlet with canal bank completely removed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View southwest, culvert inlet with canal bank completely removed. Left to right: back of headwall; tops of high inlet barrels; vertical transition wall between high inlet barrels and low, interior, inlet barrels; tops of low interior barrels; vertical heartening planks and low cutoff wall along former edge of canal bank; dewatered canal bed. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  18. 8. View southwest at the northeastern end of culvert inlet, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View southwest at the northeastern end of culvert inlet, with canal bank completely removed. Left to right: back of curved wingwall; tops of high inlet barrels; vertical transition wall between high inlet barrels and low interior barrels; tops of low, interior barrels; vertical heartening planks at former canal edge of canal bank. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  19. An Improved Method of Manufacturing Corrugated Boxes: Lateral Corrugator

    SciTech Connect

    Frank C. Murray Ph.D.; , Roman Popil Ph.D.; Michael Shaepe

    2008-12-18

    Paper physicists have known that a corrugated box constructed from outer liner sheets having a predominant fiber orientation aligned with the corrugating flute direction would have higher stiffness and crush resistance (per unit of fiber weight) than the conventional box construction. Such increased performance per unit of fiber weight could result in fiber reduction and energy savings for boxes having equivalent performance specifications. The goal of this project was to develop and demonstrate a commercially viable lateral corrugating process. This included designing and building a pilot lateral corrugator, testing and evaluating pilot machine made boxes, and developing a strategy for commercialization.

  20. Linear Corrugating - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd Chapman

    2000-05-23

    Linear Corrugating is a process for the manufacture of corrugated containers in which the flutes of the corrugated medium are oriented in the Machine Direction (MD) of the several layers of paper used. Conversely, in the conventional corrugating process the flutes are oriented at right angles to the MD in the Cross Machine Direction (CD). Paper is stronger in MD than in CD. Therefore, boxes made using the Linear Corrugating process are significantly stronger-in the prime strength criteria, Box Compression Test (BCT) than boxes made conventionally. This means that using Linear Corrugating boxes can be manufactured to BCT equaling conventional boxes but containing 30% less fiber. The corrugated container industry is a large part of the U.S. economy, producing over 40 million tons annually. For such a large industry, the potential savings of Linear Corrugating are enormous. The grant for this project covered three phases in the development of the Linear Corrugating process: (1) Production and evaluation of corrugated boxes on commercial equipment to verify that boxes so manufactured would have enhanced BCT as proposed in the application; (2) Production and evaluation of corrugated boxes made on laboratory equipment using combined board from (1) above but having dual manufactures joints (glue joints). This box manufacturing method (Dual Joint) is proposed to overcome box perimeter limitations of the Linear Corrugating process; (3) Design, Construction, Operation and Evaluation of an engineering prototype machine to form flutes in corrugating medium in the MD of the paper. This operation is the central requirement of the Linear Corrugating process. Items I and II were successfully completed, showing predicted BCT increases from the Linear Corrugated boxes and significant strength improvement in the Dual Joint boxes. The Former was constructed and operated successfully using kraft linerboard as the forming medium. It was found that tensile strength and stretch characteristics of the corrugating medium were not sufficient to allow fluting this paper in the former. Possible causes and corrective actions to overcome this problem are addressed in the body of the report below.

  1. Dealing with uncertainty when assessing fish passage through culvert road crossings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Gregory B.; Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, Byron J.; Straight, Carrie A.; Hagler, Megan M.; Peterson, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the passage of aquatic organisms through culvert road crossings has become increasingly common in efforts to restore stream habitat. Several federal and state agencies and local stakeholders have adopted assessment approaches based on literature-derived criteria for culvert impassability. However, criteria differ and are typically specific to larger-bodied fishes. In an analysis to prioritize culverts for remediation to benefit imperiled, small-bodied fishes in the Upper Coosa River system in the southeastern United States, we assessed the sensitivity of prioritization to the use of differing but plausible criteria for culvert impassability. Using measurements at 256 road crossings, we assessed culvert impassability using four alternative criteria sets represented in Bayesian belief networks. Two criteria sets scored culverts as either passable or impassable based on alternative thresholds of culvert characteristics (outlet elevation, baseflow water velocity). Two additional criteria sets incorporated uncertainty concerning ability of small-bodied fishes to pass through culverts and estimated a probability of culvert impassability. To prioritize culverts for remediation, we combined estimated culvert impassability with culvert position in the stream network relative to other barriers to compute prospective gain in connected stream habitat for the target fish species. Although four culverts ranked highly for remediation regardless of which criteria were used to assess impassability, other culverts differed widely in priority depending on criteria. Our results emphasize the value of explicitly incorporating uncertainty into criteria underlying remediation decisions. Comparing outcomes among alternative, plausible criteria may also help to identify research most needed to narrow management uncertainty.

  2. Dealing With Uncertainty When Assessing Fish Passage Through Culvert Road Crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory B.; Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, Byron J.; Straight, Carrie A.; Hagler, Megan M.; Peterson, James T.

    2012-09-01

    Assessing the passage of aquatic organisms through culvert road crossings has become increasingly common in efforts to restore stream habitat. Several federal and state agencies and local stakeholders have adopted assessment approaches based on literature-derived criteria for culvert impassability. However, criteria differ and are typically specific to larger-bodied fishes. In an analysis to prioritize culverts for remediation to benefit imperiled, small-bodied fishes in the Upper Coosa River system in the southeastern United States, we assessed the sensitivity of prioritization to the use of differing but plausible criteria for culvert impassability. Using measurements at 256 road crossings, we assessed culvert impassability using four alternative criteria sets represented in Bayesian belief networks. Two criteria sets scored culverts as either passable or impassable based on alternative thresholds of culvert characteristics (outlet elevation, baseflow water velocity). Two additional criteria sets incorporated uncertainty concerning ability of small-bodied fishes to pass through culverts and estimated a probability of culvert impassability. To prioritize culverts for remediation, we combined estimated culvert impassability with culvert position in the stream network relative to other barriers to compute prospective gain in connected stream habitat for the target fish species. Although four culverts ranked highly for remediation regardless of which criteria were used to assess impassability, other culverts differed widely in priority depending on criteria. Our results emphasize the value of explicitly incorporating uncertainty into criteria underlying remediation decisions. Comparing outcomes among alternative, plausible criteria may also help to identify research most needed to narrow management uncertainty.

  3. Dealing with uncertainty when assessing fish passage through culvert road crossings.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gregory B; Freeman, Mary C; Freeman, Byron J; Straight, Carrie A; Hagler, Megan M; Peterson, James T

    2012-09-01

    Assessing the passage of aquatic organisms through culvert road crossings has become increasingly common in efforts to restore stream habitat. Several federal and state agencies and local stakeholders have adopted assessment approaches based on literature-derived criteria for culvert impassability. However, criteria differ and are typically specific to larger-bodied fishes. In an analysis to prioritize culverts for remediation to benefit imperiled, small-bodied fishes in the Upper Coosa River system in the southeastern United States, we assessed the sensitivity of prioritization to the use of differing but plausible criteria for culvert impassability. Using measurements at 256 road crossings, we assessed culvert impassability using four alternative criteria sets represented in Bayesian belief networks. Two criteria sets scored culverts as either passable or impassable based on alternative thresholds of culvert characteristics (outlet elevation, baseflow water velocity). Two additional criteria sets incorporated uncertainty concerning ability of small-bodied fishes to pass through culverts and estimated a probability of culvert impassability. To prioritize culverts for remediation, we combined estimated culvert impassability with culvert position in the stream network relative to other barriers to compute prospective gain in connected stream habitat for the target fish species. Although four culverts ranked highly for remediation regardless of which criteria were used to assess impassability, other culverts differed widely in priority depending on criteria. Our results emphasize the value of explicitly incorporating uncertainty into criteria underlying remediation decisions. Comparing outcomes among alternative, plausible criteria may also help to identify research most needed to narrow management uncertainty. PMID:22744156

  4. Towards effective culvert design: monitoring seasonal use and behavior by Mediterranean mesocarnivores.

    PubMed

    Serronha, Ana Marta; Mateus, Ana Rita Amaro; Eaton, Finn; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Grilo, Clara

    2013-08-01

    Drainage culverts are known to be used by a diverse number of species. To date, most studies looking at culvert usage have been restricted to the dry season. This seasonal bias has limited our understanding of how different species respond to culverts and, consequently, our ability to find effective ways to promote the use of culverts as aids to species movement. The main goal of this study was to examine the role of highway culverts for mesocarnivores throughout the year. We addressed (1) the seasonality of culvert use, (2) the relative importance of culvert structure, highway features, and surrounding landscape on culvert use, (3) the influence of the water depth and cover on culvert use, and (4) the effect of culvert structure on individual behavior. Fifteen culverts were monitored along 2 highways in southern Portugal using video-surveillance cameras and marble dust for 10 consecutive days per season. We used generalized linear mixed models to determine which factors most affected the culvert use and behavior by mesocarnivores. Our results highlight the effect of seasonality and water on culvert use. Culvert use was positively related with species activity throughout the year. All species (except otters (Lutra lutra)) were less likely to use culverts that contained water more than 3 cm deep or covering more than 70 % of the culvert base. Based on our results, future surveys and culvert retrofit design should address (1) the importance of seasonality in the interpretation of results and (2) the complementarity of culvert-specific features (water, ledges, and naturalization). PMID:23208760

  5. Feasibility of culvert IED detection using thermal neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.; McFee, John E.; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Andrews, Hugh Robert; Mosquera, Cristian; Roberts, William C.

    2012-06-01

    Bulk explosives hidden in culverts pose a serious threat to the Canadian and allied armies. Culverts provide an opportunity to conceal insurgent activity, avoid the need for detectable surface disturbances, and limit the applicability of conventional sub-surface sensing techniques. Further, in spite of the large masses of explosives that can be employed, the large sensor{target separation makes detection of the bulk explosive content challeng- ing. Defence R&D Canada { Sueld and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives for over 15 years. The next generation TNA sensor, known as TNA2, incorporates a number of improvements that allow for increased sensor-to-target dis- tances, making it potentially feasible to detect large improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in culverts using TNA. Experiments to determine the ability of TNA2 to detect improvised explosive devices in culverts are described, and the resulting signal levels observed for relevant quantities of explosives are presented. Observations conrm that bulk explosives detection using TNA against a culvert-IED is possible, with large charges posing a detection challenge at least as dicult as that of a deeply buried anti-tank landmine. Because of the prototype nature of the TNA sensor used, it is not yet possible to make denitive statements about the absolute sensitivity or detection time. Further investigation is warranted.

  6. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-50 Stormwater Runoff Culvert, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-001

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2008-04-15

    The 100-F-50 waste site, part of the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, is a steel stormwater runoff culvert that runs between two railroad grades in the south-central portion of the 100-F Area. The culvert exiting the west side of the railroad grade is mostly encased in concrete and surrounded by a concrete stormwater collection depression partially filled with soil and vegetation. The drain pipe exiting the east side of the railroad grade embankment is partially filled with soil and rocks. The 100-F-50 stormwater diversion culvert confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to no action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  7. South stone portal of C&O Canal Culvert No. 211, which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South stone portal of C&O Canal Culvert No. 211, which connects to WM Culvert No. 1423, Purslane Run Culvert, looking west. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  8. 5. VIEW OF WEST GATE ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF WEST GATE ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL NO. 1 DRAIN, LOOKING 323' EAST OF NORTH. - Truckee-Carson Irrigation District, Lower Diagonal No. 1 Drain, Bounded by West Gate Road & Weapons Delivery Road, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  9. 6. VIEW OF WEST GATE ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF WEST GATE ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL NO. 1 DRAIN, LOOKING 2502 EAST OF NORTH. - Truckee-Carson Irrigation District, Lower Diagonal No. 1 Drain, Bounded by West Gate Road & Weapons Delivery Road, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  10. 35. Photo of concrete arch culvert constructed by Puget Sound ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photo of concrete arch culvert constructed by Puget Sound Construction Company, 1911, for the Northern Pacific Railroad, over flume. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  11. 9. VIEW OF WHITE ROCK ROAD INDICATING CULVERT LOCATION (SEE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF WHITE ROCK ROAD INDICATING CULVERT LOCATION (SEE ROAD ANGLE POINT ON RIGHT) WITH LATROBE RD, INTERSECTION IN DISTANCE (LEFT OF CENTER); VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Placerville Road, White Rock Road between Clarksville & White Rock, El Dorado Hills, El Dorado County, CA

  12. 7. VIEW OF WEAPONS DELIVERY ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WEAPONS DELIVERY ROAD CULVERT OF LOWER DIAGONAL NO. 1 DRAIN, LOOKING 522 EAST OF NORTH. - Truckee-Carson Irrigation District, Lower Diagonal No. 1 Drain, Bounded by West Gate Road & Weapons Delivery Road, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  13. Flood magnitude and frequency of Main Ditch at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44 and at the Conrail culvert downstream, West Deptford Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods at Main Ditch at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44 at milepost 8.3 and at the Conrail culvert 0.21 miles downstream, in West Deptford Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. Flood-magnitude and -frequency estimates, as well as drainage-basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimates are 285 cubic feet per second at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44 and 345 cubic feet per second at the Conrail culvert.

  14. Culvert Analysis Program Graphical User Interface 1.0--A preprocessing and postprocessing tool for estimating flow through culvert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D. Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The peak discharge of a flood can be estimated from the elevation of high-water marks near the inlet and outlet of a culvert after the flood has occurred. This type of discharge estimate is called an “indirect measurement” because it relies on evidence left behind by the flood, such as high-water marks on trees or buildings. When combined with the cross-sectional geometry of the channel upstream from the culvert and the culvert size, shape, roughness, and orientation, the high-water marks define a water-surface profile that can be used to estimate the peak discharge by using the methods described by Bodhaine (1968). This type of measurement is in contrast to a “direct” measurement of discharge made during the flood where cross-sectional area is measured and a current meter or acoustic equipment is used to measure the water velocity. When a direct discharge measurement cannot be made at a streamgage during high flows because of logistics or safety reasons, an indirect measurement of a peak discharge is useful for defining the high-flow section of the stage-discharge relation (rating curve) at the streamgage, resulting in more accurate computation of high flows. The Culvert Analysis Program (CAP) (Fulford, 1998) is a command-line program written in Fortran for computing peak discharges and culvert rating surfaces or curves. CAP reads input data from a formatted text file and prints results to another formatted text file. Preparing and correctly formatting the input file may be time-consuming and prone to errors. This document describes the CAP graphical user interface (GUI)—a modern, cross-platform, menu-driven application that prepares the CAP input file, executes the program, and helps the user interpret the output

  15. Turtles and culverts, and alternative energy development: an unreported but potentially significant mortality threat to the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, J.E.; Ennen, J.R.; Madrak, S.; Grover, B.

    2011-01-01

    Culverts are often used to increase the permeability of roaded landscapes for wildlife, including turtles. Although the benefits of culverts as safe passages for turtles are well documented, under some conditions culverts can entrap them and cause mortality. Here we report a culvert-related mortality in the federally threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) at a wind energy facility in California and offer simple recommendations to mitigate the negative effects of culverts for wildlife in general.

  16. Shape optimization of corrugated airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sambhav; Bhatt, Varun Dhananjay; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The effect of corrugations on the aerodynamic performance of a Mueller C4 airfoil, placed at a 5° angle of attack and Re=10{,}000, is investigated. A stabilized finite element method is employed to solve the incompressible flow equations in two dimensions. A novel parameterization scheme is proposed that enables representation of corrugations on the surface of the airfoil, and their spontaneous appearance in the shape optimization loop, if indeed they improve aerodynamic performance. Computations are carried out for different location and number of corrugations, while holding their height fixed. The first corrugation causes an increase in lift and drag. Each of the later corrugations leads to a reduction in drag. Shape optimization of the Mueller C4 airfoil is carried out using various objective functions and optimization strategies, based on controlling airfoil thickness and camber. One of the optimal shapes leads to 50 % increase in lift coefficient and 23 % increase in aerodynamic efficiency compared to the Mueller C4 airfoil.

  17. Culvert analysis program for indirect measurement of discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.

    1993-01-01

    A program based on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) methods for indirectly computing peak discharges through culverts allows users to employ input data formats used by the water surface profile program (WSPRO). The program can be used to compute discharge rating surfaces or curves that describe the behavior of flow through a particular culvert or to compute discharges from measurements of upstream of the gradually varied flow equations and has been adapted slightly to provide solutions that minimize the need for the user to determine between different flow regimes. The program source is written in Fortran 77 and has been run on mini-computers and personal computers. The program does not use or require graphics capability, a color monitor, or a mouse.

  18. 24. CULVERT WITH CONCRETE HEADWALL AND SIDEWALLS CARRYING THE LATERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CULVERT WITH CONCRETE HEADWALL AND SIDEWALLS CARRYING THE LATERAL UNDER 8TH AVENUE. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  19. Strain variation in corrugated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanye; Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Christopher, Jason; Paiella, Roberto; Swan, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-destructive technique for analyzing strain in graphene. Recently there has been interest in making corrugated graphene devices with varying spatial wavelengths Λ for plasmonic and THz applications. Transferring graphene onto corrugated substrates introduces strain, which if there was perfect clamping (high fraction) would cause a periodic strain variation. However, the strain variation for pattern size smaller than the diffraction limit λ makes it hard to precisely model the strain distribution. Here we present a detailed study on how strain varies in corrugated graphene with sub-diffraction limit periodicity Λ < λ. Mechanically exfoliated graphene was deposited onto sinusoidal shape silicon dioxide gratings with Λ=400 nm period using the pick and place transfer technique. We observed that the graphene is not rigidly clamped, but partially slides to relieve the strain. We model the linewidth variation to extract the local strain variation as well as the sliding in the presence of charge puddling in graphene. The method gives us a better understanding on graphene slippage and strain distribution in graphene on a corrugated substrate with sub-diffraction limit spatial period.

  20. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeao; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-01-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels. Experimental studies usually

  1. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeao; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-01-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels. Experimental studies usually…

  2. Aeroacoustics of the swinging corrugated tube: voice of the Dragon.

    PubMed

    Nakiboğlu, Güneş; Rudenko, Oleksii; Hirschberg, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    When one swings a short corrugated pipe segment around one's head, it produces a musically interesting whistling sound. As a musical toy it is called a "Hummer" and as a musical instrument, the "Voice of the Dragon." The fluid dynamics aspects of the instrument are addressed, corresponding to the sound generation mechanism. Velocity profile measurements reveal that the turbulent velocity profile developed in a corrugated pipe differs notably from the one of a smooth pipe. This velocity profile appears to have a crucial effect both on the non-dimensional whistling frequency (Strouhal number) and on the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations. Using a numerical model based on incompressible flow simulations and vortex sound theory, excellent predictions of the whistling Strouhal numbers are achieved. The model does not provide an accurate prediction of the amplitude. In the second part of the paper the sound radiation from a Hummer is discussed. The acoustic measurements obtained in a semi-anechoic chamber are compared with a theoretical radiation model. Globally the instrument behaves as a rotating (Leslie) horn. The effects of Doppler shift, wall reflections, bending of the tube, non-constant rotational speed on the observed frequency, and amplitude are discussed. PMID:22280698

  3. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Grot, Stephen President, Ion Power Inc.

    2013-09-30

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  4. Spontaneous corrugation of dipolar membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuquan; Gezelter, J. Daniel

    2007-03-01

    We present a simple model for dipolar elastic membranes that gives lattice-bound point dipoles complete orientational freedom as well as translational freedom along one coordinate (out of the plane of the membrane). There is an additional harmonic term which binds each of the dipoles to the six nearest neighbors on either triangular or distorted lattices. The translational freedom of the dipoles allows triangular lattices to find states that break out of the normal orientational disorder of frustrated configurations and which are stabilized by long-range antiferroelectric ordering. In order to break out of the frustrated states, the dipolar membranes form corrugated or “rippled” phases that make the lattices effectively nontriangular. We observe three common features of the corrugated dipolar membranes: (1) the corrugated phases develop easily when hosted on triangular lattices, (2) the wave vectors for the surface ripples are always found to be perpendicular to the dipole director axis, and (3) on triangular lattices, the dipole director axis is found to be parallel to any of the three equivalent lattice directions.

  5. 6. VIEW OF A RUSTED, HEAVYGAUGE METAL CULVERT (TY31776) PLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF A RUSTED, HEAVY-GAUGE METAL CULVERT (TY-3177-6) PLACED AT A SMALL DRAW WHERE KINGS CANYON ROAD WILL BE INSLOPED AND THE CULVERT WILL BE REMOVED. LOCATED AT MILEPOST 0.05 (ACCORDING TO THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE RECORD FOR TY-3177). FACING SOUTH 76ø WEST (256ø). - Kings Canyon Road, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  6. Movement and survival of an amphibian in relation to sediment and culvert design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeycutt, R.K; Lowe, W.H.; Hossack, Blake R.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat disturbance from stream culverts can affect aquatic organisms by increasing sedimentation or forming barriers to movement. Land managers are replacing many culverts to reduce these negative effects, primarily for stream fishes. However, these management actions are likely to have broad implications for many organisms, including amphibians in small streams. To assess the effects of culverts on movement and survival of the Idaho giant salamander (Dicamptodon aterrimus), we used capture-mark-recapture surveys and measured sediment in streams with 2 culvert types (i.e., unimproved culverts, improved culverts) and in streams without culverts (i.e., reference streams). We predicted culverts would increase stream sediment levels, limit movement, and reduce survival of Idaho giant salamanders. We also determined the effect of sediment levels on survival of salamanders because although sediment is often associated with distribution and abundance of stream amphibians, links with vital rates remain unclear. To estimate survival, we used a spatial Cormack–Jolly–Seber (CJS) model that explicitly incorporated information on movement, eliminating bias in apparent survival estimated from traditional (i.e., non-spatial) CJS models caused by permanent emigration beyond the study area. To demonstrate the importance of using spatial data in studies of wildlife populations, we compared estimates from the spatial CJS to estimates of apparent survival from a traditional CJS model. Although high levels of sediment reduced survival of salamanders, culvert type was unrelated to sediment levels or true survival of salamanders. Across all streams, we documented only 15 movement events between study reaches. All movement events were downstream, and they occurred disproportionately in 1 stream, which precluded measuring the effect of culvert design on movement. Although movement was low overall, the variance among streams was high enough to bias estimates of apparent survival compared to true survival. Our results suggest that where sedimentation occurs from roads and culverts, survival of the Idaho giant salamander could be reduced. Though culverts clearly do not completely block downstream movements of Idaho giant salamanders, the degree to which culvert improvements affect movements under roads in comparison to unimproved culverts remains unclear, especially for rare, but potentially important, upstream movements.

  7. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-12-31

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  8. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  9. MONITORING CULVERT PASSAGE OF JUVENILE SALMONIDS WITH PIT TAGS AND STATIONARY AND PORTABLE PIT-TAG READERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Federal land management agencies in the PNW face increasing pressure to replace culverts that do not pass all life history stages of anadromous salmon and trout. Prioritization of culverts for replacement is often based on the physical parameters of culverts, and not on how fish...

  10. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeão; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-09-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels.1-4 Experimental studies usually involve expensive and sophisticated equipment that is out of reach of school laboratory facilities.3-6 In this paper we show how to investigate quantitatively the sounds produced by a flexible sound tube corrugated on the inside by using educational equipment readily available in school laboratories, such as the oscilloscope, the microphone, the anemometer, and the air pump. We show that it is possible for students to study the discontinuous spectrum of sounds produced by a flexible corrugated tube and go even further, computing the speed of sound in air with a simple experimental procedure.

  11. Biaxially corrugated flexible sheet material

    DOEpatents

    Schmertz, John C. (5308 Ellsworth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232)

    1991-04-16

    A flexible biaxially corrugated sheet material is formed from a plurality of identical trapezium segments which are arranged in a plurality of long strips a single segment wide. Adjacent strips are mirror images of each other and connected along adjoining sides with the angles of the four corners of adjacent segments being alternately less than 360.degree. and greater than 360.degree. along the length of a strip such that the sheet material has an undulating configuration, and is inherently curved and cannot lie in a flat plane.

  12. A parametric study of cut-off corrugated surface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentzer, C. A.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Corrugated horns involve a junction between the corrugated surface and a conducting groundplane. Proper horn design requires an understanding of the electromagnetic properties of the corrugated surface and this junction. Therefore, an integral equation solution has been used to study the influence of corrugation density and shape on the power loss. Surface current, and the scattering from a groundplane-corrugated surface junction. Both square and vee shape corrugations have been considered over the range of corrugation depths where the surface acts as a cut-off corrugated surface.

  13. Assessing Juvenile Salmonid Passage Through Culverts: Field Research in Support of Protocol Development

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Greg D.; Evans, Nathan R.; Pearson, Walter H.; Southard, John A.

    2001-10-30

    The primary goal of our research this spring/ summer was to refine techniques and examine scenarios under which a standardized protocol could be applied to assess juvenile coho salmon (O. kisutch) passage through road culverts. Field evaluations focused on capture-mark- recapture methods that allowed analysis of fish movement patterns, estimates of culvert passability, and potential identification of cues inducing these movements. At this stage, 0+ age coho salmon fry 30 mm to 65 mm long (fork length) were the species and age class of interest. Ultimately, the protocol will provide rapid, statistically rigorous methods for trained personnel to perform standardized biological assessments of culvert passability to a number of juvenile salmon species. Questions to be addressed by the research include the following: ? Do hydraulic structures such as culverts restrict habitat for juvenile salmonids? ? How do existing culverts and retrofits perform relative to juvenile salmonid passage? ? Do some culvert characteristics and hydraulic conditions provide better passage than others? ? Does the culvert represent a barrier to certain size classes of fish? Recommendations addressed issues of study site selection, initial capture, marking, recapture/observations, and estimating movement.

  14. Aeroacoustic interaction in a corrugated duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kop'ev, V. F.; Mironov, M. A.; Solntseva, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    The sound generation by an air flow in a corrugated tube is studied experimentally for different values of the corrugation pitch and different tube lengths. The Strouhal numbers of sound generated in different tubes with different flow velocities lie within 0.4-0.6. As the flow velocity increases, the Strouhal number decreases. The effect of sound absorption by an air flow in a corrugated duct is described: in a corrugated tube with a flow, at frequencies below the generation frequency, the absorption of sound produced by an external source is observed. A semiempirical model of aeroacoustic interaction in a corrugated tube is proposed. The model provides a qualitative agreement with the experiment.

  15. Investigation of culvert hydraulics related to juvenile fish passage. Final research report

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, M.E.; Downs, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    Culverts often create barriers to the upstream migration of juvenile fish. The objective of this study was to determine hydraulic characteristics of culverts with different flow conditions. Methods of predicting flow profiles were developed by both Chiu and Mountjoy. Two equations were compared to experimental results. An area of flow corresponding to a predetermined allowable velocity can be calculated using Mountjoy equation. This can then be used in the design of culverts as fish passage guidelines. The report contains a summary of background information, experimental methodology, the results of experimental tests, and an analysis of both the Chiu and Mountjoy equations.

  16. Square concrete culvert and concrete retaining wall, 1/2 mile east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Square concrete culvert and concrete retaining wall, 1/2 mile east of Indigo Tunnel, milepost 128. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  17. Horn antenna with v-shaped corrugated surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, F. B.; Mentzer, C. A.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Corrugated shape is easily machined for millimeter wave application and is better suited for folding antenna designs. Measured performance showed ""V'' corrugations and rectangular corrugations have nearly the same pattern beamwidth, gain, and impedance. Also, ""V'' corrugations have higher relative power loss.

  18. Where have all the caddis gone? The role of culverts, and spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J. S.; Neumegen, R. E.; van den Braak, I. L.

    2005-05-01

    Restoration of a 1.5 km urban stream over the past five years has led to surprisingly slow improvement in benthic communities. Analysis of benthic invertebrates at six sites longitudinally showed a marked decline in caddisfly diversity and abundance upstream. This decline could not be adequately explained by changes in water quality, or in-stream physical conditions. Extensive adult trapping on multiple sites on three urban streams has shown that main roads with culverts act as barriers to the upstream flight of adult caddisflies. When adult caddis encounter a road culvert, some are distracted by the surrounding urban conditions (e.g. street lights), and only 30-50% enter the culvert. Of these, about 10-30% do not reach the upstream exit falling prey to spiders or distracted by confounding flight cues. Experimental removal of spiders and webs from three culverts showed an increase in the proportion of caddis exiting upstream. Other confounding effects on caddisflies within the culvert might include light, humidity and temperature gradients. Our results indicate that barriers to adult dispersal and colonisation, such as road culverts and confusing urban habitats, may markedly limit the recovery of urban stream communities.

  19. Method and apparatus for corrugating strips

    DOEpatents

    Day, J.R.; Curtis, C.H.

    1981-10-27

    The invention relates to a method and a machine for transversely corrugating a continuous strip of metallic foil. The product foil comprises a succession of alternately disposed corrugations, each defining in a cross section, a major segment of a circle. The foil to be corrugated is positioned to extend within a vertical passage in the machine. The walls of the passage are heated to promote the desired deformation of the foil. Foil-deforming rollers are alternately passed obliquely across the passage to respectively engage transverse sections of the foil. The rollers and their respective section of deformed foil comprise a stacked assembly which is moved incrementally through the heated passageway. As the assembly emerges from the passageway, the rollers spill from the corrugated foil and are recovered for re-use.

  20. Method and apparatus for corrugating strips

    DOEpatents

    Day, Jack R.; Curtis, Charles H.

    1983-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a machine for transversely corrugating a continuous strip of metallic foil. The product foil comprises a succession of alternately disposed corrugations, each defining in cross section, a major segment of a circle. The foil to be corrugated is positioned to extend within a vertical passage in the machine. The walls of the passage are heated to promote the desired deformation of the foil. Foil-deforming rollers are alternately passed obliquely across the passage to respectively engage transverse sections of the foil. The rollers and their respective section of deformed foil comprise a stacked assembly which is moved incrementally through the heated passageway. As the assembly emerges from the passageway, the rollers spill from the corrugated foil and are recovered for re-use.

  1. Evolutionary design of corrugated horn antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoorfar, F.; Manshadi, V.; Jamnejad, A.

    2002-01-01

    An evolutionary progranirnitzg (EP) algorithm is used to optimize pattern of a corrugated circularhorn subject to various constraints on return loss and antenna beamwidth and pattern circularity and low crosspolarization. The EP algorithm uses a Gaussian mutation operator. Examples on design synthesis of a 45 section corrugated horn, with a total of 90 optimization parameters, are presented. The results show excellent and efficient optimization of the desired horn parameters.

  2. RF Pulse Compression Using Helically Corrugated Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacInnes, P.; Ronald, K.; Burt, G.; Cross, A. W.; Young, A. R.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Konoplev, I. V.; He, W.; Samsonov, S. V.; Bratman, V. L.; Denisov, G. G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a helically corrugated waveguide as a dispersive medium for microwave pulse compression. The helically corrugated waveguide has a large variation of group velocity with frequency, but in a region where the group velocity remains large. Therefore this compressor does not suffer from reflections associated with cut-off scenarios at frequencies close to its operating regime and may be used in conjunction with high power wideband tunable microwave sources and amplifiers.

  3. Flood magnitude and frequency of Little Mantual Creek at the culvert at milepost 7.8 on New Jersey Route 44, and at the Conrail culvert 0.20 miles downstream, West Deptford Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods at Little Mantua Creek at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44 at milepost 7.8 and at the Conrail culvert 0.20 miles downstream, in West Deptford Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. Flood-magnitude and -frequency estimates, as well as drainage-basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimates are 249 cubic feet per second at the culvert on New Jersey Route 44, and 243 cubic feet per second at the Conrail culvert.

  4. Instrumentation for monitoring buried pipe behavior during backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, T.J.; Selig, E.T.; Webb, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    An extensive instrumentation plan was devised to monitor buried pipe behavior, soil behavior and pipe-soil interaction during backfilling. The emphasis of the instrumentation plan was to monitor these parameters under different installation techniques without impeding construction operations. Different types and sizes of pipe were selected for installation in trenches excavated in undisturbed in situ soil conditions. Installation variables included in situ soil conditions, trench widths, backfill material (including controlled low strength material), haunching effort, and compaction methods. A total of fourteen tests, each including reinforced concrete, corrugated steel, and corrugated HDPE, were conducted. Eleven of the installations were conducted with 900 mm inside diameter pipe and three with 1,500 mm inside diameter pipe. The pipes were buried to a cover depth of 1.2 m. Measurements of pipe shape, pipe strains, pipe-soil interface pressures, soil density, soil stresses, and soil strains were collected. Pipe shape changes were measured by a custom built profilometer. Custom designed bending beam pressure transducers were used in the steel pipe to measure interface pressures. Most of the instrumentation performed well and measured results were within the range expected. Pipe-soil interaction effects were effectively measured with the instruments selected. Pipe shape changes were a very valuable parameter for investigating pipe-soil interaction.

  5. Time-resolved measurement of quadrupole wakefields in corrugated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chao; Fu, Feichao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Shi, Libin; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhen; Xiang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Corrugated structures have recently been widely used for manipulating electron beam longitudinal phase space and for producing THz radiation. Here we report on time-resolved measurements of the quadrupole wakefields in planar corrugated structures. It is shown that while the time-dependent quadrupole wakefield produced by a planar corrugated structure causes significant growth in beam transverse emittance, it can be effectively canceled with a second corrugated structure with orthogonal orientation. The strengths of the time-dependent quadrupole wakefields for various corrugated structure gaps are also measured and found to be in good agreement with theories. Our work should forward the applications of corrugated structures in many accelerator based scientific facilities.

  6. Estimates for Pu-239 loadings in burial ground culverts based on fast/slow neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.; Hochel, R.C.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.A.

    1989-08-15

    This report provides guideline estimates for Pu-239 mass loadings in selected burial ground culverts. The relatively high recorded Pu-239 contents of these culverts have been appraised as suspect relative to criticality concerns, because they were assayed only with the solid waste monitor (SWM) per gamma-ray counting. After 1985, subsequent waste was also assayed with the neutron coincidence counter (NCC), and a comparison of the assay methods showed that the NCC generally yielded higher assays than the SWM. These higher NCC readings signaled a need to conduct non-destructive/non-intrusive nuclear interrogations of these culverts, and a technical team conducted scoping measurements to illustrate potential assay methods based on neutron and/or gamma counting. A fast/slow neutron method has been developed to estimate the Pu-239 in the culverts. In addition, loading records include the SWM assays of all Pu-239 cuts of some of the culvert drums and these data are useful in estimating the corresponding NCC drum assays from NCC vs SWM data. Together, these methods yield predictions based on direct measurements and statistical inference.

  7. High frequency scattering from corrugated stratified cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, Kamal; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    Interest in applying radar remote sensing for the study of forested areas led to the development of a model for scattering from corrugated stratified dielectric cylinders. The model is used to investigate the effect of bark and its roughness on scattering from tree trunks and branches. The outer layer of the cylinder (bark) is assumed to be a low-loss dielectric material and to have a regular (periodic) corrugation pattern. The inner layers are treated as lossy dielectrics with smooth boundaries. A hybrid solution based on the moment method and the physical optics approximation is obtained. In the solution, the corrugations are replaced with polarization currents that are identical to those of the local tangential periodic corrugated surface, and the stratified cylinder is replaced with equivalent surface currents. New expressions for the equivalent physical-optics currents are used which are more convenient than the standard ones. It is shown that the bark layer and its roughness both reduce the radar cross-section. It is also demonstrated that the corrugations can be replaced by an equivalent anisotropic layer.

  8. Ultrasonic geometrical characterization of periodically corrugated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F

    2013-04-01

    Accurate characterization of the characteristic dimensions of a periodically corrugated surface using ultrasonic imaging technique is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The possibility of accurately characterizing the characteristic dimensions is discussed. The condition for accurate characterization and the quantitative relationship between the accuracy and its determining parameters are given. The strategies to avoid diffraction effects instigated by the periodical nature of a corrugated surface are also discussed. Major causes of erroneous measurements are theoretically discussed and experimentally illustrated. A comparison is made between the presented results and the optical measurements, revealing acceptable agreement. This work realistically exposes the capability of the proposed ultrasonic technique to accurately characterize the lateral and vertical characteristic dimensions of corrugated surfaces. Both the general principles developed theoretically as well as the proposed practical techniques may serve as useful guidelines to peers. PMID:23294990

  9. 49 CFR 1242.15 - Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast, track laying and surfacing, and road property damaged... culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast, track laying and surfacing, and road property...

  10. CORRECTING UNRELIABLE VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN SHORT CULVERTS AND CANAL REACHES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water management increasingly depends on good water flow measurement. Too frequently, flow disturbances from upstream elbows, the well pump, or other pipe fittings, produce distorted flow profiles that are detrimental to the proper installation and operation of common flow meters used in...

  11. Effect of Culverts on Predator-Prey Interactions in a Tropical Stream.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, C. L.; Kikkert, D. A.; Crowl, T. A.

    2005-05-01

    As part of a biocomplexity project in Puerto Rico, we use river and road networks as a platform to understand the interactions between stream biota, the physical environment, and human activity. Specifically, we ask if humans affect aquatic organisms through road building and recreational activities. Culverts have been documented to impede or slow migration of aquatic biota. This is especially important in these streams because all of the freshwater, stream species have diadramous life cycles. If culverts do act as bottlenecks to shrimp migrations, we expect altered predator-prey interactions downstream through density-dependent predation dynamics. In order to determine how roads may affect predation rates on upstream migrating shrimp, we parameterized functional response curves for mountain mullet (Agonostomus monticola) consuming shrimp (Xiphocaris sp.) using artificial mesocosm experiments. We then used data obtained from underwater videography to determine how culverts decrease the rate and number of shrimp moving upstream. These data were combined in a predator-prey model to quantify the effects of culverts on localized shrimp densities and fish predation.

  12. CONTEXT VIEW, SHOWING STRUCTURE NO. 57.3X (CULVERT) AT RIGHT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW, SHOWING STRUCTURE NO. 57.3X (CULVERT) AT RIGHT AND STRUCTURE NO. 57.24X (BRIDGE) IN DISTANCE AT LEFT. MAIN TRACK 1 RUNS ALONG THE TOP OF THE FEATURES. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. 12 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 57.3X, Between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. Imaging Buried Culverts Using Ground Penetrating Radar: Comparing 100 MHZ Through 1 GHZ Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Aziz, A.; Stewart, R. R.; Green, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    *Aziz, A A aabdulaziz@uh.edu Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA Stewart, R R rrstewart@uh.edu Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA *Green, S L slgreen@yahoo.com Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA A 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, using three different frequency antennae, was undertaken to image buried steel culverts at the University of Houston's La Marque Geophysical Observatory 30 miles south of Houston, Texas. The four culverts, under study, support a road crossing one of the area's bayous. A 32 m by 4.5 m survey grid was designed on the road above the culverts and data were collected with 100 MHz, 250 MHz, and 1 GHz antennae. We used an orthogonal acquisition geometry for the three surveys. Inline sampling was from 1.0 cm to 10 cm (from 1 GHz to 100 MHz antenna) with inline and crossline spacings ranging from 0.2 m to 0.5 m. We used an initial velocity of 0.1 m/ns (from previous CMP work at the site) for the display purposes. The main objective of the study was to analyze the effect of different frequency antennae on the resultant GPR images. We are also interested in the accuracy and resolution of the various images, in addition to developing an optimal processing flow.The data were initially processed with standard steps that included gain enhancement, dewow and temporal-filtering, background suppression, and 2D migration. Various radar velocities were used in the 2D migration and ultimately 0.12 m/ns was used. The data are complicated by multipathing from the surface and between culverts (from modeling). Some of this is ameliorated via deconvolution. The top of each of the four culverts was evident in the GPR images acquired with the 250 MHz and 100 MHz antennas. For 1 GHz, the top of the culvert was not clear due to the signal's attenuation. The 250 MHz shielded antenna provides a vertical resolution of about 0.1 m and is the choice to image the culverts. The 100 MHz antenna provided an increment in depth of penetration, but at the expense of a substantially diminished resolution (0.25 m).

  14. An Analysis of Stream Culvert Fish Passage on the Navy Railroad Line between Bremerton and Shelton, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    May, Christopher W.; Miller, Martin C.; Southard, John A.

    2004-10-25

    The Navy railroad service line runs between Shelton, Bremerton, and Silverdale, and is used by the Navy to transfer freight to its facilities. It is also used by commercial clients to ship service items and bulk cargo for municipalities along portions of the route. Culverts of various size and construction convey streams and stormwater runoff under the railroad line. These allow transfer of water and, in some cases allow for passage of juvenile and adult salmon into waters upstream of the culverts. As part of this project, 21 culverts along a 34-mile reach (Shelton to Bremerton) of this railroad were surveyed to evaluate their function and ability to allow salmon to utilize the streams. The culverts and attached watersheds were evaluated using criteria developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to assign a Priority Index (PI) to barriers present on each fish-bearing stream. The PI is a relative numeric rating indicator, assigned using consistent criteria related to the degree of potential habitat gained by removing barriers and improving the function of the watershed. Of the 21 culverts evaluated, five were found to be complete fish-passage barriers and six were found to be partial barriers, primarily to juvenile salmon. Three of these culverts had PI ratings above 10 and five others had ratings between 7 and 10. Corrective action can be taken based on any PI rating, but the WDFW normally assigns lower priority to projects with PI scores lower than 15. Several of the stream and culverts had previously been evaluated for structural integrity and function and have been scheduled for repair. A narrative indicating the condition of the culvert has been prepared as well as a table indicating the PI scores and a summary of recommendations for action for each culvert.

  15. Long term performance of polyethylene pipe under high fill. Part 2. Technical report, July 1990-June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, E.T.

    1995-06-01

    The performance of a corrugated High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) pipe under high earth load was investigated. The cross-sectional shape of the pipes were essentially round after 5 years of burial. However, visual observations showed the development and growth of circumferential cracks in the unlined corrugated pipe and buckling of the unsupported portions of the liner in the smooth wall corrugated pipe. The cracks were mainly in the inside corrugation crests within the coupling length. The liner buckles were in the bottom half of the pipe. Material property tests on HDPE specimens cut from pieces of pipe showed the existence of longitudinal residual tensile stress in the pipe wall that were close to the yield stress of the HDPE. These residual stresses combined with longitudinal tensile stress induced by the coupling were probably the main cause of the crack development in the field. Laboratory tests were conducted on short lengths of pipe in ring bending and in hoop compression. The ring bending tests showed that the material modulus under short-term deflection increments does not diminish with time, whereas the apparent modulus under sustained deflection decreases with time. The hoop compression tests showed circumferential shortening, corrugation closure and liner buckling under external radial pressure consistent with the field observations.

  16. Plasmonic corrugated cylinder-cone terahertz probe.

    PubMed

    Yao, Haizi; Zhong, Shuncong

    2014-08-01

    The spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) effect on the electromagnetic field distribution near the tip of a periodically corrugated metal cylinder-cone probe working at the terahertz regime was studied. We found that radially polarized terahertz radiation could be coupled effectively through a spoof SPP into a surface wave and propagated along the corrugated surface, resulting in more than 20 electric field enhancement near the tip of probe. Multiple resonances caused by the antenna effect were discussed in detail by finite element computation and theoretical analysis of dispersion relation for spoof SPP modes. Moreover, the key figures of merit such as the resonance frequency of the SPP can be flexibly tuned by modifying the geometry of the probe structure, making it attractive for application in an apertureless background-free terahertz near-field microscope. PMID:25121543

  17. A 2-GHz Rectangular Corrugated Horn

    SciTech Connect

    Bersanelli, M.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Limon, M.; Smoot, George F.; Tanaka, S.; Witebsky, C.; Yamada, J.

    1991-10-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested a large, rectangular horn antenna with a center frequency of 2.0 GHz, corrugated on the E-plane walls, made out of aluminum sheet. A new technique has been developed to solder thin aluminum strips onto the back plane to form the corrugations. The radiation beam pattern shows half-power beamwidths of 12{sup 0} and 14{sup 0} in the H and E planes respectively, and side lobe response below -40 dB at angles greater than 50{sup 0} from horn axis. The measured return loss is less than -20 dB (VSWR < 1.22) between 1.7 and 2.3 GHz; insertion loss is less than 0.15 dB.

  18. Effects of corrugation of the dragonfly wing on gliding performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Kap; Ko, Jin Hwan; Park, Hoon Cheol; Byun, Doyoung

    2009-10-21

    We investigate the aerodynamic performance of the dragonfly wing, which has cross-sectional corrugation, via a static 2-dimensional unsteady simulation. Computational conditions are Re=150, 1400, and 10,000 with angles of attack ranging from 0 degrees to 40 degrees . From the computational results, lift coefficients are increased by the wing corrugation at all Reynolds number. However, the corrugation has little influence on the drag coefficients. The flows such as vortex in the valley of corrugation and near the edge of the corrugation are locally different from those of an elliptic wing. However, such local flows have little influence on the time averaged wing performance. From the numerical experiment presented in this study, it is determined that suction side corrugations of the wing have very little influence on increase of the lift coefficient at a positive angle of attack. PMID:19631665

  19. Open top culverts as an alternative drainage system to minimize ecological effects in earth roads.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Jose L.; Elorrieta, Jose; Robredo, Jose C.; García, Ricardo; García, Fernando; Gimenez, Martin C.

    2013-04-01

    During the last fifteen years a research team from School of Forestry at the Technical University of Madrid (Spain) has developed several competitive research projects regarding forest roads and open top culverts. A first approach was established with a prototype of 7 meters length in a hydraulic channel at the laboratory determining main parameters of different open top culverts in relation to different sizes of gravels and the self washing properties relationship with different slopes up to 8 %. The curves obtained may help to properly install these drainage systems avoiding maintenance costs. In addition more targeted pilot studies were developed in different forest earth roads in center and north Spain. The construction of the stations under study was financed by the U.P.M and the R&D National Plan. The main outcomes relates the low variation of humidity in a 20 m. wide range at both sides of the open top culverts and several considerations relating the angle of installation, the spacing of such drainage systems and the benefits against rilling along the roads. Also the erosion produced downhill was established and some construction methods to avoid adverse ecological effects. The diffusion of results includes congresses and a small booklet with a great acceptance in forestry services. Also a patent (ES 2 262 437) of an advanced model has been registered.

  20. Performance of zigzag corrugated furrows in Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán Cañas, J.; Chipana, R.; Moreno-Pérez, M. F.; Chipana, G.

    2012-04-01

    In Bolivia, irrigation area is estimated in more than 250000 ha, being surface irrigation the most common method. In highland areas (Altiplano) and in interandean valleys, traditional and ancestral irrigation systems such as flood irrigation, contour furrows, zigzag corrugated furrows, suka kollus and irrigation by kanis, are the most important. In the case of very steep terrains and shallow soils, the zigzag corrugated irrigation method is very frequent. This irrigation method has been used for a long time but their low application efficiency and the shortage of water justify this work devoted to their characterization and to study their performance. The experimental study was conducted southeast of the city of La Paz in the community of Cebollino located at 2600 meters above sea level. Furrow characteristics vary in function of crop type and soil slope, so that the larger the slope the greater the separation between furrows. In our case, the crop chosen was the lettuce and the experimental plot had an area of 800 m2 with a slope ranging between 14 and 18%. Blocks of corrugated furrows were identified and experimental measures were made during each irrigation, once per week, in the central blocks to avoid border effects. To determine advance curves 15 stations were used spaced 18 m. At each station, advance and recession time and infiltration depth were measured. Inlet and outlet flow were controlled each 5 min. To calculate the reference evapotranspiration, the Hargraves-Samani equation was used. Due to the very high terrain slopes, the advance curve takes a linear form rather than the typical exponential form. This hinders the proper calculation of the parameters of the Kostiakov-Lewis equation used to determine the infiltrated depth values. The inlet flow range, along irrigation events, between 0.01 and 0.085 L/s due to the uncontrolled use of water in fields located upstream. The large variability of inflow flow difficult irrigation management especially in regard to the system organization and operation.

  1. Guided wave technique for non-destructive testing of StifPipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel K.; Nguyen, Chi H.; Ehsani, Mohammad; Kundu, Tribikram

    2015-03-01

    The newly-developed StifPipe® is an effective technology for repair and strengthening of existing pipes and culverts. The wall of this pipe consists of a lightweight honeycomb core with carbon or glass fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) applied to the skin. The presence of the hollow honeycomb introduces challenges in the nondestructive testing (NDT) of this pipe. In this study, it is investigated if guided waves, excited by PZT (Lead ZirconateTitanate) transducer can detect damages in the honeycomb layer of the StifPipe®. Multiple signal processing techniques are used for in-depth study and understanding of the recorded signals. The experimental technique for damage detection in StifPipe® material is described and the obtained results are presented in this paper.

  2. The corrugated horn as an antenna range standard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldecott, R.; Mentzer, C. A.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The corrugated horn is discussed as is a valuable tool for use in microwave pattern ranges. It has the properties of concentrated energy in the main beam, low backlobes, high efficiency, almost monotonic amplitude, and phase radiation patterns which make the corrugated horn useful for a source antenna in a pattern range and also as a possible standard antenna for calibration purposes.

  3. Corrugated Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors and Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, K. K.; Chen, C. J.; Rohkinson, L. P.; Das, N. C.; Jhabvala, M.

    1999-01-01

    Quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) have many advantages in infrared detection, mainly due to the mature Ill-V material technology. The employment of the corrugation structure further advances the technology by providing a simple, yet efficient light-coupling scheme. A C-QWIP enjoys the same flexibility as a detector with intrinsic normal incident absorption. In this paper, we will discuss the utilities of C-QWIPs in different applications, including two-color detection and polarization-sensitive detection. Besides practical applications, C-QWIPs are also useful in detector characterization. They can be used for measuring the absorption coefficient of light propagating parallel to the layers under bias and providing information on the energy resolved photoconductive gain. These two quantities have never been measured before. Based on the corrugation design, we have made several modifications that further improve the detector sensitivity without increasing its complexity. Other than the C-QWIP structure, we also continue searching for other sensitive detector architectures. In a quantum grid infrared photodetector, 3-dimensional electron confinement can be achieved, with which the detector is able to absorb light in all directions. At the same time, the photoconductive gain can also be improved. We further improve the design using a blazed structure. All the experimental results are supported by a rigorous electromagnetic modal transmission-line theory developed especially for these types of structures. Preliminary thermal imaging using C-QWIP FPAs validates the advantages of the present approach.

  4. Biased Brownian motion in extremely corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, S.; Schmid, G.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Hänggi, P.

    2011-12-01

    Biased Brownian motion of point-size particles in a three-dimensional tube with varying cross-section is investigated. In the fashion of our recent work, Martens et al. [Phys. Rev. E 83, 051135 (2011)] we employ an asymptotic analysis to the stationary probability density in a geometric parameter of the tube geometry. We demonstrate that the leading order term is equivalent to the Fick-Jacobs approximation. Expression for the higher order corrections to the probability density is derived. Using this expansion orders, we obtain that in the diffusion dominated regime the average particle current equals the zeroth order Fick-Jacobs result corrected by a factor including the corrugation of the tube geometry. In particular, we demonstrate that this estimate is more accurate for extremely corrugated geometries compared with the common applied method using a spatially-dependent diffusion coefficient D(x, f) which substitutes the constant diffusion coefficient in the common Fick-Jacobs equation. The analytic findings are corroborated with the finite element calculation of a sinusoidal-shaped tube.

  5. Disappointment and regret enhance corrugator reactivity in a gambling task

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yin; Clark, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how the corrugator and zygomaticus respond to decision outcomes (i.e., gains and losses). We used a gambling task in which participants were presented with obtained followed by non-obtained outcomes. Activity at the corrugator site was sensitive to decision outcomes, such that higher obtained losses (disappointment) and higher non-obtained gains (regret) both heightened corrugator reactivity. Activity at the zygomaticus site was not responsive to obtained or non-obtained outcomes, but did show sensitivity to emotional images in the same participants, in the form of a positive linear relationship with self-reported emotional valence. Corrugator activity was negatively related to emotional valence. The findings indicate the sensitivity of corrugator to objective decision outcomes and also counterfactual comparisons, highlighting the utility of facial electromyography in research on decision making and gambling behavior. PMID:25345723

  6. Research and development of long heat pipes and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, M.; Mohtai, T.; Mochizuki, M.; Mashiko, K.

    1984-03-01

    A 40 m thermosyphon type flexible corrugated heat pipe was constructed and its heat transfer characteristics were measured. The flooding phenomenon was quantitatively observed using electronic stethoscopes, and its influence to the heat transfer characteristics was determined. The particular features of the road heating system using long heat pipes are: (1) there is no possibility of water leaking and their maintenance is easy; (2) they endure heavy loads, thermal stresses, vibrations and ground subsidence; (3) the heat transfering surface area of the heat pipes is so large that it is particularly effective for heating through small temperature difference; and (4) the installation is easy and inexpensive.

  7. The effects of road crossings on prairie stream habitat and function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouska, Wesley W.; Keane, Timothy; Paukert, Craig P.

    2010-01-01

    Improperly designed stream crossing structures may alter the form and function of stream ecosystems and habitat and prohibit the movement of aquatic organisms. Stream sections adjoining five concrete box culverts, five low-water crossings (concrete slabs vented by one or multiple culverts), and two large, single corrugated culvert vehicle crossings in eastern Kansas streams were compared to reference reaches using a geomorphologic survey and stream classification. Stream reaches were also compared upstream and downstream of crossings, and crossing measurements were used to determine which crossing design best mimicked the natural dimensions of the adjoining stream. Four of five low-water crossings, three of five box culverts, and one of two large, single corrugated pipe culverts changed classification from upstream to downstream of the crossings. Mean riffle spacing upstream at low-water crossings (8.6 bankfull widths) was double that of downstream reaches (mean 4.4 bankfull widths) but was similar upstream and downstream of box and corrugated pipe culverts. There also appeared to be greater deposition of fine sediments directly upstream of these designs. Box and corrugated culverts were more similar to natural streams than low-water crossings at transporting water, sediments, and debris during bankfull flows.

  8. Fatigue testing of corrugated and Teflon hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M.; Swanson, Theodore D.; Costello, Frederick A.

    1990-01-01

    Single and two-phase heat transport systems for the thermal control of large space facilities require fluid lines that traverse joints and either rotate or move in some other manner. Flexible hoses are being considered as one means of traversing these joints. To test the resilience of flexible hoses to bending stress, a test assembly was constructed to determine the number of flexing cycles the hoses could withstand before losing their ability to maintain a constant pressure. Corrugated metal hoses and Teflon hoses were tested at different pressures with nitrogen gas. The metal hoses had lives ranging from 30,000 to 100,000 flexing cycles. But, even after 400,000 cycles, the Teflon hoses remained essentially intact, though some leakage in the convoluted Teflon is noted.

  9. Iron line variability of discoseismic corrugation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David; Butsky, Iryna

    2013-10-01

    Using a fast semi-analytic raytracing code, we study the variability of relativistically broadened Fe-Kα lines due to discoseismic oscillations concentrated in the innermost regions of accretion discs around black holes. The corrugation mode, or c-mode, is of particular interest as its natural frequency corresponds well to the ˜0.1-15 Hz range observed for low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) for lower spins. Comparison of the oscillation phase dependent variability and quasi-periodic oscillation-phase stacked Fe-Kα line observations will allow such discoseismic models to be confirmed or ruled out as a source of particular LFQPOs. The spectral range and frequency of the variability of the Fe-Kα line due to c-modes can also potentially be used to constrain the black hole spin if observed with sufficient temporal and spectral resolution.

  10. Heat Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction, function, and applications of heat pipes. Suggests using the heat pipe to teach principles related to heat transfer and gives sources for obtaining instructional kits for this purpose. (GS)

  11. Pipe Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of attention to plumbing in college facilities, offering examples from various campuses. Addresses preventive maintenance, technology, and piping materials, including the debate between cast iron and PVC for drain pipes. (EV)

  12. Pulse propagation and electron acceleration in a corrugated plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Palastro, J P; Antonsen, T M; Morshed, S; York, A G; Milchberg, H M

    2008-03-01

    A preformed plasma channel provides a guiding structure for laser pulses unbound by the intensity thresholds of standard waveguides. The recently realized corrugated plasma channel [Layer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 035001 (2007)] allows for the guiding of laser pulses with subluminal spatial harmonics. These spatial harmonics can be phase matched to high energy electrons, making the corrugated plasma channel ideal for the acceleration of electrons. We present a simple analytic model of pulse propagation in a corrugated plasma channel and examine the laser-electron beam interaction. Simulations show accelerating gradients of several hundred MeV/cm for laser powers much lower than required by standard laser wakefield schemes. PMID:18517531

  13. Diverse corrugation pattern in radially shrinking carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Hiroyuki; Sato, Motohiro; Iiboshi, Kohtaroh; Ghosh, Susanta; Arroyo, Marino

    2010-08-15

    Stable cross sections of multiwalled carbon nanotubes subjected to electron-beam irradiation are investigated in the realm of the continuum mechanics approximation. The self-healing nature of sp{sup 2} graphitic sheets implies that selective irradiation of the outermost walls causes their radial shrinkage with the remaining inner walls undamaged. The shrinking walls exert high pressure on the interior part of nanotubes, yielding a wide variety of radial-corrugation patterns (i.e., circumferentially wrinkling structures) in the cross section. All corrugation patterns can be classified into two deformation phases for which the corrugation amplitudes of the innermost wall differ significantly.

  14. Hydrodynamics of Gas-Liquid Counterflow Through Corrugated Parallel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, V.F.

    1999-11-05

    Structured packings utilized in today's distillation packed towers consist of stacked units of many vertically oriented parallel corrugated plates. The V-shaped corrugations are oriented at a fixed angle with respect to the vertical direction, and the corrugation angle in adjacent plates are oriented in reverse direction. Points of contact, at the crests of the corrugations, between adjacent plates, form an unconsolidated porous medium with known topology. Modern structured packings have been gaining acceptance in several separation processes, particularly distillation where gas/vapor and liquid flow countercurrently through the packing. In addition, structured packings have been credited with relatively low pressure drop, high efficiency, low holdup, and higher capacity; the packing also can be made corrosion resistive.

  15. A comparative study of corrugated horn design by evolutionary techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoorfar, A.

    2003-01-01

    Here an evolutionary programming algorithm is used to optimize the pattern of a corrugated circular horn subject to various constraints on return loss, antenna beamwidth, pattern circularity, and low cross polarization.

  16. 1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  17. Spoof plasmon radiation using sinusoidally modulated corrugated reactance surfaces.

    PubMed

    Panaretos, Anastasios H; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we theoretically investigate the feasibility of creating leaky wave antennas capable of converting spoof plasmons to radiating modes. Spoof plasmons are surface waves excited along metallic corrugated surfaces and they are considered the microwave and THz equivalent of optical surface plasmon polaritons. Given that a corrugated surface is essentially a reactance surface, the proposed design methodology relies on engineering a corrugated surface so that it exhibits a sinusoidally modulated reactance profile. Through such non-uniform periodic reactance surfaces, guided surface waves can efficiently couple into free-space radiating modes. This requires the development of a realistic methodology that effectively maps the necessary sinusoidal reactance variation to a sinusoidal variation corresponding to the depth of the grooves. Both planar and cylindrical corrugated surfaces are examined and it is numerically demonstrated that the corresponding sinusoidally modulated leaky wave structures can very efficiently convert guided spoof plasmons to radiating modes. PMID:26906820

  18. 7. DETAIL VIEW UNDER BRIDGE OF CORRUGATED STEEL, BEAMS, RODS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW UNDER BRIDGE OF CORRUGATED STEEL, BEAMS, RODS, AND ABUTMENT - Price River Bridge, Spanning Price River, 760 North Street in Carbonville, 1 mile northwest of Price, Carbonville, Carbon County, UT

  19. A Wideband Profiled Corrugated Horn for Multichroic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Lingzhen; Tong, Cheuk-yu Edward; Wollack, Edward J.; Chuss, David T.

    2015-01-01

    A wideband profiled corrugated feedhorn was developed for multichroic applications. This feedhorn features a return loss of better than -25 dB and cross polarization peaks below -30 dB, over a fractional bandwidth of greater than 50%. Its performance is close to that of the ring-loaded corrugated feedhorn; however, the design presented is much easier to fabricate at millimeter wavelengths.

  20. 49 CFR 1242.15 - Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast, track laying and surfacing, and road property damaged... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Way and Structures § 1242.15 Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges...

  1. 49 CFR 1242.15 - Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast, track laying and surfacing, and road property damaged... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Way and Structures § 1242.15 Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges...

  2. 49 CFR 1242.15 - Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast, track laying and surfacing, and road property damaged... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Way and Structures § 1242.15 Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges...

  3. 49 CFR 1242.15 - Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges and culverts, ties, rails, other track material, ballast, track laying and surfacing, and road property damaged... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Way and Structures § 1242.15 Roadway, tunnels and subways, bridges...

  4. Do Steel Bridges Prevent Rail Corrugations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Peter; Stephanides, Johannes

    2010-03-01

    Rail corrugations (germ. "Schlupfwellen") are wear pattern, which emerge during the transits of railway vehicles at narrow railway curves (R ≤ 250 m) and they are a menace to railway operators, especially if their railroad network exists in mountains. Therefore ÖBB started recently a research program "OBO" (Optimierter Bogenoberbau) for better understanding and avoidance of "Schlupfwellen", which is mainly experimentally oriented. As a representative test track was the extended famous narrow curve at the valley of Brixen close to Kitzbühl chosen, and two Measurement sites where there established, one embedded in the ballasted track bed and another one on a steel bridge, situated in this curve. Measuring the passing trains, a rearly astonishing fact was discovered: Whereas in the ballasted track all well known typical features occur (vibration, bending and torsion of the rail,…), which produce the wear created Schlupfwellen and the dedicated grumbling noise, the wheelsets run properly on the steel bridge track and pass "friendly" the associated curve segment! Dicussing the ascertained fact, it was realized that on many European steel bridges such phenomena happens! The paper ends assuming that a broad-band vibration of the rail heads upon the steel bridge reduces the friction coefficient in the wheel/rail contact area ("Flange oilers"). This can be the reason for the smooth travel at the bridge. This may also be the basis for a technical application to overcome the generation of Schlupfwellen?

  5. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Phoenix Refrigeration Systems, Inc.'s heat pipe addition to the Phoenix 2000, a supermarket rooftop refrigeration/air conditioning system, resulted from the company's participation in a field test of heat pipes. Originally developed by NASA to control temperatures in space electronic systems, the heat pipe is a simple, effective, heat transfer system. It has been used successfully in candy storage facilities where it has provided significant energy savings. Additional data is expected to fully quantify the impact of the heat pipes on supermarket air conditioning systems.

  6. Directional and enhanced spontaneous emission with a corrugated metal probe.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongming; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Cheng, Yuqing; Liu, Haitao; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-07-01

    A three-dimensional corrugated metal tapered probe with surface corrugated gratings at the tip apex is proposed and investigated theoretically, which leads to an obvious emission beaming effect of spontaneous emission from a single emitter near the probe. In contrast with conventional apertureless metal probes, where only the enhancement of an optical near-field is concerned, the corrugated probe is able to manipulate local excitation intensity and far-field emission direction simultaneously. The angular emission from a single dipole source, being placed close to the corrugated probe, falls into a cone with a maximum directivity angle of ±11.6°, which improves the collection efficiency 25-fold. Such a probe simultaneously increases the localized field intensity to about twice as strong as the conventional bare tip. In addition, the radiation pattern is sensitive to the working wavelength and the dipole to tip-apex separation. These findings make a promising route to the development of plasmonic spontaneous emission manipulation based on corrugated tapered antenna-for instance, tip-enhanced spectroscopy, single-molecule sensing, and single-photon source. PMID:24887425

  7. Directional and enhanced spontaneous emission with a corrugated metal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hongming; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Cheng, Yuqing; Liu, Haitao; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-06-01

    A three-dimensional corrugated metal tapered probe with surface corrugated gratings at the tip apex is proposed and investigated theoretically, which leads to an obvious emission beaming effect of spontaneous emission from a single emitter near the probe. In contrast with conventional apertureless metal probes, where only the enhancement of an optical near-field is concerned, the corrugated probe is able to manipulate local excitation intensity and far-field emission direction simultaneously. The angular emission from a single dipole source, being placed close to the corrugated probe, falls into a cone with a maximum directivity angle of +/-11.6°, which improves the collection efficiency 25-fold. Such a probe simultaneously increases the localized field intensity to about twice as strong as the conventional bare tip. In addition, the radiation pattern is sensitive to the working wavelength and the dipole to tip-apex separation. These findings make a promising route to the development of plasmonic spontaneous emission manipulation based on corrugated tapered antenna--for instance, tip-enhanced spectroscopy, single-molecule sensing, and single-photon source .

  8. Finite-temperature Casimir force between perfectly metallic corrugated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sarabadani, Jalal; Miri, MirFaez

    2011-09-15

    We study the Casimir force between two corrugated plates due to thermal fluctuations of a scalar field. For arbitrary corrugations and temperature T, we provide an analytical expression for the Casimir force, which is exact to second order in the corrugation amplitude. We study the specific case of two sinusoidally corrugated plates with corrugation wavelength {lambda}, lateral displacement b, and mean separation H. We find that the lateral Casimir force is F{sub l}(T,H)sin(2{pi}b/{lambda}). In other words, at all temperatures, the lateral force is a sinusoidal function of the lateral shift. In the limit {lambda}>>H, F{sub l}(T{yields}{infinity},H){proportional_to}k{sub B}TH{sup -4}{lambda}{sup -1}. In the opposite limit {lambda}<

  9. Detection of rail corrugation based on fiber laser accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Du, Yanliang; Sun, Baochen; Ma, Huaixiang; Li, Fang

    2013-09-01

    Efficient inspection methods are necessary for detection of rail corrugation to improve the safety and ride quality of railway operations. This paper presents a novel fiber optic technology for detection of rail corrugation based on fiber laser accelerometers (FLAs), tailored to the measurement of surface damage on rail structures. The principle of detection of rail corrugation using double integration of axle-box acceleration is presented. Then we present the theoretical model and test results of FLAs which are installed on the bogie to detect the vertical axle-box acceleration of the train. Characteristics of high sensitivity and large dynamic range are achieved when using fiber optic interferometric demodulation. A flexible inertial algorithm based on double integration and the wavelet denoising method is proposed to accurately estimate the rail corrugation. A field test is carried out on the Datong-Qinhuangdao Railway in north China. The test results are compared with the results of a rail inspection car, which shows that the fiber laser sensing system has a good performance in monitoring rail corrugation.

  10. Piping Plover

    Chicks and eggs of piping plovers. The piping plover is a small migratory shorebird listed as endangered in Canada and the U.S. Great Lakes, and threatened throughout the remainder of its U.S. breeding and winter range. Recent surveys indicate that there are only about 8,000 adults in existence.  Th...

  11. Piping Plover

    An adult piping plover. The piping plover is a small migratory shorebird listed as endangered in Canada and the U.S. Great Lakes, and threatened throughout the remainder of its U.S. breeding and winter range. Recent surveys indicate that there are only about 8,000 adults in existence. The USGS is co...

  12. Pipe connector

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Thomas E.; Pardini, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A safety test facility for testing sodium-cooled nuclear reactor components includes a reactor vessel and a heat exchanger submerged in sodium in the tank. The reactor vessel and heat exchanger are connected by an expansion/deflection pipe coupling comprising a pair of coaxially and slidably engaged tubular elements having radially enlarged opposed end portions of which at least a part is of spherical contour adapted to engage conical sockets in the ends of pipes leading out of the reactor vessel and in to the heat exchanger. A spring surrounding the pipe coupling urges the end portions apart and into engagement with the spherical sockets. Since the pipe coupling is submerged in liquid a limited amount of leakage of sodium from the pipe can be tolerated.

  13. Aerothermodynamic Assessment of Corrugated Panel Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, H. J.; Britt, A. H.; Kipp, H. W.; Masek, R. V.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using corrugated panels as a thermal protection system for an advanced space transportation vehicle was investigated. The study consisted of two major tasks: development of improved correlations for wind tunnel heat transfer and pressure data to yield design techniques, and application of the design techniques to determine if corrugated panels have application future aerospace vehicles. A single-stage-to-orbit vehicle was used to assess advantages and aerothermodynamic penalties associated with use of such panels. In the correlation task, experimental turbulent heat transfer and pressure data obtained on corrugation roughened surfaces during wind tunnel testing were analyzed and compared with flat plate data. The correlations and data comparisons included the effects of a large range of geometric, inviscid flow, internal boundary layer, and bulk boundary layer parameters in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  14. Spatial Variations in Slip on Corrugated Reverse Fault Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. C.; Marshall, S. T.

    2010-12-01

    Faults are inherently non-planar at many scales; however, most seismic hazard analyses and geophysical methods of determining fault slip rates utilize highly simplified fault geometries. To better understand the slip behavior and seismic potential of non-planar fault surfaces, we present results from a suite of numerical models of faults with sinusoidal corrugations in the down-dip direction. Variations in wavelength, amplitude, and loading angle are introduced to determine the effects on slip behavior and seismic moment release. We find that corrugated faults, in general, slip less than planar faults and obliquely-loaded corrugated faults have less strike-slip than a planar fault with the same tip line dimensions. Short wavelength, large amplitude faults slip the least, with small changes in amplitude more strongly effecting short wavelength faults. Additionally, short wavelength, large amplitude faults accumulate mostly dip slip and, in some cases, may have an average net slip vector with the opposite sense of slip compared to their planar counterparts. This reversal in slip sense is the result of variations in resolved stress, as fault corrugations become sub-parallel to the oblique loading. Though seismic energy release can be larger for some non-planar surfaces relative to a planar surface, seismic energy release is always less for obliquely-loaded faults. While non-planar surfaces typically slip less than planar surfaces, some non-planar surfaces can release a greater amount of seismic energy relative to planar surfaces, due to a greater surface area. These results indicate a strong dependence of fault behavior on surface geometry and suggest that surface corrugation may dramatically alter slip distributions and slip rates. Therefore, models incorporating highly simplified fault surface geometry have the potential to significantly misrepresent fault slip rates. Example of modeled fault surface mesh with down-dip corrugations.

  15. Hybrid mode transmission in 62-M corrugated waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, K.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Sato, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Takita, Y.; Kuroda, T.; Iwase, M.

    1994-09-01

    Experimental measurements by wavepacket reflectometry are carried out to verify the low transmission loss of hybrid mode on HE{sub 11} in the corrugated waveguide with 88.9 mm in diameter. The HE{sub 11} mode is injected into the 62-m straight circular corrugated waveguide and the beat between the HE{sub 11} and HE{sub 21} (including degenerated TE{sub 01} and TM{sub 02}) modes is observed. The loss is too small to measure and inferred to be less than 2 db/km. The result shows that the use of HE{sub 11} mode for electron cyclotron heating system is suitable.

  16. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  17. Piping Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Burns & McDonnell provide architectural and engineering services in planning, design and construction of a wide range of projects all over the world. In design analysis, company regularly uses COSMIC computer programs. In computer testing piping design of a power plant, company uses Pipe Flexibility Analysis Program (MEL-21) to analyze stresses due to weight, temperature, and pressure found in proposed piping systems. Individual flow rates are put into the computer, then computer calculates the pressure drop existing across each component; if needed, design corrections or adjustments can be made and rechecked.

  18. Refrigerant piping

    SciTech Connect

    Puzio, H.

    1996-10-01

    The piping design of an air conditioning system is a critical element in the proper performance of the system. It involves an extremely complex relationship in the flow of refrigerant oil through the various parts of the system. The factor that must be considered in a piping design are the inter-relationships between velocity, pressure, friction and density, as well as the related variables required for proper fluid flow. These variables and relationships can be expressed in long mathematical equations, performance charts, and pressure drop tables for fluid flow through the piping. The improper design and sizing of refrigerant piping in a sealed system may result in loss of system efficiency that could lead to a los of overall system capacity as well as eventual failure of components of the system.

  19. CLOSED PROCESS WATER LOOP IN NSSC CORRUGATING MEDIUM MANUFACTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last 5 years, the Green Bay Packaging corrugating medium mill has converted to an essentially closed process water system. The mill is a net consumer of water. This is due to the greater amount of water carried out of the system with the sheet compared to the lower water...

  20. Mechanical behavior of Kenaf/Epoxy corrugated sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhori, S.; Hassan, M. Z.; Daud, Y.; Sarip, S.; Rahman, N.; Ismail, Z.; Aziz, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents the response of kenaf/epoxy corrugated sandwich structure during quasi-static test. Force-displacements curves have been deducted to determine the deformation pattern and collapse behavior of the structure. Kenaf/epoxy sandwich structures skins fabricated by using hand layup technique and the corrugated core were moulded by using steel mould. Different thicknesses of corrugated core web with two sizes of kenaf fibers were used. The corrugated core is then bonded with the skins by using poly-epoxy resin and has been cut into different number of cells. The specimens then tested under tensile and compression at different constant speeds until the specimens fully crushed. Tensile tests data showed the structure can be considered brittle when it breaking point strain, ε less than 0.025. In compression test, the specimens fail due to dominated by stress concentration that initiated by prior cracks. Also, the specimens with more number of cells and thicker core web have higher strength and the ability to absorb higher energy.

  1. Unitary formalism for scattering from a hard corrugated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. C.; Celli, V.; Coopersmith, M.; Haller, M.

    1982-07-01

    We obtain two coupled integral equations for the diffraction of waves from a hard corrugated surface. This rearrangement is shown to be equivalent to the integral equation for the scattering amplitude obtained by an application of the Rayleigh method. The formalism presented here, analogous to K-matrix theory, makes the unitarity of the theory apparent at each stage of approximation.

  2. Laser Welded Corrugated Steel Panels in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kananen, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Keskitalo, M.; Hietala, M.; Järvenpää, A.; Holappa, K.; Saine, K.; Teiskonen, J.

    Corrugated core steel panels are an effective way to reduce weight and increase stiffness of steel structures. In numerous applications, these panels have shown very promising commercial possibilities. This study presents the design, manufacturing and commercializing process for two practical examples: Case 1) a fly wheel cover for a diesel engine and Case 2) rotationally symmetrical panel for an electric motor. Test materials of various kinds were used for corrugated cores and skin plates: conventional low-carbon steel grade EN 10130 and ferritic stainless steel grade 1.4509 with plate the thicknesses of 0.5, 0.6 and 0.75 mm. To manufacture different kinds of corrugated core steel panels, flexible manufacturing tools and cost-effective processes are needed. The most important criterion for laser welding panels was the capability of forming tools for producing high quality geometry for the core. Laser welding assembly showed that the quality of the core in both studied cases was good enough for welding the lap joints properly. Developed panels have been tested in industrial applications with excellent feedback. If thickness of a corrugated panel structure is not a limiting issue, these panels are good solution on application where stiffness and lighter weight are required as well as vibrational aspect considered.

  3. Stormwater chemical contamination caused by cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) infrastructure rehabilitation activities.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Matthew L; Newman, Derrick; Whelton, Andrew J

    2014-09-16

    Cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) is becoming a popular U.S. stormwater culvert rehabilitation method. Several State transportation agencies have reported that CIPP activities can release styrene into stormwater, but no other contaminants have been monitored. CIPP's stormwater contamination potential and that of its condensate waste was characterized. Condensate completely dissolved Daphnia magna within 24 h. Condensate pH was 6.2 and its chemical oxygen demand (COD) level was 36,000 ppm. D. magna mortality (100%) occurred in 48 h, even when condensate was diluted by a factor of 10,000 and styrene was present at a magnitude less than its LC50. Condensate and stormwater contained numerous carcinogenic solvents used in resin synthesis, endocrine disrupting contaminants such as plasticizers, and initiator degradation products. For 35 days, COD levels at the culvert outlets and downstream ranged from 100 to 375 ppm and styrene was 0.01 to 7.4 ppm. Although contaminant levels generally reduced with time, styrene levels were greatest 50 ft downstream, not at the culvert outlet. Cured CIPP extraction tests confirmed that numerous contaminants other than styrene were released into the environment and their persistence and toxicity should be investigated. More effective contaminant containment and cleaner installation processes must be developed to protect the environment. PMID:25127182

  4. Bending of five-layer beams with crosswise corrugated main core

    SciTech Connect

    Magnucka-Blandzi, Ewa; Walczak, Zbigniew

    2015-03-10

    The subject of the study is one orthotropic thin-walled sandwich beam with trapezoidal core and two-layer facings. The outer layers of facings are flat, but inner layers are trapezoidal corrugated. The main core of the beam is also trapezoidal corrugated – in perpendicular direction to the corrugation of inner layers of facings. The beam is with lengthwise corrugated layers and crosswise corrugated main core. The mathematical and physical model of this beam is formulated, and also the field of displacements. The system of equilibrium equations is analytically derived using the energy method. The obtained solutions will be verified numerically (FEM)

  5. Condensation of refrigerants flowing inside smooth and corrugated tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, D.L.; Conklin, J.C.; Vineyard, E.A.

    1995-07-01

    Because heat exchanger thermal performance has a direct fluence on the overall cycle performance of vapor-compression refrigeration machinery,enhanced heat transfer surfaces are of interest to improve the efficiency of heat pumps and air conditioners. We investigated R-22 and a nonazeotropic refrigerant mixture (NARM) of 75% R-143a and 25% R-124 (by mass) to study their thermal performance in a condenser made of conventional smooth tubes and another condenser made of corrugated, or spirally indented, tubes. We investigated the condensing heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics in an experimental test loop model of a domestic beat pump system employing a variable speed compressor. The refrigerant circulates inside the central tube and the water circulates in the annulus. At refrigerant mass fluxes of approximately 275--300 kg/m{sup 2}s, the measured irreversible pressure drop of the corrugated surface was 23% higher than that of the smooth surface for the R-22. At refrigerant mass fluxes of 350-370 kg/m{sup 2}s, the irreversible pressure drop of the corrugated surface was 36% higher than that of the smooth surface for the NARM. The average heat transfer coefficient for the corrugated surface for R-22 was roughly 40% higher than that for the smooth tube surface at refrigerant mass fluxes of 275--295 kg/m{sup 2}s. The average heat transfer coefficient for the corrugated surface for the NARM was typically 70% higher than that for the smooth tube surface at refrigerant mass fluxes of 340--385 kg/m{sup 2}s.

  6. Porus electrode comprising a bonded stack of pieces of corrugated metal foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An electrode suitable for use in an electrochemical cell is described. The electrode is composed of a porous conductive support with a bonded stack of pieces of thin corrugated nickel foil where the corrugations are oriented approximately perpendicular to the sides of the electrode and form an array of passages through the electrode. Active material such as cadmium hydroxide or nickel hydroxide is uniformly distributed within the passages. The support may comprise also a piece of thin flat nickel foil between adjacent pieces of the corrugated foil, forming a barrier between the passages formed on each side of it. Typically the corrugations in the odd corrugated layers are oriented at a small angle from the perpendicular in one direction and the corrugations in the even corrugated layers are oriented at a small angle from the perpendicular in the opposite direction.

  7. Test of superplastically formed corrugated aluminum compression specimens with beaded webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Randall C.; Royster, Dick M.; Bales, Thomas T.; James, William F.; Shinn, Joseph M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Corrugated wall sections provide a highly efficient structure for carrying compressive loads in aircraft and spacecraft fuselages. The superplastic forming (SPF) process offers a means to produce complex shells and panels with corrugated wall shapes. A study was made to investigate the feasibility of superplastically forming 7475-T6 aluminum sheet into a corrugated wall configuration and to demonstrate the structural integrity of the construction by testing. The corrugated configuration selected has beaded web segments separating curved-cap segments. Eight test specimens were fabricated. Two specimens were simply a single sheet of aluminum superplastically formed to a beaded-web, curved-cap corrugation configuration. Six specimens were single-sheet corrugations modified by adhesive bonding additional sheet material to selectively reinforce the curved-cap portion of the corrugation. The specimens were tested to failure by crippling in end compression at room temperature.

  8. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than $57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was $28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  9. Aerodynamic effects of corrugation and deformation in flapping wings of hovering hoverflies.

    PubMed

    Du, Gang; Sun, Mao

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic effects of wing deformation and corrugation of a three-dimensional model hoverfly wing at a hovering condition by solving the Navier-Stokes equations on a dynamically deforming grid. Various corrugated wing models were tested. Insight into whether or not there existed significant aerodynamic coupling between wing deformation (camber and twist) and wing corrugation was obtained by comparing aerodynamic forces of four cases: a smooth-plate wing in flapping motion without deformation (i.e. a rigid flat-plate wing in flapping motion); a smooth-plate wing in flapping motion with deformation; a corrugated wing in flapping motion without deformation (i.e. a rigid corrugated wing in flapping motion); a corrugated wing in flapping motion with deformation. There was little aerodynamic coupling between wing deformation and corrugation: the aerodynamic effect of wing deformation and corrugation acting together was approximately a superposition of those of deformation and corrugation acting separately. When acting alone, the effect of wing deformation was to increase the lift by 9.7% and decrease the torque (or aerodynamic power) by 5.2%, and that of wing corrugation was to decrease the lift by 6.5% and increase the torque by 2.2%. But when acting together, the wing deformation and corrugation only increased the lift by ~3% and decreased the torque by ~3%. That is, the combined aerodynamic effect of deformation and corrugation is rather small. Thus, wing corrugation is mainly for structural, not aerodynamic, purpose, and in computing or measuring the aerodynamic forces, using a rigid flat-plate wing to model the corrugated deforming wing at hovering condition can be a good approximation. PMID:22266123

  10. Pipe gripper

    DOEpatents

    Moyers, S.M.

    1975-12-16

    A device for gripping the exterior surface of a pipe or rod is described which has a plurality of wedges, each having a concave face which engages the outer surface of the pipe and each having a smooth face opposing the concave face. The wedges are seated on and their grooved concave faces are maintained in circular alignment by tapered axial segments of an opening extending through a wedge-seating member. The wedges are allowed to slide across the tapered axial segments so that such a sliding movement acts to vary the diameter of the circular alignment.

  11. Piping Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In Stennis Space Center's Component Test Facility, piping lines carry rocket propellants and high pressure cryogenic fuels. When the lines are chilled to a pretest temperature of 400 degrees below zero, ordinary piping connectors can leak. Under contract to Stennis, Reflange, Inc. developed the T-Con connector, which included a secondary seal that tolerates severe temperature change. Because of the limited need for the large and expensive T-Con product, Reflange also developed the less costly E-Con, a smaller more compact design with the same technical advantages as the T-Con.

  12. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Heat Pipes were originally developed by NASA and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the 1960s to dissipate excessive heat build- up in critical areas of spacecraft and maintain even temperatures of satellites. Heat pipes are tubular devices where a working fluid alternately evaporates and condenses, transferring heat from one region of the tube to another. KONA Corporation refined and applied the same technology to solve complex heating requirements of hot runner systems in injection molds. KONA Hot Runner Systems are used throughout the plastics industry for products ranging in size from tiny medical devices to large single cavity automobile bumpers and instrument panels.

  13. Piping Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A complex of high pressure piping at Stennis Space Center carries rocket propellants and other fluids/gases through the Center's Component Test Facility. Conventional clamped connectors tend to leak when propellant lines are chilled to extremely low temperatures. Reflange, Inc. customized an existing piping connector to include a secondary seal more tolerant of severe thermal gradients for Stennis. The T-Con connector solved the problem, and the company is now marketing a commercial version that permits testing, monitoring or collecting any emissions that may escape the primary seal during severe thermal transition.

  14. Progress Toward Corrugated Feed Horn Arrays in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, J.; Yoon, K. W.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Cho, H. M.; Hilton, G. C.; Niemack, M. D.; Irwin, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    We are developing monolithic arrays of corrugated feed horns fabricated in silicon for dual-polarization single-mode operation at 90, 145 and 220 GHz. The arrays consist of hundreds of platelet feed horns assembled from gold-coated stacks of micro-machined silicon wafers. As a first step, Au-coated Si waveguides with a circular, corrugated cross section were fabricated; their attenuation was measured to be less than 0.15 dB/cm from 80 to 110 GHz at room temperature. To ease the manufacture of horn arrays, electrolytic deposition of Au on degenerate Si without a metal seed layer was demonstrated. An apparatus for measuring the radiation pattern, optical efficiency, and spectral band-pass of prototype horns is described. Feed horn arrays made of silicon may find use in measurements of the polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  15. Progress Toward Corrugated Feed Horn Arrays in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J.; Yoon, K. W.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Cho, H. M.; Hilton, G. C.; Niemack, M. D.; Irwin, K. D.

    2009-12-16

    We are developing monolithic arrays of corrugated feed horns fabricated in silicon for dual-polarization single-mode operation at 90, 145 and 220 GHz. The arrays consist of hundreds of platelet feed horns assembled from gold-coated stacks of micro-machined silicon wafers. As a first step, Au-coated Si waveguides with a circular, corrugated cross section were fabricated; their attenuation was measured to be less than 0.15 dB/cm from 80 to 110 GHz at room temperature. To ease the manufacture of horn arrays, electrolytic deposition of Au on degenerate Si without a metal seed layer was demonstrated. An apparatus for measuring the radiation pattern, optical efficiency, and spectral band-pass of prototype horns is described. Feed horn arrays made of silicon may find use in measurements of the polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  16. Direct Acceleration of Electrons in a Corrugated Plasma Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M.; Morshed, S.; York, A. G.; Layer, B.; Aubuchon, M.; Milchberg, H. M.; Froula, D. H.

    2009-01-22

    Direct laser acceleration of electrons provides a low power tabletop alternative to laser wakefield accelerators. Until recently, however, direct acceleration has been limited by diffraction, phase matching, and material damage thresholds. The development of the corrugated plasma channel [B. Layer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 035001 (2007)] has removed all of these limitations and promises to allow direct acceleration of electrons over many centimeters at high gradients using femtosecond lasers [A. G. York et al., Phys Rev. Lett 100, 195001 (2008), J. P. Palastro et al., Phys. Rev. E 77, 036405 (2008)]. We present a simple analytic model of laser propagation in a corrugated plasma channel and examine the laser-electron beam interaction. Simulations show accelerating gradients of several hundred MeV/cm for laser powers much lower than required by standard laser wakefield schemes. In addition, the laser provides a transverse force that confines the high energy electrons on axis, while expelling low energy electrons.

  17. Experimental results on microwave pulse compression using helically corrugated waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McStravick, M.; Samsonov, S. V.; Ronald, K.; Mishakin, S. V.; He, W.; Denisov, G. G.; Whyte, C. G.; Bratman, V. L.; Cross, A. W.; Young, A. R.; MacInnes, P.; Robertson, C. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents new results on the development of a method to generate ultrahigh-power short-microwave pulses by using a known principle of compression (reduction in pulse duration accompanying with increase in pulse amplitude) of a frequency-swept wave packet propagating through a dispersive medium. An oversized circular waveguide with helical-corrugations of its inner surface ensures an eigenwave with strongly frequency dependent group velocity far from cutoff. These dispersive properties in conjunction with high rf breakdown strength and low Ohmic losses make a helically corrugated waveguide attractive for increasing microwave peak power. The experiments performed at kilowatt power levels, demonstrate that an X-band microwave pulse of 80 ns duration with a 5% frequency sweep can be compressed into a 1.5 ns pulse having 25 times higher peak power by optimizing the frequency modulation of the input wave packet.

  18. Dispersion of helically corrugated waveguides: Analytical, numerical, and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ronald, K.; Young, A.R.; Phelps, A.D.R.; Cross, A.W.; Konoplev, I.V.; He, W.; Thomson, J.; Whyte, C.G.; Samsonov, S.V.; Denisov, G.G.; Bratman, V.L.

    2004-10-01

    Helically corrugated waveguides have recently been studied for use in various applications such as interaction regions in gyrotron traveling-wave tubes and gyrotron backward-wave oscillators and as a dispersive medium for passive microwave pulse compression. The paper presents a summary of various methods that can be used for analysis of the wave dispersion of such waveguides. The results obtained from an analytical approach, simulations with the three-dimensional numerical code MAGIC, and cold microwave measurements are analyzed and compared.

  19. Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Kemeny, George A.; Cookson, Alan H.

    1981-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

  20. Optimization of the leading edge segment of a corrugated wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Manas; Chahl, Javaan

    2014-03-01

    Insect wings consist of flat plates of membranes stiffened by spars. The effect of this structure is that the wings appear as corrugated surfaces when considered on chordwise sections. We know that aerodynamically efficient insects such as a dragonfly engage in fixed wing flight modes for extended periods. The analysis in the literature has shown that the aerodynamic efficiency (cl/cd) of a corrugated aerofoil is sensitive to Reynolds number (Re) and angle-of-attack (AoA), yet the conclusions established are on the basis of flow analysis on a single baseline shape only. The sample size of the aerofoils must be extended further so that the influence and merits of corrugated shape features can be established. In this work, a design-of-experiments (DoE) approach is applied to induce systematic shape perturbations on a select, off-the-shelf baseline shape one feature at a time over a set number of increments. At each shape increment, the aerodynamic forces are established using a high fidelity CFD solver. The design space is modeled at a Re of 20,000 and 34,000 and at flow angle of 4.0° to represent a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) in glide. The results confirmed the importance of the leading and trailing edge deflections on cl/cd. At Re = 20, 000, cl/cd of a corrugated aerofoil with deflection at the leading edge region only is 16% higher than the baseline shape, and 39% higher than the flat plate. At Re = 34, 000, cl/cd performance is sensitive to the trailing edge deflection. At the optimum deflection setting, cl/cd is 18% higher than the baseline shape and 23% higher than the flat plate. The results confirm that the leading and trailing edge deflections are critical to cl/cd for a MAV in glide.

  1. Optimization of a corrugated stiffened composite panel under uniaxial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, B. L.; Sobel, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    An approach of structural optimization has been used to optimize the weight of a simply supported, corrugated hat stiffened composite panel under uniaxial compression. The approach consists of the employment of nonlinear mathematical programming techniques to reach an optimum solution. Some simplifying assumptions are made in the stress analysis to obtain faster convergence to an optimum solution. With these simplifying assumptions the number of unknown design parameters is reduced to twelve.

  2. Classical and semiclassical theories of atom scattering from corrugated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, W. W.; Manson, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A theory based in the semiclassical eikonal approximation is developed to describe energy transfer in the collision of an atomic projectile with a surface which is either ordered or disordered. This theory is extended from the quantum mechanical regime to the classical regime of complete quantum decoherence via the Bohr correspondence principle of large numbers of excited quanta. In the quantum mechanical regime, the theory reproduces the well-known eikonal approximation for elastic collisions, provides a simple and useful expression for single-phonon inelastic scattering, and leads to further expressions for multiple-phonon transfers. In the classical limit, the theory produces an expression that includes the effects of surface corrugation in addition to the excitations of large numbers of phonons. This theory shows that a simple measurement of the most probable intensity of energy-resolved scattering spectra taken as a function of surface temperature, with all other experimentally controllable parameters held fixed, can be used to extract the surface corrugation amplitude. Comparisons with data for Ar scattering from the molten metals Ga and In show good agreement with the measured energy-resolved spectra, the in-plane angular distributions, the out-of-plane angular distributions, and produces values for the corrugation amplitudes that range from 10% to 30% of the average interparticle spacing.

  3. Transient coexisting nanophases in ultrathin films confined between corrugated walls

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.E.; Zhang, F.; Cushman, J.H. ); Schoen, M. ); Diestler, D.J. )

    1994-12-15

    Grand-canonical Monte Carlo and microcanonical molecular dynamics methods have been used to simulate an ultrathin monatomic film confined to a slit-pore [i.e., between solid surfaces (walls)]. Both walls comprise atoms rigidly fixed in the face centered cubic (100) configuration; one wall is smooth on a nanoscale and the other is corrugated (i.e., scored with regularly spaced rectilinear grooves one to several nanometers wide). Properties of the film have been computed as a function of the lateral alignment (registry), with the temperature, chemical potential, and distance between the walls kept constant. Changing the registry carries the film through a succession of equilibrium states, ranging from all solid at one extreme to all fluid at the other. Over a range of intermediate registries the film consists of fluid and solid portions in equilibrium, that is fluid-filled nanocapillaries separated by solid strips. The range of registries over which such fluid--solid equilibria exist depends upon the width of the grooves and the frequency of the corrugation. For grooves of width comparable to the range of the interatomic potential, fluid and solid phases cease to coexist. In the limit of very wide grooves the character of the film is similar to that of the film confined by strictly smooth walls. The rich phase behavior of the confined film due to the coupling between molecular (registry) and nano (corrugation) scales has obvious implications for boundary lubrication.

  4. Experimental Investigation of the Strength of Multiweb Beams with Corrugated Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Allister F

    1956-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the strength of multiweb beams with corrugated webs are reported. Included in the investigation were two types of connection between the web and the skin. A comparison between the structural efficiency of corrugated-web and channel-web multiweb beams is presented, and it is shown that, for a considerable range of the structural index, corrugated-web beams can be built which are structurally more efficient than channel-web beams.

  5. Numerical exploration of the origin of aerodynamic enhancements in [low-Reynolds number] corrugated airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Caleb J.; Visbal, Miguel R.

    2013-11-01

    This paper explores the flow structure of a corrugated airfoil using a high-fidelity implicit large eddy simulation approach. The first three-dimensional simulations for a corrugated wing section are presented considering a range of Reynolds numbers of Rec = 5 × 103 to 5.8 × 104 bridging the gap left by previous numerical and experimental studies. Several important effects are shown to result from the corrugations in the leading-edge region. First, interaction between the detached shear layer and the first corrugation peak promotes recirculation upstream and enhances transition to turbulence due to flow instabilities. Thus, early transitional flow develops on the corrugated wing which helps to delay stall even at Reynolds numbers as low as Rec = 1 × 104. Transition is shown to occur as early as Rec = 7.5 × 103 and quickly advances toward the leading-edge as Reynolds number is increased. Modification of the first corrugation peak height produces significantly reduced separation and improved aerodynamic forces demonstrating the sensitivity of flow behavior to leading-edge geometry. Second, the unusual orientation of the corrugated surface and strong suction resulting from rapidly turning fluid over the separated region upstream of the first corrugation produces a new effect which serves to reduce drag. This effect was amplified through the enhanced interaction produced by a modified geometry. Corrugations were found to be most advantageous in the leading-edge region and could be optimized to properly take advantage of the flow field under different operating conditions.

  6. Outcoupling efficiency of OLEDs with 2D periodical corrugation at the cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Sergei; Bogdanova, Maria; Teslyuk, Anton

    2016-03-01

    We study theoretically the optical performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with 2D periodical corrugation at the cathode. We show how emergence of radiative surface plasmon resonances at the 2D corrugated cathode leads to the enhancement of the outcoupling efficiency of the OLED, which is primarily due to the outcoupling of emission generated by vertically oriented emitting excitons in the emission layer. We analyze the outcoupling efficiency of the OLED as a function of geometrical parameters of the corrugation and establish design rules for optimal outcoupling enhancement with the 2D corrugation at the cathode.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide removal from sediment and water in box culverts/storm drains by iron-based granules.

    PubMed

    Sun, J L; Shang, C; Kikkert, G A

    2013-01-01

    A renewable granular iron-based technology for hydrogen sulfide removal from sediment and water in box culverts and storm drains is discussed. Iron granules, including granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), granular ferric oxide (GFO) and rusted waste iron crusts (RWIC) embedded in the sediment phase removed aqueous hydrogen sulfide formed from sedimentary biological sulfate reduction. The exhausted iron granules were exposed to dissolved oxygen and this regeneration process recovered the sulfide removal capacities of the granules. The recovery is likely attributable to the oxidation of the ferrous iron precipitates film and the formation of new reactive ferric iron surface sites on the iron granules and sand particles. GFH and RWIC showed larger sulfide removal capacities in the sediment phase than GFO, likely due to the less ordered crystal structures on their surfaces. This study demonstrates that the iron granules are able to remove hydrogen sulfide from sediment and water in box culverts and storm drains and they have the potential to be regenerated and reused by contacting with dissolved oxygen. PMID:24355850

  8. Heat pipe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A bibliography of heat pipe technology to provide a summary of research projects conducted on heat pipes is presented. The subjects duscussed are: (1) heat pipe applications, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) design and fabrication, (4) testing and operation, (5) subject and author index, and (6) heat pipe related patents.

  9. Advanced systems development - interior piping materials/configuration. Final report, March 1985-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kashalikar, U.K.; Sykes, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    New material and component design concepts were developed and evaluated for interior distribution of natural gas. The objective was to create piping systems with total installed costs reduced as significantly as possible from conventional gas piping to allow natural gas to compete more effectively with electric service to the same appliances. The design concepts are intended for single-family, multifamily-low-rise, multifamily-high-rise, and light commercial-building applications within the United States. The design concepts recommended for further development are based on corrugated stainless steel conduit, plastic-coated aluminum tubing, (copper-based) modified aluminum silicon bronze alloy components, polymer-lined copper conduit, and damage-sensing/corrugated polybutylene tubing.

  10. Aerodynamic effects of wing corrugation at gliding flight at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2013-07-01

    Corrugation gives an insect-wing the advantages of low mass, high stiffness, and low membrane stress. Researchers are interested to know if it is also advantageous aerodynamically. Previous works reported that corrugation enhanced the aerodynamic performance of wings at gliding flight. However, Reynolds numbers considered in these studies were higher than that of gliding insects. The present study showed that in the Reynolds number range of gliding insects, corrugation had negative aerodynamic effects. We studied aerodynamic effects of corrugation at gliding motion using the method of computational fluid dynamics, in the Reynolds number range of Re = 200-2400. Different corrugation patterns were considered. The effect of corrugation on aerodynamic performance was identified by comparing the aerodynamic forces between the corrugated and flat-plate wings, and the underlying flow mechanisms of the corrugation effects were revealed by analyzing the flow fields and surface pressure distributions. The findings are as follows: (1) the effect of corrugation is to decrease the lift, and change the drag only slightly (at 15°-25° angles of attack, lift is decreased by about 16%; at smaller angles of attack, the percentage of lift reduction is even larger because the lift is small). (2) Two mechanisms are responsible for the lift reduction. One is that the pleats at the lower surface of the corrugated wing produce relatively strong vortices, resulting in local low-pressure regions on the lower surface of the wing. The other is that corrugation near the leading edge pushes the leading-edge-separation layer slightly upwards and increases the size of the separation bubble above the upper surface, reducing the "suction pressure," or increasing the pressure, on the upper surface.

  11. Flood magnitude and frequency of Jacks Run at the culvert on U.S. Route 206, Southampton Township, Burlington County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Flood magnitude and frequency of Jacks Run at the culvert on U.S. Route 206, Southampton Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the rational method. Flood magnitude and frequency estimates, as well as basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimate is 29 cubic feet per second.

  12. Manipulation of Thought Content as a Determinant of Mood and Corrugator Electromyographic Activity in Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teasdale, John D.; Bancroft, Judy

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of unhappy thoughts on mood and corrugator EMG (electromyographic activity) in depressed patients. Its purpose was to obtain evidence relevant to cognitive models of depression and to examine the usefulness of corrugator EMG as an indicator of depressed mood. (Author/RK)

  13. Three-dimensional train track model for study of rail corrugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X. S.; Wen, Z. F.; Wang, K. Y.; Zhou, Z. R.; Liu, Q. Y.; Li, C. H.

    2006-06-01

    Rail corrugation is a main factor causing the vibration and noise from the structures of railway vehicles and tracks. A calculation model is put forward to analyse the effect of rail corrugation with different depths and wavelengths on the dynamical behaviour of a passenger car and a curved track in detail. Also the evolution of initial corrugation with different wavelengths is investigated. In the numerical analysis, Kalker's non-Hertzian rolling contact theory is modified and used to calculate the frictional work density on the contact area of the wheel and rail in rolling contact. The material loss per unit area is assumed to be proportional to the frictional work density to determine the wear depth of the contact surfaces of the curved rails. The combined influences of the corrugation development and the vertical and lateral coupled dynamics of the passenger car and the curved track are taken into account. The numerical results indicate that: (1) the corrugation with high passing frequencies has a great influence on the dynamical performance of the wheelset and track, but little on the car-body and the bogie frame; (2) the deeper the corrugation depth is, the greater the influence and the rail material wear are; but the longer the corrugation wavelength is, the smaller the influence and the wear are; and (3) the initial corrugation with a fixed wavelength on the rail running surface decreases with increasing number of the passenger car passages.

  14. Imaging Local Electronic Corrugations and Doped Regions in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    B Schultz; C Patridge; V Lee; C Jaye; P Lysaght; C Smith; J Barnett; D Fischer; D Prendergast; S Banerjee

    2011-12-31

    Electronic structure heterogeneities are ubiquitous in two-dimensional graphene and profoundly impact the transport properties of this material. Here we show the mapping of discrete electronic domains within a single graphene sheet using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy in conjunction with ab initio density functional theory calculations. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging provides a wealth of detail regarding the extent to which the unoccupied levels of graphene are modified by corrugation, doping and adventitious impurities, as a result of synthesis and processing. Local electronic corrugations, visualized as distortions of the {pi}*cloud, have been imaged alongside inhomogeneously doped regions characterized by distinctive spectral signatures of altered unoccupied density of states. The combination of density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging, and in situ near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy experiments also provide resolution of a longstanding debate in the literature regarding the spectral assignments of pre-edge and interlayer states.

  15. The Electrostatic Interactions between Two Corrugated Charged Planes.

    PubMed

    Tsao

    1999-08-15

    The surfaces of association colloids often undergo undulating motion due to thermal fluctuations. The electrostatic interactions between two charged planes of arbitrary corrugation are investigated on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation under the Debye-Hckle approximation. The surfaces are parallel and subject to the spatial periodicity of the amplitude A and wavelength q(-1). When the amplitude is small compared to the wavelength, i.e., (qA)(2) < 1, the electric field can be calculated by using the perturbation method. The interaction free energy is then obtained for surfaces associated with the condition of either constant surface potential or constant surface charge density during interactions. The effects of the amplitude and phase angle on the interaction energy are discussed and asymptotic expressions are obtained when the mean separation is large compared to the amplitude. At the same mean separation, the interaction energy for the corrugated surfaces is always higher than that for the planar surfaces. In other words, undulation enhances the electrostatic repulsion. The repulsive energy is minimum when the two surfaces are in-phase and maximum for the out-of-phase mode. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10421744

  16. The biofouling potential of flow on corrugated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miño, Gastón L.; Rusconi, Roberto; Kantsler, Vasily; Stocker, Roman

    2015-11-01

    Both natural and man-made surfaces are rarely smooth, and are instead often characterized by geometric heterogeneity or roughness over a broad range of scales. Because of the predicted importance of the local interaction between microorganisms and surfaces, roughness at the microbial scale can be an important element in determining the outcome of microbe-surface interactions, which represent the first step in biofilm formation and biofouling. In microbial habitats this interaction often occurs in flowing fluids, which can be important because regions with high hydrodynamic shear can induce a strong reorientation of bacteria towards surfaces, promoting attachment. Here we study the combination of flow and surface topography using video microscopy of Escherichia coli in corrugated microfluidic channels. We report that flow preferentially promotes attachment to specific regions of a corrugated surface, as result of the hydrodynamics of bacteria swimming in flow. We compute from the data a ``Local Biofouling Potential'' (LBP) and compare this successfully with predictions of a mathematical model, yielding one step towards the ability to mechanistically predict and thus ultimately either prevent or induce biofouling.

  17. A comprehensive track model for the improvement of corrugation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J.; Vadillo, E. G.; Santamaría, J.

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents a detailed model of the railway track based on wave propagation, suitable for corrugation studies. The model analyses both the vertical and the transverse dynamics of the track. Using the finite strip method (FSM), only the cross-section of the rail must be meshed, and thus it is not necessary to discretise a whole span in 3D. This model takes into account the discrete nature of the support, introducing concepts pertaining to the theory of periodic structures in the formulation. Wave superposition is enriched taking into account the contribution of residual vectors. In this way, the model obtains accurate results when a finite section of railway track is considered. Results for the infinite track have been compared against those presented by Gry and Müller. Aside from the improvements provided by the model presented in this paper, which Gry's and Müller's models do not contemplate, the results arising from the comparison prove satisfactory. Finally, the calculated receptances are compared against the experimental values obtained by the authors, demonstrating a fair degree of adequacy. Finally, these receptances are used within a linear model of corrugation developed by the authors.

  18. Corrugated fiberboard as a positioning insert for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yoshikawa, Haruo; Akai, Tomoharu; Nomoto, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Yoshimitsu, Kengo

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new body fixation system for single patient use, which consists of a vacuum cushion, a thermoplastic fixation sheet which is used to suppress involuntary and voluntary patient movement, and a triple-wall corrugated fiberboard base plate to which both the vacuum cushion and the thermoplastic sheet are affixed. To evaluate the characteristics of the fiberboard as a patient-positioning insert, the photon beam attenuation of a fiberboard base plate, a carbon-fiber base plate, and a vacuum-formed cushion were compared. The strength of the fiberboard was also evaluated. The attenuation for the carbon-fiber base plate was 3.7% and 2.6% in 4 MV and 10 MV photon beams, respectively, while the results were less for the fiberboard base plate, i.e. 1.9% and 1.6%. The vacuum-formed cushion had a minimal effect on transmission. None of the materials subsided under the weight loading of 20 g/cm(2). There was no difference between the thicknesses of the fiberboard before and after a 50 times daily load with the 60 kg weight of a volunteer. Corrugated fiberboard is a robust and low attenuating material that functions well as a patient-positioning insert. PMID:19755802

  19. Corrugated Waveguide Mode Content Analysis Using Irradiance Moments

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Idei, Hiroshi; Temkin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel, relatively simple method for determining the mode content of the linearly polarized modes of a corrugated waveguide using the moments of the intensity pattern of the field radiated from the end of the waveguide. This irradiance moment method is based on calculating the low-order irradiance moments, using measured intensity profiles only, of the radiated field from the waveguide aperture. Unlike the phase retrieval method, this method does not use or determine the phase distribution at the waveguide aperture. The new method was benchmarked numerically by comparison with sample mode mixtures. The results predict less than ±0.7% error bar in the retrieval of the mode content. The method was also tested using high-resolution experimental data from beams radiated from 63.5 mm and 19 mm corrugated waveguides at 170 and 250 GHz, respectively. The results showed a very good agreement of the mode content retrieved using the irradiance moment method versus the phase retrieval technique. The irradiance moment method is most suitable for cases where the modal power is primarily in the fundamental HE11 mode, with <8% of the power in high-order modes. PMID:25821260

  20. Plane-wave diffraction at the periodically corrugated boundary of vacuum and a negative-phase-velocity material.

    PubMed

    Depine, Ricardo A; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2004-05-01

    Considering the diffraction of a plane wave by a periodically corrugated half-space, we show that the transformation of the refracting medium from positive (negative) phase velocity to negative (positive) phase velocity type has an influence on the diffraction efficiencies. This effect increases with increasing corrugation depth, owing to the presence of evanescent waves in the troughs of the corrugated interface. PMID:15244981

  1. Assessment of scour-critical data collected at selected bridges and culverts in South Carolina, 1990-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurley, N.M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Data at bridges and culverts were collected at 3,506 stream crossings in South Carolina during 1990-92. The data include general information unique to the structure; structural data; and hydraulic, geomorphic, and vegetation information. The data are stored in the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina District Bridge-Scour Data Base. Observed- and potential-scour indexes were computed from the applicable data variables. Sites with observed-scour indexes exceeding ten and (or) potential-scour indexes exceeding 20 are considered to have significant scour-related problems. Of the 3,506 sites inspected, 257 sites had an observed-scour index exceeding ten, 214 sites had a potential-scour index exceeding 20, and 85 sites had observed- and potential-scour indexes exceeding both threshold values.

  2. Ultrasonic pipe assessment

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Graham H.; Morrow, Valerie L.; Levie, Harold; Kane, Ronald J.; Brown, Albert E.

    2003-12-23

    An ultrasonic pipe or other structure assessment system includes an ultrasonic transducer positioned proximate the pipe or other structure. A fluid connection between the ultrasonic transducer and the pipe or other structure is produced. The ultrasonic transducer is moved relative to the pipe or other structure.

  3. Modeling of a corrugated dielectric elastomer actuator for artificial muscle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadooka, Kevin; Taya, Minoru; Naito, Keishi; Saito, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators have many advantages, including light weight, simplicity, high energy density, and silent operation. These features make them suitable to replace conventional actuators and transducers, especially in artificial muscle applications where large contractile strains are necessary for lifelike motions. This paper will introduce the concept of a corrugated dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), which consists of dielectric elastomer (DE) laminated to a thin elastic layer to induce bending motion at each of the corrugations, resulting in large axial deformation. The location of the DE and elastic layers can be configured to provide tensile or compressive axial strain. Such corrugated DE actuators are also highly scalable: linking multiple actuators in series results in greater deformation, whereas multiple actuators in parallel results in larger force output. Analytical closed-form solutions based on linear elasticity were derived for the displacement and force output of curved unimorph and corrugated DEA, both consisting of an arbitrary number of lamina. A total strain energy analysis and Castigiliano's theorem were used to predict the nonlinear force-displacement behavior of the corrugated actuator. Curved unimorph and corrugated DEA were fabricated using VHB F9469PC as the DE material. Displacement of the actuators observed during testing agreed well with the modeling results. Large contractile strain (25.5%) was achieved by the corrugated DEA. Future work includes investigating higher performance DE materials such as plasticized PVDF terpolymers, processed by thin film deposition methods.

  4. Stress induced martensite in NiTi corrugated films

    SciTech Connect

    Wuttig, M.; Zheng, Y.; Slutsker, J.S.; Mori, Kiyotaka; Su, Q.

    1999-08-06

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) films have been so far deposited on planar Si, metallic and polymeric surfaces and investigated either in the detached or attached two-way SM states. It has been shown that uniform film stresses which are introduced during cooling from the processing temperature effect the transformation characteristics significantly. It is also known that non-planar surfaces are conducive to graphoepitaxial growth. In this paper the authors show that the density of martensite plates in a corrugated (Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 50} film)/(Si substrate) composite corresponds to the density of pyramidal etch patterns in the substrate and propose that the non-uniform stress state gives rise to local stress induced formation of martensite.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of corrugated doping fronts in organic optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V.; Jukimenko, O.; Modestov, M.; Marklund, M.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that electrochemical doping fronts in organic semiconductors exhibit a new fundamental instability growing from multidimensional perturbations [Bychkov , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.016103 107, 016103 (2011)]. In the instability development, linear growth of tiny perturbations goes over into a nonlinear stage of strongly distorted doping fronts. Here we develop the nonlinear theory of the doping front instability and predict the key parameters of a corrugated doping front, such as its velocity, in close agreement with the experimental data. We show that the instability makes the electrochemical doping process considerably faster. We obtain the self-similar properties of the front shape corresponding to the maximal propagation velocity, which allows for a wide range of controlling the doping process in the experiments. The developed theory provides the guide for optimizing the performance of organic optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting electrochemical cells.

  6. Unbiased diffusion in two-dimensional channels with corrugated walls.

    PubMed

    Verdel, Roberto; Dagdug, Leonardo; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2016-02-28

    This paper deals with diffusion of point particles in linearly corrugated two-dimensional channels. Such geometry allows one to obtain an approximate analytical expression that gives the particle effective diffusivity as a function of the geometric parameters of the channel. To establish its accuracy and the range of applicability, the expression is tested against Brownian dynamics simulation results. The test shows that the expression works very well for long channel periods, but fails when the period is not long enough compared to the minimum width of the channel. To fix this deficiency, we propose a simple empirical correction to the analytical expression. The resulting corrected expression for the effective diffusivity is in excellent agreement with the simulation results for all values of the channel period. PMID:26931680

  7. A Large L-Band Rectangular Corrugated Horn

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.F.; Levin, S.; Bensadoun, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a lightweight, corrugated-horn antenna, constructed from sheet metal. Over a 1.3-1.7 GHz operating band, its half-power beam width is approximately 20{sup o} in the E-plane and varies from 17{sup o} to 13{sup o} in the H-plane. Quarter-wave choke slots at the aperture help to reduce the E-plane sidelobes below -55 dB at angles greater than 90{sup o}, while the H-plane sidelobes lie in that range both with and without choke slots. Return loss throughout the operating band is -25 dB or below. Critical dimensions are provided, together with useful guidelines for designing similar antennas.

  8. Geometrical properties of turbulent premixed flames and other corrugated interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesset, F.; Maurice, G.; Halter, F.; Mazellier, N.; Chauveau, C.; Gökalp, I.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the geometrical properties of turbulent flame fronts and other interfaces. Toward that end, we use an original tool based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), which is applied to the interface spatial coordinates. The focus is mainly on the degree of roughness of the flame front, which is quantified through the scale dependence of its coverage arclength. POD is first validated by comparing with the caliper technique. Fractal characteristics are extracted in an unambiguous fashion using a parametric expression which appears to be impressively well suited for representing Richardson plots. Then it is shown that, for the range of Reynolds numbers investigated here, the scale-by-scale contribution to the arclength does not comply with scale similarity, irrespectively of the type of similarity which is invoked. The finite ratios between large and small scales, referred to as finite Reynolds number effects, are likely to explain this observation. In this context, the Reynolds number that ought to be achieved for a proper inertial range to be discernible, and for scale similarity to be likely to apply, is calculated. Fractal characteristics of flame folding are compared to available predictions. It is confirmed that the inner cutoff satisfactorily correlates with the Kolmogorov scale while the outer cutoff appears to be proportional to the integral length scale. However, the scaling for the fractal dimension is much less obvious. It is argued that much higher Reynolds numbers have to be reached for drawing firm statements about the evolution (or constancy) of the fractal dimension with respect to flame and flow parameters. Finally, a heuristic phenomenology of corrugated interfaces is highlighted. The degree of generality of the latter phenomenology is confirmed by comparing the folding of different interfaces including a turbulent-nonturbulent interface, a liquid jet destabilized by a surrounding air jet, a cavitating flow, and an isoscalar evolving in a turbulent medium. The latter outcome is likely to have strong implications for modeling the corrugation of turbulent interfaces occurring in many physical situations.

  9. Bending of five-layer beams with lengthwise corrugated main core

    SciTech Connect

    Magnucka-Blandzi, Ewa; Walczak, Zbigniew

    2015-03-10

    The paper is devoted to one orthotropic thin-walled sandwich beam with trapezoidal core and two-layer facings. The inner layers of the facings are also corrugated. The orientation of the corrugations of the inner layers of the facings is perpendicular to trapezoidal corrugation of the beam core. The mathematical and physical model of this beam is formulated, and also the field of displacements. Basing on the principle of the total potential energy the system of equilibrium equations is derived. The analytical solutions will be verified numerically with the use of the finite element method (MES)

  10. Gyrokinetic simulations of off-axis minimum-q profile corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R.E.; Austin, M.E.; Burrell, K.H.; Candy, J.

    2006-05-15

    Quasiequilibrium radial 'profile corrugations' in the electron temperature gradient are found at lowest-order singular surfaces in global gyrokinetic code simulations of both monotonic-q and off-axis minimum-q discharges. The profile corrugations in the temperature and density gradients are time-averaged components of zonal flows. The m/n=2/1 electron temperature gradient corrugation is measurably large and appears to trigger an internal transport barrier as the off-axis minimum-q=2 surfaces enter the plasma.

  11. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Abraham

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  12. Flood magnitude and frequency of Little Timber Creek at the culvert on Interstate Route 295, Haddon Heights Township, Camden County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods at the Little Timber Creek at the culvert on Interstate 295, at milepost 28.9, in Haddon Heights Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. Flood-magnitude and -frequency estimates, as well as drainage-basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimate is 770 cubic feet per second.

  13. Flood magnitude and frequency of Franklin Pond tributary at the culvert on New Jersey Route 23, Franklin Borough, Sussex County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Flood magnitude and frequency values are presented for Franklin Pond tributary at the culvert at milepost 32.2 of New Jersey Route 23, Franklin Borough, New Jersey. The values were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. A description of the drainage-basin characteristics also is included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimate is 218 cubic feet per second.

  14. Flood magnitude and frequency of Black Creek at the culvert on New Jersey Route 94, Vernon Township, Sussex County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods at Black Creek tributary at the culvert on New Jersey Route 94 at milepost 43.0 in Vernon Township, New Jersey, were determined by using the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Special Report 38 method. Estimates of flood magnitude and frequency calculated by the Special Report 38 method, as well as drainage-basin characteristics, are included in this report. The 100-year-flood estimate is 261 cubic feet per second.

  15. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design. PMID:27035269

  16. 5. Detail, 5panel door and corrugated metal siding, Oil House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail, 5-panel door and corrugated metal siding, Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, southwest facade, view to northeast (210mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  17. Corrugated velocity patterns in the spiral galaxies: NGC 278, NGC 1058, NGC 2500 & UGC 3574 .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Gil, M. C.; Alfaro, E. J.; Pérez, E.

    In this work we address the study of the detection in Halpha of a radial corrugation in the vertical velocity field in a sample of four nearly face-on, spiral galaxies. The geometry of the problem is a main criterion in the selection of the sample as well as of the azimuthal angle of the slits. These spatial corrugations must be equally associated with wavy vertical motions in the galactic plane with a strong large-scale consistency. Evidence of these kinematic waves were first detected in the analysis of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies (eg Vaucoleurs & de Vaucaleurs 1963, Pismis 1965), but it was not until 2001 that Alfaro et al. analyzed in more detail the velocity corrugations in NGC 5427 and a possible physical mechanism for their origin. The aim of this study is to analyze the corrugated velocity pattern in terms of the star formation processes. We describe the geometry of the problem and establish its fundamental relationships.

  18. Reconciling the electronic and geometric corrugations of the hexagonal boron nitride and graphene nanomeshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, William C.; Meunier, Vincent; Xu, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Rh(111) and graphene on Ru(0001) illustrate a trend of divergence between the density functional theory (DFT) calculated geometric corrugation, and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measured apparent corrugation, of metal-supported 2D films that feature chemically distinct regions. Notably, the geometric and apparent corrugations differ by up to 2 Å for boron nitride/Rh(111), whereas both the DFT-simulated and the experimentally observed STM images agree in the apparent corrugation over a wide range of bias voltages. The disparity is due to unequal contributions of the low/high-lying atoms to the local density of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level. This phenomenon has important implications for the structural characterization of certain supported 2D films, which are being explored for novel electronic and material applications.

  19. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design.

  20. Plasmonic modes in a conductor-corrugated gap-dielectric system at telecommunication wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Wei; Jiang, Xunya

    2016-04-01

    We propose a conductor-corrugated gap-dielectric structure to realize broadband plasmonic modes at telecommunication wavelength. The structure consists of a corrugated low-index dielectric gap layer sandwiched by high-index dielectric and conductor layers. The electric field of the plasmonic modes is primarily concentrated in the corrugated gap, which not only reduces the metal absorption resulting in long propagation length but also causes good field confinement. It is proved that periodic modulation introduced into the gap can significantly increase the cutoff gap thickness of the structure. The effective medium theory and numerical simulation demonstrate that the cutoff gap thickness can be further increased by decreasing the filling factor of the low-index dielectric in the corrugated gap. Meanwhile, the scattering effects induced by the periodic modulation are also investigated. The results not only provide a new understanding of the surface plasmonic modes but also benefit the designing of compact devices.

  1. 14. DETAIL OF SOUTHWEST FRONT OF WAREHOUSE, SHOWING CORRUGATED PLASTER/ASBESTOS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF SOUTHWEST FRONT OF WAREHOUSE, SHOWING CORRUGATED PLASTER/ASBESTOS WALLS, WINDOWS AND ROOF. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, International Harvester Company Showroom, Office & Warehouse, 10 South Main Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  2. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design. PMID:27035269

  3. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, N.; Samanta, Amiya K.; Roy, Dilip Kr. Singha; Thanikal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Investigations on Mechanical Behavior of Composite Corrugated Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayyani, Iman; Ziaei-Rad, Saeed; Salehi, Hamid

    2012-06-01

    Tensile and flexural characteristics of corrugated laminate panels were studied using numerical and analytical methods and compared with experimental data. Prepreg laminates of glass fiber plain woven cloth were hand-laid by use of a heat gun to ease the creation of the panel. The corrugated panels were then manufactured by using a trapezoidal machined aluminium mould. First, a series of simple tension tests were performed on standard samples to evaluate the material characteristics. Next, the corrugated panels were subjected to tensile and three-point bending tests. The force-displacement graphs were recorded. Numerical and analytical solutions were proposed to simulate the mechanical behavior of the panels. In order to model the energy dissipation due to delamination phenomenon observed in tensile tests in all members of corrugated core, plastic behavior was assigned to the whole geometry, not only to the corner regions. Contrary to the literature, it is shown that the three-stage mechanical behavior of composite corrugated core is not confined to aramid reinforced corrugated laminates and can be observed in other types such as fiber glass. The results reveal that the mechanical behavior of the core in tension is sensitive to the variation of core height. In addition, for the first time, the behavior of composite corrugated core was studied and verified in bending. Finally, the analytical and numerical results were validated by comparing them with experimental data. A good degree of correlation was observed which showed the suitability of the finite element model for predicting the mechanical behavior of corrugated laminate panels.

  5. Numerical analysis of sandwich beam with corrugated core under three-point bending

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenbeck, Leszek; Grygorowicz, Magdalena; Paczos, Piotr

    2015-03-10

    The strength problem of sandwich beam with corrugated core under three-point bending is presented.The beam are made of steel and formed by three mutually orthogonal corrugated layers. The finite element analysis (FEA) of the sandwich beam is performed with the use of the FEM system - ABAQUS. The relationship between the applied load and deflection in three-point bending is considered.

  6. Geysering inhibitor pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, F. S.

    1973-01-01

    Smaller concentric pipe is welded to main pipe beginning above bottom of isolation valve and terminating in storage tank at top. There is continuous circulation of fluid which maintains fluid temperature below boiling temperature of liquid oxygen.

  7. Propagation of Lamb waves in one-dimensional radial phononic crystal plates with periodic corrugations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinggang; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Kunpeng; Chen, Weihua

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the propagation characteristics of Lamb waves in one-dimensional radial phononic crystal plates with periodic corrugations. The dispersion relations, the power transmission spectra, and the displacement fields of the eigenmodes are calculated by using the finite element method based on two-dimensional axial symmetry models in cylindrical coordinates. The axial symmetry model is validated by three-dimensional finite element model in rectangular coordinates. The effects of the geometrical parameters on the band gaps are further explored numerically. Numerical results show that several complete band gaps with a variable bandwidth exist for Lamb waves in the proposed structures. The formation mechanism of opening the acoustic band gaps is attributed to the coupling between the Lamb modes and the corrugation mode. The band gaps are significantly dependent upon the geometrical parameters such as the corrugation height, the corrugation width, and the plate thickness. Significantly, as the increase of corrugation height, band width shifts, new band gaps appear, the bands become flat, and the corrugation mode plays a more prominent role in the opening of Lamb wave band gaps. These properties of Lamb waves in the radial phononic crystal plates can potentially be applied to optimize band gaps, generate filters, and design acoustic devices.

  8. Oceanic corrugated surfaces and the strength of the axial lithosphere at slow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, Mathilde; Sauter, Daniel; Escartn, Javier; Lavier, Luc; Picazo, Suzanne

    2009-10-01

    We analyse the topography and gravity signature of 39 corrugated surfaces formed over the past 26 myrs in the footwall of axial detachment faults at the eastern Southwest Indian Ridge. These corrugated surfaces appear to have formed at a melt supply about half the global melt supply average for mid-ocean ridges, and we find that their presently elevated topography, relative to adjacent non-corrugated seafloor, was mostly acquired at the end of their formation, at the "termination stage". This configuration, which also characterizes many off-axis corrugated surfaces in other oceans, suggests that the plate flexural rigidity was very low during the formation of the corrugated surface, and increased significantly at the termination stage. Following Buck (1988), we hypothesize that stresses related to bending of the plate cause internal deformation and damage in the footwall of the fault, which is associated with weakening. As a possible mechanism for enhanced footwall weakening while corrugated surfaces form, we propose the formation of weak shear zones coated with hydrous minerals such as talc, amphibole, chlorite and serpentine, in mantle-derived ultramafics next to gabbro intrusions. If this hypothesis is correct, the amount of footwall weakening and roll-over along axial detachment faults at slow spreading ridges may be controlled both by access to hydrothermal fluids in the footwall of the detachment, and by the abundance and distribution of gabbros intrusions in exhumed ultramafics.

  9. Geometrical properties of turbulent premixed flames and other corrugated interfaces.

    PubMed

    Thiesset, F; Maurice, G; Halter, F; Mazellier, N; Chauveau, C; Gökalp, I

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the geometrical properties of turbulent flame fronts and other interfaces. Toward that end, we use an original tool based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), which is applied to the interface spatial coordinates. The focus is mainly on the degree of roughness of the flame front, which is quantified through the scale dependence of its coverage arclength. POD is first validated by comparing with the caliper technique. Fractal characteristics are extracted in an unambiguous fashion using a parametric expression which appears to be impressively well suited for representing Richardson plots. Then it is shown that, for the range of Reynolds numbers investigated here, the scale-by-scale contribution to the arclength does not comply with scale similarity, irrespectively of the type of similarity which is invoked. The finite ratios between large and small scales, referred to as finite Reynolds number effects, are likely to explain this observation. In this context, the Reynolds number that ought to be achieved for a proper inertial range to be discernible, and for scale similarity to be likely to apply, is calculated. Fractal characteristics of flame folding are compared to available predictions. It is confirmed that the inner cutoff satisfactorily correlates with the Kolmogorov scale while the outer cutoff appears to be proportional to the integral length scale. However, the scaling for the fractal dimension is much less obvious. It is argued that much higher Reynolds numbers have to be reached for drawing firm statements about the evolution (or constancy) of the fractal dimension with respect to flame and flow parameters. Finally, a heuristic phenomenology of corrugated interfaces is highlighted. The degree of generality of the latter phenomenology is confirmed by comparing the folding of different interfaces including a turbulent-nonturbulent interface, a liquid jet destabilized by a surrounding air jet, a cavitating flow, and an isoscalar evolving in a turbulent medium. The latter outcome is likely to have strong implications for modeling the corrugation of turbulent interfaces occurring in many physical situations. PMID:26871163

  10. Pipe-to-pipe impact program

    SciTech Connect

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Bampton, M.C.C.; Friley, J.R.; Simonen, F.A.

    1984-06-01

    This report documents the tests and analyses performed as part of the Pipe-to-Pipe Impact (PTPI) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This work was performed to assist the NRC in making licensing decisions regarding pipe-to-pipe impact events following postulated breaks in high energy fluid system piping. The report scope encompasses work conducted from the program's start through the completion of the initial hot oil tests. The test equipment, procedures, and results are described, as are analytic studies of failure potential and data correlation. Because the PTPI Program is only partially completed, the total significance of the current test results cannot yet be accurately assessed. Therefore, although trends in the data are discussed, final conclusions and recommendations will be possible only after the completion of the program, which is scheduled to end in FY 1984.

  11. Inspecting flexible pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Neffgen, J.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Principal modes of failure as well as defects which cause leakage or cross-section damage are discussed. The author explains in detail how traditional problems associated with inspecting flexible pipe, which include discriminating between pipe layers, corrosion monitoring and the use of intelligent pigs, can be related to flexible pipe's complex construction and complex behavior. Proper pig selection and operations are emphasized.

  12. Heat pipes. [technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development and use of heat pipes are described, including space requirements and contributions. Controllable heat pipes, and designs for automatically maintaining a selected constant temperature, are discussed which would add to the versatility and usefulness of heat pipes in industrial processing, manufacture of integrated circuits, and in temperature stabilization of electronics.

  13. Overall Thermal Performance of Flexible Piping Under Simulated Bending Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Demko, J. A.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flexible, vacuum-insulated transfer lines for low-temperature applications have higher thermal losses than comparable rigid lines. Typical flexible piping construction uses corrugated tubes, inner and outer, with a multilayer insulation (MLI) system in the annular space. Experiments on vacuum insulation systems in a flexible geometry were conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. The effects of bending were simulated by causing the inner tube to be eccentric with the outer tube. The effects of spacers were simulated in a controlled way by inserting spacer tubes for the length of the cylindrical test articles. Two material systems, standard MLI and a layered composite insulation (LCI), were tested under the full range of vacuum levels using a liquid nitrogen boiloff calorimeter to determine the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value). The results indicate that the flexible piping under simulated bending conditions significantly degrades the thermal performance of the insulation system. These data are compared to standard MLI for both straight and flexible piping configurations. The definition of an overall k-value for actual field installations (k(sub oafi)) is described for use in design and analysis of cryogenic piping systems.

  14. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  15. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices.

  16. Corrugated Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector Focal Plane Array Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, A.; Choi, K. K.; Das, N. C.; La, A.; Jhabvala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The corrugated quantum-well infrared photodetector (C-QWIP) uses total internal reflection to couple normal incident light into the optically active quantum wells. The coupling efficiency has been shown to be relatively independent of the pixel size and wavelength thus making the C-QWIP a candidate for detectors over the entire infrared spectrum. The broadband coupling efficiency of the C-QWIP makes it an ideal candidate for multiwavelength detectors. We fabricated and tested C-QWIP focal plane arrays (FPAs) with cutoff wavelengths of 11.2 and 16.2 micrometers. Each FPA has 256 x 256 pixels that are bump-bonded to a direct injection readout circuit. Both FPAs provided infrared imagery with good aesthetic attributes. For the 11.2-micrometers FPA, background-limited performance (BLIP) was observed at 60 K with f/3 optics. For the 16.2-micrometers FPA, BLIP was observed at 38 K. Besides the reduction of dark current in C-QWIP structures, the measured internal quantum efficiency (eta) remains to be high. The values for responsivity and quantum efficiency obtained from the FPA results agree well with those measured for single devices.

  17. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  18. Corrugator activity confirms immediate negative affect in surprise

    PubMed Central

    Topolinski, Sascha; Strack, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of surprise entails a complex of immediate responses, such as cognitive interruption, attention allocation to, and more systematic processing of the surprising stimulus. All these processes serve the ultimate function to increase processing depth and thus cognitively master the surprising stimulus. The present account introduces phasic negative affect as the underlying mechanism responsible for this switch in operating mode. Surprising stimuli are schema-discrepant and thus entail cognitive disfluency, which elicits immediate negative affect. This affect in turn works like a phasic cognitive tuning switching the current processing mode from more automatic and heuristic to more systematic and reflective processing. Directly testing the initial elicitation of negative affect by surprising events, the present experiment presented high and low surprising neutral trivia statements to N = 28 participants while assessing their spontaneous facial expressions via facial electromyography. High compared to low surprising trivia elicited higher corrugator activity, indicative of negative affect and mental effort, while leaving zygomaticus (positive affect) and frontalis (cultural surprise expression) activity unaffected. Future research shall investigate the mediating role of negative affect in eliciting surprise-related outcomes. PMID:25762956

  19. Stiffness analysis of corrugated flexure beam used in compliant mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nianfeng; Liang, Xiaohe; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-07-01

    Conventional flexible joints generally have limited range of motion and high stress concentration. To overcome these shortcomings, corrugated flexure beam(CF beam) is designed because of its large flexibility obtained from longer overall length on the same span. The successful design of compliant mechanisms using CF beam requires manipulation of the stiffnesses as the design variables. Empirical equations of the CF beam stiffness components, except of the torsional stiffness, are obtained by curve-fitting method. The application ranges of all the parameters in each empirical equation are also discussed. The ratio of off-axis to axial stiffness is considered as a key characteristic of an effective compliant joint. And parameter study shows that the radius of semi-circular segment and the length of straight segment contribute most to the ratio. At last, CF beam is used to design translational and rotational flexible joints, which also verifies the validity of the empirical equations. CF beam with large flexibility is presented, and empirical equations of its stiffness are proposed to facilitate the design of flexible joint with large range of motion.

  20. The corrugation instability of a piston-driven shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jason

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a shock wave that is driven into an inviscid fluid by the steady motion of a two-dimensional planar piston with small corrugations on its surface. This problem was first considered by Freeman [Proc. Royal Soc. A. 228, 341 (1955)], who showed that piston-driven shocks are unconditionally stable when the medium through which they propagate is an ideal gas. Here, we generalize his work to account for a fluid with an arbitrary equation of state. We find that shocks are stable when - 1 < h

  1. Pipe Line Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The array of tanks, pipes and valves in the photo below is a petroleum tank farm in Georgia, part of a petrochemical pipe line system that moves refined petroleum products from Texas and Louisiana to the mid-Eastern seaboard. The same pipes handle a number of different products, such as gasoline, kerosene, jet fuel or fuel oil. The fluids are temporarily stored in tanks, pumped into the pipes in turn and routed to other way stations along the pipe line. The complex job of controlling, measuring and monitoring fuel flow is accomplished automatically by a computerized control and communications system which incorporates multiple space technologies.

  2. Impedance modelling of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, M. Austin

    2016-03-01

    Impedance models of pipes can be used to estimate resonant frequencies of standing waves and model acoustic pressure of closed and open ended pipes. Modelling a pipe with impedance methods allows additional variations to the pipe to be included in the overall model as a system. Therefore an actuator can be attached and used to drive the system and the impedance model is able to include the dynamics of the actuator. Exciting the pipe system with a chirp signal allows resonant frequencies to be measured in both the time and frequency domain. The measurements in the time domain are beneficial for introducing undergraduates to resonances without needing an understanding of fast Fourier transforms. This paper also discusses resonant frequencies in open ended pipes and how numerous texts incorrectly approximate the resonant frequencies for this specific pipe system.

  3. Critical instability and friction scaling of fluid flows through pipes with rough inner surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianjun

    2009-12-31

    It has been shown experimentally over nearly 80 years that surface fine roughness of circular pipes has a crucial effect on the natural transition to turbulence. In this Letter, a theoretical explanation is suggested for the roughness-induced instability. Once the nonlinear effect of roughness is introduced (through a pipe with fine corrugation surface), the mean velocity profile becomes unstable to three-dimensional, asymmetric, and helical traveling waves at moderate Reynolds numbers. The threshold of the aspect ratio or shape factor of the roughness element required to cause instability scales as Re-2. Inspired by the current model, a scaling form is proposed and the scaled friction factor measurements in rough pipes collapse onto a universal curve. PMID:20366316

  4. Optomechanic interaction in a corrugated phoxonic nanobeam cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudich, Mourad; El-Jallal, Said; Pennec, Yan; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Gomis-Bresco, Jordi; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.; Martnez, Alejandro; Makhoute, Abdelkader

    2014-06-01

    The interaction between phonons and photons is investigated theoretically in a phoxonic cavity inside a corrugated nanobeam waveguide presenting band gaps for both electromagnetic and elastic waves. The structure is made by drilling periodic holes on a silicon nanobeam with lateral periodic stubs and the tapered cavity is constructed by changing gradually the geometrical parameters of both the holes and stubs. We show that this kind of cavity displays localized phonons and photons inside the gaps, which can enhance their interaction and also promotes the presence of many optical confined modes with high quality factor. Using the finite-element method, we demonstrate that with appropriate design of the tapering construction, one can control the cavity modes frequency without altering significantly the quality factor of the photonic modes. By changing the tapering rates over the lattice constants, we establish the possibility of shifting the phononic cavity modes frequency to place them inside the desired gap, which enhances their confinement and increases the mechanical quality factor while keeping the strength of the optomechanic coupling high. In our calculations, we take account of both mechanisms that contribute to the acousto-optic interaction, namely photoelastic and interface motion effects. We show that in our case, these two effects can contribute additively to give high coupling strength between phononic and photonic cavity modes. The calculations of the coupling coefficient which gives the phonon-photon coupling strength give values as high as 2 MHz while photonic cavity modes display quality factor of 105 and even values up to 3.4 MHz but with smaller photonic quality factors.

  5. Designing the inner surface corrugations of hollow fibers to enhance CO2 absorption efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fashandi, Hossein; Zarrebini, Mohammad; Ghodsi, Ali; Saghafi, Reza

    2016-08-15

    For the first time, a low cost strategy is introduced to enhance the efficiency of CO2 absorption using gas-liquid membrane contactors. This is implemented by designing the corrugations in the inner layer of poly(vinyl chloride) hollow fibers (PVC HFs) through changing the bore fluid composition. In fact, the number of corrugations in the HF inner layer is engineered via changing the phase separation time within the inner layer. Such that expedited phase separation leads to highly corrugated inner layer. In contrast, decelerated phase separation is responsible for reduced number of inner layer corrugations. Phase separation causes the initial polymer solution with low viscoelastic moduli to be transferred into polymer-rich domains with high viscoelastic moduli. These domains resist against stretching-induced radial forces toward the center of HF; therefore, the inner layer of HF buckles. Delayed phase separation defers formation of polymer-rich domains and hence, HF with less corrugated inner surface is expected. The phase separation within the HF inner layer is controlled through changing the rate of solvent/nonsolvent exchange. This is conducted by variation the solvent content in the bore fluid; as higher as solvent content, as slower as solvent/nonsolvent exchange. PMID:27179177

  6. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  7. Piping inspection instrument carriage

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1993-09-20

    This invention is comprised of a pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler or other locomotion means for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has means mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and means for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has means for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  8. Miniature Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center to Thermacore Inc. have fostered the company work on devices tagged "heat pipes" for space application. To control the extreme temperature ranges in space, heat pipes are important to spacecraft. The problem was to maintain an 8-watt central processing unit (CPU) at less than 90 C in a notebook computer using no power, with very little space available and without using forced convection. Thermacore's answer was in the design of a powder metal wick that transfers CPU heat from a tightly confined spot to an area near available air flow. The heat pipe technology permits a notebook computer to be operated in any position without loss of performance. Miniature heat pipe technology has successfully been applied, such as in Pentium Processor notebook computers. The company expects its heat pipes to accommodate desktop computers as well. Cellular phones, camcorders, and other hand-held electronics are forsible applications for heat pipes.

  9. Involvement in plastic pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Buczala, G.S.; Walker, R.P.

    1983-08-01

    Vested with the responsibility of writing plastic pipe standards, ASTM's Subcommittee D20.17 on Thermoplastic Pipe and Fittings (later reorganized as a full committee, F-17) compiled many of the test methods and standards now accepted by local, state, and federal agencies. One of the most comprehensive piping specifications under F-17's jurisdiction covers gas-pressure piping materials including cellusone acetate butyrate, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, high- and normal-impact polyvinyl chloride, a variety of polyethylenes, and polybutylene. All of these materials have been used for gas distribution service, some dating back to 1942. As of 1982, figures show that 200,000 miles of all sizes of plastic gas pipe for both gas services and mains have been installed, representing 16.5% of the total gas distribution system in the US. From a handful of early pioneers, the number of utilities using plastic pipe now stands at 933.

  10. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  11. Underground piping handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides the information required to design and prepare construction drawings, and to install, inspect, test, and commission buried piping. Both pressure and gravity piping are covered, including water, steam, gases, and sewers. Directed primarily toward underground industrial piping systems, this is a succinct, well-organized compilation of practical knowledge. Checklists, examples, tables, charts, nomographs, short cuts, and helpful hints gained through years of experience complete this timely and useful ''how to'' book.

  12. Dehumidifying Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K.

    1993-01-01

    U-shaped heat pipe partly dehumidifies air leaving air conditioner. Fits readily in air-handling unit of conditioner. Evaporator and condenser sections of heat pipe consist of finned tubes in comb pattern. Each tube sealed at one end and joined to manifold at other. Sections connected by single pipe carrying vapor to condenser manifold and liquid to evaporator manifold. Simple on/off or proportional valve used to control flow of working fluid. Valve actuated by temperature/humidity sensor.

  13. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  14. Heat Pipe Materials Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.; Fleischman, G. L.; Luedke, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program to evaluate noncondensable gas generation in ammonia heat pipes was completed. A total of 37 heat pipes made of aluminum, stainless steel and combinations of these materials were processed by various techniques, operated at different temperatures and tested at low temperature to quantitatively determine gas generation rates. In order of increasing stability are aluminum/stainless combination, all aluminum and all stainless heat pipes. One interesting result is the identification of intentionally introduced water in the ammonia during a reflux step as a means of surface passivation to reduce gas generation in stainless-steel/aluminum heat pipes.

  15. Pipe crawler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Gregory L.; Erickson, Scott A.; Blackmon, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    A pipe crawler apparatus particularly useful for 3-inch and 4-inch diameter pipes is provided. The pipe crawler apparatus uses a gripping apparatus in which a free end of a piston rod is modified with a bearing retaining groove. Bearings, placed within the groove, are directed against a camming surface of three respective pivoting support members. The non-pivoting ends of the support members carry a foot-like gripping member that, upon pivoting of the support member, engages the interior wall of the pipe.

  16. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, Richard M.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Henning, Carl D.; Lennon, Joseph P.; Pastrnak, John W.; Smith, Joseph A.

    1994-01-01

    An attachment mechanism for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection.

  17. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

    1994-12-13

    An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

  18. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  19. Heat pipe investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The OAO-C spacecraft has three circular heat pipes, each of a different internal design, located in the space between the spacecraft structural tube and the experiment tube, which are designed to isothermalize the structure. Two of the pipes are used to transport high heat loads, and the third is for low heat loads. The test problems deal with the charging of the pipes, modifications, the mobile tilt table, the position indicator, and the heat input mechanisms. The final results showed that the techniques used were adequate for thermal-vacuum testing of heat pipes.

  20. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  1. Riser pipe elevator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.; Jimenez, A.F.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes a method for storing and retrieving a riser pipe, comprising the steps of: providing an upright annular magazine comprised of an inside annular wall and an outside annular wall, the magazine having an open top; storing the riser pipe in a substantially vertically oriented position within the annular magazine; and moving the riser pipe upwardly through the open top of the annular magazine at an angle to the vertical along at least a portion of the length of the riser pipe.

  2. Heat Pipe Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, William B.; Simon, Justin I.; Webb, A. Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    When volcanism dominates heat transport, a terrestrial body enters a heat-pipe mode, in which hot magma moves through the lithosphere in narrow channels. Even at high heat flow, a heat-pipe planet develops a thick, cold, downwards-advecting lithosphere dominated by (ultra-)mafic flows and contractional deformation at the surface. Heat-pipes are an important feature of terrestrial planets at high heat flow, as illustrated by Io. Evidence for their operation early in Earth's history suggests that all terrestrial bodies should experience an episode of heat-pipe cooling early in their histories.

  3. Electromagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) micropump of Jeffrey fluids through two parallel microchannels with corrugated walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Dongqing; Jian, Yongjun

    2015-03-01

    By employing the perturbation method, the approximate analytical solutions of velocity and volume flow rate are presented for electromagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible and viscous Jeffrey fluid between two slit microparallel plates with corrugated walls. The corrugations of the two walls are described as periodic sinusoidal waves with small amplitude either in phase or half-period out of phase. The effects of the corrugations on the EMHD flow velocity are analyzed by using numerical computation. The variations of velocity profiles and mean velocity parameter and their dependences on the Reynolds number Re, Hartmann number Ha, dimensionless wave number λ of the wall perturbation, the dimensionless relaxation time λ1ω and retardation time λ2ω are explained graphically.

  4. Impact-damaged graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a study of the effects of impact damage on compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich graphite-thermoplastic panels are presented. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them, and semi-sandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered in this study. Panels were designed, fabricated and tested. The panels were made using the manufacturing process of thermoforming, a less-commonly used technique for fabricating composite parts. Experimental results for unimpacted control panels and panels subjected to impact damage prior to loading are presented. Little work can be found in the literature about these configurations of thermoformed panels.

  5. Two-color corrugated quantum-well infrared photodetector for remote temperature sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.J.; Choi, K.K.; Chang, W.H.; Tsui, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    A quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP) based on the corrugated light-coupling scheme has been fabricated and tested for remote temperature sensing. The QWIP consists of two stacks of multiple quantum wells (MQWs), each sensitive in one of the atmospheric infrared transmission windows and each with a separate readout circuit. High optical coupling efficiency is obtained in both wavelength ranges, demonstrating the use of the corrugated structure for two-color detection. By monitoring the ratio of the photocurrent generated simultaneously in each MQW stack, the temperature of the object emitting the radiation can be determined, regardless of its emissivity and the geometrical factors. This temperature sensing ability is tested by using a blackbody radiator with precision temperature control as the target. The agreement between the measured and the preset temperatures indicates that the corrugated QWIP is capable of precision thermometric measurements. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Trapping of surface plasmon wave through gradient corrugated strip with underlayer ground and manipulating its propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Zhu, Guiqiang; Sun, Liguo; Lin, Fujiang

    2015-01-01

    Corrugated metal surface with underlayer metal as ground is designed as spoof surface plasmons polaritons (SSPPs) structure in microwave frequencies. Efficient conversion from guided wave to SSPP is required for energy feeding into and signal extracting from such plasmonic structure. In this paper, first a high efficient transition design is presented by using gradient corrugated strip with underlayer metal as ground and by using the impedance matching theory. The SSPP wave is highly confined within the teeth part of the corrugated surface. By using this characteristic, then the simple wire-based metamaterial is added below the strip to manipulate the SSPP wave within the propagating band. Two aforementioned devices are designed and fabricated. The simulated and measured results on the scattering coefficients demonstrate the excellent conversion and excellent manipulating of SSPP transmitting. Such results have very important value to develop advanced plasmonic integrated circuits in the microwave frequencies.

  7. Error-related electromyographic activity over the corrugator supercilii is associated with neural performance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Elkins-Brown, Nathaniel; Saunders, Blair; Inzlicht, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Emerging research in social and affective neuroscience has implicated a role for affect and motivation in performance monitoring and cognitive control. No study, however, has investigated whether facial electromyography (EMG) over the corrugator supercilii-a measure associated with negative affect and the exertion of effort-is related to neural performance monitoring. Here, we explored these potential relationships by simultaneously measuring the error-related negativity, error positivity (Pe), and facial EMG over the corrugator supercilii muscle during a punished, inhibitory control task. We found evidence for increased facial EMG activity over the corrugator immediately following error responses, and this activity was related to the Pe for both between- and within-subject analyses. These results are consistent with the idea that early, avoidance-motivated processes are associated with performance monitoring, and that such processes may also be related to orienting toward errors, the emergence of error awareness, or both. PMID:26470645

  8. Demonstration of nonlinear-energy-spread compensation in relativistic electron bunches with corrugated structures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feichao; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Zhao, Lingrong; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Chao; Liu, Shengguang; Shi, Libin; Yan, Lixin; Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Gu, Qiang; Huang, Dazhang; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xingtao; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Zhentang; Stupakov, Gennady; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2015-03-20

    High quality electron beams with flat distributions in both energy and current are critical for many accelerator-based scientific facilities such as free-electron lasers and MeV ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopes. In this Letter, we report on using corrugated structures to compensate for the beam nonlinear energy chirp imprinted by the curvature of the radio-frequency field, leading to a significant reduction in beam energy spread. By using a pair of corrugated structures with orthogonal orientations, we show that the quadrupole wakefields, which, otherwise, increase beam emittance, can be effectively canceled. This work also extends the applications of corrugated structures to the low beam charge (a few pC) and low beam energy (a few MeV) regime and may have a strong impact in many accelerator-based facilities. PMID:25839281

  9. Quantitative allocation of Bragg scattering effects in highly efficient OLEDs fabricated on periodically corrugated substrates.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, C; Schwab, T; Roch, T; Eckardt, S; Lasagni, A; Hofmann, S; Lüssem, B; Müller-Meskamp, L; Leo, K; Gather, M C; Scholz, R

    2013-07-15

    Bragg scattering effects in bottom-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) grown on corrugated aluminum-doped zinc oxide electrodes are analyzed. Periodic corrugation is introduced by structuring the oxide electrode via UV laser ablation, a process that enables flexible adjustment of the period and height of corrugation. We demonstrate that fabrication of stable and electrically efficient OLEDs on these rough substrates is feasible. Sharp spectral features are superimposed onto the broad emission spectra of the OLEDs, providing clear evidence for Bragg scattering of light from guided modes into the air cone. Theoretical analysis based on an emissive dipole model and conservation of momentum considerations allows a quantitative description of scattering and the associated dispersion relations. PMID:23938484

  10. Spatial Stereoresolution for Depth Corrugations May Be Set in Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Allenmark, Fredrik; Read, Jenny C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Stereo “3D” depth perception requires the visual system to extract binocular disparities between the two eyes' images. Several current models of this process, based on the known physiology of primary visual cortex (V1), do this by computing a piecewise-frontoparallel local cross-correlation between the left and right eye's images. The size of the “window” within which detectors examine the local cross-correlation corresponds to the receptive field size of V1 neurons. This basic model has successfully captured many aspects of human depth perception. In particular, it accounts for the low human stereoresolution for sinusoidal depth corrugations, suggesting that the limit on stereoresolution may be set in primary visual cortex. An important feature of the model, reflecting a key property of V1 neurons, is that the initial disparity encoding is performed by detectors tuned to locally uniform patches of disparity. Such detectors respond better to square-wave depth corrugations, since these are locally flat, than to sinusoidal corrugations which are slanted almost everywhere. Consequently, for any given window size, current models predict better performance for square-wave disparity corrugations than for sine-wave corrugations at high amplitudes. We have recently shown that this prediction is not borne out: humans perform no better with square-wave than with sine-wave corrugations, even at high amplitudes. The failure of this prediction raised the question of whether stereoresolution may actually be set at later stages of cortical processing, perhaps involving neurons tuned to disparity slant or curvature. Here we extend the local cross-correlation model to include existing physiological and psychophysical evidence indicating that larger disparities are detected by neurons with larger receptive fields (a size/disparity correlation). We show that this simple modification succeeds in reconciling the model with human results, confirming that stereoresolution for disparity gratings may indeed be limited by the size of receptive fields in primary visual cortex. PMID:21876667

  11. Spatial stereoresolution for depth corrugations may be set in primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Allenmark, Fredrik; Read, Jenny C A

    2011-08-01

    Stereo "3D" depth perception requires the visual system to extract binocular disparities between the two eyes' images. Several current models of this process, based on the known physiology of primary visual cortex (V1), do this by computing a piecewise-frontoparallel local cross-correlation between the left and right eye's images. The size of the "window" within which detectors examine the local cross-correlation corresponds to the receptive field size of V1 neurons. This basic model has successfully captured many aspects of human depth perception. In particular, it accounts for the low human stereoresolution for sinusoidal depth corrugations, suggesting that the limit on stereoresolution may be set in primary visual cortex. An important feature of the model, reflecting a key property of V1 neurons, is that the initial disparity encoding is performed by detectors tuned to locally uniform patches of disparity. Such detectors respond better to square-wave depth corrugations, since these are locally flat, than to sinusoidal corrugations which are slanted almost everywhere. Consequently, for any given window size, current models predict better performance for square-wave disparity corrugations than for sine-wave corrugations at high amplitudes. We have recently shown that this prediction is not borne out: humans perform no better with square-wave than with sine-wave corrugations, even at high amplitudes. The failure of this prediction raised the question of whether stereoresolution may actually be set at later stages of cortical processing, perhaps involving neurons tuned to disparity slant or curvature. Here we extend the local cross-correlation model to include existing physiological and psychophysical evidence indicating that larger disparities are detected by neurons with larger receptive fields (a size/disparity correlation). We show that this simple modification succeeds in reconciling the model with human results, confirming that stereoresolution for disparity gratings may indeed be limited by the size of receptive fields in primary visual cortex. PMID:21876667

  12. Structural efficiency studies of corrugated compression panels with curved caps and beaded webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Mills, C. T.; Prabhakaran, R.; Jackson, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    Curved cross-sectional elements are employed in structural concepts for minimum-mass compression panels. Corrugated panel concepts with curved caps and beaded webs are optimized by using a nonlinear mathematical programming procedure and a rigorous buckling analysis. These panel geometries are shown to have superior structural efficiencies compared with known concepts published in the literature. Fabrication of these efficient corrugation concepts became possible by advances made in the art of superplastically forming of metals. Results of the mass optimization studies of the concepts are presented as structural efficiency charts for axial compression.

  13. Tests of Large Airfoils in the Propeller Research Tunnel, Including Two with Corrugated Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald H

    1930-01-01

    This report gives the results of the tests of seven 2 by 12 foot airfoils (Clark Y, smooth and corrugated, Gottingen 398, N.A.C.A. M-6, and N.A.C.A. 84). The tests were made in the propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Reynolds numbers up to 2,000,000. The Clark Y airfoil was tested with three degrees of surface smoothness. Corrugating the surface causes a flattening of the lift curve at the burble point and an increase in drag at small flying angles.

  14. Casimir Force on a Surface with Shallow Nanoscale Corrugations: Geometry and Finite Conductivity Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Guerout, R.; Lussange, J.; Lambrecht, A.; Cirelli, R. A.; Klemens, F.; Mansfield, W. M.; Pai, C. S.; Chan, H. B.

    2010-12-17

    We measure the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a silicon plate with nanoscale, rectangular corrugations with a depth comparable to the separation between the surfaces. In the proximity force approximation (PFA), both the top and bottom surfaces of the corrugations contribute to the force, leading to a distance dependence that is distinct from a flat surface. The measured Casimir force is found to deviate from the PFA by up to 10%, in good agreement with calculations based on scattering theory that includes both geometry effects and the optical properties of the material.

  15. Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded corrugated sandwich core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formulas and associated graphs for evaluating the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core, are presented. A comparison of structural stiffnesses of the sandwich core and a honeycomb core under conditions of equal sandwich core density was made. The stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (that is, triangular truss core) is lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former has higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

  16. Elastic stability of superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper concerns the elastic buckling behavior of a newly developed superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plate. Uniaxial buckling loads were calculated for this type of sandwich plate with simply supported edges by using orthotropic sandwich plate theory. The buckling behavior of this sandwich plate was then compared with that of an SPF/DB unidirectionally corrugated core sandwich plate under conditions of equal structural density. It was found that the buckling load for the former was considerably higher than that of the latter.

  17. Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2014-06-23

    Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

  18. Determination of the geometric corrugation of graphene on SiC(0001) by grazing incidence fast atom diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zugarramurdi, A.; Debiossac, M.; Lunca-Popa, P.; Mayne, A. J.; Borisov, A. G.; Mu, Z.; Roncin, P.; Khemliche, H.; Momeni, A.

    2015-03-09

    We present a grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (GIFAD) study of monolayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). This system shows a Moiré-like 13 × 13 superlattice above the reconstructed carbon buffer layer. The averaging property of GIFAD results in electronic and geometric corrugations that are well decoupled; the graphene honeycomb corrugation is only observed with the incident beam parallel to the zigzag direction while the geometric corrugation arising from the superlattice is revealed along the armchair direction. Full-quantum calculations of the diffraction patterns show the very high GIFAD sensitivity to the amplitude of the surface corrugation. The best agreement between the calculated and measured diffraction intensities yields a corrugation height of 0.27 ± 0.03 Å.

  19. Polyethylene (PE) pipe electrofusion

    SciTech Connect

    Demonchy, M.Y. ); Fallou, M.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Gaz de France has developed a standardized electrofusion process for high quality polyethylene (PE) pipe assemblies. Techniques include an automated bar code and a self-regulating fusion process. The author discusses the electrofusion technique and pipe plugging, underpressure tie-in and repair applications and the influence of external factors.

  20. Heat pipe technology issues

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1984-04-01

    Critical high temperature, high power applications in space nuclear power designs are near the current state of the art of heat pipe technology in terms of power density, operating temperature, and lifetime. Recent heat pipe development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has involved performance testing of typical space reactor heat pipe designs to power levels in excess of 19 kW/cm/sup 2/ axially and 300 W/cm/sup 2/ radially at temperatures in the 1400 to 1500 K range. Operation at conditions in the 10 kW/cm/sup 2/ range has been sustained for periods of up to 1000 hours without evidence of performance degradation. The effective length for heat transport in these heat pipes was from 1.0 to 1.5 M. Materials used were molybdenum alloys with lithium employed as the heat pipe operating fluid. Shorter, somewhat lower power, molybdenum heat pipes have been life tested at Los Alamos for periods of greater than 25,000 hours at 1700 K with lithium and 20,000 hours at 1500/sup 0/K with sodium. These life test demonstrations and the attendant performance limit investigations provide an experimental basis for heat pipe application in space reactor design and represent the current state-of-the-art of high temperature heat pipe technology.

  1. These Pipes Are "Happening"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The author is blessed with having the water pipes for the school system in her office. In this article, the author describes how the breaking of the pipes had led to a very worthwhile art experience for her students. They practiced contour and shaded drawing techniques, reviewed patterns and color theory, and used their reasoning skills--all while…

  2. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  3. Heat pipe development status

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Test heat pipes have been operated in the 1400 K to 1700 K range for periods in excess of 20,000 hours with the objective of understanding and controlling corrosion and failure mechanisms. The results of a post test analysis of one of these heat pipes that was operated for 25,216 hours at 1700 K are reviewed and the implications for heat pipe lifetime discussed. An in-process report of an investigation of transient heat pipe behavior is presented. This investigation is being conducted as a result of restart problems encountered during life test of a 2 m. radiation cooled heat pipe. The results of a series of shut-down tests from power and temperature are given and probable causes of the restart problem discussed.

  4. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, Mark

    1991-01-01

    A pipe crawler having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by "inchworm"-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward.

  5. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, M.

    1991-05-28

    A pipe crawler is described having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm'-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figures.

  6. Conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, William H.; Yoon, Kue H.

    1984-04-10

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed perpendicular to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

  7. Method for producing ultrafine-grained materials using repetitive corrugation and straightening

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Jiang, Honggang; Huang, Jianyu

    2001-01-01

    A method of refining the grain structure and improving the hardness and strength properties of a metal or metal alloy workpiece is disclosed. The workpiece is subjected to forces that corrugate and then straighten the workpiece. These steps are repeated until an ultrafine-grained product having improved hardness and strength is produced.

  8. Corrugated velocity patterns in the spiral galaxies NGC 278, NGC 1058, NGC 2500 & UGC 3574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Gil, M. C.; Alfaro, E. J.; Pérez, E.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we address the study of the detection in Ha of a radial corrugation in the vertical velocity field in a sample of four nearly face-on, spiral galaxies. The geometry of the problem is a main criterion in the selection of the sample as well as of the azimuthal angle of the slits. These spatial corrugations must be equally associated with wavy vertical motions in the galactic plane with a strong large-scale consistency. Evidence of these kinematic waves were first detected in the analysis of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies (e.g. te{1963ApJ...137..363D,1965BOTT....4....8P}), but it was not until 2001 that te{2001ApJ...550..253A} analyzed in more detail the velocity corrugations in NGC 5427 and a possible physical mechanism for their origin. The aim of this study is to analyze the corrugated velocity pattern in terms of the star formation processes. We describe the geometry of the problem and establish its fundamental relationships.

  9. Survey of recent work on the analysis of discretely attached corrugated shear webs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libove, C.

    1972-01-01

    Summary and progress report of more recent work by the author and his students on the theoretical analysis of stiffness, stresses, and deformations of corrugated shear webs with discrete, rather than continuous, attachment between the ends of the corrugations and the surrounding members. Various kinds of discrete attachment are considered, and two kinds of corrugation cross section: the trapezoidal and the curvilinear, the latter having crests and valleys made up of identical circular arcs. The more recent analyses employ the method of minimum total potential energy and the calculus of variations to obtain differential equations and boundary conditions governing the longitudinal variation of various component modes used to describe the deformations of a cross section. They are believed to be more accurate than earlier analyses in that they generally permit more degrees of freedom in the assumed deformations. In particular, they abandon the assumption, characteristic of the earlier analyses, that the straight-line generators of the corrugation remain straight during the shearing of the web.

  10. Shear band blocking in explosively driven collapse of corrugated Ni-Al laminate cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, Karl; Chiu, Po-Hsun; Higgins, Andrew; Serge, Matthew; Fritz, Gregory; Stover, Adam; Nesterenko, Vitali; Benson, David

    2013-03-01

    Ni-Al laminate materials have been identified as a possible material system that can be used as a reactive material due to the self-sustaining reaction between Al and Ni layers. Besides traditional ignition methods, shear bands developed during mechanical loading can provide sites where ignition can occur. Corrugated Ni-Al laminate samples were created by swaging alternating layers of Ni (20 micrometers thick) and Al (30 micrometers thick) foils. The thick-walled cylinder (TWC) technique was performed on a corrugated Ni-Al laminate cylinder sample to examine shear band development in this material. Post experiment examination of the corrugated Ni-Al laminate material showed that the development of global shear bands were blocked via mesoscale mechanisms. The collapse of the corrugated laminate cylinder was simulated providing insight into these mesoscale mechanisms that were involved in blocking the development of shear bands during the experiment. Despite the shear band resistance of the material, several regions of the sample had localized reactions of Al and Ni spanning approximately 10-20 layers of laminate. Funding was provided by ONR MURI N00014-07-1-0740 (Program Officer Dr. Clifford Bedford)

  11. Secondary-containment piping

    SciTech Connect

    Elgendy, F.; Paul, B.O.; Hrickiewicz, M.

    1996-09-01

    Secondary-containment, or {open_quotes}double-wall,{close_quotes} piping systems are substantially more expensive and more difficult to design and install than conventional single-wall piping systems. However, they are required by law for a number of hazardous applications, including underground storage tanks for lethal, hazardous and regulated chemicals; landfills and leachate collection systems; industrial wastewater drain systems; and many other operations such as fuel depots. This article discusses the evaluation, design, and system and manufacturer selection process of secondary-containment piping systems for chemical plant and industrial waste processing.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic heat pipes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe of radical design is proposed which substitutes polarization electrohydrodynamic force effects for capillarity in collecting, guiding, and pumping a condensate liquid phase. The discussed device is restricted to the use of dielectric liquids as working fluids. Because of the relatively poor thermal transport properties of these liquids, capillary heat pipes using these liquids have not been high performance devices. The employment of the electrohydrodynamic concept should enhance this performance and help fill the performance gap that exists in the temperature range from 250 F to 750 F for 'conventional' capillary heat pipes.

  13. An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    A heat pipe of new design, using an electrode structure to orient and guide the dielectric liquid phase flow, is proposed. Analysis indicates that the operation of the electrohydrodynamic heat pipe is in direct analogy to capillary devices, with the polarization force acting in place of capillarity. Advantages of these new heat pipes include greatly reduced liquid friction, electrohydrodynamically enhanced evaporation and condensation heat transfer, and a possible voltage-controlled on/off feature. Preliminary calculations indicate that relatively high performance devices are possible.

  14. Gas pipe explorer robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A gas pipe explorer formed of a plurality of connecting elements, and an articulation element between the connected elements. The connected elements include drive capabilities, and the articulation element allows the connected elements to traverse gas pipes of arbitrary shapes and sizes. A sensor may sends the characteristics of the gas pipe, and the communication element may send back those sends characteristics. The communication can be wired, over a tether connecting the device to a remote end. Alternatively, the connection can be wireless, driven by either a generator or a battery.

  15. Experimenting with a "Pipe" Whistle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Olga

    2012-01-01

    A simple pipe whistle can be made using pieces of PVC pipe. The whistle can be used to measure the resonant frequencies of open or closed pipes. A slightly modified version of the device can be used to also investigate the interesting dependence of the sound frequencies produced on the orifice-to-edge distance. The pipe whistle described here…

  16. Experimenting with a "Pipe" Whistle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Olga

    2012-01-01

    A simple pipe whistle can be made using pieces of PVC pipe. The whistle can be used to measure the resonant frequencies of open or closed pipes. A slightly modified version of the device can be used to also investigate the interesting dependence of the sound frequencies produced on the orifice-to-edge distance. The pipe whistle described here

  17. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.

  18. Effects of corrugation shape on frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic elastic layer.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Vladislav S

    2016-04-01

    The paper concerns determining frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic waveguide. The waveguide may be considered either as an elastic layer with variable thickness or as a rod with variable cross section. As a result, widths and locations of all frequency band-gaps are determined by means of the method of varying amplitudes. For the general symmetric corrugation shape, the width of each odd band-gap is controlled only by one harmonic in the corrugation series with its number being equal to the number of the band-gap. Widths of even band-gaps, however, are influenced by all the harmonics involved in the corrugation series, so that the lower frequency band-gaps can emerge. These are band-gaps located below the frequency corresponding to the lowest harmonic in the corrugation series. For the general non-symmetric corrugation shape, the mth band-gap is controlled only by one, the mth, harmonic in the corrugation series. The revealed insights into the mechanism of band-gap formation can be used to predict locations and widths of all frequency band-gaps featured by any corrugation shape. These insights are general and can be valid also for other types of wave motion in periodic structures, e.g., transverse or torsional vibration. PMID:27106336

  19. Time-frequency characterization of rail corrugation under a combined auto-regressive and matched filter scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hory, C.; Bouillaut, L.; Aknin, P.

    2012-05-01

    Rail corrugation is an oscillatory mechanical wear of rail surface raising from the long-term interaction between rail and wheel. Signal processing approaches to corrugation monitoring, as recommended by the European standards for instance, are designed either in the mileage domain or in the wavelength domain. However a joint mileage and wavelength domain analysis of the monitoring data can provide crucial information about the simultaneous amplitude and wavelength modulations of the corrugation modes. It is proposed in this paper to perform such a mileage-wavelength domain analysis of rail corrugation using the class of Auto-Regressive-MAtched Filterbank (AR-MAFI) methods. We show that these methods assume a statistical model that fits the corrugation data. We discuss also the optimal parameter settings for the analysis of corrugation data. Experimental studies performed on data collected from the French RATP metro network show that the AR-MAFI methods outperform (in terms of readability and accuracy) the standard distance domain or wavelength domain methods in localizing and characterizing corrugation.

  20. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  1. AutoPIPE Extract Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-07-02

    The AutoPIPE Extract Program (APEX) provides an interface between CADAM (Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing) Release 21 drafting software and the AutoPIPE, Version 4.4, piping analysis program. APEX produces the AutoPIPE batch input file that corresponds to the piping shown in a CADAM model. The card image file contains header cards, material cards, and pipe cross section cards as well as tee, bend, valve, and flange cards. Node numbers are automatically generated. APEX processes straightmore » pipe, branch lines and ring geometries.« less

  2. Heat pipe development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienart, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate analytically and experimentally the performance of heat pipes with composite wicks--specifically, those having pedestal arteries and screwthread circumferential grooves. An analytical model was developed to describe the effects of screwthreads and screen secondary wicks on the transport capability of the artery. The model describes the hydrodynamics of the circumferential flow in triangular grooves with azimuthally varying capillary menisci and liquid cross-sections. Normalized results were obtained which give the influence of evaporator heat flux on the axial heat transport capability of the arterial wick. In order to evaluate the priming behavior of composite wicks under actual load conditions, an 'inverted' glass heat pipe was designed and constructed. The results obtained from the analysis and from the tests with the glass heat pipe were applied to the OAO-C Level 5 heat pipe, and an improved correlation between predicted and measured evaporator and transport performance were obtained.

  3. Composite wick heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogushi, T.; Sakurai, Y.

    This paper describes the performance of the composite wick heat pipe, which has two kinds of wicks, namely, circumferential grooves as a pumping wick and sintered stainless metal felt as a transport wick. The maximum heat transfer rate was obtained by varying the influential parameters; groove figure, porosity of felt, evaporator length and heat pipe tilt. And a theoretical model was developed to predict the maximum heat transfer rate of this type of the composite wick heat pipe. In this model, a liquid recession into the bottom of the groove due to the increased heat transfer rate, so called 'Leverett Effect', was considered. It was found that the composite wick could improve the heat pipe performance, and the predicted maximum heat transfer rate agreed well with the experimental data.

  4. The pipes of pan.

    PubMed

    Chalif, David J

    2004-12-01

    The pipes of pan is the crowning achievement of Pablo Picasso's neoclassical period of the 1920s. This monumental canvas depicts a mythological Mediterranean scene in which two sculpted classical giants stare out, seemingly across the centuries, toward a distant and lost Arcadia. Picasso was influenced by Greco-Roman art during his travels in Italy, and his neoclassical works typically portray massive, immobile, and pensive figures. Pan and his pipes are taken directly from Greek mythological lore by Picasso and placed directly into 20th century art. He frequently turned to various mythological figures throughout his metamorphosing periods. The Pipes of Pan was also influenced by the painter's infatuation with the beautiful American expatriate Sara Murphy, and the finished masterpiece represents a revision of a previously conceived neoclassical work. The Pipes of Pan now hangs in the Musee Picasso in Paris. PMID:15574231

  5. DRAINAGE PIPE DETECTOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the more frustrating problems confronting farmers and land improvement contractors in the Midwestern United States involves locating buried agricultural drainage pipes. Conventional geophysical methods, particularly ground penetrating radar (GPR), presently being used for environmental and co...

  6. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The heat pipe was developed to alternately cool and heat without using energy or any moving parts. It enables non-rotating spacecraft to maintain a constant temperature when the surface exposed to the Sun is excessively hot and the non Sun-facing side is very cold. Several organizations, such as Tropic-Kool Engineering Corporation, joined NASA in a subsequent program to refine and commercialize the technology. Heat pipes have been installed in fast food restaurants in areas where humid conditions cause materials to deteriorate quickly. Moisture removal was increased by 30 percent in a Clearwater, FL Burger King after heat pipes were installed. Relative humidity and power consumption were also reduced significantly. Similar results were recorded by Taco Bell, which now specifies heat pipe systems in new restaurants in the Southeast.

  7. Heat pipe manufacturing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1974-01-01

    Heat pipe manufacturing methods are examined with the goal of establishing cost effective procedures that will ultimately result in cheaper more reliable heat pipes. Those methods which are commonly used by all heat pipe manufacturers have been considered, including: (1) envelope and wick cleaning, (2) end closure and welding, (3) mechanical verification, (4) evacuation and charging, (5) working fluid purity, and (6) charge tube pinch off. The study is limited to moderate temperature aluminum and stainless steel heat pipes with ammonia, Freon-21 and methanol working fluids. Review and evaluation of available manufacturers techniques and procedures together with the results of specific manufacturing oriented tests have yielded a set of recommended cost-effective specifications which can be used by all manufacturers.

  8. Research on a 170 GHz, 2 MW coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Shenyong; Yu, Sheng; Li, Hongfu

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, a coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is researched. The electron kineto-equations and the first order transmission line equations of the gyrotron are derived from Lorentz force equation and the transmission line theory, respectively. And then, a 2 MW, 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is designed. By means of numerical calculation, the beam-wave interaction of the coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is investigated. Results show that the efficient and the outpower of the gyrotron are 42.3% and 2.38 MW, respectively.

  9. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better suited for the cooling of semiconductor devices.

  10. Freezable heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.; Sanzi, James L.

    1981-02-03

    A heat pipe whose fluid can be repeatedly frozen and thawed without damage to the casing. An additional part is added to a conventional heat pipe. This addition is a simple porous structure, such as a cylinder, self-supporting and free standing, which is dimensioned with its diameter not spanning the inside transverse dimension of the casing, and with its length surpassing the depth of maximum liquid.

  11. Heat pipe dynamic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issacci, F.; Roche, G. L.; Klein, D. B.; Catton, I.

    1988-01-01

    The vapor flow in a heat pipe was mathematically modeled and the equations governing the transient behavior of the core were solved numerically. The modeled vapor flow is transient, axisymmetric (or two-dimensional) compressible viscous flow in a closed chamber. The two methods of solution are described. The more promising method failed (a mixed Galerkin finite difference method) whereas a more common finite difference method was successful. Preliminary results are presented showing that multi-dimensional flows need to be treated. A model of the liquid phase of a high temperature heat pipe was developed. The model is intended to be coupled to a vapor phase model for the complete solution of the heat pipe problem. The mathematical equations are formulated consistent with physical processes while allowing a computationally efficient solution. The model simulates time dependent characteristics of concern to the liquid phase including input phase change, output heat fluxes, liquid temperatures, container temperatures, liquid velocities, and liquid pressure. Preliminary results were obtained for two heat pipe startup cases. The heat pipe studied used lithium as the working fluid and an annular wick configuration. Recommendations for implementation based on the results obtained are presented. Experimental studies were initiated using a rectangular heat pipe. Both twin beam laser holography and laser Doppler anemometry were investigated. Preliminary experiments were completed and results are reported.

  12. Heat Pipe Integrated Microsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Gass, K.; Robertson, P.J.; Shul, R.; Tigges, C.

    1999-03-30

    The trend in commercial electronics packaging to deliver ever smaller component packaging has enabled the development of new highly integrated modules meeting the demands of the next generation nano satellites. At under ten kilograms, these nano satellites will require both a greater density electronics and a melding of satellite structure and function. Better techniques must be developed to remove the subsequent heat generated by the active components required to-meet future computing requirements. Integration of commercially available electronics must be achieved without the increased costs normally associated with current generation multi chip modules. In this paper we present a method of component integration that uses silicon heat pipe technology and advanced flexible laminate circuit board technology to achieve thermal control and satellite structure. The' electronics/heat pipe stack then becomes an integral component of the spacecraft structure. Thermal management on satellites has always been a problem. The shrinking size of electronics and voltage requirements and the accompanying reduction in power dissipation has helped the situation somewhat. Nevertheless, the demands for increased onboard processing power have resulted in an ever increasing power density within the satellite body. With the introduction of nano satellites, small satellites under ten kilograms and under 1000 cubic inches, the area available on which to place hot components for proper heat dissipation has dwindled dramatically. The resulting satellite has become nearly a solid mass of electronics with nowhere to dissipate heat to space. The silicon heat pipe is attached to an aluminum frame using a thermally conductive epoxy or solder preform. The frame serves three purposes. First, the aluminum frame provides a heat conduction path from the edge of the heat pipe to radiators on the surface of the satellite. Secondly, it serves as an attachment point for extended structures attached to the satellite such as solar panels, radiators, antenna and.telescopes (for communications or sensors). Finally, the packages make thermal contact to the surface of the silicon heat pipe through soft thermal pads. Electronic components can be placed on both sides of the flexible circuit interconnect. Silicon heat pipes have a number of advantages over heat pipe constructed from other materials. Silicon heat pipes offer the ability to put the heat pipe structure beneath the active components of a processed silicon wafer. This would be one way of efficiently cooling the heat generated by wafer scale integrated systems. Using this technique, all the functions of a satellite could be reduced to a few silicon wafers. The integration of the heat pipe and the electronics would further reduce the size and weight of the satellite.

  13. Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, William H.; Cookson, Alan H.; Yoon, Kue H.

    1984-04-10

    A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

  14. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtseva, Olga

    2007-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe. Model experiments with pipes having radii R = 57 mm confirmed results of the calculations and the possibility in principle to weld pipes by explosion with use of water as filler. Reduction of pipe diameter after dynamic loading and explosive welding was ˜2%.

  15. Remotely operated pipe connector

    DOEpatents

    Josefiak, Leonard J.; Cramer, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely assembling and disassembling a Graylock type coctor between a pipe and a closure for the pipe includes a base and a receptacle on the base for the closure. The pipe is moved into position vertically above the closure by a suitable positioning device such that the flange on the pipe is immediately adjacent and concentric with the flange on the closure. A moving device then moves two semicircular collars from a position free of the closure to a position such that the interior cam groove of each collar contacts the two flanges. Finally, a tensioning device automatically allows remote tightening and loosening of a nut and bolt assembly on each side of the collar to cause a seal ring located between the flanges to be compressed and to seal the closure. Release of the pipe and the connector is accomplished in the reverse order. Preferably, the nut and bolt assembly includes an elongate shaft portion on which a removable sleeve is located.

  16. Wedgethread pipe connection

    DOEpatents

    Watts, John D.

    2003-06-17

    Several embodiments of a wedgethread pipe connection are disclosed that have improved makeup, sealing, and non-loosening characteristics. In one embodiment, an open wedgethread is disclosed that has an included angle measured in the gap between the stab flank and the load flank to be not less than zero, so as to prevent premature wedging between mating flanks before the position of full makeup is reached, as does occur between trapped wedgethreads wherein the included angle is less than zero. The invention may be used for pipe threads large or small, as a flush joint, with collars, screwed into plates or it may even be used to reversibly connect such as solid posts to base members where a wide makeup torque range is desired. This Open wedgethread, as opposed to trapped wedgethreads, provides a threaded pipe connection that: is more cost-effective; can seal high pressure gas; can provide selectively a connection strength as high as the pipe strength; assures easy makeup to the desired position of full makeup within a wide torque range; may have a torque strength as high as the pipe torque strength; is easier to manufacture; is easier to gage; and is less subject to handling damage.

  17. Turbulent heat transfer in corrugated-wall channels with and without fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.; Bagherlee, A.; Smith, R. J.; Niess, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical study is performed examining flow and heat transfer characteristics in a channel with periodically corrugated walls. The complexity of the flow in this type of channel is demonstrated by such phenomena as flow impingement on the walls, separation at the bend corners, flow reattachment, and flow recirculation. Because of the strong nonisotropic nature of the turbulent flow in the channel, the full Reynolds-stress model was employed for the evaluation of turbulence quantities. Computations are made for several different corrugation periods and for different Reynolds numbers. The results computed by using the present model show excellent agreement with experimental data for mean velocities, the Reynolds stresses, and average Nusselt numbers. The study was further extended to a channel flow where fins are inserted at bends in the channel. It was observed that the insertion of fins in the flow passage has a visible effect on flow patterns and skin friction along the channel wall.

  18. Self-Trapping of Diskoseismic Corrugation Modes in Neutron Star Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David; Pappas, George

    2016-02-01

    We examine the effects of higher-order multipole contributions of rotating neutron star (NS) spacetimes on the propagation of corrugation (c-)modes within a thin accretion disk. We find that the Lense-Thirring precession frequency, which determines the propagation region of the low-frequency fundamental corrugation modes, can experience a turnover allowing for c-modes to become self-trapped for sufficiently high dimensionless spin j and quadrupole rotational deformability α. If such self-trapping c-modes can be detected, e.g., through phase-resolved spectroscopy of the iron line for a high-spin low-mass accreting neutron star, this could potentially constrain the spin-induced NS quadrupole and the NS equation of state.

  19. Enhanced response and sensitivity of self-corrugated graphene sensors with anisotropic charge distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yol Jeong, Seung; Jeong, Sooyeon; Won Lee, Sang; Tae Kim, Sung; Kim, Daeho; Jin Jeong, Hee; Tark Han, Joong; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Seok Jeong, Mun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a high-performance molecular sensor using self-corrugated chemically modified graphene as a three dimensional (3D) structure that indicates anisotropic charge distribution. This is capable of room-temperature operation, and, in particular, exhibiting high sensitivity and reversible fast response with equilibrium region. The morphology consists of periodic, “cratered” arrays that can be formed by condensation and evaporation of graphene oxide (GO) solution on interdigitated electrodes. Subsequent hydrazine reduction, the corrugated edge area of the graphene layers have a high electric potential compared with flat graphene films. This local accumulation of electrons interacts with a large number of gas molecules. The sensitivity of 3D-graphene sensors significantly increases in the atmosphere of NO2 gas. The intriguing structures have several advantages for straightforward fabrication on patterned substrates, high-performance graphene sensors without post-annealing process. PMID:26053892

  20. The scattering of obliquely incident plane waves from a corrugated conducting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    A physical optics solution is presented for the scattering of plane waves from a perfectly conducting corrugated surface in the case of waves incident from an arbitrary direction and for an observer far from the surface. This solution is used to compute the radar cross section of the surface in the case of backscatter from irregular (i.e., stochastic) corrugations. An interesting feature of the solution is the occurrence of singularities in the scattered fields. These singularities appear to be a manifestation of focusing by the surface at its 'stationary' points. Whether or not the singularities occur in the solution depends on the manner in which one restricts the analysis to the far-field.

  1. Low-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations and Iron Line Variability of Discoseismic Corrugation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsky, Iryna; Tsang, D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a fast semi-analytic raytracing code, we study the variability of iron lines due to discoseismic oscillations concentrated in the inner-most regions of accretion discs around black holes. The dependence of the relativistically broadened line profile on the oscillation-phase is studied for discoseismic corrugation modes. The corrugation mode, or c-mode, is of particular interest as their natural frequency corresponds well to the 0.1-10 Hz range observed for low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) in X-ray binaries. Comparison of the oscillation phase dependent variability and QPO-phase stacked Fe-Kalpha line observations will allow such discoseismic models to be confirmed or ruled out as a source of LFQPOs.

  2. Low-frequency metamaterial absorber with small-size unit cell based on corrugated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Dong, Xiaochun; Zhou, Weicheng; He, Chuanwang; Jiang, Wei; Hu, Song

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we report the design, analysis, and simulation of the low-frequency perfect metamaterial absorber (MMA) based on corrugated surface, which has very small unit-cell size. The proposed MMA consist of a regular square-array and a metallic background plane, separated by a corrugated surface with periodic square-pillar-array. Through the optimized design, the ratios between lattice constant and resonance wavelength for nearly-perfect and high absorption MMA are close to 1/15 and 1/21, respectively. To explain the absorption mechanism of suggested structures, the surface current and electromagnetic field distributions are given. Moreover, the absorption peaks remain high with large angles of incidence for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations, which provide more efficient absorptions for oblique incident electromagnetic wave.

  3. Wavelength shifts of cladding-mode resonance in corrugated long-period fiber gratings under torsion.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Oleg V; Wang, Lon A

    2003-05-01

    A finite deformation theory of elasticity and a theory of nonlinear photoelasticity are applied to describe the wavelength shifts of cladding-mode resonance in corrugated long-period fiber gratings under torsion. The deformation of fiber is found by use of the Murnaghan model of a solid elastic body. The quadratic photoelastic effect that is proportional to the second-order displacement gradient is investigated and compared with the classical photoelastic effect. The electromagnetic field in the twisted corrugated structure is presented as a superposition of circularly polarized modes of the etched fiber section. The wavelength shift is found to be proportional to the square of the twist angle. As predicted by our theory, a wavelength shift of the same nature has been found in a conventionally photoinduced long-period fiber grating. PMID:12737456

  4. The scatter of obliquely incident plane waves from a corrugated conducting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    A physical optics solution is presented for the scattering of plane waves from a perfectly conducting corrugated surface in the case of waves incident from an arbitrary direction and for an observer far from the surface. This solution was used to compute the radar cross section of the surface in the case of backscatter from irregular (i.e., stochastic) corrugations and to point out a correction to the literature on this problem. A feature of the solution is the occurrence of singularities in the scattered fields which appear to be a manifestation of focussing by the surface at its stationary points. Whether or not the singularities occur in the solution depends on the manner in which one restricts the analysis to the far field.

  5. Enhanced response and sensitivity of self-corrugated graphene sensors with anisotropic charge distribution.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Yol; Jeong, Sooyeon; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Daeho; Jeong, Hee Jin; Han, Joong Tark; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a high-performance molecular sensor using self-corrugated chemically modified graphene as a three dimensional (3D) structure that indicates anisotropic charge distribution. This is capable of room-temperature operation, and, in particular, exhibiting high sensitivity and reversible fast response with equilibrium region. The morphology consists of periodic, "cratered" arrays that can be formed by condensation and evaporation of graphene oxide (GO) solution on interdigitated electrodes. Subsequent hydrazine reduction, the corrugated edge area of the graphene layers have a high electric potential compared with flat graphene films. This local accumulation of electrons interacts with a large number of gas molecules. The sensitivity of 3D-graphene sensors significantly increases in the atmosphere of NO2 gas. The intriguing structures have several advantages for straightforward fabrication on patterned substrates, high-performance graphene sensors without post-annealing process. PMID:26053892

  6. Spoof localized surface plasmons in corrugated ring structures excited by microstrip line.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bao Jia; Zhou, Yong Jin; Xiao, Qian Xun

    2015-08-10

    We have investigated the fundamental and high-order spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) modes in the proposed corrugated ring resonator printed on a thin dielectric substrate with or without ground plane. An efficient and ease-of-integration method to excite spoof LSPs in the textured ring resonator has been adopted to suppress unwanted high-order modes and enhance fundamental modes. A multi-band-pass filter has been proposed and numerically demonstrated. Experimental results at the microwave frequencies verify the high performances of the corrugated ring resonator and the filter, showing great agreements with the simulation results. We have also shown that the fabricated device is sensitive to the variation of the refraction index of materials under test, even when the material is as thin as paper. PMID:26367991

  7. Buckling test of a 3-meter-diameter corrugated graphite-epoxy ring-stiffened cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    A three m diameter by three m long corrugated cylindrical shell with external stiffening rings was tested to failure by buckling. The corrugation geometry for the graphite epoxy composite cylinder wall was optimized to withstand a compressive load producing an ultimate load intensity of 157.6 kN/m without buckling. The test method used to produce the design load intensity was to mount the specimen as a cantilevered cylinder and apply a pure bending moment to the end. A load introduction problem with the specimen was solved by using the BOSOR 4 shell of revolution computer code to analyze the shell and attached loading fixtures. The cylinder test loading achieved was 101 percent of design ultimate, and the resulting mass per unit of shell wall area was 1.96 kg/sq m.

  8. Structural testing of corrugated asbestos-cement roof panels at the Hanford Facilities, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Moustafa, S.E.; Rodehaver, S.M.; Frier, W.A.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes a roof testing program that was carried out at the 105KE/KW Spent Fuel Storage Basins and their surrounding facilities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The roof panels were constructed in the mid 1950`s of corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C), which showed common signs of aging. Based on the construction specifications, the panels capacity to meet current design standards was questioned. Both laboratory and in-situ load testing of the corrugated A/C panels was conducted. The objective of the complete test program was to determine the structural integrity of the existing A/C roof panels installed in the 105KE and 105KW facilities. The data from these tests indicated that the roofs are capable of resisting the design loads and are considered safe. A second phase test to address the roof resistance to personnel and roof removal/roofing system installation equipment was recommended and is underway.

  9. Lamb wave band gaps in one-dimensional radial phononic crystal plates with periodic double-sided corrugations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinggang; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Li, Suobin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical investigation of Lamb wave propagation in one-dimensional radial phononic crystal (RPC) plates with periodic double-sided corrugations. The dispersion relations, the power transmission spectra, and the displacement fields of the eigenmodes are studied by using the finite element method based on two-dimensional axial symmetry models in cylindrical coordinates. Numerical results show that the proposed RPC plates with periodic double-sided corrugations can yield several band gaps with a variable bandwidth for Lamb waves. The formation mechanism of band gaps in the double-sided RPC plates is attributed to the coupling between the Lamb modes and the in-phase and out-phases resonant eigenmodes of the double-sided corrugations. We investigate the evolution of band gaps in the double-sided RPC plates with the corrugation heights on both sides arranged from an asymmetrical distribution to a symmetrical distribution gradually. Significantly, with the introduction of symmetric double-sided corrugations, the antisymmetric Lamb mode is suppressed by the in-phase resonant eigenmodes of the double-sided corrugations, resulting in the disappearance of the lowest band gap. Furthermore, the effects of the geometrical parameters on the band gaps are further explored numerically.

  10. Experimental investigation on the convective heat transfer enhancement for highly viscous fluids in helical coiled corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainieri, S.; Bozzoli, F.; Cattani, L.; Pagliarini, G.

    2012-11-01

    In the present analysis, the forced convective heat transfer in smooth and corrugated helical coiled tubes was experimentally studied in the Reynolds and Dean number ranges 50÷1200 and 12÷295 respectively, by adopting Ethylene Glycol as working fluid. The primary aim of the investigation is to study the combined effect of the wall curvature and of the wall corrugation in the thermal entrance region for highly viscous fluids. Two coiled tubes with a curvature ratio of about 0.06, one with smooth wall and the other with spirally corrugated wall, were investigated under the uniform heat flux boundary condition. The main conclusion is that in the Reynolds number range analyzed, both curvature and corrugation enhance the heat transfer. For Dean number values lower than about 120 the wall curvature effect prevails, and the heat transfer enhancement reflects Nusselt numbers that are approximately 2-3 times higher than the straight smooth section. For greater Dean number values, the wall corrugation instead prevails. In fact the corrugated coiled tube reaches Nusselt number values which are up to 8 times higher than the ones expected for the smooth straight tube. The smooth coiled tube shows instead thermal performances at maximum 3.6 times over the straight section.

  11. Magneto-transport calculations in corrugated quantum wires and square quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Nicholas L.

    1999-11-01

    Nanostructure research is becoming an increasingly valuable tool as semiconductor devices are reduced in dimension. There is an obvious limitation to how far semiconductor devices can be scaled down before their expected behavior becomes erratic. This unpredictability will make itself evident in what is known as quantum phenomena. Classical rules will no longer govern the behavior of today's very large scale integration (VLSI) and ultra large scale integration (ULSI) circuitry. Semiconductor quantum dots and corrugated quantum wires (quantum dot arrays) are devices that are currently being studied to learn more about this transition in classical to quantum behavior. Both devices are studied in this work. Gallium Arsenide/Aluminum Gallium Arsenide square quantum dots of varying dimension (0.2 mum to 2.0 mum) with varying quantum point contact widths are simulated to study the scaling behavior of the periodicities of the magneto-conductance fluctuations and trapped electron orbits within the dot (wavefunction scars). Arrays of quantum dots, similar to the single quantum dots, are simulated to study the effect of backscattering and how it leads to enhanced resistance in a corrugated quantum wire. The simulation tools that have been developed and utilized in this work are discussed extensively. A three-dimensional Poisson solver, a one-dimensional Schrodinger solver, and a stabilized mode matching/two-dimensional Schrodinger solver are the tools of choice in this work. Using the simulation tools, theoretically calculated results are used to develop a magneto-conductance fluctuation 'scaling' theory for the square quantum dots. Additional simulation results for corrugated quantum wires are used to compare existing experimental data to study the backscattering effect that is observable in a doubly-corrugated structure. A self-consistent technique that combines all of the simulation tools is utilized to determine whether the scarring of the electron wavefunction exhibits a feedback effect that prolongs the wavefunction scar over a range of magnetic fields.

  12. Design and simulation of resonant cavity enhanced corrugated quantum well infrared photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Pyo; Sarangan, Andrew M

    2006-08-20

    The dipole selection rule limits the maximum achievable efficiency in corrugated quantum well infrared photodetectors (C-QWIPs) to 50%. We consider what is believed to be a novel design that utilizes a resonant cavity enhancement technique to increase the efficiency beyond 50% by rotating the photon polarization at each pass around the cavity. Simulation results show that the quantum efficiency of this device can be enhanced up to 38% compared to that of the standard C-QWIP device. PMID:16892104

  13. Ohmic losses in coaxial resonators with longitudinal inner-outer corrugation

    SciTech Connect

    Shenyong Hou, A.; Yangtze Normal University, Chongqing 408001 ; Sheng Yu, B.; Hongfu Li, C.; Qixiang Zhao, D.; Xiang Li, E.; Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, a coaxial resonator with longitudinal inner-outer corrugation is introduced. Its eigen-equation and expression of ohmic losses are derived. Ohmic losses in the cavity are investigated. Results show that ohmic losses in the outer and inner conductors share a similar variation trend, while the former is larger than the later. What's more, changes of the inner and outer slot depth and width induce different variations of ohmic losses on the surface of the inner and outer conductors.

  14. Ab initio calculation of adhesion and potential corrugation of diamond (001) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilibotti, Giovanna; Ferrario, Mauro; Bertoni, Carlo Maria; Righi, Maria Clelia

    2011-09-01

    The system consisting of two diamond (001) surfaces in contact was studied by means of plane-wave/pseudopotential density functional calculations. Different hydrogen coverages, ranging from fully hydrogenation to bare surfaces, were considered. The adhesion energy was calculated as a function of both the separation and the lateral displacement of the two surfaces. The effects of dangling carbon bonds on the adhesion and potential corrugation are quantitatively discussed.

  15. Effects of Antimicrobial Peptide Revealed by Simulations: Translocation, Pore Formation, Membrane Corrugation and Euler Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling. PMID:23579956

  16. MTR BUILDING, TRA603. EAST SIDE. CAMERA FACING WEST. CORRUGATED IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. EAST SIDE. CAMERA FACING WEST. CORRUGATED IRON BUILDING MARKED WITH "X" IS TRA-651. TRA-626, TO ITS RIGHT, HOUSED COMPRESSOR EQUIPMENT FOR THE AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROGRAM. LATER, IT WAS USED FOR STORAGE. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-42-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, April 2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Highly efficient antenna system using a corrugated horn and scanning hyperbolic reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, K. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    In a horn-reflector antenna system for producing a spherical aperture phase front, a corrugated conical horn illuminates a section of a hyperbolic reflector to produce a spherical aperture phase front. This front produces a far field beam with low sidelobes and high beam efficiency. The system is insensitive to frequency and polarization changes, and is also insensitive to orientation about the axis of the conical horn for beam scanning.

  18. Composite drill pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, James C.; Leslie, II, James C.; Heard, James; Truong, Liem , Josephson; Marvin , Neubert; Hans

    2008-12-02

    A composite pipe segment is formed to include tapered in wall thickness ends that are each defined by opposed frustoconical surfaces conformed for self centering receipt and intimate bonding contact within an annular space between corresponding surfaces of a coaxially nested set of metal end pieces. The distal peripheries of the nested end pieces are then welded to each other and the sandwiched and bonded portions are radially pinned. The composite segment may include imbedded conductive leads and the axial end portions of the end pieces are shaped to form a threaded joint with the next pipe assembly that includes a contact ring in one pipe assembly pierced by a pointed contact in the other to connect the corresponding leads across the joint.

  19. Apparatus for inspecting piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollingger, W.T.; Appel, D.K.; Park, L.R.

    1995-03-21

    An inspection rabbit is described for inspecting piping systems having severe bends therein. The rabbit consists of a flexible, modular body containing a miniaturized eddy current inspection probe, a self-contained power supply for proper operation of the rabbit, an outer surface that allows ease of movement through piping systems and means for transmitting data generated by the inspection device. The body is preferably made of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing or, alternatively, silicone rubber with a shrink wrapping of polytetrafluoroethylene (TEFLON{trademark}). The body is formed to contain the power supply, preferably a plurality of batteries, and a spool of communication wire that connects to a data processing computer external to the piping system. 6 figures.

  20. Apparatus for inspecting piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollingger, W. Thor; Appel, D. Keith; Park, Larry R.

    1995-01-01

    An inspection rabbit for inspecting piping systems having severe bends therein. The rabbit consists of a flexible, modular body containing a miniaturized eddy current inspection probe, a self-contained power supply for proper operation of the rabbit, an outer surface that allows ease of movement through piping systems and means for transmitting data generated by the inspection device. The body is preferably made of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing or, alternatively, silicone rubber with a shrink wrapping of polytetrafluoroethylene (TEFLON.RTM.). The body is formed to contain the power supply, preferably a plurality of batteries, and a spool of communication wire that connects to a data processing computer external to the piping system.

  1. Heat Pipe Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heat pipe, a sealed chamber whose walls are lined with a "wick," a thin capillary network containing a working fluid in liquid form was developed for a heat distribution system for non-rotating satellites. Use of the heat pipe provides a continuous heat transfer mechanism. "Heat tubes" that improve temperature control in plastics manufacturing equipment incorporated the heat pipe technology. James M. Stewart, an independent consultant, patented the heat tubes he developed and granted a license to Kona Corporation. The Kona Nozzle for heaterless injection molding gets heat for its operation from an external source and has no internal heating bands, reducing machine maintenance and also eliminating electrical hazards associated with heater bands. The nozzles are used by Eastman Kodak, Bic Pen Corporation, Polaroid, Tupperware, Ford Motor Company, RCA, and Western Electric in the molding of their products.

  2. Heat-pipe Earth.

    PubMed

    Moore, William B; Webb, A Alexander G

    2013-09-26

    The heat transport and lithospheric dynamics of early Earth are currently explained by plate tectonic and vertical tectonic models, but these do not offer a global synthesis consistent with the geologic record. Here we use numerical simulations and comparison with the geologic record to explore a heat-pipe model in which volcanism dominates surface heat transport. These simulations indicate that a cold and thick lithosphere developed as a result of frequent volcanic eruptions that advected surface materials downwards. Declining heat sources over time led to an abrupt transition to plate tectonics. Consistent with model predictions, the geologic record shows rapid volcanic resurfacing, contractional deformation, a low geothermal gradient across the bulk of the lithosphere and a rapid decrease in heat-pipe volcanism after initiation of plate tectonics. The heat-pipe Earth model therefore offers a coherent geodynamic framework in which to explore the evolution of our planet before the onset of plate tectonics. PMID:24067709

  3. Fabrication and evaluation of superplastically formed/weld-brazed corrugated compression panels with beaded webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Davis, R. C.; Shinn, J. M., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Wiant, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made to investigate the feasibility of superplastically forming corrugated panels with beaded webs and to demonstrate the structural integrity of these panels by testing. The test panels in the study consist of superplastically formed titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V half-hat elements that are joined by weld-brazing to titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V caps to form either single-corrugation compression panels or multiple-corrugation compression panels. Stretching and subsequent thinning of the titanium sheet during superplastic forming is reduced by approximately 35 percent with a shallow half-hat die concept instead of a deep die concept and results in a more uniform thickness across the beaded webs. The complete panels are tested in end compression at room temperature and the results compared with analysis. The heavily loaded panels failed at loads approaching the yield strength of the titanium material. At maximum load, the caps wrinkled locally accompanied with separation of the weld-braze joint in the wrinkle. None of the panels tested, however, failed catastrophically in the weld-braze joint. Experimental test results are in good agreement with structural analysis of the panels.

  4. Experimental investigation on the dynamic response of clamped corrugated sandwich plates subjected to underwater impulsive loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Dacheng; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Corrugated sandwich plates are widely used in marine industry because such plates have high strength-to-weight ratios and blast resistance. The laboratory-scaled fluid-structure interaction experiments are performed to demonstrate the shock resistance of solid monolithic plates and corrugated sandwich plates by quantifying the permanent transverse deflection at mid-span of the plates as a function of impulsive loadings per areal mass. Sandwich structures with 6mm-thick and 10mm-thick 3003 aluminum corrugated core and 5A06 face sheets are compared with the 5A06 solid monolithic plates in this paper. The dynamic deformation of plates are captured with the the 3D digital speckle correlation method (DIC). The results affirm that sandwich structures show a 30% reduction in the maximum plate deflection compare with a monolithic plate of identical mass per unit area, and the peak value of deflection effectively reduced by increasing the thickness core. The failure modes of sandwich plates consists of core crushing, imprinting, stretch tearing of face sheets, bending and permanent deformation of entire structure with the increasing impulsive loads, and the failure mechanisms are analyzed with the postmortem panels and dynamic deflection history captured by cameras. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.: 11372088).

  5. Corrugated Waveguide and Directional Coupler for CW 250-GHz Gyrotron DNP Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Woskov, Paul P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    A 250-GHz corrugated transmission line with a directional coupler for forward and backward power monitoring has been constructed and tested for use with a 25-W continuous-wave gyrotron for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The main corrugated line (22-mm internal diameter, 2.4-m long) connects the gyrotron output to the DNP probe input. The directional coupler, inserted approximately midway, is a four-port crossed waveguide beamsplitter design. Two beamsplitters, a quartz plate and ten-wire array, were tested with output coupling of 2.5% (−16 dB) at 250.6 GHz and 1.6% (−18 dB), respectively. A pair of mirrors in the DNP probe transferred the gyrotron beam from the 22-mm waveguide to an 8-mm helically corrugated waveguide for transmission through the final 0.58-m distance inside the NMR magnet to the sample. The transmission-line components were all cold tested with a 248 ± 4-GHz radiometer. A total insertion loss of 0.8 dB was achieved for HE11 -mode propagation from the gyrotron to the sample with only 1% insertion loss for the 22-mm-diameter waveguide. A clean Gaussian gyrotron beam at the waveguide output and reliable forward power monitoring were achieved for many hours of continuous operation. PMID:17901907

  6. Method of Green's function of nonlinear vibration of corrugated shallow shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hong

    2008-06-01

    Based on the dynamic equations of nonlinear large deflection of axisymmetric shallow shells of revolution, the nonlinear free vibration and forced vibration of a corrugated shallow shell under concentrated load acting at the center have been investigated. The nonlinear partial differential equations of shallow shell were reduced to the nonlinear integral-differential equations by using the method of Green’s function. To solve the integral-differential equations, the expansion method was used to obtain Green’s function. Then the integral-differential equations were reduced to the form with a degenerate core by expanding Green’s function as a series of characteristic function. Therefore, the integral-differential equations became nonlinear ordinary differential equations with regard to time. The amplitude-frequency relation, with respect to the natural frequency of the lowest order and the amplitude-frequency response under harmonic force, were obtained by considering single mode vibration. As a numerical example, nonlinear free and forced vibration phenomena of shallow spherical shells with sinusoidal corrugation were studied. The obtained solutions are available for reference to the design of corrugated shells.

  7. Superfluid Helium Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, P.

    This paper reports on the development and the thermal tests of three superfluid helium heat pipes. Two of them are designed to provide a large transport capacity (4 mW at 1.7 K). They feature a copper braid located inside a 6 mm outer diameter stainless tube fitted with copper ends for mechanical anchoring. The other heat pipe has no copper braid and is designed to get much smaller heat transport capacity (0.5 mW) and to explore lower temperature (0.7 - 1 K). The copper braid and the tube wall is the support of the Rollin superfluid helium film in which the heat is transferred. The low filling pressure makes the technology very simple with the possibility to easily bend the tube. We present the design and discuss the thermal performance of the heat pipes tested in the 0.7 to 2.0 K temperature range. The long heat pipe (1.2 m with copper braid) and the short one (0.25 m with copper braid) have similar thermal performance in the range 0.7 - 2.0 K. At 1.7 K the long heat pipe, 120 g in weight, reaches a heat transfer capacity of 6.2 mW and a thermal conductance of 600 mW/K for 4 mW transferred power. Due to the pressure drop of the vapor flow and Kapitza thermal resistance, the conductance of the third heat pipe dramatically decreases when the temperature decreases. A 3.8 mW/K is obtained at 0.7 K for 0.5 mW transferred power.

  8. Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Polcyn, Adam D.

    2010-12-28

    An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

  9. Apparatus for moving a pipe inspection probe through piping

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Appel, D. Keith; Lewis, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controllably moving devices for cleaning or inspection through piping systems, including piping systems with numerous piping bends therein, by using hydrostatic pressure of a working fluid introduced into the piping system. The apparatus comprises a reservoir or other source for supplying the working fluid to the piping system, a launch tube for admitting the device into the launcher and a reversible, positive displacement pump for controlling the direction and flow rate of the working fluid. The device introduced into the piping system moves with the flow of the working fluid through the piping system. The launcher attaches to the valved ends of a piping system so that fluids in the piping system can recirculate in a closed loop. The method comprises attaching the launcher to the piping system, supplying the launcher with working fluid, admitting the device into the launcher, pumping the working fluid in the direction and at the rate desired so that the device moves through the piping system for pipe cleaning or inspection, removing the device from the launcher, and collecting the working fluid contained in the launcher.

  10. Apparatus for moving a pipe inspection probe through piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Appel, D.K.; Lewis, G.W.

    1995-07-18

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for controllably moving devices for cleaning or inspection through piping systems, including piping systems with numerous piping bends therein, by using hydrostatic pressure of a working fluid introduced into the piping system. The apparatus comprises a reservoir or other source for supplying the working fluid to the piping system, a launch tube for admitting the device into the launcher and a reversible, positive displacement pump for controlling the direction and flow rate of the working fluid. The device introduced into the piping system moves with the flow of the working fluid through the piping system. The launcher attaches to the valved ends of a piping system so that fluids in the piping system can recirculate in a closed loop. The method comprises attaching the launcher to the piping system, supplying the launcher with working fluid, admitting the device into the launcher, pumping the working fluid in the direction and at the rate desired so that the device moves through the piping system for pipe cleaning or inspection, removing the device from the launcher, and collecting the working fluid contained in the launcher. 8 figs.

  11. Heat pipe cooled probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J. (Inventor); Couch, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The basic heat pipe principle is employed to provide a self-contained passively cooled probe that may be placed into a high temperature environment. The probe consists of an evaporator region of a heat pipe and a sensing instrument. Heat is absorbed as the working fluid evaporates in the probe. The vapor is transported to the vapor space of the condenser region. Heat is dissipated from the condenser region and fins causing condensation of the working fluid, which returns to the probe by gravity and the capillary action of the wick. Working fluid, wick and condenser configurations and structure materials can be selected to maintain the probe within an acceptable temperature range.

  12. Heat transfer in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbach, T.

    1985-01-01

    The heat transfer from hot water to a cold copper pipe in laminar and turbulent flow condition is determined. The mean flow through velocity in the pipe, relative test length and initial temperature in the vessel were varied extensively during tests. Measurements confirm Nusselt's theory for large test lengths in laminar range. A new equation is derived for heat transfer for large starting lengths which agrees satisfactorily with measurements for large starting lengths. Test results are compared with the new Prandtl equation for heat transfer and correlated well. Test material for 200- and to 400-diameter test length is represented at four different vessel temperatures.

  13. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  14. Six Centuries Old Spiral of Vertical Corrugations in Saturn's C-Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E. A.; French, R. G.; Rappaport, N. J.; Wong, K.; McGhee, C.; Anabtawi, A.

    2011-12-01

    Likely evidence of nearly six centuries old collision of captured cometary material with Saturn's Ring C is uncovered in recent Cassini Radio Science ring observations. Three Cassini ring occultation experiments were especially designed so that radio signals transmitted by Cassini to the Earth pass through the rings when the rings are nearly closed as viewed by the ground receiving stations of the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). In this special geometry, the long path of the radio signals through the rings enhances sensitivity to detection of very tenuous ring material and allows ~400 meters resolution profiling of its radial structure. The observations uncover previously undetectable quasi-periodic optical depth undulations in 4 sub-regions of the innermost ~4000 km of Ring C (~74,480-77,740 km). The structure modulates a tenuous background optical depth of ~0.05 and has peak-to-peak fluctuations < ~0.01, making detection possible only in the case of these 3 special occultations (ring opening angle of 4.8, 4.8, and 1.9 degrees; Cassini Revs 123, 125, and 133, respectively). The structure is detectable at two observation wavelengths (0.94 and 3.6 cm), at multiple observing DSN ground stations, and in data from all 3 occultations. It's characterized by two interfering "tones" of spatial wavelength ~1.3 and ~1.2 km. The wavelength increases slowly with ring radius. The behavior appears consistent with presence of vertical corrugations 4-10 meters in height likely caused by a past ring tilting event (collision with cometary debris) and subsequent differential nodal regression of particle orbits. Time evolution of the perturbations creates a tightly wound spiral pattern of ring height variations which when probed by the radio signals yield the observed tenuous quasi-periodic optical depth fluctuations. The corrugations model was proposed by Hedman et al. [Science 332, 2011] to explain intriguing 30-50 km wavelength structure observed in Cassini images (ISS) across Ring C. The RSS wavelength-radius behavior is in general agreement with the corrugation model prediction; however, important differences persist (ring mass effect?). The much shorter RSS corrugation wavelength compared with ISS implies a separate ring tilting event that is older by ~600 years (late 1300's), and the two tones separation suggests two sub-events ~50 years apart. Together with reported detection of similar corrugations within the tenuous Jovian rings [Showalter et al., Science 332, 2011], the collective observations suggest that these ring-plane-tilting events may not be rare.

  15. Effect of discrete track support by sleepers on rail corrugation at a curved track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X. S.; Wen, Z. F.

    2008-08-01

    The paper investigates into the effect of discrete track support by sleepers on the initiation and development of rail corrugation at a curved track when a railway vehicle passes through using a numerical method. The numerical method considers a combination of Kalker's rolling contact theory with non-Hertzian form, a linear frictional work model and a dynamics model of a half railway vehicle coupled with the curved track. The half-vehicle has a two-axle bogie and doubled suspension systems. It is treated as a full dynamic rigid multi-body model. In the track model, an Euler beam is used to model the rail, and the discrete track support by sleepers moving backward with respect to the vehicle running direction is considered to simulate the effect of the discrete sleeper support on the wheels/rails in rolling contact when the vehicle moves on the track. The sleeper is treated as a rigid body and the ballast bed is replaced with equivalent mass bodies. The numerical analysis exams in detail the variations of wheel/rail normal loads, the creepages, and the rail wear volume along the curved track. Their variations are much concerned with the discrete track support. The numerical results show that the discrete track support causes the fluctuating of the normal loads and creepages at a few frequencies. These frequencies comprise the passing frequency of the sleepers and the excited track resonant frequencies, which are higher than the sleeper passing frequency. Consequently, rail corrugation with several wavelengths initiates and develops. Also the results show that the contact vibrating between the curved rails and the four wheels of the same bogie has different frequencies. In this way, the different key frequencies to be excited play an important role in the initiation and development of curved rail corrugation. Therefore, the corrugations caused by the four wheels of the same bogie present different wavelengths. The paper shows and discusses the depths of the initial corrugations caused by the four wheels of the same bogie, at the entering transition curve, the circle curve and the exit transition curve of the curved track, respectively.

  16. Adjustable-angle pipe fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    This invention pertains to a pipe fitting for joining two pipes at a desired, preselected angle and comprises a curved section of pipe with a generally circular cross-section. One end of the curved pipe is preferably furnished with a bell fitting. The other end is adapted to be inserted into the bell of another pipe fitting. The surface of the pipe is marked with circumferential lines spaced at several-degree intervals, the lines corresponding to the angle of the bend which will result if the pipe is cut along that line. The outer diameter of the pipe is closely controlled to be the same throughout its length as the outer diameter of a straight pipe, so the cut end can be inserted into the bell of another fitting without further treatment, and the radius of curvature of the pipe is larger than a standard street elbow, preferably three to ten times the diameter of the pipe. Thus, a cut approximately perpendicular to the axial centerline can be made at any point along the length of the pipe to form an elbow of any desired angle.

  17. Reusable high-temperature heat pipes and heat pipe panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A reusable, durable heat pipe which is capable of operating at temperatures up to about 3000 F in an oxidizing environment and at temperatures above 3000 F in an inert or vacuum environment is produced by embedding a refractory metal pipe within a carbon-carbon composite structure. A reusable, durable heat pipe panel is made from an array of refractory-metal pipes spaced from each other. The reusable, durable, heat-pipe is employed to fabricate a hypersonic vehicle leading edge and nose cap.

  18. Defect characterization in pipe-to-pipe welds in large diameter stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, D.E. Jr.; West, S.L.; Wheeler, D.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Metallurgical evaluation of pipe-to-pipe welds in large-diameter, Type 304 stainless steel piping used to construct the moderator/coolant water systems for Savannah River Site reactors has demonstrated that small weld defects found in this 1950-vintage system do not compromise the integrity of the system. The weld defects were too small for detection by the pre-service standard radiographic inspection, but were found through systematic ultrasonic testing (UT) and penetrant testing (PT) evaluations of piping that had been removed during upgrades to the piping system. The defects include lack of weld penetration, slag inclusions, and other weld metal discontinuities. These discontinuities typically did not propagate during more than 35 years of service. The defects examined were too small and isolated to degrade the mechanical properties of the pipe-to-pipe weldments and therefore did not compromise the integrity of the piping system. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  20. Heat pipe investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques associated with thermal-vacuum and bench testing, along with flight testing of the OAO-C spacecraft heat pipes are outlined, to show that the processes used in heat transfer design and testing are adequate for good performance evaluations.

  1. Find optimum pipe size

    SciTech Connect

    Fastenakels, M.; Campana, H.

    1984-09-01

    For decades, chemical engineers have used various rules of thumb for selecting the size of pipe in continuousprocess plants. Often these methods result in sizes that are not the correct selection for the operating conditions. This causes the plant to be less efficient to operate or more costly to erect. The optimum size is controlled by one of three modes of selection: the least annual cost (energy external source), the pressure drop available or the velocity allowable (often is two-phase flow)./sup 3/ Pressure drop available applies when a pressure loss may be (or must be) absorbed by the pipe. The optimum size then becomes the smallest and the least expensive that permits the flow to take place with no undesirable side effects. Except for very special cases, this would not be used in conjunction with a pumped or compressed fluid. This mode requires at least an approximation of the length of the pipe and the quantity and nature of the fittings in the system before the selection can be made. It can also apply under some conditions to the suction piping for pumps or compressors, to the lines conducting steam to and from reciprocating pumps and to heating equipment.

  2. The Band-Gap and TRUE Band-Gap in Nominally Metallic Carbon Nanotubes: the Tight-Binding Study on Corrugation Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongxia; Wu, Jianbao; Wang, Jizhen; Shi, Shaocong; Zhang, Weiyi

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the band-gap and true band-gap are analyzed for the corrugated structures of various types of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) within the tight binding approximation. We show that corrugation, combined with curvature effect, yields naturally the true small band-gap in all SWCNTs with small radius. The more stable corrugated structures of SWCNTs are backed by the abinitio total energy calculations for nominally metallic armchair SWCNTs.

  3. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  4. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  5. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  6. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  7. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  8. A Multifrequency Notch Filter for Millimeter Wave Plasma Diagnostics based on Photonic Bandgaps in Corrugated Circular Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Bongers, W.; Kasparek, W.; Leuterer, F.; Monaco, F.; Münich, M.; Schütz, H.; Stober, J.; Thumm, M.; Brand, H. v. d.

    2015-03-01

    Sensitive millimeter wave diagnostics need often to be protected against unwanted radiation like, for example, stray radiation from high power Electron Cyclotron Heating applied in nuclear fusion plasmas. A notch filter based on a waveguide Bragg reflector (photonic band-gap) may provide several stop bands of defined width within up to two standard waveguide frequency bands. A Bragg reflector that reflects an incident fundamental TE11 into a TM1n mode close to cutoff is combined with two waveguide tapers to fundamental waveguide diameter. Here the fundamental TE11 mode is the only propagating mode at both ends of the reflector. The incident TE11 mode couples through the taper and is converted to the high order TM1n mode by the Bragg structure at the specific Bragg resonances. The TM1n mode is trapped in the oversized waveguide section by the tapers. Once reflected at the input taper it will be converted back into the TE11 mode which then can pass through the taper. Therefore at higher order Bragg resonances, the filter acts as a reflector for the incoming TE11 mode. Outside of the Bragg resonances the TE11 mode can propagate through the oversized waveguide structure with only very small Ohmic attenuation compared to propagating in a fundamental waveguide. Coupling to other modes is negligible in the non-resonant case due to the small corrugation amplitude (typically 0.05·λ0, where λ0 is the free space wavelength). A Bragg reflector for 105 and 140 GHz was optimized by mode matching (scattering matrix) simulations and manufactured by SWISSto12 SA, where the required mechanical accuracy of ± 5 μm could be achieved by stacking stainless steel rings, manufactured by micro-machining, in a high precision guiding pipe. The two smooth-wall tapers were fabricated by electroforming. Several measurements were performed using vector network analyzers from Agilent (E8362B), ABmm (MVNA 8-350) and Rohde&Schwarz (ZVA24) together with frequency multipliers. The stop bands around 105 GHz (- 55dB) and 140 GHz (-60dB) correspond to the TE11-TM12 and TE11-TM13 Bragg resonances. Experiments are in good agreement with theory.

  9. Heat Pipes Cool Power Magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I.; Chester, M.; Luedke, E.

    1983-01-01

    Configurations originally developed for space use are effective in any orientation. Heat pipes integrated into high-power, high-frequency, highvoltage spaceflight magnetics reduce weight and improve reliability by lowering internal tempertures. Two heat pipes integrated in design of power transformer cool unit in any orientation. Electrostatic shield conducts heat from windings to heat pipe evaporator. Technology allows dramatic reductions in size and weight, while significantly improving reliability. In addition, all attitude design of heat pipes allows operation of heat pipes independent of local gravity forces.

  10. Spectral Formulation for the Solution of Full-Wave Scattering from a Conducting Wedge Tipped with a Corrugated Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polycarpou, A. C.; Christou, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    A spectral mode-matching technique is formulated to solve for the full-wave scattering of a corrugated cylinder-tipped wedge in the presence of an impressed electric or magnetic line source. Asymptotic approximations of large-order Bessel or Henkel functions for a fixed argument were introduced in order to overcome numerical difficulties in their regular series expansions. The corrugations on the conducting cylinder have the shape of annular sectors. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the impact of corrugations on the scattered field in the shadow region of the structure. An optimally designed corrugated cylinder placed at the tip of a conducting wedge can effectively suppress electromagnetic scattering in the shadow region. Obtained numerical results using the proposed approach prove the above concept. These results were validated against numerical data obtained using a nodal finite element method. The aim of this research is to utilize these corrugated tips in horn antenna design for the reduction of side-lobe level and the shaping of the respective E-plane radiation pattern.

  11. Non-binding conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.H.

    1984-04-24

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a non-binding transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement and for moving without binding along corrugations of any slope less than vertical. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed parallel to the motion of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly. 7 figs.

  12. Non-binding conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, William H.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a non-binding transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement and for moving without binding along corrugations of any slope less than vertical. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed parallel to the motion of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

  13. Spectral Formulation for the Solution of Full-Wave Scattering from a Conducting Wedge Tipped with a Corrugated Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Polycarpou, A. C.; Christou, M. A.

    2011-11-29

    A spectral mode-matching technique is formulated to solve for the full-wave scattering of a corrugated cylinder-tipped wedge in the presence of an impressed electric or magnetic line source. Asymptotic approximations of large-order Bessel or Henkel functions for a fixed argument were introduced in order to overcome numerical difficulties in their regular series expansions. The corrugations on the conducting cylinder have the shape of annular sectors. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the impact of corrugations on the scattered field in the shadow region of the structure. An optimally designed corrugated cylinder placed at the tip of a conducting wedge can effectively suppress electromagnetic scattering in the shadow region. Obtained numerical results using the proposed approach prove the above concept. These results were validated against numerical data obtained using a nodal finite element method. The aim of this research is to utilize these corrugated tips in horn antenna design for the reduction of side-lobe level and the shaping of the respective E-plane radiation pattern.

  14. State-of-the-art interior piping systems applications: Single-family buildings. Final report, January 1985-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Torbin, R.N.; Belkus, P.

    1988-11-01

    State-of-the-art interior gas-piping technology, which includes steel pipe, copper tubing, and corrugated stainless steel tubing, was evaluated through a series of installation studies in two different types of single-family dwellings. Side-by-side comparisons were made between steel pipe and semirigid tubing in terms of installation labor and material costs. The results of the installation studies indicated that semirigid tubing is a more cost-effective approach than steel pipe for single-family homes. The semirigid tubing system can be operated at low pressure or by using the hybrid-pressure approach. Field data were used to estimate the impact of semirigid tubing systems on other single-family housing styles. Additional studies were conducted to investigate other issues involved with the use and long-term acceptance of semirigid tubing. These studies included: an assessment of the issues involved with the use of copper tubing; the need for mechanical protection of concealed semirigid tubing; and constraints of the gas-distribution system (street pressure, service regulators, and gas meters) affecting the use of the hybrid-pressure approach. An evaluation of the SMART HOUSE concept was performed to assess if innovative gas piping, modified gas appliances, and advanced control systems could be integrated.

  15. Explosive welding of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennov, O.; Burtseva, O.; Kitin, A.

    2006-08-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water. Model experiments with pipes having radii R = 57 mm confirmed results of the calculations and the possibility in principle to weld pipes by explosion with use of water as filler.

  16. Drill pipe protector development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R.; Wemple, R.P.

    1996-03-01

    The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

  17. Pipe liner process

    SciTech Connect

    Ledoux, P.R.; Fourgaut, L.R.

    1991-01-22

    This paper describes a process for installing a thermoplastic liner in a pipe for flowing a service fluid under pressure through the pipe liner. It comprises: providing a hollow generally cylindrical liner, reducing the cross-sectional shape of the liner; disposing the reduced liner; partially expanding the liner; sealing the expanded liner; mechanically reforming the reduced liner by passing a pig; the step of passing the pig including providing a differential pressure on opposite sides of the pig within the liner to propel the pig between the sealed ends of the liner; subsequent to mechanically reforming the liner; then depressurizing the liner and removing the mechanical means; and then pressurizing the liner with the service fluid.

  18. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Solar Fundamentals, Inc.'s hot water system employs space-derived heat pipe technology. It is used by a meat packing plant to heat water for cleaning processing machinery. Unit is complete system with water heater, hot water storage, electrical controls and auxiliary components. Other than fans and a circulating pump, there are no moving parts. System's unique design eliminates problems of balancing, leaking, corroding, and freezing.

  19. Electrohydrodynamic heat pipe research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.; Perry, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical applications to electrohydrodynamic heat pipe (EHDHP) research are presented. Two problems in the research which are discussed are the prediction of the effective thermal conductance of an EHDHP with threaded grooves for fluid distribution to the evaporator of an EHDHP. Hydrodynamic equations are included along with a discussion of boundary conditions and burn-out conditions. A discussion of the theoretical and experimental results is presented.

  20. Light Pipe Thermophotovoltaics (LTPV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    2007-02-01

    In a conventional thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy converter the radiation from the emitter to the photovoltaic (PV) array is transmitted in a vacuum or air where the index of refraction, n = 1. The intensity of the radiation is proportional to n2. Therefore, the incident intensity on the PV array could be greatly increase if the medium between the emitter and the PV array had n > 1. This light pipe TPV (LTPV) concept was introduced by The Quantum Group at the Third National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) TPV Conference in 1997. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the LTPV concept. The solution of the one-dimensional energy equation that includes both thermal conduction and radiation yields the temperature distribution through the light pipe. Applying the analysis to a zinc selenide (ZnSe) light pipe yielded the following result. For an emitter temperature of 1000K the convertible radiation(photon energy >PV bandgap energy) that reaches the photovoltaic(PV) cell is 1 W/cm2. At the same emitter temperature, a conventional TPV converter would have 1/8 W/cm2 of convertible radiation. Thus, the LTPV concept makes possible lower temperature operation than current TPV converters.

  1. Analysis of Bonded Joints Between the Facesheet and Flange of Corrugated Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a method for the stress analysis of bonded composite corrugated panel facesheet to flange joints. The method relies on the existing HyperSizer Joints software, which analyzes the bonded joint, along with a beam analogy model that provides the necessary boundary loading conditions to the joint analysis. The method is capable of predicting the full multiaxial stress and strain fields within the flange to facesheet joint and thus can determine ply-level margins and evaluate delamination. Results comparing the method to NASTRAN finite element model stress fields are provided illustrating the accuracy of the method.

  2. Geometric and electronic structures of corannulene polymers: Ultra narrow graphene ribbons with corrugation and topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Kohei; Okada, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    We used density functional theory to study the geometric and electronic structure of dimerized and one-dimensionally polymerized corannulene as ultra-narrow graphene ribbons with corrugation and topological defects. Our computations reveal that the relative stability and electronic structure of dimerized and polymerized corannulene are sensitive to the intermolecular covalent networks. The energy gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied states of corannulene dimers is narrower than that of isolated corannulene. The corannulene polymers are semiconductors with a direct energy gap of about 1 eV depending on intermolecular bonds. The polymers possess moderate mechanical stiffness having Young's moduli of 200 GPa.

  3. Effects of asymmetric surface corrugations on fully metal-coated scanning near field optical microscopy tips.

    PubMed

    Lotito, Valeria; Sennhauser, Urs; Hafner, Christian

    2010-04-12

    We propose a new configuration for a fully metal coated scanning near field (SNOM) probe based on asymmetric corrugations in the metal coating. The variation in the metal surface induces coupling mechanisms leading to the creation of a localized hot spot under linearly polarized excitation. Field localization is an effect of paramount importance for resolution but cannot be achieved with standard axisymmetric fully metal-coated probes, unless a more cumbersome radially polarized excitation is used. Our simulations show that this promising structure allows one to simplify the mode injection procedures circumventing the need for a radially polarized beam. PMID:20588716

  4. Eddy Current System for Detection of Cracking Beneath Braiding in Corrugated Metal Hose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Hall, George

    2008-01-01

    In this paper an eddy current system for the detection of partially-through-the-thickness cracks in corrugated metal hose is presented. Design criteria based upon the geometry and conductivity of the part are developed and applied to the fabrication of a prototype inspection system. Experimental data are used to highlight the capabilities of the system and an image processing technique is presented to improve flaw detection capabilities. A case study for detection of cracking damage in a space shuttle radiator retract flex hoses is also presented.

  5. EDDY CURRENT SYSTEM FOR DETECTION OF CRACKING BENEATH BRAIDING IN CORRUGATED METAL HOSE

    SciTech Connect

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Hall, George

    2009-03-03

    In this paper an eddy current system for the detection of partially-through-the-thickness cracks in corrugated metal hose is presented. Design criteria based upon the geometry and conductivity of the part are developed and applied to the fabrication of a prototype inspection system. Experimental data are used to highlight the capabilities of the system and an image processing technique is presented to improve flaw detection capabilities. A case study for detection of cracking damage in a space shuttle radiator retract flex hoses is also presented.

  6. 3D finite element modeling of the micromachined microphone with corrugated diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, Alexei I.; Pyatishev, Evgenij N.; Lurie, Mihail S.; Korshunov, Andrey V.; Akulshin, Y. D.; Sabadash, V. O.; Smolnikov, B. A.

    2001-02-01

    Measurements of acoustic pressure oscillations on curvilinear surface streamlined by a flow, for example, on the wall of wind-tunnel or airfoil is necessary to supply for aeroacoustic appendices. Microphone should have the minimal sizes and feeler set flush-mounted. Such microphones are demanded for creation distributed audio-systems and noise reduction devices in the source. Developed the MEMS-microphone with corrugated diaphragm should have a sharp response, stability to effects of ram airflow and high level pressure. Preliminary simulation of design and technological parameters is necessary for creation of this microphone.

  7. 3D finite element modeling of the micromachined microphone with corrugated diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, Alexei I.; Pyatishev, Evgenij N.; Lurie, Mihail S.; Korshunov, Andrey V.; Akulshin, Y. D.; Sabadash, V. O.; Smolnikov, B. A.

    2000-02-01

    Measurements of acoustic pressure oscillations on curvilinear surface streamlined by a flow, for example, on the wall of wind-tunnel or airfoil is necessary to supply for aeroacoustic appendices. Microphone should have the minimal sizes and feeler set flush-mounted. Such microphones are demanded for creation distributed audio-systems and noise reduction devices in the source. Developed the MEMS-microphone with corrugated diaphragm should have a sharp response, stability to effects of ram airflow and high level pressure. Preliminary simulation of design and technological parameters is necessary for creation of this microphone.

  8. Radiation characteristics of electromagnetic eigenmodes at the corrugated interface of a left-handed material.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Mauro; Depine, Ricardo A

    2009-08-28

    We study the radiation characteristics of electromagnetic surface waves at a periodically corrugated interface between a conventional and a negatively refracting (or left-handed) material. In this case, and contrary to the surface plasmon polariton in a metallic grating, surface plasmon polaritons may radiate on both sides of the rough interface along which they propagate. We find novel radiation regimes which provide an indirect demonstration of other unusual phenomena characteristic of electromagnetic wave propagation in left-handed materials, such as negative refraction or backward wave propagation. PMID:19792827

  9. Shear Lag in Corrugated Sheets Used for the Chord Member of a Box Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Joseph S; Reissner, Eric

    1941-01-01

    The problem of the distribution of normal stress across a wide corrugated sheet used as the chord of a box-beam-like structure is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Expressions are developed giving the stress distribution in beams, symmetrical or unsymmetrical, about a plane passed spanwise through the center of the sheet. The experiments were arranged to insure bending without torsion and surveys of the normal stresses were made by means of mechanical and electrical strain gages. The experimental data showed very good agreement with the new b of the theoretical curves, especially at the highly stressed sections, for both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical beams. Several suggestions for future research are included.

  10. Distributed-feedback Terahertz Quantum-cascade Lasers with Laterally Corrugated Metal Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2005-01-01

    We report the demonstration of distributed-feedback terahertz quantum-cascade lasers based on a first-order grating fabricated via a lateral corrugation in a double-sided metal ridge waveguide. The phase of the facet reflection was precisely set by lithographically defined facets by dry etching. Single-mode emission was observed at low to moderate injection currents, although multimode emission was observed far beyond threshold owing to spatial hole burning. Finite-element simulations were used to calculate the modal and threshold characteristics for these devices, with results in good agreement with experiments.

  11. Influence of corrugation shape in steel bars ductility used on reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortign, B.; Nieto, E. J.; Fernndez, F.; Hernndez, O.

    2012-04-01

    Necking process stress and strain analysis, which is key to determine the plastic flow evolution in finite deformation, has been widely studied and applied to a number of materials based on the theories established by Davidenkov-Spiridnova and Bridgman in the 40's decade. These theories envolve from the study of necking geometry in fracture. In this paper, we develop an exhaustive experimental analysis of the stress and strain field in the necking process, applied to concrete bars and mechanized samples with similar features, in order to compare the results with the ones given by the theories listed above and to look for the corrugation influence in the material's plastic behavior.

  12. Helically corrugated waveguide gyrotron traveling wave amplifier using a thermionic cathode electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, A. W.; He, W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C. G.; Young, A. R.; Robertson, C. W.; Rafferty, E. G.; Thomson, J.

    2007-06-01

    Experimental operation of a gyrotron traveling wave amplifier with a helically corrugated waveguide using a thermionic cathode electron gun is presented. The coupling between the second harmonic cyclotron mode of the gyrating electron beam and the radiation occurred in the region of near infinite phase velocity over a broad frequency band. With an axis-encircling electron beam of pitch factor of 185keV, and current of 6.0A, the amplifier achieved an output power of 220kW, saturated gain of 24dB, saturated bandwidth of 8.4to10.4GHz, and an interaction efficiency of 20%.

  13. Dual nature of localization in guiding systems with randomly corrugated boundaries: Anderson-type versus entropic

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Yu.V. Shostenko, L.D.

    2015-05-15

    A unified theory for the conductance of an infinitely long multimode quantum wire whose finite segment has randomly rough lateral boundaries is developed. It enables one to rigorously take account of all feasible mechanisms of wave scattering, both related to boundary roughness and to contacts between the wire rough section and the perfect leads within the same technical frameworks. The rough part of the conducting wire is shown to act as a mode-specific randomly modulated effective potential barrier whose height is governed essentially by the asperity slope. The mean height of the barrier, which is proportional to the average slope squared, specifies the number of conducting channels. Under relatively small asperity amplitude this number can take on arbitrary small, up to zero, values if the asperities are sufficiently sharp. The consecutive channel cut-off that arises when the asperity sharpness increases can be regarded as a kind of localization, which is not related to the disorder per se but rather is of entropic or (equivalently) geometric origin. The fluctuating part of the effective barrier results in two fundamentally different types of guided wave scattering, viz., inter- and intramode scattering. The intermode scattering is shown to be for the most part very strong except in the cases of (a) extremely smooth asperities, (b) excessively small length of the corrugated segment, and (c) the asperities sharp enough for only one conducting channel to remain in the wire. Under strong intermode scattering, a new set of conducting channels develops in the corrugated waveguide, which have the form of asymptotically decoupled extended modes subject to individual solely intramode random potentials. In view of this fact, two transport regimes only are realizable in randomly corrugated multimode waveguides, specifically, the ballistic and the localized regime, the latter characteristic of one-dimensional random systems. Two kinds of localization are thus shown to coexist in waveguide-like systems with randomly corrugated boundaries, specifically, the entropic localization and the one-dimensional Anderson (disorder-driven) localization. If the particular mode propagates across the rough segment ballistically, the Fabry–Pérot-type oscillations should be observed in the conductance, which are suppressed for the mode transferred in the Anderson-localized regime.

  14. High performance WR-1.5 corrugated horn based on stacked rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Bruno; von Bieren, Arndt; de Rijk, Emile; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe; Pisano, Giampaolo; Legg, Stephen; Macor, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    We present the development and characterisation of a high frequency (500 - 750 GHz) corrugated horn based on stacked rings. A previous horn design, based on a Winston profile, has been adapted for the purpose of this manufacturing process without noticeable RF degradation. A subset of experimental results obtained using a vector network analyser are presented and compared to the predicted performance. These first results demonstrate that this technology is suitable for most commercial applications and also astronomical receivers in need of horn arrays at high frequencies.

  15. A study of structurally efficient graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1993-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich composite panels is studied to determine their weight savings potential. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them, and semi-sandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight designs for critical compressive load levels ranging from 3,000 to 24,000 lb/in. Graphite-thermoplastic panels based on the optimal minimum weight designs were fabricated and tested. A finite-element analysis of several test specimens was also conducted. The results of the optimization study, the finite-element analysis, and the experiments are presented.

  16. Experimenting with a ``Pipe'' Whistle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Olga

    2012-04-01

    A simple pipe whistle can be made using pieces of PVC pipe. The whistle can be used to measure the resonant frequencies of open or closed pipes. A slightly modified version of the device can be used to also investigate the interesting dependence of the sound frequencies produced on the orifice-to-edge distance. The pipe whistle described here allows students in a physics of music or introductory physics course to study an example of an "edge tone" device that produces discrete sound frequencies. From their textbooks, students likely know about standing waves produced by pipes or strings, as well as the resonant frequencies for open and closed pipes. To go a bit further, they can also learn how the frequency of the sound wave depends on the orifice-to-edge distance of the wind instrument.

  17. 49 CFR 230.62 - Dry pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dry pipe. 230.62 Section 230.62 Transportation....62 Dry pipe. Dry pipes subject to pressure shall be examined at each annual inspection to measure wall thickness. Dry pipes with wall thickness reduced below that required to render the pipe...

  18. 49 CFR 230.62 - Dry pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dry pipe. 230.62 Section 230.62 Transportation....62 Dry pipe. Dry pipes subject to pressure shall be examined at each annual inspection to measure wall thickness. Dry pipes with wall thickness reduced below that required to render the pipe...

  19. 49 CFR 230.62 - Dry pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....62 Dry pipe. Dry pipes subject to pressure shall be examined at each annual inspection to measure wall thickness. Dry pipes with wall thickness reduced below that required to render the pipe suitable... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dry pipe. 230.62 Section 230.62...

  20. Heat pipe technology: A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The annual supplement on heat pipe technology for 1971 is presented. The document contains 101 references with abstracts and 47 patents. The subjects discussed are: (1) heat pipe applications, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) design, development, and fabrication of heat pipes, (4) testing and operation, (5) subject and author index, and (6) heat pipe related patents.

  1. Insulating Cryogenic Pipes With Frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. G.; Bova, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Crystallized water vapor fills voids in pipe insulation. Small, carefully controlled amount of water vapor introduced into dry nitrogen gas before it enters aft fuselage. Vapor freezes on pipes, filling cracks in insulation. Ice prevents gaseous nitrogen from condensing on pipes and dripping on structure, in addition to helping to insulate all parts. Industrial applications include large refrigeration plants or facilities that use cryogenic liquids.

  2. Cryogenic Heat Pipe Experiment (CRYOHP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Roy

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the CRYOHP experiment is to conduct a shuttle experiment that demonstrates the reliable operation of two oxygen heat pipes in microgravity. The experiment will perform the following tasks: (1) demonstrate startup of the pipes from the supercritical state; (2) measure the heat transport capacity of the pipes; (3) measure evaporator and condenser film coefficients; and (4) work shuttle safety issues. The approach for the experiment is as follows: (1) fly two axially grooved oxygen heat pipes attached to mechanical stirling cycle tactical coolers; (2) integrate experiment in hitch-hiker canister; and (3) fly on shuttle and control from ground.

  3. Multileg Heat-Pipe Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J. P.; Haslett, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Parallel pipes provide high heat flow from small heat exchanger. Six parallel heat pipes extract heat from overlying heat exchanger, forming evaporator. Vapor channel in pipe contains wick that extends into screen tube in liquid channel. Rods in each channel hold wick and screen tube in place. Evaporator compact rather than extended and more compatible with existing heat-exchanger geometries. Prototype six-pipe evaporator only 0.3 m wide and 0.71 m long. With ammonia as working fluid, transports heat to finned condenser at rate of 1,200 W.

  4. Thermostructural applications of heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeples, M. E.; Reeder, J. C.; Sontag, K. E.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of integrating heat pipes in high temperature structure to reduce local hot spot temperature was evaluated for a variety of hypersonic aerospace vehicles. From an initial list of twenty-two potential applications, the single stage to orbit wing leading edge showed the greatest promise and was selected for preliminary design of an integrated heat pipe thermostructural system. The design consisted of a Hastelloy X assembly with sodium heat pipe passages aligned normal to the wing leading edge. A d-shaped heat pipe cross section was determined to be optimum from the standpoint of structural weight.

  5. Inkjet printing of UHF antennas on corrugated cardboards for packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowade, Enrico; Göthel, Frank; Zichner, Ralf; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a method based on inkjet printing has been established to develop UHF antennas on a corrugated cardboard for packaging applications. The use of such a standardized, paper-based packaging substrate as material for printing electronics is challenging in terms of its high surface roughness and high ink absorption rate, especially when depositing very thin films with inkjet printing technology. However, we could obtain well-defined silver layers on the cardboard substrates due to a primer layer approach. The primer layer is based on a UV-curable ink formulation and deposited as well as the silver ink with inkjet printing technology. Industrial relevant printheads were chosen for the deposition of the materials. The usage of inkjet printing allows highest flexibility in terms of pattern design. The primer layer was proven to optimize the surface characteristics of the substrate, mainly reducing the surface roughness and water absorptiveness. Thanks to the primer layer approach, ultra-high-frequency (UHF) radio-frequency identification (RFID) antennas were deposited by inkjet printing on the corrugated cardboards. Along with the characterization and interpretation of electrical properties of the established conductive antenna patterns, the performance of the printed antennas were analyzed in detail by measuring the scattering parameter S11 and the antenna gain.

  6. Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

    2008-10-30

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

  7. Atomic-scale friction modulated by potential corrugation in multi-layered graphene materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-03-21

    Friction is an important issue that has to be carefully treated for the fabrication of graphene-based nano-scale devices. So far, the friction mechanism of graphene materials on the atomic scale has not yet been clearly presented. Here, first-principles calculations were employed to unveil the friction behaviors and their atomic-scale mechanism. We found that potential corrugations on sliding surfaces dominate the friction force and the friction anisotropy of graphene materials. Higher friction forces correspond to larger corrugations of potential energy, which are tuned by the number of graphene layers. The friction anisotropy is determined by the regular distributions of potential energy. The sliding along a fold-line path (hollow-atop-hollow) has a relatively small potential energy barrier. Thus, the linear sliding observed in macroscopic friction experiments may probably be attributed to the fold-line sliding mode on the atomic scale. These findings can also be extended to other layer-structure materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) and graphene-like BN sheets.

  8. Investigation of a corrugated channel flow with an open source PIV software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivas, Deniz; Bahadır Olcay, A.; Ahn, Hojin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the corrugated channel flow was investigated by using an open-source particle image velocimetry (PIV) software. The open-source software called OpenPIV was first verified by using images of an earlier experimental work of a vortex ring formation. The corrugated channel flow images were taken with 200 W power LED light source and a high speed camera and those images were analysed with these spatial and temporal tools of OpenPIV. Laminar, transient and turbulent flow regimes were identified when Reynolds number was below 1100, in between 1100 and 2000 and higher than 2000, respectively. The velocity vectors were found to be about 20% lower than the previous study results. The flow inside the grooves was also investigated with OpenPIV and flow characteristics at the grooves were captured when interrogation window size was lowered. The visualization of the flow was presented for different Reynolds numbers with the relative scale values. As a result of this study, OpenPIV software was determined as promising open source PIV analysis software.

  9. Study of the effects of corrugated wall structures due to blanket modules around ICRH antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Dumortier, Pierre; Louche, Fabrice; Messiaen, André; Vervier, Michel

    2014-02-12

    In future fusion reactors, and in ITER, the first wall will be covered by blanket modules. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF properties of the antenna if they are in the ICRF operating range. The effect on the wave propagation along the wall structure, which is acting as a spatially periodic (toroidally and poloidally) corrugated structure, and hence constitutes a slow wave structure modifying the wall boundary condition, is examined.

  10. Simple Expressions for the Design of Linear Tapers in Overmoded Corrugated Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, S. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple analytical formulae are presented for the design of linear tapers with very low mode conversion loss in overmoded corrugated waveguides. For tapers from waveguide radius a2 to a1, with a1 < a2, the optimal length of the taper is 3.198a1a2/λ. Here, λ is the wavelength of radiation. The fractional loss of the HE11 mode in an optimized taper is 0.0293(a2−a1)4∕a12a22. These formulae are accurate when a2 ≲ 2a1. Slightly more complex formulae, accurate for a2 ≤ 4a1, are also presented in this paper. The loss in an overmoded corrugated linear taper is less than 1 % when a2 ≤ 2.12a1 and less than 0.1 % when a2 ≤ 1.53a1. The present analytic results have been benchmarked against a rigorous mode matching code and have been found to be very accurate. The results for linear tapers are compared with the analogous expressions for parabolic tapers. Parabolic tapers may provide lower loss, but linear tapers with moderate values of a2/a1 may be attractive because of their simplicity of fabrication.

  11. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Qi, Yi-Zhou; Ouyang, Wengen; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Qunyang

    2015-12-01

    Although atomic stick-slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competition of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves normally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effectively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  12. Design and Fabrication of a Ring-Stiffened Graphite-Epoxy Corrugated Cylindrical Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Design and fabrication of supplement test panels that represent key portions of the cylinder are described, as are supporting tests of coupons, sample joints, and stiffening ring elements. The cylindrical shell is a ring-stiffened, open corrugation design that uses T300/5208 graphite-epoxy tape as the basic material for the shell wall and stiffening rings. The test cylinder is designed to withstand bending loads producing the relatively low maximum load intensity in the shell wall of 1,576 N/cm. The resulting shell wall weight, including stiffening rings and fasteners, is 0.0156 kg/m. The shell weight achieved in the graphite-epoxy cylinder represents a weight saving of approximately 23 percent, compared to a comparable aluminum shell. A unique fabrication approach was used in which the cylinder wall was built in three flat segments, which were then wrapped to the cylindrical shape. Such an approach, made possible by the flexibility of the thin corrugated wall in a radial direction, proved to be a simple approach to building the test cylinder. Based on tooling and fabrication methods in this program, the projected costs of a production run of 100 units are reported.

  13. Transmission Loss and Absorption of Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels With Embedded Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of embedded resonators on the diffuse field sound transmission loss and absorption of composite corrugated core sandwich panels has been evaluated experimentally. Two 1.219 m × 2.438 m panels with embedded resonator arrangements targeting frequencies near 100 Hz were evaluated using non-standard processing of ASTM E90-09 acoustic transmission loss and ASTM C423-09a room absorption test measurements. Each panel is comprised of two composite face sheets sandwiching a corrugated core with a trapezoidal cross section. When inlet openings are introduced in one face sheet, the chambers within the core can be used as embedded acoustic resonators. Changes to the inlet and chamber partition locations allow this type of structure to be tuned for targeted spectrum passive noise control. Because the core chambers are aligned with the plane of the panel, the resonators can be tuned for low frequencies without compromising the sandwich panel construction, which is typically sized to meet static load requirements. Absorption and transmission loss performance improvements attributed to opening the inlets were apparent for some configurations and inconclusive for others.

  14. Polymeric heat pipe wick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidenberg, Benjamin

    1988-01-01

    A wick for use in a capillary loop pump heat pipe is described. The wick material is an essentially uniformly porous, permeable, open-cell, polyethylene thermoplastic foam having an ultrahigh average molecular weight of from approximately 1 to 5 million, and an average pore size of about 10 to 12 microns. A representative material having these characteristics is POREX UF, which has an average molecular weight of about 3 million. This material is fully compatible with the FREONs and anhydrous ammonia and allows for the use of these very efficient working fluids in capillary loops.

  15. Ceramic heat pipe wick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidenberg, Benjamin (Inventor); Swanson, Theodore (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A wick for use in a capillary loop pump heat pipe is disclosed. The wick material is an essentially uniformly porous, permeable, open-cell, silicon dioxide/aluminum oxide inorganic ceramic foam having a silica fiber ratio, by weight, of about 78 to 22, respectively, a density of 6 lbs/cu ft, and an average pore size of less than 5 microns. A representative material having these characteristics is Lockheed Missile and Space Company, Inc.'s HTP 6-22. This material is fully compatible with the freons and anhydrous ammonia and allows for the use of these very efficient working fluids, and others, in capillary loops.

  16. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

  17. Removal of Pipe Fouling Inside Pipes Using Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Noritoshi; Fujihara, Masaya; Wu, Chaoqun; Satonobu, Jun

    Since fouling generated inside pipes of chemistry plant equipment, shortens “its life”, periodical maintenance such as cleaning or replacement is needed. Therefore, the development of a safe and sanitary method of preventing a corrosion and blockage inside pipes is desired. In this study, a vibration system, composed of a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer and a pipe, was employed to experimentally study the possibility of fouling removal. In the experiment, a flexural vibration was excited in a pipe containing fouling using ultrasonic waves. When the pipe was made to vibrate, with calcium carbonate or starch used as the fouling, it was shown that the fouling was diffused into the air, and except at the node of the flexural vibration, the fouling was removed completely. Also, the result showed that a higher input voltage to the transducer was more effective in removing the fouling.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory corregated metal pipe saw facility preliminary safety analysis report. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1990-09-19

    This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and design operation of the processing systems in the Corrugated Metal Pipe Saw Facility with respect to normal and abnormal conditions. Potential hazards are identified, credible accidents relative to the operation of the facility and the process systems are analyzed, and the consequences of postulated accidents are presented. The risk associated with normal operations, abnormal operations, and natural phenomena are analyzed. The accident analysis presented shows that the impact of the facility will be acceptable for all foreseeable normal and abnormal conditions of operation. Specifically, under normal conditions the facility will have impacts within the limits posted by applicable DOE guidelines, and in accident conditions the facility will similarly meet or exceed the requirements of all applicable standards. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  20. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  1. Pipe crawler with stabilizing midsection

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.; Treanor, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    A pipe crawler having a midsection that provides the stability and flexibty to allow the pipe crawler to negotiate curved and uneven segments of piping while traveling through piping systems. The pipe crawler comprises a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly, a midsection with a gimbal at each end for connecting the midsection to the front and rear leg assemblies in a flexible manner, and an air cylinder for changing the distance between the front and rear leg assemblies. The pipe crawler moves in "inch worm" fashion with the front and rear leg assemblies alternating between an extended and a retracted position as the air cylinder moves the retracted leg assembly forward. The midsection has a plurality of legs extending radially for holding the midsection within a maximum displacement from the piping axis so that the gimbals are not pivoted to extreme angles where they might lock up or seize. When the midsection is displaced sufficiently, its legs with wheels on each end engage the interior surface of the piping and prevent further displacement. Using two gimbals divides the angle between the planes defined by the front and rear leg assemblies which also helps to prevent excessive gimbal pivoting.

  2. Alternate high capacity heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, F. E.

    1986-01-01

    The performance predictions for a fifty foot heat pipe (4 foot evaporator - 46 foot condensor) are discussed. These performance predictions are supported by experimental data for a four foot heat pipe. Both heat pipes have evaporators with axial groove wick structures and condensers with powder metal external artery wick structures. The predicted performance of a rectangular axial groove/external artery heat pipe operating in space is given. Heat transport versus groove width is plotted for 100, 200 and 300 grooves in the evaporator. The curves show that maximum power is achieved for groove widths from 0.040 to 0.053 as the number of grooves varies from 300 to 100. The corresponding range of maximum power is 3150 to 2400 watts. The relationships between groove width and heat pipe evaporate diameter for 100, 200 and 300 grooves in the evaporator are given. A four foot heat pipe having a three foot condenser and one foot evaporator was built and tested. The evaporator wick structure used axial grooves with rectangular cross sections, and the condenser wick structure used powder metal with an external artery configuration. Fabrication drawings are enclosed. The predicted and measured performance for this heat pipe is shown. The agreement between predicted and measured performance is good and therefore substantiates the predicted performance for a fifty foot heat pipe.

  3. Building a Copper Pipe "Xylophone."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Explains how to use the equation for frequency of vibration of a transversely oscillating bar or pipe with both ends free to vibrate to build a simple and inexpensive xylophone from a 3-meter section of copper pipe. The instrument produces a full major scale and can be used to investigate various musical intervals. (Author/NB)

  4. Heat Pipe Thermal Conditioning Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and evaluation of heat pipe thermal conditioning panels are discussed. The panels were designed and fabricated to be compatible with several planned NASA space vehicles, in terms of panel size, capacity, temperature gradients, and integration with various heat exchangers and electronic components. It was satisfactorily demonstrated that the heat pipe thermal conditioning panel meets the thermal efficiency and heat transport requirements.

  5. Pipe crawler with stabilizing midsection

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1994-12-27

    A pipe crawler is described having a midsection that provides the stability and flexibility to allow the pipe crawler to negotiate curved and uneven segments of piping while traveling through piping systems. The pipe crawler comprises a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly, a midsection with a gimbal at each end for connecting the midsection to the front and rear leg assemblies in a flexible manner, and an air cylinder for changing the distance between the front and rear leg assemblies. The pipe crawler moves in ''inch worm'' fashion with the front and rear leg assemblies alternating between an extended and a retracted position as the air cylinder moves the retracted leg assembly forward. The midsection has a plurality of legs extending radially for holding the midsection within a maximum displacement from the piping axis so that the gimbals are not pivoted to extreme angles where they might lock up or seize. When the midsection is displaced sufficiently, its legs with wheels on each end engage the interior surface of the piping and prevent further displacement. Using two gimbals divides the angle between the planes defined by the front and rear leg assemblies which also helps to prevent excessive gimbal pivoting. 5 figures.

  6. Vibration analysis methods for piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, R. J.

    1981-09-01

    Attention is given to flow vibrations in pipe flow induced by singularity points in the piping system. The types of pressure fluctuations induced by flow singularities are examined, including the intense wideband fluctuations immediately downstream of the singularity and the acoustic fluctuations encountered in the remainder of the circuit, and a theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics is developed. The response of the piping systems to the pressure fluctuations thus generated is considered, and the calculation of the modal characteristics of piping containing a dense fluid in order to obtain the system transfer function is discussed. The TEDEL program, which calculates the vibratory response of a structure composed of straight and curved pipes with variable mechanical characteristics forming a three-dimensional network by a finite element method, is then presented, and calculations of fluid-structural coupling in tubular networks are illustrated.

  7. Geothermal district piping - A primer

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1989-11-01

    Transmission and distribution piping constitutes approximately 40 -60% of the capital costs of typical geothermal district heating systems. Selections of economical piping suitable for the fluid chemistry is critical. Presently, most piping (56%) in geothermal systems is of asbestos cement construction. Some fiberglass (19%) and steel (19%) is also in use. Identification of an economical material to replace asbestos cement is important to future project development. By providing information on relative costs, purchase considerations, existing material performance and new products, this report seeks to provide a background of information to the potential pipe purchaser. A brief discussion of the use of uninsulated piping in geothermal district heating systems is also provided. 5 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  9. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, Charles F.; Howard, Boyd D.

    1998-01-01

    A flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus, comprising a flexible, hollow shaft that carries a plurality of modules, including at least one rotatable ultrasonic transducer, a motor/gear unit, and a position/signal encoder. The modules are connected by flexible knuckle joints that allow each module of the apparatus to change its relative orientation with respect to a neighboring module, while the shaft protects electrical wiring from kinking or buckling while the apparatus moves around a tight corner. The apparatus is moved through a pipe by any suitable means, including a tether or drawstring attached to the nose or tail, differential hydraulic pressure, or a pipe pig. The rotational speed of the ultrasonic transducer and the forward velocity of the apparatus are coordinated so that the beam sweeps out the entire interior surface of the pipe, enabling the operator to accurately assess the condition of the pipe wall and determine whether or not leak-prone corrosion damage is present.

  10. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  11. Radiative decay effects influence the local electromagnetic response of the monolayer graphene with surface corrugations in terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Yu. A.; Firsova, N. E.

    2015-07-01

    We continue the study of surface corrugations influence on the monolayer graphene local electromagnetic response in terahertz range we started earlier. The effects of radiative decay, double-valley structure of charge carriers spectrum in graphene and the "breathing" corrugated surface form induced synthetic electric fields are taken into account. To fulfill this program the generalized nonlinear self-consistent-field equation is obtained. In case of weak external alternating electric field E→ext (t) =E→0 cos ωt for the obtained equation in linear approximation on the external electric field the exact solution is found. It shows that in this case we get local induced current paths depending on the surface form z = h (x , y) . This theoretical result qualitatively explains the corresponding experiments with local current patterns depending on the point by corrugations influence. The induced currents formula was obtained without using fully quantum approach which is necessary for theoretical description of such phenomenon in graphene nanoribbons. Besides the formulae obtained in the present paper could become the basis of the new method of the imaging of surface corrugations form for given experimental picture of local current paths.

  12. Tension-induced tunable corrugation in bio-inspired two-phase soft composite materials: mechanisms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, Ahmed; Chen, Qianli

    We numerically investigate the elastic deformation response of a two-phase bio-inspired soft composite material under externally applied concentric tension using the finite element method. We show that by carefully designing the inclusion pattern it is possible to induce corrugations normal to the direction of stretch. By stacking 1D composite fibers to form 2D membranes, these corrugations collectively lead to the formation of membrane channels with shapes and sizes that are tunable by the level of stretch. Furthermore, we show that by using specific inclusion patterns in laminated plates, it is possible to create pop-ups and troughs enabling the development of complex 3D geometries from planar construction. We have found that the corrugation amplitude increases with the stiffness of inclusion and its eccentricity from the tension axis. We discuss the mechanisms leading to the development of corrugations as well as its different implications. We discuss applications for this design in a variety of fields including tunable band gap formation, surface roughness controllability, auxetic materials and toughness enhancement via programmable evolving geometrical effects..

  13. Atomic scale study of corrugating and anticorrugating states on the bare Si(1 0 0) surface.

    PubMed

    Yengui, Mayssa; Pinto, Henry P; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Riedel, Damien

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we study the origin of the corrugating and anticorrugating states through the electronic properties of the Si(1 0 0) surface via a low-temperature (9 K) scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Our study is based on the analysis of the STM topographies corrugation variations when related to the shift of the local density of states (LDOS) maximum in the [Formula: see text] direction. Our experimental results are correlated with numerical simulations using the density-functional theory with hybrid Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional to simulate the STM topographies, the projected density of states variations at different depths in the silicon surface as well as the three dimensional partial charge density distributions in real-space. This work reveals that the Si(1 0 0) surface exhibits two anticorrugating states at +0.8 and +2.8 V that are associated with a phase shift of the LDOS maximum in the unoccupied states STM topographies. By comparing the calculated data with our experimental results, we have been able to identify the link between the variations of the STM topographies corrugation and the shift of the LDOS maximum observed experimentally. Each surface voltage at which the STM topographies corrugation drops is defined as anticorrugating states. In addition, we have evidenced a sharp jump in the tunnel current when the second LDOS maximum shift is probed, whose origin is discussed and associated with the presence of Van Hove singularities. PMID:25524935

  14. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Upgrade Piping Loads on Cleanroom Roof

    SciTech Connect

    Sakla, Steve; /Fermilab

    1995-08-28

    The proposed piping layout for the DO upgrade will run along the south wall of DAB. The cryogenic service pipe runs above the upper and lower cleanroom roofs and will need to be supported by the roofs beams. Calculations were done to determine the stresses in the I-beams created by the existing and additional loads due to the upgrade. Refer to drawing no. 3823.115-ME-317283 for drawings of the piping layout. Figure 1 shows the 'plan view' portion of this drawing. The weight of the individual lines were calculated in figure 2 assuming a pipe density of O.28 lbm/in{sup 3} for stainless steel (0.12% C) and a fluid density (assuming LN2 at 1 atm) of 0.03 lbm/in{sup 3}. The weights of the corrugated steel flooring, assembly hall feed cans, support beams, and roof hatch were also included in the analysis. These loads are calculated on pgs. 5-6. A floor load of 50 lbf/ft{sup 2} was also added in order to maintain the existing floor load limit in addition to the added piping loads. Measurements of the dimensions of the I-beams determined that the nominal sizes of the beams were W8 x 21 for the lower roof and W14 x 26 for the upper roof. Pipe lengths were determined from the drawing for each of the lines on pgs. 1-2 of the calculations (refer to all piping by line numbers according to figure 2). A total weight was calculated for lines 3-9 along the south wall and lines 1-2 running along the north wall of the lower cleanroom roof. To simplify the calculations these weights were assumed to be evenly distributed on the 5 I-beam supports of the lower cleanroom roof 2.5 feet in from the south wall. The stress analysis was done using FrameMac, a 2-D finite element program for the Macintosh. Beam 3 was not included in the analysis because it is structurally equivalent to beam 1. The program outputted maximum values for shear stress, bending stress, shear force, and moments in each of the beams analyzed. These values were then compared to the allowable stresses as per the specifications and codes stated in the AISC: Manual of Steel Construction. The stresses on the roof beams needed to be determined in a number of different places. The first was in the beam itself which included the flange and web sections. The second place was at the ends of the beams where the flanges were removed to make the perpendicular connections to the other beams on the lower roof. The final point was the framed beam connection which included the bolt analysis. FrameMac calculated stresses only for the beams which included the sections where the flanges were removed to make the end connections. To analyze the connections, the allowable bending and shear stresses were solved for allowable shear and moments. This was done because FrameMac does not have the capability to analyze the dimensions for the bolts and angles used in the connections were known and the program outputted values for reaction forces and moments at the ends of the beams. Multiplying the allowable shear stress for the bolts and angle connections by their respective areas gave the allowable shear force. The allowable moment for the angle connection was calculated by multiplying the section modulus of the angle by the allowable bending stress. These allowable loads are calculated on pgs. 7-8. The allowable and maximum calculated stresses by FrameMac are summarized in a table. In conclusion, the cleanroom roofs will be able to safely support the weight of the upgrade cryogenic piping, feed cans, corrugated flooring and a 50 lbf/ft{sup 2} floor load with the addition of diagonal braces at the ends of beams 1,2,3,4, and 8. The location and size of these diagonal braces are shown in fig. 4. Also, the piping supports and feed cans will all need to be placed directly above the I-beam supports. These supports will consist of unistrut structures that will be detailed and specified separate to this analysis. The output and input data from FrameMac and the drawings used in the analysis follow the calculation pages.

  15. Growth of InP directly on Si by corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Kataria, Himanshu; Sun, Yan-Ting; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2015-02-01

    In an attempt to achieve an InP-Si heterointerface, a new and generic method, the corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth (CELOG) technique in a hydride vapor phase epitaxy reactor, was studied. An InP seed layer on Si (0 0 1) was patterned into closely spaced etched mesa stripes, revealing the Si surface in between them. The surface with the mesa stripes resembles a corrugated surface. The top and sidewalls of the mesa stripes were then covered by a SiO2 mask after which the line openings on top of the mesa stripes were patterned. Growth of InP was performed on this corrugated surface. It is shown that growth of InP emerges selectively from the openings and not on the exposed silicon surface, but gradually spreads laterally to create a direct interface with the silicon, hence the name CELOG. We study the growth behavior using growth parameters. The lateral growth is bounded by high index boundary planes of {3 3 1} and {2 1 1}. The atomic arrangement of these planes, crystallographic orientation dependent dopant incorporation and gas phase supersaturation are shown to affect the extent of lateral growth. A lateral to vertical growth rate ratio as large as 3.6 is achieved. X-ray diffraction studies confirm substantial crystalline quality improvement of the CELOG InP compared to the InP seed layer. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal the formation of a direct InP-Si heterointerface by CELOG without threading dislocations. While CELOG is shown to avoid dislocations that could arise due to the large lattice mismatch (8%) between InP and Si, staking faults could be seen in the layer. These are probably created by the surface roughness of the Si surface or SiO2 mask which in turn would have been a consequence of the initial process treatments. The direct InP-Si heterointerface can find applications in high efficiency and cost-effective Si based III-V semiconductor multijunction solar cells and optoelectronics integration.

  16. Technology for concrete pipe manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Dan; Lin, Renzhi

    2010-01-01

    The pipe manipulator is a developing mechatronic system to enhance productivity and protects workers from cave-ins in the trench while excavating and laying pipe. The pipe manipulator is for installing concrete pipe into the trench. It is an optical-electro-mechanical system. The mechanism is make up of two parts, the upside and underside. The upside is for lifting the equipment by backhoe and rotating the underside mechanism. It includes rigidity lift beams, holding pad, four-bar linkages, hydraulic cylinder, rotating support, and rotating mechanism. Holding pad will press the bucket back to keep the bucket hooking the pipe man safely and stably. The underside mechanism is for lifting, holding and adjusting the pipe section's stance. The underside mechanism includes support trolley, and lift fork. The support trolley is driven by hydraulic cylinder for moving the fork forward or backward while laying a pipe into trench. The fork is with a self-lock mechanism for preventing the pipe from slide out of the prongs. A new photoelectric locating system is developed for auto-measuring the installing pipe section's stance within the work area. The laser target has been developed as a key part in the photoelectric locating systems. The photoelectric target is a rotating polar coordinate. Photodiodes are used for making the polar radius. There is an angular displacement sensor sitting on the heart-axis of the target for measuring angle of the target rotating. The pipe manipulator can be located by the system, and the locating methods have been presented at last of the paper.

  17. Technology for concrete pipe manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Dan; Lin, Renzhi

    2009-12-01

    The pipe manipulator is a developing mechatronic system to enhance productivity and protects workers from cave-ins in the trench while excavating and laying pipe. The pipe manipulator is for installing concrete pipe into the trench. It is an optical-electro-mechanical system. The mechanism is make up of two parts, the upside and underside. The upside is for lifting the equipment by backhoe and rotating the underside mechanism. It includes rigidity lift beams, holding pad, four-bar linkages, hydraulic cylinder, rotating support, and rotating mechanism. Holding pad will press the bucket back to keep the bucket hooking the pipe man safely and stably. The underside mechanism is for lifting, holding and adjusting the pipe section's stance. The underside mechanism includes support trolley, and lift fork. The support trolley is driven by hydraulic cylinder for moving the fork forward or backward while laying a pipe into trench. The fork is with a self-lock mechanism for preventing the pipe from slide out of the prongs. A new photoelectric locating system is developed for auto-measuring the installing pipe section's stance within the work area. The laser target has been developed as a key part in the photoelectric locating systems. The photoelectric target is a rotating polar coordinate. Photodiodes are used for making the polar radius. There is an angular displacement sensor sitting on the heart-axis of the target for measuring angle of the target rotating. The pipe manipulator can be located by the system, and the locating methods have been presented at last of the paper.

  18. Dynamical back-action at 5.5 GHz in a corrugated optomechanical beam

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro-Urrios, D.; Gomis-Bresco, J.; Alzina, F.; El-Jallal, S.; Oudich, M.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Pitanti, A.; Capuj, N.; Tredicucci, A.; Griol, A.; Martínez, A.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the optomechanical properties of a breathing mechanical mode oscillating at 5.5 GHz in a 1D corrugated Si nanobeam. This mode has an experimental single-particle optomechanical coupling rate of |g{sub o,OM}| = 1.8 MHz (|g{sub o,OM}|/2π = 0.3 MHz) and shows strong dynamical back-action effects at room temperature. The geometrical flexibility of the unit-cell would lend itself to further engineering of the cavity region to localize the mode within the full phononic band-gap present at 4 GHz while keeping high g{sub o,OM} values. This would lead to longer lifetimes at cryogenic temperatures, due to the suppression of acoustic leakage.

  19. Euler buckling, membrane corrugation and pore formation induced by antimicrobial peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovic, Leonardo; Gao, Lianghui; Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Fang, Weihai

    2014-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides serve as defense weapons against bacteria. They are secreted by organisms of plants and animals and have a wide variety in composition and structure. In this study, we theoretically explore the effects of the antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using analytic arguments and the coarse grained dissipative particle dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling. Such buckled membrane states have been indeed seen in a number of experiments with bacteria affected by peptide, yet this is the first theoretical study addressing these phenomena more deeply.

  20. Energy shift of collective electron excitations in highly corrugated graphitic nanostructures: Experimental and theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedelnikova, O. V. Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Yushina, I. V.

    2014-04-21

    Effect of corrugation of hexagonal carbon network on the collective electron excitations has been studied using optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. Onion-like carbon (OLC) was taken as a material, where graphitic mantle enveloping agglomerates of multi-shell fullerenes is strongly curved. Experiments showed that positions of π and π + σ plasmon modes as well as π → π* absorption peak are substantially redshifted for OLC as compared with those of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and thermally exfoliated graphite consisted of planar sheets. This effect was reproduced in behavior of dielectric functions of rippled graphite models calculated within the random phase approximation. We conclude that the energy of electron excitations in graphitic materials could be precisely tuned by a simple bending of hexagonal network without change of topology. Moreover, our investigation suggests that in such materials optical exciton can transfer energy to plasmon non-radiatively.

  1. Energy shift of collective electron excitations in highly corrugated graphitic nanostructures: Experimental and theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedelnikova, O. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Asanov, I. P.; Yushina, I. V.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2014-04-01

    Effect of corrugation of hexagonal carbon network on the collective electron excitations has been studied using optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. Onion-like carbon (OLC) was taken as a material, where graphitic mantle enveloping agglomerates of multi-shell fullerenes is strongly curved. Experiments showed that positions of π and π + σ plasmon modes as well as π → π* absorption peak are substantially redshifted for OLC as compared with those of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and thermally exfoliated graphite consisted of planar sheets. This effect was reproduced in behavior of dielectric functions of rippled graphite models calculated within the random phase approximation. We conclude that the energy of electron excitations in graphitic materials could be precisely tuned by a simple bending of hexagonal network without change of topology. Moreover, our investigation suggests that in such materials optical exciton can transfer energy to plasmon non-radiatively.

  2. Radial Corrugations of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Driven by Inter-Wall Nonbonding Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We perform large-scale quasi-continuum simulations to determine the stable cross-sectional configurations of free-standing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). We show that at an inter-wall spacing larger than the equilibrium distance set by the inter-wall van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the initial circular cross-sections of the MWCNTs are transformed into symmetric polygonal shapes or asymmetric water-drop-like shapes. Our simulations also show that removing several innermost walls causes even more drastic cross-sectional polygonization of the MWCNTs. The predicted cross-sectional configurations agree with prior experimental observations. We attribute the radial corrugations to the compressive stresses induced by the excessive inter-wall vdW energy release of the MWCNTs. The stable cross-sectional configurations provide fundamental guidance to the design of single MWCNT-based devices and shed lights on the mechanical control of electrical properties.

  3. Entropically induced asymmetric passage times of charged tracers across corrugated channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Miguel Rubi, J.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the diffusion of charged and neutral tracers suspended in an electrolyte embedded in a channel of varying cross section. Making use of systematic approximations, the diffusion equation governing the motion of tracers is mapped into an effective 1D equation describing the dynamics along the longitudinal axis of the channel where its varying-section is encoded as an effective entropic potential. This simplified approach allows us to characterize tracer diffusion under generic confinement by measuring their mean first passage time (MFPT). In particular, we show that the interplay between geometrical confinement and electrostatic interactions strongly affect the MFTP of tracers across corrugated channels hence leading to alternative means to control tracers translocation across charged pores. Finally, our results show that the MFPTs of a charged tracer in opposite directions along an asymmetric channel may differ We expect our results to be relevant for biological as well synthetic devices whose dynamics is controlled by the detection of diluted tracers.

  4. A new mechanism for negative refraction and focusing using selective diffraction from surface corrugation.

    PubMed

    Lu, W T; Huang, Y J; Vodo, P; Banyal, R K; Perry, C H; Sridhar, S

    2007-07-23

    Refraction at a smooth interface is accompanied by momentum transfer normal to the interface. We show that corrugating an initially smooth, totally reflecting, non-metallic interface provides a momentum kick parallel to the surface, which can be used to refract light negatively or positively. This new mechanism of negative refraction is demonstrated by visible light and microwave experiments on grisms (grating-prisms). Single-beam all-angle-negative-refraction is achieved by incorporating a surface grating on a flat multilayered material. This negative refraction mechanism is used to create a new optical device, a grating lens. A planoconcave grating lens is demonstrated to focus plane microwaves to a point image. These results show that customized surface engineering can be used to achieve negative refraction even though the bulk material has positive refractive index. The surface periodicity provides a tunable parameter to control beam propagation leading to novel optical and microwave devices. PMID:19547258

  5. High second-order nonlinear response of platinum nanoflowers: the role of surface corrugation.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoang Minh; Lai, Ngoc Diep; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle

    2016-02-14

    Platinum nanoflowers (PtNFs) were elaborated using the seed-mediated growth technique applied to monodisperse platinum nanoparticles (∼3.0 nm) synthesized by the chemical reduction method. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of face-centered-cubic platinum nanocrystals. We report the Harmonic Light Scattering (HLS) properties of PtNFs for six different diameters (∼7.0; 8.0; 10.0; 14.0; 20.0 and 31.0 nm). From these HLS data we infer, for the first time, large hyperpolarizability β values of PtNFs. These very high β values of PtNFs are assigned mainly to highly corrugated surfaces for nanoparticles with irregular shapes. PMID:26795722

  6. Theory of the corrugation instability of a piston-driven shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the two-dimensional stability of a shock wave driven by a steadily moving corrugated piston in an inviscid fluid with an arbitrary equation of state. For h ?-1 or h >hc , where h is the D'yakov parameter and hc is the Kontorovich limit, we find that small perturbations on the shock front are unstable and growat first quadratically and later linearlywith time. Such instabilities are associated with nonequilibrium fluid states and imply a nonunique solution to the hydrodynamic equations. The above criteria are consistent with instability limits observed in shock-tube experiments involving ionizing and dissociating gases and may have important implications for driven shocks in laser-fusion, astrophysical, and/or detonation studies.

  7. Biased transport of Brownian particles in a weakly corrugated serpentine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinli

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the biased transport of Brownian particles in a weakly corrugated channel with constant width but a varying centerline (called serpentine channel). Two different types of channels are considered: a soft-channel is confined by a potential energy landscape; a solid-channel is confined by solid walls. Based on the small amplitude of channel boundaries, the asymptotic method is used to analytically calculate two important macroscopic transport properties—average velocity (or mobility) and effective dispersion coefficient. We find the nonlinear dependence of transport properties on Péclet numbers, which is qualitatively different from the results in a narrow serpentine channel, in which the leading order terms of mobility and the effective dispersion coefficient do not depend on Péclet numbers. In the purely diffusive case where the Péclet number is zero, the Sutherland-Einstein relation is satisfied in both soft and solid channels.

  8. Measuring the height-to-height correlation function of corrugation in suspended graphene.

    PubMed

    Kirilenko, D A; Brunkov, P N

    2016-06-01

    Nanocorrugation of 2D crystals is an important phenomenon since it affects their electronic and mechanical properties. The corrugation may have various sources; one of them is flexural phonons that, in particular, are responsible for the thermal conductivity of graphene. A study of corrugation of just the suspended graphene can reveal much of valuable information on the physics of this complicated phenomenon. At the same time, the suspended crystal nanorelief can hardly be measured directly because of high flexibility of the 2D crystal. Moreover, the relief portion related to rapid out-of-plane oscillations (flexural phonons) is also inaccessible by such measurements. Here we present a technique for measuring the Fourier components of the height-height correlation function H(q) of suspended graphene which includes the effect of flexural phonons. The technique is based on the analysis of electron diffraction patterns. The H(q) is measured in the range of wavevectors q≈0.4-4.5nm(-1). At the upper limit of this range H(q) does follow the T/κq(4) law. So, we measured the value of suspended graphene bending rigidity κ=1.2±0.4eV at ambient temperature T≈300K. At intermediate wave vectors, H(q) follows a slightly weaker exponent than theoretically predicted q(-3.15) but is closer to the results of the molecular dynamics simulation. At low wave vectors, the dependence becomes even weaker, which may be a sign of influence of charge carriers on the dynamics of undulations longer than 10nm. The technique presented can be used for studying physics of flexural phonons in other 2D materials. PMID:27043766

  9. High second-order nonlinear response of platinum nanoflowers: the role of surface corrugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Hoang Minh; Lai, Ngoc Diep; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    Platinum nanoflowers (PtNFs) were elaborated using the seed-mediated growth technique applied to monodisperse platinum nanoparticles (~3.0 nm) synthesized by the chemical reduction method. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of face-centered-cubic platinum nanocrystals. We report the Harmonic Light Scattering (HLS) properties of PtNFs for six different diameters (~7.0 8.0; 10.0; 14.0; 20.0 and 31.0 nm). From these HLS data we infer, for the first time, large hyperpolarizability β values of PtNFs. These very high β values of PtNFs are assigned mainly to highly corrugated surfaces for nanoparticles with irregular shapes.Platinum nanoflowers (PtNFs) were elaborated using the seed-mediated growth technique applied to monodisperse platinum nanoparticles (~3.0 nm) synthesized by the chemical reduction method. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of face-centered-cubic platinum nanocrystals. We report the Harmonic Light Scattering (HLS) properties of PtNFs for six different diameters (~7.0 8.0; 10.0; 14.0; 20.0 and 31.0 nm). From these HLS data we infer, for the first time, large hyperpolarizability β values of PtNFs. These very high β values of PtNFs are assigned mainly to highly corrugated surfaces for nanoparticles with irregular shapes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The recalculated β and β' values inferred from data by Galletto et al.15 in AuNSs using their reported β values per nanoparticle corrected. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07571h

  10. Sound Transmission at Pipe Joints.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servis, Dimitris C.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A model was developed using beam and plane wave theory to describe the sound transmission at pipe joints. This approach greatly simplifies the modelling of the pipe joint and the solution is presented in a manner which can be applied in both the Frequency and the Time domain, for the solution of acoustic and fluid dynamics problems related to pipe joint transmission. This form of modelling can be extended to describe a wide range of pipe joints and discontinuities and lend itself to the study of piping networks by incorporating its solution in existing models used to describe the performance of large systems. A variety of experimental techniques have been explored and applied for the measurement of the sound transmission at pipe joints. The model predictions were found to be in good agreement with experimental data and form the basis of a simple and effective method for the study of sound transmission at pipe joints.

  11. Superconducting pipes and levitating magnets.

    PubMed

    Levin, Yan; Rizzato, Felipe B

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a beautiful demonstration of the Faraday and the Lenz laws in which a small neodymium magnet falls slowly through a conducting nonferromagnetic tube, we consider the dynamics of a magnet falling coaxially through a superconducting pipe. Unlike the case of normal conducting pipes, in which the magnet quickly reaches the terminal velocity, inside a superconducting tube the magnet falls freely. On the other hand, to enter the pipe the magnet must overcome a large electromagnetic energy barrier. For sufficiently strong magnets, the barrier is so large that the magnet will not be able to penetrate it and will be levitated over the mouth of the pipe. We calculate the work that must done to force the magnet to enter a superconducting tube. The calculations show that superconducting pipes are very efficient at screening magnetic fields. For example, the magnetic field of a dipole at the center of a short pipe of radius a and length L approximately > a decays, in the axial direction, with a characteristic length xi approximately 0.26a. The efficient screening of the magnetic field might be useful for shielding highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices. Finally, the motion of the magnet through a superconducting pipe is compared and contrasted to the flow of ions through a trans-membrane channel. PMID:17280160

  12. Surface Plasmon-Polariton Mediated Red Emission from Organic Light-Emitting Devices Based on Metallic Electrodes Integrated with Dual-Periodic Corrugation

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yan-Gang; Feng, Jing; Liu, Yu-Shan; Li, Yun-Fei; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Han, Xiao-Chi; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an effective approach to realize excitation and outcoupling of the SPP modes associated with both cathode/organic and anode/organic interfaces in OLEDs by integrating dual-periodic corrugation. The dual-periodic corrugation consists of two set gratings with different periods. The light trapped in the SPP modes associated with both top and bottom electrode/organic interfaces are efficiently extracted from the OLEDs by adjusting appropriate periods of two set corrugations, and a 29% enhancement in the current efficiency has been obtained. PMID:25407776

  13. Variable conductance heat pipe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, B. D.; Edwards, D. K.; Anderson, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Research and development programs in variable conductance heat pipe technology were conducted. The treatment has been comprehensive, involving theoretical and/or experimental studies in hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, heat transfer into and out of the pipe, fluid selection, and materials compatibility, in addition to the principal subject of variable conductance control techniques. Efforts were not limited to analytical work and laboratory experimentation, but extended to the development, fabrication and test of spacecraft hardware, culminating in the successful flight of the Ames Heat Pipe Experiment on the OAO-C spacecraft.

  14. Abrasion protection in process piping

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, J.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping often is subjected to failure from abrasion or a combination of abrasion and corrosion. Abrasion is a complex phenomenon, with many factors involved to varying degrees. Hard, mineral based alumina ceramic and basalt materials are used to provide protection against abrasion in many piping systems. Successful life extension examples are presented from many different industries. Lined piping components require special attention with regard to operating conditions as well as design and engineering considerations. Economic justification involves direct cost comparisons and avoided costs.

  15. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  16. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  17. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  18. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  19. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  20. Heat pipe technology: A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A cumulative bibliography on heat pipe research and development projects is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) general information, (2) heat pipe applications, (3) heat pipe theory, (4) design and fabrication, (5) testing and operation, (6) subject and author index, and (7) heat pipe related patents.

  1. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  2. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  3. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  4. Heat pipe technology: A biblography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A bibliography of heat pipe research and development projects conducted during April through June 1972, is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) general information, (2) heat pipe applications, (3) heat pipe theory, (4) design and fabrication, (5) test and operation, (6) subject and author index, and (7) heat pipe related patents.

  5. Determination of Secondary Encasement Pipe Design Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    TEDESCHI, A.R.

    2000-10-26

    This document published results of iterative calculations for maximum tank farm transfer secondary pipe (encasement) pressure upon failure of the primary pipe. The maximum pressure was calculated from a primary pipe guillotine break. Results show encasement pipeline design or testing pressures can be significantly lower than primary pipe pressure criteria.

  6. 46 CFR 45.133 - Air pipes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air pipes. 45.133 Section 45.133 Shipping COAST GUARD....133 Air pipes. (a) Where an air pipe to any tank extends above the freeboard or superstructure deck— (1) The exposed part of the air pipe must be made of steel and of sufficient thickness to...

  7. Leachate storage transport tanker loadout piping

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlock, R.W.

    1994-11-18

    This report shows the modifications to the W-025 Trench No. 31 leachate loadout discharge piping, and also the steps involved in installing the discharge piping, including dimensions and welding information. The installation of the discharge pipe should be done in accordance to current pipe installation standards. Trench No. 31 is a radioactive mixed waste land disposal facility.

  8. The Sacred Pipe in American Indian Religions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Paul B.

    1984-01-01

    A bibliographic essay covers all significant literature on the Sacred Pipe among the North American tribes. Organizes over 130 references dating from 1843 to 1980 under topics such as American Indian attitudes toward the pipe, sacramental and ceremonial uses of the pipe, and the pipe as symbolic man. (JHZ)

  9. 46 CFR 45.133 - Air pipes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air pipes. 45.133 Section 45.133 Shipping COAST GUARD....133 Air pipes. (a) Where an air pipe to any tank extends above the freeboard or superstructure deck— (1) The exposed part of the air pipe must be made of steel and of sufficient thickness to...

  10. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  11. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  12. High capacity heat pipe with axial grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Y.; Ido, Y.

    A new type of high capacity heat pipe for spacecraft use was fabricated and tested. The heat pipe consists of an outer pipe and an inner pipe. The outer pipe is a container and it has two channels, one for liquid and one for vapor. The inner pipe is provided with axial grooves and circumferential slits, and it is inserted into the vapor channel of the outer pipe. The circumferential slits connect the liquid channel and the axial grooves. Preliminary test results for the first 1 m long development model are presented and discussed, relating to its heat transport capacity.

  13. Heat pipe life and processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniuk, D.; Luedke, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    The merit of adding water to the reflux charge in chemically and solvent cleaned aluminum/slab wick/ammonia heat pipes was evaluated. The effect of gas in the performance of three heat pipe thermal control systems was found significant in simple heat pipes, less significant in a modified simple heat pipe model with a short wickless pipe section. Use of gas data for the worst and best heat pipes of the matrix in a variable conductance heat pipe model showed a 3 C increase in the source temperature at full on condition after 20 and 246 years, respectively.

  14. Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B. ); Smith, R. )

    1994-09-19

    Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

  15. Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prenger, F. C.; Hill, D. D.; Daney, D. E.; Daugherty, M. A.; Green, G. F.; Roth, E. W.

    A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in the temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined.

  16. Method for casting polyethylene pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Short lengths of 7-cm ID polyethylene pipe are cast in a mold which has a core made of room-temperature-vulcanizable (RTV) silicone. Core expands during casting and shrinks on cooling to allow for contraction of the polyethylene.

  17. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The start-up transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe start-up behaviors. Topics include the four start-up scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the start-up scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power start-up, and methods to enhance the start-up success. Also addressed are the thermodynamic constraint between the evaporator and reservoir in the loop heat pipe operation, the superheat requirement for nucleate boiling, pressure spike and pressure surge during the start-up transient, and repeated cycles of loop start-up andshutdown under certain conditions.

  18. Light pipes for LED measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, S. R.; Thomas, E. F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Light pipe directly couples LED optical output to single detector. Small area detector measures total optical output of diode. Technique eliminates thermal measurement problems and channels optical output to remote detector.

  19. Heat pipe radiators for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the data heat pipe radiator systems tested in both vacuum and ambient environments was continued. The systems included (1) a feasibility VCHP header heat-pipe panel, (2) the same panel reworked to eliminate the VCHP feature and referred to as the feasibility fluid header panel, and (3) an optimized flight-weight fluid header panel termed the 'prototype.' A description of freeze-thaw thermal vacuum tests conducted on the feasibility VCHP was included. In addition, the results of ambient tests made on the feasibility fluid header are presented, including a comparison with analytical results. A thermal model of a fluid header heat pipe radiator was constructed and a computer program written. The program was used to make a comparison of the VCHP and fluid-header concepts for both single and multiple panel applications. The computer program was also employed for a parametric study, including optimum feeder heat pipe spacing, of the prototype fluid header.

  20. Physics of heat pipe rewetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report which summarizes the research accomplishments under the project entitled 'Physics of Heat Pipe Rewetting' under NASA Grant No. NAG 9-525, Basic, during the period of April 1, 1991 to January 31, 1994. The objective of the research project was to investigate both analytically and experimentally the rewetting characteristics of the heated, grooved plate. The grooved plate is to simulate the inner surface of the vapor channel in monogroove heat pipes for space station design. In such designs, the inner surface of the vapor channel is threaded with monogrooves. When the heat pipe is thermally overloaded, dryout of the monogroove surface occurs. Such a dryout surface should be promptly rewetted to prevent the failure of the heat pipe operation in the thermal radiator of the space station.

  1. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Da-Xi; Beach, Duane E.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range. Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  2. B Plant process piping replacement feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Howden, G.F.

    1996-02-07

    Reports on the feasibility of replacing existing embedded process piping with new more corrosion resistant piping between cells and between cells and a hot pipe trench of a Hanford Site style canyon facility. Provides concepts for replacement piping installation, and use of robotics to replace the use of the canyon crane as the primary means of performing/supporting facility modifications (eg, cell lining, pipe replacement, equipment reinstallation) and operational maintenenace.

  3. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Daxi; Beach, Duane E.

    2004-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test Data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range.Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  4. Mapping Temperatures On Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunnerson, Fred S.; Thorncroft, Glen E.

    1993-01-01

    Paints containing thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC's) used to map temperatures on heat pipes and thermosyphons. Color of thermally sensitive TLC coat changes reversibly upon heating or cooling. Each distinct color indicates particular temperature. Transient and steady-state isotherms become visible as colored bands. Positions and movements of bands yield information about startup transients, steady-state operation, cooler regions containing noncondensible gas, and other phenomena relevant to performance of heat pipe.

  5. Heat Pipe Thermal Conditioning Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    The technology involved in designing and fabricating a heat pipe thermal conditioning panel to satisfy a broad range of thermal control system requirements on NASA spacecraft is discussed. The design specifications were developed for a 30 by 30 inch heat pipe panel. The fundamental constraint was a maximum of 15 gradient from source to sink at 300 watts input and a flux density of 2 watts per square inch. The results of the performance tests conducted on the panel are analyzed.

  6. Automated internal pipe cutting device

    DOEpatents

    Godlewski, William J.; Haffke, Gary S.; Purvis, Dale; Bashar, Ronald W.; Jones, Stewart D.; Moretti, Jr., Henry; Pimentel, James

    2003-01-21

    The invention is a remotely controlled internal pipe cutting device primarily used for cutting pipes where the outside of the pipe is inaccessible at the line where the cut is to be made. The device includes an axial ram within a rotational cylinder which is enclosed in a housing. The housing is adapted for attachment to an open end of the pipe and for supporting the ram and cylinder in cantilever fashion within the pipe. A radially movable cutter, preferably a plasma arc torch, is attached to the distal end of the ram. A drive mechanism, containing motors and mechanical hardware for operating the ram and cylinder, is attached to the proximal end of the housing. The ram and cylinder provide for moving the cutter axially and circumferentially, and a cable assembly attached to a remote motor provide for the movement of the cutter radially, within the pipe. The control system can be adjusted and operated remotely to control the position and movement of the cutter to obtain the desired cut. The control system can also provide automatic standoff control for a plasma arc torch.

  7. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, Charles K.; Sette, Primo J.

    1992-01-01

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  8. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device that provides for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  9. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

    1992-11-24

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels. 2 figs.

  10. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  11. Heat pipe cooled power magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A high frequency, high power, low specific weight (0.57 kg/kW) transformer developed for space use was redesigned with heat pipe cooling allowing both a reduction in weight and a lower internal temperature rise. The specific weight of the heat pipe cooled transformer was reduced to 0.4 kg/kW and the highest winding temperature rise was reduced from 40 C to 20 C in spite of 10 watts additional loss. The design loss/weight tradeoff was 18 W/kg. Additionally, allowing the same 40 C winding temperature rise as in the original design, the KVA rating is increased to 4.2 KVA, demonstrating a specific weight of 0.28 kg/kW with the internal loss increased by 50W. This space environment tested heat pipe cooled design performed as well electrically as the original conventional design, thus demonstrating the advantages of heat pipes integrated into a high power, high voltage magnetic. Another heat pipe cooled magnetic, a 3.7 kW, 20A input filter inductor was designed, developed, built, tested, and described. The heat pipe cooled magnetics are designed to be Earth operated in any orientation.

  12. Drill pipe turning device

    SciTech Connect

    Soutsos, M.D.

    1986-08-12

    This patent describes a tool conformed to clamp onto segments of pipe and to advance in rotation the segments, including a frame, two opposed jaw-like arms each of the arms at a first end thereof attached to the frame by a pivotal mount and each arm including rolling means at a free second end thereof, a chain loop, a motor attached to the frame for advancing the chain loop, the motor including a drive sprocket thereon. The chain loop extends around and in engagement with the drive sprocket, the pivotal mounts, and the rolling means; the arms each including levers radially extending from the pivoted mounts and projecting over the frame; a pair of shuttles slidably mounted on the frame and having camming means to abut against the levers to pivotally articulate the arms around the pivotal mounts in the course of the translation of the shuttles; a pair of shuttle idles supported for rotation on the shuttles and aligned to engage the exterior of the chain loop; and actuating means operatively connected for translating the shuttles.

  13. Leaks in pipe networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pudar, Ranko S.; Liggett, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Leak detection in water-distribution systems can be accomplished by solving an inverse problem using measurements of pressure and/or flow. The problem is formulated with equivalent orifice areas of possible leaks as the unknowns. Minimization of the difference between measured and calculated heads produces a solution for the areas. The quality of the result depends on number and location of the measurements. A sensitivity matrix is key to deciding where to make measurements. Both location and magnitude of leaks are sensitive to the quantity and quality of pressure measurements and to how well the pipe friction parameters are known. The overdetermined problem (more measurements than suspected leaks) gives the best results, but some information can be derived from the underdetermined problem. The variance of leak areas, based on the quality of system characteristics and pressure data, indicates the likely accuracy of the results. The method will not substitute for more traditional leak surveys but can serve as a guide and supplement.

  14. Organ pipe resonance induced vibration in piping system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustic-induced vibration is a fluid-structure interaction phenomenon. The feedback mechanism between the acoustic pressure pulsation and the structure movements determines the excited acoustic modes which, in turn, amplify the structure response when confidence frequency and mode shape matching occurs. The acoustic modes are not determined from the acoustic boundary conditions alone, structure feedback is as responsible for determining the acoustic modes and shaping the resulting forcing functions. Acoustic-induced piping vibration, when excited, does not attenuate much with distance. Pressure pulsation can be transmitted throughout the piping system and its branch connections. It is this property that makes vibration monitoring difficult, because vibration can surface at locations far away from the acoustic source when resonance occurs. For a large piping system with interconnected branches, the monitoring task can be formidable, particularly when there is no indication what the real source is. In organ pipe resonance induced vibration, the initiating acoustic source may be inconspicuous or unavoidable during operation. In these situations, the forcing function approach can offer an optimal tool for vibration assessment. The forcing function approach was used in the evaluation of a standby steam piping vibration problem. Monitoring locations and instrument specifications were determined from the acoustic eigenfunction profiles. Measured data confirmed the presence of coherent vibrations in the large bore piping. The developed forcing function permits design evaluation of the piping system, which leads to remedial actions and enables fatigue life determination, thus providing confidence to system operation. The forcing function approach is shown to be useful in finding potential vibration area and verifying the integrity of weak structure links. Application is to steam lines at BWR plants.

  15. Reduction of the azimuthal beamwidth of quasi-optical circular waveguide slot-type launchers using a corrugated horn-like structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sealy, P.J.; Vernon, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The radiation pattern of a rotating TE{sub mn}{sup O} mode quasi-optical launcher with corrugated flares is examined. A potential use of the launcher would be to excite a beam-shaping reflector system. Without the flares the launcher has a broad azimuthal beamwidth. The corrugated flares decrease the azimuthal beamwidth and increase the peak power density of the launcher`s radiation pattern.

  16. Ultrasonic isolation of buried pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinov, Eli; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Cawley, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Long-range guided wave testing (GWT) is used routinely for the monitoring and detection of corrosion defects in above ground pipelines. The GWT test range in buried, coated pipelines is greatly reduced compared to above ground configurations due to energy leakage into the embedding soil. In this paper, the effect of pipe coatings on the guided wave attenuation is investigated with the aim of increasing test ranges for buried pipelines. The attenuation of the T(0,1) and L(0,2) guided wave modes is measured using a full-scale experimental apparatus in a fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated 8 in. pipe, buried in loose and compacted sand. Tests are performed over a frequency range typically used in GWT of 10-35 kHz and compared with model predictions. It is shown that the application of a low impedance coating between the FBE layer and the sand effectively decouples the influence of the sand on the ultrasound leakage from the buried pipe. Ultrasonic isolation of a buried pipe is demonstrated by coating the pipe with a Polyethylene (PE)-foam layer that has a smaller impedance than both the pipe and sand, and has the ability to withstand the overburden load from the sand. The measured attenuation in the buried PE-foam-FBE-coated pipe is found to be substantially reduced, in the range of 0.3-1.2 dB m-1 for loose and compacted sand conditions, compared to measured attenuation of 1.7-4.7 dB m-1 in the buried FBE-coated pipe without the PE-foam. The acoustic properties of the PE-foam are measured independently using ultrasonic interferometry and incorporated into model predictions of guided wave propagation in buried coated pipe. Good agreement is found between the experimental measurements and model predictions. The attenuation exhibits periodic peaks in the frequency domain corresponding to the through-thickness resonance frequencies of the coating layer. The large reduction in guided wave attenuation for PE-coated pipes would lead to greatly increased GWT test ranges; such coatings would be attractive for new pipeline installations.

  17. Emission Characteristics of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Organic Thin-Films with Planar and Corrugated Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mao-Kuo; Lin, Chii-Wann; Yang, Chih-Chung; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Lee, Jiun-Haw; Lin, Hoang-Yan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we review the emission characteristics from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic molecular thin films with planar and corrugated structures. In a planar thin film structure, light emission from OLEDs was strongly influenced by the interference effect. With suitable design of microcavity structure and layer thicknesses adjustment, optical characteristics can be engineered to achieve high optical intensity, suitable emission wavelength, and broad viewing angles. To increase the extraction efficiency from OLEDs and organic thin-films, corrugated structure with micro- and nano-scale were applied. Microstructures can effectively redirects the waveguiding light in the substrate outside the device. For nanostructures, it is also possible to couple out the organic and plasmonic modes, not only the substrate mode. PMID:20480033

  18. Study on light extraction efficiency of light-emitting diodes having periodically corrugated enhancement structures with different duty cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Hao Ming; Wang, Huei Tsz; Huang, Chen Yang; Pan, Huang Wei; Chao, Shiuh

    2016-02-01

    The duty cycle effect on the light extraction efficiency of light-emitting diodes having different periodically corrugated enhancement structures placed opposite to the emission surface was studied. The experimental results were compared with numerical simulation results. The numerical simulation was performed using a rigorous-coupled-wave-analysis method. In the case of common structures such as a patterned-sapphire structure, we found that, in general, extraction efficiency increased drastically when duty cycle was increased from zero, and then it varied relatively slowly as the duty cycle was increased further; after that, the extraction efficiency dropped drastically as the duty cycle approached 100%. However, for a structure that was composed of autocloned-photonic crystals super-imposing on the periodical corrugation, the efficiency increased monotonically with the duty cycle and reached 83.4% (corresponding to 589% enhancement efficiency) when the duty cycle approached 100%. A method for the fabrication of such high-efficiency structures was proposed.

  19. Experimental Demonstration of Longitudinal Beam Phase-Space Linearizer in a Free-Electron Laser Facility by Corrugated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Haixiao; Zhang, Meng; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-12-01

    Removal of the undesired time-energy correlations in the electron beam is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons themselves in a corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as a beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ˜10 000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  20. Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, William H.

    1984-04-24

    A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.