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Sample records for cortical bone strain

  1. Machine vision photogrammetry: a technique for measurement of microstructural strain in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, D P; Nicholls, A E; Lankford, J; Davy, D T

    2001-01-01

    Understanding local microstructural deformations and strains in cortical bone may lead to a better understanding of cortical bone damage development, fracture, and remodeling. Traditional experimental techniques for measuring deformation and strain do not allow characterization of these quantities at the microstructural level in cortical bone. This study describes a technique based on digital stereoimaging used to measure the microstructural strain fields in cortical bone. The technique allows the measurement of material surface displacements and strains by comparing images acquired from a specimen at two distinct stress states. The accuracy of the system is investigated by analyzing an undeformed image set; the test image is identical to the reference image but translated by a known pixel amount. An increase in the correlation sub-image train parameter results in an increase in displacement measurement accuracy from 0.049 to 0.012 pixels. Errors in strain calculated from the measured displacement field were between 39 and 564 microstrain depending upon the sub-image train size and applied image displacement. The presence of a microcrack in cortical bone results in local strain at the crack tip reaching 0.030 (30,000 microstrain) and 0.010 (10,000 microstrain) near osteocyte lacunae. It is expected that the use of this technique will allow a greater understanding of bone strength and fracture as well as bone mechanotransduction. PMID:11425075

  2. Influence of strain rate on the mechanical behaviour in tension of bovine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latella, C.; Dotta, M.; Forni, D.; Tesio, N.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of bones when subjected to tension loading in a wide range of strain-rates is fundamental to develop protection systems. The paper presents the preliminary tests on the tensile behaviour of bovine cortical bone at medium and high strain rates. Two special apparatus, both installed at the DynaMat Laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, a Hydro-Pneumatic Machine and a Modified Hopkinson Bar respectively for medium and high strain-rate tests have been used. Flat shape specimens (having 10 mm of gauge length, 5 mm width and 3 mm thickness) have been obtained from 15 bovine femurs with the same age. The paper describes the preparation techniques of the samples and the experimental results obtained. The bovine cortical bone shown a quite important strain rate dependency.

  3. Constant strain rate compression of bovine cortical bone on the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar.

    PubMed

    Bekker, A; Cloete, T J; Chinsamy-Turan, A; Nurick, G N; Kok, S

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a visco-elastic material which implies that strain rate will affect its response. Although the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar is an accepted technique for determining the dynamic compressive properties of cortical bone it has been shown that the strain rate of compression does not remain constant throughout the duration of a classical experiment with a uniform striker. This raises concerns as to the measurement of smeared responses. This paper presents a shaped striker technique whereby the incident pulse can be shaped to attain a constant strain rate experiment for bovine bone. Shaped strikers offer benefits such as re-usability and increased test repeatability. A comparison of the stress-strain-strain rate responses attained through classical and constant strain rate experiments shows that the shape of the stress-strain curves from conventional experiments is adversely affected in the portion where the strain rate varies. The dynamic response corridors for the two tests are similar, however the ultimate properties are affected. It is concluded that the strain rate history should be presented with dynamic stress-strain responses since the instantaneous strain rate is a likely contributor to potential constitutive models. PMID:25492009

  4. Hopkinson bar techniques for the intermediate strain rate testing of bovine cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Cloete, T. J.; Paul, G.; Ismail, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the dynamic viscoelastic properties of bone is required to understand the mechanisms of macroscopic bone fracture in humans, and other terrestrial mammals, during impact loading events (e.g. falls, vehicle accidents, etc.). While the dynamic response of bone has been studied for several decades, high-quality data remain limited, and it is only within the last decade that techniques for conducting dynamic compression tests on bone at near-constant strain rates have been developed. Furthermore, there appears to be a lack of published bone data in the intermediate strain rate (ISR) range (i.e. 1–100 s−1), which represents a regime in which many dynamic bone fractures occur. In this paper, preliminary results for the dynamic compression of bovine cortical bone in the ISR regime are presented. The results are obtained using two Hopkinson-bar-related techniques, namely the conventional split Hopkinson bar arrangement incorporating a novel cone-in-tube striker design, and the recently developed wedge bar apparatus. The experimental results show a rapid transition in the strain rate sensitive behaviour of bovine cortical bone in the ISR range. Finally, a new viscoelastic model is proposed that captures the observed transition behaviour. PMID:24711493

  5. In vitro non-enzymatic ribation reduces post-yield strain accommodation in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Willett, Thomas L; Sutty, Sibi; Gaspar, Anne; Avery, Nick; Grynpas, Marc

    2013-02-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation (NEG) and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) may contribute to bone fragility in various diseases, ageing, and other conditions by modifying bone collagen and causing degraded mechanical properties. In this study, we sought to further understand how collagen modification in an in vitro non-enzymatic ribation model leads to loss of cortical bone toughness. Previous in vitro studies using non-enzymatic ribation reported loss of ductility in the cortical bone. Increased crosslinking is most commonly blamed for these changes; however, some studies report positive correlations between measures of total collagen crosslinking and work-to-fracture/toughness measurements whilst correlations between general NEG and measures of ductility are often negative. Fifteen bone beam triplets were cut from bovine metatarsi. Each provided one native non-incubated control, one incubated control and one ribated specimen. Incubation involved simulated body fluid±ribose for fourteen days at 37°C. Pentosidine and pyridinoline crosslinks were measured using HPLC. Three-point bending tests quantified mechanical properties. Fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The effects of ribation on bone collagen molecular stability and intermolecular connectivity were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and hydrothermal isometric tension testing. Ribation caused increased non-enzymatic collagen modification and pentosidine content (16mmol/mol collagen) and inferior post-yield mechanical behaviour, especially post-yield strain and flexural toughness. Fracture surfaces were smoother with less collagen fibril deformation or tearing than observed in controls. In the ribated group only, pentosidine content and thermomechanical measures of crosslinking were positively correlated with measures of strain accommodation and energy absorption before failure. Non-enzymatic ribation and the resulting modifications reduce cortical bone pseudo

  6. Deformable image registration and 3D strain mapping for the quantitative assessment of cortical bone microdamage.

    PubMed

    Christen, David; Levchuk, Alina; Schori, Stefan; Schneider, Philipp; Boyd, Steven K; Müller, Ralph

    2012-04-01

    The resistance to forming microcracks is a key factor for bone to withstand critical loads without fracturing. In this study, we investigated the initiation and propagation of microcracks in murine cortical bone by combining three-dimensional images from synchrotron radiation-based computed tomography and time-lapsed biomechanical testing to observe microdamage accumulation over time. Furthermore, a novel deformable image registration procedure utilizing digital volume correlation and demons image registration was introduced to compute 3D strain maps allowing characterization of the mechanical environment of the microcracks. The displacement and strain maps were validated in a priori tests. At an image resolution of 740 nm the spatial resolution of the strain maps was 10 μm (MTF), while the errors of the displacements and strains were 130 nm and 0.013, respectively. The strain maps revealed a complex interaction of the propagating microcracks with the bone microstructure. In particular, we could show that osteocyte lacunae play a dual role as stress concentrating features reducing bone strength, while at the same time contributing to the bone toughness by blunting the crack tip. We conclude that time-lapsed biomechanical imaging in combination with three-dimensional strain mapping is suitable for the investigation of crack initiation and propagation in many porous materials under various loading scenarios. PMID:22402165

  7. The effect of strain rate on fracture toughness of human cortical bone: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani; Zioupos, Peter; Buchanan, Drew; Vashishth, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    Evaluating the mechanical response of bone under high loading rates is crucial to understanding fractures in traumatic accidents or falls. In the current study, a computational approach based on cohesive finite element modeling was employed to evaluate the effect of strain rate on fracture toughness of human cortical bone. Two-dimensional compact tension specimen models were simulated to evaluate the change in initiation and propagation fracture toughness with increasing strain rate (range: 0.08-18 s(-1)). In addition, the effect of porosity in combination with strain rate was assessed using three-dimensional models of micro-computed tomography-based compact tension specimens. The simulation results showed that bone's resistance against the propagation of a crack decreased sharply with increase in strain rates up to 1 s(-1) and attained an almost constant value for strain rates larger than 1 s(-1). On the other hand, initiation fracture toughness exhibited a more gradual decrease throughout the strain rates. There was a significant positive correlation between the experimentally measured number of microcracks and the fracture toughness found in the simulations. Furthermore, the simulation results showed that the amount of porosity did not affect the way initiation fracture toughness decreased with increasing strain rates, whereas it exacerbated the same strain rate effect when propagation fracture toughness was considered. These results suggest that strain rates associated with falls lead to a dramatic reduction in bone's resistance against crack propagation. The compromised fracture resistance of bone at loads exceeding normal activities indicates a sharp reduction and/or absence of toughening mechanisms in bone during high strain conditions associated with traumatic fracture. PMID:21783112

  8. THE EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE: A FINITE ELEMENT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ani; Zioupos, Peter; Buchanan, Drew; Vashishth, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the mechanical response of bone under high loading rates is crucial to understanding fractures in traumatic accidents or falls. In the current study, a computational approach based on cohesive finite element modeling was employed to evaluate the effect of strain rate on fracture toughness of human cortical bone. Two-dimensional compact tension specimen models were simulated to evaluate the change in initiation and propagation fracture toughness with increasing strain rate (range: 0.08 to 18 s−1). In addition, the effect of porosity in combination with strain rate was assessed using three-dimensional models of microcomputed tomography-based compact tension specimens. The simulation results showed that bone’s resistance against the propagation of fracture decreased sharply with increase in strain rates up to 1 s−1 and attained an almost constant value for strain rates larger than 1 s−1. On the other hand, initiation fracture toughness exhibited a more gradual decrease throughout the strain rates. There was a significant positive correlation between the experimentally measured number of microcracks and the fracture toughness found in the simulations. Furthermore, the simulation results showed that the amount of porosity did not affect the way initiation fracture toughness decreased with increasing strain rates, whereas it exacerbated the same strain rate effect when propagation fracture toughness was considered. These results suggest that strain rates associated with falls lead to a dramatic reduction in bone’s resistance against crack propagation. The compromised fracture resistance of bone at loads exceeding normal activities indicates a sharp reduction and/or absence of toughening mechanisms in bone during high strain conditions associated with traumatic fracture. PMID:21783112

  9. The effects of bone density and crestal cortical bone thickness on micromotion and peri-implant bone strain distribution in an immediately loaded implant: a nonlinear finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the effects of bone density and crestal cortical bone thickness at the implant-placement site on micromotion (relative displacement between the implant and bone) and the peri-implant bone strain distribution under immediate-loading conditions. Methods A three-dimensional finite element model of the posterior mandible with an implant was constructed. Various bone parameters were simulated, including low or high cancellous bone density, low or high crestal cortical bone density, and crestal cortical bone thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 mm. Delayed- and immediate-loading conditions were simulated. A buccolingual oblique load of 200 N was applied to the top of the abutment. Results The maximum extent of micromotion was approximately 100 μm in the low-density cancellous bone models, whereas it was under 30 μm in the high-density cancellous bone models. Crestal cortical bone thickness significantly affected the maximum micromotion in the low-density cancellous bone models. The minimum principal strain in the peri-implant cortical bone was affected by the density of the crestal cortical bone and cancellous bone to the same degree for both delayed and immediate loading. In the low-density cancellous bone models under immediate loading, the minimum principal strain in the peri-implant cortical bone decreased with an increase in crestal cortical bone thickness. Conclusions Cancellous bone density may be a critical factor for avoiding excessive micromotion in immediately loaded implants. Crestal cortical bone thickness significantly affected the maximum extent of micromotion and peri-implant bone strain in simulations of low-density cancellous bone under immediate loading. PMID:27382504

  10. Effect of trabecular bone loss on cortical strain rate during impact in an in vitro model of avian femur

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Tal; Gefen, Amit

    2006-01-01

    Background Osteoporotic hip fractures occur due to loss of cortical and trabecular bone mass and consequent degradation in whole bone strength. The direct cause of most fractures is a fall, and hence, characterizing the mechanical behavior of a whole osteopenic bone under impact is important. However, very little is known about the mechanical interactions between cortical and trabecular bone during impact, and it is specifically unclear to what extent epiphyseal trabecular bone contributes to impact resistance of whole bones. We hypothesized that trabecular bone serves as a structural support to the cortex during impact, and hence, loss of a critical mass of trabecular bone reduces internal constraining of the cortex, and, thereby, decreases the impact tolerance of the whole bone. Methods To test this hypothesis, we conducted cortical strain rate measurements in adult chicken's proximal femora subjected to a Charpy impact test, after removing different trabecular bone core masses to simulate different osteopenic severities. Results We found that removal of core trabecular bone decreased by ~10-fold the cortical strain rate at the side opposite to impact (p < 0.01), i.e. from 359,815 ± 1799 μm/m per second (mean ± standard error) for an intact (control) specimen down to 35,997 ± 180 μm/m per second where 67% of the total trabecular bone mass (~0.7 grams in adult chicken) were removed. After normalizing the strain rate by the initial weight of bone specimens, a sigmoid relation emerged between normalized strain rate and removed mass of trabecular bone, showing very little effect on the cortex strain rate if below 10% of the trabecular mass is removed, but most of the effect was already apparent for less than 30% trabecular bone loss. An analytical model of the experiments supported this behavior. Conclusion We conclude that in our in vitro avian model, loss of over 10% of core trabecular bone substantially altered the deformation response of whole bone to impact

  11. Development of a strain rate dependent material model of human cortical bone for computer-aided reconstruction of injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Zahra; Zioupos, Peter; Graw, Matthias; Peldschus, Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided methods such as finite-element simulation offer a great potential in the forensic reconstruction of injury mechanisms. Numerous studies have been performed on understanding and analysing the mechanical properties of bone and the mechanism of its fracture. Determination of the mechanical properties of bones is made on the same basis used for other structural materials. The mechanical behaviour of bones is affected by the mechanical properties of the bone material, the geometry, the loading direction and mode and of course the loading rate. Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of cortical bone has been well demonstrated in literature studies, but as many of these were performed on animal bones and at non-physiological strain rates it is questionable how these will apply in the human situations. High strain-rates dominate in a lot of forensic applications in automotive crashes and assault scenarios. There is an overwhelming need to a model which can describe the complex behaviour of bone at lower strain rates as well as higher ones. Some attempts have been made to model the viscoelastic and viscoplastic properties of the bone at high strain rates using constitutive mathematical models with little demonstrated success. The main objective of the present study is to model the rate dependent behaviour of the bones based on experimental data. An isotropic material model of human cortical bone with strain rate dependency effects is implemented using the LS-DYNA material library. We employed a human finite element model called THUMS (Total Human Model for Safety), developed by Toyota R&D Labs and the Wayne State University, USA. The finite element model of the human femur is extracted from the THUMS model. Different methods have been employed to develop a strain rate dependent material model for the femur bone. Results of one the recent experimental studies on human femur have been employed to obtain the numerical model for cortical femur. A

  12. Microcracking damage and the fracture process in relation to strain rate in human cortical bone tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, Peter; Hansen, Ulrich; Currey, John D

    2008-10-20

    It is difficult to define the 'physiological' mechanical properties of bone. Traumatic failures in-vivo are more likely to be orders of magnitude faster than the quasistatic tests usually employed in-vitro. We have reported recently [Hansen, U., Zioupos, P., Simpson, R., Currey, J.D., Hynd, D., 2008. The effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering/Transactions of the ASME 130, 011011-1-8] results from tests on specimens of human femoral cortical bone loaded in tension at strain rates (epsilon ) ranging from low (0.08s(-1)) to high (18s(-1)). Across this strain rate range the modulus of elasticity generally increased, stress at yield and failure and strain at failure decreased for rates higher than 1s(-1), while strain at yield was invariant for most strain rates and only decreased at rates higher than 10s(-1). The results showed that strain rate has a stronger effect on post-yield deformation than on initiation of macroscopic yielding. In general, specimens loaded at high strain rates were brittle, while those loaded at low strain rates were much tougher. Here, a post-test examination of the microcracking damage reveals that microcracking was inversely related to the strain rate. Specimens loaded at low strain rates showed considerable post-yield strain and also much more microcracking. Partial correlation and regression analysis suggested that the development of post-yield strain was a function of the amount of microcracking incurred (the cause), rather than being a direct result of the strain rate (the excitation). Presumably low strain rates allow time for microcracking to develop, which increases the compliance of the specimen, making them tougher. This behaviour confirms a more general rule that the degree to which bone is brittle or tough depends on the amount of microcracking damage it is able to sustain. More importantly, the key to bone toughness is its ability to avoid a ductile

  13. Interactive effects of nutrition, environment, and rat-strain on cortical and vertebral bone geometry and biomechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernicke, R. F.; Li, K.-C.; Salem, G. J.; Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to generate comparative data on the sensitivity of cortical- and vertebral-bone adaptations in two different rat strains maintained at conditions typical for spaceborne experiments conducted by U.S.A. and USSR. The effects of cage environment, diet, and rat-strain on the cortical (humerus) and vertebral (T7) bones of male Taconic-Sprague-Dawley and Czechoslovakian-Wistar rats were investigated using different flight-simulation cages (one rat/cage for U.S.A.; ten rats/cage for USSR conditions) and fed either U.S.A. or USSR diet. The results showed significant effects of these factors on the humeral and vertebral geometry and mechanical properties, as well as significant interactive effects on the mechanical properties of the humerus.

  14. Strain-rate stiffening of cortical bone: observations and implications from nanoindentation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Noriko; Shibata, Yo; Wurihan, Affb; Swain, Michael V.; Kataoka, Yu; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Yamada, Atsushi; Maki, Koutaro; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    While bone mineralization is considered to be responsible for its stiffness, bone durability partially associated with the time-dependent viscoelasticity of matrix proteins is still poorly elucidated. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism of highly mineralized bone durability almost independent of inherent viscoelastic behaviour along with a protocol for measuring the mechanical properties of mineralized tissues. Strain-rate nanoindentation tests showed substantial stiffening of the highly mineralized calvarial bone, whereas large creep or stress relaxation was observed during constant load or displacement tests, respectively. Based on the lower viscoelasticity of the highly mineralized structure, such large time-dependent response appears to be associated with nanoscale dimensional recovery, rather than viscoelastic behaviour, implying the inverse namely strain-rate dependent dilatant behaviour. This dilatant expansion increased the indenter penetration resistance into the surface, enhancing instantaneous stiffness. The associated stiffening and higher effective elastic modulus were highly strain-rate dependent and more readily observed in more highly mineralized tissues such as the calvarial bone. Such strain-rate stiffening and consequent dimensional recovery may be vital responses of bone tissues against excessive deformation to maintain tissue integrity.While bone mineralization is considered to be responsible for its stiffness, bone durability partially associated with the time-dependent viscoelasticity of matrix proteins is still poorly elucidated. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism of highly mineralized bone durability almost independent of inherent viscoelastic behaviour along with a protocol for measuring the mechanical properties of mineralized tissues. Strain-rate nanoindentation tests showed substantial stiffening of the highly mineralized calvarial bone, whereas large creep or stress relaxation was observed during constant load or displacement

  15. Quantification of Age-Related Tissue-Level Failure Strains of Rat Femoral Cortical Bones Using an Approach Combining Macrocompressive Test and Microfinite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruoxun; Gong, He; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Jiazi; Jia, Zhengbin; Hu, Yanjuan

    2016-04-01

    Bone mechanical properties vary with age; meanwhile, a close relationship exists among bone mechanical properties at different levels. Therefore, conducting multilevel analyses for bone structures with different ages are necessary to elucidate the effects of aging on bone mechanical properties at different levels. In this study, an approach that combined microfinite element (micro-FE) analysis and macrocompressive test was established to simulate the failure of male rat femoral cortical bone. Micro-FE analyses were primarily performed for rat cortical bones with different ages to simulate their failure processes under compressive load. Tissue-level failure strains in tension and compression of these cortical bones were then back-calculated by fitting the experimental stress-strain curves. Thus, tissue-level failure strains of rat femoral cortical bones with different ages were quantified. The tissue-level failure strain exhibited a biphasic behavior with age: in the period of skeletal maturity (1-7 months of age), the failure strain gradually increased; when the rat exceeded 7 months of age, the failure strain sharply decreased. In the period of skeletal maturity, both the macro- and tissue-levels mechanical properties showed a large promotion. In the period of skeletal aging (9-15 months of age), the tissue-level mechanical properties sharply deteriorated; however, the macromechanical properties only slightly deteriorated. The age-related changes in tissue-level failure strain were revealed through the analysis of male rat femoral cortical bones with different ages, which provided a theoretical basis to understand the relationship between rat cortical bone mechanical properties at macro- and tissue-levels and decrease of bone strength with age. PMID:26902102

  16. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  17. A rate-dependent microcrack-bridging model that can explain the strain rate dependency of cortical bone apparent yield strength.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Yener N; Fyhrie, David P

    2003-09-01

    Although there are empirical correlations between strain rate, cortical and cancellous bone apparent stiffness, apparent yield strength, apparent ultimate strength and cortical bone fracture toughness, a mechanistic description for these phenomena is lacking. Microcracking is a major mechanism in cortical and cancellous bone failure, however, microdamage content alone cannot explain the strain rate dependence of bone strength without considering time-dependent behavior of the crack. Using a rate-dependent model of a fiber-bridged microcrack and data from the literature, we demonstrate that the experimental apparent yield strength of bone can be predicted directly from measurements of apparent moduli of elasticity of bone constituents and failure strain of the collagenous matrix. Yield strength predictions for estrogen depleted bone were made using the model and data from ovariectomized sheep. It was predicted that the yield strength of estrogen-deficient bone is comparable to that of normal bone within strain rates associated with physiological activities. For high strain rates, however, the strength of estrogen-depleted bone was predicted to be much weaker than normals suggesting a higher fracture risk due to impact from falls, for individuals with estrogen-depleted bones such as in post-menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:12893043

  18. Internal strains and stresses measured in cortical bone via high-energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Almer, J D; Stock, S R

    2005-10-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to study internal stresses in bone under in situ compressive loading. A transverse cross-section of a 12-14 year old beagle fibula was studied with 80.7 keV radiation, and the transmission geometry was used to quantify internal strains and corresponding stresses in the mineral phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite. The diffraction patterns agreed with tabulated patterns, and the distribution of diffracted intensity around 00.2/00.4 and 22.2 diffraction rings was consistent with the imperfect 00.1 fiber texture expected along the axis of a long bone. Residual compressive stress along the bone's longitudinal axis was observed in the specimen prior to testing: for 22.2 this stress equaled -95 MPa and for 00.2/00.4 was between -160 and -240 MPa. Diffraction patterns were collected for applied compressive stresses up to -110 MPa, and, up to about -100 MPa, internal stresses rose proportionally with applied stress but at a higher rate, corresponding to stress concentration in the mineral of 2.8 times the stress applied. The widths of the 00.2 and 00.4 diffraction peaks indicated that crystallite size perpendicular to the 00.1 planes increased from t=41 nm before stress was applied to t=44 nm at -118 MPa applied stress and that rms strain epsilon(rms) rose from 2200 muepsilon before loading to 4600 muepsilon at the maximum applied stress. Small angle X-ray scattering of the unloaded sample, recorded after deformation was complete, showed a collagen D-period of 66.4 nm (along the bone axis). PMID:16183302

  19. Anisotropic elasticity of cortical and cancellous bone in the posterior mandible increases peri-implant stress and strain under oblique loading.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, A M; Williams, J L; Spencer, P

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare implant-bone interface stresses and peri-implant principal strains in anisotropic versus isotropic three-dimensional finite element models of an osseointegrated implant in the posterior mandible. We obtained anisotropic (transversely isotropic) elastic constants for mandibular bone and derived equivalent isotropic constants by averaging over all possible spatial orientations. A finite element model was constructed using ten-node tetrahedral p-elements, providing curved edges where necessary and increasing the accuracy of the results in regions of high stress gradients. Perfect bonding was assumed at the implant-bone interface. An oblique load was applied at the coronal aspect of the crown with 100 N vertical and 20 N bucco-to-lingual components. Implant-bone interface stresses exceeded reported bond strengths and principal strains reached yield strain levels in the cortical crest. Anisotropy increased what were already high levels of stress and strain in the isotropic case by 20 to 30% in the cortical crest. In cancellous bone, anisotropy increased what were relatively low levels of interface stress in the isotropic case by three- to four-fold to exceed bond strength levels. Anisotropy has subtle, yet significant effects on interface stresses and peri-implant strains and careful consideration should be given to its use in finite element studies of dental implants. PMID:11737110

  20. Compressive mechanical compatibility of anisotropic porous Ti6Al4V alloys in the range of physiological strain rate for cortical bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuping; Li, Jinshan; Kou, Hongchao; Huang, Tingting; Zhou, Lian

    2015-09-01

    Porous titanium and its alloys are believed to be promising materials for bone implant applications, since they can reduce the "stress shielding" effect by tailoring porosity and improve fixation of implant through bone ingrowth. In the present work, porous Ti6Al4V alloys for biomedical application were fabricated by diffusion bonding of alloy meshes. Compressive mechanical behavior and compatibility in the range of physiological strain rate were studied under quasi-static and dynamic conditions. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V alloys possess anisotropic structure with elongated pores in the out-of-plane direction. For porous Ti6Al4V alloys with 60-70 % porosity, more than 40 % pores are in the range of 200-500 μm which is the optimum pore size suited for bone ingrowth. Quasi-static Young's modulus and yield stress of porous Ti6Al4V alloys with 30-70 % relative density are in the range of 6-40 GPa and 100-500 MPa, respectively. Quasi-static compressive properties can be quantitatively tailored by porosity to match those of cortical bone. Strain rate sensitivity of porous Ti6Al4V alloys is related to porosity. Porous Ti6Al4V alloys with porosity higher than 50 % show enhanced strain rate sensitivity, which is originated from that of base materials and micro-inertia effect. Porous Ti6Al4V alloys with 60-70 % porosity show superior compressive mechanical compatibility in the range of physiological strain rate for cortical bone implant applications. PMID:26384823

  1. Relationships between in vivo microdamage and the remarkable regional material and strain heterogeneity of cortical bone of adult deer, elk, sheep and horse calcanei.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Sybrowsky, Christian L; Anderson, Wm Erick; Chow, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Natural loading of the calcanei of deer, elk, sheep and horses produces marked regional differences in prevalent/predominant strain modes: compression in the dorsal cortex, shear in medial-lateral cortices, and tension/shear in the plantar cortex. This consistent non-uniform strain distribution is useful for investigating mechanisms that mediate the development of the remarkable regional material variations of these bones (e.g. collagen orientation, mineralization, remodeling rates and secondary osteon morphotypes, size and population density). Regional differences in strain-mode-specific microdamage prevalence and/or morphology might evoke and sustain the remodeling that produces this material heterogeneity in accordance with local strain characteristics. Adult calcanei from 11 animals of each species (deer, elk, sheep and horses) were transversely sectioned and examined using light and confocal microscopy. With light microscopy, 20 linear microcracks were identified (deer: 10; elk: six; horse: four; sheep: none), and with confocal microscopy substantially more microdamage with typically non-linear morphology was identified (deer: 45; elk: 24; horse: 15; sheep: none). No clear regional patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage were found in the three species with microdamage. In these species, the highest overall concentrations occurred in the plantar cortex. This might reflect increased susceptibility of microdamage in habitual tension/shear. Absence of detectable microdamage in sheep calcanei may represent the (presumably) relatively greater physical activity of deer, elk and horses. Absence of differences in microdamage prevalence/morphology between dorsal, medial and lateral cortices of these bones, and the general absence of spatial patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage, might reflect the prior emergence of non-uniform osteon-mediated adaptations that reduce deleterious concentrations of microdamage by the adult stage of bone development. PMID

  2. Relationships between in vivo microdamage and the remarkable regional material and strain heterogeneity of cortical bone of adult deer, elk, sheep and horse calcanei

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G; Sybrowsky, Christian L; Anderson, Wm Erick; Chow, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Natural loading of the calcanei of deer, elk, sheep and horses produces marked regional differences in prevalent/predominant strain modes: compression in the dorsal cortex, shear in medial–lateral cortices, and tension/shear in the plantar cortex. This consistent non-uniform strain distribution is useful for investigating mechanisms that mediate the development of the remarkable regional material variations of these bones (e.g. collagen orientation, mineralization, remodeling rates and secondary osteon morphotypes, size and population density). Regional differences in strain-mode-specific microdamage prevalence and/or morphology might evoke and sustain the remodeling that produces this material heterogeneity in accordance with local strain characteristics. Adult calcanei from 11 animals of each species (deer, elk, sheep and horses) were transversely sectioned and examined using light and confocal microscopy. With light microscopy, 20 linear microcracks were identified (deer: 10; elk: six; horse: four; sheep: none), and with confocal microscopy substantially more microdamage with typically non-linear morphology was identified (deer: 45; elk: 24; horse: 15; sheep: none). No clear regional patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage were found in the three species with microdamage. In these species, the highest overall concentrations occurred in the plantar cortex. This might reflect increased susceptibility of microdamage in habitual tension/shear. Absence of detectable microdamage in sheep calcanei may represent the (presumably) relatively greater physical activity of deer, elk and horses. Absence of differences in microdamage prevalence/morphology between dorsal, medial and lateral cortices of these bones, and the general absence of spatial patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage, might reflect the prior emergence of non-uniform osteon-mediated adaptations that reduce deleterious concentrations of microdamage by the adult stage of bone development. PMID

  3. Thermographic stress analysis in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Vanderby, R; Kohles, S S

    1991-11-01

    Under adiabatic (or near adiabatic) conditions a volumetric change in an elastic material will produce a corresponding change in temperature. Based upon this principle, thermographic stress analysis (TSA) measures changes in surface heat flux (which are related to changes in surface temperature) and relates them to a coupled form of strains or stresses. To demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique for biomechanical applications, we thermographically measured heat flux from loaded specimens of cortical bone and correlated the results with strain gage data. Regular parallelepipeds were cut from the cortex of bovine femora and loaded sinusoidally at 20 Hz. At this rate of loading, mechanically induced changes in surface temperature could be sampled (via heat flux) prior to a measureable attenuation of the thermoelastic effect. Correlation coefficients demonstrated a significant linear relationship between TSA and measured and computed mechanical parameters (stress, strain, first strain invariant, and strain energy density). TSA therefore appears to be a promising technology for experimental stress analysis in cortical bone. PMID:1762439

  4. Cortical tibial bone volume in two strains of mice: effects of sciatic neurectomy and genetic regulation of bone response to mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Y; Dimai, H P; Wergedal, J; Sheng, M; Malpe, R; Kutilek, S; Beamer, W; Donahue, L R; Rosen, C; Baylink, D J; Farley, J

    1999-08-01

    Although C3H/HeJ (C3H) and C57BL/6J (B6) mice are similar in body size (and adult weight), and have bones of similar external size, C3H mice have higher peak bone densities than B6 mice (e.g., 53% higher peak bone density in the femora). The current studies were intended to assess the role of mechanical loading/unloading as a possible determinant of the bone density difference between these inbred strains of mice and, specifically, to assess the effect of sciatic neurectomy on histomorphometric indices of bone formation and resorption in the tibiae of female C3H and B6 mice. Groups of 10 mice of each strain were subjected to left-side sciatic neurectomy (left hindlimb immobilization) or a sham procedure. The contralateral (right) legs of each mouse were used as controls. Four weeks of immobilization produced no systemic changes in bone formation indices in either strain of mice (i.e., no change in serum alkaline phosphatase or serum osteocalcin). However, histomorphometric assessments at the tibiofibular junction showed that 4 weeks of immobilization caused a time-dependent decrease in the length of the endosteal bone forming perimeter (e.g., 14% of control single-labeled, noneroded surface at 4 weeks, p < 0.005) with a concomitant increase in the length of the endosteal bone resorbing perimeter (i.e., 424% of control eroded surface at 4 weeks, p < 0.005), in the B6 mice. These effects were associated with an increase in medullary area (132% of control, p < 0.05) at this site, in the B6 mice. The pattern of response was different in the tibiae of the C3 mice-a much smaller decrease in bone forming perimeter (88% of control at 4 weeks, p < 0.05), with no associated increase in bone resorbing perimeter, and no change in medullary area. Similar effects were seen at a second cross-sectional sampling site, in the proximal tibia. Together, these findings indicate that B6 mice are more sensitive to endosteal bone loss from hindlimb immobilization than C3H mice. PMID

  5. Probiotics Protect Mice from Ovariectomy-Induced Cortical Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, Claes; Engdahl, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Andersson, Annica; Windahl, Sara H.; Farman, Helen H.; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Islander, Ulrika; Sjögren, Klara

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx) results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L) strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para) or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix) given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh) treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice. PMID:24637895

  6. Analysis of anisotropic viscoelastoplastic properties of cortical bone tissues.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Adel A; Alam, Khurshid; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2011-07-01

    Bone fractures affect the health of many people and have a significant social and economic effect. Often, bones fracture due to impacts, sudden falls or trauma. In order to numerically model the fracture of a cortical bone tissue caused by an impact it is important to know parameters characterising its viscoelastoplastic behaviour. These parameters should be measured for various orientations in a bone tissue to assess bone's anisotropy linked to its microstructure. So, the first part of this study was focused on quantification of elastic-plastic behaviour of cortical bone using specimens cut along different directions with regard to the bone axis-longitudinal (axial) and transverse. Due to pronounced non-linearity of the elastic-plastic behaviour of the tissue, cyclic loading-unloading uniaxial tension tests were performed to obtain the magnitudes of elastic moduli not only from the initial loading part of the cycle but also from its unloading part. Additional tests were performed with different deformation rates to study the bone's strain-rate sensitivity. The second part of this study covered creep and relaxation properties of cortical bone for two directions and four different anatomical positions-anterior, posterior, medial and lateral-to study the variability of bone's properties. Since viscoelastoplasticity of cortical bone affects its damping properties due to energy dissipation, the Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) technique was used in the last part of our study to obtain magnitudes of storage and loss moduli for various frequencies. Based on analysis of elastic-plastic behaviour of the bovine cortical bone tissue, it was found that magnitudes of the longitudinal Young's modulus for four cortical positions were in the range of 15-24 GPa, while the transversal modulus was lower--between 10 and 15 GPa. Axial strength for various anatomical positions was also higher than transversal strength with significant differences in magnitudes for those positions

  7. Effects of cortical bone perforation on experimental guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Ooya, Kiyoshi

    2004-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of cortical bone perforation histologically and histomorphometrically on guided bone regeneration (GBR) in rabbits. After elimination of the periosteum, cortical bone defects of two sizes were made in the external cortical plate of the frontal bone (Group A: 1 x 15 mm; Group B: 3 x 15 mm). A non-resorbable membrane filled with autogenous blood was placed in the experimental area and secured with titanium pins. After 1 and 2 weeks, vascularized connective tissue and new bone were generated in the space surrounding the defects in both the groups. The amount of vascularized connective tissue generated in Group B was greater than that in Group A at 1 week. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was expressed on the bone surrounding the perforation. The expression of ALP was more extensive in Group B than in Group A and was proportional to the breadth of perforation. At 2 weeks, the perforated region was almost covered with new bone in Group A. ALP was expressed at the periphery of newly formed bone. The expression of ALP was proportional to the breadth and height of perforation. At 6 weeks, semicircular outgrowth of bone towards the periphery of the perforated region was observed in both the groups. Newly formed bone volume and ALP expression in Group B were more extensive than those in Group A. At 12 weeks, the space was filled with bone and connective tissue in both the groups. There was no difference in ALP expression between Groups A and B. Histomorphometric analysis showed significant differences between both the groups (two-way ANOVA, P<0.01). We conclude that a larger perforation is associated with prompter bone formation in the secluded space during GBR. PMID:15142091

  8. Anisotropy of bovine cortical bone tissue damage properties.

    PubMed

    Szabó, M E; Thurner, P J

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a heterogeneous, anisotropic natural composite material. Several studies have measured human cortical bone elastic properties in different anatomical directions and found that the Young's modulus was highest in the longitudinal, followed by the tangential and then by the radial direction. This study compared the Young's modulus, the accumulated microdamage and local strains related to the failure process in these three anatomical directions. Cortical bone samples (≈360 μm×360 μm) were mechanically tested in three-point bending and concomitantly imaged to assess local strains using digital image correlation technique. The bone whitening effect was used to detect microdamage formation and propagation. No statistically significant difference was found between the Young's modulus of longitudinal (9.4±2.0 GPa) and tangential (9.9±1.8 GPa) bovine bone samples, as opposed to previous findings on human bone samples. The same similarity was found for the whitening values (5000±1900 pix/mm(2) for longitudinal, 5800±2600 pix/mm(2) for tangential) and failure strains (16.8±7.0% for longitudinal, 19.1±3.2% for tangential) as well. However, significantly lower values were observed in the radial samples for Young's modulus (5.92±0.77 GPa), whitening (none or minimal) and failure strain (10.8±3.8%). For strains at whitening onset, no statistically significant difference was seen for the longitudinal (5.1±1.6%) and radial groups (4.2±2.0%), however, the tangential values were significantly greater (7.0±2.4%). The data implies that bovine cortical bone tissue in long bones is designed to withstand higher loads in the longitudinal and tangential directions than in the radial one. A possible explanation of the anisotropy in the mechanical parameters derived here might be the structure of the tissues in the three directions tested. PMID:23063771

  9. The reaction of cortical bone to compression by screw threads.

    PubMed

    Schatzker, J; Horne, J G; Sumner-Smith, G

    1975-09-01

    Cortical bone subjected to compression by screw threads retains its integrity and is not resorbed. Screws which generate compression at the interface of their threads with bone can be expected to provide adequate fixation until bone union occurs. PMID:1157421

  10. The myokine irisin increases cortical bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Mongelli, Teresa; Pignataro, Paolo; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ping; Sartini, Loris; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mori, Giorgio; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Reseland, Janne E.; Colucci, Silvia; New, Maria I.; Zaidi, Mone; Cinti, Saverio; Grano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear how physical activity stimulates new bone synthesis. We explored whether irisin, a newly discovered myokine released upon physical activity, displays anabolic actions on the skeleton. Young male mice were injected with vehicle or recombinant irisin (r-irisin) at a low cumulative weekly dose of 100 µg kg−1. We observed significant increases in cortical bone mass and strength, notably in cortical tissue mineral density, periosteal circumference, polar moment of inertia, and bending strength. This anabolic action was mediated primarily through the stimulation of bone formation, but with parallel notable reductions in osteoclast numbers. The trabecular compartment of the same bones was spared, as were vertebrae from the same mice. Higher irisin doses (3,500 µg kg−1 per week) cause browning of adipose tissue; this was not seen with low-dose r-irisin. Expectedly, low-dose r-irisin modulated the skeletal genes, Opn and Sost, but not Ucp1 or Pparγ expression in white adipose tissue. In bone marrow stromal cell cultures, r-irisin rapidly phosphorylated Erk, and up-regulated Atf4, Runx2, Osx, Lrp5, β-catenin, Alp, and Col1a1; this is consistent with a direct receptor-mediated action to stimulate osteogenesis. We also noted that, although the irisin precursor Fndc5 was expressed abundantly in skeletal muscle, other sites, such as bone and brain, also expressed Fndc5, albeit at low levels. Furthermore, muscle fibers from r-irisin–injected mice displayed enhanced Fndc5 positivity, and irisin induced Fdnc5 mRNA expression in cultured myoblasts. Our data therefore highlight a previously unknown action of the myokine irisin, which may be the molecular entity responsible for muscle–bone connectivity. PMID:26374841

  11. The myokine irisin increases cortical bone mass.

    PubMed

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Mongelli, Teresa; Pignataro, Paolo; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ping; Sartini, Loris; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mori, Giorgio; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Reseland, Janne E; Colucci, Silvia; New, Maria I; Zaidi, Mone; Cinti, Saverio; Grano, Maria

    2015-09-29

    It is unclear how physical activity stimulates new bone synthesis. We explored whether irisin, a newly discovered myokine released upon physical activity, displays anabolic actions on the skeleton. Young male mice were injected with vehicle or recombinant irisin (r-irisin) at a low cumulative weekly dose of 100 µg kg(-1). We observed significant increases in cortical bone mass and strength, notably in cortical tissue mineral density, periosteal circumference, polar moment of inertia, and bending strength. This anabolic action was mediated primarily through the stimulation of bone formation, but with parallel notable reductions in osteoclast numbers. The trabecular compartment of the same bones was spared, as were vertebrae from the same mice. Higher irisin doses (3,500 µg kg(-1) per week) cause browning of adipose tissue; this was not seen with low-dose r-irisin. Expectedly, low-dose r-irisin modulated the skeletal genes, Opn and Sost, but not Ucp1 or Pparγ expression in white adipose tissue. In bone marrow stromal cell cultures, r-irisin rapidly phosphorylated Erk, and up-regulated Atf4, Runx2, Osx, Lrp5, β-catenin, Alp, and Col1a1; this is consistent with a direct receptor-mediated action to stimulate osteogenesis. We also noted that, although the irisin precursor Fndc5 was expressed abundantly in skeletal muscle, other sites, such as bone and brain, also expressed Fndc5, albeit at low levels. Furthermore, muscle fibers from r-irisin-injected mice displayed enhanced Fndc5 positivity, and irisin induced Fdnc5 mRNA expression in cultured myoblasts. Our data therefore highlight a previously unknown action of the myokine irisin, which may be the molecular entity responsible for muscle-bone connectivity. PMID:26374841

  12. Variability and anisotropy of mechanical behavior of cortical bone in tension and compression.

    PubMed

    Li, Simin; Demirci, Emrah; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical properties of cortical bone vary not only from bone to bone; they demonstrate a spatial viability even within the same bone due to its changing microstructure. They also depend considerably on different loading modes and orientations. To understand the variability and anisotropic mechanical behavior of a cortical bone tissue, specimens cut from four anatomical quadrants of bovine femurs were investigated both in tension and compression tests. The obtained experimental results revealed a highly anisotropic mechanical behavior, depending also on the loading mode (tension and compression). A compressive longitudinal loading regime resulted in the best load-bearing capacity for cortical bone, while tensile transverse loading provided significantly poorer results. The distinctive stress-strain curves obtained for tension and compression demonstrated various damage mechanisms associated with different loading modes. The variability of mechanical properties for different cortices was evaluated with two-way ANOVA analyses. Statistical significances were found among different quadrants for the Young's modulus. The results of microstructure analysis of the entire transverse cross section of a cortical bone also confirmed variations of volume fractions of constituents at microscopic level between anatomic quadrants: microstructure of the anterior quadrant was dominated by plexiform bone, whereas secondary osteons were prominent in the posterior quadrant. The effective Young's modulus predicted using the modified Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging scheme accurately reproduced our experimental results, corroborating additionally a strong effect of random and heterogeneous microstructure on variation of mechanical properties in cortical bone. PMID:23563047

  13. A mechanostatistical approach to cortical bone remodelling: an equine model.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G; Das, R; Davies, H; Fernandez, J W

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the development of a mechanostatistical model of three-dimensional cortical bone remodelling informed with in vivo equine data is presented. The equine model was chosen as it is highly translational to the human condition due to similar Haversian systems, availability of in vivo bone strain and biomarker data, and furthermore, equine models are recommended by the US Federal Drugs Administration for comparative joint research. The model was derived from micro-computed tomography imaged specimens taken from the equine third metacarpal bone, and the Frost-based 'mechanostat' was informed from both in vivo strain gauges and biomarkers to estimate bone growth rates. The model also described the well-known 'cutting cone' phenomena where Haversian canals tunnel and replace bone. In order to make this model useful in practice, a partial least squares regression (PLSR) surrogate model was derived based on training data from finite element simulations with different loads. The PLSR model was able to predict microstructure and homogenised Young's modulus with errors less than 2.2% and 0.6%, respectively. PMID:25862068

  14. The tensile behavior of demineralized bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Bowman, S M; Zeind, J; Gibson, L J; Hayes, W C; McMahon, T A

    1996-11-01

    Bone is frequently modeled as a two-phase composite of hydroxyapatite mineral crystals dispersed throughout an organic collagen matrix. However, because of the numerous limitations (e.g. small sample size, poor strain measuring techniques, rapid demineralization with acids) of previous mechanical tests of bone with its hydroxyapatite chemically removed, we have determined new, accurate data on the material properties of the demineralized bone matrix for use in these composite models. We performed tensile tests on waisted specimens of demineralized bovine cortical bone from six humeral diaphyses. Specimens were demineralized over 14 days with a 0.5 M disodium EDTA solution that was replaced daily. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to track the demineralization process and to determine the effectiveness of our demineralization protocol. Mechanical tests were performed at room temperature under displacement control at an approximate strain rate of 0.5% per s. We imposed nine preconditioning cycles before a final ramp to failure, and measured gauge length displacements using a non-invasive optical technique. The resulting stress-strain curves were similar to the tensile behavior observed in mechanical tests of other collagenous tissues, exhibiting an initial non-linear 'toe' region, followed by a linear region and subsequent failure without evidence of yielding. We found an average modulus, ultimate stress, and ultimate strain of 613 MPa (S.D. = 113 MPa), 61.5 MPa (S.D. = 13.1 MPa), and 12.3% (S.D. = 0.5%), respectively. Our average modulus is approximately half the value frequently used in current composite bone analyses. These data should also have clinical relevance because the early strength of healing fractured bone depends largely on the material properties of the collagen matrix. PMID:8894931

  15. Shear deformation and fracture of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tengteng; Ebacher, Vincent; Cripton, Peter; Guy, Pierre; McKay, Heather; Wang, Rizhi

    2015-02-01

    Bone can be viewed as a nano-fibrous composite with complex hierarchical structures. Its deformation and fracture behaviors depend on both the local structure and the type of stress applied. In contrast to the extensive studies on bone fracture under compression and tension, there is a lack of knowledge on the fracture process under shear, a stress state often exists in hip fracture. This study investigated the mechanical behavior of human cortical bone under shear, with the focus on the relation between the fracture pattern and the microstructure. Iosipescu shear tests were performed on notched rectangular bar specimens made from human cortical bone. They were prepared at different angles (i.e. 0°, 30°, 60° and 90°) with respect to the long axis of the femoral shaft. The results showed that human cortical bone behaved as an anisotropic material under shear with the highest shear strength (~50MPa) obtained when shearing perpendicular to the Haversian systems or secondary osteons. Digital image correlation (DIC) analysis found that shear strain concentration bands had a close association with long bone axis with an average deviation of 11.8° to 18.5°. The fracture pattern was also greatly affected by the structure with the crack path generally following the direction of the long axes of osteons. More importantly, we observed unique peripheral arc-shaped microcracks within osteons, using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). They were generally long cracks that developed within a lamella without crossing the boundaries. This microcracking pattern clearly differed from that created under either compressive or tensile stress: these arc-shaped microcracks tended to be located away from the Haversian canals in early-stage damaged osteons, with ~70% developing in the outer third osteonal wall. Further study by second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy revealed a strong influence of the organization of collagen

  16. Ultrasonic wave propagation in cortical bone mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Simon P.; Cunningham, James L.; Miles, Anthony W.; Humphrey, Victor F.; Gheduzzi, Sabina

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves in cortical bone is important for studies of osteoporosis and fractures. In particular, propagation in free- and water-loaded acrylic plates, with a thickness range of around 1-6 mm, has been widely used to mimic cortical bone behavior. A theoretical investigation of Lamb mode propagation at 200 kHz in free- and water-loaded acrylic plates revealed a marked difference in the form of their velocity and attenuation dispersion curves as a function of frequency thickness product. In experimental studies, this difference between free and loaded plates is not seen. Over short measurement distances, the results for both free and loaded plates are consistent with previous modeling and experimental studies: for thicker plates (above 3-4 mm), the velocity calculated using the first arrival signal is a lateral wave comparable with the longitudinal velocity. As the plate thickness decreases, the velocity approaches the S0 Lamb mode value. WAVE2000 modeling of the experimental setup agrees with experimental data. The data are also used to test a hypothesis that for thin plates the velocity approaches the corresponding S0 Lamb mode velocity at large measurement distances or when different arrival time criteria are used. [Work supported by Action Medical Research.

  17. Impact of lanthanum carbonate on cortical bone in dialysis patients with adynamic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Aiji; Inaba, Masaaki; Tominaga, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Motoko; Otsubo, Shigeru; Nitta, Kosaku; Ito, Akemi; Satoh, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Among the most serious problems in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is fragility of cortical bone caused by cortical thinning and increased cortical porosity; the cortical fragility is sometimes irreversible, with fractures generally initiating from cortical bone. Therefore, development of treatments for problems of cortical bone is urgently desired. Cortical bone has the three surfaces, including the periosteal surface, intracortical spaces and endocortical surface. Bone turnover at the endocortical surface and intracortical resorption spaces are increased as compared with that at cancellous surface. Bone growth sometimes depends on apposition at the periosteal surface. We treated hyperphosphatemia in two hemodialysis patients with adynamic bone disease with 750-1500 mg/day of lanthanum carbonate, which is a non-calcium containing phosphate binder; the treatment resulted in a decrease of the serum phosphorus levels (P levels), without significant change of the serum intact parathyroid hormone levels. We now report that treatment of these patients with lanthanum carbonate increased mineralization of the periosteal surface, increased bone mass within the intracortical resorption spaces and increased mineralization of the minimodeling surface at the endocortical surface. In addition, woven bone volume in cortical bone was decreased and mineralization of bone units, namely, osteons, was increased. Although these findings were not observed across all surfaces of the cortical bone in the patients, it is expected that lanthanum carbonate would increase the cortical stability in CKD patients, with consequent reduction in the fracture rate in these patients. PMID:23586512

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of bovine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cangueiro, Liliana T.; Vilar, Rui; Botelho do Rego, Ana M.; Muralha, Vania S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We study the surface topographical, structural, and compositional modifications induced in bovine cortical bone by femtosecond laser ablation. The tests are performed in air, with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (500 fs, 1030 nm) at fluences ranging from 0.55 to 2.24 J/cm2. The ablation process is monitored by acoustic emission measurements. The topography of the laser-treated surfaces is studied by scanning electron microscopy, and their constitution is characterized by glancing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation allows removing bone without melting, carbonization, or cracking. The structure and composition of the remaining tissue are essentially preserved, the only constitutional changes observed being a reduction of the organic material content and a partial recrystallization of hydroxyapatite in the most superficial region of samples. The results suggest that, within this fluence range, ablation occurs by a combination of thermal and electrostatic mechanisms, with the first type of mechanism predominating at lower fluences. The associated thermal effects explain the constitutional changes observed. We show that femtosecond lasers are a promising tool for delicate orthopaedic surgeries, where small amounts of bone must be cut with negligible damage, thus minimizing surgical trauma.

  19. Cement line staining in undecalcified thin sections of cortical bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, S. D.; Impeduglia, T. M.; Rubin, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for demonstrating cement lines in thin, undecalcified, transverse sections of cortical bone has been developed. Cortical bone samples are processed and embedded undecalcified in methyl methacrylate plastic. After sectioning at 3-5 microns, cross-sections are transferred to a glass slide and flattened for 10 min. Sections of cortical bone are stained for 20 sec free-floating in a fresh solution of 1% toluidine blue dissolved in 0.1% formic acid. The section is dehydrated in t-butyl alcohol, cleared in xylene, and mounted with Eukitt's medium. Reversal lines appear as thin, scalloped, dark blue lines against a light blue matrix, whereas bone formation arrest lines are thicker with a smooth contour. With this technique cellular detail, osteoid differentiation, and fluorochrome labels are retained. Results demonstrate the applicability of a one-step staining method for cement lines which will facilitate the assessment of bone remodeling activity in thin sections of undecalcified cortical bone.

  20. Interaction of microstructure and microcrack growth in cortical bone: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Mischinski, Susan; Ural, Ani

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural features including osteons and cement lines are considered to play an important role in determining the crack growth behaviour in cortical bone. This study aims to develop a computational mechanics approach to evaluate microscale fracture mechanisms in bone. In this study, finite element models based on actual human cortical bone images that allow for arbitrary crack growth were utilised to determine the crack propagation behaviour. The simulations varied the cement line and osteon strength and fracture toughness in different bone microstructures to assess the crack propagation trajectory, stress-strain relationship and nonlinear strain energy density. The findings of this study provide additional insight into the individual influence of microstructural features and their properties on crack growth behaviour in bone using a computational approach. PMID:21970670

  1. Biomechanical characteristics of regenerated cortical bone in the canine mandible

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Uriel; Opperman, Lynne A.; Kontogiorgos, Elias; Elsalanty, Mohammed E.; Dechow, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    To test the mechanical properties of regenerate cortical bone created using Mandibular Bone Transport (MBT) distraction, five adult male American foxhound dogs underwent unilateral distraction of the mandible with a novel MBT device placed to linearly repair a 30-35 mm bone defect. The animals were sacrificed 12 weeks after the beginning of the consolidation period. Fourteen cylindrical specimens were taken from the inner (lingual) and outer (buccal) plates of the reconstructed mandible and 21 control specimens were removed from the contralateral aspect of the mandible. The mechanical properties of the 35 cylindrical cortical bone specimens were assessed by using a non-destructive pulse ultrasound technique. Results showed that all of the cortical mechanical properties exhibit higher numerical values on the control side than the MBT regenerate side. In addition, both densities and the elastic moduli in the direction of maximum stiffness of the regenerate cortical bone specimens are higher on the lingual side than the buccal side. Interestingly, there is no statistical difference between elastic modulus (E1 and E2) in orthogonal directions throughout the 35 cortical specimens. The data suggest that the regenerate canine cortical bone is not only heterogeneous, but the elastic mechanical properties tend to approximate transverse isotropy at a tissue level as opposed to control cortical bone that is orthotropic. In addition, the elastic mechanical properties are not only higher on the control side but also in the lingual anatomical position, suggesting a stress shielding effect from the presence of the reconstruction plate. PMID:21695796

  2. Progressive femoral cortical and cancellous bone density loss after uncemented tapered-design stem fixation

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Tobias E; Haeberle, Lothar; Mueller, Lars P; Kress, Alexander; Voelk, Michael; Pfander, David; Forst, Raimund; Schmidt, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Background Aseptic implant loosening and periprosthetic bone loss are major problems after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We present an in vivo method of computed tomography (CT) assisted osteodensitometry after THA that differentiates between cortical and cancellous bone density (BD) and area around the femoral component. Method Cortical and cancellous periprosthetic femoral BD (mg CaHA/mL), area (mm2) and contact area between the prothesis and cortical bone were determined prospectively in 31 patients 10 days, 1 year, and 6 years after uncemented THA (mean age at implantation: 55 years) using CT-osteodensitometry. Results 6 years postoperatively, cancellous BD had decreased by as much as 41% and cortical BD by up to 27% at the metaphyseal portion of the femur; this decrease was progressive between the 1-year and 6-year examinations. Mild cortical hypertrophy was observed along the entire length of the diaphysis. No statistically significant changes in cortical BD were observed along the diaphysis of the stem. Interpretation Periprosthetic CT-assisted osteodensitometry has the technical ability to discriminate between cortical and cancellous bone structures with respect to strain-adapted remodeling. Continuous loss of cortical and cancellous BD at the femoral metaphysis, a homeostatic cortical strain configuration, and mild cortical hypertrophy along the diaphysis suggest a diaphyseal fixation of the implanted stem. CT-assisted osteodensitometry has the potential to become an effective instrument for quality control in THA by means of in vivo determination of periprosthetic BD, which may be a causal factor in implant loosening after THA. PMID:20180716

  3. Scanning acoustic microscopy study of human cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Bumrerraj, S; Katz, J L

    2001-12-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) has been used in the burst mode to study the properties of human cortical and trabecular bone. An Olympus UH3 SAM (Olympus Co., Tokyo, Japan) was used with a 400 MHz burst mode lens (120 degrees aperture, nominal lateral resolution 2.5 microm). The human cortical bone was from the midshaft of a femur from a 60+ male cadaver; the trabecular bone specimens were obtained from the distal femoral condyles of another 60+ human male cadaver. Elastic moduli for both trabecular and cortical bone were obtained by means of a series of calibration curves correlating SAM gray levels of known materials with their elastic moduli; specimens included: polypropylene, PMMA, Teflon, aluminum, Pyrex glass, titanium, and stainless steel. Values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those obtained by nanoindentation techniques. The three critical findings earlier by Katz and Meunier were observed here as well in both the cortical and trabecular bone samples. PMID:11853252

  4. Mechanical properties of femoral cortical bone following cemented hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ni, G X; Lu, W W; Chiu, P K Y; Wang, Y; Li, Z Y; Zhang, Y G; Xu, B; Deng, L F; Luk, K D K

    2007-11-01

    Femoral bone remodeling following total hip replacement is a big concern and has never been examined mechanically. In this study, six goats underwent unilateral cemented hip hemiarthroplasty with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. Nine months later animals were sacrificed, and the femoral cortical bone slices at different levels were analysed using microhardness testing and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) scanning. Implanted femurs were compared to contralateral nonimplanted femurs. Extensive bone remodeling was demonstrated at both the proximal and middle levels, but not at the distal level. Compared with the nonimplanted side, significant decreases were found in the implanted femur in cortical bone area, bone mineral density, and cortical bone hardness at the proximal level, as well as in bone mineral density and bone hardness at the middle level. However, no significant difference was observed in either variable for the distal level. In addition, similar proximal-to-distal gradient changes were revealed both in cortical bone microhardness and bone mineral density. From the mechanical point of view, the results of the present study suggested that stress shielding is an important mechanical factor associated with bone adaptation following total hip replacement. PMID:17506504

  5. Microstrain fields for cortical bone in uniaxial tension: optical analysis method.

    PubMed

    Kim, D G; Brunski, J B; Nicolella, D P

    2005-01-01

    This study employed an optical strain measurement method, called microdisplacements by machine vision photogrammetry (DISMAP), to measure both the global and local strain fields in microtensile specimens of cortical bone subjected to controlled uniaxial tension. The variation of local maximum principal strains was measured within the gauge region of samples as a function of applied tensile stress during testing. High gradients of local strain appeared around microstructural features in stressed bone even while the global strain for the entire gauge region showed a strong linear correlation with increasing tensile stress (r2 = 0.98, p < 0.0001). The highest local strain around microstructural features in bone was 11.5-79.5 times higher than the global strain. PMID:15819483

  6. The Effects of Obesity on Murine Cortical Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sophi

    This dissertation details the effects of obesity on the mechanical properties and structure of cortical bone. Obesity is associated with greater bone mineral content that might be expected to protect against fracture, which has been observed in adults. Paradoxically however, the incidence of bone fractures has been found to increase in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Femora from adolescent and adult mice fed a high-fat diet are investigated for changes in shape, tissue structure, as well as tissue-level and whole-bone mechanical properties. Results indicate increased bone size, reduced size-independent mechanical properties, but maintained size-dependent mechanical properties. Other changes in cortical bone response to obesity are observed with advancing age. This study indicates that bone quantity and bone quality play important compensatory roles in determining fracture risk, and that fracture risk may not be lessened for adults as previously thought.

  7. Effect of micromorphology of cortical bone tissue on crack propagation under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mayao; Gao, Xing; Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Li, Simin; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Riedel, Christoph; Busse, Björn; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    Structural integrity of bone tissue plays an important role in daily activities of humans. However, traumatic incidents such as sports injuries, collisions and falls can cause bone fracture, servere pain and mobility loss. In addition, ageing and degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis can increase the risk of fracture [1]. As a composite-like material, a cortical bone tissue is capable of tolerating moderate fracture/cracks without complete failure. The key to this is its heterogeneously distributed microstructural constituents providing both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms. At micro-scale level, cortical bone can be considered as a four-phase composite material consisting of osteons, Haversian canals, cement lines and interstitial matrix. These microstructural constituents can directly affect local distributions of stresses and strains, and, hence, crack initiation and propagation. Therefore, understanding the effect of micromorphology of cortical bone on crack initiation and propagation, especially under dynamic loading regimes is of great importance for fracture risk evaluation. In this study, random microstructures of a cortical bone tissue were modelled with finite elements for four groups: healthy (control), young age, osteoporosis and bisphosphonate-treated, based on osteonal morphometric parameters measured from microscopic images for these groups. The developed models were loaded under the same dynamic loading conditions, representing a direct impact incident, resulting in progressive crack propagation. An extended finite-element method (X-FEM) was implemented to realize solution-dependent crack propagation within the microstructured cortical bone tissues. The obtained simulation results demonstrate significant differences due to micromorphology of cortical bone, in terms of crack propagation characteristics for different groups, with the young group showing highest fracture resistance and the senior group the lowest.

  8. Ultrashort echo time magnetization transfer (UTE-MT) imaging of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eric Y; Bae, Won C; Shao, Hongda; Biswas, Reni; Li, Shihong; Chen, Jun; Patil, Shantanu; Healey, Robert; D'Lima, Darryl D; Chung, Christine B; Du, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging is one way to indirectly assess pools of protons with fast transverse relaxation. However, conventional MT imaging sequences are not applicable to short T2 tissues such as cortical bone. Ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences with TE values as low as 8 µs can detect signals from different water components in cortical bone. In this study we aim to evaluate two-dimensional UTE-MT imaging of cortical bone and its application in assessing cortical bone porosity as measured by micro-computed tomography (μCT) and biomechanical properties. In total, 38 human cadaveric distal femur and proximal tibia bones were sectioned to produce 122 rectangular pieces of cortical bone for quantitative UTE-MT MR imaging, μCT, and biomechanical testing. Off-resonance saturation ratios (OSRs) with a series of MT pulse frequency offsets (Δf) were calculated and compared with porosity assessed with μCT, as well as elastic (modulus, yield stress, and strain) and failure (ultimate stress, failure strain, and energy) properties, using Pearson correlation and linear regression. A moderately strong negative correlation was observed between OSR and μCT porosity (R(2)  = 0.46-0.51), while a moderate positive correlation was observed between OSR and yield stress (R(2)  = 0.25-0.30) and failure stress (R(2)  = 0.31-0.35), and a weak positive correlation (R(2)  = 0.09-0.12) between OSR and Young's modulus at all off-resonance saturation frequencies. OSR determined with the UTE-MT sequence provides quantitative information on cortical bone and is sensitive to μCT porosity and biomechanical function. PMID:25981914

  9. Tensile material properties of human tibia cortical bone effects of orientation and loading rate.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Manoogian, Sarah J; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify effects of both specimen orientation and loading rate on the tensile material properties for human tibia cortical bone in a controlled study. This study presents 25 human tibia cortical bone coupon tests obtained from the mid-diaphysis of two fresh frozen male human cadavers: 11 axial and 14 lateral. The primary component for the tension coupon testing was a high rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor. The specimen were loaded at a constant strain rate of approximately 0.05 strains/s, 0.5 strains/s, or 5.0 strains/s. Axial specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress and ultimate strain compared to lateral specimens for all loading rates, and a significantly larger modulus for low and high loading rates. This finding illustrates the anisentropic behavior of bone over a range of strain rates, which is attributed to the microstructure of the bone and the osteon orientation along the long axis of the bone. With respect to loading rate, both axial and lateral specimens showed significant increases in the modulus and significant decreases in ultimate strain with increased loading rate. Although not significant, axial specimens showed another traditional viscoelastic trend, with ultimate stress increasing with increased loading rate. PMID:19141952

  10. Relationships between material properties and CT scan data of cortical bone with and without metastatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tadashi S; Pejcic, Marina R; Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Keyak, Joyce H

    2003-07-01

    Breast, prostate, lung, and other cancers can metastasize to bone and lead to pathological fracture. To lay the groundwork for new clinical techniques for assessing the risk of pathological fracture, we identified relationships between density measured using quantitative computed tomography (rhoQCT), longitudinal mechanical properties, and ash density (rhoAsh) of cortical bone from femoral diaphyses with and without metastatic lesions from breast, prostate, and lung cancer (bone with metastases from six donors; bone without metastases from one donor with cancer and two donors without cancer). Moderately strong linear relationships between rhoQCT and elastic modulus, strength, and rhoAsh were found for bone with metastases (0.73strain, and rhoAsh of bone with metastatic lesions differed from those of bone from donors without cancer (P<0.01). However, differences in tensile strength or compressive yield strain, after controlling for rhoQCT, were not found. Thus, these cancers degrade the elastic modulus and compressive strength, but not the tensile strength, of cortical bone beyond the amount that would be expected from decreased density alone. The rhoQCT-mechanical property relationships reported may be useful for evaluating bone integrity and assessing the risk of fracture of bone with metastases. PMID:12787982

  11. Prostaglandin E2 Prevents Disuse-Induced Cortical Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Akamine, T.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian; Tang, L. Y.; Zeng, Q. Q.

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can prevent disuse (underloaded)-induced cortical bone loss as well as add extra bone to underloaded bones. Thirteen-month-old retired female Sprague-Dawley breeders served as controls or were subjected to simultaneous right hindlimb immobilization by bandaging and daily subcutaneous doses of 0, 1, 3, or 6 mg PGE2/kg/d for two and six weeks. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). Disuse-induced cortical bone loss occurred by enlarging the marrow cavity and increasing intracortical porosity. PGE2 treatment of disuse shafts further increased intracortical porosity above that in disuse alone controls. This bone loss was counteracted by enhancement of periosteal and corticoendosteal bone formation. Stimulation of periosteal and corticoendosteal bone formation slightly enlarged the total tissue (cross-sectional) area and inhibited marrow cavity enlargement. These PGE2-induced activities netted the same percentage of cortical bone with a different distribution than the beginning and age related controls. These findings indicate the PGE2-induced increase in bone formation compensated for the disuse and PGE2-induced bone loss, and thus prevented immobilization induced bone loss.

  12. Material properties of human rib cortical bone from dynamic tension coupon testing.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Kennedy, Eric A; Manoogian, Sarah J; Rath, Amber L; Ng, Tracy P; Stitzel, Joel D; Smith, Eric P; Duma, Stefan M; Matsuoka, Fumio

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop material properties of human rib cortical bone using dynamic tension coupon testing. This study presents 117 human rib cortical bone coupon tests from six cadavers, three male and three female, ranging in age from 18 to 67 years old. The rib sections were taken from the anterior, lateral, and posterior regions on ribs 1 through 12 of each cadaver's rib cage. The cortical bone was isolated from each rib section with a low speed diamond saw, and milled into dog bone shaped tension coupons using a small computer numerical control machine. A high-rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System equipped with a custom slack adaptor, to provide constant strain rates, was used to apply tension loads to failure at an average rate of 0.5 strains/sec. The elastic modulus, yield stress, yield strain, ultimate stress, ultimate strain, and strain energy density were determined from the resulting stress versus strain curves. The overall average of all cadaver data gives an elastic modulus of 13.9 GPa, a yield stress of 93.9 MPa, a yield strain of 0.88 %, an ultimate stress of 124.2 MPa, an ultimate strain of 2.7 %, and a strain energy density of 250.1 MPa-microstrain. For all cadavers, the plastic region of the stress versus strain curves was substantial and contributed approximately 60 % to the strain energy and over 80 % in the tests with the 18 year old cadaver. The rib cortical bone becomes more brittle with increasing age, shown by an increase in the modulus (p < 0.01) and a decrease in peak strain (p < 0.01). In contrast to previous three-bending tests on whole rib and rib cortical bone coupons, there were no significant differences in material properties with respect to rib region or rib level. When these results are considered in conjunction with the previous three-point bending tests, there is regional variation in the structural response of the human rib cage, but this variation appears to be primarily a result of changes in the

  13. Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones, ... home. What to Do: For a Suspected Broken Bone: Do not move a child whose injury involves ...

  14. Micromechanical Modeling of R-Curve Behaviors in Human Cortical Bone

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwai S.; Nicolella, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The risk of bone fracture increases with age because of a variety of factors that include, among others, decreasing bone quantity and quality due to increasing porosity and crack density with age. Experimental evidence has indicated that changes in bone microstructure and trace mineralization with age can result in different crack-tip strain field and fracture response, leading to different fracture mechanisms and R-curve behaviors. In this paper, a micromechanical modeling approach is developed to predict the R-curve response of bone tissue by delineating fracture mechanisms that lead to microdamage and ligament bridging by incorporating the influence of increasing porosity and crack density with age. The effects of age on fracture of human femur cortical bone due to porosity (bone quantity) and bone quality (crack density) with age are then examined via the micromechanical model. PMID:23158217

  15. Dynamic photophysical processes in laser irradiated human cortical skull bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Kwan, Chi-Hang; Matvienko, Anna

    2009-02-01

    Modulated luminescence (LUM) technique was applied to analyze photophysical processes in the cortical layer of human skull bones. The theoretical interpretation of the results was based on the optical excitation and decay rate equations of the fluorophore and on the molecular interaction parameter with the photon field density in the matrix of the bone. Using comparisons of the theory with the frequency response of dental LUM it was concluded that the optically active molecular species (fluorophore) in the bones is hydroxyapatite. An effective relaxation lifetime of skull cortical bone was derived theoretically and was found to depend on the intrinsic fluorophore decay lifetime, on the photon field density, and on the thickness of the bone. The experimentally measured dependencies were in excellent agreement with the theoretical model. The theory was able to yield measurements of the optical scattering coefficient, optical absorption coefficient, and mean coupling coefficient. These results show that the quantitative LUM can be used as a sensitive method to measure optical properties of the active fluorophore in cortical skull bones and the optical-field-induced molecular interaction parameter. When calibrated vs. laser intensity, the modulated luminescence can also be used to measure human skull thickness. These traits can be applied to monitor the bone mineral density (BMD) and, ultimately can be used as potential markers of bone health or disease, such as osteoporosis or bone cancer.

  16. Progressive post-yield behavior of human cortical bone in shear

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xuanliang N.; Luo, Qing; Wang, Xiaodu

    2012-01-01

    Bone fragility depends on its post-yield behavior since most of energy dissipation in bone occurs during the post-yield deformation. Previous studies have investigated the progressive changes in the post-yield behavior of human cortical bone in tension and compression using a novel progressive loading scheme. However, little is known regarding the progressive changes in the post-yield behavior of bone in shear. The objective of this short study was to address this issue by testing bone specimens in an inclined double notch shear configuration using the progressive loading protocol. The results of this study indicated that the shear modulus of bone decreased with respect to the applied strain, and the rate of degradation was about 50% less than those previously observed in compression and tension tests. In addition, a quasi-linear relationship between the plastic and applied strains was observed in shear mode, which is similar to those previously reported in tension and compression tests. However, the viscous responses of bone (i.e. relaxation time constants and stress magnitude) demonstrated slight differences in shear compared with those observed in tension and compression tests. Nonetheless, the results of this study suggest that the intrinsic mechanism of plastic deformation of human cortical bone may be independent of loading modes. PMID:23219946

  17. Weibull Analysis of Fracture Test Data on Bovine Cortical Bone: Influence of Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Ekwaro-Osire, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The fracture toughness, KIC, of a cortical bone has been experimentally determined by several researchers. The variation of KIC values occurs from the variation of specimen orientation, shape, and size during the experiment. The fracture toughness of a cortical bone is governed by the severest flaw and, hence, may be analyzed using Weibull statistics. To the best of the authors' knowledge, however, no studies of this aspect have been published. The motivation of the study is the evaluation of Weibull parameters at the circumferential-longitudinal (CL) and longitudinal-circumferential (LC) directions. We hypothesized that Weibull parameters vary depending on the bone microstructure. In the present work, a two-parameter Weibull statistical model was applied to calculate the plane-strain fracture toughness of bovine femoral cortical bone obtained using specimens extracted from CL and LC directions of the bone. It was found that the Weibull modulus of fracture toughness was larger for CL specimens compared to LC specimens, but the opposite trend was seen for the characteristic fracture toughness. The reason for these trends is the microstructural and extrinsic toughening mechanism differences between CL and LC directions bone. The Weibull parameters found in this study can be applied to develop a damage-mechanics model for bone. PMID:24385985

  18. Weibull analysis of fracture test data on bovine cortical bone: influence of orientation.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Morshed; Ekwaro-Osire, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The fracture toughness, K IC, of a cortical bone has been experimentally determined by several researchers. The variation of K IC values occurs from the variation of specimen orientation, shape, and size during the experiment. The fracture toughness of a cortical bone is governed by the severest flaw and, hence, may be analyzed using Weibull statistics. To the best of the authors' knowledge, however, no studies of this aspect have been published. The motivation of the study is the evaluation of Weibull parameters at the circumferential-longitudinal (CL) and longitudinal-circumferential (LC) directions. We hypothesized that Weibull parameters vary depending on the bone microstructure. In the present work, a two-parameter Weibull statistical model was applied to calculate the plane-strain fracture toughness of bovine femoral cortical bone obtained using specimens extracted from CL and LC directions of the bone. It was found that the Weibull modulus of fracture toughness was larger for CL specimens compared to LC specimens, but the opposite trend was seen for the characteristic fracture toughness. The reason for these trends is the microstructural and extrinsic toughening mechanism differences between CL and LC directions bone. The Weibull parameters found in this study can be applied to develop a damage-mechanics model for bone. PMID:24385985

  19. Dynamic tensile material properties of human pelvic cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    IIn order for finite element models of the human body to predict pelvic injuries accurately, the appropriate material properties must be applied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the dynamic material properties of human pelvic cortical bone in tension. In order to accomplish this, a total of 20 tension coupon specimens were obtained from four regions of four human cadaver pelves: anterior ilium wing, posterior ilium wing, superior pubic ramus, and ischium body. For the anterior and posterior regions of the ilium wing, samples were taken in two orientations to investigate any direction dependence. A high-rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor was used to apply tension loads to failure at a constant loading rate of 0.5 strains/s. The horizontally oriented anterior ilium specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress (p=0.02), ultimate strain (p>0.01), and modulus (p=0.02) than the vertically oriented anterior ilium specimens. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.27), ultimate strain (p=0.85), or modulus (p=0.87) found between horizontally oriented and vertically oriented posterior ilium specimens. However, additional testing should be conducted at specimen orientation 45 degree from the orientations used in the current study to further investigate the effect of specimen orientation on the posterior portion of the ilium wing. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.79), ultimate strain (p=0.31), or modulus (p=0.15) found between the superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens. However, the statistical comparison between superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens was considered weak due to the limited samples and large variation between subjects. PMID:19141951

  20. Disuse exaggerates the detrimental effects of alcohol on cortical bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefferan, Theresa E.; Kennedy, Angela M.; Evans, Glenda L.; Turner, Russell T.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol abuse is associated with an increased risk for osteoporosis. However, comorbidity factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcohol-related bone fractures. Suboptimal mechanical loading of the skeleton, an established risk factor for bone loss, may occur in some alcohol abusers due to reduced physical activity, muscle atrophy, or both. The effect of alcohol consumption and reduced physical activity on bone metabolism has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mechanical disuse alters bone metabolism in a rat model for chronic alcohol abuse. METHODS: Alcohol was administered in the diet (35% caloric intake) of 6-month-old male rats for 4 weeks. Rats were hindlimb-unloaded the final 2 weeks of the experiment to prevent dynamic weight bearing. Afterward, cortical bone histomorphometry was evaluated at the tibia-fibula synostosis. RESULTS: At the periosteal surface of the tibial diaphysis, alcohol and hindlimb unloading independently decreased the mineralizing perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate. In addition, alcohol, but not hindlimb unloading, increased endocortical bone resorption. The respective detrimental effects of alcohol and hindlimb unloading to inhibit bone formation were additive; there was no interaction between the two variables. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced weight bearing accentuates the detrimental effects of alcohol on cortical bone in adult male rats by further inhibiting bone formation. This finding suggests that reduced physical activity may be a comorbidity factor for osteoporosis in alcohol abusers.

  1. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack propagation rate of short fiber reinforced epoxy composites for analogue cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chong, Alexander C M; Miller, Forrest; Buxton, McKee; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Third-generation mechanical analogue bone models and synthetic analogue cortical bone materials manufactured by Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc. (PRL) are popular tools for use in mechanical testing of various orthopedic implants and biomaterials. A major issue with these models is that the current third-generation epoxy-short fiberglass based composite used as the cortical bone substitute is prone to crack formation and failure in fatigue or repeated quasistatic loading of the model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the tensile and fracture mechanics properties of the current baseline (established PRL "third-generation" E-glass-fiber-epoxy) composite analogue for cortical bone to a new composite material formulation proposed for use as an enhanced fourth-generation cortical bone analogue material. Standard tensile, plane strain fracture toughness, and fatigue crack propagation rate tests were performed on both the third- and fourth-generation composite material formulations using standard ASTM test techniques. Injection molding techniques were used to create random fiber orientation in all test specimens. Standard dog-bone style tensile specimens were tested to obtain ultimate tensile strength and stiffness. Compact tension fracture toughness specimens were utilized to determine plane strain fracture toughness values. Reduced thickness compact tension specimens were also used to determine fatigue crack propagation rate behavior for the two material groups. Literature values for the same parameters for human cortical bone were compared to results from the third- and fourth-generation cortical analogue bone materials. Tensile properties of the fourth-generation material were closer to that of average human cortical bone than the third-generation material. Fracture toughness was significantly increased by 48% in the fourth-generation composite as compared to the third-generation analogue bone. The threshold stress intensity to propagate the crack

  2. The effect of supercritical carbon dioxide sterilization on the anisotropy of bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nicholas; Rives, Alain; Pelletier, Matthew H; Wang, Tian; Walsh, William R

    2015-03-01

    Bone allografts are used to replace bone that has been removed or to augment bone tissue in a number of clinical scenarios. In order to minimize the risk of infection and immune response, the bone is delipidated and terminally sterilized prior to implantation. The optimal method for bone graft sterilization has been the topic of considerable research and debate. Recently, supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) treatments have been shown to terminally sterilize bone against a range of bacteria and viruses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of these SCCO(2) treatments on the anisotropic mechanical properties of cortical bone. Adult bovine cortical cubes were prepared and treated using SCCO(2) and a range of common processing additives (ethanol, peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide). The bone was mechanically tested in uniaxial compression in the axial, radial and tangential orientations. Ultimate stress, strain, elastic modulus, energy and stiffness were evaluated. This study found that SCCO(2) treatment without additive did not alter the ultimate stress, stiffness or energy to failure depreciably in any orientation. The addition of sterilants peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide also preserved mechanical function, with no deleterious effect on stress or stiffness. This study highlights the expediency of SCCO(2) treatment for bone allograft processing as terminal sterilization can be achieved while maintaining the intrinsic mechanical properties of the graft. PMID:24737303

  3. Mammalian cortical bone in tension is non-Haversian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, Ashwij; Banerjee, Anuradha; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    Cortical bone, found in the central part of long bones like femur, is known to adapt to local mechanical stresses. This adaptation has been linked exclusively with Haversian remodelling involving bone resorption and formation of secondary osteons. Compared to primary/plexiform bone, the Haversian bone has lower stiffness, fatigue strength and fracture toughness, raising the question why nature prefers an adaptation that is detrimental to bone's primary function of bearing mechanical stresses. Here, we show that in the goat femur, Haversian remodelling occurs only at locations of high compressive stresses. At locations corresponding to high tensile stresses, we observe a microstructure that is non-Haversian. Compared with primary/plexiform bone, this microstructure's mineralisation is significantly higher with a distinctly different spatial pattern. Thus, the Haversian structure is an adaptation only to high compressive stresses rendering its inferior tensile properties irrelevant as the regions with high tensile stresses have a non-Haversian, apparently primary microstructure.

  4. Individual-specific multi-scale finite element simulation of cortical bone of human proximal femur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Kawas, Neal P.; Lutz, Andre; Kardas, Dieter; Nackenhorst, Udo; Keyak, Joyce H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an innovative method to perform multi-scale finite element analyses of the cortical component of the femur using the individual's (1) computed tomography scan; and (2) a bone specimen obtained in conjunction with orthopedic surgery. The method enables study of micro-structural characteristics regulating strains and stresses under physiological loading conditions. The analysis of the micro-structural scenarios that cause variation of strain and stress is the first step in understanding the elevated strains and stresses in bone tissue, which are indicative of higher likelihood of micro-crack formation in bone, implicated in consequent remodeling or macroscopic bone fracture. Evidence that micro-structure varies with clinical history and contributes in significant, but poorly understood, ways to bone function, motivates the method's development, as does need for software tools to investigate relationships between macroscopic loading and micro-structure. Three applications - varying region of interest, bone mineral density, and orientation of collagen type I, illustrate the method. We show, in comparison between physiological loading and simple compression of a patient's femur, that strains computed at the multi-scale model's micro-level: (i) differ; and (ii) depend on local collagen-apatite orientation and degree of calcification. Our findings confirm the strain concentration role of osteocyte lacunae, important for mechano-transduction. We hypothesize occurrence of micro-crack formation, leading either to remodeling or macroscopic fracture, when the computed strains exceed the elastic range observed in micro-structural testing.

  5. Modeling deformation-induced fluid flow in cortical bone's canalicular-lacunar system.

    PubMed

    Gururaja, S; Kim, H J; Swan, C C; Brand, R A; Lakes, R S

    2005-01-01

    To explore the potential role that load-induced fluid flow plays as a mechano-transduction mechanism in bone adaptation, a lacunar-canalicular scale bone poroelasticity model is developed and implemented. The model uses micromechanics to homogenize the pericanalicular bone matrix, a system of straight circular cylinders in the bone matrix through which bone fluids can flow, as a locally anisotropic poroelastic medium. In this work, a simplified two-dimensional model of a periodic array of lacunae and their surrounding systems of canaliculi is used to quantify local fluid flow characteristics in the vicinity of a single lacuna. When the cortical bone model is loaded, microscale stress, and strain concentrations occur in the vicinity of individual lacunae and give rise to microscale spatial variations in the pore fluid pressure field. Furthermore, loading of the bone matrix containing canaliculi generates fluid pressures in the contained fluids. Consequently, loading of cortical bone induces fluid flow in the canaliculi and exchange of fluid between canaliculi and lacunae. For realistic bone morphology parameters, and a range of loading frequencies, fluid pressures and fluid-solid drag forces in the canalicular bone are computed and the associated energy dissipation in the models compared to that measured in physical in vitro experiments on human cortical bone. The proposed model indicates that deformation-induced fluid pressures in the lacunar-canalicular system have relaxation times on the order of milliseconds as opposed to the much shorter times (hundredths of milliseconds) associated with deformation-induced pressures in the Haversian system. PMID:15709702

  6. Cortical bone distribution in the femoral neck of strepsirhine primates.

    PubMed

    Demes, B; Jungers, W L; Walker, C

    2000-10-01

    The thickness of the inferior and superior cortices of the femoral neck was measured on X-rays of 181 strepsirhine primate femora representing 24 species. Neck length, neck depth and neck-shaft angle were also measured. The strength of the femoral neck in frontal bending was estimated by modeling the neck as a hollow cylinder, with neck depth as the outer diameter and cortical thickness representing the superior and inferior shell dimensions. Results indicate that the inferior cortex is always thicker than the superior cortex. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is highly variable but distinguishes two of the three locomotor groups in the sample. Vertical clingers and leapers have higher ratios (i.e., a more even distribution of cortical bone) than quadrupeds. The slow climbers tend to have the lowest ratios, although they do not differ significantly from the leapers and quadrupeds. These results do not confirm prior theoretical expectations and reported data for anthropoid primates that link greater asymmetry of the cortical shell to more stereotypical hip excursions. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is unrelated to body mass, femoral neck length, and neck-shaft angle, calling into question whether the short neck of strepsirhine primates acts as a cantilever beam in bending. On the other hand, the estimated section moduli are highly correlated with body mass and neck length, a correlation that is driven primarily by body mass. In conclusion, we believe that an alternative interpretation to the cantilever beam model is needed to explain the asymmetry in bone distribution in the femoral neck, at least in strepsirhine primates (e.g., a thicker inferior cortex is required to reinforce the strongly curved inferior surface). As in prior studies of cross-sectional geometry of long bones, we found slightly positive allometry of cortical dimensions with body mass. PMID:11006046

  7. Investigation of hyperelastic models for nonlinear elastic behavior of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, M; Ghoreishi, M; Narooei, K

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the hyperelastic models of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone were investigated and appropriate models were developed. Using uniaxial compression test data, the strain energy versus stretch was calculated and the appropriate hyperelastic strain energy functions were fitted on data in order to calculate the material parameters. To obtain the mechanical behavior in other loading conditions, the hyperelastic strain energy equations were investigated for pure shear and equi-biaxial tension loadings. The results showed the Mooney-Rivlin and Ogden models cannot predict the mechanical response of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone accurately, while the general exponential-exponential and general exponential-power law models have a good agreement with the experimental results. To investigate the sensitivity of the hyperelastic models, a variation of 10% in material parameters was performed and the results indicated an acceptable stability for the general exponential-exponential and general exponential-power law models. Finally, the uniaxial tension and compression of cortical femur bone were studied using the finite element method in VUMAT user subroutine of ABAQUS software and the computed stress-stretch curves were shown a good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26953961

  8. Non-Contact Ultrasound Imaging Applied to Cortical Bone Phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halcrow, Peter; Ganezer, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to take the initial steps towards applying Non-Contact Ultrasound (NCU) to the in-vivo monitoring of osteoporosis and to quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of the skeleton using cortical bone. This project was also undertaken to find additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing the severity of third degree burns. With an NCU imaging system, a pair of specially designed broadband 1.5 MHz non-contact transducers and cortical bone phantoms we determined bone mineral density, speed of sound (SOS), integrated acoustical response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps of greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were used to collect data from phantoms of known mass density and bone mineral density (BMD). Significant correlations between known BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained for all 14 phantoms. At least thirty to forty repeated measurements were collected over a period of 1.5 years of the SOS, thickness, and IR for our phantom set, extending through most of the in-vivo range of BMD found in cortical bone. The collected data showed a small variation in the range of measurements of plus or minus 1-2 %. These NCU results were shown to be in agreement with similar results from contact ultrasound to within 1-2%. This study suggests that NCU might find additional applications in a clinical setting in the near future in medical imaging.

  9. Post-yield and failure properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Uwe; Schwiedrzik, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Ageing and associated skeletal diseases pose a significant challenge for health care systems worldwide. Age-related fractures have a serious impact on personal, social and economic wellbeing. A significant proportion of physiological loading is carried by the cortical shell. Its role in the fracture resistance and strength of whole bones in the ageing skeleton is of utmost importance. Even though a large body of knowledge has been accumulated on this topic on the macroscale, the underlying micromechanical material behaviour and the scale transition of bone's mechanical properties are yet to be uncovered. Therefore, this review aims at providing an overview of the state-of-the-art of the post-yield and failure properties of cortical bone at the extracellular matrix and the tissue level. PMID:27579166

  10. Drill wear monitoring in cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Staroveski, Tomislav; Brezak, Danko; Udiljak, Toma

    2015-06-01

    Medical drills are subject to intensive wear due to mechanical factors which occur during the bone drilling process, and potential thermal and chemical factors related to the sterilisation process. Intensive wear increases friction between the drill and the surrounding bone tissue, resulting in higher drilling temperatures and cutting forces. Therefore, the goal of this experimental research was to develop a drill wear classification model based on multi-sensor approach and artificial neural network algorithm. A required set of tool wear features were extracted from the following three types of signals: cutting forces, servomotor drive currents and acoustic emission. Their capacity to classify precisely one of three predefined drill wear levels has been established using a pattern recognition type of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network algorithm. Experiments were performed on a custom-made test bed system using fresh bovine bones and standard medical drills. Results have shown high classification success rate, together with the model robustness and insensitivity to variations of bone mechanical properties. Features extracted from acoustic emission and servomotor drive signals achieved the highest precision in drill wear level classification (92.8%), thus indicating their potential in the design of a new type of medical drilling machine with process monitoring capabilities. PMID:25922212

  11. Machining characteristics of the haversian and plexiform components of bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Conward, Michael; Samuel, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the characteristic differences observed while machining the haversian and plexiform components of a bovine cortical femoral bone. To this end micro-milling slotting experiments are performed on both the components by varying both the cutting velocity and the feed-per-tooth values. The scale of machining is chosen specifically to ensure sensitivity to the microstructural variations in the bone. The material properties of the microstructural components and their size-scale relative to the feed-per-tooth values are seen to dictate the failure mechanisms encountered during machining. The cutting force, surface roughness, and tool wear are all uniquely affected by the plexiform and haversian components of the cortical bone. In general, plexiform bone requires a higher cutting force than the haversian bone. While a higher cutting velocity can lower the surface roughness of haversian bone, it typically results in the most surface damage. The cutting force and surface roughness values for both the components show strain rate sensitivity. The tool wear is seen to be the highest while cutting parallel to the lamellar structures seen in the plexiform bone. PMID:27041629

  12. Evaluation of trabecular bone patterns on dental radiographic images: influence of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouriq, Yves; Evenou, Pierre; Arlicot, Aurore; Normand, Nicolas; Layrolle, Pierre; Weiss, Pierre; Guédon, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    For some authors trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs. For other authors, the observed intrabony trabecular pattern is a representation of only the endosteal surface of cortical bone, not of intermedullary striae. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the true anatomical structures that are visible in routine dental radiographs and classically denoted trabecular bone. This is a major point for bone texture analysis on radiographs. Computed radiography (CR) images of dog mandible section in molar region were compared with simulations calculated from high-resolution micro-CT volumes. Calculated simulations were obtained using the Mojette Transform. By digitally editing the CT volume, the simulations were separated into trabecular and cortical components into a region of interest. Different images were compared and correlated, some bone micro-architecture parameters calculated. A high correlation was found between computed radiographs and calculated simulations from micro-CT. The Mojette transform was successful to obtain high quality images. Cortical bone did not contribute to change in a major way simulated images. These first results imply that intrabony trabecular pattern observed on radiographs can not only be a representation of the cortical bone endosteal surface and that trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs.

  13. A new WNT on the bone: WNT16, cortical bone thickness, porosity and fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Francesca; Lerner, Ulf; Ohlsson, Claes; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has provided abundant data implicating the WNT pathway in bone development and in the regulation of skeletal homeostasis. Rare human mutations together with gain- and loss-of-function approaches in mice have clearly demonstrated that disrupted regulation of this pathway leads to altered bone mass. In addition to these rare human and mice mutations, large population-based genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ∼60 loci strongly associated with variations in bone mineral density (BMD) at different skeletal sites. Among the loci/genes identified by BMD GWAS, components of the WNT signaling pathway are numerous and have been shown to contribute to skeletal development and homeostasis. Within the components of WNT signaling, the gene coding for WNT16, one of the 19 WNT ligands of the human genome, has been found strongly associated with specific bone traits such as cortical bone thickness, cortical porosity and fracture risk. Recently, the first functional characterization of Wnt16 has confirmed the critical role of Wnt16 in the regulation of cortical bone mass and bone strength in mice. These reports have extended our understanding of Wnt16 function in bone homeostasis and have not only confirmed the unique association of Wnt16 with cortical bone and fracture susceptibility, as suggested by GWAS in human populations, but have also provided novel insights into the biology of this WNT ligand and the mechanism(s) by which it regulates cortical but not trabecular bone homeostasis. Most interestingly, Wnt16 appears to be a strong anti-resorptive soluble factor acting on both osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors. PMID:25987984

  14. Three-dimensional simulations of ultrasonic axial transmission velocity measurement on cortical bone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossy, Emmanuel; Talmant, Maryline; Laugier, Pascal

    2004-05-01

    The ultrasonic axial transmission technique, used to assess cortical shells of long bones, is investigated using numerical simulations based on a three-dimensional (3D) finite difference code. We focus our interest on the effects of 3D cortical bone geometry (curvature, cortical thickness), anisotropy, and microporosity on speed of sound (SOS) measurements for different frequencies in the MHz range. We first show that SOS values measured on tubular cortical shells are identical to those measured on cortical plates of equal thickness. Anisotropy of cortical bone is then shown to have a major impact on SOS measurement as a function of cortical thickness. The range of SOS values measured on anisotropic bone is half the range found when bone is considered isotropic. Dependence of thickness occurs for cortical shell thinner than 0.5×λbone in anisotropic bonebone: wavelength in bone), whereas it occurs for cortical shell thinner than λbone when anisotropy is neglected. Sensitivity of SOS along the bone axis to intracortical microporosity is shown to be approximately -20 m s-1 per percent of porosity. Using homogenized porous bone, we finally show that the cortical depth that contributes to lateral wave SOS measurement is approximately 1-1.5 mm for frequencies ranging from 500 kHz to 2 MHz under classical in vivo measurement conditions.

  15. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury. PMID:26334198

  16. Fracture Characterization of Human Cortical Bone Under Mode I Loading.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filipe; de Moura, Marcelo; Dourado, Nuno; Xavier, José; Pereira, Fábio; Morais, José; Dias, Maria; Lourenço, Paulo; Judas, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    A miniaturized version of the double cantilever beam (DCB) test is used to determine the fracture energy in human cortical bone under pure mode I loading. An equivalent crack length based data-reduction scheme is used with remarkable advantages relative to classical methods. Digital image correlation (DIC) technique is employed to determine crack opening displacement at the crack tip being correlated with the evolution of fracture energy. A method is presented to obtain the cohesive law (trapezoidal bilinear softening) mimicking the mechanical behavior observed in bone. Cohesive zone modeling (CZM) (finite-element method) was performed to validate the procedure showing excellent agreement. PMID:26502314

  17. Evaluation of mandibular cortical bone thickness for placement of temporary anchorage devices (TADs)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Objective In this study, we measured the cortical bone thickness in the mandibular buccal and lingual areas using computed tomography in order to evaluate the suitability of these areas for application of temporary anchorage devices (TADs) and to suggest a clinical guide for TADs. Methods The buccal and lingual cortical bone thickness was measured in 15 men and 15 women. Bone thickness was measured 4 mm apical to the interdental cementoenamel junction between the mandibular canine and the 2nd molar using the transaxial slices in computed tomography images. Results The cortical bone in the mandibular buccal and lingual areas was thicker in men than in women. In men, the mandibular lingual cortical bone was thicker than the buccal cortical bone, except between the 1st and 2nd molars on both sides. In women, the mandibular lingual cortical bone was thicker in all regions when compared to the buccal cortical bone. The mandibular buccal cortical bone thickness increased from the canine to the molars. The mandibular lingual cortical bone was thickest between the 1st and 2nd premolars, followed by the areas between the canine and 1st premolar, between the 2nd premolar and 1st molar, and between the 1st molar and 2nd molar. Conclusions There is sufficient cortical bone for TAD applications in the mandibular buccal and lingual areas. This provides the basis and guidelines for the clinical use of TADs in the mandibular buccal and lingual areas. PMID:23112941

  18. Comparative study between cortical bone graft versus bone dust for reconstruction of cranial burr holes

    PubMed Central

    Worm, Paulo V.; Ferreira, Nelson P.; Faria, Mario B.; Ferreira, Marcelo P.; Kraemer, Jorge L.; Collares, Marcus V. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: As a consequence of the progressive evolution of neurosurgical techniques, there has been increasing concern with the esthetic aspects of burr holes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the use of cortical bone graft and bone dust for correcting cranial deformities caused by neurosurgical trephines. Methods: Twenty-three patients were enrolled for cranial burr hole reconstruction with a 1-year follow-up. A total of 108 burr holes were treated; 36 burr holes were reconstructed with autogenous cortical bone discs (33.3%), and the remaining 72 with autogenous wet bone powder (66.6%). A trephine was specifically designed to produce this coin-shaped bone plug of 14 mm in diameter, which fit perfectly over the burr holes. The reconstructions were studied 12 months after the surgical procedure, using three-dimensional quantitative computed tomography. Additionally, general and plastic surgeons blinded for the study evaluated the cosmetic results of those areas, attributing scores from 0 to 10. Results: The mean bone densities were 987.95 ± 186.83 Hounsfield units (HU) for bone fragment and 473.55 ± 220.34 HU for bone dust (P < 0.001); the mean cosmetic scores were 9.5 for bone fragment and 5.7 for bone dust (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The use of autologous bone discs showed better results than bone dust for the reconstruction of cranial burr holes because of their lower degree of bone resorption and, consequently, better cosmetic results. The lack of donor site morbidity associated with procedural low cost qualifies the cortical autograft as the first choice for correcting cranial defects created by neurosurgical trephines. PMID:21206899

  19. Photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopic study of undisturbed human cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2013-02-01

    Chemical pretreatment has been the prevailing sample preparation procedure for infrared (IR) spectroscopic studies on bone. However, experiments have indicated that chemical pretreatment can potentially affect the interactions between the components. Typically the IR techniques have involved transmission experiments. Here we report experimental studies using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (PA-FTIR). As a nondestructive technique, PA-FTIR can detect absorbance spectrum from a sample at controllable sampling depth and with little or no sample preparation. Additionally, the coupling inert gas, helium, which is utilized in the PA-FTIR system, can inhibit bacteria growth of bone by displacing oxygen. Therefore, we used this technique to study the undisturbed human cortical bone. It is found that photoacoustic mode (linear-scan, LS-PA-FTIR) can obtain basically similar spectra of bone as compared to the traditional transmission mode, but it seems more sensitive to amide III and ν2 carbonate bands. The ν3 phosphate band is indicative of detailed mineral structure and symmetry of native bone. The PA-FTIR depth profiling experiments on human cortical bone also indicate the influence of water on OH band and the cutting effects on amide I and mineral bands. Our results indicate that phosphate ion geometry appears less symmetric in its undisturbed state as detected by the PA-FTIR as compared to higher symmetry observed using transmission techniques on disturbed samples. Moreover, the PA-FTIR spectra indicate a band at 1747 cm-1 possibly resulting from Cdbnd O stretching of lipids, cholesterol esters, and triglycerides from the arteries. Comparison of the spectra in transverse and longitudinal cross-sections demonstrates that, the surface area of the longitudinal section bone appears to have more organic matrix exposed and with higher mineral stoichiometry.

  20. Progressive post-yield behavior of human cortical bone in compression for middle-aged and elderly groups

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Huijie; Dong, X. Neil; Wang, Xiaodu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a progressive loading regimen (load–dwell–unloading–dwell–reloading) was applied on bone samples to examine the compressive post-yield response of bone at increasing strain levels. Cortical bone specimens from human tibiae of two age groups (middle-aged group: 53±2 years, 4 females and 4 males, elderly group: 83±6 years, 4 females and 4 males) were loaded in compression using the progressive loading scheme. Modulus degradation, plastic deformation, viscous response, and energy dissipation of bone during post-yield deformation were assessed. Although initial modulus was not significantly different between the two age groups, the degradation of modulus with the applied strain in the elderly group was faster than in the middle-aged group. The modulus loss (or microdamage accumulation) of bone occurred prior to plastic deformation. Plastic strain had a similar linear relationship with the applied strain for both middle-aged and the elderly group although middle-aged bone yielded at a greater strain. The viscoelastic time constant changed similarly with increasing strain for the two groups, whereas a higher magnitude of stress relaxation was observed in the middle-aged group. Energy dissipation was investigated through three pathways: elastic release strain energy, hysteresis energy, and plastic strain energy. The middle-aged group had significantly greater capacity of energy dissipation than the elderly group in all three pathways. The information obtained may provide important insights in age-related effects on bone fragility. PMID:19150716

  1. Quantitative ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI of human cortical bone: correlation with porosity and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won C; Chen, Peter C; Chung, Christine B; Masuda, Koichi; D'Lima, Darryl; Du, Jiang

    2012-04-01

    In this study we describe the use of ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate short and long T2* components as well as the water content of cortical bone. Fourteen human cadaveric distal femur and proximal tibia were sectioned to produce 44 rectangular slabs of cortical bone for quantitative UTE MR imaging, microcomputed tomography (µCT), and biomechanical testing. A two-dimensional (2D) UTE pulse sequence with a minimal nominal TE of 8 µseconds was used together with bicomponent analysis to quantify the bound and free water in cortical bone using a clinical 3T scanner. Total water concentration was measured using a 3D UTE sequence together with a reference water phantom. UTE MR measures of water content (total, free, and bound), T2* (short and long), and short and long T2* fractions were compared with porosity assessed with µCT, as well as elastic (modulus, yield stress, and strain) and failure (ultimate stress, failure strain, and energy) properties, using Pearson correlation. Porosity significantly correlated positively with total (R(2)  = 0.23; p < 0.01) and free (R(2)  = 0.31; p < 0.001) water content as well as long T2* fraction (R(2)  = 0.25; p < 0.001), and negatively with short T2* fraction and short T2* (R(2)  = 0.24; p < 0.01). Failure strain significantly correlated positively with short T2* (R(2)  = 0.29; p < 0.001), ultimate stress significantly correlated negatively with total (R(2)  = 0.25; p < 0.001) and bound (R(2)  = 0.22; p < 0.01) water content, and failure energy significantly correlated positively with both short (R(2)  = 0 30; p < 0.001) and long (R(2)  = 0.17; p < 0.01) T2* values. These results suggest that UTE MR measures are sensitive to the structure and failure properties of human cortical bone, and may provide a novel way of evaluating cortical bone quality. PMID:22190232

  2. Individual-specific multi-scale finite element simulation of cortical bone of human proximal femur

    SciTech Connect

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Kardas, Dieter; Nackenhorst, Udo; Keyak, Joyce H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an innovative method to perform multi-scale finite element analyses of the cortical component of the femur using the individual’s (1) computed tomography scan; and (2) a bone specimen obtained in conjunction with orthopedic surgery. The method enables study of micro-structural characteristics regulating strains and stresses under physiological loading conditions. The analysis of the micro-structural scenarios that cause variation of strain and stress is the first step in understanding the elevated strains and stresses in bone tissue, which are indicative of higher likelihood of micro-crack formation in bone, implicated in consequent remodeling or macroscopic bone fracture. Evidence that micro-structure varies with clinical history and contributes in significant, but poorly understood, ways to bone function, motivates the method’s development, as does need for software tools to investigate relationships between macroscopic loading and micro-structure. Three applications – varying region of interest, bone mineral density, and orientation of collagen type I, illustrate the method. We show, in comparison between physiological loading and simple compression of a patient’s femur, that strains computed at the multi-scale model’s micro-level: (i) differ; and (ii) depend on local collagen-apatite orientation and degree of calcification. Our findings confirm the strain concentration role of osteocyte lacunae, important for mechano-transduction. We hypothesize occurrence of micro-crack formation, leading either to remodeling or macroscopic fracture, when the computed strains exceed the elastic range observed in micro-structural testing.

  3. Bone strain magnitude is correlated with bone strain rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, B. R.; Iriarte-Diaz, J.; Blob, R. W.; Butcher, M. T.; Carrano, M. T.; Espinoza, N. R.; Main, R. P.; Ross, C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone strain magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level strain magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar–canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone strain rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of strain magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because strain magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using strain gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between strain rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone strain magnitude is encoded in strain rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction. PMID:26063842

  4. Inhibition of cortical and trabecular bone formation in the long bones of immobilized monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Tetracycline derivatives are administered on three separate occasions to label the sites of bone formation. Determinations are made of the tetracycline-labeling frequency and mineral apposition rate of osteons and trabecular bone surfaces in the humerus and femur. The inhibition of bone formation induced by immobilization is found to be more pronounced in trabecular bone. The immobilized monkeys exhibit a moderate, but statistically nonsignificant, reduction in the percentage of osteons forming bone. Conversely, the dramatic decline in the percentage of trabecular surfaces undergoing bone formation in the monkeys is found to be highly significant. The diminished rate of mineral apposition in osteons is seen as suggesting that osteoblastic activity is impaired in cortical bone during immobilization.

  5. Micro-Computed Tomography of Fatigue Microdamage in Cortical Bone Using a Barium Sulfate Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Huijie; Wang, Xiang; Ross, Ryan D.; Niebur, Glen L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of microdamage during fatigue can lead to increased fracture susceptibility in bone. Current techniques for imaging microdamage in bone are inherently destructive and two-dimensional. Therefore, the objective of this study was to image the accumulation of fatigue microdamage in cortical bone using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) with a barium sulfate (BaSO4) contrast agent. Two symmetric notches were machined on the tensile surface of bovine cortical bone beams in order to generate damage ahead of the stress concentrations during four-point bending fatigue. Specimens were loaded to a specified number of cycles or until one notch fractured, such that the other notch exhibited the accumulation of microdamage prior to fracture. Microdamage ahead of the notch was stained in vitro by precipitation of BaSO4 and imaged using micro-CT. Reconstructed images showed a distinct region of bright voxels around the notch tip or along propagating cracks due to the presence of BaSO4, which was verified by backscattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The shape of the stained region ahead of the notch tip was consistent with principal strain contours calculated by finite element analysis. The relative volume of the stained region was correlated with the number of loading cycles by non-linear regression using a power-law. This study demonstrates new methods for the non-destructive and three-dimensional detection of fatigue microdamage accumulation in cortical bone in vitro, which may be useful to gain further understanding into the role of microdamage in bone fragility. PMID:18443659

  6. Tensile Mechanical Properties of Swine Cortical Mandibular Bone

    PubMed Central

    Brosh, Tamar; Rozitsky, Doron; Geron, Silvia; Pilo, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Temporary orthodontic mini implants serve as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatments. Often, they are inserted in the jaw bones, between the roots of the teeth. The stability of the mini implants within the bone is one of the major factors affecting their success and, consequently, that of the orthodontic treatment. Bone mechanical properties are important for implant stability. The aim of this study was to determine the tensile properties of the alveolar and basal mandible bones in a swine model. The diametral compression test was employed to study the properties in two orthogonal directions: mesio-distal and occluso-gingival. Small cylindrical cortical bone specimens (2.6 mm diameter, 1.5 mm thickness) were obtained from 7 mandibles using a trephine drill. The sites included different locations (anterior and posterior) and aspects (buccal and lingual) for a total of 16 specimens from each mandible. The load-displacement curves were continuously monitored while loading half of the specimens in the oclluso-gingival direction and half in the mesio-distal direction. The stiffness was calculated from the linear portion of the curve. The mesio-distal direction was 31% stiffer than the occluso-gingival direction. The basal bone was 40% stiffer than the alveolar bone. The posterior zone was 46% stiffer than the anterior zone. The lingual aspect was stiffer than the buccal aspect. Although bone specimens do not behave as brittle materials, the diametral compression test can be adequately used for determining tensile behavior when only small bone specimens can be obtained. In conclusion, to obtain maximal orthodontic mini implant stability, the force components on the implants should be oriented mostly in the mesio-distal direction. PMID:25463971

  7. Finite element analysis of dental implant loading on atrophic and non-atrophic cancellous and cortical mandibular bone - a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Marcián, Petr; Borák, Libor; Valášek, Jiří; Kaiser, Jozef; Florian, Zdeněk; Wolff, Jan

    2014-12-18

    The first aim of this study was to assess displacements and micro-strain induced on different grades of atrophic cortical and trabecular mandibular bone by axially loaded dental implants using finite element analysis (FEA). The second aim was to assess the micro-strain induced by different implant geometries and the levels of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) on the surrounding bone. Six mandibular bone segments demonstrating different grades of mandibular bone atrophy and various bone volume fractions (from 0.149 to 0.471) were imaged using a micro-CT device. The acquired bone STL models and implant (Brånemark, Straumann, Ankylos) were merged into a three-dimensional finite elements structure. The mean displacement value for all implants was 3.1 ±1.2 µm. Displacements were lower in the group with a strong BIC. The results indicated that the maximum strain values of cortical and cancellous bone increased with lower bone density. Strain distribution is the first and foremost dependent on the shape of bone and architecture of cancellous bone. The geometry of the implant, thread patterns, grade of bone atrophy and BIC all affect the displacement and micro-strain on the mandible bone. Preoperative finite element analysis could offer improved predictability in the long-term outlook of dental implant restorations. PMID:25468296

  8. Effect of a hypergravity environment on cortical bone elasticity in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohles, S. S.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining whether hypergravity can be used as a countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss. This study was conducted on 20 immature male rats in order to investigate possible elastic adaptations of cortical bone in rapidly growing rats exposed to chronic hypergravity. Ten rats were continuously centrifuged for 14 days at twice gravitational acceleration (2G) on a 12.75 foot radius centrifuge and 10 rats concurrently acted as stationary controls. The effect of hypergravity on the elastic characteristics of cortical bone was quantified via ultrasonic wave propagation. Propagation velocities of longitudinal and shear waves were measured through cubic cortical specimens from the posterior femoral diaphyses. Density was measured with an Archimedes' technique. The orthotropic elastic properties were calculated and used to compare the difference between groups. Results showed an average increase in both the Young's moduli (Eii, + 2.2%) and shear moduli (Gij, + 4.3%) with a statistically significant increase only in G12 (+15.7%, P = 0.046). The ratio of transverse to axial strain (Poisson's ratio, nuij) demonstrated statistically significant changes in nu12, nu21, nu13, and nu31 (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that although slight elastic changes were incurred via a hypergravity environment, the treatment level or duration in this study do not dramatically perturb the normal elastic behavior of cortical bone and that dramatic biomechanical differences noted in previous studies were due more to structural changes than material elasticity changes. Hypergravity applied post facto to a microgravity environment would offer further illucidation of this method as treatment for a degenerative spaceflight experience.

  9. Reduced Bone Density and Cortical Bone Indices in Female Adiponectin-Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Naot, Dorit; Watson, Maureen; Callon, Karen E; Tuari, Donna; Musson, David S; Choi, Ally J; Sreenivasan, Dharshini; Fernandez, Justin; Tu, Pao Ting; Dickinson, Michelle; Gamble, Greg D; Grey, Andrew; Cornish, Jillian

    2016-09-01

    A positive association between fat and bone mass is maintained through a network of signaling molecules. Clinical studies found that the circulating levels of adiponectin, a peptide secreted from adipocytes, are inversely related to visceral fat mass and bone mineral density, and it has been suggested that adiponectin contributes to the coupling between fat and bone. Our study tested the hypothesis that adiponectin affects bone tissue by comparing the bone phenotype of wild-type and adiponectin-knockout (APN-KO) female mice between the ages of 8-37 weeks. Using a longitudinal study design, we determined body composition and bone density using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. In parallel, groups of animals were killed at different ages and bone properties were analyzed by microcomputed tomography, dynamic histomorphometry, 3-point bending test, nanoindentation, and computational modelling. APN-KO mice had reduced body fat and decreased whole-skeleton bone mineral density. Microcomputed tomography analysis identified reduced cortical area fraction and average cortical thickness in APN-KO mice in all the age groups and reduced trabecular bone volume fraction only in young APN-KO mice. There were no major differences in bone strength and material properties between the 2 groups. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive effect of adiponectin on bone geometry and density in our mouse model. Assuming adiponectin has similar effects in humans, the low circulating levels of adiponectin associated with increased fat mass are unlikely to contribute to the parallel increase in bone mass. Therefore, adiponectin does not appear to play a role in the coupling between fat and bone tissue. PMID:27384302

  10. Bone Morphology in 46 BXD Recombinant Inbred Strains and Femur-Tibia Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yueying; Lu, Lu; Hasty, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the bone properties of BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mice by analyzing femur and tibia and compared their phenotypes of different compartments. 46 BXD RI mouse strains were analyzed including progenitor C57BL/6J (n = 16) and DBA/2J (n = 15) and two first filial generations (D2B6F1 and B6D2F1). Strain differences were observed in bone quality and structural properties (P < 0.05) in each bone profile (whole bone, cortical bone, or trabecular bone). It is well known that skeletal phenotypes are largely affected by genetic determinants and genders, such as bone mineral density (BMD). While genetics and gender appear expectedly as the major determinants of bone mass and structure, significant correlations were also observed between femur and tibia. More importantly, positive and negative femur-tibia associations indicated that genetic makeup had an influence on skeletal integrity. We conclude that (a) femur-tibia association in bone morphological properties significantly varies from strain to strain, which may be caused by genetic differences among strains, and (b) strainwise variations were seen in bone mass, bone morphology, and bone microarchitecture along with bone structural property. PMID:25811045

  11. Bone Balance within a Cortical BMU: Local Controls of Bone Resorption and Formation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David W.; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Dunstan, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining bone volume during bone turnover by a BMU is known as bone balance. Balance is required to maintain structural integrity of the bone and is often dysregulated in disease. Consequently, understanding how a BMU controls bone balance is of considerable interest. This paper develops a methodology for identifying potential balance controls within a single cortical BMU. The theoretical framework developed offers the possibility of a directed search for biological processes compatible with the constraints of balance control. We first derive general control constraint equations and then introduce constitutive equations to identify potential control processes that link key variables that describe the state of the BMU. The paper describes specific local bone volume balance controls that may be associated with bone resorption and bone formation. Because bone resorption and formation both involve averaging over time, short-term fluctuations in the environment are removed, leaving the control systems to manage deviations in longer-term trends back towards their desired values. The length of time for averaging is much greater for bone formation than for bone resorption, which enables more filtering of variability in the bone formation environment. Remarkably, the duration for averaging of bone formation may also grow to control deviations in long-term trends of bone formation. Providing there is sufficient bone formation capacity by osteoblasts, this leads to an extraordinarily robust control mechanism that is independent of either osteoblast number or the cellular osteoid formation rate. A complex picture begins to emerge for the control of bone volume. Different control relationships may achieve the same objective, and the ‘integration of information’ occurring within a BMU may be interpreted as different sets of BMU control systems coming to the fore as different information is supplied to the BMU, which in turn leads to different observable BMU behaviors

  12. Dynamic testing of old and young baboon cortical bone with numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocron, S.; Nicolella, D.; Nicholls, A. E.; Bredbenner, T.; Havill, L.

    2012-08-01

    Cortical bone tensile mechanical properties at quasistatic and high rates (˜300s-1) were determined ex vivo using the right femurs of 12 female baboons, (Papio hamadryas spp.) from the Texas Biomedical Research Institute/Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio, Texas. The animals were divided into two age groups: a young age group (6.63 ± 0.6 years) and an old age group (26.96 ± 1.3 years). Seven specimens per group were monotonically loaded to failure to determine their mechanical properties. The quasistatic strength of the bone for the old group was just a little (but not significantly) lower than the young group. High strain rate tests performed with the Hopkinson bar indicate that baboon bone from the older group was significantly weaker under impact loads than that from the younger group. This observation is particularly important due to the similarities between baboon and human bone tissue. Typical strain rates for these tests ranged from 130s-1 to 250s-1. A full-size 3-D simulation of the Hopkinson bar test was performed to confirm that the bone specimen was under stress equilibrium and to evaluate the consistency of the modulus and strength inferred from the tests. Simulations were performed in which the modulus, strength and failure strain were varied to see the sensitivity of the results. Additionally, simplified simulations were performed to estimate the strain rate environment of a femur during a fall at an impact velocity of 5 m/s, similar to a free fall velocity from a height of 1.3 meters. The simulations confirm that strain rates obtained in the Hopkinson bar are relevant because they are similar to those expected inr such a fall.

  13. In Vitro Fracture of Human Cortical Bone: Local Fracture Criteria and Toughening Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R; Stolken, J; Kinney, J; Ritchie, R

    2004-08-18

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture that encompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure and defines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research on the response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/or disease. Micro-mechanical models for fracture incorporating such local failure criteria have been widely developed for metallic and ceramic materials systems; however, few such deliberations have been undertaken for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event in mineralized tissues such as bone is commonly believed to be locally strain controlled, until recently there has been little experimental evidence to support this widely held belief. In the present study, a series of in vitro experiments involving a double-notch bend test geometry are performed in order to shed further light on the nature of the local cracking events that precede catastrophic fracture in bone and to define their relationship to the microstructure. Specifically, crack-microstructure interactions are examined to determine the salient toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone and to characterize how these may affect the anisotropy in fracture properties. Based on preliminary micro-mechanical models of these processes, in particular crack deflection and uncracked ligament bridging, the relative importance of these toughening mechanisms is established.

  14. Finite element modeling for strain rate dependency of fracture resistance in compact bone.

    PubMed

    Charoenphan, S; Polchai, A

    2007-02-01

    Crack growths in compact bones driven by various strain rate levels were studied using finite element modeling. The energy resistance curves in bovine femur cortical bones were characterized, whereas the orthotropic viscoelasticity in bone materials was accounted for to assess the effect of strain rate on the energy resistance curve. The models were also used to justify the anticipated plane strain response as a result of rather thick specimens used in experiments. Similarities were found between the experimental and model results when crack resistance ability exhibited in bones with slow loading rates, while unstable crack growth existed in bones with rapid loading rates. The critical energy release rates slightly decreased with the increase in strain rates. The hybrid experimental and computational method introduced in this study could be beneficial for application in fracture study in which standard experiments cannot be validly performed. PMID:17227094

  15. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  16. Decreased cortical and increased cancellous bone in two children with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Boechat, M I; Westra, S J; Van Dop, C; Kaufman, F; Gilsanz, V; Roe, T F

    1996-01-01

    The basis for this study is two children with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) who radiographically manifested both marked subperiosteal resorption and prominent osteosclerosis. We hypothesize that the parathyroid hormone (PTH) elevation not only increased osteoclastic resorption of cortical bone but also simultaneously enhanced cancellous bone formation, giving rise to osteosclerosis. In this report, we describe the changes in trabecular and cortical bone density, as measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT), in these two young patients with severe PHPT, before and after removal of a parathyroid adenoma. Before surgery, the radiographic findings of subperiosteal resorption and osteosclerosis were associated with low cortical and high cancellous bone density values in both children. Within 1 week of surgery, both cortical and cancellous bone density values increased and serum concentrations of calcium and, to a lesser degree, phosphorus decreased due to the "hungry bone syndrome." Twelve weeks after parathyroidectomy, QCT bone density values and skeletal radiographs were normal in both patients. The findings suggest that in patients with severe PHPT, the catabolic effect of PTH on cortical bone may be associated with a simultaneous anabolic effect on cancellous bone, and PTH may cause a significant redistribution of bone mineral from cortical to cancellous bone. PMID:8544781

  17. Novel multilayer Ti foam with cortical bone strength and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Ochiai, S; Yamamoto, A; Daigo, Y; Honma, K; Matano, S; Omori, K

    2013-03-01

    The major functions required for load-bearing orthopaedic implants are load-bearing and mechanical or biological fixation with the surrounding bone. Porous materials with appropriate mechanical properties and adequate pore structure for fixation are promising candidates for load-bearing implant material. In previous work, the authors developed a novel titanium (Ti) foam sheet 1-2mm thick by an original slurry foaming method. In the present work, novel Ti foam is developed with mechanical properties compatible with cortical bone and biological fixation capabilities by layer-by-layer stacking of different foam sheets with volumetric porosities of 80% and 17%. The resulting multilayer Ti foam exhibited a Young's modulus of 11-12GPa and yield strength of 150-240MPa in compression tests. In vitro cell culture on the sample revealed good cell penetration in the higher-porosity foam (80% volumetric porosity), which reached 1.2mm for 21 days of incubation. Cell penetration into the high-porosity layers of a multilayer sample was good and not influenced by the lower-porosity layers. Calcification was also observed in the high-porosity foam, suggesting that this Ti foam does not inhibit bone formation. Contradictory requirements for high volumetric porosity and high strength were attained by role-sharing between the foam sheets of different porosities. The unique characteristics of the present multilayer Ti foam make them attractive for application in the field of orthopaedics. PMID:23201016

  18. Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-05-07

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  19. Computer modelling of the structure of the cortical and trabecular bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakova, Tatyana

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents computer models of the structure of cortical and trabecular bone tissue. The model fragment of the cortical bone tissue was built based on a real image of the natural bone microstructure. The osteons and Haversian canals were directly taken into consideration. The Volkmann's canals and the orientation of the collagenous mineral fibers in the osteons and the surrounding matrix were considered indirectly. The model fragment of the trabecular bone tissue was built based on the data of structure of the real bone fragments, taking into account the orientation of the trabecules of bones, their length and thickness.

  20. CONSTITUTIVE RELATIONSHIP OF TISSUE BEHAVIOR WITH DAMAGE ACCUMULATION OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qing; Leng, Huijie; Acuna, Rae; Dong, Xuanliang; Rong, Qiguo; Wang, Xiaodu

    2010-01-01

    Microdamage accumulation has been identified as a major conduit for bone tissues to absorb fracture energy. Due to the poor understanding of its underlying mechanism, however, an adequate constitutive relationship between damage accumulation and the mechanical behavior of bone has not yet been established. In this study, the constitutive relationship between the damage accumulation induced by overload and the evolution of mechanical properties of bone with incremental deformation was established based on the experimental results obtained from a novel progressive loading protocol developed in our laboratory. First, a decayed exponential model was proposed to capture the damage accumulation (modulus loss) with increasing applied strain. Next, a power law function was proposed to represent the progression of plastic deformation with damage accumulation. Finally, a linear combination of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) function and Debye function was used to depict the viscoelastic behavior of bone associated with damage accumulation. The results of this study may help develop a constitutive model for predicting the mechanical behavior of cortical bone tissues. PMID:20472239

  1. POST-YIELD NANOMECHANICS OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE IN COMPRESSION USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY SCATTERING TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Neil; Almer, Jon D; Wang, Xiaodu

    2010-01-01

    The ultrastructural response to applied loads governs the post-yield deformation and failure behavior of bone, and is correlated with bone fragility fractures. Combining a novel progressive loading protocol and synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques, this study investigated the correlation of the local deformation (i.e., internal strains of the mineral and collagen phases) with the bulk mechanical behavior of bone. The results indicated that the internal strains of the longitudinally oriented collagen fibrils and mineral crystals increased almost linearly with respect to the macroscopic strain prior to yielding, but markedly decreased first and then gradually leveled off after yielding. Similar changes were also observed in the applied stress before and after yielding of bone. However, the collagen to mineral strain ratio remained nearly constant throughout the loading process. In addition, the internal strains of longitudinal mineral and collagen phases did not exhibit a linear relationship with either the modulus loss or the plastic deformation of bulk bone tissue. Finally, the time-dependent response of local deformation in the mineral phase was observed after yielding. Based on the results, we speculate that the mineral crystals and collagen fibrils aligned with the loading axis only partially explain the post-yield deformation suggesting that shear deformation involving obliquely oriented crystals and fibrils (off axis) is dominant mechanism of yielding for human cortical bone in compression. PMID:21112589

  2. Post-yield nanomechanics of human cortical bone in compression using synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X.N.; Almer, J.D.; Wang, X.

    2011-02-24

    The ultrastructural response to applied loads governs the post-yield deformation and failure behavior of bone, and is correlated with bone fragility fractures. Combining a novel progressive loading protocol and synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques, this study investigated the correlation of the local deformation (i.e., internal strains of the mineral and collagen phases) with the bulk mechanical behavior of bone. The results indicated that the internal strains of the longitudinally oriented collagen fibrils and mineral crystals increased almost linearly with respect to the macroscopic strain prior to yielding, but markedly decreased first and then gradually leveled off after yielding. Similar changes were also observed in the applied stress before and after yielding of bone. However, the collagen to mineral strain ratio remained nearly constant throughout the loading process. In addition, the internal strains of longitudinal mineral and collagen phases did not exhibit a linear relationship with either the modulus loss or the plastic deformation of bulk bone tissue. Finally, the time-dependent response of local deformation in the mineral phase was observed after yielding. Based on the results, we speculate that the mineral crystals and collagen fibrils aligned with the loading axis only partially explain the post-yield deformation, suggesting that shear deformation involving obliquely oriented crystals and fibrils (off axis) is dominant mechanism of yielding for human cortical bone in compression.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of human cortical bone failure surfaces.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Stagni, L

    1997-02-01

    Undecalcified samples extracted from human femoral shafts are fractured by bending and the fracture surfaces are examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The investigation is performed on both dry and wet (hydrated with a saline solution) specimens. SEM micrographs show patterns in many respects similar to those observed in fractography studies of laminated fiber-reinforced synthetic composites. In particular, dry and wet samples behave like brittle and ductile matrix laminates, respectively. An analysis carried out on the basis of the mechanisms that dominate the fracture process of laminates shows that a reasonable cortical bone model is that of a laminated composite material whose matrix is composed of extracellular noncollagenous calcified proteins, and the reinforcement is constituted by the calcified collagen fiber system. PMID:9001936

  4. Relationship of bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) in cortical and cancellous bone within the iliac crest of healthy premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Misof, B M; Dempster, D W; Zhou, Hua; Roschger, P; Fratzl-Zelman, N; Fratzl, P; Silverberg, S J; Shane, E; Cohen, A; Stein, E; Nickolas, T L; Recker, R R; Lappe, J; Bilezikian, J P; Klaushofer, K

    2014-10-01

    Bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) is an important determinant of bone mechanical properties. The most available skeletal site for access to the BMDD is the iliac crest. Compared to cancellous bone much less information on BMDD is available for cortical bone. Hence, we analyzed complete transiliac crest bone biopsy samples from premenopausal women (n = 73) aged 25-48 years, clinically classified as healthy, by quantitative backscattered electron imaging for cortical (Ct.) and cancellous (Cn.) BMDD. The Ct.BMDD was characterized by the arithmetic mean of the BMDD of the cortical plates. We found correlations between Ct. and Cn. BMDD variables with correlation coefficients r between 0.42 and 0.73 (all p < 0.001). Additionally to this synchronous behavior of cortical and cancellous compartments, we found that the heterogeneity of mineralization densities (Ct.Ca(Width)), as well as the cortical porosity (Ct.Po) was larger for a lower average degree of mineralization (Ct.Ca(Mean)). Moreover, Ct.Po correlated negatively with the percentage of highly mineralized bone areas (Ct.Ca(High)) and positively with the percentage of lowly mineralized bone areas (Ct.Ca(Low)). In conclusion, the correlation of cortical with cancellous BMDD in the iliac crest of the study cohort suggests coordinated regulation of bone turnover between both bone compartments. Only in a few cases, there was a difference in the degree of mineralization of >1wt % between both cortices suggesting a possible modeling situation. This normative dataset of healthy premenopausal women will provide a reference standard by which disease- and treatment-specific effects can be assessed at the level of cortical bone BMDD. PMID:25134800

  5. Strain determination in bone sections with simultaneous 3D digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Araceli Sánchez; De la Torre Ibarra, Manuel H.; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza; Anaya, Tonatiuh-Saucedo

    2014-06-01

    A 3D digital holographic interferometer was used to measure the surface strain components in two different bovine's bone sections. The applied force on the sample was induced by a precisely controlled lateral micro compression. The simultaneous acquisition capability of the system helps to record a fast sequence of images, each one containing three independent holograms that result in three orthogonal displacement components u, v and w from which the surface strain components ɛx, ɛy and γxy over the bone's field of view were calculated. This research study was carried out in two different bone sections: the cortical bone and the medullary cavity/yellow marrow section. The resulting strain concentrators are of great importance to better understand the mechanical response of complex biological structures such as this bovine femoral bone.

  6. DIFFERENCES IN THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF CORTICAL BONE BETWEEN COMPRESSION AND TENSION WHEN SUBJECTED TO PROGRESSIVE LOADING

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S.; Ling, Huijie; Dong, Xuanliang; Wang, Xiaodu

    2008-01-01

    The hierarchical arrangement of collagen and mineral into bone tissue presumabley maximizes fracture resistance with respect to the predominant strain mode in bone. Thus, the ability of cortical bone to dissipate energy may differ between compression and tension for the same anatomical site. To test this notion, we subjected bone specimens from the anterior quadrant of human cadaveric tibiae to a progressive loading scheme in either uniaxial tension or uniaxial compression. One tension (dog-bone shape) and one compression specimen (cylindrical shape) were collected each from tibiae of nine middle aged male donors. At each cycle of loading-dwell-unloading-dwell-reloading, we calculated maximum stress, permanent strain, modulus, stress relaxation, time constant, and 3 pathways of energy dissipation for both loading modes. In doing so, we found that bone dissipated greater energy through the mechanisms of permanent and viscoelastic deformation in compression than in tension. On the other hand, however, bone dissipated greater energy through the release of surface energy in tension than in compression. Moreover, differences in the plastic and viscoelastic properties after yielding were not reflected in the evolution of modulus loss (an indicator of damage accumulation), which was similar for both loading modes. A possible explanation is that differences in damage morphology between the two loading modes may favor the plastic and viscolelastic energy dissipation in compression, but facilitate the surface energy release in tension. Such detailed information about failure mechanisms of bone at the tissue-level would help explain the underlying causes of bone fractures. PMID:19716106

  7. Comparative cortical bone thickness between the long bones of humans and five common non-human mammal taxa.

    PubMed

    Croker, Sarah L; Reed, Warren; Donlon, Denise

    2016-03-01

    The task of identifying fragments of long bone shafts as human or non-human is difficult but necessary, for both forensic and archaeological cases, and a fast simple method is particularly useful. Previous literature suggests there may be differences in the thickness of the cortical bone between these two groups, but this has not been tested thoroughly. The aim of this study was not only to test this suggestion, but also to provide data that could be of practical assistance for future comparisons. The major limb bones (humerus, radius, femur and tibia) of 50 Caucasoid adult skeletons of known age and sex were radiographed, along with corresponding skeletal elements from sheep, pigs, cattle, large dogs and kangaroos. Measurements were taken from the radiographs at five points along the bone shaft, of shaft diameter, cortical bone thickness, and a cortical thickness index (sum of cortices divided by shaft diameter) in both anteroposterior and mediolateral orientations. Each variable for actual cortical bone thickness as well as cortical thickness indices were compared between the human group (split by sex) and each of the non-human groups in turn, using Student's t-tests. Results showed that while significant differences did exist between the human groups and many of the non-human groups, these were not all in the same direction. That is, some variables in the human groups were significantly greater than, and others were significantly less than, the corresponding variable in the non-human groups, depending on the particular non-human group, sex of the human group, or variable under comparison. This was the case for measurements of both actual cortical bone thickness and cortical thickness index. Therefore, for bone shaft fragments for which the skeletal element is unknown, the overlap in cortical bone thickness between different areas of different bones is too great to allow identification using this method alone. However, by providing extensive cortical bone

  8. Differences in Non-Enzymatic Glycation and Collagen Crosslinks between Human Cortical and Cancellous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Lamya; Tang, Simon Y.; Sroga, Grażyna E.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Accumulation of collagen crosslinks (advanced glycation end products [AGEs]) produced by non-enzymatic glycation deteriorates bone's mechanical properties and fracture resistance. Although a single AGE, pentosidine, is commonly used as a representative marker, it is unclear whether it quantitatively reflects total fluorescent AGEs in bone. The goal of this study was to establish the relationship between pentosidine and total AGEs in cancellous and cortical bone. Methods Pentosidine and total AGEs were quantified in 170 human bone samples. Total fluorescent AGEs were measured in 28 additional cancellous and cortical bone specimens of the same apparent volume that were incubated in control or in vitro glycation solutions. Correlations between pentosidine and total AGEs and differences between cortical and cancellous groups were determined. Results Pentosidine was correlated with total AGEs in cancellous bone (r=0.53, p<0.0001) and weakly correlated in cortical bone (r=0.23, p<0.05). There was more pentosidine (p<0.01) and total AGEs (p<0.001) in cancellous than in cortical bone. The in vitro glycation sub-study showed that cancellous bone accumulated more AGEs than cortical bone (p<0.05). Conclusion The relationship between pentosidine and total AGEs and their magnitude of accumulation differed in cancellous and cortical bone of the same apparent volume, and were dependent on the surface-to-volume ratios of each sample. It is important to consider the bone types as two separate entities, and it is crucial to quantify total AGEs in addition to pentosidine to allow for more comprehensive analysis of the effects of non-enzymatic glycation in bone. PMID:23471564

  9. Fatigue crack growth behavior in equine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Debbie Renee

    2001-07-01

    Objectives for this research were to experimentally determine crack growth rates, da/dN, as a function of alternating stress intensity factor, DeltaK, for specimens from lateral and dorsal regions of equine third metacarpal cortical bone tissue, and to determine if the results were described by the Paris law. In one set of experiments, specimens were oriented for crack propagation in the circumferential direction with the crack plane transverse to the long axis of the bone. In the second set of experiments, specimens were oriented for radial crack growth with the crack plane parallel to the long axis of the bone. Results of fatigue tests from the latter specimens were used to evaluate the hypothesis that crack growth rates differ regionally. The final experiments were designed to determine if crack resistance was dependent on region, proportion of hooped osteons (those with circumferentially oriented collagen fibers in the outer lamellae) or number of osteons penetrated by the crack, and to address the hypothesis that hooped osteons resist invasion by cracks better than other osteonal types. The transverse crack growth data for dorsal specimens were described by the Paris law with an exponent of 10.4 and suggested a threshold stress intensity factor, DeltaKth, of 2.0 MPa·m1/2 and fracture toughness of 4.38 MPa·m 1/2. Similar results were not obtained for lateral specimens because the crack always deviated from the intended path and ran parallel to the loading direction. Crack growth for the dorsal and lateral specimens in the radial orientation was described by the Paris law with exponents of 8.7 and 10.2, respectively, and there were no regional differences in the apparent DeltaK th (0.5 MPa·m1/2) or fracture toughness (1.2 MPa·m 1/2). Crack resistance was not associated with cortical region, proportion of hooped osteons or the number of osteons penetrated by the crack. The extent to which cracks penetrate osteons was influenced by whether the collagen fiber

  10. Radiographic features of bone in several strains of laboratory mice and of their tumours induced by bone-seeking radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Loutit, J F; Corp, M J; Ardran, G M

    1976-11-01

    The natural radiographic appearance of the various bones of the skeleton are described for several strains of laboratory mice. The Harwell substrains of CBA, A and 101 are generally similar and become osteoporotic on ageing. Harwell C57BL have similar, but more delicately chiseled, bones. Harwell C3H mice have bones with stouter cortices and may show osteosclerosis on ageing. CF1 females (donated by Dr M. Finkel) showed osteosclerosis and osteophytic outgrowths when aged. NMRI mice (donated by Dr A. Luz) appeared larger than the pure-strain Harwell mice. In general, mouse bones are simple tubular structures with an ivory cortex and a marrow cavity. Cancellous trabecular bone is scanty, even in vertebrae, flat bones and the metaphyses of long bones. Bone-seeking radionuclides administered to mice lead to skeletal tumours: (a) osteosarcomata, which are commonly radio-opaque to a variable degree owing to calcified tumour bone, but which may be osteolytic, (b) primitive mesenchymal (angio-) sarcomata which are non-osteogenic and osteolytic, (c) fibrosarcomata--which also are osteolytic--and to local or general lymphomata from irradiation of parental cells in bone marrow, but no special radiological features have been found associated with these last-named tumours. PMID:1069700

  11. Using the gradient of human cortical bone properties to determine age-related bone changes via ultrasonic guided waves.

    PubMed

    Baron, Cécile

    2012-06-01

    Bone fragility depends not only on bone mass but also on bone quality (structure and material). To accurately evaluate fracture risk or propose therapeutic treatment, clinicians need a criterion, which reflects the determinants of bone strength: geometry, structure and material. In human long bone, the changes due to aging, accentuated by osteoporosis are often revealed through the trabecularization of cortical bone, i.e., increased porosity of endosteal bone inducing a thinning of the cortex. Consequently, the intracortical porosity gradient corresponding to the spatial variation in porosity across the cortical thickness is representative of loss of mass, changes in geometry (thinning) and variations in structure (porosity). This article examines the gradient of material properties and its age-related evolution as a relevant parameter to assess bone geometry, structure and material. By applying a homogenization process, cortical bone can be considered as an anisotropic functionally graded material with variations in material properties. A semi-analytical method based on the sextic Stroh formalism is proposed to solve the wave equation in an anisotropic functionally graded waveguide for two geometries, a plate and a tube, without using a multilayered model to represent the structure. This method provides an analytical solution called the matricant and explicitly expressed under the Peano series expansion form. Our findings indicate that ultrasonic guided waves are sensitive to the age-related evolution of realistic gradients in human bone properties across the cortical thickness and have their place in a multimodal clinical protocol. PMID:22502890

  12. Analysis of micro fracture in human Haversian cortical bone under compression.

    PubMed

    Jonvaux, J; Hoc, T; Budyn, E

    2012-09-01

    A procedure to investigate local stress intensity factors in human Haversian cortical bone under compression is presented. The method combines a customised experimental setting for micro-compression tests of millimetric bone specimens and a finite element contact model conforming to the bone morphology that tracks advancing microcracks. The non-interpenetration conditions along the crack edges are ensured by penalty constraints of which the parameters are optimised for minimum contact pressure error with respect to the crack orientations. A cohesive crack opening law is implemented in the wake of the crack tips to remain consistent with the progressive tearing of collagen fibrils. The displacement solution is searched by a Newton-Raphson scheme containing a double loop first on the displacements and second on the frictional contact and cohesive condition updates at the crack interfaces. The experimental Dirichlet boundary conditions are acquired by digital image cross-correlation of bone light microscopy observations and then imported into the model. The local mechanical elastic moduli are measured by nanoindentation and microextensometry. The comparison of the macroscopic stress-strain numerical response with the experiment reveals the existence of narrow diffuse damaged zones near the major cracks where the local stress intensity factors can be calculated. PMID:22941926

  13. Overexpression of DMP1 Accelerates Mineralization and Alters Cortical Bone Biomechanical Properties in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ankush; Albazzaz, Michael; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A.; Inoue, Nozomu; Miller, Lisa M.; Acerbo, Alvin; George, Anne; Sumner, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1) is a key regulator of biomineralization. Here, we examine changes in structural, geometric, and material properties of cortical bone in a transgenic mouse model overexpressing DMP1. Micro-computed tomography and three-point bending were performed on 90 femora of wild type and transgenic mice at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months. Fourier transform infrared imaging was performed at 2 months. We found that the transgenic femurs were longer (p<0.01), more robust in cross-section (p<0.05), stronger (p<0.05), but had less post-yield strain and displacement (p<0.01), and higher tissue mineral density (p<0.01) than the wild type femurs at 1 and 2 months. At 2 months, the transgenic femurs also had a higher mineral-to-matrix ratio (p<0.05) and lower carbonate substitution (p<0.05) compared to wild type femurs. These findings indicate that increased mineralization caused by overexpressing DMP1 led to increased structural cortical bone properties associated with decreased ductility during the early post-natal period. PMID:22100074

  14. Occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone of the human mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition: a three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Janovic, Aleksa; Saveljic, Igor; Vukicevic, Arso; Nikolic, Dalibor; Rakocevic, Zoran; Jovicic, Gordana; Filipovic, Nenad; Djuric, Marija

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the occlusal load distribution through the mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition is essential because alterations in magnitude and/or direction of occlusal forces may cause remarkable changes in cortical and trabecular bone structure. Previous analyses by strain gauge technique, photoelastic and, more recently, finite element (FE) methods provided no direct evidence for occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone compartments individually. Therefore, we developed an improved three-dimensional FE model of the human skull in order to clarify the distribution of occlusal forces through the cortical and trabecular bone during habitual masticatory activities. Particular focus was placed on the load transfer through the anterior and posterior maxilla. The results were presented in von Mises stress (VMS) and the maximum principal stress, and compared to the reported FE and strain gauge data. Our qualitative stress analysis indicates that occlusal forces distribute through the mid-facial skeleton along five vertical and two horizontal buttresses. We demonstrated that cortical bone has a priority in the transfer of occlusal load in the anterior maxilla, whereas both cortical and trabecular bone in the posterior maxilla are equally involved in performing this task. Observed site dependence of the occlusal load distribution may help clinicians in creating strategies for implantology and orthodontic treatments. Additionally, the magnitude of VMS in our model was significantly lower in comparison to previous FE models composed only of cortical bone. This finding suggests that both cortical and trabecular bone should be modeled whenever stress will be quantitatively analyzed. PMID:25458179

  15. Trabecular and Cortical Bone of Growing C3H Mice Is Highly Responsive to the Removal of Weightbearing.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Sankaran, Jeyantt Srinivas; Judex, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic make-up strongly influences the skeleton's susceptibility to the loss of weight bearing with some inbred mouse strains experiencing great amounts of bone loss while others lose bone at much smaller rates. At young adulthood, female inbred C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice are largely resistant to catabolic pressure induced by unloading. Here, we tested whether the depressed responsivity to unloading is inherent to the C3H genetic make-up or whether a younger age facilitates a robust skeletal response to unloading. Nine-week-old, skeletally immature, female C3H mice were subjected to 3wk of hindlimb unloading (HLU, n = 12) or served as normal baseline controls (BC, n = 10) or age-matched controls (AC, n = 12). In all mice, cortical and trabecular architecture of the femur, as well as levels of bone formation and resorption, were assessed with μCT, histomorphometry, and histology. Changes in bone marrow progenitor cell populations were determined with flow cytometry. Following 21d of unloading, HLU mice had 52% less trabecular bone in the distal femur than normal age-matched controls. Reflecting a loss of trabecular tissue compared to baseline controls, trabecular bone formation rates (BFR/BS) in HLU mice were 40% lower than in age-matched controls. Surfaces undergoing osteoclastic resorption were not significantly different between groups. In the mid-diaphysis, HLU inhibited cortical bone growth leading to 14% less bone area compared to age-matched controls. Compared to AC, BFR/BS of HLU mice were 53% lower at the endo-cortical surface and 49% lower at the periosteal surface of the mid-diaphysis. The enriched osteoprogenitor cell population (OPC) comprised 2% of the bone marrow stem cells in HLU mice, significantly different from 3% OPC in the AC group. These data show that bone tissue in actively growing C3H mice is lost rapidly, or fails to grow, during the removal of functional weight bearing-in contrast to the insignificant response previously demonstrated in female

  16. EFFECT OF AGE ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE COLLAGEN PHASE IN DIFFERENT ORIENTATIONS OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Huijie; Reyes, Michael J; Dong, Neil X; Wang, Xiaodu

    2013-01-01

    The collagen phase plays an important role in mechanical behaviors of cortical bone. However, aging effects on the mechanical behavior of the collagen phase is still poorly understood. In this study, micro-tensile tests were performed on demineralized human cortical bone samples from young, middle-aged, and elderly donors and aging effects on the mechanical properties of the collagen phase in different orientations (i.e. longitudinal and transverse directions of bone) were examined. The results of this study indicated that the elastic modulus and ultimate strength of the demineralized bone specimens decreased with aging in both the longitudinal and transverse orientations. However, the failure strain exhibited no significant changes in both orientations regardless of aging. These results suggest that the stiffness and strength of the collagen phase in bone are deteriorated with aging in both longitudinal and transverse directions. However, the aging effect is not reflected in the failure strain of the collagen phase in both longitudinal and transverse orientations, implying that the maximum sustainable deformation of the collagen phase is independent of aging and orientation. PMID:23598045

  17. Effect of the quantity and quality of cortical bone on the failure force of a miniscrew implant.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Takano, Masamitsu; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Muguruma, Takeshi; Nakagaki, Susumu; Sakakura, Yasunori; Ochi, Morio; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the influence of the quantity and quality of cortical bone on the failure force of miniscrew implants. Twenty-six titanium alloy miniscrew implants (AbsoAnchor) 1.4mm in diameter and 5 or 7 mm long were placed in cross-sectioned maxillae (n = 6) and mandibles (n = 20) of human cadavers. Computed tomography imaging was used to estimate the cortical bone thickness and bone mineral density [total bone mineral density (TBMD, values obtained from cortical bone plus trabecular bone); cortical bone mineral density (CBMD, values obtained from only cortical bone)]. Maximum force at failure was measured in a shear test. Nanoindentation tests were performed to measure the hardness and elastic modulus of cortical bone around the miniscrew implants. The mean failure force of miniscrew implants placed in mandibles was significantly greater than that for implants in maxillae, and the bone hardness of mandibles was significantly greater than that of maxillae. The length of miniscrew implants did not influence the mean failure force in monocortical placement in the mandible. Cortical bone thickness, TBMD, CBMD, and bone hardness were significantly related to the mean failure force. CBMD was related to the mechanical properties of cortical bone. In conclusion, the quantity and quality of cortical bone greatly influenced the failure force of miniscrew implants. PMID:23041933

  18. AGE-RELATED FACTORS AFFECTING THE POST-YIELD ENERGY DISSIPATION OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S.; Roy, Anuradha; Tyler, Jerrod H.; Acuna, Rae L.; Gayle, Heather J.; Wang, Xiaodu

    2007-01-01

    The risk of bone fracture depends in part on the quality of the tissue, not just the size and mass. This study assessed the post-yield energy dissipation of cortical bone in tension as a function of age and composition. Tensile specimens were prepared from tibiae of human cadavers in which male and female donors were divided into two age groups: middle aged (51 to 56 years old, n = 9) and elderly (72 to 90 years old, n = 8). By loading, unloading, and reloading a specimen with rest period inserted in between, tensile properties at incremental strain levels were assessed. In addition, the post-yield toughness was estimated and partitioned as follows: plastic strain energy related to permanent deformation, released elastic strain energy related to stiffness loss, and hysteresis energy related to viscous behavior. Porosity, mineral and collagen content, and collagen crosslinks of each specimen were also measured to determine the micro and ultrastructural properties of the tissue. It was found that age affected all the energy terms plus strength but not elastic stiffness. The post-yield energy terms were correlated with porosity, pentosidine (a marker of non-enzymatic crosslinks), and collagen content, all of which significantly varied with age. General linear models with the highest possible R2 value suggested that the pentosidine concentration and collagen content provided the best explanation of the age-related decrease in the post-yield energy dissipation of bone. Among them, pentosidine concentration had the greatest contribution to plastic strain energy and was the best explanatory variable of damage accumulation. PMID:17266142

  19. Non-destructive characterization of microdamage in cortical bone using low field pulsed NMR.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, Daniel P; Ni, Qingwen; Chan, Kwai S

    2011-04-01

    The microcracking and damage accumulation process in human cortical bone was characterized by performing cyclic loading under four-point bending at ambient temperature. A non-destructive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation technique was applied to quantify the apparent changes in bone porosity as a function of cyclic loading and prior damage accumulation, first to unloaded cortical bone to quantify the initial porosity and then to fatigued cortical bone that was subjected to cyclic loading to various levels of modulus degradation and microdamage in the form of microcracks. The NMR T(2) relaxation time and amplitude data of the fatigued bone were compared against the undamaged state. The difference in the T(2) relaxation time data was taken as a measure of the increase in pore size, bone porosity or microcrack density due to microdamage induced by cyclic loading. A procedure was developed to deduce the number and size distributions of microcracks formed in cortical bone. Serial sectioning of the fatigued bone showed the formation of microcracks along the cement lines or within the interstitial tissue. The results on the evolution of microdamage derived from NMR measurements were verified by independent experimental measurements of microcrack density using histological characterization techniques. The size distribution and population of the microcracks were then utilized in conjunction with an analytical model to predict the degradation of the elastic modulus of cortical bone as a function of damage accumulation. PMID:21316626

  20. Regional, ontogenetic, and sex-related variations in elastic properties of cortical bone in baboon mandibles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Ashley, Dennis W.; Dechow, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical features of cortical bone and their changes with growth and adaptation to function plays an important role in our ability to interpret the morphology and evolution of craniofacial skeletons. We assessed the elastic properties of cortical bone of juvenile and adult baboon mandibles using ultrasonic techniques. Results showed that, overall, cortical bone from baboon mandibles could be modeled as an orthotropic elastic solid. There were significant differences in the directions of maximum stiffness, thickness, density, and elastic stiffness among different functional areas, indicating regional adaptations. After maturity, the cortical bone becomes thicker, denser, and stiffer, but less anisotropic. There were differences in elastic properties of the corpus and ramus between male and female mandibles which are not observed in human mandibles. There were correlations between cortical thicknesses and densities, between bone elastic properties and microstructural configuration, and between the directions of maximum stiffness and bone anatomical axes in some areas. The relationships between bone extrinsic and intrinsic properties bring us insights into the integration of form and function in craniofacial skeletons and suggest that we need to consider both macroscopic form, microstructural variation, and the material properties of bone matrix when studying the functional properties and adaptive nature of the craniofacial skeleton in primates. The differences between baboon and human mandibles is at variance to the pattern of differences in crania, suggesting differences in bone adaption to varying skeletal geometries and loading regimes at both phylogenetic and ontogenetic levels. PMID:19927280

  1. Assessment of cortical and trabecular bone distribution in the beagle skeleton by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Jee, W.S.; Dell, R.B.; Miller, G.E.

    1986-07-01

    The distribution of bone calcium between morphologically identifiable cortical and trabecular bone obtained by dissection and quantitated by neutron activation analysis (NAA) is described. The skeleton of a female beagle dog was dissected into approximately 400 pieces and assayed for /sup 49/Ca produced in the University of California, Irvine TRIGA reactor. For each of the skeletal sections, we give the initial weight of the alcohol-fixed tissue, which includes cortical bone, trabecular bone, marrow, and cartilage, and a final tissue weight after the marrow and trabecular bone have been dissected away; total section and cortical section calcium weights are reported. The level of detail is represented, for example, by the vertebrae, which were divided into three parts (body, spine, and transverse processes) and by the long bones, which were divided into 10-12 parts such that characterization of the epiphysis, metaphysis, and diaphysis was accomplished. The median percentage cortical calcium values for cervical, thoracic, and lumbar vertebrae were 82%, 56%, and 66%, respectively; however, variation within these groups and among individual vertebral sections was about a factor of 2. For long bones, the median percentage cortical calcium varied from 90-100% in the midshaft to below 50% in the proximal and distal sections. The final calculated cortical tissue-to-calcium mass ratio (TCR) varied from about 4.5 for midshafts of the long bones to about 9 for thoracic vertebral bodies and indicated that the mineral fraction of cortical bone is not constant throughout the skeleton. The ratio of cortical to trabecular calcium in the skeleton was 79.6:20.4.

  2. Mixed-mode toughness of human cortical bone containing a longitudinal crack in far-field compression.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Diana; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O

    2012-01-01

    Bone is generally loaded under multiaxial conditions in vivo; as it invariably contains microcracks, this leads to complex mixed-mode stress-states involving combinations of tension, compression and shear. In previous work on the mixed-mode loading of human cortical bone (using an asymmetric bend test geometry), we found that the bone toughness was lower when loaded in far-field shear than in tension (opposite to the trend in most brittle materials), although only for the transverse orientation. This is a consequence of the competition between preferred mechanical vs. microstructural crack-path directions, the former dictated by the direction of the maximum mechanical "driving force" (which changes with the mode-mixity), and the latter by the "weakest" microstructural path (which in human bone is along the osteonal interfaces or cement lines). As most microcracks are oriented longitudinally, we investigate here the corresponding mixed-mode toughness of human cortical bone in the longitudinal (proximal-distal) orientation using a "double cleavage drilled compression" test geometry, which provides a physiologically-relevant loading condition for bone in that it characterizes the toughness of a longitudinal crack loaded in far-field compression. In contrast to the transverse toughness, results show that the longitudinal toughness, measured using the strain-energy release rate, is significantly higher in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I). This is consistent, however, with the individual criteria of preferred mechanical vs. microstructural crack paths being commensurate in this orientation. PMID:22115793

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Cefuroxime in Porcine Cortical and Cancellous Bone Determined by Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Bendtsen, Michael; Bue, Mats; Brock, Birgitte; Fuursted, Kurt; Søballe, Kjeld; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobials in bone have been investigated using bone biopsy specimens, but this approach suffers from considerable methodological limitations. Consequently, new methods are needed. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of microdialysis (MD) for measuring cefuroxime in bone and to obtain pharmacokinetic profiles for the same drug in porcine cortical and cancellous bone. The measurements were conducted in bone wax sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone and in drill holes in cancellous bone and in subcutaneous tissue. As a reference, the free and total plasma concentrations were also measured. The animals received a bolus of 1,500 mg cefuroxime over 30 min. No significant differences were found between the key pharmacokinetic parameters for sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone. The mean ± standard error of the mean area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values from 0 to 5 h were 6,013 ± 1,339, 3,222 ± 1086, 2,232 ± 635, and 952 ± 290 min · μg/ml for free plasma, subcutaneous tissue, cancellous bone, and cortical bone, respectively (P < 0.01, analysis of variance). The AUC for cortical bone was also significantly different from that for cancellous bone (P = 0.04). This heterogeneous tissue distribution was also reflected in other key pharmacokinetic parameters. This study validates MD as a suitable method for measuring cefuroxime in bone. Cefuroxime penetration was impaired for all tissues, and bone may not be considered one distinct compartment. PMID:24663019

  4. Trabecular and Cortical Bone of Growing C3H Mice Is Highly Responsive to the Removal of Weightbearing

    PubMed Central

    Judex, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic make-up strongly influences the skeleton’s susceptibility to the loss of weight bearing with some inbred mouse strains experiencing great amounts of bone loss while others lose bone at much smaller rates. At young adulthood, female inbred C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice are largely resistant to catabolic pressure induced by unloading. Here, we tested whether the depressed responsivity to unloading is inherent to the C3H genetic make-up or whether a younger age facilitates a robust skeletal response to unloading. Nine-week-old, skeletally immature, female C3H mice were subjected to 3wk of hindlimb unloading (HLU, n = 12) or served as normal baseline controls (BC, n = 10) or age-matched controls (AC, n = 12). In all mice, cortical and trabecular architecture of the femur, as well as levels of bone formation and resorption, were assessed with μCT, histomorphometry, and histology. Changes in bone marrow progenitor cell populations were determined with flow cytometry. Following 21d of unloading, HLU mice had 52% less trabecular bone in the distal femur than normal age-matched controls. Reflecting a loss of trabecular tissue compared to baseline controls, trabecular bone formation rates (BFR/BS) in HLU mice were 40% lower than in age-matched controls. Surfaces undergoing osteoclastic resorption were not significantly different between groups. In the mid-diaphysis, HLU inhibited cortical bone growth leading to 14% less bone area compared to age-matched controls. Compared to AC, BFR/BS of HLU mice were 53% lower at the endo-cortical surface and 49% lower at the periosteal surface of the mid-diaphysis. The enriched osteoprogenitor cell population (OPC) comprised 2% of the bone marrow stem cells in HLU mice, significantly different from 3% OPC in the AC group. These data show that bone tissue in actively growing C3H mice is lost rapidly, or fails to grow, during the removal of functional weight bearing—in contrast to the insignificant response previously demonstrated in

  5. Adaptations of young adult rat cortical bone to 14 days of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R., Jr.; Martinez, D. A.; Ashman, R. B.; Ulm, M. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Durnova, G. N.; Kaplanskii, A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether mature humeral cortical bone would be modified significantly by an acute exposure to weightlessness, adult rats (110 days old) were subjected to 14 days of microgravity on the COSMOS 2044 biosatellite. There were no significant changes in peak force, stiffness, energy to failure, and displacement at failure in the flight rats compared with ground-based controls. Concentrations and contents of hydroxyproline, calcium, and mature stable hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline collagen cross-links remained unchanged after spaceflight. Bone lengths, cortical and endosteal areas, and regionl thicknesses showed no significant differences between flight animals and ground controls. The findings suggest that responsiveness of cortical bone to microgravity is less pronounced in adult rats than in previous spaceflight experiments in which young growing animals were used. It is hypothesized that 14 days of spaceflight may not be sufficient to impact the biochemical and biomechanical properties of cortical bone in the mature rat skeleton.

  6. Cortical bone trajectory screws for the middle-upper thorax

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Chen, Jiao-Xiang; Chen, Wei; Xue, En-Xing; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To quantify the reference data concerning the morphometrics of the middle-upper thorax to guide the placement of cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screws. Eighty patients were studied on computed tomography (CT) scans. The reference anatomical parameters were measured. Next, 20 cadaveric specimens were implanted with CBT screws based on CT measurements. These specimens were then judged directly from the cadaveric vertebrae and X-ray. The maximum length of the trajectory, the maximum diameter, and the cephaled angle exhibited a slight increase trend while the transverse and sagittal angles of the pedicle tended to decrease from T3 to T8. We recommend that the width of CBT screw for middle-upper thoracic spine is 5.0 mm, the length is 25 to 35 mm. The cadaveric anatomical study revealed that 5/240 screws penetrated in the medial or lateral areas, 5/240 screws penetrated in the superior or inferior pedicle wall, and 2/240 screws did not fit into the superior endplate of the pedicle. The CBT screws are safe for the middle-upper thorax. This study provides a theoretical basis for clinical surgery. PMID:27583893

  7. The high bone mass phenotype is characterised by a combined cortical and trabecular bone phenotype: Findings from a pQCT case–control study☆

    PubMed Central

    Gregson, Celia L.; Sayers, Adrian; Lazar, Victor; Steel, Sue; Dennison, Elaine M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Rittweger, Jörn; Tobias, Jon H.

    2013-01-01

    High bone mass (HBM), detected in 0.2% of DXA scans, is characterised by a mild skeletal dysplasia largely unexplained by known genetic mutations. We conducted the first systematic assessment of the skeletal phenotype in unexplained HBM using pQCT in our unique HBM population identified from screening routine UK NHS DXA scans. pQCT measurements from the mid and distal tibia and radius in 98 HBM cases were compared with (i) 65 family controls (constituting unaffected relatives and spouses), and (ii) 692 general population controls. HBM cases had substantially greater trabecular density at the distal tibia (340 [320, 359] mg/cm3), compared to both family (294 [276, 312]) and population controls (290 [281, 299]) (p < 0.001 for both, adjusted for age, gender, weight, height, alcohol, smoking, malignancy, menopause, steroid and estrogen replacement use). Similar results were obtained at the distal radius. Greater cortical bone mineral density (cBMD) was observed in HBM cases, both at the midtibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.001). Total bone area (TBA) was higher in HBM cases, at the distal and mid tibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.05 versus family controls), suggesting greater periosteal apposition. Cortical thickness was increased at the mid tibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.001), implying reduced endosteal expansion. Together, these changes resulted in greater predicted cortical strength (strength strain index [SSI]) in both tibia and radius (p < 0.001). We then examined relationships with age; tibial cBMD remained constant with increasing age amongst HBM cases (adjusted β − 0.01 [− 0.02, 0.01], p = 0.41), but declined in family controls (− 0.05 [− 0.03, − 0.07], p < 0.001) interaction p = 0.002; age-related changes in tibial trabecular BMD, CBA and SSI were also divergent. In contrast, at the radius HBM cases and controls showed parallel age-related declines in cBMD and trabecular BMD. HBM is characterised by increased trabecular BMD and

  8. The influence of tibial component malalignment on bone strain in revision total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Rastetter, Benjamin R; Wright, Samantha J; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Miles, Anthony W; Clift, Sally E

    2016-06-01

    Revision total knee replacement is a challenging surgical procedure typically associated with significant loss of bone stock in the proximal tibia. To increase the fixation stability, extended stems are frequently used for the tibial component in revision surgery. The design of the tibial stem influences the load transfer from tibial component to the surrounding bone and is cited as a possible cause for the clinically reported pain in the location of the stem-end. This study aimed to analyse the strain distribution of a fully cemented revision tibial component with a validated finite element model. The model was developed from a scanned composite tibia (Sawbones), with an implanted, fully cemented stemmed tibial component aligned to the mechanical axis of the tibia. Loading was applied to the tibial component with mediolateral compartment load distributions of 60:40 and 80:20. Three strain gauged composite tibias with implanted tibial components of the same design using the same loading distribution were tested to obtain experimental strains at five locations in the proximal tibia. The finite element model developed was validated against strain measurements obtained in the experimental study. The strains displayed similar patterns (R(2) = 0.988) and magnitudes with those predicted from the finite element model. The displacement of the stem-end from the natural mechanical axis in the finite element model demonstrated increased strains in the stem-end region with a close proximity of the distal stem with the cortical bone. The simulation of a mediolateral compartment load of 80:20 developed peak cortical strain values on the posterior-medial side beneath the stem. This may possibly be related to the clinically reported pain at the stem-end. Furthermore, stem positioning in close proximity or contact with the posterior cortical bone is a contributory factor for an increase in distal strain. PMID:27006420

  9. Hierarchical analysis and multi-scale modelling of rat cortical and trabecular bone

    PubMed Central

    Oftadeh, Ramin; Entezari, Vahid; Spörri, Guy; Villa-Camacho, Juan C.; Krigbaum, Henry; Strawich, Elsa; Graham, Lila; Rey, Christian; Chiu, Hank; Müller, Ralph; Hashemi, Hamid Nayeb; Vaziri, Ashkan; Nazarian, Ara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the hierarchical arrangement of structural properties in cortical and trabecular bone and to determine a mathematical model that accurately predicts the tissue's mechanical properties as a function of these indices. By using a variety of analytical techniques, we were able to characterize the structural and compositional properties of cortical and trabecular bones, as well as to determine the suitable mathematical model to predict the tissue's mechanical properties using a continuum micromechanics approach. Our hierarchical analysis demonstrated that the differences between cortical and trabecular bone reside mainly at the micro- and ultrastructural levels. By gaining a better appreciation of the similarities and differences between the two bone types, we would be able to provide a better assessment and understanding of their individual roles, as well as their contribution to bone health overall. PMID:25808343

  10. Effect of random microstructure on crack propagation in cortical bone tissue under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Li, S.; Adel-Wahab, A.; Silberschmidt, V.

    2013-07-01

    A fracture process in a cortical bone tissue depends on various factors, such as bone loss, heterogeneous microstructure, variation of its material properties and accumulation of microcracks. Therefore, it is crucial to comprehend and describe the effect of microstructure and material properties of the components of cortical bone on crack propagation in a dynamic loading regime. At the microscale level, osteonal bone demonstrates a random distribution of osteons imbedded in an interstitial matrix and surrounded by a thin layer known as cement line. Such a distribution of osteons can lead to localization of deformation processes. The global mechanical behavior of bone and the crack-propagation process are affected by such localization under external loads. Hence, the random distribution of microstructural features plays a key role in the fracture process of cortical bone. The purpose of this study is two-fold: firstly, to develop two-dimensional microstructured numerical models of cortical bone tissue in order to examine the interaction between the propagating crack and bone microstructure using an extended finite-element method under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions; secondly, to investigate the effect of randomly distributed microstructural constituents on the crack propagation processes and crack paths. The obtained results of numerical simulations showed the influence of random microstructure on the global response of bone tissue at macroscale and on the crack-propagation process for quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions.

  11. Predicting cortical bone adaptation to axial loading in the mouse tibia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, A. F.; Javaheri, B.; Pitsillides, A. A.; Shefelbine, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of predictive mathematical models can contribute to a deeper understanding of the specific stages of bone mechanobiology and the process by which bone adapts to mechanical forces. The objective of this work was to predict, with spatial accuracy, cortical bone adaptation to mechanical load, in order to better understand the mechanical cues that might be driving adaptation. The axial tibial loading model was used to trigger cortical bone adaptation in C57BL/6 mice and provide relevant biological and biomechanical information. A method for mapping cortical thickness in the mouse tibia diaphysis was developed, allowing for a thorough spatial description of where bone adaptation occurs. Poroelastic finite-element (FE) models were used to determine the structural response of the tibia upon axial loading and interstitial fluid velocity as the mechanical stimulus. FE models were coupled with mechanobiological governing equations, which accounted for non-static loads and assumed that bone responds instantly to local mechanical cues in an on–off manner. The presented formulation was able to simulate the areas of adaptation and accurately reproduce the distributions of cortical thickening observed in the experimental data with a statistically significant positive correlation (Kendall's τ rank coefficient τ = 0.51, p < 0.001). This work demonstrates that computational models can spatially predict cortical bone mechanoadaptation to a time variant stimulus. Such models could be used in the design of more efficient loading protocols and drug therapies that target the relevant physiological mechanisms. PMID:26311315

  12. Increased intra-cortical porosity reduces bone stiffness and strength in pediatric patients with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Vardakastani, V; Saletti, D; Skalli, W; Marry, P; Allain, J M; Adam, C

    2014-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disease occurring in one out of every 20,000 births. Although it is known that Type I collagen mutation in OI leads to increased bone fragility, the mechanism of this increased susceptibility to fracture is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the microstructure of cortical bone fragments from patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) using polarized light microscopy, and to correlate microstructural observations with the results of previously performed mechanical compression tests on bone from the same source. Specimens of cortical bone were harvested from the lower limbs of three (3) OI patients at the time of surgery, and were divided into two groups. Group 1 had been subjected to previous micro-mechanical compression testing, while Group 2 had not been subjected to any prior testing. Polarized light microscopy revealed disorganized bone collagen architecture as has been previously observed, as well as a large increase in the areal porosity of the bone compared to typical values for healthy cortical bone, with large (several hundred micron sized), asymmetrical pores. Importantly, the areal porosity of the OI bone samples in Group 1 appears to correlate strongly with their previously measured apparent Young's modulus and compressive strength. Taken together with prior nanoindentation studies on OI bone tissue, the results of this study suggest that increased intra-cortical porosity is responsible for the reduction in macroscopic mechanical properties of OI cortical bone, and therefore that in vivo imaging modalities with resolutions of ~100 μm or less could potentially be used to non-invasively assess bone strength in OI patients. Although the number of subjects in this study is small, these results highlight the importance of further studies in OI bone by groups with access to human OI tissue in order to clarify the relationship between increased porosity and reduced macroscopic mechanical integrity. PMID

  13. Osteostatin-coated porous titanium can improve early bone regeneration of cortical bone defects in rats.

    PubMed

    van der Stok, Johan; Lozano, Daniel; Chai, Yoke Chin; Amin Yavari, Saber; Bastidas Coral, Angela P; Verhaar, Jan A N; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Schrooten, Jan; Jahr, Holger; Zadpoor, Amir A; Esbrit, Pedro; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-05-01

    A promising bone graft substitute is porous titanium. Porous titanium, produced by selective laser melting (SLM), can be made as a completely open porous and load-bearing scaffold that facilitates bone regeneration through osteoconduction. In this study, the bone regenerative capacity of porous titanium is improved with a coating of osteostatin, an osteoinductive peptide that consists of the 107-111 domain of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP), and the effects of this osteostatin coating on bone regeneration were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SLM-produced porous titanium received an alkali-acid-heat treatment and was coated with osteostatin through soaking in a 100 nM solution for 24 h or left uncoated. Osteostatin-coated scaffolds contained ∼0.1 μg peptide/g titanium, and in vitro 81% was released within 24 h. Human periosteum-derived osteoprogenitor cells cultured on osteostatin-coated scaffolds did not induce significant changes in osteogenic (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagen type 1 [Col1], osteocalcin [OCN], runt-related transcription factor 2 [Runx2]), or angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) gene expression; however, it resulted in an upregulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene expression after 24 h and a lower receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RankL):OPG mRNA ratio. In vivo, osteostatin-coated, porous titanium implants increased bone regeneration in critical-sized cortical bone defects (p=0.005). Bone regeneration proceeded until 12 weeks, and femurs grafted with osteostatin-coated implants and uncoated implants recovered, respectively, 66% and 53% of the original femur torque strength (97±31 and 77±53 N·mm, not significant). In conclusion, the osteostatin coating improved bone regeneration of porous titanium. This effect was initiated after a short burst release and might be related to the observed in vitro upregulation of OPG gene expression by osteostatin in osteoprogenitor

  14. High-acceleration whole body vibration stimulates cortical bone accrual and increases bone mineral content in growing mice.

    PubMed

    Gnyubkin, Vasily; Guignandon, Alain; Laroche, Norbert; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Malaval, Luc; Vico, Laurence

    2016-06-14

    Whole body vibration (WBV) is a promising tool for counteracting bone loss. Most WBV studies on animals have been performed at acceleration <1g and frequency between 30 and 90Hz. Such WBV conditions trigger bone growth in osteopenia models, but not in healthy animals. In order to test the ability of WBV to promote osteogenesis in young animals, we exposed seven-week-old male mice to vibration at 90Hz and 2g peak acceleration for 15min/day, 5 days/week. We examined the effects on skeletal tissues with micro-computed tomography and histology. We also quantified bone vascularization and mechanosensitive osteocyte proteins, sclerostin and DMP1. Three weeks of WBV resulted in an increase of femur cortical thickness (+5%) and area (+6%), associated with a 25% decrease of sclerostin expression, and 35% increase of DMP1 expression in cortical osteocytes. Mass-structural parameters of trabecular bone were unaltered in femur or vertebra, while osteoclastic parameters and bone formation rate were increased at both sites. Three weeks of WBV resulted in higher blood vessel numbers (+23%) in the distal femoral metaphysis. After 9-week WBV, we have not observed the difference in structural cortical or trabecular parameters. However, the tissue mineral density of cortical bone was increased by 2.5%. Three or nine weeks of 2g/90Hz WBV treatment did not affect longitudinal growth rate or body weight increase under our experimental conditions, indicating that these are safe to use. These results validate a potential of 2g/90Hz WBV to stimulate trabecular bone cellular activity, accelerate cortical bone growth, and increase bone mineral density. PMID:27178020

  15. Reduced Bone Cortical Thickness in Boys with Autism or Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hediger, Mary L.; England, Lucinda J.; Molloy, Cynthia A.; Yu, Kai F.; Manning-Courtney, Patricia; Mills, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Bone development, casein-free diet use, supplements, and medications were assessed for 75 boys with autism or autism spectrum disorder, ages 4-8 years. Second metacarpal bone cortical thickness (BCT), measured on hand-wrist radiographs, and % deviations in BCT from reference medians were derived. BCT increased with age, but % deviations evidenced…

  16. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE MINERAL IN DUCTILE AND BRITTLE CORTICAL MOUSE BONE

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J.; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone’s mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone’s mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta murine (oim−/−) mice were used to model brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants (Phospho1−/−) had ductile bone. They were compared to their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification, to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (qbSEM). Interestingly, the mineral of brittle oim−/− and ductile Phospho1−/− bones had many similar characteristics. Both pathology models had smaller apatite crystals, lower mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild-types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. The degree of mineralization of the bone matrix was different for each strain: oim−/− were hypermineralized, while Phospho1−/− were hypomineralized. However, alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results revealed that despite having extremely different whole bone mechanics, the mineral of oim−/− and Phospho1−/− has several similar trends at smaller length scales. This

  17. Effect of Cortical Bone Thickness on Detection of Intraosseous Lesions by Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Adibi, Sadaf; Shakibafard, Alireza; Karimi Sarvestani, Zohreh; Saadat, Najmeh; Khojastepour, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background. Usefulness of ultrasound (US) in detection of intrabony lesions has been showed. A cortical bone perforation or a very thin and intact cortical bone is prerequisite for this purpose. Objective. The current in vitro study was aimed at measuring the cut-off thickness of the overlying cortical bone which allows ultrasonic assessment of bony defects. Materials and Methods. 20 bovine scapula blocks were obtained. Samples were numbered from 1 to 20. In each sample, 5 artificial lesions were made. The lesions were made in order to increase the overlying bone thickness, from 0.1 mm in the first sample to 2 mm in the last one (with 0.1 mm interval). After that, the samples underwent ultrasound examinations by two practicing radiologists. Results. All five lesions in samples numbered 1 to 11 were detected as hypoechoic area. Cortical bone thickness more than 1.1 mm resulted in a failure in the detection of central lesions. Conclusion. We can conclude that neither bony perforation nor very thin cortical bones are needed to consider US to be an effective imaging technique in the evaluation of bony lesion. PMID:26366296

  18. Temperature Values Variability in Piezoelectric Implant Site Preparation: Differences between Cortical and Corticocancellous Bovine Bone

    PubMed Central

    Lamazza, Luca; Garreffa, Girolamo; Laurito, Domenica; Lollobrigida, Marco; Palmieri, Luigi; De Biase, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Various parameters can influence temperature rise and detection during implant site preparation. The aim of this study is to investigate local temperature values in cortical and corticocancellous bovine bone during early stages of piezoelectric implant site preparation. Materials and Methods. 20 osteotomies were performed using a diamond tip (IM1s, Mectron Medical Technology, Carasco, Italy) on two different types of bovine bone samples, cortical and corticocancellous, respectively. A standardized protocol was designed to provide constant working conditions. Temperatures were measured in real time at a fixed position by a fiber optic thermometer. Results. Significantly higher drilling time (154.90 sec versus 99.00 sec; p < 0.0001) and temperatures (39.26°C versus 34.73°C; p = 0.043) were observed in the cortical group compared to the corticocancellous group. A remarkable variability of results characterized the corticocancellous blocks as compared to the blocks of pure cortical bone. Conclusion. Bone samples can influence heat generation during in vitro implant site preparation. When compared to cortical bone, corticocancellous samples present more variability in temperature values. Even controlling most experimental factors, the impact of bone samples still remains one of the main causes of temperature variability. PMID:27110567

  19. Penetration of moxifloxacin and levofloxacin into cancellous and cortical bone in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Metallidis, S; Topsis, D; Nikolaidis, J; Alexiadou, E; Lazaraki, G; Grovaris, L; Theodoridou, A; Nikolaidis, P

    2007-12-01

    Penetration of levofloxacin and moxifloxacin into cancellous and cortical bone was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 16 patients who underwent routine total hip arthroplasty. Our results demonstrate a good degree of penetration into bone for both quinolones. The mean cancellous penetration was 53.86% for moxifloxacin and 54.13% for levofloxacin. The penetration into cortical bone was 41.59% and 34.26% respectively. The concentrations for both quinolones were above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC(90s)) for the most common pathogens, so they can be used for the treatment of osteomyelitis. PMID:18230551

  20. Eldecalcitol improves mechanical strength of cortical bones by stimulating the periosteal bone formation in the senescence-accelerated SAM/P6 mice - a comparison with alfacalcidol.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Ayako; Sakai, Sadaoki; Saito, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2014-10-01

    Eldecalcitol (ELD), a 2β-hydroxypropyloxy derivative of 1α,25(OH)2D3, is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption that has demonstrated a greater effect at reducing the risk of fracture in osteoporotic patients than alfacalcidol (ALF). In the present study, we used the senescence-accelerated mouse strain P6 (SAM/P6), which has low bone mass caused by osteoblast dysfunction, to evaluate the effect of ELD on cortical bone in comparison with ALF. Four-month-old SAM/P6 mice were given either ELD (0.025 or 0.05μg/kg) or ALF (0.2 or 0.4μg/kg) by oral gavage 5 times/week for 6 weeks. Both ELD and ALF increased serum calcium (Ca) in a dose-dependent manner. Serum Ca levels in the ELD 0.05μg/kg group were comparable to those of the ALF 0.2μg/kg group. ELD 0.05μg/kg significantly improved the bone biomechanical properties of the femur compared with the vehicle control group (p<0.001) and the ALF 0.2μg/kg group (p<0.05) evaluated by 3-point bending test. The cortical area of the mid-femur in the ELD 0.05μg/kg group but not the ALF 0.2μg/kg group was significantly higher than those of the vehicle control group (p<0.001). Bone histomorphometry revealed that in the femoral endocortical surface, the suppression of bone resorption parameters (N.Oc/BS) and bone formation parameters (MS/BS) by ELD (0.05μg/kg) was greater than that by ALF (0.2μg/kg). In contrast, in the femoral periosteal surface, ELD 0.05μg/kg significantly increased bone formation parameters (BFR/BS, MS/BS) compared with the vehicle control group (p<0.05, p<0.01, respectively), whereas ALF 0.2μg/kg did not alter these parameters. These results indicate that ELD improved the biomechanical properties of femoral cortical bone not only by inhibiting endocortical bone resorption but also by stimulating the periosteal bone formation in SAM/P6 mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:24189542

  1. Modeling of femoral neck cortical bone for the numerical simulation of ultrasound propagation.

    PubMed

    Grimal, Quentin; Rohrbach, Daniel; Grondin, Julien; Barkmann, Reinhard; Glüer, Claus-C; Raum, Kay; Laugier, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative ultrasound assessment of the cortical compartment of the femur neck (FN) is investigated with the goal of achieving enhanced fracture risk prediction. Measurements at the FN are influenced by bone size, shape and material properties. The work described here was aimed at determining which FN material properties have a significant impact on ultrasound propagation around 0.5 MHz and assessing the relevancy of different models. A methodology for the modeling of ultrasound propagation in the FN, with a focus on the modeling of bone elastic properties based on scanning acoustic microscopy data, is introduced. It is found that the first-arriving ultrasound signal measured in through-transmission at the FN is not influenced by trabecular bone properties or by the heterogeneities of the cortical bone mineralized matrix. In contrast, the signal is sensitive to variations in cortical porosity, which can, to a certain extent, be accounted for by effective properties calculated with the Mori-Tanaka method. PMID:24486239

  2. The effect of in vitro fluoride ion treatment on the ultrasonic properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Walsh, W R; Labrador, D P; Kim, H D; Guzelsu, N

    1994-01-01

    The mechanical properties of composites are influenced, in part, by the volume fraction, orientation, constituent mechanical properties, and interfacial bonding. Cortical bone tissue represents a short-fibered biological composite where the hydroxyapatite phase is embedded in an organic matrix composed of type I collagen and other noncollagenous proteins. Destructive mechanical testing has revealed that fluoride ion treatment significantly lowers the Z-axis tensile and compressive properties of cortical bone through a constituent interfacial debonding mechanism. The present ultrasonic data indicates that fluoride ion treatment significantly alters the longitudinal velocity in the Z-axis as well as the circumferential and radial axes of cortical bone. This suggests that the distribution of constituents and interfacial bonding amongst them may contribute to the anisotropic nature of bone tissue. PMID:7998686

  3. Cortical Bone Morphological and Trabecular Bone Microarchitectural Changes in the Mandible and Femoral Neck of Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pei-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Wang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Ying-Ju; Wu, Jay; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study used microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) to evaluate the effects of ovariectomy on the trabecular bone microarchitecture and cortical bone morphology in the femoral neck and mandible of female rats. Materials and Methods Twelve female Wister rats were divided into two groups: the control and ovariectomized groups. The rats in the ovariectomized group received ovariectomy at 8 weeks of age; all the rats were sacrificed at 20 weeks of age, and their mandibles and femurs were removed and scanned using micro-CT. Four microstructural trabecular bone parameters were measured for the region below the first mandibular molar and the femoral neck region: bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (TbTh), trabecular separation (TbSp), and trabecular number (TbN). In addition, four cortical bone parameters were measured for the femoral neck region: total cross-sectional area (TtAr), cortical area (CtAr), cortical bone area fraction (CtAr/TtAr), and cortical thickness (CtTh). The CtTh at the masseteric ridge was used to assess the cortical bone morphology in the mandible. The trabecular bone microarchitecture and cortical bone morphology in the femoral necks and mandibles of the control group were compared with those of the ovariectomized group. Furthermore, Spearman’s correlation (rs) was conducted to analyze the correlation between the osteoporosis conditions of the mandible and femoral neck. Results Regarding the trabecular bone microarchitectural parameters, the BV/TV of the trabecular bone microarchitecture in the femoral necks of the control group (61.199±11.288%, median ± interquartile range) was significantly greater than that of the ovariectomized group (40.329±5.153%). Similarly, the BV/TV of the trabecular bone microarchitecture in the mandibles of the control group (51.704±6.253%) was significantly greater than that of the ovariectomized group (38.486±9.111%). Furthermore, the TbSp of the femoral necks in the ovariectomized group

  4. On-line analysis of cracking in cortical bone under wedge penetration.

    PubMed

    Alam, Khurshid; Kerckhofs, Greet; Mitrofanov, Alexander V; Lomov, Stepan; Wevers, Martin; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of crack propagation during bone cutting is necessary for the development of realistic bone cutting models. This article studies the on-line fractural behaviour of cortical bone caused by penetration with a sharp metallic wedge mounted on an on-line loading stage within an X-ray microfocus computed tomography system. The experimental results demonstrated anisotropy in crack propagation depending on the penetration direction with regard to the longitudinal bone axis and relate the crack growth to the extent of penetration. Scanning electron microscopy is performed to analyse the mechanism of cracking in the two phase microstructure of compact bone. PMID:23025172

  5. Effect of microstructure on micromechanical performance of dry cortical bone tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ling; Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin Qinghua

    2009-12-15

    The mechanical properties of bone depend on composition and structure. Previous studies have focused on macroscopic fracture behavior of bone. In the present study, we performed microindentation studies to understand the deformation properties and microcrack-microstructure interactions of dry cortical bone. Dry cortical bone tissues from lamb femurs were tested using Vickers indentation with loads of 0.245-9.8 N. We examined the effect of bone microstructure on deformation and crack propagation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the significant effect of cortical bone microstructure on indentation deformation and microcrack propagation. The indentation deformation of the dry cortical bone was basically plastic at any applied load with a pronounced viscoelastic recovery, in particular at lower loads. More microcracks up to a length of approximately 20 {mu}m occurred when the applied load was increased. At loads of 4.9 N and higher, most microcracks were found to develop from the boundaries of haversian canals, osteocyte lacunae and canaliculi. Some microcracks propagated from the parallel direction of the longitudinal interstitial lamellae. At loads 0.45 N and lower, no visible microcracks were observed.

  6. An approach to the histomorphological and histochemical variations of the humerus cortical bone through human ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cambra-Moo, Oscar; Nacarino Meneses, Carmen; Rodríguez Barbero, Miguel Ángel; García Gil, Orosia; Rascón Pérez, Josefina; Rello-Varona, Santiago; D'Angelo, Manuel; Campo Martín, Manuel; González Martín, Armando

    2014-01-01

    For many years, clinical and non-clinical investigations have investigated cortical bone structure in an attempt to address questions related to normal bone development, mineralisation, pathologies and even evolutionary trends in our lineage (adaptations). Research in the fields of medicine, materials science, physical anthropology, palaeontology, and even archaeobiology has contributed interesting data. However, many questions remain regarding the histomorphological and histochemical variations in human cortical bone during different stages of life. In the present work, we describe a study of long bone cortex transformations during ontogeny. We analysed cross-sections of 15 human humeri histomorphologically and histochemically from perinatal to adult age, marking and quantifying the spatial distribution of bone tissue types using GIS software and analysing the mineral composition and crystallinity of the mineralised cortex using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our results allowed us to propose that human cortical bone undergoes three main ‘events’ through ontogeny that critically change the proportions and structure of the cortex. In early development, bone is not well mineralised and proportionally presents a wide cortex that narrows through the end of childhood. Before reaching complete maturity, the bone mineral area increases, allowing the bone to nearly reach the adult size. The medullary cavity is reduced, and the mineral areas have a highly ordered crystalline structure. The last event occurs in adulthood, when the ‘oldest’ individuals present a reduced mineralised area, with increasing non-mineralised cavities (including the medullary cavity) and reduced crystalline organisation. PMID:24660964

  7. Loss of Prostaglandin E2-induced Extra Cortical Bone After its Withdrawal in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the fate of PGE2-(Prostaglandin E2) induced new cortical bone mass after withdrawal of PGE2 administration. Seven-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were given subcutaneous injections of 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 60 days and then withdrawn for 60 and 120 days (on/off treatment). Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent-labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). In a previous report we showed that after 60, 120 and 180 days of daily PGE2 (on)treatment, a new steady state was achieved marked by increased total bone area (+16%, +25% and +34% with 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day) when compared to age-matched controls. The continuous PGE2 treatment stimulated periosteal and endocortical lamellar bone formation, activated endocortical woven trabecular bone formation and intracortical bone resorption. These responses increased cortical bone mass since the bone formation exceeded bone resorption. The current study showed that after withdrawal of PGE2 for 60 and 120 days, the extra endocortical bone, which was induced by the first 60-days treatment, was resorbed, but the new subperiosteal bone persisted resulting in a tibial shaft with larger cross sectional and marrow areas. Despite that, there was still the same amount of bone mass in these shafts as in age-related controls. A new steady state was achieved after 60 days of withdrawal, in which the bone mass and bone formation activity approximated that of age-related controls. It was concluded that maintaining the extra PGE2-induced cortical bone mass depends on continuous daily administration of PGE2.

  8. Loss of Prostaglandin E2-induced Extra Cortical Bone after its Withdrawal in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the fate of PGE2-induced new cortical bone mass after withdrawal of PGE2 administration. Seven-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were given subcutaneous injections of 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 60 days and then withdrawn for 60 and 120 days (on/off treatment). Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent-labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). In a previous report we showed that after 60, 120 and 180 days of daily PGE2 (on)treatment, a new steady state was achieved marked by increased total bone area (+ 16%, +25% and + 34% with 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day) when compared to age-matched controls. The continuous PGE2 treatment stimulated periosteal and endocortical lamellar bone formation, activated endocortical woven trabecular bone formation and intracortical bone resorption. These responses increased cortical bone mass since the bone formation exceeded bone resorption. The current study showed that after withdrawal of PGE2 for 60 and 120 days, the extra endocortical bone, which was induced by the first 60-days treatment, was resorbed, but the new subperiosteal bone persisted resulting in a tibial shaft with larger cross sectional and marrow areas. Despite that, there was still the same amount of bone mass in these shafts as in age-related controls. A new steady state was achieved after 60 days of withdrawal, in which the bone mass and bone formation activity approximated that of age-related controls. It was concluded that maintaining the extra PGE2-induced cortical bone mass depends on continuous daily administration of PGE2.

  9. Assessment of the cortical bone thickness using ultrasonic guided waves: modelling and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Petro; Nicholson, Patrick H F; Kilappa, Vantte; Cheng, Sulin; Timonen, Jussi

    2007-02-01

    Determination of cortical bone thickness is warranted, e.g., for assessing the level of endosteal resorption in osteoporosis or other bone pathologies. We have shown previously that the velocity of the fundamental antisymmetric (or flexural) guided wave, measured for bone phantoms and bones in vitro, correlates with the cortical thickness significantly better than those by other axial ultrasound methods. In addition, we have introduced an inversion scheme based on guided wave theory, group velocity filtering and 2-D fast Fourier transform, for determination of cortical thickness from the measured velocity of guided waves. In this study, the method was validated for tubular structures by using numerical simulations and experimental measurements on tube samples. In addition, 40 fresh human radius specimens were measured. For tubes with a thin wall, plate theory could be used to determine the wall thickness with a precision of 4%. For tubes with a wall thicker than 1/5 of the outer radius, tube theory provided the wall thickness with similar accuracy. For the radius bone specimens, tube theory was used and the ultrasonically-determined cortical thickness was found to be U-Th = 2.47 mm +/- 0.66 mm. It correlated strongly (r(2) = 0.73, p < 0.001) with the average cortical thickness, C-Th = 2.68 +/- 0.53 mm, and the local cortical thickness (r(2) = 0.81, p < 0.001), measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. We can conclude that the guided-wave inversion scheme introduced here is a feasible method for assessing cortical bone thickness. PMID:17306696

  10. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  11. Assessment of water distribution changes in human cortical bone by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Wang, Xiaodu; DeLos Santos, Armondo; Nicolella, Daniel P.

    2007-03-01

    A NMR spin-spin (T2) relaxation technique has been described for determining water distribution changes in human cortical bone tissue. The advantages of using NMR T2 relaxation techniques for bone water distribution are illustrated. The CPMG T2 relaxation data can be inverted to T2 relaxation distribution and this distribution then can be transformed to a pore size distribution with the longer relaxation times corresponding to larger pores. The FID T2 relaxation data can be inverted to T2 relaxation distribution and this distribution then can be transformed to bound- and mobile-water distribution with the longest relaxation time corresponding to mobile water and the middle relaxation time corresponding to bound water. The technique is applied to quantify apparent changes in porosity, bound and mobile water in cortical bone. Overall bone porosity is determined using the calibrated NMR fluid volume from the proton relaxation data divided by overall bone volume. The NMR bound and mobile water changes were determined from cortical bone specimens obtained from male and female donors of different ages. Differences in water distribution were found between specimens from male and female donors. Furthermore, the distribution of water within a single specimen was found to be non-homogeneous. Our results show that the ratio of the average bound to mobile water in bone from male donors is higher than in bone from female donors when the bone porosities are similar between male and female groups. We also show that the average bone porosity multiplied by the ratio of bound to mobile water is constant for both male and female bone groups. This parameter may be used as a measure of bone quality describing both porosity and water content, both of which may be important determinants of bone strength and fracture resistance.

  12. Hindlimb unloading has a greater effect on cortical compared with cancellous bone in mature female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Bloomfield, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of 28 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) on the mature female rat skeleton. In vivo proximal tibia bone mineral density and geometry of HU and cage control (CC) rats were measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 28. Postmortem pQCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical testing were performed on tibiae and femora. After 28 days, HU animals had significantly higher daily food consumption (+39%) and lower serum estradiol levels (-49%, P = 0.079) compared with CC. Proximal tibia bone mineral content and cortical bone area significantly declined over 28 days in HU animals (-4.0 and 4.8%, respectively), whereas total and cancellous bone mineral densities were unchanged. HU animals had lower cortical bone formation rates and mineralizing surface at tibial midshaft, whereas differences in similar properties were not detected in cancellous bone of the distal femur. These results suggest that cortical bone, rather than cancellous bone, is more prominently affected by unloading in skeletally mature retired breeder female rats.

  13. Analytical methods to determine the effective mesoscopic and macroscopic elastic properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Parnell, William J; Vu, M B; Grimal, Q; Naili, S

    2012-07-01

    We compare theoretical predictions of the effective elastic moduli of cortical bone at both the meso- and macroscales. We consider the efficacy of three alternative approaches: the method of asymptotic homogenization, the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the Hashin-Rosen bounds. The methods concur for specific engineering moduli such as the axial Young's modulus but can vary for others. In a past study, the effect of porosity alone on mesoscopic properties of cortical bone was considered, taking the matrix to be isotropic. Here, we consider the additional influence of the transverse isotropy of the matrix. We make the point that micromechanical approaches can be used in two alternative ways to predict either the macroscopic (size of cortical bone sample) or mesoscopic (in between micro- and macroscales) effective moduli, depending upon the choice of representative volume element size. It is widely accepted that the mesoscale behaviour is an important aspect of the mechanical behaviour of bone but models incorporating its effect have started to appear only relatively recently. Before this only macroscopic behaviour was addressed. Comparisons are drawn with experimental data and simulations from the literature for macroscale predictions with particularly good agreement in the case of dry bone. Finally, we show how predictions of the effective mesoscopic elastic moduli can be made which retain dependence on the well-known porosity gradient across the thickness of cortical bone. PMID:22109098

  14. Artifacts and thresholding in X-ray CT of a cortical bone and titanium composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, C.J.; Gayou, D.E.

    1996-05-01

    X-Ray CT has the potential to provide precise and accurate data from which the mechanical properties of bone can be calculated. Such data would be useful in understanding the response of bone tissue to implants. Various artifacts can, however, degrade accuracy of the data. The aim of this study was to measure the artifactual errors produced in CT of a simulated femoral bone-titanium composite and to propose a method to correct for them. A composite phantom that simulates cortical bone and a titanium implant was designed and constructed. The phantom was scanned and the image data were analyzed over a range of thresholds with image analysis software developed for this study. The outer (OD) and inner (ID) diameter and the CT number of the cortical bone, with and without titanium, were measured over a range of cortical thicknesses. While ID can be accurately measured by choosing the proper threshold (800 HU), OD, even at optimal threshold, will be underestimated by {approx}2%. If a proper threshold is selected, CT number can also be accurately determined. Errors of tip to 5%, however, are produced by titanium unless corrected by proper threshold selection. Intramedullary titanium is not a deterrent to obtaining accurate measurements of cortical bone dimensions and properties. Proper choice of thresholds for image analysis of CT scan data can yield accuracy and precision of 2%. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  15. ONO-5334, a cathepsin K inhibitor, improves bone strength by preferentially increasing cortical bone mass in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Yasuo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hiroshi; Kawada, Naoki; Kayasuga, Ryoji; Nakanishi, Yasutomo; Tanaka, Makoto; Imagawa, Akira; Ohmoto, Kazuyuki; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the effects of ONO-5334, a cathepsin K inhibitor, with those of alendronate on bone mass and strength in ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomy resulted in significant elevation in urinary deoxypyridinoline and plasma C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) 8 weeks after surgery. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography analysis showed that total, trabecular, and cortical bone mineral content (BMC) decreased in the proximal tibia, which was paralleled with a significant decline in bone strength. Treatment with ONO-5334 (0.12, 0.6, 3 or 15 mg/kg) once daily for 8 weeks dose-dependently restored the decrease in total BMC and bone mineral density (BMD) in the proximal tibia and suppressed urinary deoxypyridinoline and plasma CTX levels. Alendronate (1 mg/kg, once daily) also fully restored these bone mass parameters. Separate analysis of trabecular and cortical bones, however, showed that ONO-5334 only partially restored trabecular BMD and BMC at 15 mg/kg, whereas alendronate fully restored these parameters. On the other hand, ONO-5334 increased both cortical BMD and BMC with an effect more potent than that of alendronate. Bone geometric analysis indicated that ONO-5334 at 15 mg/kg decreased endosteal circumference without affecting periosteal circumference, resulting in marked increase in cortical thickness. Interestingly, the effects of ONO-5334 on bone strength parameters were more prominent than those of alendronate, although the two test compounds had a similar effect on total BMC. Taken together, our results indicate that ONO-5334 has pharmacological characteristics different from those of alendronate and may offer a unique therapy for patients with osteoporosis. PMID:24317478

  16. A new algorithm to improve assessment of cortical bone geometry in pQCT.

    PubMed

    Cervinka, Tomas; Sievänen, Harri; Lala, Deena; Cheung, Angela M; Giangregorio, Lora; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is now considered the leading imaging modality in bone research. However, access to HR-pQCT is limited and image acquisition is mainly constrained only for the distal third of appendicular bones. Hence, the conventional pQCT is still commonly used despite inaccurate threshold-based segmentation of cortical bone that can compromise the assessment of whole bone strength. Therefore, this study addressed whether the use of an advanced image processing algorithm, called OBS, can enhance the cortical bone analysis in pQCT images and provide similar information to HR-pQCT when the same volumes of interest are analyzed. Using pQCT images of European Forearm Phantom (EFP), and pQCT and HR-pQCT images of the distal tibia from 15 cadavers, we compared the results from the OBS algorithm with those obtained from common pQCT analyses, HR-pQCT manual analysis (considered as a gold standard) and common HR-pQCT analysis dual threshold technique.We found that the use of OBS segmentation method for pQCT image analysis of EFP data did not result in any improvement but reached similar performance in cortical bone delineation as did HR-pQCT image analyses. The assessments of cortical cross-sectional bone area and thickness by OBS algorithm were overestimated by less than 4% while area moments of inertia were overestimated by ~5–10%, depending on reference HR-pQCT analysis method. In conclusion, this study showed that the OBS algorithm performed reasonably well and it offers a promising practical tool to enhance the assessment of cortical bone geometry in pQCT. PMID:26428659

  17. Mandibular Inferior Cortical Bone Thickness on Panoramic Radiographs in Patients using Bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sandra R.; Chen, Curtis S. K.; Leroux, Brian G.; Lee, Peggy P.; Hollender, Lars G.; Lloid, Michelle; Drew, Shane Patrick; Schubert, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect dimensional changes in the mandibular cortical bone associated with bisphosphonate (BP) use and to correlate the measurements of the cortical bone with the cumulative dose of BP therapy. Methods Mandibular inferior cortical bone thickness (MICBT) was measured under the mental foramen from panoramic radiographs of subjects using BP with and without bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) and controls. Results The highest mean MICBT was observed in BRONJ subjects 6.81 (± 1.35 mm), when compared to subjects using BP 5.44 (± 1.09 mm) and controls 4.79 (± 0.85 mm; p<0.01). The mean MICBT of BRONJ subjects was significantly higher than that of subjects using BP without BRONJ. There was a correlation between MICBT and cumulative dose of zolendronate. Conclusion The MICBT on panoramic radiograph is a potentially useful tool for the detection of dimensional changes associated with BP therapy. PMID:25864820

  18. Acute hypothalamic suppression significantly affects trabecular bone but not cortical bone following recovery and ovariectomy surgery in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Kathryn A.; Lunny, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Osteoporosis is “a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences.” Bone morphology and tissue quality co-adapt during ontogeny for sufficient bone stiffness. Altered bone morphology from hypothalamic amenorrhea, a risk factor for low bone mass in women, may affect bone strength later in life. Our purpose was to determine if altered morphology following hypothalamic suppression during development affects cortical bone strength and trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) at maturity. Methods. Female rats (25 days old) were assigned to a control (C) group (n = 45) that received saline injections (.2 cc) or an experimental group (GnRH-a) (n = 45) that received gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist injections (.24 mg per dose) for 25 days. Fifteen animals from each group were sacrificed immediately after the injection protocol at Day 50 (C, GnRH-a). The remaining animals recovered for 135 days and a subset of each group was sacrificed at Day 185 ((C-R) (n = 15) and (G-R) (n = 15)). The remaining animals had an ovariectomy surgery (OVX) at 185 days of age and were sacrificed 40 days later (C-OVX) (n = 15) and (G-OVX) (n = 15). After sacrifice femurs were mechanically tested and scanned using micro CT. Serum C-terminal telopeptides (CTX) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured. Two-way ANOVA (2 groups (GnRH-a and Control) X 3 time points (Injection Protocol, Recovery, post-OVX)) was computed. Results. GnRH-a injections suppressed uterine weights (72%) and increased CTX levels by 59%. Bone stiffness was greater in the GnRH-a groups compared to C. Ash content and cortical bone area were similar between groups at all time points. Polar moment of inertia, a measure of bone architecture, was 15% larger in the GnRH-a group and remained larger than C (19%) following recovery. Both the polar moment of inertia and cortical area increased linearly with the increases in body weight. Following the injection protocol, trabecular BV/TV was 31% lower in the Gn

  19. Acute hypothalamic suppression significantly affects trabecular bone but not cortical bone following recovery and ovariectomy surgery in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yingling, Vanessa R; Mitchell, Kathryn A; Lunny, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Osteoporosis is "a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences." Bone morphology and tissue quality co-adapt during ontogeny for sufficient bone stiffness. Altered bone morphology from hypothalamic amenorrhea, a risk factor for low bone mass in women, may affect bone strength later in life. Our purpose was to determine if altered morphology following hypothalamic suppression during development affects cortical bone strength and trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) at maturity. Methods. Female rats (25 days old) were assigned to a control (C) group (n = 45) that received saline injections (.2 cc) or an experimental group (GnRH-a) (n = 45) that received gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist injections (.24 mg per dose) for 25 days. Fifteen animals from each group were sacrificed immediately after the injection protocol at Day 50 (C, GnRH-a). The remaining animals recovered for 135 days and a subset of each group was sacrificed at Day 185 ((C-R) (n = 15) and (G-R) (n = 15)). The remaining animals had an ovariectomy surgery (OVX) at 185 days of age and were sacrificed 40 days later (C-OVX) (n = 15) and (G-OVX) (n = 15). After sacrifice femurs were mechanically tested and scanned using micro CT. Serum C-terminal telopeptides (CTX) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured. Two-way ANOVA (2 groups (GnRH-a and Control) X 3 time points (Injection Protocol, Recovery, post-OVX)) was computed. Results. GnRH-a injections suppressed uterine weights (72%) and increased CTX levels by 59%. Bone stiffness was greater in the GnRH-a groups compared to C. Ash content and cortical bone area were similar between groups at all time points. Polar moment of inertia, a measure of bone architecture, was 15% larger in the GnRH-a group and remained larger than C (19%) following recovery. Both the polar moment of inertia and cortical area increased linearly with the increases in body weight. Following the injection protocol, trabecular BV/TV was 31% lower in the Gn

  20. Modalities for Visualization of Cortical Bone Remodeling: The Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kimberly D; Cooper, David M L

    2015-01-01

    Bone's ability to respond to load-related phenomena and repair microdamage is achieved through the remodeling process, which renews bone by activating groups of cells known as basic multicellular units (BMUs). The products of BMUs, secondary osteons, have been extensively studied via classic two-dimensional techniques, which have provided a wealth of information on how histomorphology relates to skeletal structure and function. Remodeling is critical in maintaining healthy bone tissue; however, in osteoporotic bone, imbalanced resorption results in increased bone fragility and fracture. With increasing life expectancy, such degenerative bone diseases are a growing concern. The three-dimensional (3D) morphology of BMUs and their correlation to function, however, are not well-characterized and little is known about the specific mechanisms that initiate and regulate their activity within cortical bone. We believe a key limitation has been the lack of 3D information about BMU morphology and activity. Thus, this paper reviews methodologies for 3D investigation of cortical bone remodeling and, specifically, structures associated with BMU activity (resorption spaces) and the structures they create (secondary osteons), spanning from histology to modern ex vivo imaging modalities, culminating with the growing potential of in vivo imaging. This collection of papers focuses on the theme of "putting the 'why' back into bone architecture." Remodeling is one of two mechanisms "how" bone structure is dynamically modified and thus an improved 3D understanding of this fundamental process is crucial to ultimately understanding the "why." PMID:26322017

  1. Intramedullary reaming for press-fit fixation of a humeral component removes cortical bone asymmetrically.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael; Chebli, Caroline; Mounce, Doug; Bertelsen, Alexander; Richardson, Michael; Matsen, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    Periprosthetic humeral fractures are major complications of shoulder arthroplasty. Bone removal during surgical reaming is a risk factor for these fractures. Although it is recognized that the endosteal surface of the humerus is asymmetrical whereas the reamers are symmetrical, to our knowledge, the effect of cylindrical reaming on the pattern of cortical bone removal during reaming has not been previously studied. The medullary canals of 10 cadaveric humeri (mean age, 73 years) were reamed in a manner similar to that used during humeral arthroplasty. Cortical dimensions were obtained from computed tomography scans before and after reaming. In unreamed humeri, the anterior-posterior endocortical diameter was 20% smaller than the medial-lateral diameter. The average medial-lateral diameter (15.6 +/- 2.3 mm) was significantly greater than the anterior-posterior diameter (12.5 +/- 1.9 mm) at 13 cm distal to the tuberosity (P < .00005). Successive cylindrical reaming preferentially thinned the anterior and posterior cortices. This bone loss would not be apparent on anterior-posterior radiographs. Intramedullary reaming to obtain substantial cortical contact asymmetrically removes cortical bone in a manner that may increase the risk of periprosthetic fracture. PMID:18029200

  2. Optical phase analysis in drilled cortical porcine bones using digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavera R., César G.; De la Torre I., Manuel H.; Flores M., J. Mauricio; Luna H., Juan M.; Briones R., Manuel de J.; Mendoza S., Fernando

    2016-03-01

    A study in porcine femoral bones with and without the presence of cortical drilling is presented. An out of plane digital holographic interferometer is used to retrieve the optical phase during the controlled compression tests. These tests try to simulate physiological deformations in postmortem healthy bones and compare their mechanical response with those having a cortical hole. The cortical drilling technique is widely used in medical procedures to fix plaques and metallic frames to a bone recovering from a fracture. Several materials and drilling techniques are used for this purpose. In this work we analyze the superficial variations of the bone when different drilling diameters are used. By means of the optical phase it is possible to recover the superficial deformation of the tissue during a controlled deformation with high resolution. This information could give a better understand about the micro structural variations of the bone instead of a bulk response. As proof of principle, several tests were performed to register the modes and ranges of the displacements for compressive loads. From these tests notorious differences are observed between both groups of bones, having less structural stiffness the drilled ones as expected. However, the bone's characteristic to absorb and adjust itself due the load is also highly affected according to the number of holes. Results from different kind of samples (undrilled and drilled) are presented and discussed in this work.

  3. Micromechanical modeling of elastic properties of cortical bone accounting for anisotropy of dense tissue.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Laura; Saadat, Fatemeh; Sevostianov, Igor

    2014-10-17

    The paper analyzes the connection between microstructure of the osteonal cortical bone and its overall elastic properties. The existing models either neglect anisotropy of the dense tissue or simplify cortical bone microstructure (accounting for Haversian canals only). These simplifications (related mostly to insufficient mathematical apparatus) complicate quantitative analysis of the effect of microstructural changes - produced by age, microgravity, or some diseases - on the overall mechanical performance of cortical bone. The present analysis fills this gap; it accounts for anisotropy of the dense tissue and uses realistic model of the porous microstructure. The approach is based on recent results of Sevostianov et al. (2005) and Saadat et al. (2012) on inhomogeneities in a transversely-isotropic material. Bone's microstructure is modeled according to books of Martin and Burr (1989), Currey (2002), and Fung (1993) and includes four main families of pores. The calculated elastic constants for porous cortical bone are in agreement with available experimental data. The influence of each of the pore types on the overall moduli is examined. PMID:25234350

  4. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion. PMID:25481219

  5. Using digital image correlation to determine bone surface strains during loading and after adaptation of the mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Sztefek, Pavel; Vanleene, Maximilien; Olsson, Robin; Collinson, Rebecca; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Shefelbine, Sandra

    2010-03-01

    Previous models of cortical bone adaptation, in which loading is imposed on the bone, have estimated the strains in the tissue using strain gauges, analytical beam theory, or finite element analysis. We used digital image correlation (DIC), tracing a speckle pattern on the surface of the bone during loading, to determine surface strains in a murine tibia during compressive loading through the knee joint. We examined whether these surface strains in the mouse tibia are modified following two weeks of load-induced adaptation by comparison with contralateral controls. Results indicated non-uniform strain patterns with isolated areas of high strain (0.5%), particularly on the medial side. Strain measurements were reproducible (standard deviation of the error 0.03%), similar between specimens, and in agreement with strain gauge measurements (between 0.1 and 0.2% strain). After structural adaptation, strains were more uniform across the tibial surface, particularly on the medial side where peak strains were reduced from 0.5% to 0.3%. Because DIC determines local strains over the entire surface, it will provide a better understanding of how strain stimulus influences the bone response during adaptation. PMID:20005517

  6. Model to characterize strain generated potentials in bone.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, F A; Hastings, G W; Martini, M

    1988-01-01

    A model has been developed to characterize the strain generated potentials (SGPs) in bone. The model relates the SGP signal to the rotation (reorientation) of the spontaneous dipoles of bone in response to mechanical deformation. The effects of bone structural conditions and the measuring circuitry on the recorded potential are both accounted for by the model. PMID:3347035

  7. The effect of high voltage, high frequency pulsed electric field on slain ovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Asgarifar, Hajarossadat; Oloyede, Adekunle; Zare, Firuz

    2014-04-01

    High power, high frequency pulsed electric fields known as pulsed power (PP) has been applied recently in biology and medicine. However, little attention has been paid to investigate the application of pulse power in musculoskeletal system and its possible effect on functional behavior and biomechanical properties of bone tissue. This paper presents the first research investigating whether or not PP can be applied safely on bone tissue as a stimuli and what will be the possible effect of these signals on the characteristics of cortical bone by comparing the mechanical properties of this type of bone pre and post expose to PP and in comparison with the control samples. A positive buck-boost converter was applied to generate adjustable high voltage, high frequency pulses (up to 500 V and 10 kHz). The functional behavior of bone in response to pulse power excitation was elucidated by applying compressive loading until failure. The stiffness, failure stress (strength) and the total fracture energy (bone toughness) were determined as a measure of the main bone characteristics. Furthermore, an ultrasonic technique was applied to determine and comprise bone elasticity before and after pulse power stimulation. The elastic property of cortical bone samples appeared to remain unchanged following exposure to pulse power excitation for all three orthogonal directions obtained from ultrasonic technique and similarly from the compression test. Nevertheless, the compressive strength and toughness of bone samples were increased when they were exposed to 66 h of high power pulsed electromagnetic field compared to the control samples. As the toughness and the strength of the cortical bone tissue are directly associated with the quality and integrity of the collagen matrix whereas its stiffness is primarily related to bone mineral content these overall results may address that although, the pulse power stimulation can influence the arrangement or the quality of the collagen network

  8. Time responses of cancellous and cortical bones to sciatic neurectomy in growing female rats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q Q; Jee, W S; Bigornia, A E; King, J G; D'Souza, S M; Li, X J; Ma, Y F; Wechter, W J

    1996-07-01

    Effects of unilateral sciatic neurectomy on the responses of both cancellous and cortical bones were studied in growing female rats at 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after operation. Using double-fluorescent labeling techniques, histomorphometric analyses were performed on longitudinal sections of proximal tibial metaphyseal secondary spongiosa (PTM) and on cross sections of tibial shaft (TX). In PTM, sciatic neurectomy not only inhibited the age-related bone gain, but also reduced the trabecular bone mass by 46%, which was accompanied by decreases in trabecular number, thickness, and node to node density, and an increase in trabecular separation and free end to free end density. The bone loss occurred mainly between 1 and 4 weeks after operation. A sharp increase in bone formation indices was observed during the first week after nerve section. However, these endpoints quickly dropped to levels lower than those of sham-operated controls at 4 weeks, and were not different from the control levels at 8 weeks after operation. Eroded surface increased progressively after sciatic neurectomy during the 12 weeks experimental period. In TX, sciatic neurectomy inhibited the age-related increase in total tissue area that maintained it at the basal control level. However, the cortical bone area in neurectomized legs was lower than that in sham-operated controls. Sciatic neurectomy also stimulated the bone formation indices on both periosteal and endocortical surfaces during the first week after operation. These endpoints declined sharply between 1 and 4 weeks and then maintained at control levels between 8 and 12 weeks post surgery. Endocortical eroded surface increased 1 week after neurectomy, reached the peak at 8 weeks, and then decreased thereafter. These findings suggest that (1) sciatic neurectomy not only inhibited age-related bone gain but also induced marked bone loss in cancellous bone site and inhibited age-related bone gain in cortical bone site, which mainly resulted

  9. The Effect of High Voltage, High Frequency Pulsed Electric Field on Slain Ovine Cortical Bone

    PubMed Central

    Asgarifar, Hajarossadat; Oloyede, Adekunle; Zare, Firuz

    2014-01-01

    High power, high frequency pulsed electric fields known as pulsed power (PP) has been applied recently in biology and medicine. However, little attention has been paid to investigate the application of pulse power in musculoskeletal system and its possible effect on functional behavior and biomechanical properties of bone tissue. This paper presents the first research investigating whether or not PP can be applied safely on bone tissue as a stimuli and what will be the possible effect of these signals on the characteristics of cortical bone by comparing the mechanical properties of this type of bone pre and post expose to PP and in comparison with the control samples. A positive buck-boost converter was applied to generate adjustable high voltage, high frequency pulses (up to 500 V and 10 kHz). The functional behavior of bone in response to pulse power excitation was elucidated by applying compressive loading until failure. The stiffness, failure stress (strength) and the total fracture energy (bone toughness) were determined as a measure of the main bone characteristics. Furthermore, an ultrasonic technique was applied to determine and comprise bone elasticity before and after pulse power stimulation. The elastic property of cortical bone samples appeared to remain unchanged following exposure to pulse power excitation for all three orthogonal directions obtained from ultrasonic technique and similarly from the compression test. Nevertheless, the compressive strength and toughness of bone samples were increased when they were exposed to 66 h of high power pulsed electromagnetic field compared to the control samples. As the toughness and the strength of the cortical bone tissue are directly associated with the quality and integrity of the collagen matrix whereas its stiffness is primarily related to bone mineral content these overall results may address that although, the pulse power stimulation can influence the arrangement or the quality of the collagen network

  10. Postnatal Changes in Humerus Cortical Bone Thickness Reflect the Development of Metabolic Bone Disease in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tokuriki, Shuko; Igarashi, Aiko; Okuno, Takashi; Ohta, Genrei; Kosaka, Takuya; Ohshima, Yusei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To use cortical bone thickness (CBT) of the humerus to identify risk factors for the development of metabolic bone disease in preterm infants. Methods. Twenty-seven infants born at <32 weeks of gestational age, with a birth weight of <1,500 g, were enrolled. Humeral CBT was measured from chest radiographs at birth and at 27-28, 31-32, and 36–44 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA). The risk factors for the development of osteomalacia were statistically analyzed. Results. The humeral CBT at 36–44 weeks of PMA was positively correlated with gestational age and birth weight and negatively correlated with the duration of mechanical ventilation. CBT increased with PMA, except in six very early preterm infants in whom it decreased. Based on logistic regression analysis, gestational age and duration of mechanical ventilation were identified as risk factors for cortical bone thinning. Conclusions. Humeral CBT may serve as a radiologic marker of metabolic bone disease at 36–44 weeks of PMA in preterm infants. Cortical bones of extremely preterm infants are fragile, even when age is corrected for term, and require extreme care to lower the risk of fractures. PMID:27194819

  11. Implant design and its effects on osseointegration over time within cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bryan G; Danna, Natalie R; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Marin, Charles; Tovar, Nick; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-08-01

    Healing chambers present at the interface between implant and bone have become a target for improving osseointegration. The objective of the present study was to compare osseointegration of several implant healing chamber configurations at early time points and regions of interest within bone using an in vivo animal femur model. Six implants, each with a different healing chamber configuration, were surgically implanted into each femur of six skeletally mature beagle dogs (n = 12 implants per dog, total n = 72). The implants were harvested at 3 and 5 weeks post-implantation, non-decalcified processed to slides, and underwent histomorphometry with measurement of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) within healing chambers at both cortical and trabecular bone sites. Microscopy demonstrated predominantly woven bone at 3 weeks and initial replacement of woven bone by lamellar bone by 5 weeks. BIC and BAFO were both significantly increased by 5 weeks (p < 0.001), and significantly higher in cortical than trabecular bone (p < 0.001). The trapezoidal healing chamber design demonstrated a higher BIC than other configurations. Overall, a strong temporal and region-specific dependence of implant osseointegration in femurs was noted. Moreover, the findings suggest that a trapezoidal healing chamber configuration may facilitate the best osseointegration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1091-1097, 2016. PMID:26034012

  12. Prostaglandin E2 Increased Rat Cortical Bone Mass When Administered Immediately Following Ovariectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S.S.; Zeng, Qing Qiang; Li, Mei; Lin, Bai Yun

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effects of ovariectomy and the simultaneous administration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on rat tibial shaft cortical bone histomorphometry, thirty-five 3 month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were either ovariectomized (OVX), or sham ovariectomy (sham-OVX). The OVX rats were divided into three groups and treated with 0, 1 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 90 days. The double fluorescent labeled undecalcified tibial shaft cross sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction) of all the subjects were used for histomorphometry analysis. No differences in cross-sectional area and cortical bone area were found between sham-OVX and OVX controls, but OVX increased marrow area, intracortical porosity area and endocortical eroded perimeter. Periosteal and endocortical bone formation rates decreased with aging yet OVX prevented these changes. These OVX-induced increases in marrow area and endocortical eroded perimeter were prevented by 1 mg PGE2/kg/day treatment and added bone to periosteal and endocortical surfaces and to the marrow cavity. At the 6 mg/kg/day dose level, PGE2-treated OVX rats increased total tissue area, cortical bone area, marrow trabmular bone area, minimal cortical width and intracortical porosity area, and decreased marrow area compared to basal, sham-OVX and OVX controls. In addition, periosteal bone formation was elevated in the 6 mg PGE2/kg/day-treated OVX rats compared to OVX controls. Endocortical eroded perimeter increased from basal and sham-OVX control levels, but decreased from OVX control levels in the 6 mg PGE2/kg/day-treated OVX rats. Our study confirmed that ovariectomy does not cause osteopenia in tibial shaft cortical bone in rats, but it does stimulate endocortical bone resorption and enlarges marrow area. The new findings from the present study demonstrate that PGE2 prevents the OVX-induced increases in endocortical bone resorption and marrow area and adds additional bone to periosteal and endocortical surfaces and to marrow

  13. Bone stress and strain modification in diastema closure: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Bouserhal, Joseph; Martin, Domingo; Baghaeian, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the stress and strain distribution in the alveolar bone between two central incisors in the process of diastema closure with a constant force. A 3-dimensional computer modeling based on finite element techniques was used for this purpose. A model of an anterior segment of the mandible containing cortical bone, spongy bone, gingivae, PDL and two central incisors with a bracket in the labial surface of each tooth were designed. The von Mises stress and strain was evaluated in alveolar bone along a path of nodes defined in a cresto-apical direction in the midline between two teeth. It was observed that stress and strain of alveolar bone increased in midline with a constant force to close the diastema regardless of the type of movement in gradual steps of diastema closure, however the stress was higher in the tipping movement than the bodily so it can be suggested that a protocol of force system modification should be introduced to compensate for the stress and strain changes caused by the reduced distance to avoid the unwanted stress alteration during the diastema closure. PMID:26277458

  14. Anisotropic properties of human cortical bone with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Katti, Kalpana S; Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R

    2016-02-01

    The heterogeneity of bone shape and size variation is modulated by genetic, mechanical, nutritional, and hormonal patterning throughout its lifetime. Microstructural changes across cross sections are a result of mechanistic optimization that results over the years of evolution while being based on universal, time-invariant ingredients and patterns. Here we report changes across anatomical sections of bone with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that undermines the work of evolution through genetic mutation. This work examines the microstructure and molecular composition of different anatomical positions (anterior, medial, posterior, and lateral regions) in the diaphysis of an OI human tibia. The study shows that although there is no significant microstructural difference, molecular changes are observed using FTIR revealing differences in molecular composition of the four anatomical positions. In addition, the nanomechanical properties of anterior section of OI bone seem more heterogeneous. The nanomechanical properties of interstitial lamellae in all these bone samples are consistently greater than those of osteonal lamellae. The nanomechanical properties of bone depend on its anatomical section and on the measurement direction as well. Variations in molecular structure with anatomical positions and also corresponding differences in nanomechanical properties are reported. These are compared to those observed typically in healthy bone illustrating the unique influence of OI on bone multiscale behavior which results from an evolutionary process lasting for many years. PMID:26399513

  15. Effect of ibandronate on bending strength and toughness of rodent cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Savaridas, T.; Wallace, R. J.; Dawson, S.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There remains conflicting evidence regarding cortical bone strength following bisphosphonate therapy. As part of a study to assess the effects of bisphosphonate treatment on the healing of rat tibial fractures, the mechanical properties and radiological density of the uninjured contralateral tibia was assessed. Methods Skeletally mature aged rats were used. A total of 14 rats received 1µg/kg ibandronate (iban) daily and 17 rats received 1 ml 0.9% sodium chloride (control) daily. Stress at failure and toughness of the tibial diaphysis were calculated following four-point bending tests. Results Uninjured cortical bone in the iban group had a significantly greater mean (standard deviation (sd)), p < 0.001, stress at failure of 219.2 MPa (sd 45.99) compared with the control group (169.46 MPa (sd 43.32)) following only nine weeks of therapy. Despite this, the cortical bone toughness and work to failure was similar. There was no significant difference in radiological density or physical dimensions of the cortical bone. Conclusions Iban therapy increases the stress at failure of uninjured cortical bone. This has relevance when normalising the strength of repair in a limb when comparing it with the unfractured limb. However, the 20% increase in stress at failure with iban therapy needs to be interpreted with caution as there was no corresponding increase in toughness or work to failure. Further research is required in this area, especially with the increasing clinical burden of low-energy diaphyseal femoral fractures following prolonged use of bisphosphonates. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:99–104 PMID:26062566

  16. Increased Resistance during Jump Exercise Does Not Enhance Cortical Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, Ramon D.; Swift, Joshua M.; Gasier, Heath G.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Hogan, Harry A.; Fluckey, James D.; Bloomfield, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study sought to elucidate the effects of a low- and high-load jump resistance exercise (RE) training protocol on cortical bone of the tibia and femur mid-diaphyses. METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 6-mos-old) were randomly assigned to high-load RE (HRE; n = 16), low-load RE (LRE; n = 15) or cage control (CC; n = 11) groups. Animals in the HRE and LRE groups performed 15 sessions of jump RE for 5 weeks. Load in the HRE group was progressively increased from 80g added to a weighted vest (50 repetitions) to 410g (16 repetitions). The LRE rats completed the same protocol as the HRE group (same number of repetitions) with only a 30g vest applied. RESULTS Low- and high-load jump RE resulted in 6–11% higher cortical bone mineral content (BMC) and cortical bone area compared to controls as determined by in vivo pQCT measurements. In the femur, however, only LRE demonstrated improvements in cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD; +11%) and cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI; +20%) versus CC group. Three-point bending to failure revealed a marked increase in tibial max force (25–29%), stiffness (19–22%), and energy to max force (35–55%), and a reduction in elastic modulus (−11–14%) in both LRE and HRE compared to controls. Dynamic histomorphometry assessed at the tibia mid-diaphysis determined that both LRE and HRE resulted in 20–30% higher periosteal mineralizing surface versus CC group. Mineral apposition rate (MAR) and bone formation rate (BFR) were significantly greater in LRE animals (27%, 39%) than in the HRE group. CONCLUSION These data demonstrate that jump training with minimal loading is equally, and sometimes more, effective at augmenting cortical bone integrity compared to overload training in skeletally mature rats. PMID:24743108

  17. Ultrashort pulse laser interactions with cortical bone tissue for applications in orthopaedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashforth, Simon A.; Simpson, M. C.; Bodley, Owen; Oosterbeek, Reece

    2015-03-01

    Using a femtosecond pulsed laser system (pulse width = 100fs, repetition rate = 1kHz, λ = 800nm), ablation threshold studies of freshly culled bovine and ovine cortical bone samples were identified using the diameter regression technique. Using the D2 technique, the ablation threshold was found to lie within a range of 0.83 - 0.96 Jcm-2 and 0.89 - 0.95 Jcm-2 for ovine and bovine cortical bone respectively indicating that laser ablation of bone is irrespective of target species. The relationship between cortical bone tissue removal and the number of applied pulses was explored. By altering the laser spot translation rate, we varied the number of pulses at each point along scribed linear cuts. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and PDMS casting indicates that cut depth is linearly dependent on the number of pulses applied to the tissue, irrespective of donor species. For single pulse ablation of ovine and bovine cortical bone, we determined that the ablation rates were 0.41 - 0.75 μm per pulse and 0.28 - 0.90 μm per pulse when pulses of fluences in the range 0.52 - 2.63 Jcm-2 were applied to ovine and bovine cortical bone tissue, respectively. Structural analysis of the ablation features using environmental scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy were utilized to assess the ablation features and identify signs of damage to surrounding tissue. We observed no structural indications of thermal shockwave cracking, molten debris deposition or charring of the tissue whilst leaving hydroxyapatite crystal structure intact.

  18. Experimental and numerical analysis of Izod impact test of cortical bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, A. A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-05-01

    Bones can only sustain loads until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Usually, the reasons for bone fracture are traumatic falls, sports injuries, and engagement in transport or industrial accidents. A proper treatment of bones and prevention of their fracture can be supported by in-depth understanding of deformation and fracture behavior of this tissue in such dynamic events. In this paper, a combination of experimental and numerical analysis was carried out in order to comprehend the fracture behavior of cortical bone tissue. Experimental tests were performed to study the transient dynamic behavior of cortical bone tissue under impact bending loading. The variability of absorbed energy for different cortex positions and notch depths was studied using Izod impact tests. Also, Extended Finite-Element Method implemented into the commercial finite-element software Abaqus was used to simulate the crack initiation and growth processes in a cantilever beam of cortical bone exposed to impact loading using the Izod loading scheme. The simulation results show a good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Histometric analyses of cancellous and cortical interface in autogenous bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Henrique Duque; Olate, Sergio; Klüppel, Leandro; do Carmo, Antonio Marcio Resende; Vásquez, Bélgica; Albergaria-Barbosa, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures involving the rehabilitation of the maxillofacial region frequently require bone grafts; the aim of this research was to evaluate the interface between recipient and graft with cortical or cancellous contact. 6 adult beagle dogs with 15 kg weight were included in the study. Under general anesthesia, an 8 mm diameter block was obtained from parietal bone of each animal and was put on the frontal bone with a 12 mm 1.5 screws. Was used the lag screw technique from better contact between the recipient and graft. 3-week and 6-week euthanized period were chosen for histometric evaluation. Hematoxylin-eosin was used in a histologic routine technique and histomorphometry was realized with IMAGEJ software. T test was used for data analyses with p<0.05 for statistical significance. The result show some differences in descriptive histology but non statistical differences in the interface between cortical or cancellous bone at 3 or 6 week; as natural, after 6 week of surgery, bone integration was better and statistically superior to 3-week analyses. We conclude that integration of cortical or cancellous bone can be usefully without differences. PMID:23923071

  20. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  1. Estrogen receptor-α signaling in osteoblast progenitors stimulates cortical bone accrual

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria; Iyer, Srividhya; Martin-Millan, Marta; Bartell, Shoshana M.; Han, Li; Ambrogini, Elena; Onal, Melda; Xiong, Jinhu; Weinstein, Robert S.; Jilka, Robert L.; O’Brien, Charles A.; Manolagas, Stavros C.

    2012-01-01

    The detection of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in osteoblasts and osteoclasts over 20 years ago suggested that direct effects of estrogens on both of these cell types are responsible for their beneficial effects on the skeleton, but the role of ERα in osteoblast lineage cells has remained elusive. In addition, estrogen activation of ERα in osteoclasts can only account for the protective effect of estrogens on the cancellous, but not the cortical, bone compartment that represents 80% of the entire skeleton. Here, we deleted ERα at different stages of differentiation in murine osteoblast lineage cells. We found that ERα in osteoblast progenitors expressing Osterix1 (Osx1) potentiates Wnt/β-catenin signaling, thereby increasing proliferation and differentiation of periosteal cells. Further, this signaling pathway was required for optimal cortical bone accrual at the periosteum in mice. Notably, this function did not require estrogens. The osteoblast progenitor ERα mediated a protective effect of estrogens against endocortical, but not cancellous, bone resorption. ERα in mature osteoblasts or osteocytes did not influence cancellous or cortical bone mass. Hence, the ERα in both osteoblast progenitors and osteoclasts functions to optimize bone mass but at distinct bone compartments and in response to different cues. PMID:23221342

  2. Can cone beam CT predict the hardness of interradicular cortical bone?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Orthodontic mini implants can be inserted at the interradicular site. The bone quality at this site may affect the stability and anchorage of the implant. Bone density is clinically evaluated by Hounsfield units (HU) obtained from cone beam CT (CBCT). The objective of this study was to determine the correlations between HU, microhardness and cortical bone thickness of interradicular site at various segments (anterior/posterior) and aspects (buccal/lingual) of both jaws in a swine model. Materials and methods Eight mandible and maxilla swine bones were scanned by CBCT. The HU and thickness of the above-mentioned sites were determined. Then, a Knoop microhardness test was applied and the Knoop Hardness Number was obtained (KHN). Results The mandible parameters spread over a wider range than the maxilla. The buccal aspect of the maxilla had higher HU and KHN values than the mandible. The lingual aspect of the mandible had higher KHN values than the maxilla. Posterior segments had higher HU and KHN values. The thickness of the alveolar cortical bone was greater in the maxilla than in the mandible. Correlations were found between HU and KHN for 3 of the 4 sites (anterior or posterior, buccal or lingual) of the mandible only. No correlations were found for the maxilla. Upon pooling the HU and KHN data for the whole jaw, correlation was found for the maxilla as well. Conclusions Relying on HU values as a predictor of cortical bone hardness should be considered with caution. PMID:24735746

  3. Histological analysis of the alterations on cortical bone channels network after radiotherapy: A rabbit study.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Gustavo Davi; Beletti, Marcelo Emílio; Dechichi, Paula

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy in cortical bone channels network. Fourteen rabbits were divided in two groups and test group received single dose of 15 Gy cobalt-60 radiation in tibia, bilaterally. The animals were sacrificed and a segment of tibia was removed and histologically processed. Histological images were taken and had their bone channels segmented and called regions of interest (ROI). Images were analyzed through developed algorithms using the SCILAB mathematical environment, getting percentage of bone matrix, ROI areas, ROI perimeters, their standard deviations and Lacunarity. The osteocytes and empty lacunae were also counted. Data were evaluated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann Whitney, and Student's t test (P < 0.05). Significant differences in bone matrix percentage, area and perimeters of the channels, their respective standard deviations and lacunarity were found between groups. In conclusion, the radiotherapy causes reduction of bone matrix and modifies the morphology of bone channels network. PMID:20169617

  4. The effects of immobilization on cortical bone in monkeys (M. nemestrina)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niklowitz, W. J.; Bunch, T. E.; Young, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Rhesus and pigtail monkeys were restrained for up to seven months in a hypogravic-hypodynamic environment for the purpose of studying the osteoporotic process and its reversibility, particularly in relation to humans. In vivo bending, radiography and tomography are among the techniques that were used. Bone deterioration within one month was detectable only in histological preparation, where resorption and subsequent cavity formation were demonstrated in addition to demineralization of the remaining hard tissue. Norland bone mineral analysis showed the greatest bone demineralization in the proximal tibia (23 percent to 31 percent after six months restraint), recovery did not even necessarily occur after 15 months. The largest bone stiffness decrease was 36 to 40 percent after a six months restraint; normal bending properties but not mineral content were restored after 8-1/2 months. Contrary to earlier studies, it is concluded that bone recovery, though a lengthy process, is possible: cortical bone in the tibia required 40 months.

  5. Ultrasonic wave velocity measurement in small polymeric and cortical bone specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohles, S. S.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1997-01-01

    A system was refined for the determination of the bulk ultrasonic wave propagation velocity in small cortical bone specimens. Longitudinal and shear wave propagations were measured using ceramic, piezoelectric 20 and 5 MHz transducers, respectively. Results of the pulse transmission technique were refined via the measurement of the system delay time. The precision and accuracy of the system were quantified using small specimens of polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene. These polymeric materials had known acoustic properties, similarity of propagation velocities to cortical bone, and minimal sample inhomogeneity. Dependence of longitudinal and transverse specimen dimensions upon propagation times was quantified. To confirm the consistency of longitudinal wave propagation in small cortical bone specimens (< 1.0 mm), cut-down specimens were prepared from a normal rat femur. Finally, cortical samples were prepared from each of ten normal rat femora, and Young's moduli (Eii), shear moduli (Gij), and Poisson ratios (Vij) were measured. For all specimens (bone, polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene), strong linear correlations (R2 > 0.997) were maintained between propagation time and distance throughout the size ranges down to less than 0.4 mm. Results for polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene were accurate to within 5 percent of reported literature values. Measurement repeatability (precision) improved with an increase in the wave transmission distance (propagating dimension). No statistically significant effect due to the transverse dimension was detected.

  6. Anisotropic mode-dependent damage of cortical bone using the extended finite element method (XFEM).

    PubMed

    Feerick, Emer M; Liu, Xiangyi Cheryl; McGarry, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Anisotropic damage initiation criteria were developed for extended finite element method (XFEM) prediction of crack initiation and propagation in cortical bone. This anisotropic damage model was shown to accurately predict the dependence of crack propagation patterns and fracture toughness on mode mixity and on osteon orientations, as observed experimentally. Four initiation criteria were developed to define crack trajectories relative to osteon orientations and max principal stress for single and mixed mode fracture. Alternate failure strengths for tensile and compressive loading were defined to simulate the asymmetric failure of cortical bone. The dependence of cortical bone elasticity and failure properties on osteon orientation is analogous to the dependence of composite properties on fibre orientation. Hence, three of the criteria developed in the present study were based upon the Hashin damage criteria. The fourth criterion developed was defined in terms of the max principal stress. This criterion initiated off axis crack growth perpendicular to the direction of the max principal stress. The unique set of parameters calibrated accurately predicted; (i) the relationship between fracture energy and osteon alignment, (ii) the alternate crack patterns for both varying osteon orientations and loading angle. Application of the developed anisotropic damage models to cortical bone screw pullout highlights the potential application for orthopaedic device design evaluation. PMID:23455165

  7. USE OF CORTICAL STRUCTURAL HOMOLOGOUS BONE GRAFT IN FEMORAL RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Milton Valdomiro; Roos, Bruno Dutra; Giora, Taís Stedile Busin; Taglietti, Thiago Martins

    2015-01-01

    To perform a clinical and radiographic assessment of patients undergoing surgical treatment using a cortical structural homologous bone graft for femoral reconstruction following mechanical failure of total hip arthroplasty and periprosthetic fractures. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 27 patients who underwent surgical treatment for femoral reconstruction following mechanical failure of total hip arthroplasty (12 cases) and periprosthetic fractures (15 cases), using a cortical structural homologous bone graft and cemented implants, between June 1999 and February 2008. Of these, 21 fulfilled all the criteria required for this study. The patients underwent pre and postoperative clinical assessments using the Harris Hip Score. Preoperative, immediate postoperative and late postoperative radiographs were also evaluated, with comparisons of fracture consolidation, radiographic signs of graft consolidation, changes to the bone stock and femoral bone quality, and femoral alignment. Results: Nine patients (42.9%) underwent femoral reconstruction following mechanical failure of total hip arthroplasty and 12 cases (57.1%) underwent femoral reconstruction following periprosthetic fracture. Regarding the postoperative clinical classification, the results were considered satisfactory in 85.7% of the cases and unsatisfactory in 14.3%. Radiographic signs of graft consolidation were seen in all cases. There was an increase in bone stock in 90.5% of the hip reconstructions, as measured by the cortical index. Furthermore, the changes to femoral bone quality were considered good in 66.7% of the cases. Conclusion: The use of cortical structural homologous bone grafts for both femoral reconstructive surgery on total hip arthroplasty and periprosthetic fractures is a good treatment option for selected cases, enabling satisfactory clinical and radiographic results. PMID:27026955

  8. Physical activity when young provides lifelong benefits to cortical bone size and strength in men

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Stuart J.; Mantila Roosa, Sara M.; Kersh, Mariana E.; Hurd, Andrea L.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Pandy, Marcus G.; Fuchs, Robyn K.

    2014-01-01

    The skeleton shows greatest plasticity to physical activity-related mechanical loads during youth but is more at risk for failure during aging. Do the skeletal benefits of physical activity during youth persist with aging? To address this question, we used a uniquely controlled cross-sectional study design in which we compared the throwing-to-nonthrowing arm differences in humeral diaphysis bone properties in professional baseball players at different stages of their careers (n = 103) with dominant-to-nondominant arm differences in controls (n = 94). Throwing-related physical activity introduced extreme loading to the humeral diaphysis and nearly doubled its strength. Once throwing activities ceased, the cortical bone mass, area, and thickness benefits of physical activity during youth were gradually lost because of greater medullary expansion and cortical trabecularization. However, half of the bone size (total cross-sectional area) and one-third of the bone strength (polar moment of inertia) benefits of throwing-related physical activity during youth were maintained lifelong. In players who continued throwing during aging, some cortical bone mass and more strength benefits of the physical activity during youth were maintained as a result of less medullary expansion and cortical trabecularization. These data indicate that the old adage of “use it or lose it” is not entirely applicable to the skeleton and that physical activity during youth should be encouraged for lifelong bone health, with the focus being optimization of bone size and strength rather than the current paradigm of increasing mass. The data also indicate that physical activity should be encouraged during aging to reduce skeletal structural decay. PMID:24706816

  9. Biomechanical properties of canine cortical bone allografts: effects of preparation and storage.

    PubMed

    Roe, S C; Pijanowski, G J; Johnson, A L

    1988-06-01

    The effects of various preparation and storage procedures and of different storage times on structural properties of canine cortical bone allografts were determined by evaluation of the compressive load to failure of a whole diaphyseal segment, the ability of a screw to resist being pulled from a cortical segment, and the torque required to strip the threads of a screw hole in a cortical segment. Preparation and storage procedures evaluated were sterile collection and storage at -20 C; ethylene oxide sterilization and storage at room temperature (22 C); chemical sterilization (methanol and chloroform, then iodoacetic acid) and storage at -20 C; and chemical sterilization, partial decalcification, and storage at -20 C. Storage times were 1, 16, and 32 weeks for each procedure. After 1 week of storage, aseptically collected frozen bone and ethylene oxide-sterilized bone had an increase, compared with matched controls, in load to failure in compression, but pullout load or screw-stripping torque did not change. Chemically sterilized bone had not changed after 1 week of storage, whereas chemically sterilized and partially decalcified bone had a 40% to 60% decrease in compressive load to failure, pullout load, and screw-stripping torque. Chemically sterilized and partially decalcified bone remained weak after 16 and 32 weeks of storage. Significant structural alterations were not detected in aseptically collected bone after 16 or 32 weeks of storage. Ethylene oxide-sterilized bone had a reduced pullout load after 32 weeks of storage. Chemically sterilized bone had significantly reduced compressive load to failure and pullout load after 16 and 32 weeks of storage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3041883

  10. GBR and autogenous cortical bone particulate by bone scraper for alveolar ridge augmentation: a 2-case report.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, Leonardo; Farina, Roberto; Marzola, Andrea; Itro, Angelo; Calura, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Scientific literature describes autogenous bone as the gold standard among graft materials for alveolar reconstructive procedures. Alveolar ridge augmentation has been clinically achieved with different forms of autogenous bone, including autogenous cortical bone particulate (ACBP). However, few histologic studies demonstrating the biologic potential and healing dynamics following the use of ACBP are currently available. This case report presents 2 patients in whom atrophic edentulous alveolar crests were submitted to a vertical/lateral ridge augmentation prior to implant placement. The technique was performed through the use of a titanium-reinforced expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membrane with an ACBP graft obtained from the retromolar region with a specially designed bone scraper. Bone biopsy specimens were harvested at 9 months after graft placement. Analysis of the reconstructed bone revealed bone with a lamellar quality characterized by a mature osteonic structure. Sparse particles of grafted bone were evident in direct contact with the regenerated bone. Marrow spaces showed a normal stromal component with limited grafted particles. PMID:18416419

  11. Characterization of the effects of x-ray irradiation on the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Holly; Zimmermann, Elizabeth; Schaible, Eric; Tang, Simon; Alliston, Tamara; Ritchie, Robert

    2011-08-19

    Bone comprises a complex structure of primarily collagen, hydroxyapatite and water, where each hierarchical structural level contributes to its strength, ductility and toughness. These properties, however, are degraded by irradiation, arising from medical therapy or bone-allograft sterilization. We provide here a mechanistic framework for how irradiation affects the nature and properties of human cortical bone over a range of characteristic (nano to macro) length-scales, following x-­ray exposures up to 630 kGy. Macroscopically, bone strength, ductility and fracture resistance are seen to be progressively degraded with increasing irradiation levels. At the micron-­scale, fracture properties, evaluated using in-situ scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography, provide mechanistic information on how cracks interact with the bone-matrix structure. At sub-micron scales, strength properties are evaluated with in-situ tensile tests in the synchrotron using small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction, where strains are simultaneously measured in the macroscopic tissue, collagen fibrils and mineral. Compared to healthy bone, results show that the fibrillar strain is decreased by ~40% following 70 kGy exposures, consistent with significant stiffening and degradation of the collagen. We attribute the irradiation-­induced deterioration in mechanical properties to mechanisms at multiple length-scales, including changes in crack paths at micron-­scales, loss of plasticity from suppressed fibrillar sliding at sub-­micron scales, and the loss and damage of collagen at the nano-­scales, the latter being assessed using Raman and Fourier-Transform-Infrared spectroscopy and a fluorometric assay.

  12. Characterization of the effects of x-ray irradiation on the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Holly D.; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Tang, Simon Y.; Alliston, Tamara; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    Bone comprises a complex structure of primarily collagen, hydroxyapatite and water, where each hierarchical structural level contributes to its strength, ductility and toughness. These properties, however, are degraded by irradiation, arising from medical therapy or bone-allograft sterilization. We provide here a mechanistic framework for how irradiation affects the nature and properties of human cortical bone over a range of characteristic (nano to macro) length-scales, following x-ray exposures up to 630 kGy. Macroscopically, bone strength, ductility and fracture resistance are seen to be progressively degraded with increasing irradiation levels. At the micron-scale, fracture properties, evaluated using insitu scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography, provide mechanistic information on how cracks interact with the bone-matrix structure. At sub-micron scales, strength properties are evaluated with insitu tensile tests in the synchrotron using small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction, where strains are simultaneously measured in the macroscopic tissue, collagen fibrils and mineral. Compared to healthy bone, results show that the fibrillar strain is decreased by ~40% following 70 kGy exposures, consistent with significant stiffening and degradation of the collagen. We attribute the irradiation-induced deterioration in mechanical properties to mechanisms at multiple length-scales, including changes in crack paths at micron-scales, loss of plasticity from suppressed fibrillar sliding at sub-micron scales, and the loss and damage of collagen at the nano-scales, the latter being assessed using Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and a fluorometric assay. PMID:21885114

  13. PTHrP regulates the modeling of cortical bone surfaces at fibrous insertion sites during growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meina; VanHouten, Joshua N; Nasiri, Ali R; Johnson, Randy L; Broadus, Arthur E

    2013-03-01

    The sites that receive ligament and tendon insertions (entheses) on the cortical surfaces of long bones are poorly understood, particularly regarding modeling and regulation. Entheses are classified as either fibrocartilaginous or fibrous based on their structures. Fibrous entheses typically insert into the metaphysis or diaphysis of a long bone, bear a periosteal component, and are modeled during long-bone growth. This modeling forms a root system by which the insertions attach to the cortical surface. In the case of the medial collateral ligament, modeling drives actual migration of the ligament along the cortical surface in order to accommodate linear growth, whereas in other sites modeling may excavate a deep cortical root system (eg, the teres major insertion) or a shallow root system with a large footprint (eg, the latissimus dorsi insertion). We report here that conditionally deleting parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in fibrous entheses via Scleraxis-Cre targeting causes modeling to fail in these three iterations of osteoclast-driven enthesis excavation or migration. These iterations appear to represent formes frustes of a common modeling strategy, presumably differing from each other as a consequence of differences in biomechanical control. In sites in which PTHrP is not induced, either physiologically or because of conditional deletion, modeling does not take place and fibrocartilage is induced. These findings represent the initial genetic evidence that PTHrP regulates periosteal/intramembranous bone cell activity on cortical bone surfaces and indicate that PTHrP serves as a load-induced modeling tool in fibrous insertion sites during linear growth. PMID:23109045

  14. PROGRESSIVE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE IN TENSION FOR TWO AGE GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S.; Roy, Anuradha; Reyes, Michael J.; Wang, Xiaodu

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of bone for post-yield energy dissipation decreases with age. To gain information on the cause of such changes, we examined the mechanical behavior of human cadaveric bone as a function of progressive deformation. In this study, tensile specimens from tibiae of 9 middle aged and 8 elderly donors were loaded till failure in an incremental and cyclic (load-dwell-unload-dwell-reload) scheme. The elastic modulus, maximum stress, permanent strain, stress relaxation, viscoelastic time constant, plastic strain energy, elastic release strain energy, and hysteresis energy were determined at incremental strains of each loading cycle. Experimental results showed that elderly bone failed at much lower strains compared to middle aged bone, but little age-related differences were observed in the mechanical behavior of bone until the premature failure of elderly bone. Energy dissipation and permanent strain appeared to linearly increase with increasing strain, while non-linear changes occurred in the modulus loss and stress relaxation/time constant with increasing strain. Such changes suggest that two distinct stages may exist in the progressive deformation of bone. In Stage I, rapid damage accumulation and increased involvement of collagen in load bearing appeared to dominate the mechanical behavior of bone with limited energy dissipation (<20% of total energy dissipated), whereas Stage II is dominated by continuous plastic deformation, accompanied by major energy dissipation through all three pathways till failure. This study suggests that damaging mechanisms in bone vary with deformation and age affects the post-yield mechanisms causing a significant decline in the capacity of aged bone to dissipate energy. PMID:18437693

  15. Collagen and mineral deposition in rabbit cortical bone during maturation and growth: effects on tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Hanna; Harjula, Terhi; Koistinen, Arto; Iivarinen, Jarkko; Seppänen, Kari; Arokoski, Jari P A; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J

    2010-12-01

    We characterized the composition and mechanical properties of cortical bone during maturation and growth and in adult life in the rabbit. We hypothesized that the collagen network develops earlier than the mineralized matrix. Growth was monitored, and the rabbits were euthanized at birth (newborn), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 18 months of age. The collagen network was assessed biochemically (collagen content, enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links) in specimens from the mid-diaphysis of the tibia and femur and biomechanically (tensile testing) from decalcified whole tibia specimens. The mineralized matrix was analyzed using pQCT and 3-point bend tests from intact femur specimens. The collagen content and the Young's modulus of the collagen matrix increased significantly until the rabbits were 3 months old, and thereafter remained stable. The amount of HP and LP collagen cross-links increased continuously from newborn to 18 months of age, whereas PEN cross-links increased after 6 months of age. Bone mineral density and the Young's modulus of the mineralized bone increased until the rabbits were at least 6 months old. We concluded that substantial changes take place during the normal process of development in both the biochemical and biomechanical properties of rabbit cortical bone. In cortical bone, the collagen network reaches its mature composition and mechanical strength prior to the mineralized matrix. PMID:20540098

  16. In situ observation of fracture behavior of canine cortical bone under bending.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zilan X; Xu, Zhi-Hui; An, Yuehuei H; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    Cortical bone provides many important body functions and maintains the rigidness and elasticity of bone. A common failure mode for bone structure is fracture under a bending force. In the current study, the fracture behavior of canine cortical bone under three-point bending was observed in situ using an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an optical microscope to examine the fracture process in detail. Nanoindentation was carried out to determine the elastic modulus and hardness of different building blocks of the canine cortical bone. The results have shown that the special structure of Haversian systems has significant effects on directing crack propagation. Although Haversian systems contain previously believed weak points, and micro-cracks initiate within Haversian systems, our findings have demonstrated that macro-cracks typically form around the boundaries of Haversian systems, i.e. the cement lines. Micro-cracks that developed inside Haversian systems have the functions of absorbing and dissipating energy and slow down on expanding when interstitial tissue cannot hold any more pressure, then plastic deformation and fracture occur. PMID:26952434

  17. Quantitative medical imaging: Initial studies of noncontact ultrasound applied to cortical bone phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halcrow, Peter William

    The purpose of this study was to take the initial steps towards applying Noncontact Ultrasound (NCU) to the in vivo monitoring of osteoporosis and to skeletal quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) using cortical bone phantoms. This project sought additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing third-degree burns. With this noncontact ultrasound imaging system, noncontact transducers and cortical bone phantoms with known bone mineral density (BMD) were used to determine speed of sound (SOS), integrated acoustical response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were used to collect data. Significant correlations between BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained. These NCU results were shown to be in agreement with results from contact ultrasound within 1-2%, which suggests that NCU might find additional applications in a clinical setting in the future in medical imaging.

  18. Internal strain gradients quantified in bone under load using high-energy X-ray scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, S.R.; Yuan, F.; Brinson, L.C.; Almer, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray scattering (>60 keV) allows noninvasive quantification of internal strains within bone. In this proof-of-principle study, wide angle X-ray scattering maps internal strain vs position in cortical bone (murine tibia, bovine femur) under compression, specifically using the response of the mineral phase of carbonated hydroxyapatite. The technique relies on the response of the carbonated hydroxyapatite unit cells and their Debye cones (from nanocrystals correctly oriented for diffraction) to applied stress. Unstressed, the Debye cones produce circular rings on the two-dimensional X-ray detector while applied stress deforms the rings to ellipses centered on the transmitted beam. Ring ellipticity is then converted to strain via standard methods. Strain is measured repeatedly, at each specimen location for each applied stress. Experimental strains from wide angle X-ray scattering and an attached strain gage show bending of the rat tibia and agree qualitatively with results of a simplified finite element model. At their greatest, the apatite-derived strains approach 2500 {micro}{var_epsilon} on one side of the tibia and are near zero on the other. Strains maps around a hole in the femoral bone block demonstrate the effect of the stress concentrator as loading increased and agree qualitatively with the finite element model. Experimentally, residual strains of approximately 2000 {micro}{var_epsilon} are present initially, and strain rises to approximately 4500 {micro}{var_epsilon} at 95 MPa applied stress (about 1000 {micro}{var_epsilon} above the strain in the surrounding material). The experimental data suggest uneven loading which is reproduced qualitatively with finite element modeling.

  19. Trabecular and cortical bone deficits are present in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Andrea; Schall, Joan; Stallings, Virginia A; Zemel, Babette S

    2016-09-01

    Osteopenia and increased fracture rates are well-recognized in adults with CF, but neither the specific contributions of cortical and trabecular bone deficits to bone fragility nor their presence in youth with CF are well-characterized. This study sought to characterize cortical and trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), geometry, and biomechanical competence in children with CF and determine their relationship to growth, body composition, and disease severity. Peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT) measures of total, cortical, and trabecular vBMD, cortical, muscle, and fat cross-sectional areas (CSA), periosteal and endosteal circumferences, and the polar unweighted section modulus (Zp) of the tibia were converted to age- and tibial length-adjusted Z-scores in 97 CF and 199 healthy children (aged 8-21y). Effects of body composition and pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1s, FEV1) upon pQCT outcomes were determined using linear regression. Children with CF (FEV1%-predicted: 84.4+19.7) had lower weight-, height-, BMI-, and whole body lean mass (LBM)-Z and tibial length. Females with CF had lower (p<0.01) total and trabecular vBMD; cortical, muscle, and fat CSA; Zp and periosteal circumference than females in the healthy reference group. These bone differences persisted after adjustment for BMI-Z and to a great extent following adjustment for muscle CSA. Males with CF had lower (p<0.01) cortical, muscle, and fat CSA and their trabecular vBMD deficit approached significance (p=0.069). Deficits were attenuated by adjustment for BMI-Z and to a greater extent adjustment for muscle CSA-Z. The relationship between FEV1%-predicted and pQCT outcomes persisted only in males following adjustment for age and BMI-Z. The CF cohort had lower tibial muscle CSA than expected for their LBM. In this relatively healthy, young CF cohort, deficits in trabecular and multiple cortical bone parameters were present. In females, deficits were greater

  20. Time Related Changes of Mineral and Collagen and Their Roles in Cortical Bone Mechanics of Ovariectomized Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Wu, Zi-Xiang; Zhang, Yang; Feng, Ya-Fei; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    As cortical bone has a hierarchical structure, the macroscopic bone strength may be affected by the alterations of mineral crystal and collagen, which are main components of cortical bone. Limited studies focused on the time related alterations of these two components in osteoporosis, and their contributions to bone mechanics at tissue level and whole-bone level. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the time related changes of mineral and collagen in cortical bone of ovariectomized (OVX) rabbits, and to relate these changes to cortical bone nanomechanics and macromechanics. 40 Rabbits (7-month-old) were randomly allocated into two groups (OVX and sham). OVX group received bilateral ovariectomy operation. Sham group received sham-OVX operation. Cortical bone quality of five rabbits in each group were assessed by DXA, μCT, nanoindentation, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and biomechanical tests (3-point bending of femoral midshaft) at pre-OVX, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after OVX. As time increased from pre-OVX to 8 weeks, the mineral to matrix ratio decreased with time, while both collagen crosslink ratio and crystallinity increased with time in OVX group. Elastic modulus and hardness measured by nanoindentation, whole-bone strength measured by biomechanical tests all decreased in OVX group with time. Bone material properties measured by FTIR correlated well with nano or whole-bone level mechanics. However, bone mineral density (BMD), structure, tissue-level and whole-bone mechanical properties did not change with age in sham group. Our study demonstrated that OVX could affect the tissue-level mechanics and bone strength of cortical bone. And this influence was attributed to the time related alterations of mineral and collagen properties, which may help us to design earlier interventions and more effective treatment strategies on osteoporosis. PMID:26046792

  1. Suppression of Autophagy in Osteocytes Does Not Modify the Adverse Effects of Glucocorticoids on Cortical Bone

    PubMed Central

    Piemontese, Marilina; Onal, Melda; Xiong, Jinhu; Wang, Yiying; Almeida, Maria; Thostenson, Jeff D.; Weinstein, Robert S.; Manolagas, Stavros C.; O’Brien, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid excess decreases bone mass and strength in part by acting directly on osteoblasts and osteocytes, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Macroautophagy (herein referred to as autophagy) is a lysosome-based recycling pathway that promotes the turnover of intracellular components and can promote cell function and survival under stressful conditions. Recent studies have shown that glucocorticoids stimulate autophagy in osteocytes, suggesting that autophagy may oppose the negative actions of glucocorticoids on this cell type. To address this possibility, we compared the impact of prednisolone administration on the skeletons of adult mice in which autophagy was suppressed in osteocytes, via deletion of Atg7 with a Dmp1-Cre transgene, to their control littermates. In control mice, prednisolone increased autophagic flux in osteocyte-enriched bone as measured by LC3 conversion, but this change did not occur in the mice lacking Atg7 in osteocytes. Nonetheless, prednisolone reduced femoral cortical thickness, increased cortical porosity, and reduced bone strength to similar extents in mice with and without autophagy in osteocytes. Prednisolone also suppressed osteoblast number and bone formation in the cancellous bone of control mice. As shown previously, Atg7 deletion in osteocytes reduced osteoblast number and bone formation in cancellous bone, but these parameters were not further reduced by prednisolone administration. In cortical bone, prednisolone elevated osteoclast number to a similar extent in both genotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that although glucocorticoids stimulate autophagy in osteocytes, suppression of autophagy in this cell type does not worsen the negative impact of glucocorticoids on the skeleton. PMID:25700544

  2. A mathematical model of cortical bone remodeling at cellular level under mechanical stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qing-Hua; Wang, Ya-Nan

    2012-12-01

    A bone cell population dynamics model for cortical bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus is developed in this paper. The external experiments extracted from the literature which have not been used in the creation of the model are used to test the validity of the model. Not only can the model compare reasonably well with these experimental results such as the increase percentage of final values of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone fracture energy (BFE) among different loading schemes (which proves the validity of the model), but also predict the realtime development pattern of BMC and BFE, as well as the dynamics of osteoblasts (OBA), osteoclasts (OCA), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) for each loading scheme, which can hardly be monitored through experiment. In conclusion, the model is the first of its kind that is able to provide an insight into the quantitative mechanism of bone remodeling at cellular level by which bone cells are activated by mechanical stimulus in order to start resorption/formation of bone mass. More importantly, this model has laid a solid foundation based on which future work such as systemic control theory analysis of bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus can be investigated. The to-be identified control mechanism will help to develop effective drugs and combined nonpharmacological therapies to combat bone loss pathologies. Also this deeper understanding of how mechanical forces quantitatively interact with skeletal tissue is essential for the generation of bone tissue for tissue replacement purposes in tissue engineering.

  3. Effects of Habitual Physical Activity and Fitness on Tibial Cortical Bone Mass, Structure and Mass Distribution in Pre-pubertal Boys and Girls: The Look Study.

    PubMed

    Duckham, Rachel L; Rantalainen, Timo; Ducher, Gaele; Hill, Briony; Telford, Richard D; Telford, Rohan M; Daly, Robin M

    2016-07-01

    Targeted weight-bearing activities during the pre-pubertal years can improve cortical bone mass, structure and distribution, but less is known about the influence of habitual physical activity (PA) and fitness. This study examined the effects of contrasting habitual PA and fitness levels on cortical bone density, geometry and mass distribution in pre-pubertal children. Boys (n = 241) and girls (n = 245) aged 7-9 years had a pQCT scan to measure tibial mid-shaft total, cortical and medullary area, cortical thickness, density, polar strength strain index (SSIpolar) and the mass/density distribution through the bone cortex (radial distribution divided into endo-, mid- and pericortical regions) and around the centre of mass (polar distribution). Four contrasting PA and fitness groups (inactive-unfit, inactive-fit, active-unfit, active-fit) were generated based on daily step counts (pedometer, 7-days) and fitness levels (20-m shuttle test and vertical jump) for boys and girls separately. Active-fit boys had 7.3-7.7 % greater cortical area and thickness compared to inactive-unfit boys (P < 0.05), which was largely due to a 6.4-7.8 % (P < 0.05) greater cortical mass in the posterior-lateral, medial and posterior-medial 66 % tibial regions. Cortical area was not significantly different across PA-fitness categories in girls, but active-fit girls had 6.1 % (P < 0.05) greater SSIpolar compared to inactive-fit girls, which was likely due to their 6.7 % (P < 0.05) greater total bone area. There was also a small region-specific cortical mass benefit in the posterior-medial 66 % tibia cortex in active-fit girls. Higher levels of habitual PA-fitness were associated with small regional-specific gains in 66 % tibial cortical bone mass in pre-pubertal children, particularly boys. PMID:26983726

  4. Effect of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bones in orchidectomized and/or sciatic neurectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun; Yeh, James K; Takeda, Tsuyoshi

    2003-04-01

    We examined the effect of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bones in orchidectomized and/or sciatic neurectomized rats. Ninety male Sprague-Dawley rats, 3 months of age, were randomized by stratified weight method into nine groups with 10 rats in each group: baseline control (BLC), age-matched intact control (IN), IN+vitamin K2 administration (K), orchidectomy (ORX), ORX+K, unilateral sciatic neurectomy (NX), NX+K, ORX+NX (ONX), and ONX+K. Vitamin K2 (menatetrenone) was administered orally twice a week at a dose of 30 mg/kg each. After 10 weeks of feeding, the tibial shaft and proximal tibia were processed for cortical and cancellous bone histomorphometric analyses, respectively. An ORX-induced reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain and ORX-induced cancellous bone loss were attributable to increased endocortical and trabecular bone turnover, respectively. NX- and ONX-induced reductions in maturation-related cortical bone gain were attributable to decreased periosteal bone formation and increased endocortical bone turnover, while NX- and ONX-induced cancellous bone loss was attributable to increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. ORX-induced cancellous bone loss was more pronounced when combined with immobilization. Vitamin K2 administration did not significantly alter any parameters in IN rats. Vitamin K2 administration in ORX rats suppressed endocortical bone resorption and trabecular bone turnover, retarding a reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain and cancellous bone loss. This effect on cancellous bone loss was primarily because of prevention of a reduction of trabecular thickness. Vitamin K2 administration in NX and ONX rats suppressed bone resorption and stimulated bone formation (mineralization), with retardation of a reduction of trabecular thickness without any significant effect on cancellous bone mass, and suppressed endocortical bone resorption, retarding a reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone demonstrate increased clonal incidence, potency, and developmental capacity compared to their bone marrow–derived counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Blashki, Daniel; Murphy, Matthew B; Ferrari, Mauro; Simmons, Paul J; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we show that matrix dense cortical bone is the more potent compartment of bone than bone marrow as a stromal source for mesenchymal stem cells as isolated from adult rats. Lineage-depleted cortical bone-mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated >150-fold enrichment of colony forming unit–fibroblasts per cell incidence. compared to lineage-depleted bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells, corresponding to a 70-fold increase in absolute recovered colony forming unit–fibroblasts. The composite phenotype Lin−/CD45−/CD31−/VLA-1+/Thy-1+ enriched for clonogenic mesenchymal stem cells solely from cortical bone–derived cells from which 70% of clones spontaneously differentiated into all lineages of bone, cartilage, and adipose. Both populations generated vascularized bone tissue within subcutaneous implanted collagen scaffolds; however, cortical bone–derived cells formed significantly more osteoid than bone marrow counterparts, quantified by histology. The data demonstrate that our isolation protocol identifies and validates mesenchymal stem cells with superior clonal, proliferative, and developmental potential from cortical bone compared to the bone marrow niche although marrow persists as the typical source for mesenchymal stem cells both in the literature and current pre-clinical therapies. PMID:27579159

  6. Spaceflight-relevant types of ionizing radiation and cortical bone: Potential LET effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Shane A. J.; Bandstra, Eric R.; Travis, Neil D.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Pecaut, Michael J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Willey, Jeffrey S.; Bateman, Ted A.

    2008-12-01

    Extended exposure to microgravity conditions results in significant bone loss. Coupled with radiation exposure, this phenomenon may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. In a previous study, we identified a profound and prolonged loss of trabecular bone (29-39%) in mice following exposure to an acute, 2 Gy dose of radiation simulating both solar and cosmic sources. However, because skeletal strength depends on trabecular and cortical bone, accurate assessment of strength requires analysis of both bone compartments. The objective of the present study was to examine various properties of cortical bone in mice following exposure to multiple types of spaceflight-relevant radiation. Nine-week old, female C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed 110 days after exposure to a single, whole body, 2 Gy dose of gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation. Femora were evaluated with biomechanical testing, microcomputed tomography, quantitative histomorphometry, percent mineral content, and micro-hardness analysis. Compared to non-irradiated controls, there were significant differences compared to carbon or iron radiation for only fracture force, medullary area and mineral content. A greater differential effect based on linear energy transfer (LET) level may be present: high-LET (carbon or iron) particle irradiation was associated with a decline in structural properties (maximum force, fracture force, medullary area, and cortical porosity) and mineral composition compared to low-LET radiation (gamma and proton). Bone loss following irradiation appears to be largely specific to trabecular bone and may indicate unique biological microenvironments and microdosimetry conditions. However, the limited time points examined and non-haversian skeletal structure of the mice employed highlight the need for further investigation.

  7. Spaceflight-relevant types of ionizing radiation and cortical bone: Potential LET effect?

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shane A J; Bandstra, Eric R; Travis, Neil D; Nelson, Gregory A; Bourland, J Daniel; Pecaut, Michael J; Gridley, Daila S; Willey, Jeffrey S; Bateman, Ted A

    2008-01-01

    Extended exposure to microgravity conditions results in significant bone loss. Coupled with radiation exposure, this phenomenon may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. In a previous study, we identified a profound and prolonged loss of trabecular bone (29-39%) in mice following exposure to an acute, 2 Gy dose of radiation simulating both solar and cosmic sources. However, because skeletal strength depends on trabecular and cortical bone, accurate assessment of strength requires analysis of both bone compartments. The objective of the present study was to examine various properties of cortical bone in mice following exposure to multiple types of spaceflight-relevant radiation. Nine-week old, female C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed 110 days after exposure to a single, whole body, 2 Gy dose of gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation. Femora were evaluated with biomechanical testing, microcomputed tomography, quantitative histomorphometry, percent mineral content, and micro-hardness analysis. Compared to non-irradiated controls, there were significant differences compared to carbon or iron radiation for only fracture force, medullary area and mineral content. A greater differential effect based on linear energy transfer (LET) level may be present: high-LET (carbon or iron) particle irradiation was associated with a decline in structural properties (maximum force, fracture force, medullary area, and cortical porosity) and mineral composition compared to low-LET radiation (gamma and proton). Bone loss following irradiation appears to be largely specific to trabecular bone and may indicate unique biological microenvironments and microdosimetry conditions. However, the limited time points examined and non-haversian skeletal structure of the mice employed highlight the need for further investigation. PMID:19122806

  8. Spaceflight-relevant types of ionizing radiation and cortical bone: Potential LET effect?

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane A.J.; Bandstra, Eric R.; Travis, Neil D.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Pecaut, Michael J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Willey, Jeffrey S.; Bateman, Ted A.

    2008-01-01

    Extended exposure to microgravity conditions results in significant bone loss. Coupled with radiation exposure, this phenomenon may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. In a previous study, we identified a profound and prolonged loss of trabecular bone (29−39%) in mice following exposure to an acute, 2 Gy dose of radiation simulating both solar and cosmic sources. However, because skeletal strength depends on trabecular and cortical bone, accurate assessment of strength requires analysis of both bone compartments. The objective of the present study was to examine various properties of cortical bone in mice following exposure to multiple types of spaceflight-relevant radiation. Nine-week old, female C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed 110 days after exposure to a single, whole body, 2 Gy dose of gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation. Femora were evaluated with biomechanical testing, microcomputed tomography, quantitative histomorphometry, percent mineral content, and micro-hardness analysis. Compared to non-irradiated controls, there were significant differences compared to carbon or iron radiation for only fracture force, medullary area and mineral content. A greater differential effect based on linear energy transfer (LET) level may be present: high-LET (carbon or iron) particle irradiation was associated with a decline in structural properties (maximum force, fracture force, medullary area, and cortical porosity) and mineral composition compared to low-LET radiation (gamma and proton). Bone loss following irradiation appears to be largely specific to trabecular bone and may indicate unique biological microenvironments and microdosimetry conditions. However, the limited time points examined and non-haversian skeletal structure of the mice employed highlight the need for further investigation. PMID:19122806

  9. A morphometric and biomechanic comparison of titanium implants inserted in rabbit cortical and cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Sennerby, L; Thomsen, P; Ericson, L E

    1992-01-01

    The removal torques for screw-shaped pure titanium implants inserted in rabbit tibia and the femoral part of the knee joint and the tissue response to these implants, as quantitated with light microscopic morphometry on ground sections, were compared after 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. The bone surrounding the femoral intra-articular implants was mostly cancellous, while cortical bone was formed around the tibial implants. The torque needed to remove the intra-articular implants increased with time, but there was no such increase for the tibial implants. At 6 weeks, significantly less torque was needed to remove the intra-articular implants in spite of the fact that significantly more bone was found in the threads of these implants as compared with the tibial implants. When calculating the amount of bone in threads situated in the cortical and subchondral passage, more was found in the threads of the tibial implants, which corresponded to the higher removal torque. Additional light microscopic observations on implants unscrewed after 12 months in rabbit tibia indicated that rupture occurred between the implant surface and calcified bone. Findings indicate that the resistance to unscrewing is dependent on the amount of compact bone surrounding a titanium implant. PMID:1398826

  10. Orientation and size-dependent mechanical modulation within individual secondary osteons in cortical bone tissue

    PubMed Central

    Carnelli, Davide; Vena, Pasquale; Dao, Ming; Ortiz, Christine; Contro, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Anisotropy is one of the most peculiar aspects of cortical bone mechanics; however, its anisotropic mechanical behaviour should be treated only with strict relationship to the length scale of investigation. In this study, we focus on quantifying the orientation and size dependence of the spatial mechanical modulation in individual secondary osteons of bovine cortical bone using nanoindentation. Tests were performed on the same osteonal structure in the axial (along the long bone axis) and transverse (normal to the long bone axis) directions along arrays going radially out from the Haversian canal at four different maximum depths on three secondary osteons. Results clearly show a periodic pattern of stiffness with spatial distance across the osteon. The effect of length scale on lamellar bone anisotropy and the critical length at which homogenization of the mechanical properties occurs were determined. Further, a laminate-composite-based analytical model was applied to the stiffness trends obtained at the highest spatial resolution to evaluate the elastic constants for a sub-layer of mineralized collagen fibrils within an osteonal lamella on the basis of the spatial arrangement of the fibrils. The hierarchical arrangement of lamellar bone is found to be a major determinant for modulation of mechanical properties and anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the tissue. PMID:23389895

  11. Anisotropy of Longitudinal Wave Velocity and Hydroxyapatite Orientation in Bovine Cortical Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaoi, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Kazufumi; Nakatsuji, Tomohiro; Yanagitani, Takahiko; Matsukawa, Mami; Yamazaki, Kaoru; Nagano, Akira

    2009-07-01

    The anisotropy of longitudinal wave velocity and the hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystallite orientation in bovine cortical bone were experimentally investigated in detail. A ring-shaped cortical bone sample was obtained from the midshaft of a 32-month-old bovine femur. Four cylindrical specimens (diameter 11 mm) were taken from the ring-shaped cortical bone specimen along the radial direction. Velocity was measured by a conventional ultrasonic pulse system, by rotating the specimen in the axial-tangential plane. The direction of the fastest wave velocity observed was inclined 5-10° from the axial direction. The HAp crystallite orientation in the specimen was also investigated by X-ray diffraction pole-figure analysis. We observed a strong intensive peak of (0002), indicating HAp crystallite c-axis alignment along the bone axis. However, the pole-figure also revealed a small tilt in the HAp crystallite orientation from the axial direction. Comparing the velocity and X-ray diffraction peak at each angle of the axial-tangential plane, a significant correlation between the velocity and the HAp orientation was observed.

  12. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, I. V.; Belev, G.; Zhu, N.; Chapman, L. D.; Cooper, D. M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling.

  13. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pratt, I V; Belev, G; Zhu, N; Chapman, L D; Cooper, D M L

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling. PMID:25489926

  14. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P < 0.05) in longitudinal bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the processes regulating new collagen accretion, bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  15. Modalities for Visualization of Cortical Bone Remodeling: The Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Kimberly D.; Cooper, David M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bone’s ability to respond to load-related phenomena and repair microdamage is achieved through the remodeling process, which renews bone by activating groups of cells known as basic multicellular units (BMUs). The products of BMUs, secondary osteons, have been extensively studied via classic two-dimensional techniques, which have provided a wealth of information on how histomorphology relates to skeletal structure and function. Remodeling is critical in maintaining healthy bone tissue; however, in osteoporotic bone, imbalanced resorption results in increased bone fragility and fracture. With increasing life expectancy, such degenerative bone diseases are a growing concern. The three-dimensional (3D) morphology of BMUs and their correlation to function, however, are not well-characterized and little is known about the specific mechanisms that initiate and regulate their activity within cortical bone. We believe a key limitation has been the lack of 3D information about BMU morphology and activity. Thus, this paper reviews methodologies for 3D investigation of cortical bone remodeling and, specifically, structures associated with BMU activity (resorption spaces) and the structures they create (secondary osteons), spanning from histology to modern ex vivo imaging modalities, culminating with the growing potential of in vivo imaging. This collection of papers focuses on the theme of “putting the ‘why’ back into bone architecture.” Remodeling is one of two mechanisms “how” bone structure is dynamically modified and thus an improved 3D understanding of this fundamental process is crucial to ultimately understanding the “why.” PMID:26322017

  16. Relating crack-tip deformation to mineralization and fracture resistance in human femur cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwai S; Chan, Candace K; Nicolella, Daniel P

    2009-09-01

    The risk of bone fracture increases with age because of a variety of factors that include, among others, decreasing bone quantity and quality. Despite recent advances, the roles of bone microstructure and trace mineralization in the fracture process are not well understood. In this study, we utilize a combination of in-situ fracture toughness testing, digital strain mapping, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques to characterize the near-tip strain field, fracture toughness, and chemical elements on the fracture surface of bone specimens from donors of two ages (48-year-old and 78-year-old females). We show that age-related embrittlement of bone fracture is associated with higher near-tip strains by lamellar shear and crack deflection at lamellar interfaces in the young bone and their absence in the old bone. The different near-tip deformation behaviors may be associated with the presence of Si and Zn in the young bone but more Ca and P and the lack of Si and Zn in the old bone. PMID:19497396

  17. Toughness and damage susceptibility in human cortical bone is proportional to mechanical inhomogeneity at the osteonal-level.

    PubMed

    Katsamenis, Orestis L; Jenkins, Thomas; Thurner, Philipp J

    2015-07-01

    Limitations associated with current clinical fracture risk assessment tools highlight the need for increased understanding of the fracture mechanisms of the bone and, ideally, a means of assessing this in vivo. Being a multi-layered hierarchical structure, the overall properties of the bone are dictated by its structural and compositional properties over multiple length scales. In this study, we investigate the osteonal-, micro- and tissue-level mechanical behaviour of cortical bone tissue samples from young and elderly donors through atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever-based nanoindentation, reference point microindentation (RPI) and fracture toughness experiments respectively. We demonstrate that bone's fracture toughness and crack growth resistance at the tissue-level are significantly correlated to damage susceptibility at the micro-level, and mechanical inhomogeneity between lamellae and interlamellar areas at the osteonal-level. In more detail, reduced nanoelasticity inhomogeneity of lamellar/interlamellar layers within the osteons correlated to increased indentation depth at the micro-level and an overall reduction in crack-growth toughness and fracture toughness of the tissue. Our data also suggest that deterioration of bone's mechanical properties is expressed concurrently at these three levels, and that mechanical inhomogeneity between the principal structural units of the cortical tissue holds a key role on bone's toughness behaviour. We hypothesise that the reduction in nanoelasticity inhomogeneity is--at least to some extent--responsible for the inability of the microstructure to effectively adapt to the applied load, e.g. by redistributing strains, in a non-catastrophic manner preventing damage formation and propagation. Our hypothesis is further supported by synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SRμCT) data, which show that failure of tougher bone specimens is governed by increased deflection of the crack path and broadly spread

  18. Interfacial fracture toughness between bovine cortical bone and cements.

    PubMed

    Lucksanasombool, P; Higgs, W A J; Higgs, R J E D; Swain, M V

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the bonding strength of the interfaces within the cemented arthroplasty system, various mechanical tests have been used. Conventional push-out and pull-out tests cannot reveal the actual bonding property of the interface because of the significant influence of surface roughness on the measured adhesion and the failure to account for the mismatch of elastic modulus across the interface. An alternative fracture mechanics approach, which considers the mix of opening and shear modes of the crack tip loading associated with the testing system and the elastic mismatch of materials across the interface, was used to evaluate the bonding ability of various cements. The four-point bend interfacial delamination test by Charalambides et al. (J. Appl. Mech. 56 (1989) 77; Mech. Mater. 8 (1990) 269) was used to quantify the bonding ability of cements. This method is arguably more suitable since the applied loading mode is comparable to the nature of loading within the prosthetic system, which is primarily bending. The bovine bone specimens were polished to mirror finish to eliminate bonding by mechanical interlocking. The results revealed minimal bonding for the conventional bone cement (PMMA) whereas substantial bonding was evident for the glass-ionomer cements tested. However, only the conventional glass-ionomer cements showed evidence of bonding on testing, while the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (poly-HEMA) did not. The latter appeared to debond before testing because of excessive expansion stresses associated with swelling in water. PMID:12527256

  19. Solid-State Quantitative (1)H and (31)P MRI of Cortical Bone in Humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Wehrli, Felix W

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a pivotal role for assessment of the musculoskeletal system. It is currently the clinical modality of choice for evaluation of soft tissues including cartilage, ligaments, tendons, muscle, and bone marrow. By comparison, the study of calcified tissue by MRI is still in its infancy. In this article, we review the potential of the modality for assessment of cortical bone properties known to be affected in degenerative bone disease, with focus on parameters related to matrix and mineral densities, and porosity, by means of emerging solid-state (1)H and (31)P MRI techniques. In contrast to soft tissues, the MRI signal in calcified tissues has very short lifetime, on the order of 100 μs to a few milliseconds, demanding customized imaging approaches that allow capture of the signal almost immediately after excitation. The technologies described are suited for quantitatively imaging human cortical bone in specimens as well as in vivo in patients on standard clinical imagers, yielding either concentrations in absolute units when measured against a reference standard, or more simply, in the form of surrogate biomarkers. The two major water fractions in cortical bone are those of collagen-bound and pore water occurring at an approximately 3:1 ratio. Collagen-bound water density provides a direct quantitative measure of osteoid density. While at an earlier stage of development, quantification of mineral phosphorus by (31)P MRI yields mineral density and, together with knowledge of matrix density, should allow quantification of the degree of bone mineralization. PMID:27048472

  20. Pore network microarchitecture influences human cortical bone elasticity during growth and aging.

    PubMed

    Bala, Yohann; Lefèvre, Emmanuelle; Roux, Jean-Paul; Baron, Cécile; Lasaygues, Philippe; Pithioux, Martine; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Follet, Hélène

    2016-10-01

    Cortical porosity is a major determinant of bone strength. Haversian and Volkmann׳s canals are׳seen' as pores in 2D cross-section but fashion a dynamic network of interconnected channels in 3D, a quantifiable footprint of intracortical remodeling. Given the changes in bone remodeling across life, we hypothesized that the 3D microarchitecture of the cortical pore network influences its stiffness during growth and ageing. Cubes of cortical bone of 2 mm side-length were harvested in the distal 1/3 of the fibula in 13 growing children (mean age±SD: 13±4 yrs) and 16 adults (age: 75±13 yrs). The cubes were imaged using desktop micro-CT (8.14µm isotropic voxel size). Pores were segmented as a solid to assess pore volume fraction, number, diameter, separation, connectivity and structure model index. Elastic coefficients were derived from measurements of ultrasonic bulk compression and shear wave velocities and apparent mass density. The pore volume fraction did not significantly differ between children and adults but originates from different microarchitectural patterns. Compared to children, adults had 42% (p=0.033) higher pore number that were more connected (Connective Density: +205%, p=0.001) with a 18% (p=0.007) lower pore separation. After accounting for the contribution of pore volume fraction, axial elasticity in traction-compression mode was significantly correlated with better connectivity in growing children and with pore separation among adults. The changes in intracortical remodeling across life alter the distribution, size and connectedness of the channels from which cortical void fraction originates. These alterations in pore network microarchitecture participate in changes in compressive and shear mechanical behavior, partly in a porosity-independent manner. The assessment of pore volume fraction (i.e., porosity) provides only a limited understanding of the role of cortical void volume fraction in its mechanical properties. PMID:27389322

  1. Stochastic multiscale modelling of cortical bone elasticity based on high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Vittorio; Gagliardi, Davide; Desceliers, Christophe; Bousson, Valérie; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Peyrin, Françoise; Haïat, Guillaume; Naili, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Accurate and reliable assessment of bone quality requires predictive methods which could probe bone microstructure and provide information on bone mechanical properties. Multiscale modelling and simulation represent a fast and powerful way to predict bone mechanical properties based on experimental information on bone microstructure as obtained through X-ray-based methods. However, technical limitations of experimental devices used to inspect bone microstructure may produce blurry data, especially in in vivo conditions. Uncertainties affecting the experimental data (input) may question the reliability of the results predicted by the model (output). Since input data are uncertain, deterministic approaches are limited and new modelling paradigms are required. In this paper, a novel stochastic multiscale model is developed to estimate the elastic properties of bone while taking into account uncertainties on bone composition. Effective elastic properties of cortical bone tissue were computed using a multiscale model based on continuum micromechanics. Volume fractions of bone components (collagen, mineral, and water) were considered as random variables whose probabilistic description was built using the maximum entropy principle. The relevance of this approach was proved by analysing a human bone sample taken from the inferior femoral neck. The sample was imaged using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography. 3-D distributions of Haversian porosity and tissue mineral density extracted from these images supplied the experimental information needed to build the stochastic models of the volume fractions. Thus, the stochastic multiscale model provided reliable statistical information (such as mean values and confidence intervals) on bone elastic properties at the tissue scale. Moreover, the existence of a simpler "nominal model", accounting for the main features of the stochastic model, was investigated. It was shown that such a model does exist, and its relevance

  2. Micropillar fabrication on bovine cortical bone by direct-write femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yong C.; Altman, Katrina J.; Farson, Dave F.; Flores, Katharine M.

    2009-11-01

    We investigated fabrication of cylindrical micropillars on bovine cortical bone using direct-write femtosecond laser ablation. The ablation threshold of the material was measured by single-pulse ablation tests, and the incubation coefficient was measured from linear scanned ablation tests. A motion system was programmed to apply multiple layers of concentric rings of pulses to machine pillars of various diameters and heights. The diameter of the top surface of the pillar was found to steadily decrease due to incubation of damage from successive layers of pulses during the machining process. Pillar top diameter was predicted based on a paraxial beam fluence approximation and single-pulse ablation threshold and incubation coefficient measurements. Pillar diameters predicted as successive layers of pulses were applied were well-matched to experiments, confirming that femtosecond laser ablation of the cortical bone was well-modeled by single-pulse ablation threshold measurements and an incubation coefficient.

  3. The binding of calcium and yttrium ions to a glycoprotein from bovine cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. A.; Peacocke, A. R.

    1967-01-01

    The binding of Ca2+ and Y3+ to an acidic glycoprotein from bovine cortical bone, bone sialoprotein, was determined from the titration curves at I 0·2 in the presence and absence of the cations. The binding of Y3+ was greater than that of Ca2+. The value for the association constant, k, for the interaction with Y3+ increased with pH, from log k 2·93 at pH3·4 to log k 3·50 at pH4·4, and the number of binding sites/mol. increased from 4·6 at pH3·4 to 9·1 at pH4·4. It is proposed that the binding site consists of three carboxyl groups, but it is likely that the binding is a strong electrostatic interaction rather than a co-ordination linkage. A chondroitin sulphate–protein complex also extracted from bovine cortical bone interacted with Y3+ and Ca2+ to a similar extent as did bone sialoprotein. It is suggested that these materials are present in bone at the resting and resorbing surfaces and that they contribute to the deposition of yttrium, americium and plutonium at these sites. PMID:16742544

  4. Influence of tool geometry on drilling performance of cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; Frühwirt, C; Kment, C

    2013-08-01

    Minimally invasive surgery poses high demands on tool design. The goal was to measure the influence of drill bit geometry on maximum thrust forces required for drilling, and compare this relative to the known influence of feed rate and bone composition. Blind holes were drilled perpendicular to the iliac crest up to 10 mm depth in cadaveric pelvic bones of 20 pigs (adolescent) and 11 goats (full grown) with eight substantially different drill bits of ∅ 3-3.2 mm. Subsequently, boreholes were drilled perpendicular to the ilium with the same drill bits at three different feed rates (0.58 mm/s, 0.83 mm/s, 1.08 mm/s). The mean maximum thrust force ranges from 10 to 110 N for cortical bone, and from 3 to 65 N for trabecular bone. The results show that both drill bit geometry and feed rate have a significant influence on the maximum thrust forces, with a dominant influence of drill bit geometry in terms of shape of the flutes, sharpness of cutting edges and value of point angle. The differences in thrust forces between cortical and trabecular bone are substantial for all measured conditions. The measured values can be used for drill design. PMID:23298783

  5. Variability in reference point microindentation and recommendations for testing cortical bone: location, thickness and orientation heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Coutts, L V; Jenkins, T; Li, T; Dunlop, D G; Oreffo, R O C; Cooper, C; Harvey, N C; Thurner, P J

    2015-06-01

    Reference Point Indentation (RPI) has been proposed as a new clinical tool to aid the diagnosis of Osteoporosis. This study has examined the performance of the tool within entire femurs to improve the understanding of the mechanical properties of bone and also to guide future RPI testing to optimize repeatability of results obtained using the technique. Human, bovine, porcine and rat femurs were indented along three longitudinal axes: anterior and posterior: medial and lateral as well as around the circumference of the femoral head and neck. Cortical and subchondral bone thickness was measured using CT and radiography. The study shows that in some samples, bone is too thin to support the high loads applied with the technique and in these cases, RPI values are highly influenced by thickness. The technique will be useful in the mid-shaft region where cortical thickness is greatest, providing previously established guidelines are followed to optimize measurement repeatability, including performing multiple measurements per sample and investigating multiple samples. The study has also provided evidence that RPI values vary significantly with test site, hence mechanical properties should not be inferred from RPI findings alone away from the test site, even within the same bone. In conclusion, RPI appears to be a useful tool for scientific investigation; however further work is required to examine the feasibility of using RPI for assessing differences between healthy and diseased bone in a clinical setting. PMID:25837158

  6. Effect of Aging on the Toughness of Human Cortical Bone: Evaluation by R-Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J

    2004-10-08

    Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties of bone, coupled with increased life expectancy, are responsible for increasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly, and hence, an understanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age is essential. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments to quantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughness properties of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Because cortical bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crack extension, unlike most previous studies the toughness is evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone taken from wide range of age groups (34-99 years). Using this approach, both the ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determined and are found to deteriorate with age; the initiation toughness decreases some 40% over six decades from 40 to 100 years, while the growth toughness is effectively eliminated over the same age range. The reduction in crack-growth toughness is considered to be associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular involving crack bridging in the wake of the crack.

  7. The Effect of Osteoporosis Treatments on Fatigue Properties of Cortical Bone Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Garry R.; Chen, Julia T.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; MacLeay, Jennifer; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Boskey, Adele L.; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are commonly prescribed for treatment of osteoporosis. Long-term use of bisphosphonates has been correlated to atypical femoral fractures (AFF). AFFs arise from fatigue damage to bone tissue that cannot be repaired due to pharmacologic treatments. Despite fatigue being the primary damage mechanism of AFFs, the effects of osteoporosis treatments on fatigue properties of cortical bone are unknown. To examine if fatigue-life differences occur in bone tissue after different pharmacologic treatments for osteoporosis, we tested bone tissue from the femurs of sheep given a metabolic acidosis diet to induce osteoporosis, followed by treatment with a selective estrogen reception modulator (raloxifene), a bisphosphonate (alendronate or zoledronate), or parathyroid hormone (teriparatide, PTH). Beams of cortical bone tissue were created and tested in four-point bending fatigue to failure. Tissues treated with alendronate had reduced fatigue life and less modulus loss at failure compared to other treatments, while tissue treated with PTH had a prolonged fatigue life. No loss of fatigue life occurred with zoledronate treatment despite its greater binding affinity and potency compared to alendronate. Tissue mineralization measured by microCT did not explain the differences seen in fatigue behavior. Increased fatigue life with PTH suggests that current treatment methods for AFF could have beneficial effects for restoring fatigue life. These results indicate that fatigue life differs with each type of osteoporosis treatment. PMID:25642445

  8. [Structure and solidity of new bone in a cortical gliding hole by implanted leg screw (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hutzschenreuter, P; Claes, L

    1976-07-23

    Leg screws were implanted in 30 tibia diaphysis. 112 days later in the gliding hole there was new lamellar bone round of the screw head, neck of screw and into the both first screw threads. After screw explantation we measured in 8 cases the solidity of the new bone. Under conditions of tension measurement, we use 341 N per millimeter cortical thread surfaces to put out all new bone from the gliding hole. The results of these tension measurements were cylindric fragments. The remodelling into the gliding hole seems to be the results of static stress and dynamic compensation for reaching a defect in living cortical bone. PMID:962685

  9. The resistance of cortical bone tissue to failure under cyclic loading is reduced with alendronate.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Devendra; Geissler, Joseph R; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B; Fritton, J C

    2014-07-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most prescribed preventative treatment for osteoporosis. However, their long-term use has recently been associated with atypical fractures of cortical bone in patients who present with low-energy induced breaks of unclear pathophysiology. The effects of bisphosphonates on the mechanical properties of cortical bone have been exclusively studied under simple, monotonic, quasi-static loading. This study examined the cyclic fatigue properties of bisphosphonate-treated cortical bone at a level in which tissue damage initiates and is accumulated prior to frank fracture in low-energy situations. Physiologically relevant, dynamic, 4-point bending applied to beams (1.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 10 mm) machined from dog rib (n=12/group) demonstrated mechanical failure and micro-architectural features that were dependent on drug dose (3 groups: 0, 0.2, 1.0mg/kg/day; alendronate [ALN] for 3 years) with cortical bone tissue elastic modulus (initial cycles of loading) reduced by 21% (p<0.001) and fatigue life (number of cycles to failure) reduced in a stress-life approach by greater than 3-fold with ALN1.0 (p<0.05). While not affecting the number of osteons, ALN treatment reduced other features associated with bone remodeling, such as the size of osteons (-14%; ALN1.0: 10.5±1.8, VEH: 12.2±1.6, ×10(3) μm2; p<0.01) and the density of osteocyte lacunae (-20%; ALN1.0: 11.4±3.3, VEH: 14.3±3.6, ×10(2) #/mm2; p<0.05). Furthermore, the osteocyte lacunar density was directly proportional to initial elastic modulus when the groups were pooled (R=0.54, p<0.01). These findings suggest that the structural components normally contributing to healthy cortical bone tissue are altered by high-dose ALN treatment and contribute to reduced mechanical properties under cyclic loading conditions. PMID:24704262

  10. The Resistance of Cortical Bone Tissue to Failure under Cyclic Loading is Reduced with Alendronate

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Devendra; Geissler, Joseph R.; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.; Fritton, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most prescribed preventative treatment for osteoporosis. However, their long-term use has recently been associated with atypical fractures of cortical bone in patients who present with low-energy induced breaks of unclear pathophysiology. The effects of bisphosphonates on the mechanical properties of cortical bone have been exclusively studied under simple, monotonic, quasi-static loading. This study examined the cyclic fatigue properties of bisphosphonate-treated cortical bone at a level in which tissue damage initiates and is accumulated prior to frank fracture in low-energy situations. Physiologically relevant, dynamic, 4-point bending applied to beams (1.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 10 mm) machined from dog rib (n=12/group) demonstrated mechanical failure and micro-architectural features that were dependent on drug dose (3 groups: 0, 0.2, 1.0 mg/kg/day; Alendronate [ALN] for 3 years) with cortical bone tissue elastic modulus (initial cycles of loading) reduced by 21% (p<0.001) and fatigue life (number of cycles to failure) reduced in a stress-life approach by greater than 3-fold with ALN1.0 (p<0.05). While not affecting the number of osteons, ALN treatment reduced other features associated with bone remodeling, such as the size of osteons (−14%, ALN1.0: 10.5±1.8, VEH: 12.2±1.6, ×103 µm2; p<0.01) and the density of osteocyte lacunae (−20%; ALN1.0: 11.4±3.3, VEH: 14.3±3.6, ×102 #/mm2; p<0.05). Furthermore, the osteocyte lacunar density was directly proportional to initial elastic modulus when the groups were pooled (R=0.54, p<0.01). These findings suggest that the structural components normally contributing to healthy cortical bone tissue are altered by high-dose ALN treatment and contribute to reduced mechanical properties under cyclic loading conditions. PMID:24704262

  11. Lattice strains and load partitioning in bovine trabecular bone.

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, R.; Daymond, M. R.; Almer, J. D.; Mummery, P. M.

    2012-02-01

    Microdamage and failure mechanisms have been well characterized in bovine trabecular bone. However, little is known about how elastic strains develop in the apatite crystals of the trabecular struts and their relationship with different deformation mechanisms. In this study, wide-angle high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used to determine bulk elastic strains under in situ compression. Dehydrated bone is compared to hydrated bone in terms of their response to load. During compression, load is initially borne by trabeculae aligned parallel to loading direction with non-parallel trabeculae deforming by bending. Ineffective load partitioning is noted in dehydrated bone whereas hydrated bone behaves like a plastically yielding foam

  12. Bone marrow ablation demonstrates that excess endogenous parathyroid hormone plays distinct roles in trabecular and cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Sun, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2012-07-01

    Mice null for Cyp27b1, which encodes the 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase [1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice], lack 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D] and have hypocalcemia and high parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. Intermittent, exogenous PTH is anabolic for bone. To determine the effect of the chronic excess endogenous PTH on osteogenesis and bone turnover, bone marrow ablations (BMX) were performed in tibiae and femurs of 6-week-old 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice and in wild-type (WT) controls. Newly formed bone tissue was analyzed at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after BMX. BMX did not alter the higher levels of PTH in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice. In the marrow cavity, trabecular volume, osteoblast number, alkaline phosphatase-positive areas, type I collagen-positive areas, bone formation-related genes, and protein expression levels all increased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. Osteoclast numbers and surface and ratio of RANKL/OPG-relative mRNA levels decreased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. In the cortex, alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and osteoclast numbers increased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. These results demonstrate that chronic excess endogenous PTH exerts an anabolic role in trabecular bone by stimulating osteogenic cells and reducing bone resorption, but plays a catabolic role in cortical bone by enhancing bone turnover with an increase in resorption. PMID:22640808

  13. Automated classification of mandibular cortical bone on dental panoramic radiographs for early detection of osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiba, Kazuki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Fukui, Tatsumasa; Hara, Takeshi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Findings on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) have shown that mandibular cortical index (MCI) based on the morphology of mandibular inferior cortex was significantly correlated with osteoporosis. MCI on DPRs can be categorized into one of three groups and has the high potential for identifying patients with osteoporosis. However, most DPRs are used only for diagnosing dental conditions by dentists in their routine clinical work. Moreover, MCI is not generally quantified but assessed subjectively. In this study, we investigated a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that automatically classifies mandibular cortical bone for detection of osteoporotic patients at early stage. First, an inferior border of mandibular bone was detected by use of an active contour method. Second, regions of interest including the cortical bone are extracted and analyzed for its thickness and roughness. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) differentiate cases into three MCI categories by features including the thickness and roughness. Ninety eight DPRs were used to evaluate our proposed scheme. The number of cases classified to Class I, II, and III by a dental radiologist are 56, 25 and 17 cases, respectively. Experimental result based on the leave-one-out cross-validation evaluation showed that the sensitivities for the classes I, II, and III were 94.6%, 57.7% and 94.1%, respectively. Distribution of the groups in the feature space indicates a possibility of MCI quantification by the proposed method. Therefore, our scheme has a potential in identifying osteoporotic patients at an early stage.

  14. Effects of fatigue induced damage on the longitudinal fracture resistance of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Lloyd; Codrington, John; Parkinson, Ian

    2014-07-01

    As a composite material, cortical bone accumulates fatigue microdamage through the repetitive loading of everyday activity (e.g. walking). The accumulation of fatigue microdamage is thought to contribute to the occurrence of fragility fractures in older people. Therefore it is beneficial to understand the relationship between microcrack accumulation and the fracture resistance of cortical bone. Twenty longitudinally orientated compact tension fracture specimens were machined from a single bovine femur, ten specimens were assigned to both the control and fatigue damaged groups. The damaged group underwent a fatigue loading protocol to induce microdamage which was assessed via fluorescent microscopy. Following fatigue loading, non-linear fracture resistance tests were undertaken on both the control and damaged groups using the J-integral method. The interaction of the crack path with the fatigue induced damage and inherent toughening mechanisms were then observed using fluorescent microscopy. The results of this study show that fatigue induced damage reduces the initiation toughness of cortical bone and the growth toughness within the damage zone by three distinct mechanisms of fatigue-fracture interaction. Further analysis of the J-integral fracture resistance showed both the elastic and plastic component were reduced in the damaged group. For the elastic component this was attributed to a decreased number of ligament bridges in the crack wake while for the plastic component this was attributed to the presence of pre-existing fatigue microcracks preventing energy absorption by the formation of new microcracks. PMID:24715332

  15. The analysis and compensation of cortical thickness effect on ultrasonic backscatter signals in cancellous bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Ta, Dean; Hu, Bo; Le, Lawrence H.; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-09-01

    To determine the influence of the overlying cortical shell on ultrasonic backscatter signal in cancellous bone, ultrasonic backscatter simulations were carried out by a three dimensional finite difference time domain method. The simulated signals were obtained for various cortical thickness (CTh) and three central frequencies (1, 2.25, and 3.5 MHz). The integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), integrated transmission coefficient, and apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) were calculated from the signals. The results showed that the IRC oscillated with amplitudes decreasing with increasing CTh and the amplitudes diminished gradually when CTh was over 2.18 mm. The AIB fluctuated and decreased as the CTh increased (R = -0.72 ˜ -0.90, p < 0.05), and the amplitudes were much smaller when the CTh was over 2.18 mm. After removing the multiple reflections in the cortical shell, the corresponding AIB (referred as AIB-c) decreased and the fluctuations were smaller (R = -0.80 ˜ -0.96, p < 0.05). An explicit compensation method for the cortical effect was proposed. No significant correlations were observed between the CTh and the compensated AIB (CAIB: R = -0.19 ˜ 0.26, p > 0.05, and CAIB-c: R = -0.09 ˜ -0.00, p > 0.05, respectively), and the fluctuations in CAIB-c were also reduced. The results demonstrated that the effect of cortical thickness on backscatter signals was removed by the compensation method proposed in this study.

  16. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates. PMID:26879146

  17. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; et al

    2016-02-16

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibrilmore » deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. We find the significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.« less

  18. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.

  19. Estrogen regulates the rate of bone turnover but bone balance in ovariectomized rats is modulated by prevailing mechanical strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerlind, K. C.; Wronski, T. J.; Ritman, E. L.; Luo, Z. P.; An, K. N.; Bell, N. H.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency induced bone loss is associated with increased bone turnover in rats and humans. The respective roles of increased bone turnover and altered balance between bone formation and bone resorption in mediating estrogen deficiency-induced cancellous bone loss was investigated in ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomy resulted in increased bone turnover in the distal femur. However, cancellous bone was preferentially lost in the metaphysis, a site that normally experiences low strain energy. No bone loss was observed in the epiphysis, a site experiencing higher strain energy. The role of mechanical strain in maintaining bone balance was investigated by altering the strain history. Mechanical strain was increased and decreased in long bones of ovariectomized rats by treadmill exercise and functional unloading, respectively. Functional unloading was achieved during orbital spaceflight and following unilateral sciatic neurotomy. Increasing mechanical loading reduced bone loss in the metaphysis. In contrast, decreasing loading accentuated bone loss in the metaphysis and resulted in bone loss in the epiphysis. Finally, administration of estrogen to ovariectomized rats reduced bone loss in the unloaded and prevented loss in the loaded limb following unilateral sciatic neurotomy in part by reducing indices of bone turnover. These results suggest that estrogen regulates the rate of bone turnover, but the overall balance between bone formation and bone resorption is influenced by prevailing levels of mechanical strain.

  20. Estrogen regulates the rate of bone turnover but bone balance in ovariectomized rats is modulated by prevailing mechanical strain

    PubMed Central

    Westerlind, Kim C.; Wronski, Thomas J.; Ritman, Erik L.; Luo, Zong-Ping; An, Kai-Nan; Bell, Norman H.; Turner, Russell T.

    1997-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency induced bone loss is associated with increased bone turnover in rats and humans. The respective roles of increased bone turnover and altered balance between bone formation and bone resorption in mediating estrogen deficiency-induced cancellous bone loss was investigated in ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomy resulted in increased bone turnover in the distal femur. However, cancellous bone was preferentially lost in the metaphysis, a site that normally experiences low strain energy. No bone loss was observed in the epiphysis, a site experiencing higher strain energy. The role of mechanical strain in maintaining bone balance was investigated by altering the strain history. Mechanical strain was increased and decreased in long bones of ovariectomized rats by treadmill exercise and functional unloading, respectively. Functional unloading was achieved during orbital spaceflight and following unilateral sciatic neurotomy. Increasing mechanical loading reduced bone loss in the metaphysis. In contrast, decreasing loading accentuated bone loss in the metaphysis and resulted in bone loss in the epiphysis. Finally, administration of estrogen to ovariectomized rats reduced bone loss in the unloaded and prevented loss in the loaded limb following unilateral sciatic neurotomy in part by reducing indices of bone turnover. These results suggest that estrogen regulates the rate of bone turnover, but the overall balance between bone formation and bone resorption is influenced by prevailing levels of mechanical strain. PMID:9108129

  1. The pitfall of treating low bone turnover: Effects on cortical porosity.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Maria Julia C L N; Karohl, Cristina; Elias, Rosilene M; Barreto, Fellype C; Barreto, Daniela Veit; Canziani, Maria Eugenia F; Carvalho, Aluizio B; Jorgetti, Vanda; Moyses, Rosa M A

    2016-10-01

    Although it is recognized that cortical bone contributes significantly to the mechanical strength of the skeleton, little is known about this compartment from bone biopsy studies, particularly in CKD patients. In addition, there is no prospective data on the effects of CKD-MBD therapy on cortical porosity (Ct.Po). This is a post hoc analysis on data from a randomized controlled trial on the effects of different phosphate binders on bone remodelling. Therapy was adjusted according to the first biopsy, and included sevelamer or calcium acetate, calcitriol and changes in calcium dialysate concentration. We measured Ct.Po at baseline and one year after. Fifty-two patients (46±13years old, 67% women and 60% white) were enrolled. Ct.Po was already high at baseline in 85% of patients [30% (17, 46)] and correlated with PTH (p=0.001). Low bone turnover was seen in 28 patients (54.9%). After one-year treatment, PTH increased in patients with low turnover, as intended. However, increased Ct.Po was seen in 49 patients (94%). This increase correlated with the delta of phosphate (p=0.015) and the delta of PTH (p=0.03); it was also higher among non-white patients than in white patients (p=0.039). The risk of increase in Ct.Po was 4.5 higher among non-white patients. Adjusted multiple regression analysis showed that the delta of Ct.Po was dependent on delta PTH and race (r(2)=0.193). We concluded that in an attempt to increase bone turnover, the increase in PTH levels might be associated with higher cortical porosity, particularly in non-white patients. Whether this finding leads to a high risk of fracture deserves further investigation. PMID:27424935

  2. Structural and Mechanical Improvements to Bone Are Strain Dependent with Axial Compression of the Tibia in Female C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Alycia G.; Clauser, Creasy A.; Wunderlin, Caitlin; Hammond, Max A.; Wallace, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Strain-induced adaption of bone has been well-studied in an axial loading model of the mouse tibia. However, most outcomes of these studies are restricted to changes in bone architecture and do not explore the mechanical implications of those changes. Herein, we studied both the mechanical and morphological adaptions of bone to three strain levels using a targeted tibial loading mouse model. We hypothesized that loading would increase bone architecture and improve cortical mechanical properties in a dose-dependent fashion. The right tibiae of female C57BL/6 mice (8 week old) were compressively loaded for 2 weeks to a maximum compressive force of 8.8N, 10.6N, or 12.4N (generating periosteal strains on the anteromedial region of the mid-diaphysis of 1700 με, 2050 με, or 2400 με as determined by a strain calibration), while the left limb served as an non-loaded control. Following loading, ex vivo analyses of bone architecture and cortical mechanical integrity were assessed by micro-computed tomography and 4-point bending. Results indicated that loading improved bone architecture in a dose-dependent manner and improved mechanical outcomes at 2050 με. Loading to 2050 με resulted in a strong and compelling formation response in both cortical and cancellous regions. In addition, both structural and tissue level strength and energy dissipation were positively impacted in the diaphysis. Loading to the highest strain level also resulted in rapid and robust formation of bone in both cortical and cancellous regions. However, these improvements came at the cost of a woven bone response in half of the animals. Loading to the lowest strain level had little effect on bone architecture and failed to impact structural- or tissue-level mechanical properties. Potential systemic effects were identified for trabecular bone volume fraction, and in the pre-yield region of the force-displacement and stress-strain curves. Future studies will focus on a moderate load level which

  3. Orientation dependence of progressive post-yield behavior of human cortical bone in compression

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xuanliang N.; Acuna, Rae L.; Luo, Qing; Wang, Xiaodu

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the underlying mechanisms of energy dissipation during post-yield deformation of bone is critical in understanding bone fragility fractures. However, the orientation-dependence of post-yield properties of bone is still poorly understood. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of loading direction on the evolution of post-yield behavior of bone using a progressive loading protocol. To do so, cylindrical compressive bone samples were prepared each in the longitudinal, circumferential and radial directions, from the mid-shaft of cadaveric femurs procured from eight middle-aged male donors (51.5 ± 3.3 years old). These specimens were tested in compression in a progressive loading scheme. The results exhibited that the elastic modulus, yield stress, and energy dissipation were significantly greater in the longitudinal direction than in the transverse (circumferential and radial) directions. However, no significant differences were observed in the yield strain as well as in the successive plastic strain with respect to the increasing applied strain among the three orientations. These results suggest that the initiation and progression of plastic strain are independent of loading orientations, thus implying that the underlying mechanism of plastic behavior of bone in compression is similar in all the orientations. PMID:22995144

  4. Relationships between the anisotropy of longitudinal wave velocity and hydroxyapatite crystallite orientation in bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazufumi; Nakatsuji, Tomohiro; Yaoi, Yuichiro; Yamato, Yu; Yanagitani, Takahiko; Matsukawa, Mami; Yamazaki, Kaoru; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is now widely used for evaluating bone in vivo, because obtained ultrasonic wave properties directly reflect the visco-elasticity. Bone tissue is composed of minerals like hydroxyapatite (HAp) and a collagen matrix. HAp crystallites orientation is thus one parameter of bone elasticity. In this study, we experimentally investigated the anisotropy of ultrasonic wave velocity and the HAp crystallites orientation in the axial-radial and axial-tangential planes in detail, using cylindrical specimens obtained from the cortical bone of three bovine femurs. Longitudinal bulk wave propagation was investigated by using a conventional ultrasonic pulse system. We used the one cycle of sinusoidal pulse which was emitted from wide band transmitter. The nominal frequency of the pulse was 1MHz. First, we investigated the anisotropy of longitudinal wave velocity, measuring the anisotropy of velocity in two planes using cylindrical specimens obtained from identical bone areas. The wave velocity changed due to the rotation angle, showing the maximum value in the direction a little off the bone axis. Moreover, X-ray pole figure measurements also indicated that there were small tilts in the HAp crystallites orientation from the bone axis. The tilt angles were similar to those of the highest velocity direction. There were good correlations between velocity and HAp crystallites orientation obtained in different directions. However, a comparatively low correlation was found in posterior bone areas, which shows the stronger effects of bone microstructure. In the radial-tangential plane, where the HAp crystallites hardly ever align, weak anisotropy of velocity was found which seemed to depend on the bone microstructure. PMID:22014464

  5. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Farman, H. H.; Windahl, S. H.; Westberg, L.; Isaksson, H.; Egecioglu, E.; Schele, E.; Ryberg, H.; Jansson, J. O.; Tuukkanen, J.; Koskela, A.; Xie, S. K.; Hahner, L.; Zehr, J.; Clegg, D. J.; Lagerquist, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα−/−). Female POMC-ERα−/− and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα−/− mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P < .01) and mechanical strength (+193 ± 38%, P < .01). To test whether ERα in VMN is involved in the regulation of bone mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice. PMID:27254004

  6. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Farman, H H; Windahl, S H; Westberg, L; Isaksson, H; Egecioglu, E; Schele, E; Ryberg, H; Jansson, J O; Tuukkanen, J; Koskela, A; Xie, S K; Hahner, L; Zehr, J; Clegg, D J; Lagerquist, M K; Ohlsson, C

    2016-08-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα(-/-)). Female POMC-ERα(-/-) and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα(-/-) mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P < .01) and mechanical strength (+193 ± 38%, P < .01). To test whether ERα in VMN is involved in the regulation of bone mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice. PMID:27254004

  7. Improved accuracy of cortical bone mineralization measured by polychromatic microcomputed tomography using a novel high mineral density composite calibration phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Deuerling, Justin M.; Rudy, David J.; Niebur, Glen L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is increasingly used as a nondestructive alternative to ashing for measuring bone mineral content. Phantoms are utilized to calibrate the measured x-ray attenuation to discrete levels of mineral density, typically including levels up to 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, which encompasses levels of bone mineral density (BMD) observed in trabecular bone. However, levels of BMD observed in cortical bone and levels of tissue mineral density (TMD) in both cortical and trabecular bone typically exceed 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, requiring extrapolation of the calibration regression, which may result in error. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate (1) the relationship between x-ray attenuation and an expanded range of hydroxyapatite (HA) density in a less attenuating polymer matrix and (2) the effects of the calibration on the accuracy of subsequent measurements of mineralization in human cortical bone specimens. Methods: A novel HA-polymer composite phantom was prepared comprising a less attenuating polymer phase (polyethylene) and an expanded range of HA density (0-1860 mg HA/cm{sup 3}) inclusive of characteristic levels of BMD in cortical bone or TMD in cortical and trabecular bone. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the new HA-polymer calibration phantom were compared to measurements using a conventional HA-polymer phantom comprising 0-800 mg HA/cm{sup 3} and the corresponding ash density measurements on the same specimens. Results: The HA-polymer composite phantom exhibited a nonlinear relationship between x-ray attenuation and HA density, rather than the linear relationship typically employed a priori, and obviated the need for extrapolation, when calibrating the measured x-ray attenuation to high levels of mineral density. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the conventional phantom was significantly lower than the measured ash density by 19% (p<0.001, ANCOVA) and 33% (p<0

  8. Decreased bone turnover with balanced resorption and formation prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    PubMed

    McGee, Meghan E; Maki, Aaron J; Johnson, Steven E; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2008-02-01

    Disuse uncouples bone formation from resorption, leading to increased porosity, decreased bone geometrical properties, and decreased bone mineral content which compromises bone mechanical properties and increases fracture risk. However, black bear bone properties are not adversely affected by aging despite annual periods of disuse (i.e., hibernation), which suggests that bears either prevent bone loss during disuse or lose bone and subsequently recover it at a faster rate than other animals. Here we show decreased cortical bone turnover during hibernation with balanced formation and resorption in grizzly bear femurs. Hibernating grizzly bear femurs were less porous and more mineralized, and did not demonstrate any changes in cortical bone geometry or whole bone mechanical properties compared to active grizzly bear femurs. The activation frequency of intracortical remodeling was 75% lower during hibernation than during periods of physical activity, but the normalized mineral apposition rate was unchanged. These data indicate that bone turnover decreases during hibernation, but osteons continue to refill at normal rates. There were no changes in regional variation of porosity, geometry, or remodeling indices in femurs from hibernating bears, indicating that hibernation did not preferentially affect one region of the cortex. Thus, grizzly bears prevent bone loss during disuse by decreasing bone turnover and maintaining balanced formation and resorption, which preserves bone structure and strength. These results support the idea that bears possess a biological mechanism to prevent disuse osteoporosis. PMID:18037367

  9. Ultrasonic wave propagation in viscoelastic cortical bone plate coupled with fluids: a spectral finite element study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Naili, Salah

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the ultrasonic wave propagation in the cortical layer of long bones which is known as being a functionally graded anisotropic material coupled with fluids. The viscous effects are taken into account. The geometrical configuration mimics the one of axial transmission technique used for evaluating the bone quality. We present a numerical procedure adapted for this purpose which is based on the spectral finite element method (FEM). By using a combined Laplace-Fourier transform, the vibroacoustic problem may be transformed into the frequency-wavenumber domain in which, as radiation conditions may be exactly introduced in the infinite fluid halfspaces, only the heterogeneous solid layer needs to be analysed using FEM. Several numerical tests are presented showing very good performance of the proposed approach. We present some results to study the influence of the frequency on the first arriving signal velocity in (visco)elastic bone plate. PMID:22288934

  10. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy of cortical bone reveals details of extrafibrillar crystals.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Henry P; McNally, Elizabeth A; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study we showed that most of the mineral in bone is present in the form of "mineral structures", 5-6nm-thick, elongated plates which surround and are oriented parallel to collagen fibrils. Using dark-field transmission electron microscopy, we viewed mineral structures in ion-milled sections of cortical human bone cut parallel to the collagen fibrils. Within the mineral structures we observe single crystals of apatite averaging 5.8±2.7nm in width and 28±19nm in length, their long axes oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Some appear to be composite, co-aligned crystals as thin as 2nm. From their similarity to TEM images of crystals liberated from deproteinated bone we infer that we are viewing sections through platy crystals of apatite that are assembled together to form the mineral structures. PMID:25449316