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Sample records for cosmological correlation functions

  1. Multiple soft limits of cosmological correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, Austin; Khoury, Justin; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2015-01-01

    We derive novel identities satisfied by inflationary correlation functions in the limit where two external momenta are taken to be small. We derive these statements in two ways: using background-wave arguments and as Ward identities following from the fixed-time path integral. Interestingly, these identities allow us to constrain some of the O(q{sup 2}) components of the soft limit, in contrast to their single-soft analogues. We provide several nontrivial checks of our identities both in the context of resonant non-Gaussianities and in small sound speed models. Additionally, we extend the relation at lowest order in external momenta to arbitrarily many soft legs, and comment on the many-soft extension at higher orders in the soft momentum. Finally, we consider how higher soft limits lead to identities satisfied by correlation functions in large-scale structure.

  2. The Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Pierluigi

    1997-10-01

    This thesis aims to review the cosmological mass function problem, both from the theoretical and the observational point of view, and to present a new mass function theory, based on realistic approximations for the dynamics of gravitational collapse. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction on gravitational dynamics in cosmological models. Chapter 2 gives a complete review of the mass function theory. Chapters 3 and 4 present the ``dynamical'' mass function theory, based on truncated Lagrangian dynamics and on the excursion set approach. Chapter 5 reviews the observational state-of-the-art and the main applications of the mass function theories described before. Finally, Chapter 6 gives conclusions and future prospects.

  3. Galaxy cosmological mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: This paper studies the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach that uses observational data provided by recent galaxy redshift surveys. Methods: Starting from a previously presented relation between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity L, and the average galactic mass ℳg were computed in terms of the redshift. ℳg was also alternatively estimated by means of a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allowed us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 function, but whose fitted parameter values are different from the values found in the literature for the GSMF. Conclusions: This GCMF behavior follows the theoretical predictions from the cold dark matter models in which the less massive objects form first, followed later by more massive ones. In the range 0.5

  4. Gravitational clustering of galaxies: Derivation of two-point galaxy correlation function using statistical mechanics of cosmological many-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Farooq; Malik, Manzoor A.; Bhat, M. Maqbool

    2016-07-01

    We derive the spatial pair correlation function in gravitational clustering for extended structure of galaxies (e.g. galaxies with halos) by using statistical mechanics of cosmological many-body problem. Our results indicate that in the limit of point masses (ɛ=0) the two-point correlation function varies as inverse square of relative separation of two galaxies. The effect of softening parameter `ɛ' on the pair correlation function is also studied and results indicate that two-point correlation function is affected by the softening parameter when the distance between galaxies is small. However, for larger distance between galaxies, the two-point correlation function is not affected at all. The correlation length r0 derived by our method depends on the random dispersion velocities < v2rangle^{1/2} and mean number density bar{n}, which is in agreement with N-body simulations and observations. Further, our results are applicable to the clusters of galaxies for their correlation functions and we apply our results to obtain the correlation length r0 for such systems which again agrees with the data of N-body simulations and observations.

  5. Cosmological measurements with general relativistic galaxy correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Montanari, Francesco; Bertacca, Daniele; Doré, Olivier; Durrer, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the cosmological dependence and the constraining power of large-scale galaxy correlations, including all redshift-distortions, wide-angle, lensing and gravitational potential effects on linear scales. We analyze the cosmological information present in the lensing convergence and in the gravitational potential terms describing the so-called ``relativistic effects'', and we find that, while smaller than the information contained in intrinsic galaxy clustering, it is not negligible. We investigate how neglecting them does bias cosmological measurements performed by future spectroscopic and photometric large-scale surveys such as SKA and Euclid. We perform a Fisher analysis using the CLASS code, modified to include scale-dependent galaxy bias and redshift-dependent magnification and evolution bias. Our results show that neglecting relativistic terms, especially lensing convergence, introduces an error in the forecasted precision in measuring cosmological parameters of the order of a few tens of percent, in particular when measuring the matter content of the Universe and primordial non-Gaussianity parameters. The analysis suggests a possible substantial systematic error in cosmological parameter constraints. Therefore, we argue that radial correlations and integrated relativistic terms need to be taken into account when forecasting the constraining power of future large-scale number counts of galaxy surveys.

  6. General covariance constraints on cosmological correlators

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T.; Penco, Riccardo E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2015-01-01

    We study the extent to which diffeomorphism invariance restricts the properties of the perturbations in single scalar field cosmological models. We derive a set of identities that constrain the connected correlators of the cosmological perturbations, as well as the one-particle-irreducible vertices of the theory in any gauge. These identities are the analogues of Slavnov-Taylor identities in gauge theories, and follow essentially from diffeomorphism invariance alone. Yet because quantization requires diffeomorphism invariance to be broken, they not only reflect invariance under diffeomorphisms, but also how the latter has been broken by gauge fixing terms. In order not to lose the symmetry altogether, we cannot simply set some fields to zero, as is usually done in cosmological perturbation theory, but need to decouple them smoothly and make sure that they do not contribute to cosmological correlators in the decoupling limit. We use these identities to derive a set of consistency relations between bispectra and power spectra of cosmological perturbations in different gauges. Without additional assumptions, these consistency relations just seem to reflect the redundancy implied by diffeomorphisms. But when combined with analyticity, in a formulation of the theory in which auxiliary fields have been integrated out, we recover novel and previously derived relations that follow from invariance under both time and spatial diffeomorphisms.

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological implications of the large-scale two-point correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Scóccola, C. G.; Ross, A. J.; Percival, W.; Manera, M.; Montesano, F.; Mazzalay, X.; Cuesta, A. J.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Kazin, E.; McBride, C. K.; Mehta, K.; Montero-Dorta, A. D.; Padmanabhan, N.; Prada, F.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Tojeiro, R.; Xu, X.; Magaña, M. Vargas; Aubourg, E.; Bahcall, N. A.; Bailey, S.; Bizyaev, D.; Bolton, A. S.; Brewington, H.; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, J. R.; Gott, J. Richard; Hamilton, J. C.; Ho, S.; Honscheid, K.; Labatie, A.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Maraston, C.; Muna, D.; Nichol, R. C.; Oravetz, D.; Pan, K.; Ross, N. P.; Roe, N. A.; Reid, B. A.; Schlegel, D. J.; Shelden, A.; Schneider, D. P.; Simmons, A.; Skibba, R.; Snedden, S.; Thomas, D.; Tinker, J.; Wake, D. A.; Weaver, B. A.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Zehavi, I.; Zhao, G.

    2012-09-01

    We obtain constraints on cosmological parameters from the spherically averaged redshift-space correlation function of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We combine this information with additional data from recent cosmic microwave background (CMB), supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Our results show no significant evidence of deviations from the standard flat Λ cold dark matter model, whose basic parameters can be specified by Ωm = 0.285 ± 0.009, 100 Ωb = 4.59 ± 0.09, ns = 0.961 ± 0.009, H0 = 69.4 ± 0.8 km s-1 Mpc-1 and σ8 = 0.80 ± 0.02. The CMB+CMASS combination sets tight constraints on the curvature of the Universe, with Ωk = -0.0043 ± 0.0049, and the tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio, for which we find r < 0.16 at the 95 per cent confidence level (CL). These data show a clear signature of a deviation from scale invariance also in the presence of tensor modes, with ns < 1 at the 99.7 per cent CL. We derive constraints on the fraction of massive neutrinos of fν < 0.049 (95 per cent CL), implying a limit of ∑mν < 0.51 eV. We find no signature of a deviation from a cosmological constant from the combination of all data sets, with a constraint of wDE = -1.033 ± 0.073 when this parameter is assumed time-independent, and no evidence of a departure from this value when it is allowed to evolve as wDE(a) = w0 + wa(1 - a). The achieved accuracy on our cosmological constraints is a clear demonstration of the constraining power of current cosmological observations.

  8. The Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A. R.; Iribarrem, A.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work is to present a semi-empirical relativistic approach which uses the general model connecting cosmological theory to observational data derived from galaxy surveys (Ribeiro & Stoeger 2003, ApJ, 592, 1) to study the galactic mass evolution. For this purpose we define a new quantity named the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF). We used the FORS Deep Field survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 5.0 and its luminosity function in the B-band, as well as this sample's stellar masses. We obtained that the GCMF behaves as a power-law given by ζ (z) ∝ [M_{g}(z)]^{-2.3± 0.4}, where M_{g} is the average galactic mass in the studied redshift interval. This result can be seen as an average of the galaxy stellar mass function pattern found in the literature, where more massive galaxies were assembled earlier than less massive ones.

  9. Three-Point Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters in Cosmological Models - a Strong Dependence on Triangle Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Y. P.; Borner, G.; Valdarnini, R.

    1995-11-01

    In this paper, we use large P^3^M N-body simulations to study the three- point correlation function {ζ of clusters in two theoretical models. The first model (LCDM) is a low-density flat model of {OMEGA}_0_ = 0.3, {LAMBDA}_0_ = 0.7 and h = 0.75, and the second model (PIM) is an Einstein-de Sitter model with its linear power spectrum obtained from observations We find that the scaled function Q(r, u, v), which is defined as the ratio of ζ(r, ru, ru + rv) to the hierarchical sum ξ(r)ξ(ru) + ξ(ru)ξ(ru + rv) + ξ(ru + rv)ξ(r) (where ξ is the two-point correlation function of clusters), depends weakly on r and u, but very strongly on v. Q(r, u, v) is about 0.2 at v = 0.1 and 1.8 at v = 0.9. A model of Q(r, u, v) = {THETA}10^1.3_v_^2^ can fit the data of ζ very nicely with {THETA} ~ 0.14. This model is found to be universal for the LCDM clusters and for the PIM clusters. Furthermore, Q(r, u, v) is found to be insensitive to the cluster richness. We compare our N-body results with simple analytical theories of cluster formation, like the peak theories or the local maxima theories. We find that these theories do not provide an adequate description for the three-point function of clusters. We also examine the observational data of ζ presently available, and do not find any contradiction between the observations and our model predictions. The v- dependence of 4 in a projected catalogue of clusters is shown to be much weaker than the v-dependence of Q found in the three-dimensional case. This is probably the reason why the v-dependence of Q has not been found in an angular correlation function analysis of the Abell catalogue. The v-dependence found in this paper might be an important feature of clusters formed in the Gaussian gravitational instability theories. Therefore it would be important to search for the v-dependence on Q in redshift samples of rich clusters.

  10. Cosmology with void-galaxy correlations.

    PubMed

    Hamaus, Nico; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Sutter, P M; Lavaux, Guilhem; Warren, Michael S

    2014-01-31

    Galaxy bias, the unknown relationship between the clustering of galaxies and the underlying dark matter density field is a major hurdle for cosmological inference from large-scale structure. While traditional analyses focus on the absolute clustering amplitude of high-density regions mapped out by galaxy surveys, we propose a relative measurement that compares those to the underdense regions, cosmic voids. On the basis of realistic mock catalogs we demonstrate that cross correlating galaxies and voids opens up the possibility to calibrate galaxy bias and to define a static ruler thanks to the observable geometric nature of voids. We illustrate how the clustering of voids is related to mass compensation and show that volume-exclusion significantly reduces the degree of stochasticity in their spatial distribution. Extracting the spherically averaged distribution of galaxies inside voids from their cross correlations reveals a remarkable concordance with the mass-density profile of voids. PMID:24580436

  11. Cosmological singularities encoded in IR boundary correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, Adam; Hertog, Thomas; Schillo, Marjorie

    2016-05-01

    We study the dynamics near big crunch singularities produced in asymptotic AdS cosmologies using gauge/gravity duality. The dual description consists of a constant mass deformation of ABJM theory on de Sitter space and is well-defined and stable for small deformations. We identify the critical deformation where the theory becomes unstable at weak and at strong coupling. Using spacelike geodesics anchored on the boundary we compute two-point correlators of ABJM operators of large dimensions. Near the critical deformation a second saddle point contribution enters, in which the spacelike geodesics probe the high curvature region near the singularity. Its contribution strongly enhances the long-distance correlations. This has a natural interpretation in the weakly coupled boundary theory where the critical point corresponds to a massless limit.

  12. Revisiting the Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seunghwan; Lee, J.

    2013-01-01

    A non-stochastic scale-independent multi-dimensional barrier model of ellipsoidal collapse for the excursion set halo mass function is presented. The key concept of our model is that a bound halo forms at the moment when the initial shear eigenvalues hit a multi-dimensional absorbing barrier of constant height in their random walking process. The multi-dimensional barrier height that characterizes the analytic halo mass function is empirically determined by fitting the numerical results from the high-resolution N-body simulation to our model. It is found that the best-fit value of the barrier height is independent of redshift and key cosmological parameters. Our analytic model with empirically determined barrier-height is shown to work excellently in the wide mass-range at various redshifts: The ratio of the model to the N-body results departs from unity by up to 5% over 1011 1015M⊙/h at z=0, 0.5 and 1 for both of the FoF-halo and SO-halo cases. It is also shown that our analytic model naturally explains the stochastic behaviors of the density threshold value and its log-normal distribution.

  13. Entropy mode loops and cosmological correlations during perturbative reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Ali; Kutluk, Emine Seyma E-mail: seymakutluk@gmail.com

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that during preheating the entropy modes circulating in the loops, which correspond to the inflaton decay products, meaningfully modify the cosmological correlation functions at superhorizon scales. In this paper, we determine the significance of the same effect when reheating occurs in the perturbative regime. In a typical two scalar field model, the magnitude of the loop corrections are shown to depend on several parameters like the background inflaton amplitude in the beginning of reheating, the inflaton decay rate and the inflaton mass. Although the loop contributions turn out to be small as compared to the preheating case, they still come out larger than the loop effects during inflation.

  14. The Weyl tensor correlator in cosmological spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Fröb, Markus B.

    2014-12-01

    We give a general expression for the Weyl tensor two-point function in a general Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime. We work in reduced phase space for the perturbations, i.e., quantize only the dynamical degrees of freedom without adding any gauge-fixing term. The general formula is illustrated by a calculation in slow-roll single-field inflation to first order in the slow-roll parameters ε and δ, and the result is shown to have the correct de Sitter limit as ε, δ → 0. Furthermore, it is seen that the Weyl tensor correlation function in slow-roll does not suffer from infrared divergences, unlike the two-point functions of the metric and scalar field perturbations. Lastly, we show how to recover the usual tensor power spectrum from the Weyl tensor correlation function.

  15. The Weyl tensor correlator in cosmological spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Fröb, Markus B.

    2014-12-05

    We give a general expression for the Weyl tensor two-point function in a general Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime. We work in reduced phase space for the perturbations, i.e., quantize only the dynamical degrees of freedom without adding any gauge-fixing term. The general formula is illustrated by a calculation in slow-roll single-field inflation to first order in the slow-roll parameters ϵ and δ, and the result is shown to have the correct de Sitter limit as ϵ,δ→0. Furthermore, it is seen that the Weyl tensor correlation function in slow-roll does not suffer from infrared divergences, unlike the two-point functions of the metric and scalar field perturbations. Lastly, we show how to recover the usual tensor power spectrum from the Weyl tensor correlation function.

  16. Probing cosmology with weak lensing Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratochvil, Jan M.; Lim, Eugene A.; Wang, Sheng; Haiman, Zoltán; May, Morgan; Huffenberger, Kevin

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we show that Minkowski functionals (MFs) of weak gravitational lensing (WL) convergence maps contain significant non-Gaussian, cosmology-dependent information. To do this, we run a large suite of cosmological ray-tracing N-body simulations to create mock WL convergence maps, and study the cosmological information content of MFs derived from these maps. Our suite consists of 80 independent 5123 N-body runs, covering seven different cosmologies, varying three cosmological parameters Ωm, w, and σ8 one at a time, around a fiducial lambda cold dark matter model. In each cosmology, we use ray tracing to create a thousand pseudoindependent 12deg2 convergence maps, and use these in a Monte Carlo procedure to estimate the joint confidence contours on the above three parameters. We include redshift tomography at three different source redshifts zs=1, 1.5, 2, explore five different smoothing scales θG=1,2,3,5,10arcmin, and explicitly compare and combine the MFs with the WL power spectrum. We find that the MFs capture a substantial amount of information from non-Gaussian features of convergence maps, i.e. beyond the power spectrum. The MFs are particularly well suited to break degeneracies and to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w (by a factor of ≈three better than from the power spectrum alone). The non-Gaussian information derives partly from the one-point function of the convergence (through V0, the “area” MF), and partly through nonlinear spatial information (through combining different smoothing scales for V0, and through V1 and V2, the boundary length and genus MFs, respectively). In contrast to the power spectrum, the best constraints from the MFs are obtained only when multiple smoothing scales are combined.

  17. RECONSTRUCTING THE SHAPE OF THE CORRELATION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Galeazzi, M.; Ursino, E.

    2013-06-01

    We develop an estimator for the correlation function which, in the ensemble average, returns the shape of the correlation function, even for signals that have significant correlations on the scale of the survey region. Our estimator is general and works in any number of dimensions. We develop versions of the estimator for both diffuse and discrete signals. As an application, we apply them to Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray background measurements. These include a realistic, spatially inhomogeneous population of spurious detector events. We discuss applying the estimator to the averaging of correlation functions evaluated on several small fields, and to other cosmological applications.

  18. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 1054 erg of energy isotropically (Eiso) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ˜ 0.01 up to ˜ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (Ep,i) and the "intensity" is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the Ep,i - Eiso correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density ΩM being ˜ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of ΩM. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  19. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-17

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 10{sup 54} erg of energy isotropically (E{sub iso}) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ∼ 0.01 up to ∼ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (E{sub p,i}) and the “intensity” is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the E{sub p,i} – E{sub iso} correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density Ω{sub M} being ∼ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of E{sub p,i} with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of Ω{sub M}. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  20. Dark energy and normalization of the cosmological wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peng; Huang, Yue; Li, Miao; Li, Nan

    2016-08-01

    Dark energy is investigated from the perspective of quantum cosmology. It is found that, together with an appropriate normal ordering factor q, only when there is dark energy can the cosmological wave function be normalized. This interesting observation may require further attention.

  1. The Observed squeezed limit of cosmological three-point functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2013-10-01

    The squeezed limit of the three-point function of cosmological perturbations is a powerful discriminant of different models of the early Universe. We present a conceptually simple and complete framework to relate any primordial bispectrum in this limit to late time observables, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature bispectrum and the scale-dependent halo bias. We employ a series of convenient coordinate transformations to capture the leading nonlinear effects of cosmological perturbation theory on these observables. This makes crucial use of Fermi normal coordinates and their conformal generalization, which we introduce here and discuss in detail. As an example, we apply our formalism to standard slow-roll single-field inflation. We show explicitly that Maldacena’s results for the squeezed limits of the scalar bispectrum [proportional to (ns-1) in comoving gauge] and the tensor-scalar-scalar bispectrum lead to no deviations from a Gaussian universe, except for projection effects. In particular, the primordial contributions to the squeezed CMB bispectrum and scale dependent halo bias vanish, and there are no primordial “fossil” correlations between long-wavelength tensor perturbations and small-scale perturbations. The contributions to observed correlations are then only due to projection effects such as gravitational lensing and redshift perturbations.

  2. Phantom cosmology with a decaying cosmological function Λ(t) induced from five-dimensional (5D) geometric vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madriz Aguilar, J. E.; Bellini, M.; Cruz, M. A. S.

    2008-08-01

    Introducing a variable cosmological function $\\Lambda (t)$ in a geometrical manner from a 5D Riemann-flat metric, we investigate the possibility of having a geometrical criterion to choose a suitable cosmological function $\\Lambda (t)$ for every 4D dynamical hypersurface capable of generate phantom cosmologies.

  3. Quantum Newtonian cosmology and the biconfluent Heun functions

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, H. S.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2015-09-15

    We obtain the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation for a particle (galaxy) moving in a Newtonian universe with a cosmological constant, which is given in terms of the biconfluent Heun functions. The first six Heun polynomials of the biconfluent function are written explicitly. The energy spectrum which resembles the one corresponding to the isotropic harmonic oscillator is also obtained. The wave functions as well as the energy levels codify the role played by the cosmological constant.

  4. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: cross correlation with Planck maps

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, Thibaut; Calabrese, Erminia; Dunkley, Joanna; Næss, Sigurd; Addison, Graeme E.; Hincks, Adam D.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hlozek, Renée; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dünner, Rolando; Infante, Leopoldo; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Huffenberger, Kevin; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; and others

    2014-07-01

    We present the temperature power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background obtained by cross-correlating maps from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 and 218 GHz with maps from the Planck satellite at 143 and 217 GHz, in two overlapping regions covering 592 square degrees. We find excellent agreement between the two datasets at both frequencies, quantified using the variance of the residuals between the ACT power spectra and the ACT × Planck cross-spectra. We use these cross-correlations to measure the calibration of the ACT data at 148 and 218 GHz relative to Planck, to 0.7% and 2% precision respectively. We find no evidence for anisotropy in the calibration parameter. We compare the Planck 353 GHz power spectrum with the measured amplitudes of dust and cosmic infrared background (CIB) of ACT data at 148 and 218 GHz. We also compare planet and point source measurements from the two experiments.

  5. Properties of the cosmological density distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardeau, Francis; Kofman, Lev

    1995-04-01

    The properties of the probability distribution function (PDF) of the cosmological continuous density field are studied. We focus our analysis on the quasi-linear regime where various calculations, based on dynamically motivated methods, have been presented: either by using the Zel'dovich approximation (ZA) or by using the perturbation theory to evaluate the behavior of the moments of the distribution function. We show how these two approaches are related to each other and that they can be used in a complementary way. For that respect, the one-dimensional dynamics, where the ZA is exact solution, has first been used as a testing ground. In particular, we show that, when the density PDF obtained with the ZA is regularized, its various moments exhibit the behavior expected by the perturbation theory applied to the ZA. We show that ZA approach can be used for arbitrary initial conditions (not only Gaussian) and that the nonlinear evolution of the moments can be obtained. The perturbation theory can be used for the exact dynamics. We take into account the final filtering of the density field both for ZA and perturbation theory. Applying these techniques, we got the generating function of the moments for the one-dimensional dynamics, the three-dimensional ZA, with and without smoothing effects. We also suggest methods to build PDFs. One is based on the Laplace inverse transform of the moment generating function. The other, the Edgeworth expansion, is obtained when the previous generating function is truncated at a given order and allows evaluation of the PDF out of limited number of moments. It provides insight on the relationship between the moments and the shape of the density PDF. In particular, it provides an alternative method to evaluate the skewness and kurtosis by measuring the PDF around its maximum. Eventually, results obtained from a numerical simulation with cold dark matter initial conditions have been used to validate the accuracy of the considered

  6. Cosmological parameters and evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David; Petrosian, Vahe

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the observed distribution of discrete sources of a flux limited sample, the luminosity function of these sources, and the cosmological model is discussed. It is stressed that some assumptions about the form and evolution of the luminosity function must be made in order to determine the cosmological parameters from the observed distribution of sources. Presented is a method to test the validity of these assumptions using the observations. It is shown how, using higher moments of the observed distribution, one can determine, independently of the cosmological model, all parameters of the luminosity function except those describing evolution of the density and the luminosity of the luminosity function. These methods are applied to the sample of approximately 1000 galaxies recently used by Loh and Spillar to determine a value of the cosmological density parameter Omega approx = 1. It is shown that the assumptions made by Loh and Spillar about the luminosity function are inconsistent with the data, and that a self-consistent treatment of the data indicates a lower value of Omega approx = 0.2 and a flatter luminosity function. It should be noted, however, that incompleteness in the sample could cause a flattening of the luminosity function and lower the calculated value of Omega and that uncertainty in the values of these parameters due to random fluctuations is large.

  7. Cosmological parameters and evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David; Petrosian, Vahe

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the observed distribution of discrete sources of a flux limited sample, the luminosity function of these sources, and the cosmological model is discussed. It is stressed that some assumptions about the form and evolution of the luminosity function must be made in order to determine the cosmological parameters from the observed distribution of sources. Presented is a method to test the validity of these assumptions using the observations. It is shown how, using higher moments of the observed distribution, one can determine, independently of the cosmological model, all parameters of the luminosity function except those describing evolution of the density and the luminosity of the luminosity function. These methods are applied to the sample of approximately 1000 galaxies recently used by Loh and Spillar to determine a value of the cosmological density parameter Omega approx = 1. It is shown that the assumptions made by Loh and Spillar about the luminosity function are inconsistent with the data, and that a self-consistent treatment of the data indicates a lower value of Omega approx = 0.2 and a flatter luminosity function. It should be noted, however, that incompleteness in the sample could cause a flattening of the luminosity function and lower the calculated value of Omega and that uncertainty in the values of these parameters due to random fluctuations is large.

  8. CfunBASE: A Cosmological Functions Library for Astronomical Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh-Popp, M.

    2010-08-01

    CfunBASE is a customizable C# cosmological functions library in the .NET framework. Its primary use is in CasJobs/SkyServer, where the functions are ported into a MS-SQL Server database hosting the SDSS science archive, and can be executed through simple T-SQL commands. This gives cloud-computing users the possibility of calculating cosmological distances, volumes and times as a function of redshift, as well as their respective inverse functions. Also included are basic data exploratory analysis tools, such as binning, N-dimensional weighted histograms, and quantile and cumulative distribution aggregate functions. Advanced astronomical examples are presented and discussed, such as the T-SQL implementation and fast computation of luminosity functions, color-magnitude diagrams, and the friends-of-friends galaxy cluster identification algorithm.

  9. Antisymmetric galaxy cross-correlations as a cosmological probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D.; Raccanelli, Alvise; Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2016-01-01

    The autocorrelation between two members of a galaxy population is symmetric under the interchange of the two galaxies being correlated. The cross-correlation between two different types of galaxies, separated by a vector r , is not necessarily the same as that for a pair separated by -r . Local anisotropies in the two-point cross-correlation function may thus indicate a specific direction which when mapped as a function of position trace out a vector field. This vector field can then be decomposed into longitudinal and transverse components, and those transverse components written as positive- and negative-helicity components. A locally asymmetric cross-correlation of the longitudinal type arises naturally in halo clustering, even with Gaussian initial conditions, and could be enhanced with local-type non-Gaussianity. Early-Universe scenarios that introduce a vector field may also give rise to such effects. These antisymmetric cross-correlations also provide a new possibility to seek a preferred cosmic direction correlated with the hemispherical power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background and to seek a preferred location associated with the cosmic microwave background cold spot. New ways to seek cosmic parity breaking are also possible.

  10. CROSS-CORRELATIONS AS A COSMOLOGICAL CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Dore, Olivier; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Lidz, Adam

    2013-05-01

    We present a new procedure to measure the large-scale carbon monoxide (CO) emissions across cosmic history. As a tracer of large-scale structure (LSS), the CO gas content as a function of redshift can be quantified by its three-dimensional fluctuation power spectra. Furthermore, cross-correlating CO emission with other LSS tracers offers a way to measure the emission as a function of scale and redshift. Here we introduce the model relevant for such a cross-correlation measurement between CO and other LSS tracers, and between different CO rotational lines. We propose a novel use of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and attempt to extract redshifted CO emissions embedded in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data set. We cross-correlate the all-sky WMAP7 data with LSS data sets, namely, the photometric quasar sample and the luminous red galaxy sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Releases 6 and 7, respectively. We are unable to detect a cross-correlation signal with either CO(1-0) or CO(2-1) lines, mainly due to the instrumental noise in the WMAP data. However, we are able to rule out models more than three times greater than our more optimistic model. We discuss the cross-correlation signal from the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and dust as potential contaminants, and quantify their impact for our CO measurements. We discuss forecasts for current CMB experiments and a hypothetical future CO-focused experiment, and propose to cross-correlate CO temperature data with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment Ly{alpha}-emitter sample, for which a signal-to-noise ratio of 58 is possible.

  11. The correlation function for density perturbations in an expanding universe. IV - The evolution of the correlation function. [galaxy distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclelland, J.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the two-point correlation function for the large-scale distribution of galaxies in an expanding universe is studied on the assumption that the perturbation densities lie in a Gaussian distribution centered on any given mass scale. The perturbations are evolved according to the Friedmann equation, and the correlation function for the resulting distribution of perturbations at the present epoch is calculated. It is found that: (1) the computed correlation function gives a satisfactory fit to the observed function in cosmological models with a density parameter (Omega) of approximately unity, provided that a certain free parameter is suitably adjusted; (2) the power-law slope in the nonlinear regime reflects the initial fluctuation spectrum, provided that the density profile of individual perturbations declines more rapidly than the -2.4 power of distance; and (3) both positive and negative contributions to the correlation function are predicted for cosmological models with Omega less than unity.

  12. Cosmology with the Cluster Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rines, Kenneth J.

    2006-12-01

    Galaxy clusters probe the amplitude of density fluctuations in the early universe and the growth of large-scale structure. I will discuss our recent efforts to constrain Ω_m and σ_8 using the mass function of X-ray selected galaxy clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our results agree well with Third-Year WMAP results and have statistical uncertainties competitive with cosmic shear estimates. Alternatively, these measurements can be used to estimate the velocity segregation of cluster galaxies. Taking the Third-Year WMAP results as a prior, we estimate that cluster galaxies have a velocity dispersion 1.3 times larger than the dark matter. I will discuss future efforts to improve these constraints and to use the evolution of the mass function to probe dark energy.

  13. A Functional Representation of the Cosmological Reduced Void Probability Distribution as the Fox H Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, Keith; Smailhodzic, A.; Carini, M.; Barnaby, D.

    2010-01-01

    We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the DEEP2 and 2dF Galaxy Redshift surveys and numerical runs of the Gadget II code to analyze the distribution of cosmological voids in the universe similar to the model proposed by Mekjian.1. The Void Probability Function focuses on a scaling model inspired from percolation theory that gives an analytical form for the distribution function. For large redshifts the early universe was smooth and the probability function has a simple mathematical form that mimics the two point correlation results leading to a generalized power law. As various large scale galactic structures emerge in a given simulation a number of relatively empty regions are isolated and characterized as voids based upon number counts in the associated volume. The number density of these regions is such that the universe has a large scale “sponge-like” appearance with voids of all scales permeating the field of observation. For these data sets we examine the range of critical void probability function parameters that give rise to the best fit to the numerical and observational data. Several expressions for the probability distribution differ at the long end tail of the distribution which is sensitive to the Levy index of the distribution. Almost all of the distributions can be expressed as special cases of the Fox H function which has an asymptotic form whose tail depends upon the Levy index. We analyze the Levy index expressions and link them to the Fox H function parameters and to an anomalous diffusion equation that gives rise to the observed LSS void pattern. We wish to thank the Kentucky Space Grant Consortium for providing the NASA grant funding this research 1. Aram Z. Mekjian , Generalized statistical models of voids and hierarchical structure in cosmology, The Astrophysical Journal, 655: 1-10, 2007, arXiv:0712.1217

  14. Probing Cosmology with Weak Lensing Peak Counts and Minkowski Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratochvil, Jan Michael; Wang, S.; Lim, E. A.; Haiman, Z.; May, M.

    2010-05-01

    The new method of counting peaks in weak lensing (WL) maps, as a function of their height, to probe models of dark energy and to constrain cosmological parameters offers advantages over similar, more traditional statistics like cluster counts: Because peaks can be identified in two-dimensional WL maps directly, they can provide constraints which are free from potential selection effects and biases involved in identifying and determining the masses of galaxy clusters. Our pilot study (Kratochvil, Haiman, May 2009), where we investigated three cosmological models with different constant values of the dark energy equation of state parameter w=-0.8, w=-1, w=-1.2 and with a fixed normalization of the primordial power spectrum, revealed a parameter sensitivity of w which warrants a numerically very costly in-depth study when marginalization over other uncertain cosmological parameters is included. Towards that goal, we present recent results from a new, extensive simulation suite of ninety 5123-particle N-body simulations, run on New York Blue at BNL, allowing us to vary several cosmological parameters individually and yielding vastly improved statistics. Studies have shown that weak lensing maps likely contain as much information in the nonlinear regime as in the linear one. While being a powerful probe of the nonlinear regime, weak lensing peak counts capture by definition only a subset of the total available information in the convergence maps. In particular, we found that relatively low-amplitude peaks account for most of the parameter sensitivity detected, hinting to a more complicated structure. Therefore, we extend our work by probing the morphology of the maps with Minkowski functionals, in our quest to extract the most possible information from the nonlinear aspects of large-scale structure formation.

  15. CMB-galaxy correlation in Unified Dark Matter scalar field cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Raccanelli, Alvise; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide; Giannantonio, Tommaso E-mail: alvise.raccanelli@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    We present an analysis of the cross-correlation between the CMB and the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe in Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field cosmologies. We work out the predicted cross-correlation function in UDM models, which depends on the speed of sound of the unified component, and compare it with observations from six galaxy catalogues (NVSS, HEAO, 2MASS, and SDSS main galaxies, luminous red galaxies, and quasars). We sample the value of the speed of sound and perform a likelihood analysis, finding that the UDM model is as likely as the ΛCDM, and is compatible with observations for a range of values of c{sub ∞} (the value of the sound speed at late times) on which structure formation depends. In particular, we obtain an upper bound of c{sub ∞}{sup 2} ≤ 0.009 at 95% confidence level, meaning that the ΛCDM model, for which c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 0, is a good fit to the data, while the posterior probability distribution peaks at the value c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 10{sup −4} . Finally, we study the time dependence of the deviation from ΛCDM via a tomographic analysis using a mock redshift distribution and we find that the largest deviation is for low-redshift sources, suggesting that future low-z surveys will be best suited to constrain UDM models.

  16. Relativistic cosmology number densities and the luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A. S.; Lopes, A. R.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: This paper studies the connection between the relativistic number density of galaxies down the past light cone in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime with non-vanishing cosmological constant and the galaxy luminosity function (LF) data. It extends the redshift range of previous results presented in Albani et al. (2007, ApJ, 657, 760), where the galaxy distribution was studied out to z = 1. Observational inhomogeneities were detected at this range. This research also searches for LF evolution in the context of the framework advanced by Ribeiro and Stoeger (2003, ApJ, 592, 1), further developing the theory linking relativistic cosmology theory and LF data. Methods: Selection functions are obtained using the Schechter parameters and redshift parametrization of the galaxy LF obtained from an I-band selected dataset of the FORS deep field galaxy survey in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 5.0 for its blue bands and 0.75 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 for its red ones. Differential number counts, densities and other related observables are obtained, and then used with the calculated selection functions to study the empirical radial distribution of the galaxies in a fully relativistic framework. Results: The redshift range of the dataset used in this work, which is up to five times larger than the one used in previous studies, shows an increased relevance of the relativistic effects of expansion when compared to the evolution of the LF at the higher redshifts. The results also agree with the preliminary ones presented in Albani et al., suggesting a power-law behavior of relativistic densities at high redshifts when they are defined in terms of the luminosity distance.

  17. COSMOLOGY WITH THE Ep,i - Eiso CORRELATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Lorenzo

    2012-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the brightest sources in the universe, emit mostly in the hard X-ray energy band and have been detected at redshifts up to about 8.2. Thus, they are in principle very powerful probes for cosmology. I shortly review the researches aimed to use GRBs for the measurement of cosmological parameters, which are mainly based on the correlation between spectral peak photon energy and total radiated energy or luminosity. In particular, based on an enriched sample of 120 GRBs, I will provide an update of the analysis by Amati et al. (2008) aimed at extracting information on ΩM and, to a less extent, on ΩΛ, from the Ep,i - Eiso correlation.

  18. Information geometry with correlated data: Bayesian explorations of cosmological predictions for the microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katherine; de Bernardis, Francesco; Niemack, Michael; Sethna, James

    We developed a new, generalized fitting algorithm for miltiparameter models which incorporates varying and correlated errors. This was combined with geometrical methods of sampling to explore model prediction space, notably to plot geodesics and determine the size and edges of the model manifold. We illustrate this using the microwave background spectra for all possible universes, as described by the standard Λ-cold dark matter (Λ-CDM) cosmological model. In this case, the predicted data are fluctuations and highly correlated with varying errors, resulting in a manifold with a varying metric (as the natural metric to use is given by the Fisher information matrix). Furthermore, the model manifold shares the hyperribbon structure seen in other models, with the edges forming a strongly distorted image of a hypercube. Practical applications of such an analysis include optimizing experimental instrumentation designed to test more detailed cosmological theories. Funding supported in part by NSERC.

  19. Correlations Between the Cosmic X-Ray and Microwave Backgrounds: Constraints on a Cosmological Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughn, S. P.; Crittenden, R. G.; Turok, N. G.

    1998-01-01

    In universes with significant curvature or cosmological constant, cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are created very recently via the Rees-Sciama or integrated Sachs-Wolfe effects. This causes the CMB anisotropies to become partially correlated with the local matter density (z less than 4). We examine the prospects of using the hard (2- 10 keV) X-ray background as a probe of the local density and the measured correlation between the HEAO1 A2 X-ray survey and the 4-year COBE-DMR map to obtain a constraint on the cosmological constant. The 95% confidence level upper limit on the cosmological constant is OMega(sub Lambda) less than or equal to 0.5, assuming that the observed fluctuations in the X-ray map result entirely from large scale structure. (This would also imply that the X-rays trace matter with a bias factor of b(sub x) approx. = 5.6 Omega(sub m, sup 0.53)). This bound is weakened considerably if a large portion of the X-ray fluctuations arise from Poisson noise from unresolved sources. For example, if one assumes that the X-ray bias is b(sub x) = 2, then the 95% confidence level upper limit is weaker, Omega(sub Lambda) less than or equal to 0.7. More stringent limits should be attainable with data from the next generation of CMB and X-ray background maps.

  20. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Calibration with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Using Cross-Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajian, Amir; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John William; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, John R.; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Bertrand Doriese, W.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Moseley, Harvey; Wollack, Ed

    2011-01-01

    We present a new calibration method based on cross-correlations with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and apply it to data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). ACT's observing strategy and mapmaking procedure allows an unbiased reconstruction of the modes in the maps over a wide range of multipoles. By directly matching the ACT maps to WMAP observations in the multipole range of 400 < I < 1000, we determine the absolute calibration with an uncertainty of 2% in temperature. The precise measurement of the calibration error directly impacts the uncertainties in the cosmological parameters estimated from the ACT power spectra. We also present a combined map based on ACT and WMAP data that has a high signal-to-noise ratio over a wide range of multipoles.

  1. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: CALIBRATION WITH THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE USING CROSS-CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hajian, Amir; Bond, John R.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Das, Sudeep; Dunkley, Joanna; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Amiri, Mandana; Battistelli, Elia S.; Burger, Bryce; Appel, John William; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Brown, Ben; Chervenak, Jay; Doriese, W. Bertrand

    2011-10-20

    We present a new calibration method based on cross-correlations with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and apply it to data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). ACT's observing strategy and map-making procedure allows an unbiased reconstruction of the modes in the maps over a wide range of multipoles. By directly matching the ACT maps to WMAP observations in the multipole range of 400 < l < 1000, we determine the absolute calibration with an uncertainty of 2% in temperature. The precise measurement of the calibration error directly impacts the uncertainties in the cosmological parameters estimated from the ACT power spectra. We also present a combined map based on ACT and WMAP data that has a high signal-to-noise ratio over a wide range of multipoles.

  2. Modeling the three-point correlation function

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, Felipe; Wechsler, Risa; Frieman, Joshua A.; Nichol, Robert; /Portsmouth U., ICG

    2007-04-01

    We present new theoretical predictions for the galaxy three-point correlation function (3PCF) using high-resolution dissipationless cosmological simulations of a flat {Lambda}CDM Universe which resolve galaxy-size halos and subhalos. We create realistic mock galaxy catalogs by assigning luminosities and colors to dark matter halos and subhalos, and we measure the reduced 3PCF as a function of luminosity and color in both real and redshift space. As galaxy luminosity and color are varied, we find small differences in the amplitude and shape dependence of the reduced 3PCF, at a level qualitatively consistent with recent measurements from the SDSS and 2dFGRS. We confirm that discrepancies between previous 3PCF measurements can be explained in part by differences in binning choices. We explore the degree to which a simple local bias model can fit the simulated 3PCF. The agreement between the model predictions and galaxy 3PCF measurements lends further credence to the straightforward association of galaxies with CDM halos and subhalos.

  3. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: measuring radio galaxy bias through cross-correlation with lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Rupert; Lindsay, Sam N.; Sherwin, Blake D.; de Bernardis, Francesco; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio; Henderson, Shawn; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Jarvis, Matt; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Madhavacheril, Mathew; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-07-01

    We correlate the positions of radio galaxies in the FIRST survey with the cosmic microwave background lensing convergence estimated from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope over 470 deg2 to determine the bias of these galaxies. We remove optically cross-matched sources below redshift z = 0.2 to preferentially select active galactic nuclei (AGN). We measure the angular cross-power spectrum C_l^{κ g} at 4.4σ significance in the multipole range 100 < l < 3000, corresponding to physical scales within ≈2-60 Mpc at an effective redshift zeff = 1.5. Modelling the AGN population with a redshift-dependent bias, the cross-spectrum is well fitted by the Planck best-fitting Λ cold dark matter cosmological model. Fixing the cosmology and assumed redshift distribution of sources, we fit for the overall bias model normalization, finding b(zeff) = 3.5 ± 0.8 for the full galaxy sample and b(zeff) = 4.0 ± 1.1(3.0 ± 1.1) for sources brighter (fainter) than 2.5 mJy. This measurement characterizes the typical halo mass of radio-loud AGN: we find log (M_halo / M_{⊙}) = 13.6^{+0.3}_{-0.4}.

  4. The GRB Golentskii Correlation as a Cosmological Probe via Bayesian Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are characterized by a strong correlation between the instantaneous luminosity and the spectral peak energy within a burst. This correlation, which is known as the hardness-intensity correlation or the Golenetskii correlation, not only holds important clues to the physics of GRBs but is thought to have the potential to determine redshifts of bursts. In this paper, I use a hierarchical Bayesian model to study the universality of the rest-frame Golenetskii correlation and in particular I assess its use as a redshift estimator for GRBs. I find that, using a power-law prescription of the correlation, the power-law indices cluster near a common value, but have a broader variance than previously reported ( 1-2). Furthermore, I find evidence that there is spread in intrinsic rest-frame correlation normalizations for the GRBs in our sample ( 10 ^{51}-10 ^{53} erg/s). This points towards variable physical settings of the emission (magnetic field strength, number of emitting electrons, photospheric radius, viewing angle, etc.). Subsequently, these results eliminate the Golenetskii correlation as a useful tool for redshift determination and hence a cosmological probe. Nevertheless, the Bayesian method introduced in this paper allows for a better determination of the rest frame properties of the correlation, which in turn allows for more stringent limitations for physical models of the emission to be set.

  5. A Generalized Cosmological Reduced Void Probability Distribution Function and Levy Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Andrew, K.; Baxley, J.; Smailhodzic, A.; Bolen, B.; Gary, J.; Taylor, L.; Barnaby, D.

    2009-01-01

    We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the DEEP2 survey and numerical runs of the Gadget II code to analyze the distribution of cosmological voids in the universe similar to the model proposed by Mekjian.1 The general form of the Void Probability Function focuses on a scaling model inspired from percolation theory that gives an analytical form for the distribution function. For large redshifts the early universe was smooth and the probability function has a simple mathematical form that mimics the two point correlation results leading to a Zipf's Law probability distribution indicating an ever decreasing probability of larger and larger voids, we determine the Zipf form of the scaling power law for void frequency. As various large scale galactic structures emerge in a given simulation a number of relatively empty regions are isolated and characterized as voids based upon number counts in the associated volume. The number density of these regions is such that the universe has a large scale "sponge-like” appearance with voids of all scales permeating the field of observation, hinting at the existence of an underlying scaling law. For these data sets we examine the range of critical void probability function parameters that give rise to the best fit to the numerical and observational data. The resulting void probability functions are then used to determine the Levy index and the Fisher critical exponent within the context of a grand canonical ensemble analysis viewed as a percolation effect. We wish to thank the Kentucky Space Grant Consortium for providing the NASA grant funding this research 1. Aram Z. Mekjian , Generalized statistical models of voids and hierarchical structure in cosmology, The Astrophysical Journal, 655: 1-10, 2007, arXiv:0712.1217

  6. Correlation, functional analysis and optical pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Lee, M.L.; Stalker, K.T.

    1994-03-01

    Correlation integrals have played a central role in optical pattern recognition. The success of correlation, however, has been limited. What is needed is a mathematical operation more complex than correlation. Suitably complex operations are the functionals defined on the Hilbert space of Lebesgue square integrable functions. Correlation is a linear functional of a parameter. In this paper, we develop a representation of functionals in terms of inner products or equivalently correlation functions. We also discuss the role of functionals in neutral networks. Having established a broad relation of correlation to pattern recognition, we discuss the computation of correlation functions using acousto-optics.

  7. Boundary anomalies and correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-08-01

    It was shown recently that boundary terms of conformal anomalies recover the universal contribution to the entanglement entropy and also play an important role in the boundary monotonicity theorem of odd-dimensional quantum field theories. Motivated by these results, we investigate relationships between boundary anomalies and the stress tensor correlation functions in conformal field theories. In particular, we focus on how the conformal Ward identity and the renormalization group equation are modified by boundary central charges. Renormalized stress tensors induced by boundary Weyl invariants are also discussed, with examples in spherical and cylindrical geometries.

  8. Test of the peak energy- luminosity correlations of GRBs for their application in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Disha

    In a few dozen seconds gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit upto 10 (54) ergs in terms of an equivalent isotropical radiated energy "E _{iso}", so they can be observed with redshifts almost upto 10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to shed light on the expansion rate and the history of the universe. Here we review the use of the E _{p,i} - E _{iso} correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter Omega _{M}. We show that the present data set of gamma ray bursts, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that Omega _{M} ˜ 0.3. As the first step, we consider verifying the correltion depending on several considerable criteria (e.g. E _{p,i} - E _{iso}, E _{p,i} - L _{iso}, E _{p,i} - L _{peak}, etc.). The results of the comparisons will lead us to verify the reliability of the correlations for cosmographical purpose. This will eventually be utilized to constrain GRBs as standard candles for studying cosmology.

  9. Correlation functions in stochastic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennin, Vincent; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2015-09-01

    Combining the stochastic and formalisms, we derive non-perturbative analytical expressions for all correlation functions of scalar perturbations in single-field, slow-roll inflation. The standard, classical formulas are recovered as saddle-point limits of the full results. This yields a classicality criterion that shows that stochastic effects are small only if the potential is sub-Planckian and not too flat. The saddle-point approximation also provides an expansion scheme for calculating stochastic corrections to observable quantities perturbatively in this regime. In the opposite regime, we show that a strong suppression in the power spectrum is generically obtained, and we comment on the physical implications of this effect.

  10. Functional Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Jung, Kwanghee; Takane, Yoshio; Woodward, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose functional multiple-set canonical correlation analysis for exploring associations among multiple sets of functions. The proposed method includes functional canonical correlation analysis as a special case when only two sets of functions are considered. As in classical multiple-set canonical correlation analysis, computationally, the…

  11. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  12. PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF COSMOLOGICAL LENSING: CONVERGENCE, SHEAR, AND MAGNIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Oguri, Masamune; Sato, Masanori; Hamana, Takashi

    2011-11-20

    We perform high-resolution ray-tracing simulations to investigate probability distribution functions (PDFs) of lensing convergence, shear, and magnification on distant sources up to the redshift of z{sub s} = 20. We pay particular attention to the shot noise effect in N-body simulations by explicitly showing how it affects the variance of the convergence. We show that the convergence and magnification PDFs are closely related to each other via the approximate relation {mu} = (1 - {kappa}){sup -2}, which can reproduce the behavior of PDFs surprisingly well up to the high magnification tail. The mean convergence measured in the source plane is found to be systematically negative, rather than zero as often assumed, and is correlated with the convergence variance. We provide simple analytical formulae for the PDFs, which reproduce simulated PDFs reasonably well for a wide range of redshifts and smoothing sizes. As explicit applications of our ray-tracing simulations, we examine the strong-lensing probability and the magnification effects on the luminosity functions of distant galaxies and quasars.

  13. Hierarchy of N-point functions in the {Lambda}CDM and ReBEL cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Weygaert, Rien van de

    2010-11-15

    In this work we investigate higher-order statistics for the {Lambda}CDM and ReBEL scalar-interacting dark matter models by analyzing 180h{sup -1} Mpc dark matter N-body simulation ensembles. The N-point correlation functions and the related hierarchical amplitudes, such as skewness and kurtosis, are computed using the counts-in-cells method. Our studies demonstrate that the hierarchical amplitudes S{sub n} of the scalar-interacting dark matter model significantly deviate from the values in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology on scales comparable and smaller than the screening length r{sub s} of a given scalar-interacting model. The corresponding additional forces that enhance the total attractive force exerted on dark matter particles at galaxy scales lower the values of the hierarchical amplitudes S{sub n}. We conclude that hypothetical additional exotic interactions in the dark matter sector should leave detectable markers in the higher-order correlation statistics of the density field. We focused in detail on the redshift evolution of the dark matter field's skewness and kurtosis. From this investigation we find that the deviations from the canonical {Lambda}CDM model introduced by the presence of the 'fifth' force attain a maximum value at redshifts 0.5

  14. Cluster Structure in Cosmological Simulations. I. Correlation to Observables, Mass Estimates, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeltema, Tesla E.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Motl, Patrick M.

    2008-07-01

    We use Enzo, a hybrid Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement/N-body code including nongravitational heating and cooling, to explore the morphology of the X-ray gas in clusters of galaxies and its evolution in current-generation cosmological simulations. We employ and compare two observationally motivated structure measures: power ratios and centroid shift. Overall, the structure of our simulated clusters compares remarkably well to low-redshift observations, although some differences remain that may point to incomplete gas physics. We find no dependence on cluster structure in the mass-observable scaling relations, TX-M and YX-M, when using the true cluster masses. However, estimates of the total mass based on the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, as assumed in observational studies, are systematically low. We show that the hydrostatic mass bias strongly correlates with cluster structure and, more weakly, with cluster mass. When the hydrostatic masses are used, the mass-observable scaling relations and gas mass fractions depend significantly on cluster morphology, and the true relations are not recovered even if the most relaxed clusters are used. We show that cluster structure, via the power ratios, can be used to effectively correct the hydrostatic mass estimates and mass scaling relations, suggesting that we can calibrate for this systematic effect in cosmological studies. Similar to observational studies, we find that cluster structure, particularly centroid shift, evolves with redshift. This evolution is mild but will lead to additional errors at high redshift. Projection along the line of sight leads to significant uncertainty in the structure of individual clusters: less than 50% of clusters which appear relaxed in projection based on our structure measures are truly relaxed.

  15. COSMOLOGICAL DEPENDENCE OF THE MEASUREMENTS OF LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, PROJECTED CLUSTERING AND GALAXY-GALAXY LENSING SIGNAL

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2013-11-10

    Observables such as the galaxy luminosity function, Φ(M), projected galaxy clustering, w {sub p}(r {sub p}), and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal, ΔΣ(r {sub p}), are often measured from galaxy redshift surveys assuming a fiducial cosmological model for calculating distances to, and between galaxies. There are a growing number of studies that perform joint analyses of these measurements and constrain cosmological parameters. We quantify the amount by which such measurements systematically vary as the fiducial cosmology used for the measurements is changed, and show that these effects can be significant at high redshifts (z ∼ 0.5). Cosmological analyses (or halo occupation distribution analyses) that use the luminosity function, clustering and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal but ignore such systematic effects may bias the inference of the parameters. We present a simple way to account for the differences in the cosmological model used for the measurements and those used for the prediction of observables, thus allowing a fair comparison between models and data.

  16. BMS in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehagias, A.; Riotto, A.

    2016-05-01

    Symmetries play an interesting role in cosmology. They are useful in characterizing the cosmological perturbations generated during inflation and lead to consistency relations involving the soft limit of the statistical correlators of large-scale structure dark matter and galaxies overdensities. On the other hand, in observational cosmology the carriers of the information about these large-scale statistical distributions are light rays traveling on null geodesics. Motivated by this simple consideration, we study the structure of null infinity and the associated BMS symmetry in a cosmological setting. For decelerating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds, for which future null infinity exists, we find that the BMS transformations which leaves the asymptotic metric invariant to leading order. Contrary to the asymptotic flat case, the BMS transformations in cosmology generate Goldstone modes corresponding to scalar, vector and tensor degrees of freedom which may exist at null infinity and perturb the asymptotic data. Therefore, BMS transformations generate physically inequivalent vacua as they populate the universe at null infinity with these physical degrees of freedom. We also discuss the gravitational memory effect when cosmological expansion is taken into account. In this case, there are extra contribution to the gravitational memory due to the tail of the retarded Green functions which are supported not only on the light-cone, but also in its interior. The gravitational memory effect can be understood also from an asymptotic point of view as a transition among cosmological BMS-related vacua.

  17. The Einstein-Hilbert action with cosmological constant as a functional of generic form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolksdorf, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The geometrical underpinnings of a specific class of Dirac operators are discussed. It is demonstrated how this class of Dirac operators allows to relate various geometrical functionals like the Yang-Mills action and the functional of non-linear σ - models (i.e., of (Dirac) harmonic maps). These functionals are shown to be similar to the Einstein-Hilbert action with cosmological constant (EHC). The EHC may thus be regarded as a "generic functional." As a byproduct, the geometrical setup presented also allows to avoid the issue of "fermion doubling" as usually encountered, for instance, in the geometrical discussion of the Standard Model in terms of Dirac operators. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how the geometrical setup presented allows to derive the cosmological constant term of the EHC from the Einstein-Hilbert functional and the action of a purely gauge coupling Higgs field.

  18. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cross-Correlation of Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwin, Blake D; Das, Sudeep; Haijian, Amir; Addison, Graeme; Bond, Richard; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gralla, Megan B.; Halpern, Mark; Hill, J. Colin; Hincks, Adam D.; Hughes, John P.; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hlozek, Renee; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Reese. Erik D.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Sifon, Cristobal; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    We measure the cross-correlation of Atacama cosmology telescope cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps with quasar maps made from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8 SDSS-XDQSO photometric catalog. The CMB lensing quasar cross-power spectrum is detected for the first time at a significance of 3.8 sigma, which directly confirms that the quasar distribution traces the mass distribution at high redshifts z > 1. Our detection passes a number of null tests and systematic checks. Using this cross-power spectrum, we measure the amplitude of the linear quasar bias assuming a template for its redshift dependence, and find the amplitude to be consistent with an earlier measurement from clustering; at redshift z ap 1.4, the peak of the distribution of quasars in our maps, our measurement corresponds to a bias of b = 2.5 +/- 0.6. With the signal-to-noise ratio on CMB lensing measurements likely to improve by an order of magnitude over the next few years, our results demonstrate the potential of CMB lensing crosscorrelations to probe astrophysics at high redshifts.

  19. Spatial Correlation Function of the Chandra Selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2006-01-01

    We present the spatial correlation function analysis of non-stellar X-ray point sources in the Chandra Large Area Synoptic X-ray Survey of Lockman Hole Northwest (CLASXS). Our 9 ACIS-I fields cover a contiguous solid angle of 0.4 deg(exp 2) and reach a depth of 3 x 10(exp -15) erg/square cm/s in the 2-8 keV band. We supplement our analysis with data from the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN). The addition of this field allows better probe of the correlation function at small scales. A total of 233 and 252 sources with spectroscopic information are used in the study of the CLASXS and CDFN fields respectively. We calculate both redshift-space and projected correlation functions in co-moving coordinates, averaged over the redshift range of 0.1 < z < 3.0, for both CLASXS and CDFN fields for a standard cosmology with Omega(sub Lambda) = 0.73,Omega(sub M) = 0.27, and h = 0.71 (H(sub 0) = 100h km/s Mpc(exp -1). The correlation function for the CLASXS field over scales of 3 Mpc< s < 200 Mpc can be modeled as a power-law of the form xi(s) = (S/SO)(exp - gamma), with gamma = 1.6(sup +0.4 sub -0.3) and S(sub o) = 8.0(sup +.14 sub -1.5) Mpc. The redshift-space correlation function for CDFN on scales of 1 Mpc< s < 100 Mpc is found to have a similar correlation length so = 8.55(sup +0.74 sub -0.74) Mpc, but a shallower slope (gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.1). The real-space correlation functions derived from the projected correlation functions, are found to be tau(sub 0 = 8.1(sup +1.2 sub -2.2) Mpc, and gamma = 2.1 +/- 0.5 for the CLASXS field, and tau(sub 0) = 5.8(sup +.1.0 sub -1.5) Mpc, gamma = 1.38(sup +0.12 sub -0.14 for the CDFN field. By comparing the real- and redshift-space correlation functions in the combined CLASXS and CDFN samples, we are able to estimate the redshift distortion parameter Beta = 0.4 +/- 0.2 at an effective redshift z = 0.94. We compare the correlation functions for hard and soft spectra sources in the CLASXS field and find no significant difference between the

  20. Using cross correlations to calibrate lensing source redshift distributions: Improving cosmological constraints from upcoming weak lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    De Putter, Roland; Doré, Olivier; Das, Sudeep

    2014-01-10

    Cross correlations between the galaxy number density in a lensing source sample and that in an overlapping spectroscopic sample can in principle be used to calibrate the lensing source redshift distribution. In this paper, we study in detail to what extent this cross-correlation method can mitigate the loss of cosmological information in upcoming weak lensing surveys (combined with a cosmic microwave background prior) due to lack of knowledge of the source distribution. We consider a scenario where photometric redshifts are available and find that, unless the photometric redshift distribution p(z {sub ph}|z) is calibrated very accurately a priori (bias and scatter known to ∼0.002 for, e.g., EUCLID), the additional constraint on p(z {sub ph}|z) from the cross-correlation technique to a large extent restores the cosmological information originally lost due to the uncertainty in dn/dz(z). Considering only the gain in photo-z accuracy and not the additional cosmological information, enhancements of the dark energy figure of merit of up to a factor of four (40) can be achieved for a SuMIRe-like (EUCLID-like) combination of lensing and redshift surveys, where SuMIRe stands for Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts). However, the success of the method is strongly sensitive to our knowledge of the galaxy bias evolution in the source sample and we find that a percent level bias prior is needed to optimize the gains from the cross-correlation method (i.e., to approach the cosmology constraints attainable if the bias was known exactly).

  1. The cosmological evolution and luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Avni, Y.; Giommi, P.; Griffiths, R. E.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Danziger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 31 AGNs extracted from a fully identified sample of X-ray sources from the Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey and is therefore exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space is found to be strongly nonuniform. The amount of cosmological evolution required by the X-ray data is derived in the framework of pure luminosity evolution and is found to be smaller than the amount determined from optically selected samples. The X-ray luminosity function is derived. It can be satisfactorily represented by a single power law only over a limited range of absolute luminosities. Evidence that the luminosity function flattens at low luminosity or steepens at high luminosity, or both, is presented and discussed.

  2. Ways to improve your correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a number of ways to improve on the standard method for measuring the two-point correlation function of large scale structure in the Universe. Issues addressed are: (1) the problem of the mean density, and how to solve it; (2) how to estimate the uncertainty in a measured correlation function; (3) minimum variance pair weighting; (4) unbiased estimation of the selection function when magnitudes are discrete; and (5) analytic computation of angular integrals in background pair counts.

  3. Correlation function studies for snow and ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallese, F.; Kong, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The random medium model is used to characterize snow and ice fields in the interpretation of active and passive microwave remote sensing data. A correlation function is used to describe the random permittivity fluctuations with the associated mean and variance and correlation lengths; and several samples are investigated to determine typical correlation functions for snow and ice. It is shown that correlation functions are extracted directly from appropriate ground truth data, and an exponential correlation function is observed for snow and ice with lengths corresponding to the actual size of ice particles or air bubbles. Thus, given that a medium has spatially stationary statistics and a small medium, the random medium model can interpret remote sensing data where theoretical parameters correspond to actual physical parameters of the terrain.

  4. Bootstrapping correlation functions in {N}=4 SYM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicherin, Dmitry; Doobary, Reza; Eden, Burkhard; Heslop, Paul; Korchemsky, Gregory P.; Sokatchev, Emery

    2016-03-01

    We describe a new approach to computing the chiral part of correlation functions of stress-tensor supermultiplets in {N}=4 SYM that relies on symmetries, analytic properties and the structure of the OPE only. We demonstrate that the correlation functions are given by a linear combination of chiral {N}=4 superconformal invariants accompanied by coefficient functions depending on the space-time coordinates only. We present the explicit construction of these invariants and show that the six-point correlation function is fixed in the Born approximation up to four constant coefficients by its symmetries. In addition, the known asymptotic structure of the correlation function in the light-like limit fixes unambiguously these coefficients up to an overall normalization. We demonstrate that the same approach can be applied to obtain a representation for the six-point NMHV amplitude that is free from any auxiliary gauge fixing parameters, does not involve spurious poles and manifests half of the dual superconformal symmetry.

  5. Correlation functions for extended mass galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Naseer; Ahmad, Naveel; Hamid, Mubashir; Masood, Tabasum

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of clustering of galaxies on the basis of correlation functions in an expanding Universe is studied by using equation of state, taking gravitational interaction between galaxies of extended nature into consideration. The partial differential equation for the extended mass structures of a two-point correlation function developed earlier by Iqbal, Ahmad & Khan is studied on the basis of assigned boundary conditions. The solution for the correlation function for extended structures satisfies the basic boundary conditions, which seem to be sufficient for understanding the phenomena, and provides a new insight into the gravitational clustering problem for extended mass structures.

  6. The Cosmological Constant in Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhongchao

    2008-10-10

    Hawking proposed that the cosmological constant is probably zero in quantum cosmology in 1984. By using the right configuration for the wave function of the universe, a complete proof is found very recently.

  7. On the measurability of quantum correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio de Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2015-05-15

    The concept of correlation function is widely used in classical statistical mechanics to characterize how two or more variables depend on each other. In quantum mechanics, on the other hand, there are observables that cannot be measured at the same time; the so-called incompatible observables. This prospect imposes a limitation on the definition of a quantum analog for the correlation function in terms of a sequence of measurements. Here, based on the notion of sequential weak measurements, we circumvent this limitation by introducing a framework to measure general quantum correlation functions, in principle, independently of the state of the system and the operators involved. To illustrate, we propose an experimental configuration to obtain explicitly the quantum correlation function between two Pauli operators, in which the input state is an arbitrary mixed qubit state encoded on the polarization of photons.

  8. Multitime correlation functions in nonclassical stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumm, F.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2016-06-01

    A general method is introduced for verifying multitime quantum correlations through the characteristic function of the time-dependent P functional that generalizes the Glauber-Sudarshan P function. Quantum correlation criteria are derived which identify quantum effects for an arbitrary number of points in time. The Magnus expansion is used to visualize the impact of the required time ordering, which becomes crucial in situations when the interaction problem is explicitly time dependent. We show that the latter affects the multi-time-characteristic function and, therefore, the temporal evolution of the nonclassicality. As an example, we apply our technique to an optical parametric process with a frequency mismatch. The resulting two-time-characteristic function yields full insight into the two-time quantum correlation properties of such a system.

  9. Generalized hydrodynamic correlations and fractional memory functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Rosalio F.; Fujioka, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    A fractional generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model of the longitudinal velocity fluctuations correlation, and its associated memory function, for a complex fluid is analyzed. The adiabatic elimination of fast variables introduces memory effects in the transport equations, and the dynamic of the fluctuations is described by a generalized Langevin equation with long-range noise correlations. These features motivate the introduction of Caputo time fractional derivatives and allows us to calculate analytic expressions for the fractional longitudinal velocity correlation function and its associated memory function. Our analysis eliminates a spurious constant term in the non-fractional memory function found in the non-fractional description. It also produces a significantly slower power-law decay of the memory function in the GH regime that reduces to the well-known exponential decay in the non-fractional Navier-Stokes limit.

  10. Omega from the anisotropy of the redshift correlation function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1993-01-01

    Peculiar velocities distort the correlation function of galaxies observed in redshift space. In the large scale, linear regime, the distortion takes a characteristic quadrupole plus hexadecapole form, with the amplitude of the distortion depending on the cosmological density parameter omega. Preliminary measurements are reported here of the harmonics of the correlation function in the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS 2 Jansky redshift surveys. The observed behavior of the harmonics agrees qualitatively with the predictions of linear theory on large scales in every survey. However, real anisotropy in the galaxy distribution induces large fluctuations in samples which do not yet probe a sufficiently fair volume of the Universe. In the CfA 14.5 sample in particular, the Great Wall induces a large negative quadrupole, which taken at face value implies an unrealistically large omega 20. The IRAS 2 Jy survey, which covers a substantially larger volume than the optical surveys and is less affected by fingers-of-god, yields a more reliable and believable value, omega = 0.5 sup +.5 sub -.25.

  11. Pair correlation function integrals: Computation and use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedberg, Rasmus; O'Connell, John P.; Peters, Günther H.; Abildskov, Jens

    2011-08-01

    We describe a method for extending radial distribution functions obtained from molecular simulations of pure and mixed molecular fluids to arbitrary distances. The method allows total correlation function integrals to be reliably calculated from simulations of relatively small systems. The long-distance behavior of radial distribution functions is determined by requiring that the corresponding direct correlation functions follow certain approximations at long distances. We have briefly described the method and tested its performance in previous communications [R. Wedberg, J. P. O'Connell, G. H. Peters, and J. Abildskov, Mol. Simul. 36, 1243 (2010);, 10.1080/08927020903536366 Fluid Phase Equilib. 302, 32 (2011)], 10.1016/j.fluid.2010.10.004, but describe here its theoretical basis more thoroughly and derive long-distance approximations for the direct correlation functions. We describe the numerical implementation of the method in detail, and report numerical tests complementing previous results. Pure molecular fluids are here studied in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble with isothermal compressibilities evaluated from the total correlation function integrals and compared with values derived from volume fluctuations. For systems where the radial distribution function has structure beyond the sampling limit imposed by the system size, the integration is more reliable, and usually more accurate, than simple integral truncation.

  12. Halo mass function: baryon impact, fitting formulae, and implications for cluster cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Sebastian; Saro, Alex; Dolag, Klaus; Mohr, Joseph J.

    2016-03-01

    We use a set of hydrodynamical and dark matter-only (DMonly) simulations to calibrate the halo mass function (HMF). We explore the impact of baryons, propose an improved parametrization for spherical overdensity masses, and identify differences between our DMonly HMF and previously published HMFs. We use the Magneticum simulations, which are well suited because of their accurate treatment of baryons, high resolution, and large cosmological volumes of up to (3818 Mpc)3. Baryonic effects globally decrease the masses of galaxy clusters, which, at a given mass, results in a decrease of their number density. This effect vanishes at high redshift z ˜ 2 and for high masses M200 m ≳ 1014 M⊙. We perform cosmological analyses of three idealized approximations to the cluster surveys by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Planck, and eROSITA. We pursue two main questions. (1) What is the impact of baryons? - for the SPT-like and the Planck-like samples, the impact of baryons on cosmological results is negligible. In the eROSITA-like case, however, neglecting the baryonic impact leads to an underestimate of Ωm by about 0.01, which is comparable to the expected uncertainty from eROSITA. (2) How does our DMonly HMF compare with previous work? - for the Planck-like sample, results obtained using our DMonly HMF are shifted by Δ(σ8) ≃ Δ(σ8(Ωm/0.27)0.3) ≃ 0.02 with respect to results obtained using the Tinker et al. fit. This suggests that using our HMF would shift results from Planck clusters towards better agreement with cosmic-microwave-background anisotropy measurements. Finally, we discuss biases that can be introduced through inadequate HMF parametrizations that introduce false cosmological sensitivity.

  13. Triplet correlation functions in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhabal, Debdas; Singh, Murari; Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2014-11-01

    Triplet correlations have been shown to play a crucial role in the transformation of simple liquids to anomalous tetrahedral fluids [M. Singh, D. Dhabal, A. H. Nguyen, V. Molinero, and C. Chakravarty, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 147801 (2014)]. Here we examine triplet correlation functions for water, arguably the most important tetrahedral liquid, under ambient conditions, using configurational ensembles derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) datasets fitted to experimental scattering data. Four different RMC data sets with widely varying hydrogen-bond topologies fitted to neutron and x-ray scattering data are considered [K. T. Wikfeldt, M. Leetmaa, M. P. Ljungberg, A. Nilsson, and L. G. M. Pettersson, J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 6246 (2009)]. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed for two rigid-body effective pair potentials (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005) and the monatomic water (mW) model. Triplet correlation functions are compared with other structural measures for tetrahedrality, such as the O-O-O angular distribution function and the local tetrahedral order distributions. In contrast to the pair correlation functions, which are identical for all the RMC ensembles, the O-O-O triplet correlation function can discriminate between ensembles with different degrees of tetrahedral network formation with the maximally symmetric, tetrahedral SYM dataset displaying distinct signatures of tetrahedrality similar to those obtained from atomistic simulations of the SPC/E model. Triplet correlations from the RMC datasets conform closely to the Kirkwood superposition approximation, while those from MD simulations show deviations within the first two neighbour shells. The possibilities for experimental estimation of triplet correlations of water and other tetrahedral liquids are discussed.

  14. Triplet correlation functions in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Dhabal, Debdas; Chakravarty, Charusita; Singh, Murari; Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor

    2014-11-07

    Triplet correlations have been shown to play a crucial role in the transformation of simple liquids to anomalous tetrahedral fluids [M. Singh, D. Dhabal, A. H. Nguyen, V. Molinero, and C. Chakravarty, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 147801 (2014)]. Here we examine triplet correlation functions for water, arguably the most important tetrahedral liquid, under ambient conditions, using configurational ensembles derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) datasets fitted to experimental scattering data. Four different RMC data sets with widely varying hydrogen-bond topologies fitted to neutron and x-ray scattering data are considered [K. T. Wikfeldt, M. Leetmaa, M. P. Ljungberg, A. Nilsson, and L. G. M. Pettersson, J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 6246 (2009)]. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed for two rigid-body effective pair potentials (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005) and the monatomic water (mW) model. Triplet correlation functions are compared with other structural measures for tetrahedrality, such as the O–O–O angular distribution function and the local tetrahedral order distributions. In contrast to the pair correlation functions, which are identical for all the RMC ensembles, the O–O–O triplet correlation function can discriminate between ensembles with different degrees of tetrahedral network formation with the maximally symmetric, tetrahedral SYM dataset displaying distinct signatures of tetrahedrality similar to those obtained from atomistic simulations of the SPC/E model. Triplet correlations from the RMC datasets conform closely to the Kirkwood superposition approximation, while those from MD simulations show deviations within the first two neighbour shells. The possibilities for experimental estimation of triplet correlations of water and other tetrahedral liquids are discussed.

  15. Investigating cosmological distances as a function of the red-shift in the Szekeres inhomogeneous cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Anthony Chukwuemeka

    2011-09-01

    The interpretation of cosmological observations depends on the choice of a cosmological model. One must choose a cosmological model, calculate the observables in the chosen cosmological model and then confront the results of the calculations with the data. Cosmological observations are made on the past null cone, which involve observation of luminosities and red-shifts of astrophysical objects like distant supernovae in the universe. The physical characteristics of these observed objects such as the red-shift and the magnitudes are dependent on the space-time in which they travelled through to reach the observer, and thus choosing the correct model of the universe is of crucial importance in the interpretation of cosmological observations. The universe has been observed to be inhomogeneous on scales that can affect observed quantities such as area distance, luminosity distance and red-shift. Because of this, it is necessary to use cosmological models that can take into account the observed inhomogeneities to study the universe such as the Szekeres inhomogeneous models and computing observable quantities in the Szekeres model is a non-trivial problem, more specifically computing the area distance in general requires one to compute the partial derivatives of the null vector components. The goal of this dissertation is to derive observables in the Szekeres models in all generality. For the general space-time, an analytical expression for the null vector components is not known and thus computing the partial derivatives of the null vector components is not straight-forward. In this dissertation, we will show a new method to compute these partial derivatives in the Szekeres inhomogeneous models and use them to derive and calculate cosmological distances. Using the computed partial derivatives of the null vector components, we will then compute for the first time in the history of the Szekeres inhomogeneous models, the area distance for the case where the Szekeres model

  16. Long-time limit of correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franosch, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Auto-correlation functions in an equilibrium stochastic process are well-characterized by Bochner's theorem as Fourier transforms of a finite symmetric Borel measure. The existence of a long-time limit of these correlation functions depends on the spectral properties of the measure. Here we provide conditions applicable to a wide class of dynamical theories guaranteeing the existence of the long-time limit. We discuss the implications in the context of the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition where a non-trivial long-time limit signals an idealized glass state.

  17. Locality of correlation in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kieron; Cancio, Antonio; Gould, Tim; Pittalis, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The Hohenberg-Kohn density functional was long ago shown to reduce to the Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation in the non-relativistic semiclassical (or large-Z) limit for all matter, i.e., the kinetic energy becomes local. Exchange also becomes local in this limit. Numerical data on the correlation energy of atoms support the conjecture that this is also true for correlation, but much less relevant to atoms. We illustrate how expansions around a large particle number are equivalent to local density approximations and their strong relevance to density functional approximations. Analyzing highly accurate atomic correlation energies, we show that EC → -AC ZlnZ + BCZ as Z → ∞, where Z is the atomic number, AC is known, and we estimate BC to be about 37 mhartree. The local density approximation yields AC exactly, but a very incorrect value for BC, showing that the local approximation is less relevant for the correlation alone. This limit is a benchmark for the non-empirical construction of density functional approximations. We conjecture that, beyond atoms, the leading correction to the local density approximation in the large-Z limit generally takes this form, but with BC a functional of the TF density for the system. The implications for the construction of approximate density functionals are discussed.

  18. Locality of correlation in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kieron; Cancio, Antonio; Gould, Tim; Pittalis, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The Hohenberg-Kohn density functional was long ago shown to reduce to the Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation in the non-relativistic semiclassical (or large-Z) limit for all matter, i.e., the kinetic energy becomes local. Exchange also becomes local in this limit. Numerical data on the correlation energy of atoms support the conjecture that this is also true for correlation, but much less relevant to atoms. We illustrate how expansions around a large particle number are equivalent to local density approximations and their strong relevance to density functional approximations. Analyzing highly accurate atomic correlation energies, we show that EC → -AC ZlnZ + BCZ as Z → ∞, where Z is the atomic number, AC is known, and we estimate BC to be about 37 mhartree. The local density approximation yields AC exactly, but a very incorrect value for BC, showing that the local approximation is less relevant for the correlation alone. This limit is a benchmark for the non-empirical construction of density functional approximations. We conjecture that, beyond atoms, the leading correction to the local density approximation in the large-Z limit generally takes this form, but with BC a functional of the TF density for the system. The implications for the construction of approximate density functionals are discussed. PMID:27497544

  19. Cosmology with massive neutrinos III: the halo mass function and an application to galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Costanzi, Matteo; Borgani, Stefano; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Xia, Jun-Qing; Castorina, Emanuele; Sefusatti, Emiliano E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it E-mail: xiajq@ihep.ac.cn E-mail: castori@sissa.it

    2013-12-01

    We use a suite of N-body simulations that incorporate massive neutrinos as an extra-set of particles to investigate their effect on the halo mass function. We show that for cosmologies with massive neutrinos the mass function of dark matter haloes selected using the spherical overdensity (SO) criterion is well reproduced by the fitting formula of Tinker et al. (2008) once the cold dark matter power spectrum is considered instead of the total matter power, as it is usually done. The differences between the two implementations, i.e. using P{sub cdm}(k) instead of P{sub m}(k), are more pronounced for large values of the neutrino masses and in the high end of the halo mass function: in particular, the number of massive haloes is higher when P{sub cdm}(k) is considered rather than P{sub m}(k). As a quantitative application of our findings we consider a Planck-like SZ-clusters survey and show that the differences in predicted number counts can be as large as 30% for ∑m{sub ν} = 0.4 eV. Finally, we use the Planck-SZ clusters sample, with an approximate likelihood calculation, to derive Planck-like constraints on cosmological parameters. We find that, in a massive neutrino cosmology, our correction to the halo mass function produces a shift in the σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.27){sup γ} relation which can be quantified as Δγ ∼ 0.05 and Δγ ∼ 0.14 assuming one (N{sub ν} = 1) or three (N{sub ν} = 3) degenerate massive neutrino, respectively. The shift results in a lower mean value of σ{sub 8} with Δσ{sub 8} = 0.01 for N{sub ν} = 1 and Δσ{sub 8} = 0.02 for N{sub ν} = 3, respectively. Such difference, in a cosmology with massive neutrinos, would increase the tension between cluster abundance and Planck CMB measurements.

  20. Correlation Functions Aid Analyses Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    New uses found for correlation functions in analyses of spectra. In approach combining elements of both pattern-recognition and traditional spectral-analysis techniques, spectral lines identified in data appear useless at first glance because they are dominated by noise. New approach particularly useful in measurement of concentrations of rare species of molecules in atmosphere.

  1. Modeling the Galaxy Three-Point Correlation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, Felipe; Wechsler, Risa; Frieman, Joshua A.; Nichol, Robert; /Portsmouth U., ICG

    2007-06-05

    We present new theoretical predictions for the galaxy three-point correlation function (3PCF) using high-resolution dissipationless cosmological simulations of a flat Lambda CDM Universe which resolve galaxy-size halos and subhalos. We create realistic mock galaxy catalogs by assigning luminosities and colors to dark matter halos and subhalos, and we measure the reduced 3PCF as a function of luminosity and color in both real and redshift space. As galaxy luminosity and color are varied, we find small differences in the amplitude and shape dependence of the reduced 3PCF, at a level qualitatively consistent with recent measurements from the SDSS and 2dFGRS. We confirm that discrepancies between previous 3PCF measurements can be explained in part by differences in binning choices. We explore the degree to which a simple local bias model can fit the simulated 3PCF. The agreement between the model predictions and galaxy 3PCF measurements lends further credence to the straightforward association of galaxies with CDM halos and subhalos.

  2. Correlated Strength in the Nuclear Spectral Function

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rohe; C. S. Armstrong; R. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; S. Bueltmann; C. Carasco; D. Day; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; K. Garrow; A. Gasparian; P. Gueye; M. Hauger; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; C. E. Keppel; G. Kubon; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D. J. Mack; J. H. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; D. Mocelj; K. Normand; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; E. Segbefia; I. Sick; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; F. Tiefenbacher; W. F. Vulcan; G. Warren; S. A. Wood; L. Yuan; M. Zeier; H. Zhu; B. Zihlmann

    2004-10-01

    We have carried out an (e,ep) experiment at high momentum transfer and in parallel kinematics to measure the strength of the nuclear spectral function S(k,E) at high nucleon momenta k and large removal energies E. This strength is related to the presence of short-range and tensor correlations, and was known hitherto only indirectly and with considerable uncertainty from the lack of strength in the independent-particle region. This experiment locates by direct measurement the correlated strength predicted by theory.

  3. Computation of the halo mass function using physical collapse parameters: application to non-standard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Achitouv, I.; Weller, J.; Wagner, C.; Rasera, Y. E-mail: cwagner@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE E-mail: yann.rasera@obspm.fr

    2014-10-01

    In this article we compare the halo mass function predicted by the excursion set theory with a drifting diffusive barrier against the results of N-body simulations for several cosmological models. This includes the standard ΛCDM case for a large range of halo masses, models with different types of primordial non-Gaussianity, and the Ratra-Peebles quintessence model of Dark Energy. We show that in all those cosmological scenarios, the abundance of dark matter halos can be described by a drifting diffusive barrier, where the two parameters describing the barrier have physical content. In the case of the Gaussian ΛCDM, the statistics are precise enough to actually predict those parameters at different redshifts from the initial conditions. Furthermore, we found that the stochasticity in the barrier is non-negligible making the simple deterministic spherical collapse model a bad approximation even at very high halo masses. We also show that using the standard excursion set approach with a barrier inspired by peak patches leads to inconsistent predictions of the halo mass function.

  4. Redshift distortions of galaxy correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, J. N.; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    1994-01-01

    To examine how peculiar velocities can affect the two-, three-, and four-point redshift correlation functions, we evaluate volume-average correlations for configurations that emphasize and minimize redshift distortions for four different volume-limited samples from each of the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS redshift catalogs. We present the results as the correlation length r(sub 0) and power index gamma of the two-point correlations, bar-xi(sub 0) = (r(sub 0)/r)(exp gamma), and as the hierarchical amplitudes of the three- and four-point functions, S(sub 3) = bar-xi(sub 3)/bar-xi(exp 2)(sub 2) and S(sub 4) = bar-xi(sub 4)/bar-xi(exp 3)(sub 2). We find a characteristic distortion for bar-xi(sub 2), the slope gamma is flatter and the correlation length is larger in redshift space than in real space; that is, redshift distortions 'move' correlations from small to large scales. At the largest scales (up to 12 Mpc), the extra power in the redshift distribution is compatible with Omega(exp 4/7)/b approximately equal to 1. We estimate Omega(exp 4/7)/b to be 0.53 +/- 0.15, 1.10 +/- 0.16, and 0.84 +/- 0.45 for the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS catalogs. Higher order correlations bar-xi(sub 3) and bar-xi(sub 4) suffer similar redshift distortions but in such a way that, within the accuracy of our ananlysis, the normalized amplitudes S(sub 3) and S(sub 4) are insensitive to this effect. The hierarchical amplitudes S(sub 3) and S(sub 4) are constant as a function of scale between 1 and 12 Mpc and have similar values in all samples and catalogs, S(sub 3) approximately equal to 2 and S(sub 4) approximately equal to 6, despite the fact that bar-xi(sub 2), bar-xi(sub 3), and bar-xi(sub 4) differ from one sample to another by large factors (up to a factor of 4 in bar-xi(sub 2), 8 for bar-xi(sub 3), and 12 for bar-xi(sub 4)). The agreement between the independent estimations of S(sub 3) and S(sub 4) is remarkable given the different criteria in the selection of galaxies and also the difference in the

  5. Correlation functions for describing and reconstructing soil microstructure: the use of directional correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsanina, Marina; Gerke, Kirill; Skvortsova, Elena; Mallants, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Structural features of porous materials define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere, etc.) and solute transport. To characterize soil microstructure, conventional soil science uses such metrics as pore size and grain-size distributions and thin section-derived morphological indicators. However, these descriptors provide only limited amount of information about the complex arrangement of soil structure and have limited capability to reconstruct structural features or predict physical properties. We introduce three different spatial correlation functions as a comprehensive tool to characterize soil microstructure: (i) two-point probability functions, (ii) linear functions, and (iii) two-point cluster functions. This novel approach was tested on thin-sections (2.21×2.21 cm2) representing eight soils with different pore space configurations. The two-point probability and linear correlation functions were subsequently used as a part of simulated annealing optimization procedures to reconstruct soil structure. Comparison of original and reconstructed images was based on morphological characteristics, cluster correlation functions, total number of pores and pore-size distribution. Results showed excellent agreement for soils with isolated pores, but relatively poor correspondence for soils exhibiting dual-porosity (i.e. superpositions of pores and microcracks). Insufficient information content in the correlation function sets used for reconstruction may have contributed to the observed discrepancies. Improved reconstructions may be obtained by adding cluster and other correlation functions into reconstruction sets. Correlation functions and the associated stochastic reconstruction algorithms introduced here are universally applicable in soil science, including for soil classification, pore

  6. On soft limits of large-scale structure correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Konstandin, Thomas; Porto, Rafael A.; Sagunski, Laura

    2015-02-01

    We study soft limits of correlation functions for the density and velocity fields in the theory of structure formation. First, we re-derive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times using the eikonal approximation. These are solely based on symmetry arguments and are therefore universal. Then, we explore the existence of equal-time relations in the soft limit which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We scrutinize two approaches in the literature: the time-flow formalism, and a background method where the soft mode is absorbed into a locally curved cosmology. The latter has been recently used to set up (angular averaged) `equal-time consistency relations'. We explicitly demonstrate that the time-flow relations and `equal-time consistency conditions' are only fulfilled at the linear level, and fail at next-to-leading order for an Einstein de-Sitter universe. While applied to the velocities both proposals break down beyond leading order, we find that the `equal-time consistency conditions' quantitatively approximates the perturbative results for the density contrast. Thus, we generalize the background method to properly incorporate the effect of curvature in the density and velocity fluctuations on short scales, and discuss the reasons behind this discrepancy. We conclude with a few comments on practical implementations and future directions.

  7. Density gradient expansion of correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present a general scheme based on nonlinear response theory to calculate the expansion of correlation functions such as the pair-correlation function or the exchange-correlation hole of an inhomogeneous many-particle system in terms of density derivatives of arbitrary order. We further derive a consistency condition that is necessary for the existence of the gradient expansion. This condition is used to carry out an infinite summation of terms involving response functions up to infinite order from which it follows that the coefficient functions of the gradient expansion can be expressed in terms of the local density profile rather than the background density around which the expansion is carried out. We apply the method to the calculation of the gradient expansion of the one-particle density matrix to second order in the density gradients and recover in an alternative manner the result of Gross and Dreizler [Gross and Dreizler, Z. Phys. AZPAADB0340-219310.1007/BF01413038 302, 103 (1981)], which was derived using the Kirzhnits method. The nonlinear response method is more general and avoids the turning point problem of the Kirzhnits expansion. We further give a description of the exchange hole in momentum space and confirm the wave vector analysis of Langreth and Perdew [Langreth and Perdew, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.21.5469 21, 5469 (1980)] for this case. This is used to derive that the second-order gradient expansion of the system averaged exchange hole satisfies the hole sum rule and to calculate the gradient coefficient of the exchange energy without the need to regularize divergent integrals.

  8. Significance of Input Correlations in Striatal Function

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Man Yi; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is the main input station of the basal ganglia and is strongly associated with motor and cognitive functions. Anatomical evidence suggests that individual striatal neurons are unlikely to share their inputs from the cortex. Using a biologically realistic large-scale network model of striatum and cortico-striatal projections, we provide a functional interpretation of the special anatomical structure of these projections. Specifically, we show that weak pairwise correlation within the pool of inputs to individual striatal neurons enhances the saliency of signal representation in the striatum. By contrast, correlations among the input pools of different striatal neurons render the signal representation less distinct from background activity. We suggest that for the network architecture of the striatum, there is a preferred cortico-striatal input configuration for optimal signal representation. It is further enhanced by the low-rate asynchronous background activity in striatum, supported by the balance between feedforward and feedback inhibitions in the striatal network. Thus, an appropriate combination of rates and correlations in the striatal input sets the stage for action selection presumably implemented in the basal ganglia. PMID:22125480

  9. Correlation functions for glass-forming systems

    PubMed

    Jacobs

    2000-07-01

    We present a simple, linear, partial-differential equation for the density-density correlation function in a glass-forming system. The equation is written down on the basis of fundamental and general considerations of linearity, symmetry, stability, thermodynamic irreversibility and consistency with the equation of continuity (i.e. , conservation of matter). The dynamical properties of the solutions show a change in behavior characteristic of the liquid-glass transition as a function of one of the parameters (temperature). The equation can be shown to lead to the simplest mode-coupling theory of glasses and provides a partial justification of this simplest theory. It provides also a method for calculating the space dependence of the correlation functions not available otherwise. The results suggest certain differences in behavior between glassy solids and glass-forming liquids which may be accessible to experiment. A brief discussion is presented of how the method can be applied to other systems such as sandpiles and vortex glasses in type II superconductors. PMID:11088609

  10. Effective theory of squeezed correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Simonović, Marko

    2016-03-01

    Various inflationary scenarios can often be distinguished from one another by looking at the squeezed limit behavior of correlation functions. Therefore, it is useful to have a framework designed to study this limit in a more systematic and efficient way. We propose using an expansion in terms of weakly coupled super-horizon degrees of freedom, which is argued to generically exist in a near de Sitter space-time. The modes have a simple factorized form which leads to factorization of the squeezed-limit correlation functions with power-law behavior in klong/kshort. This approach reproduces the known results in single-, quasi-single-, and multi-field inflationary models. However, it is applicable even if, unlike the above examples, the additional degrees of freedom are not weakly coupled at sub-horizon scales. Stronger results are derived in two-field (or sufficiently symmetric multi-field) inflationary models. We discuss the observability of the non-Gaussian 3-point function in the large-scale structure surveys, and argue that the squeezed limit behavior has a higher detectability chance than equilateral behavior when it scales as (klong/kshort)Δ with Δ < 1—where local non-Gaussianity corresponds to Δ = 0.

  11. Functional complexity in correlated electron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, A. R.

    2002-05-01

    We outline several themes which have now emerged in both organic and inorganic correlated electronic materials: the prevalence of intrinsic complexity realized in the coexistence or competition among broken-symmetry ground states; the origin of landscapes in coupled spin, charge and lattice (orbital) degrees-of-freedom; the importance of co-existing short- and long-range forces; and the importance of multiscale complexity for key material properties, including hierarchies of functional, connected scales, coupled intrinsic inhomogeneities in spin, charge and lattice, consequent intrinsic multiple timescales, and the importance of multifunctional “electro-elastic” materials.

  12. MESON CORRELATION FUNCTIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES.

    SciTech Connect

    WISSEL, S.; DATTA, S.; KARSCH, F.; LAERMANN, E.; SHCHEREDIN, S.

    2005-07-25

    We present preliminary results for the correlation- and spectral functions of different meson channels on the lattice. The main focus lies on gaining control over cut-off as well as on the finite-volume effects. Extrapolations of screening masses above the deconfining temperature are guided by the result of the free (T = {infinity}) case on the lattice and in the continuum. We study the quenched non-perturbatively improved Wilson-clover fermion as well as the hypercube fermion action which might show less cut-off effects.

  13. Meson's correlation functions in a nuclear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chanyong

    2016-09-01

    We investigate meson's spectrum, decay constant and form factor in a nuclear medium through holographic two- and three-point correlation functions. To describe a nuclear medium composed of protons and neutrons, we consider a hard wall model on the thermal charged AdS geometry and show that due to the isospin interaction with a nuclear medium, there exist splittings of the meson's spectrum, decay constant and form factor relying on the isospin charge. In addition, we show that the ρ-meson's form factor describing an interaction with pseudoscalar fluctuation decreases when the nuclear density increases, while the interaction with a longitudinal part of an axial vector meson increases.

  14. Nuclear correlation functions in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Detmold, William; Orginos, Konstantinos

    2013-06-01

    We consider the problem of calculating the large number of Wick contractions necessary to compute states with the quantum numbers of many baryons in lattice QCD. We consider a constructive approach and a determinant-based approach and show that these methods allow the required contractions to be performed for certain choices of interpolating operators. Examples of correlation functions computed using these techniques are shown for the quantum numbers of the light nuclei, $^4$He, $^8$Be, $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O and $^{28}$Si.

  15. Cosmology with massive neutrinos II: on the universality of the halo mass function and bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Emanuele; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Sheth, Ravi K.; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo

    2014-02-01

    We use a large suite of N-body simulations to study departures from universality in halo abundances and clustering in cosmologies with non-vanishing neutrino masses. To this end, we study how the halo mass function and halo bias factors depend on the scaling variable σ2(M,z), the variance of the initial matter fluctuation field, rather than on halo mass M and redshift z themselves. We show that using the variance of the cold dark matter rather than the total mass field, i.e., σ2cdm(M,z) rather than σ2m(M,z), yields more universal results. Analysis of halo bias yields similar conclusions: when large-scale halo bias is defined with respect to the cold dark matter power spectrum, the result is both more universal, and less scale- or k-dependent. These results are used extensively in Papers I and III of this series.

  16. Detecting correlations among functional-sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirino, Davide; Rigosa, Jacopo; Ledda, Alice; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Sequence motifs are words of nucleotides in DNA with biological functions, e.g., gene regulation. Identification of such words proceeds through rejection of Markov models on the expected motif frequency along the genome. Additional biological information can be extracted from the correlation structure among patterns of motif occurrences. In this paper a log-linear multivariate intensity Poisson model is estimated via expectation maximization on a set of motifs along the genome of E. coli K12. The proposed approach allows for excitatory as well as inhibitory interactions among motifs and between motifs and other genomic features like gene occurrences. Our findings confirm previous stylized facts about such types of interactions and shed new light on genome-maintenance functions of some particular motifs. We expect these methods to be applicable to a wider set of genomic features.

  17. Detecting correlations among functional-sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Pirino, Davide; Rigosa, Jacopo; Ledda, Alice; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Sequence motifs are words of nucleotides in DNA with biological functions, e.g., gene regulation. Identification of such words proceeds through rejection of Markov models on the expected motif frequency along the genome. Additional biological information can be extracted from the correlation structure among patterns of motif occurrences. In this paper a log-linear multivariate intensity Poisson model is estimated via expectation maximization on a set of motifs along the genome of E. coli K12. The proposed approach allows for excitatory as well as inhibitory interactions among motifs and between motifs and other genomic features like gene occurrences. Our findings confirm previous stylized facts about such types of interactions and shed new light on genome-maintenance functions of some particular motifs. We expect these methods to be applicable to a wider set of genomic features. PMID:23005179

  18. Dynamic functional network connectivity using distance correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudas, Jorge; Guaje, Javier; Demertzi, Athena; Heine, Lizette; Tshibanda, Luaba; Soddu, Andrea; Laureys, Steven; Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Investigations about the intrinsic brain organization in resting-state are critical for the understanding of healthy, pathological and pharmacological cerebral states. Recent studies on fMRI suggest that resting state activity is organized on large scale networks of coordinated activity, in the so called, Resting State Networks (RSNs). The assessment of the interactions among these functional networks plays an important role for the understanding of different brain pathologies. Current methods to quantify these interactions commonly assume that the underlying coordination mechanisms are stationary and linear through the whole recording of the resting state phenomena. Nevertheless, recent evidence suggests that rather than stationary, these mechanisms may exhibit a rich set of time-varying repertoires. In addition, these approaches do not consider possible non-linear relationships maybe linked to feed-back communication mechanisms between RSNs. In this work, we introduce a novel approach for dynamical functional network connectivity for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting activity, which accounts for non-linear dynamic relationships between RSNs. The proposed method is based on a windowed distance correlations computed on resting state time-courses extracted at single subject level. We showed that this strategy is complementary to the current approaches for dynamic functional connectivity and will help to enhance the discrimination capacity of patients with disorder of consciousness.

  19. String Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraniotis, G. V.

    In this work, we review recent work on string cosmology. The need for an inflationary era is well known. Problems of Standard Cosmology such as horizon, flatness, monopole and entropy find an elegant solution in the inflationary scenario. On the other hand no adequate inflationary model has been constructed so far. In this review we discuss the attempts that have been made in the field of string theory for obtaining an adequate Cosmological Inflationary Epoch. In particular, orbifold compactifications of string theory which are constrained by target-space duality symmetry offer as natural candidates for the role of inflatons the orbifold moduli. Orbifold moduli dynamics is very constrained by duality symmetry and offers a concrete framework for discussing Cosmological Inflation. We discuss the resulting cosmology assuming that nonperturbative dynamics generates a moduli potential which respects target-space modular invariance. Various modular forms for the nonperturbative superpotential and Kähler potential which include the absolute modular invariant j(T) besides the Dedekind eta function η(T) are discussed. We also review scale-factor duality and pre-Big-Bang scenarios in which inflation is driven by the kinetic terms of the dilaton modulus. In this context we discuss the problem of graceful exit and review recent attempts for solving the problem of exiting from inflation. The possibility of obtaining inflation through the D-terms in string models with anomalous UA(1) and other Abelian factors is reviewed. In this context we discuss how the slow-roll problem in supergravity models with F-term inflation can be solved by D-term inflation. We also briefly review the consequences of duality for a generalized Heisenberg uncertainty principle and the structure of space-time at short scales. The problem of the Cosmological Constant is also briefly discussed.

  20. Structure-function correlations in tyrosinases.

    PubMed

    Kanteev, Margarita; Goldfeder, Mor; Fishman, Ayelet

    2015-09-01

    Tyrosinases are metalloenzymes belonging to the type-3 copper protein family which contain two copper ions in the active site. They are found in various prokaryotes as well as in plants, fungi, arthropods, and mammals and are responsible for pigmentation, wound healing, radiation protection, and primary immune response. Tyrosinases perform two sequential enzymatic reactions: hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of diphenols to form quinones which polymerize spontaneously to melanin. Two other members of this family are catechol oxidases, which are prevalent mainly in plants and perform only the second oxidation step, and hemocyanins, which lack enzymatic activity and are oxygen carriers. In the last decade, several structures of plant and bacterial tyrosinases were determined, some with substrates or inhibitors, highlighting features and residues which are important for copper uptake and catalysis. This review summarizes the updated information on structure-function correlations in tyrosinases along with comparison to other type-3 copper proteins. PMID:26104241

  1. Structure–function correlations in tyrosinases

    PubMed Central

    Kanteev, Margarita; Goldfeder, Mor; Fishman, Ayelet

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosinases are metalloenzymes belonging to the type-3 copper protein family which contain two copper ions in the active site. They are found in various prokaryotes as well as in plants, fungi, arthropods, and mammals and are responsible for pigmentation, wound healing, radiation protection, and primary immune response. Tyrosinases perform two sequential enzymatic reactions: hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of diphenols to form quinones which polymerize spontaneously to melanin. Two other members of this family are catechol oxidases, which are prevalent mainly in plants and perform only the second oxidation step, and hemocyanins, which lack enzymatic activity and are oxygen carriers. In the last decade, several structures of plant and bacterial tyrosinases were determined, some with substrates or inhibitors, highlighting features and residues which are important for copper uptake and catalysis. This review summarizes the updated information on structure–function correlations in tyrosinases along with comparison to other type-3 copper proteins. PMID:26104241

  2. The galaxy correlation function as a constraint on galaxy formation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Daalen, Marcel P.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.; Angulo, Raul E.; White, Simon D. M.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce methods which allow observed galaxy clustering to be used together with observed luminosity or stellar mass functions to constrain the physics of galaxy formation. We show how the projected two-point correlation function of galaxies in a large semi-analytic simulation can be estimated to better than ˜10 per cent using only a very small subsample of the subhalo merger trees. This allows measured correlations to be used as constraints in a Monte Carlo Markov Chain exploration of the astrophysical and cosmological parameter space. An important part of our scheme is an analytic profile which captures the simulated satellite distribution extremely well out to several halo virial radii. This is essential to reproduce the correlation properties of the full simulation at intermediate separations. As a first application, we use low-redshift clustering and abundance measurements to constrain a recent version of the Munich semi-analytic model. The preferred values of most parameters are consistent with those found previously, with significantly improved constraints and somewhat shifted `best' values for parameters that primarily affect spatial distributions. Our methods allow multi-epoch data on galaxy clustering and abundance to be used as joint constraints on galaxy formation. This may lead to significant constraints on cosmological parameters even after marginalizing over galaxy formation physics.

  3. Primordial cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montani, Giovanni

    to the literature.8. Hamiltonian formulation of the mixmaster. 8.1. Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics. 8.2. The mixmaster model in the Misner variables. 8.3. Misner-Chitre like variables. 8.4. The invariant Liouville measure. 8.5. Invariant Lyapunov exponent. 8.6. Chaos covariance. 8.7. Cosmological chaos as a dimensional and matter dependent phenomenon. 8.8. Isotropization Mechanism. 8.9. Guidelines to the literature -- 9. The generic cosmological solution near the singularity. 9.1. Inhomogeneous perturbations of Bianchi IX. 9.2. Formulation of the generic cosmological problem. 9.3. The fragmentation process. 9.4. The generic cosmological solution in Misner variables. 9.5. Hamiltonian formulation in a general framework. 9.6. The generic cosmological problem in the Iwasawa variables. 9.7. Multidimensional oscillatory regime. 9.8. Properties of the BKL map. 9.9. Guidelines to the literature -- 10. Standard quantum cosmology. 10.1. Quantum geometrodynamics. 10.2. The problem of time. 10.3. What is quantum cosmology? 10.4. Path integral in the minisuperspace. 10.5. Scalar field as relational time. 10.6. Interpretation of the wave function of the universe. 10.7. Boundary conditions. 10.8. Quantization of the FRW model filled with a scalar field. 10.9. The Poincare half plane. 10.10. Quantum dynamics of the Taub universe. 10.11. Quantization of the mixmaster in the Misner picture. 10.12. The quantum Mixmaster in the Poincare half plane. 10.13. Guidelines to the literature -- 11. Generalized approaches to quantum mechanics. 11.1. The algebraic approach. 11.2. Polymer quantum mechanics. 11.3. On the existence of a fundamental scale. 11.4. String theory and generalized uncertainty principle. 11.5. Heisenberg algebras in non-commutative Snyder space-time. 11.6. Quantum mechanics in the GUP framework. 11.7. Guidelines to the literature -- 12. Modern quantum cosmology. 12.1. Loop quantum gravity. 12.2. Loop quantum cosmology. 12.3. Mixmaster universe in LQC. 12

  4. Anisotropic extinction distortion of the galaxy correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wenjuan; Hui, Lam; Ménard, Brice; May, Morgan; Scranton, Ryan

    2011-09-01

    Similar to the magnification of the galaxies’ fluxes by gravitational lensing, the extinction of the fluxes by comic dust, whose existence is recently detected by [B. Ménard, R. Scranton, M. Fukugita, and G. Richards, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc.MNRAA40035-8711 405, 1025 (2010)DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16486.x.], also modifies the distribution of a flux-selected galaxy sample. We study the anisotropic distortion by dust extinction to the 3D galaxy correlation function, including magnification bias and redshift distortion at the same time. We find the extinction distortion is most significant along the line of sight and at large separations, similar to that by magnification bias. The correction from dust extinction is negative except at sufficiently large transverse separations, which is almost always opposite to that from magnification bias (we consider a number count slope s>0.4). Hence, the distortions from these two effects tend to reduce each other. At low z (≲1), the distortion by extinction is stronger than that by magnification bias, but at high z, the reverse holds. We also study how dust extinction affects probes in real space of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the linear redshift distortion parameter β. We find its effect on BAO is negligible. However, it introduces a positive scale-dependent correction to β that can be as large as a few percent. At the same time, we also find a negative scale-dependent correction from magnification bias, which is up to percent level at low z, but to ˜40% at high z. These corrections are non-negligible for precision cosmology, and should be considered when testing General Relativity through the scale-dependence of β.

  5. Luminosity function and cosmological evolution of X-ray selected quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of a complete sample of 55 X-ray sources is presented as part of the Medium Sensitivity Survey of the Einstein Observatory. A pure luminosity evolutionary law is derived in order to determine the uniform distribution of the sources and the rates of evolution for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) observed by X-ray and optical techniques are compared. A nonparametric representation of the luminosity function is fitted to the observational data. On the basis of the reduced data, it is determined that: (1) AGNs evolve cosmologically; (2) less evolution is required to explain the X-ray data than the optical data; (3) the high-luminosity portion of the X-ray luminosity can be described by a power-law with a slope of gamma = 3.6; and (4) the X-ray luminosity function flattens at low luminosities. Some of the implications of the results for conventional theoretical models of the evolution of quasars and Seyfert galaxies are discussed.

  6. Emulating the CFHTLenS weak lensing data: Cosmological constraints from moments and Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Andrea; Liu, Jia; Haiman, Zoltán; May, Morgan; Hui, Lam; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2015-05-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is a powerful cosmological probe, with non-Gaussian features potentially containing the majority of the information. We examine constraints on the parameter triplet (Ωm,w ,σ8) from non-Gaussian features of the weak lensing convergence field, including a set of moments (up to fourth order) and Minkowski functionals, using publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations spanning 91 points in (Ωm,w ,σ8) parameter space, replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts and shape noise in the CFHTLenS catalogs. We then build an emulator that interpolates the simulated descriptors as a function of (Ωm,w ,σ8), and use it to compute the likelihood function and parameter constraints. We employ a principal component analysis to reduce dimensionality and to help stabilize the constraints with respect to the number of bins used to construct each statistic. Using the full set of statistics, we find Σ8≡σ8(Ωm/0.27 )0.55=0.75 ±0.04 (68% C.L.), in agreement with previous values. We find that constraints on the (Ωm,σ8) doublet from the Minkowski functionals suffer a strong bias. However, high-order moments break the (Ωm,σ8) degeneracy and provide a tight constraint on these parameters with no apparent bias. The main contribution comes from quartic moments of derivatives.

  7. Cosmological dynamics with non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrycyna, Orest; Szydłowski, Marek

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical systems methods are used to investigate global behaviour of the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model in gravitational theory with a non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function. We show that the system can be reduced to an autonomous three-dimensional dynamical system and additionally is equipped with an invariant manifold corresponding to an accelerated expansion of the universe. Using this invariant manifold we find an exact solution of the reduced dynamics. We investigate all solutions for all admissible initial conditions using theory of dynamical systems to obtain a classification of all evolutional paths. The right-hand sides of the dynamical system depend crucially on the value of the non-minimal coupling constant therefore we study bifurcation values of this parameter under which the structure of the phase space changes qualitatively. We found a special bifurcation value of the non-minimal coupling constant which is distinguished by dynamics of the model and may suggest some additional symmetry in matter sector of the theory.

  8. Cosmological Parameter Estimation and Window Function in Counts-in-Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Y.; Matsubara, T.

    2006-11-01

    We estimate the cosmological parameter bounds expected from the counts-in-cells analysis of the galaxy distributions of SDSS samples, which are the Main Galaxies (MGs) and the Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We use the m-weight Epanechnikov kernel as window function with expectation of improving the bounds of parameters. We apply the Fisher Information Matrix Analysis, which can estimate the minimum expected parameter bounds without any data. In this analysis, we derive the covariance matrix that includes the consideration of overlapping of cells. As a result, we found that the signal to noise of the LRG sample is bigger than that of the MG sample because the range of data using is only linear scale. Therefore, the LRG sample is more suitable for parameter estimation. For the LRG sample, about six hundred data points are sufficient to get maximum effect on parameter bounds. Large parameter set results in poor bounds because of degeneracy, the matter density, the baryon fraction, the neutrino density and σ2 8 including the amplitude of the power spectrum, the linear bias and the Kaiser effect seems to be an appropriate set.

  9. Cosmology with massive neutrinos II: on the universality of the halo mass function and bias

    SciTech Connect

    Castorina, Emanuele; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Sheth, Ravi K.; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo E-mail: emiliano.sefusatti@brera.inaf.it E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it

    2014-02-01

    We use a large suite of N-body simulations to study departures from universality in halo abundances and clustering in cosmologies with non-vanishing neutrino masses. To this end, we study how the halo mass function and halo bias factors depend on the scaling variable σ{sup 2}(M,z), the variance of the initial matter fluctuation field, rather than on halo mass M and redshift z themselves. We show that using the variance of the cold dark matter rather than the total mass field, i.e., σ{sup 2}{sub cdm}(M,z) rather than σ{sup 2}{sub m}(M,z), yields more universal results. Analysis of halo bias yields similar conclusions: when large-scale halo bias is defined with respect to the cold dark matter power spectrum, the result is both more universal, and less scale- or k-dependent. These results are used extensively in Papers I and III of this series.

  10. X-ray selected quasars and Seyfert galaxies - Cosmological evolution, luminosity function, and contribution to the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of quasars and Seyfert galaxies (active galactic nuclei /AGNs/) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 56 objects extracted from the expanded Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey, and it is exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space of X-ray selected AGNs is confirmed to be strongly nonuniform; the amount of cosmological evolution required by the data is in agreement with a previous determination based on a smaller sample of objects. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) is derived. The high-luminosity part of the XLF is satisfactorily described by a power law of slope gamma approximately 3.6. A significant flattening is observed at low luminosities. The simultaneous determination of the cosmological evolution and of the X-ray luminosity function of AGNs is then used to estimate the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse X-ray background. Using the best fit values for the evolution of AGNs and for their volume density, it is found that they contribute approximately 80 percent of the 2 keV diffuse X-ray background. Uncertainties in this estimate are still rather large; however, it seems difficult to reconcile the data with a contribution much less than 50 percent.

  11. Unified cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.M. Department of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul )

    1990-04-15

    Recently a unified cosmology was proposed as a higher-dimensional generalization of the standard big-bang cosmology. In this paper we discuss its foundation, characteristics, and possible cosmological solutions in detail. In particular we discuss how the missing-mass problem, the horizon problem, and the flatness problem of the standard model can be resolved within the context of this unified cosmology.

  12. Deformation quantization of cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Rubén; García-Compeán, Hugo; Turrubiates, Francisco J.

    2011-06-01

    The Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of deformation quantization is applied to cosmological models in the minisuperspace. The quantization procedure is performed explicitly for quantum cosmology in a flat minisuperspace. The de Sitter cosmological model is worked out in detail and the computation of the Wigner functions for the Hartle-Hawking, Vilenkin and Linde wave functions are done numerically. The Wigner function is analytically calculated for the Kantowski-Sachs model in (non)commutative quantum cosmology and for string cosmology with dilaton exponential potential. Finally, baby universes solutions are described in this context and the Wigner function is obtained.

  13. Density Functional Model for Nondynamic and Strong Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Proynov, Emil

    2016-01-12

    A single-term density functional model for the left-right nondynamic/strong electron correlation is presented based on single-determinant Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It is derived from modeling the adiabatic connection for kinetic correlation energy based on physical arguments, with the correlation potential energy based on the Becke'13 model ( Becke, A.D. J. Chem. Phys . 2013 , 138 , 074109 ). This functional satisfies some known scaling relationships for correlation functionals. The fractional spin error is further reduced substantially with a new density-functional correction. Preliminary tests with self-consistent-field implementation show that the model, with only three empirical parameters, recovers the majority of left-right nondynamic/strong correlation upon bond dissociation and performs reasonably well for atomization energies and singlet-triplet energy splittings. This study also demonstrates the feasibility of developing DFT functionals for nondynamic and strong correlation within the single-determinant KS scheme. PMID:26636190

  14. Holographic signatures of cosmological singularities.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Netta; Hertog, Thomas; Horowitz, Gary T

    2014-09-19

    To gain insight into the quantum nature of cosmological singularities, we study anisotropic Kasner solutions in gauge-gravity duality. The dual description of the bulk evolution towards the singularity involves N=4 super Yang-Mills theory on the expanding branch of deformed de Sitter space and is well defined. We compute two-point correlators of Yang-Mills operators of large dimensions using spacelike geodesics anchored on the boundary. The correlators show a strong signature of the singularity around horizon scales and decay at large boundary separation at different rates in different directions. More generally, the boundary evolution exhibits a process of particle creation similar to that in inflation. This leads us to conjecture that information on the quantum nature of cosmological singularities is encoded in long-wavelength features of the boundary wave function. PMID:25279620

  15. Total energy equation leading to exchange-correlation functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Tzu-Chiang

    2015-05-01

    By solving the total energy equation, we obtain the formula of exchange-correlation functional for the first time. This functional is usually determined by fitting experimental data or the numerical results of models. In the uniform electron gas limit, our exchange-correlation functional can exactly reproduce the results of Perdew-Zunger parameterization from the jellium model. By making use of a particular solution, our exchange-correlation functional could take into account the case of non-uniform electron density, and its validity can be confirmed through comparisons of the band structure, equilibrium lattice constant, and bulk modulus of aluminum and silicon. The absence of mechanical prescriptions for the systematic improvement of exchange-correlation functional hinders further development of density-functional theory (DFT), and the formula of exchange-correlation functional given in this study might provide a new perspective to help DFT out of this awkward situation.

  16. The Eulerian time correlation function from direct simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; He, Guowei

    2001-11-01

    The Eulerian time correlation function in homogeneous isotropic turbulence is obtained from direct numerical simulation. We develop curvefits of this function using a producure suggested by Boon and Yip (Molecular Hydrodynamics), which develops a continued fraction expansion of the Laplace transform of the time correlation function. Results of different two-pole expressions are compared with the results of the simulations. Good agreement using one such expression is obtained. The curvefit is developed both for the DNS dataset and for the time correlation function computed from LES. The dynamic meaning of the time correlation function in turbulence is compared to the role of the time correlation function in molecular hydrodynamics, where it is associated with the hydrodynamic modes of the fluid.

  17. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in correlated wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Tocchio, Luca F.; Valentí, Roser; Becca, Federico; Gros, Claudius

    2016-03-01

    We show that Jastrow-Slater wave functions, in which a density-density Jastrow factor is applied onto an uncorrelated fermionic state, may possess long-range order even when all symmetries are preserved in the wave function. This fact is mainly related to the presence of a sufficiently strong Jastrow term (also including the case of full Gutzwiller projection, suitable for describing spin models). Selected examples are reported, including the spawning of Néel order and dimerization in spin systems, and the stabilization of charge and orbital order in itinerant electronic systems.

  18. Functional brain correlates of heterosexual paedophilia.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Boris; Paul, Thomas; Gizewski, Elke; Forsting, Michael; Leygraf, Norbert; Schedlowski, Manfred; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2008-05-15

    Although the neuronal mechanisms underlying normal sexual motivation and function have recently been examined, the alterations in brain function in deviant sexual behaviours such as paedophilia are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify paedophilia-specific functional networks implicated in sexual arousal. Therefore a consecutive sample of eight paedophile forensic inpatients, exclusively attracted to females, and 12 healthy age-matched heterosexual control participants from a comparable socioeconomic stratum participated in a visual sexual stimulation procedure during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The visual stimuli were sexually stimulating photographs and emotionally neutral photographs. Immediately after the imaging session subjective responses pertaining to sexual desire were recorded. Principally, the brain response of heterosexual paedophiles to heteropaedophilic stimuli was comparable to that of heterosexual males to heterosexual stimuli, including different limbic structures (amygdala, cingulate gyrus, and hippocampus), the substantia nigra, caudate nucleus, as well as the anterior cingulate cortex, different thalamic nuclei, and associative cortices. However, responses to visual sexual stimulation were found in the orbitofrontal cortex in healthy heterosexual males, but not in paedophiles, in whom abnormal activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was observed. Thus, in line with clinical observations and neuropsychological studies, it seems that central processing of sexual stimuli in heterosexual paedophiles may be altered by a disturbance in the prefrontal networks, which, as has already been hypothesized, may be associated with stimulus-controlled behaviours, such as sexual compulsive behaviours. Moreover, these findings may suggest a dysfunction (in the functional and effective connectivity) at the cognitive stage of sexual arousal processing. PMID:18358744

  19. Analysis of spectra using correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A novel method is presented for the quantitative analysis of spectra based on the properties of the cross correlation between a real spectrum and either a numerical synthesis or laboratory simulation. A new goodness-of-fit criterion called the heteromorphic coefficient H is proposed that has the property of being zero when a fit is achieved and varying smoothly through zero as the iteration proceeds, providing a powerful tool for automatic or near-automatic analysis. It is also shown that H can be rendered substantially noise-immune, permitting the analysis of very weak spectra well below the apparent noise level and, as a byproduct, providing Doppler shift and radial velocity information with excellent precision. The technique is in regular use in the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) project and operates in an interactive, realtime computing environment with turn-around times of a few seconds or less.

  20. Off-forward quark-quark correlation function

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, Sabrina

    2006-09-01

    The properties of the nonforward quark-quark correlation function are examined. We derive constraints on the correlation function from the transformation properties of the fundamental fields of QCD occurring in its definition. We further develop a method to construct an Ansatz for this correlator. We present the complete leading order set of generalized parton distributions in terms of the amplitudes of the Ansatz. Finally we conclude that the number of independent generalized parton helicity changing distributions is four.

  1. Generalized -deformed correlation functions as spectral functions of hyperbolic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Bytsenko, A. A.; Guimarães, M. E. X.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze the role of vertex operator algebra and 2d amplitudes from the point of view of the representation theory of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras, MacMahon and Ruelle functions. By definition p-dimensional MacMahon function, with , is the generating function of p-dimensional partitions of integers. These functions can be represented as amplitudes of a two-dimensional c = 1 CFT, and, as such, they can be generalized to . With some abuse of language we call the latter amplitudes generalized MacMahon functions. In this paper we show that generalized p-dimensional MacMahon functions can be rewritten in terms of Ruelle spectral functions, whose spectrum is encoded in the Patterson-Selberg function of three-dimensional hyperbolic geometry.

  2. A Representation for Fermionic Correlation Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Joel; Knörrer, Horst; Trubowitz, Eugene

    Let dμS(a) be a Gaussian measure on the finitely generated Grassmann algebra A. Given an even W(a)∈A, we construct an operator R on A such that for all f(a)∈A. This representation of the Schwinger functional iteratively builds up Feynman graphs by successively appending lines farther and farther from f. It allows the Pauli exclusion principle to be implemented quantitatively by a simple application of Gram's inequality.

  3. 42 CFR 476.86 - Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions. 476.86 Section 476.86 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...) Qio Review Functions § 476.86 Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions....

  4. 42 CFR 476.86 - Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions. 476.86 Section 476.86 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...) Qio Review Functions § 476.86 Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions....

  5. Understanding volatility correlation behavior with a magnitude cross-correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Woo Cheol; Oh, Gabjin; Kim, Seunghwan

    2006-06-01

    We propose an approach for analyzing the basic relation between correlation properties of the original signal and its magnitude fluctuations by decomposing the original signal into its positive and negative fluctuation components. We use this relation to understand the following phenomenon found in many naturally occurring time series: the magnitude of the signal exhibits long-range correlation, whereas the original signal is short-range correlated. The applications of our approach to heart rate variability signals and high-frequency foreign exchange rates reveal that the difference between the correlation properties of the original signal and its magnitude fluctuations is induced by the time organization structure of the correlation function between the magnitude fluctuations of positive and negative components. We show that this correlation function can be described well by a stretched-exponential function and is related to the nonlinearity and the multifractal structure of the signals.

  6. Two-point correlation function of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.; Bouchet, Francois R.

    1989-01-01

    The two-point correlations of cosmic-string loops are studied with numerical simulations of the evolution of a cosmic-string network in an expanding universe. It is found that the initial positions of loops that are chopped off the network have a correlation function that is quite similar to the highest estimates of the Abell-cluster correlation function, but these correlations are rapidly washed out by the motion of the loops. The implications for the cosmic-string galaxy-formation scenario are briefly discussed.

  7. The Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters and Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z <= 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/R 0)-γ on the scales of 10 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 50 h -1 Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R 0 = 18.84 ± 0.27 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 15 and a smaller length of R 0 = 16.15 ± 0.13 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 5. The power-law index of γ = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r ~ 110 h -1 Mpc with a significance of ~1.9σ. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 200 h -1 Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are Dv (zm = 0.276) = 1077 ± 55(1σ) Mpc and h = 0.73 ± 0.039(1σ), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density Ω m h 2 = 0.093 ± 0.0077(1σ), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3σ. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  8. THE CORRELATION FUNCTION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AND DETECTION OF BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-10

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z {<=} 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model {xi}(r) = (r/R{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}} on the scales of 10 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R{sub 0} = 18.84 {+-} 0.27 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 15 and a smaller length of R{sub 0} = 16.15 {+-} 0.13 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 5. The power-law index of {gamma} = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r {approx} 110 h{sup -1} Mpc with a significance of {approx}1.9{sigma}. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 200 h{sup -1} Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are D{sub v} (z{sub m} = 0.276) = 1077 {+-} 55(1{sigma}) Mpc and h = 0.73 {+-} 0.039(1{sigma}), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density {Omega}{sub m} h{sup 2} = 0.093 {+-} 0.0077(1{sigma}), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3{sigma}. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  9. Dental microwear. Morphological, functional and phylogenetic correlations.

    PubMed

    Villa, G; Giacobini, G

    1998-01-01

    Dental wear, at first considered a pathological condition, is now regarded as a physiological mechanism of teeth adaptation to continuous masticatory stresses. Excessive wear is limited by characteristic structural adaptations of dental hard tissues showing a phylogenetic trend and specialisation. Enamel is the main tissue subjected to wear; however, advanced enamel wear exposes increasingly large areas of dentine. Enamel hardness and anisotropy are the major factors contrasting wear and microfractures. Anisotropy is mainly related to the different orientation of prism bundles (and of hydroxiapatite cristals). Enamel wear development is also related to differences in microhardness, density, mineral composition and protein distribution. Masticatory loads distributed along the enamel-dentine junction uniformly disperse in the underlying dentine. In spite of its structural characteristics, dentine is relatively isotropic by the functional point of view. Even if its lower hardness opposes less efficaciously to wear, its biomechanical characteristics successfully contrast microfractures. The study of microwear (namely the microscopic analysis of worn dental surfaces) can be made both on original surfaces and on high definition silicone-resin replicas. Scanning electron microscope observations allow identification of surface damage (microtraces) produced by different physical and chemical agents. Microwear analysis may provide indications about alimentary and non alimentary habits, masticatory biomechanics and pathological situations (e.g., bruxism). PMID:9766174

  10. Correlation functions of one-dimensional Bose-Fermi mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Frahm, Holger; Palacios, Guillaume

    2005-12-15

    We calculate the asymptotic behavior of correlators as a function of the microscopic parameters for an integrable Bose-Fermi mixture with repulsive interaction in one dimension. For two cases, namely polarized and unpolarized fermions the singularities of the momentum distribution functions are characterized as a function of the coupling constant and the relative density of bosons.

  11. A cumulant functional for static and dynamic correlation.

    PubMed

    Hollett, Joshua W; Hosseini, Hessam; Menzies, Cameron

    2016-08-28

    A functional for the cumulant energy is introduced. The functional is composed of a pair-correction and static and dynamic correlation energy components. The pair-correction and static correlation energies are functionals of the natural orbitals and the occupancy transferred between near-degenerate orbital pairs, rather than the orbital occupancies themselves. The dynamic correlation energy is a functional of the statically correlated on-top two-electron density. The on-top density functional used in this study is the well-known Colle-Salvetti functional. Using the cc-pVTZ basis set, the functional effectively models the bond dissociation of H2, LiH, and N2 with equilibrium bond lengths and dissociation energies comparable to those provided by multireference second-order perturbation theory. The performance of the cumulant functional is less impressive for HF and F2, mainly due to an underestimation of the dynamic correlation energy by the Colle-Salvetti functional. PMID:27586903

  12. athena: Tree code for second-order correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbinger, Martin; Bonnett, Christopher; Coupon, Jean

    2014-02-01

    athena is a 2d-tree code that estimates second-order correlation functions from input galaxy catalogues. These include shear-shear correlations (cosmic shear), position-shear (galaxy-galaxy lensing) and position-position (spatial angular correlation). Written in C, it includes a power-spectrum estimator implemented in Python; this script also calculates the aperture-mass dispersion. A test data set is available.

  13. Alcock-paczynski cosmological test

    SciTech Connect

    López-Corredoira, M.

    2014-02-01

    In order to test the expansion of the universe and its geometry, we carry out an Alcock-Paczyński cosmological test, that is, an evaluation of the ratio of observed angular size to radial/redshift size. The main advantage of this test is that it does not depend on the evolution of the galaxies but only on the geometry of the universe. However, the redshift distortions produced by the peculiar velocities of the gravitational infall also have an influence, which should be separated from the cosmological effect. We derive the anisotropic correlation function of sources in three surveys within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): galaxies from SDSS-III/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 10 (BOSS-DR10) and QSOs from SDSS-II and SDSS-III/BOSS-DR10. From these, we are able to disentangle the dynamic and geometric distortions and thus derive the ratio of observed angular size to radial/redshift size at different redshifts. We also add some other values available in the literature. Then we use the data to evaluate which cosmological model fits them. We used six different models: concordance ΛCDM, Einstein-de Sitter, open-Friedman cosmology without dark energy, flat quasi-steady state cosmology, a static universe with a linear Hubble law, and a static universe with tired-light redshift. Only two of the six models above fit the data of the Alcock-Paczyński test: concordance ΛCDM and static universe with tired-light redshift, whereas the rest of them are excluded at a >95% confidence level. If we assume that ΛCDM is the correct one, the best fit with a free Ω {sub m} is produced for Ω{sub m}=0.24{sub −0.07}{sup +0.10}.

  14. Equilibrium time correlation functions and the dynamics of fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Luban, Marshall; Luscombe, James H.

    1999-12-01

    Equilibrium time correlation functions are of great importance because they probe the equilibrium dynamical response to external perturbations. We discuss the properties of time correlation functions for several systems that are simple enough to illustrate the calculational steps involved. The discussion underscores the need for avoiding language which misleadingly suggests that thermal equilibrium is associated with a quiescent or moribund state of the system. (c) 1999 American Association of Physics Teachers.

  15. ZeldovichRecon: Halo correlation function using the Zeldovich approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Martin

    2015-12-01

    ZeldovichRecon computes the halo correlation function using the Zeldovich approximation. It includes 3 variants:zelrecon.cpp, which computes the various contributions to the correlation function; zelrecon_ctypes.cpp, which is designed to be called from Python using the ctypes library; and a version which implements the "ZEFT" formalism of "A Lagrangian effective field theory" [arxiv:1506.05264] including the alpha term described in that paper.

  16. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings: Voronoi correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Michael A; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    We characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings by computing the Minkowski functionals (volume, surface area, and integrated mean curvature) of their associated Voronoi cells. The probability distribution functions of these functionals of Voronoi cells in MRJ sphere packings are qualitatively similar to those of an equilibrium hard-sphere liquid and partly even to the uncorrelated Poisson point process, implying that such local statistics are relatively structurally insensitive. This is not surprising because the Minkowski functionals of a single Voronoi cell incorporate only local information and are insensitive to global structural information. To improve upon this, we introduce descriptors that incorporate nonlocal information via the correlation functions of the Minkowski functionals of two cells at a given distance as well as certain cell-cell probability density functions. We evaluate these higher-order functions for our MRJ packings as well as equilibrium hard spheres and the Poisson point process. It is shown that these Minkowski correlation and density functions contain visibly more information than the corresponding standard pair-correlation functions. We find strong anticorrelations in the Voronoi volumes for the hyperuniform MRJ packings, consistent with previous findings for other pair correlations [A. Donev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 090604 (2005)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.090604], indicating that large-scale volume fluctuations are suppressed by accompanying large Voronoi cells with small cells, and vice versa. In contrast to the aforementioned local Voronoi statistics, the correlation functions of the Voronoi cells qualitatively distinguish the structure of MRJ sphere packings (prototypical glasses) from that of not only the Poisson point process but also the correlated equilibrium hard-sphere liquids. Moreover, while we did not find any perfect icosahedra (the locally densest possible structure in which a

  17. Structure of correlation functions in single-field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Shandera, Sarah

    2009-06-15

    Many statistics available to constrain non-Gaussianity from inflation are simplest to use under the assumption that the curvature correlation functions are hierarchical. That is, if the n-point function is proportional to the (n-1) power of the two-point function amplitude and the fluctuations are small, the probability distribution can be approximated by expanding around a Gaussian in moments. However, single-field inflation with higher derivative interactions has a second small number, the sound speed, that appears in the problem when non-Gaussianity is significant and changes the scaling of correlation functions. Here we examine the structure of correlation functions in the most general single scalar field action with higher derivatives, formalizing the conditions under which the fluctuations can be expanded around a Gaussian distribution. We comment about the special case of the Dirac-Born-Infeld action.

  18. Structure of correlation functions in single-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shandera, Sarah

    2009-06-01

    Many statistics available to constrain non-Gaussianity from inflation are simplest to use under the assumption that the curvature correlation functions are hierarchical. That is, if the n-point function is proportional to the (n-1) power of the two-point function amplitude and the fluctuations are small, the probability distribution can be approximated by expanding around a Gaussian in moments. However, single-field inflation with higher derivative interactions has a second small number, the sound speed, that appears in the problem when non-Gaussianity is significant and changes the scaling of correlation functions. Here we examine the structure of correlation functions in the most general single scalar field action with higher derivatives, formalizing the conditions under which the fluctuations can be expanded around a Gaussian distribution. We comment about the special case of the Dirac-Born-Infeld action.

  19. Even-odd correlation functions on an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kapit, Eliot; Mueller, Erich

    2010-07-15

    We study how different many-body states appear in a quantum-gas microscope, such as the one developed at Harvard [Bakr et al., Nature 462, 74 (2009)], where the site-resolved parity of the atom number is imaged. We calculate the spatial correlations of the microscope images, corresponding to the correlation function of the parity of the number of atoms at each site. We produce analytic results for a number of well-known models: noninteracting bosons, the large-U Bose-Hubbard model, and noninteracting fermions. We find that these parity correlations tend to be less strong than density-density correlations, but they carry similar information.

  20. A Kinematically Consistent Two-Point Correlation Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    A simple kinematically consistent expression for the longitudinal two-point correlation function related to both the integral length scale and the Taylor microscale is obtained. On the inner scale, in a region of width inversely proportional to the turbulent Reynolds number, the function has the appropriate curvature at the origin. The expression for two-point correlation is related to the nonlinear cascade rate, or dissipation epsilon, a quantity that is carried as part of a typical single-point turbulence closure simulation. Constructing an expression for the two-point correlation whose curvature at the origin is the Taylor microscale incorporates one of the fundamental quantities characterizing turbulence, epsilon, into a model for the two-point correlation function. The integral of the function also gives, as is required, an outer integral length scale of the turbulence independent of viscosity. The proposed expression is obtained by kinematic arguments; the intention is to produce a practically applicable expression in terms of simple elementary functions that allow an analytical evaluation, by asymptotic methods, of diverse functionals relevant to single-point turbulence closures. Using the expression devised an example of the asymptotic method by which functionals of the two-point correlation can be evaluated is given.

  1. Testing Group Differences in Brain Functional Connectivity: Using Correlations or Partial Correlations?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Wozniak, Jeffrey R.; Mueller, Bryon A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows one to study brain functional connectivity, partly motivated by evidence that patients with complex disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, may have altered functional brain connectivity patterns as compared with healthy subjects. A functional connectivity network describes statistical associations of the neural activities among distinct and distant brain regions. Recently, there is a major interest in group-level functional network analysis; however, there is a relative lack of studies on statistical inference, such as significance testing for group comparisons. In particular, it is still debatable which statistic should be used to measure pairwise associations as the connectivity weights. Many functional connectivity studies have used either (full or marginal) correlations or partial correlations for pairwise associations. This article investigates the performance of using either correlations or partial correlations for testing group differences in brain connectivity, and how sparsity levels and topological structures of the connectivity would influence statistical power to detect group differences. Our results suggest that, in general, testing group differences in networks deviates from estimating networks. For example, high regularization in both covariance matrices and precision matrices may lead to higher statistical power; in particular, optimally selected regularization (e.g., by cross-validation or even at the true sparsity level) on the precision matrices with small estimation errors may have low power. Most importantly, and perhaps surprisingly, using either correlations or partial correlations may give very different testing results, depending on which of the covariance matrices and the precision matrices are sparse. Specifically, if the precision matrices are sparse, presumably and arguably a reasonable assumption, then using correlations often yields much higher powered and more

  2. Design of exchange-correlation functionals through the correlation factor approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlíková Přecechtělová, Jana E-mail: Matthias.Ernzerhof@UMontreal.ca

    2015-10-14

    The correlation factor model is developed in which the spherically averaged exchange-correlation hole of Kohn-Sham theory is factorized into an exchange hole model and a correlation factor. The exchange hole model reproduces the exact exchange energy per particle. The correlation factor is constructed in such a manner that the exchange-correlation energy correctly reduces to exact exchange in the high density and rapidly varying limits. Four different correlation factor models are presented which satisfy varying sets of physical constraints. Three models are free from empirical adjustments to experimental data, while one correlation factor model draws on one empirical parameter. The correlation factor models are derived in detail and the resulting exchange-correlation holes are analyzed. Furthermore, the exchange-correlation energies obtained from the correlation factor models are employed to calculate total energies, atomization energies, and barrier heights. It is shown that accurate, non-empirical functionals can be constructed building on exact exchange. Avenues for further improvements are outlined as well.

  3. Universal Spatial Correlation Functions for Describing and Reconstructing Soil Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Elena B.; Mallants, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Structural features of porous materials such as soil define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, or gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere) and solute transport. To characterize soil microstructure, conventional soil science uses such metrics as pore size and pore-size distributions and thin section-derived morphological indicators. However, these descriptors provide only limited amount of information about the complex arrangement of soil structure and have limited capability to reconstruct structural features or predict physical properties. We introduce three different spatial correlation functions as a comprehensive tool to characterize soil microstructure: 1) two-point probability functions, 2) linear functions, and 3) two-point cluster functions. This novel approach was tested on thin-sections (2.21×2.21 cm2) representing eight soils with different pore space configurations. The two-point probability and linear correlation functions were subsequently used as a part of simulated annealing optimization procedures to reconstruct soil structure. Comparison of original and reconstructed images was based on morphological characteristics, cluster correlation functions, total number of pores and pore-size distribution. Results showed excellent agreement for soils with isolated pores, but relatively poor correspondence for soils exhibiting dual-porosity features (i.e. superposition of pores and micro-cracks). Insufficient information content in the correlation function sets used for reconstruction may have contributed to the observed discrepancies. Improved reconstructions may be obtained by adding cluster and other correlation functions into reconstruction sets. Correlation functions and the associated stochastic reconstruction algorithms introduced here are universally applicable in soil science, such as for soil classification

  4. Revealing quantum correlation by negativity of the Wigner function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiabadi, Razieh; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two two-mode continuous variable separable states with the same marginal states. We adopt the definition of classicality in the form of well-defined positive Wigner function describing the state and find that although the states possess positive local Wigner functions, they exhibit negative Wigner functions for the global states. Using the negativity of Wigner function as an indicator of nonclassicality, we show that despite these states possess different negativities of the Wigner function, they do not reveal this difference as phase space nonclassicalities such as negativity of the Mandel Q parameter or quadrature squeezing. We then concentrate on quantum correlation of these states and show that quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty, as two well-defined measures of quantum correlation, manifest the difference between negativity of the Wigner functions. The non-Gaussianity of these states is also examined and show that the difference in behavior of their non-Gaussianity is the same as the difference between negativity of their Wigner functions. We also investigate the influence of correlation rank criterion and find that when the states can be produced locally from classical states, the Wigner functions cannot reveal their quantum correlations.

  5. Dynamical correlation effects on pair-correlation functions of spin polarized two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishan; Garg, Vinayak; Moudgil, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    We report a theoretical study on the spin-resolved pair-correlation functions gσσ'(r) of a two-dimensional electron gas having arbitrary spin polarization ζ by including the dynamics of exchange-correlations within the dynamical self-consistent mean-field theory of Hasegawa and Shimizu. The calculated g↑↑(r), g↓↓(r) and g↑↓(r) exhibit a nice agreement with the recent quantum Monte Carlo simulation data of Gori-Giorgi et al. However, the agreement for the minority spin correlation function g↓↓(r) decreases with increase in ζ and/or decrease in electron density. Nevertheless, the spin-summed correlation function remains close to the simulation data.

  6. IMPROVING CORRELATION FUNCTION FITTING WITH RIDGE REGRESSION: APPLICATION TO CROSS-CORRELATION RECONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu

    2012-02-01

    Cross-correlation techniques provide a promising avenue for calibrating photometric redshifts and determining redshift distributions using spectroscopy which is systematically incomplete (e.g., current deep spectroscopic surveys fail to obtain secure redshifts for 30%-50% or more of the galaxies targeted). In this paper, we improve on the redshift distribution reconstruction methods from our previous work by incorporating full covariance information into our correlation function fits. Correlation function measurements are strongly covariant between angular or spatial bins, and accounting for this in fitting can yield substantial reduction in errors. However, frequently the covariance matrices used in these calculations are determined from a relatively small set (dozens rather than hundreds) of subsamples or mock catalogs, resulting in noisy covariance matrices whose inversion is ill-conditioned and numerically unstable. We present here a method of conditioning the covariance matrix known as ridge regression which results in a more well behaved inversion than other techniques common in large-scale structure studies. We demonstrate that ridge regression significantly improves the determination of correlation function parameters. We then apply these improved techniques to the problem of reconstructing redshift distributions. By incorporating full covariance information, applying ridge regression, and changing the weighting of fields in obtaining average correlation functions, we obtain reductions in the mean redshift distribution reconstruction error of as much as {approx}40% compared to previous methods. We provide a description of POWERFIT, an IDL code for performing power-law fits to correlation functions with ridge regression conditioning that we are making publicly available.

  7. Correlation functions of the integrable spin-s chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Klümper, A.

    2016-06-01

    We study the correlation functions of su(2) invariant spin-s chains in the thermodynamic limit. We derive nonlinear integral equations for an auxiliary correlation function ω for any spin s and finite temperature T. For the spin-3/2 chain for arbitrary temperature and zero magnetic field we obtain algebraic expressions for the reduced density matrix of two-sites. In the zero temperature limit, the density matrix elements are evaluated analytically and appear to be given in terms of Riemann’s zeta function values of even and odd arguments. Dedicated to Professor Rodney Baxter on the occasion of his 75th birthday.

  8. Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    I discuss the classical cosmological tests, i.e., angular size-redshift, flux-redshift, and galaxy number counts, in the light of the cosmology prescribed by the interpretation of the CMB anisotropies. The discussion is somewhat of a primer for physicists, with emphasis upon the possible systematic uncertainties in the observations and their interpretation. Given the curious composition of the Universe inherent in the emerging cosmological model, I stress the value of searching for inconsistencies rather than concordance, and suggest that the prevailing mood of triumphalism in cosmology is premature.

  9. Correlation Function Analysis of Fiber Networks: Implications for Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez-Garcia, Jorge; Braginsky, Leonid; Shklover, Valery; Lawson, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The heat transport in highly porous fiber structures is investigated. The fibers are supposed to be thin, but long, so that the number of the inter-fiber connections along each fiber is large. We show that the effective conductivity of such structures can be found from the correlation length of the two-point correlation function of the local conductivities. Estimation of the parameters, determining the conductivity, from the 2D images of the structures is analyzed.

  10. Long-time tails of correlation and memory functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Isao

    2002-11-01

    We review the generalized Langevin equation, which is a transformation and reformulation of equation of motion, from the two viewpoints: the projection operator method developed by Mori and the recurrence relations method developed by Lee. The fluctuating forces acting on the Bloch electrons’ current are clarified the strongly colored quantum fluctuations with the spontaneous interband transitions leading to a long-time tail of 1/ t for the envelope of the memory function. The velocity autocorrelation functions in the coupled harmonic oscillator on the Bethe lattice have a long-time tail of 1/t t. The oscillation and the form of decay found in correlation functions affect transport coefficients given by the integrated intensity up to infinity. We also study the force-force correlation functions often used as an approximation to the memory function.

  11. Prevalence and correlates of functional dependence among maintenance dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Niall T; Schiller, Brigitte; Saxena, Anjali B; Thomas, I-Chun; Kurella Tamura, Manjula

    2015-10-01

    Functional dependence is an important determinant of longevity and quality of life. The purpose of the current study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of functional dependence among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving maintenance dialysis. We enrolled 148 participants with ESRD from five clinics. Functional status, as measured by basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL, IADL), was ascertained by validated questionnaires. Functional dependence was defined as needing assistance in at least one of seven IADLs or at least one of four ADLs. Demographic characteristics, chronic health conditions, anthropometric measurements, and laboratories were assessed by a combination of self-report and chart review. Cognitive function was assessed with a neurocognitive battery, and depressive symptoms were assessed by questionnaire. Mean age of the sample was 56.2 ± 14.6 years. Eighty-seven participants (58.8%) demonstrated dependence in ADLs or IADLs, 70 (47.2%) exhibited IADL dependence alone, and 17 (11.5%) exhibited combined IADL and ADL dependence. In a multivariable-adjusted model, stroke, cognitive impairment, and higher systolic blood pressure were independent correlates of functional dependence. We found no significant association between demographic characteristics, chronic health conditions, depressive symptoms or laboratory measurements, and functional dependence. Impairment in executive function was more strongly associated with functional dependence than memory impairment. Functional dependence is common among ESRD patients and independently associated with stroke, systolic blood pressure, and executive function impairment. PMID:25731070

  12. N = 4 superconformal Ward identities for correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, A. V.; Hohenegger, S.; Korchemsky, G. P.; Sokatchev, E.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we study the four-point correlation function of the energy-momentum supermultiplet in theories with N = 4 superconformal symmetry in four dimensions. We present a compact form of all component correlators as an invariant of a particular abelian subalgebra of the N = 4 superconformal algebra. This invariant is unique up to a single function of the conformal cross-ratios which is fixed by comparison with the correlation function of the lowest half-BPS scalar operators. Our analysis is independent of the dynamics of a specific theory, in particular it is valid in N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory for any value of the coupling constant. We discuss in great detail a subclass of component correlators, which is a crucial ingredient for the recent study of charge-flow correlations in conformal field theories. We compute the latter explicitly and elucidate the origin of the interesting relations among different types of flow correlations previously observed in arXiv:1309.1424.

  13. Pade spectroscopy of structural correlation functions: Application to liquid gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Klumov, B. A.; Ryltsev, R. E.; Khusnutdinoff, R. M.; Mokshin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We propose the new method of fluid structure investigation based on numerical analytic continuation of structural correlation functions with Pade approximants. The method particularly allows extracting hidden structural features of disordered condensed matter systems from experimental diffraction data. The method has been applied to investigate the local order of liquid gallium, which has a non-trivial structure in both the liquid and solid states. Processing the correlation functions obtained from molecular dynamic simulations, we show the method proposed reveals non-trivial structural features of liquid gallium such as the spectrum of length-scales and the existence of different types of local clusters in the liquid.

  14. An Accurate Density Functional from Exchange-Correlation Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    The exchange-correlation hole is most fundamentally important in the development and understanding of density functional theory (DFT). However, due to the nonlocal nature of the exchange-correlation hole, development of DFT from the underlying hole presents a great challenge, and the works along this direction are limited. Here I will discuss a novel nonempirical DFT based on a semilocal hole, which is obtained from the density matrix expansion. Extensive tests on molecules and solids show that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for wide-ranging properties in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. This work was supported by NSF under Grant No. CHE-1261918.

  15. Quarkonium correlators and spectral functions at zero and finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jakovac, A.; Petreczky, P.; Petrov, K.; Velytsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    We study quarkonium correlators and spectral functions at zero and finite temperature using the anisotropic Fermilab lattice formulation with anisotropy {xi}=2 and 4. To control cut-off effects we use several different lattice spacings. The spectral functions were extracted from lattice correlators with maximum entropy method based on a new algorithm. We find evidence for the survival of 1S quarkonium states in the deconfined medium till relatively high temperatures as well as for dissolution of 1P quarkonium states right above the deconfinement temperature.

  16. A canonical correlation analysis of intelligence and executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Pierson, Eric E; Finch, W Holmes

    2011-01-01

    Executive functioning is one of the most researched and debated topics in neuropsychology. Although neuropsychologists routinely consider executive functioning and intelligence in their assessment process, more information is needed regarding the relationship between these constructs. This study reports the results of a canonical correlation study between the most widely used measure of adult intelligence, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, 3rd edition (WAIS-III; Wechsler, 1997), and the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS; Delis, Kaplan, & Kramer, 2001). The results suggest that, despite considerable shared variability, the measures of executive functioning maintain unique variance that is not encapsulated in the construct of global intelligence. PMID:21390902

  17. Optimization of an exchange-correlation density functional for water.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Michelle; Fernández-Serra, Marivi; Soler, José M

    2016-06-14

    We describe a method, that we call data projection onto parameter space (DPPS), to optimize an energy functional of the electron density, so that it reproduces a dataset of experimental magnitudes. Our scheme, based on Bayes theorem, constrains the optimized functional not to depart unphysically from existing ab initio functionals. The resulting functional maximizes the probability of being the "correct" parameterization of a given functional form, in the sense of Bayes theory. The application of DPPS to water sheds new light on why density functional theory has performed rather poorly for liquid water, on what improvements are needed, and on the intrinsic limitations of the generalized gradient approximation to electron exchange and correlation. Finally, we present tests of our water-optimized functional, that we call vdW-DF-w, showing that it performs very well for a variety of condensed water systems. PMID:27305990

  18. Optimization of an exchange-correlation density functional for water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Michelle; Fernández-Serra, Marivi; Soler, José M.

    2016-06-01

    We describe a method, that we call data projection onto parameter space (DPPS), to optimize an energy functional of the electron density, so that it reproduces a dataset of experimental magnitudes. Our scheme, based on Bayes theorem, constrains the optimized functional not to depart unphysically from existing ab initio functionals. The resulting functional maximizes the probability of being the "correct" parameterization of a given functional form, in the sense of Bayes theory. The application of DPPS to water sheds new light on why density functional theory has performed rather poorly for liquid water, on what improvements are needed, and on the intrinsic limitations of the generalized gradient approximation to electron exchange and correlation. Finally, we present tests of our water-optimized functional, that we call vdW-DF-w, showing that it performs very well for a variety of condensed water systems.

  19. Generating functional approach to Bose-Einstein correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, N.; Biyajima, M.; Andreev, I.V.

    1997-11-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations are considered in the presence of M independent chaotic sources and a coherent source. Our approach is an extension of the formulation in the quantum optics given by Glauber and Lachs. The generating functional (GF) of Bose-Einstein correlation (BEC) functions is derived, and higher order BEC functions are obtained from the GF. A diagrammatic representation for cumulants is made. The number M is explicitly contained in our formulation, which is different from that given by Cramer {ital et al.} The possibility of estimating the number M from the analysis of BEC functions and cumulants is pointed out. Moreover, source size dependence of multiplicity distributions is shown in a simplified case. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Gutzwiller density functional theory for correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K. M.; Schmalian, J.; Wang, C. Z.

    2008-02-04

    We develop a density functional theory (DFT) and formalism for correlated electron systems by taking as reference an interacting electron system that has a ground state wave function which exactly obeys the Gutzwiller approximation for all one-particle operators. The solution of the many-electron problem is mapped onto the self-consistent solution of a set of single-particle Schroedinger equations, analogously to standard DFT-local density approximation calculations.

  1. Structural and functional correlates of epileptogenesis — Does gender matter?

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Ivanka; Engel, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of neuropsychiatric conditions, marked gender-based differences have been found in the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and therapy of disease. One possible reason is that sex differences in cerebral morphology, structural and functional connections, render men and women differentially vulnerable to various disease processes. The present review addresses this issue with respect to the functional and structural correlates to some forms of epilepsy. PMID:24943053

  2. Explicitly correlated wave function for a boron atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalski, Mariusz; Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    We present results of high-precision calculations for a boron atom's properties using wave functions expanded in the explicitly correlated Gaussian basis. We demonstrate that the well-optimized 8192 basis functions enable a determination of energy levels, ionization potential, and fine and hyperfine splittings in atomic transitions with nearly parts per million precision. The results open a window to a spectroscopic determination of nuclear properties of boron including the charge radius of the proton halo in the 8B nucleus.

  3. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  4. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  5. Coverage of dynamic correlation effects by density functional theory functionals: density-based analysis for neon.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, K; Nowakowski, K; Grabowski, I; Wasilewski, J

    2009-04-28

    The problem of linking the dynamic electron correlation effects defined in traditional ab initio methods [or wave function theories (WFTs)] with the structure of the individual density functional theory (DFT) exchange and correlation functionals has been analyzed for the Ne atom, for which nondynamic correlation effects play a negligible role. A density-based approach directly hinged on difference radial-density (DRD) distributions defined with respect the Hartree-Fock radial density has been employed for analyzing the impact of dynamic correlation effects on the density. Attention has been paid to the elimination of basis-set incompleteness errors. The DRD distributions calculated by several ab initio methods have been compared to their DFT counterparts generated for representatives of several generations of broadly used exchange-correlation functionals and for the recently developed orbital-dependent OEP2 exchange-correlation functional [Bartlett et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 034104 (2005)]. For the local, generalized-gradient, and hybrid functionals it has been found that the dynamic correlation effects are to a large extend accounted for by densities resulting from exchange-only calculations. Additional calculations with self-interaction corrected exchange potentials indicate that this finding cannot be explained as an artifact caused by the self-interaction error. It has been demonstrated that the VWN5 and LYP correlation functionals do not represent any substantial dynamical correlation effects on the electron density, whereas these effects are well represented by the orbital-dependent OEP2 correlation functional. Critical comparison of the present results with their counterparts reported in literature has been made. Some attention has been paid to demonstrating the differences between the energy- and density-based perspectives. They indicate the usefulness of density-based criteria for developing new exchange-correlation functionals. PMID:19405556

  6. Coverage of dynamic correlation effects by density functional theory functionals: Density-based analysis for neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, K.; Nowakowski, K.; Grabowski, I.; Wasilewski, J.

    2009-04-01

    The problem of linking the dynamic electron correlation effects defined in traditional ab initio methods [or wave function theories (WFTs)] with the structure of the individual density functional theory (DFT) exchange and correlation functionals has been analyzed for the Ne atom, for which nondynamic correlation effects play a negligible role. A density-based approach directly hinged on difference radial-density (DRD) distributions defined with respect the Hartree-Fock radial density has been employed for analyzing the impact of dynamic correlation effects on the density. Attention has been paid to the elimination of basis-set incompleteness errors. The DRD distributions calculated by several ab initio methods have been compared to their DFT counterparts generated for representatives of several generations of broadly used exchange-correlation functionals and for the recently developed orbital-dependent OEP2 exchange-correlation functional [Bartlett et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 034104 (2005)]. For the local, generalized-gradient, and hybrid functionals it has been found that the dynamic correlation effects are to a large extend accounted for by densities resulting from exchange-only calculations. Additional calculations with self-interaction corrected exchange potentials indicate that this finding cannot be explained as an artifact caused by the self-interaction error. It has been demonstrated that the VWN5 and LYP correlation functionals do not represent any substantial dynamical correlation effects on the electron density, whereas these effects are well represented by the orbital-dependent OEP2 correlation functional. Critical comparison of the present results with their counterparts reported in literature has been made. Some attention has been paid to demonstrating the differences between the energy- and density-based perspectives. They indicate the usefulness of density-based criteria for developing new exchange-correlation functionals.

  7. Even-odd correlation functions on an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapit, Eliot; Mueller, Erich

    2010-07-01

    We study how different many-body states appear in a quantum-gas microscope, such as the one developed at Harvard [Bakr , NatureNATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08482 462, 74 (2009)], where the site-resolved parity of the atom number is imaged. We calculate the spatial correlations of the microscope images, corresponding to the correlation function of the parity of the number of atoms at each site. We produce analytic results for a number of well-known models: noninteracting bosons, the large-U Bose-Hubbard model, and noninteracting fermions. We find that these parity correlations tend to be less strong than density-density correlations, but they carry similar information.

  8. Correlations and Functional Connections in a Population of Grid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roudi, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    We study the statistics of spike trains of simultaneously recorded grid cells in freely behaving rats. We evaluate pairwise correlations between these cells and, using a maximum entropy kinetic pairwise model (kinetic Ising model), study their functional connectivity. Even when we account for the covariations in firing rates due to overlapping fields, both the pairwise correlations and functional connections decay as a function of the shortest distance between the vertices of the spatial firing pattern of pairs of grid cells, i.e. their phase difference. They take positive values between cells with nearby phases and approach zero or negative values for larger phase differences. We find similar results also when, in addition to correlations due to overlapping fields, we account for correlations due to theta oscillations and head directional inputs. The inferred connections between neurons in the same module and those from different modules can be both negative and positive, with a mean close to zero, but with the strongest inferred connections found between cells of the same module. Taken together, our results suggest that grid cells in the same module do indeed form a local network of interconnected neurons with a functional connectivity that supports a role for attractor dynamics in the generation of grid pattern. PMID:25714908

  9. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  10. Local-hybrid functional based on the correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Erin R.

    2014-09-28

    Local-hybrid functionals involve position-dependent mixing of Hartree-Fock and density-functional exchange, which should allow improved performance relative to conventional hybrids by reducing the inherent delocalization error and improving the long-range behaviour. Herein, the same-spin correlation length, obtained from the Fermi-hole radius, is used as the mixing parameter. The performance of the resulting local-hybrid functional is assessed for standard thermochemical and kinetics benchmarks. The local hybrid is shown to perform significantly better than the corresponding global hybrid in almost all cases.

  11. Model-independent plotting of the cosmological scale factor as a function of lookback time

    SciTech Connect

    Ringermacher, H. I.; Mead, L. R. E-mail: Lawrence.mead@usm.edu

    2014-11-01

    In this work we describe a model-independent method of developing a plot of scale factor a(t) versus lookback time t{sub L} from the usual Hubble diagram of modulus data against redshift. This is the first plot of this type. We follow the model-independent methodology of Daly and Djorgovski used for their radio-galaxy data. Once the a(t)data plot is completed, any model can be applied and will display as described in the standard literature. We then compile an extensive data set to z = 1.8 by combining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data from SNLS3 of Conley et al., high-z SNe data of Riess et al., and radio-galaxy data of Daly and Djorgovski to validate the new plot. We first display these data on a standard Hubble diagram to confirm the best fit for ΛCDM cosmology, and thus validate the joined data set. The scale factor plot is then developed from the data and the ΛCDM model is again displayed from a least-squares fit. The fit parameters are in agreement with the Hubble diagram fit confirming the validity of the new plot. Of special interest is the transition time of the universe, which in the scale factor plot will appear as an inflection point in the data set. Noise is more visible in this presentation, which is particularly sensitive to inflection points of any model displayed in the plot, unlike on a modulus-z diagram, where there are no inflection points and the transition-z is not at all obvious by inspection. We obtain a lower limit of z ≥ 0.6. It is evident from this presentation that there is a dearth of SNe data in the range z = 1-2, exactly the range necessary to confirm a ΛCDM transition-z around z = 0.76. We then compare a 'toy model' wherein dark matter is represented as a perfect fluid with an equation of state p = –(1/3) ρ to demonstrate the plot sensitivity to model choice. Its density varies as 1/t {sup 2} and it enters the Friedmann equations as Ω{sub dark}/t {sup 2}, replacing only the Ω{sub dark}/a {sup 3} term. The toy model is a

  12. Entropy and correlation functions of a driven quantum spin chain

    SciTech Connect

    Cherng, R. W.; Levitov, L. S.

    2006-04-15

    We present an exact solution for a quantum spin chain driven through its critical points. Our approach is based on a many-body generalization of the Landau-Zener transition theory, applied to a fermionized spin Hamiltonian. The resulting nonequilibrium state of the system, while being a pure quantum state, has local properties of a mixed state characterized by finite entropy density associated with Kibble-Zurek defects. The entropy and the finite spin correlation length are functions of the rate of sweep through the critical point. We analyze the anisotropic XY spin-1/2 model evolved with a full many-body evolution operator. With the help of Toeplitz determinant calculus, we obtain an exact form of correlation functions. The properties of the evolved system undergo an abrupt change at a certain critical sweep rate, signaling the formation of ordered domains. We link this phenomenon to the behavior of complex singularities of the Toeplitz generating function.

  13. Large N correlation functions in superconformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego; Russo, Jorge G.

    2016-06-01

    We compute correlation functions of chiral primary operators in mathcal{N}=2 super-conformal theories at large N using a construction based on supersymmetric localization recently developed by Gerchkovitz et al. We focus on mathcal{N}=4 SYM as well as on supercon-formal QCD. In the case of mathcal{N}=4 we recover the free field theory results as expected due to non-renormalization theorems. In the case of superconformal QCD we study the planar expansion in the large N limit. The final correlators admit a simple generalization to a finite N formula which exactly matches the various small N results in the literature.

  14. Density functional theory for strongly-correlated ultracold dipolar gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet Giralt, Francesc; Reimann, Stephanie; Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Lund University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We address quasi-one-dimensional strongly-correlated dipolar ultracold gases by means of density functional theory. We make use of an approximation for the Hartree-exchange-correlation that has been shown to be very accurate for electronic systems with coulombic interactions. We show that this approach allows to treat systems with very large particle numbers at relatively low computational cost. This work has been supported by a VIDI grant of the NWO and a Marie Curie grant within the FP7 programme.

  15. Cosmological antigravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    The long-derided cosmological constant - a contrivance of Albert Einstein's that represents a bizarre form of energy inherent in space itself - is one of two contenders for explaining changes in the expansion rate of the Universe.

  16. Modular cosmology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, T.

    This talk is a summary of work done in collaboration with Micha Berkooz, Greg Moore, Steve Shenker and Paul Steinhardt on a cosmology whose early history is described in terms of the moduli fields of string theory.

  17. Cosmological Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourges, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present a self-contained summary of the theory of linear cosmological perturbations. We emphasize the effect of the six parameters of the minimal cosmological model, first, on the spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies, and second, on the linear matter power spectrum. We briefly review at the end the possible impact of a few non-minimal dark matter and dark energy models.

  18. Emphasizing the exchange-correlation potential in functional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menconi, Giuseppina; Wilson, Philip J.; Tozer, David J.

    2001-03-01

    Exchange-correlation functionals are determined by constraining the potentials of flexible functional forms to be as parallel as possible to asymptotically vanishing ab initio exchange-correlation potentials. No thermochemical or gradient information is explicitly included in the fitting procedure. A range of spatial weightings is considered and the functionals are assessed by comparing with experiment and with the HCTH functional [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 6264 (1998)], which was determined by fitting to both potentials and to thermochemical and gradient data. Optimal thermochemistry, structures, and polarizabilities are simultaneously achieved by emphasizing an intermediate spatial region in the fit; an optimal functional is presented. The thermochemistry of this functional is less accurate than HCTH, although the structures of the fitting molecules are significantly improved. The mean absolute bond length error for 40 of the fitting molecules is 0.006 Å, a factor of 2 improvement over HCTH. The bond lengths of 16 diatomic radicals absent from the fitting data are also improved. For the difficult molecules FOOF, FNO2, O3, FO2, Cr(CO)6, and Ni(CO)4, the results are variable. The new functional improves the polarizabilities of 14 small molecules, compared to HCTH. It also improves electronic excitation energies to Rydberg states of N2, H2CO, and C6H6, although the errors remain significant, reflecting the incorrect asymptotic potential. To obtain optimal nuclear shielding constants, it is necessary to emphasize regions closer to the nuclei; a second functional is presented which gives improved shieldings compared to HCTH. By considering the dominant occupied-virtual excitation contributions to the paramagnetic shieldings in CO and H2O, analogies are drawn between our results and those of a recently proposed method for improving density functional shielding constants.

  19. A partitioned correlation function interaction approach for describing electron correlation in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdebout, S.; Rynkun, P.; Jönsson, P.; Gaigalas, G.; Froese Fischer, C.; Godefroid, M.

    2013-04-01

    The traditional multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) and configuration interaction (CI) methods are based on a single orthonormal orbital basis. For atoms with many closed core shells, or complicated shell structures, a large orbital basis is needed to saturate the different electron correlation effects such as valence, core-valence and correlation within the core shells. The large orbital basis leads to massive configuration state function (CSF) expansions that are difficult to handle, even on large computer systems. We show that it is possible to relax the orthonormality restriction on the orbital basis and break down the originally very large calculations into a series of smaller calculations that can be run in parallel. Each calculation determines a partitioned correlation function (PCF) that accounts for a specific correlation effect. The PCFs are built on optimally localized orbital sets and are added to a zero-order multireference (MR) function to form a total wave function. The expansion coefficients of the PCFs are determined from a low dimensional generalized eigenvalue problem. The interaction and overlap matrices are computed using a biorthonormal transformation technique (Verdebout et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 43 074017). The new method, called partitioned correlation function interaction (PCFI), converges rapidly with respect to the orbital basis and gives total energies that are lower than the ones from ordinary MCHF and CI calculations. The PCFI method is also very flexible when it comes to targeting different electron correlation effects. Focusing our attention on neutral lithium, we show that by dedicating a PCF to the single excitations from the core, spin- and orbital-polarization effects can be captured very efficiently, leading to highly improved convergence patterns for hyperfine parameters compared with MCHF calculations based on a single orthogonal radial orbital basis. By collecting separately optimized PCFs to correct the MR

  20. Correlation function ratios and the identification of space plasma instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Winske, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Wave-particle transport in a collisionless plasma is due to particle scattering by enhanced fluctuations associated with the growth of instabilities. In particular, relatively short wave-length kinetic instabilities are frequently invoked to explain many different types of plasma transport in space. Although there is an extensive theoretical and simulation literature describing the potential applications of many such instabilities, there are only a few cases of clear-cut identification of kinetic modes in space. The research described in this paper uses linear Vlasov dispersion theory to study correlation functions and dimensionless correlation function ratios for fluctuations or instabilities in three space plasma regimes. This research shows that both the compressibility and the parallel compressibility are likely to be useful in distinguishing modes in the magnetosheath as well as in the plasma sheet boundary layer and that helicity remains a useful identifier of electromagnetic ion/ion instabilities in the foreshock.

  1. Non-Markovianity measure using two-time correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md. Manirul; Lo, Ping-Yuan; Tu, Matisse Wei-Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-12-01

    We investigate non-Markovianity measure using two-time correlation functions for open quantum systems. We define non-Markovianity measure as the difference between the exact two-time correlation function and the one obtained from quantum regression theorem in the Born-Markov approximation. Such non-Markovianity can easily be measured in experiments. We found that the non-Markovianity dynamics in different time scale crucially depends on the system-environment coupling strength and other physical parameters such as the initial temperature of the environment and the initial state of the system. In particular, we obtain the short-time and long-time behaviors of non-Markovianity for different spectral densities. We find that the thermal fluctuation always reduce the non-Markovian memory effect. Also, the non-Markovianity measure shows nontrivial initial state dependence in different time scales.

  2. Correlation of Thyroid Functions with Severity and Outcome of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kharb, S; Sardana, D; Nanda, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: During normal pregnancy, changes in thyroid function are well documented; however, information regarding thyroid function in preeclampsia is scanty. Aim: The present study was planned to study thyroid hormones in mild and severe preeclamptic women and normotensive women and correlate them with outcome of pregnancy. Subject and Methods: Thyroid hormones were analyzed in mild (n = 50) and severe (n = 50) cases of preeclamptic women and normotensive women (n = 100). Results: Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and TT4 levels were higher in mild preeclampsia as compared with severe preeclampsia (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). TT3 levels were lower in preeclampsia (more so in severe preeclamptics as compared with normotensive pregnant and non-pregnant women). Preeclamptic with raised TSH levels had significantly higher mean arterial blood pressure and low birth weight (BW). A negative correlation was observed between BW and TSH levels (r = 0.296, P < 0.001) and BW and TT4 levels. A positive correlation was observed between BW and TT3 levels. Conclusion: These findings indicate that there is a state of biochemical hypothyroidism that correlates with severity of preeclampsia and influences obstetric outcome in these women. Identification of thyroid hormone in pregnancy might be of help in predicting occurrence of preeclampsia. PMID:23634328

  3. Correlation functions and correlation widths in quantum-chaotic scattering for mesoscopic systems and nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. G. G. S.; Barbosa, A. L. R.; Carlson, B. V.; Frederico, T.; Hussein, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the correlation functions of the electronic conductance fluctuations of an open quantum dot under several conditions. Both the variation of energy and that of an external parameter, such as an applied perpendicular or parallel magnetic fields, are considered in the general case of partial openness. These expressions are then used to obtain the ensemble-averaged density of maxima, a measure recently suggested to contain invaluable information concerning the correlation widths of chaotic systems. The correlation width is then calculated for the case of energy variation, and a significant deviation from the Weisskopf estimate is found in the case of two terminals. The results are extended to more than two terminals. All of our results are analytical. The use of these results in other fields, such as nuclei, where the system can only be studied through a variation of the energy, is then discussed.

  4. Correlation functions and correlation widths in quantum-chaotic scattering for mesoscopic systems and nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J G G S; Barbosa, A L R; Carlson, B V; Frederico, T; Hussein, M S

    2016-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the correlation functions of the electronic conductance fluctuations of an open quantum dot under several conditions. Both the variation of energy and that of an external parameter, such as an applied perpendicular or parallel magnetic fields, are considered in the general case of partial openness. These expressions are then used to obtain the ensemble-averaged density of maxima, a measure recently suggested to contain invaluable information concerning the correlation widths of chaotic systems. The correlation width is then calculated for the case of energy variation, and a significant deviation from the Weisskopf estimate is found in the case of two terminals. The results are extended to more than two terminals. All of our results are analytical. The use of these results in other fields, such as nuclei, where the system can only be studied through a variation of the energy, is then discussed. PMID:26871076

  5. Charmonium correlators and spectral functions at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ding,H.T.; Kaczmarek, O.; Karsch, F.; Satz, H.

    2008-09-01

    We present an operational approach to address the in-medium behavior of charmonium and analyze the reliability of maximum entropy method (MEM). We study the dependences of the ratio of correlators to the reconstructed one and the free one on the resonance's width and the continuum's threshold. Furthermore, we discuss the issue of the default model dependence of the spectral function obtained from MEM.

  6. Statistical Study of Turbulence: Spectral Functions and Correlation Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenkiel, Francois N.

    1958-01-01

    In reading the publications on turbulence of different authors, one often runs the risk of confusing the various correlation coefficients and turbulence spectra. We have made a point of defining, by appropriate concepts, the differences which exist between these functions. Besides, we introduce in the symbols a few new characteristics of turbulence. In the first chapter, we study some relations between the correlation coefficients and the different turbulence spectra. Certain relations are given by means of demonstrations which could be called intuitive rather than mathematical. In this way we demonstrate that the correlation coefficients between the simultaneous turbulent velocities at two points are identical, whether studied in Lagrange's or in Euler's systems. We then consider new spectra of turbulence, obtained by study of the simultaneous velocities along a straight line of given direction. We determine some relations between these spectra and the correlation coefficients. Examining the relation between the spectrum of the turbulence measured at a fixed point and the longitudinal-correlation curve given by G. I. Taylor, we find that this equation is exact only when the coefficient is very small.

  7. Hydrodynamic Waves and Correlation Functions in Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Wang, Xiaogang

    1997-11-01

    A hydrodynamic description of strongly coupled dusty plasmas is given when physical quantities vary slowly in space and time and the system can be assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The linear waves in such a system are analyzed. In particular, a dispersion equation is derived for low-frequency dust acoustic waves, including collisional damping effects, and compared with experimental results. The linear response of the system is calculated from the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the hydrodynamic equations. The requirement that these two calculations coincide constrains the particle correlation function for slowly varying perturbations [L. P. Kadanoff and P. C. Martin, Ann. Phys. 24, 419 (1963)]. It is shown that in the presence of the slow dust-acoustic waves, the dust auto-correlation function is of the Debye-Hekel form and the shielding distance is the dust Debye length. In the short-wavelength regime, an integral equation is derived from kinetic theory and solved numerically to yield particle correlation functions that display ``liquid-like'' behavior and have been observed experimentally [R. A.. Quinn, C. Cui, J. Goree, J. B. Pieper, H. Thomas and G. E. Morfill, Phys. Rev. E 53, R2049 (1996)].

  8. Cosmological perturbations in teleparallel Loop Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, Jaime

    2013-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations in Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) are usually studied incorporating either holonomy corrections, where the Ashtekar connection is replaced by a suitable sinus function in order to have a well-defined quantum analogue, or inverse-volume corrections coming from the eigenvalues of the inverse-volume operator. In this paper we will develop an alternative approach to calculate cosmological perturbations in LQC based on the fact that, holonomy corrected LQC in the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry could be also obtained as a particular case of teleparallel F(T) gravity (teleparallel LQC). The main idea of our approach is to mix the simple bounce provided by holonomy corrections in LQC with the non-singular perturbation equations given by F(T) gravity, in order to obtain a matter bounce scenario as a viable alternative to slow-roll inflation. In our study, we have obtained an scale invariant power spectrum of cosmological perturbations. However, the ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations is of order 1, which does not agree with the current observations. For this reason, we suggest a model where a transition from the matter domination to a quasi de Sitter phase is produced in order to enhance the scalar power spectrum.

  9. FAR-IR/SUBMILLIMETER SPECTROSCOPIC COSMOLOGICAL SURVEYS: PREDICTIONS OF INFRARED LINE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS FOR z < 4 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Dasyra, Kalliopi M.; Gruppioni, Carlotta; Valiante, Elisabetta; Isaak, Kate

    2012-02-01

    Star formation and accretion onto supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies are the two most energetic processes in the universe, producing the bulk of the observed emission throughout its history. We simulated the luminosity functions of star-forming and active galaxies for spectral lines that are thought to be good spectroscopic tracers of either phenomenon, as a function of redshift. We focused on the infrared (IR) and submillimeter domains, where the effects of dust obscuration are minimal. Using three different and independent theoretical models for galaxy formation and evolution, constrained by multi-wavelength luminosity functions, we computed the number of star-forming and active galaxies per IR luminosity and redshift bin. We converted the continuum luminosity counts into spectral line counts using relationships that we calibrated on mid- and far-IR spectroscopic surveys of galaxies in the local universe. Our results demonstrate that future facilities optimized for survey-mode observations, i.e., the Space Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics and the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope, will be able to observe thousands of z > 1 galaxies in key fine-structure lines, e.g., [Si II], [O I], [O III], [C II], in a half-square-degree survey, with 1 hr integration time per field of view. Fainter lines such as [O IV], [Ne V], and H{sub 2} (0-0)S1 will be observed in several tens of bright galaxies at 1 < z < 2, while diagnostic diagrams of active nucleus versus star formation activity will be feasible even for normal z {approx} 1 galaxies. We discuss the new parameter space that these future telescopes will cover and that strongly motivates their construction.

  10. Hybrid exchange-correlation energy functionals for strongly correlated electrons: Applications to transition-metal monoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Fabien; Blaha, Peter; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Novák, Pavel

    2006-10-01

    For the treatment of strongly correlated electrons, the corresponding Hartree-Fock exchange energy is used instead of the local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functional, as suggested recently [P. Novák , Phys. Status Solidi B 243, 563 (2006)]. If this is done only inside the atomic spheres, using an augmented plane wave scheme, a significant simplification and reduction of computational cost is achieved with respect to the usual but costly implementation of the Hartree-Fock formalism in solids. Starting from this, we construct exchange-correlation energy functionals of the hybrid form like B3PW91, PBE0, etc. These functionals are tested on the transition-metal monoxides MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO, and the results are compared with the LDA, GGA, LDA+U , and experimental ones. The results show that the proposed method, which does not contain any system-dependent input parameter, gives results comparable or superior to the ones obtained with LDA+U which is designed to improve significantly over the LDA and GGA results for systems containing strongly correlated electrons. The computational efficiency, similar to the LDA+U one, and accuracy of the proposed method show that it represents a very good alternative to LDA+U .

  11. Algorithm for the direct reconstruction of the dark matter correlation function from weak lensing and galaxy clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Baldauf, Tobias; Smith, Robert E.; Seljak, Uros; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2010-03-15

    The clustering of matter on cosmological scales is an essential probe for studying the physical origin and composition of our Universe. To date, most of the direct studies have focused on shear-shear weak lensing correlations, but it is also possible to extract the dark matter clustering by combining galaxy-clustering and galaxy-galaxy-lensing measurements. In order to extract the required information, one must relate the observable galaxy distribution to the underlying dark matter distribution. In this study we develop in detail a method that can constrain the dark matter correlation function from galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy-lensing measurements, by focusing on the correlation coefficient between the galaxy and matter overdensity fields. Our goal is to develop an estimator that maximally correlates the two. To generate a mock galaxy catalogue for testing purposes, we use the halo occupation distribution approach applied to a large ensemble of N-body simulations to model preexisting SDSS luminous red galaxy sample observations. Using this mock catalogue, we show that a direct comparison between the excess surface mass density measured by lensing and its corresponding galaxy clustering quantity is not optimal. We develop a new statistic that suppresses the small-scale contributions to these observations and show that this new statistic leads to a cross-correlation coefficient that is within a few percent of unity down to 5h{sup -1} Mpc. Furthermore, the residual incoherence between the galaxy and matter fields can be explained using a theoretical model for scale-dependent galaxy bias, giving us a final estimator that is unbiased to within 1%, so that we can reconstruct the dark matter clustering power spectrum at this accuracy up to k{approx}1h Mpc{sup -1}. We also perform a comprehensive study of other physical effects that can affect the analysis, such as redshift space distortions and differences in radial windows between galaxy clustering and weak

  12. Cosmology with galaxy clusters: Systematic effects in the halo mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2014-07-01

    We investigate potential systematic effects in constraining the amplitude of primordial fluctuations σ8 arising from the choice of halo mass function in the likelihood analysis of current and upcoming galaxy cluster surveys. We study the widely used N-body simulation fit of Tinker et al. (T08) and, as an alternative, the recently proposed analytical model of excursion set peaks (ESP). We first assess the relative bias between these prescriptions when constraining σ8 by sampling the ESP mass function to generate mock catalogs and using the T08 fit to analyze them, for various choices of survey selection threshold, mass definition and statistical priors. To assess the level of absolute bias in each prescription, we then repeat the analysis on dark matter halo catalogs in N-body simulations designed to mimic the mass distribution in the current data release of Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters. This N-body analysis shows that using the T08 fit without accounting for the scatter introduced when converting between mass definitions (alternatively, the scatter induced by errors on the parameters of the fit) can systematically overestimate the value of σ8 by as much as 2σ for current data, while analyses that account for this scatter should be close to unbiased in σ8. With an increased number of objects as expected in upcoming data releases, regardless of accounting for scatter, the T08 fit could overestimate the value of σ8 by ˜1.5σ. The ESP mass function leads to systematically more biased but comparable results. A strength of the ESP model is its natural prediction of a weak nonuniversality in the mass function which closely tracks the one measured in simulations and described by the T08 fit. We suggest that it might now be prudent to build new unbiased ESP-based fitting functions for use with the larger data sets of the near future.

  13. Brain structure and function correlates of cognitive subtypes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Daniel; Walton, Esther; Naylor, Melissa; Roessner, Veit; Lim, Kelvin O; Charles Schulz, S; Gollub, Randy L; Calhoun, Vince D; Sponheim, Scott R; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-10-30

    Stable neuropsychological deficits may provide a reliable basis for identifying etiological subtypes of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to identify clusters of individuals with schizophrenia based on dimensions of neuropsychological performance, and to characterize their neural correlates. We acquired neuropsychological data as well as structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging from 129 patients with schizophrenia and 165 healthy controls. We derived eight cognitive dimensions and subsequently applied a cluster analysis to identify possible schizophrenia subtypes. Analyses suggested the following four cognitive clusters of schizophrenia: (1) Diminished Verbal Fluency, (2) Diminished Verbal Memory and Poor Motor Control, (3) Diminished Face Memory and Slowed Processing, and (4) Diminished Intellectual Function. The clusters were characterized by a specific pattern of structural brain changes in areas such as Wernicke's area, lingual gyrus and occipital face area, and hippocampus as well as differences in working memory-elicited neural activity in several fronto-parietal brain regions. Separable measures of cognitive function appear to provide a method for deriving cognitive subtypes meaningfully related to brain structure and function. Because the present study identified brain-based neural correlates of the cognitive clusters, the proposed groups of individuals with schizophrenia have some external validity. PMID:26341950

  14. Exact correlation functions in SU(2) N=2 superconformal QCD.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Marco; Niarchos, Vasilis; Papadodimas, Kyriakos

    2014-12-19

    We report an exact solution of 2- and 3-point functions of chiral primary fields in SU(2) N=2 super-Yang-Mills theory coupled to four hypermultiplets. It is shown that these correlation functions are nontrivial functions of the gauge coupling, obeying differential equations which take the form of the semi-infinite Toda chain. We solve these equations recursively in terms of the Zamolodchikov metric that can be determined exactly from supersymmetric localization on the four-sphere. Our results are verified independently in perturbation theory with a Feynman diagram computation up to 2 loops. This is a short version of a companion paper that contains detailed technical remarks, additional material, and aspects of an extension to the SU(N) gauge group. PMID:25554873

  15. Dynamical functions of a 1D correlated quantum liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Bozi, D.; Penc, K.

    2008-10-01

    The dynamical correlation functions in one-dimensional electronic systems show power-law behaviour at low energies and momenta close to integer multiples of the charge and spin Fermi momenta. These systems are usually referred to as Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids. However, near well defined lines of the (k,ω) plane the power-law behaviour extends beyond the low-energy cases mentioned above, and also appears at higher energies, leading to singular features in the photoemission spectra and other dynamical correlation functions. The general spectral-function expressions derived in this paper were used in recent theoretical studies of the finite-energy singular features in photoemission of the organic compound tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) metallic phase. They are based on a so-called pseudofermion dynamical theory (PDT), which allows us to systematically enumerate and describe the excitations in the Hubbard model starting from the Bethe ansatz, as well as to calculate the charge and spin object phase shifts appearing as exponents of the power laws. In particular, we concentrate on the spin-density m\\rightarrow 0 limit and on effects in the vicinity of the singular border lines, as well as close to half filling. Our studies take into account spectral contributions from types of microscopic processes that do not occur for finite values of the spin density. In addition, the specific processes involved in the spectral features of TTF-TCNQ are studied. Our results are useful for the further understanding of the unusual spectral properties observed in low-dimensional organic metals and also provide expressions for the one- and two-atom spectral functions of a correlated quantum system of ultracold fermionic atoms in a 1D optical lattice with on-site two-atom repulsion.

  16. Reduced density-matrix functional theory: Correlation and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Di Sabatino, S.; Romaniello, P.; Berger, J. A.; Reining, L.

    2015-07-14

    In this work, we explore the performance of approximations to electron correlation in reduced density-matrix functional theory (RDMFT) and of approximations to the observables calculated within this theory. Our analysis focuses on the calculation of total energies, occupation numbers, removal/addition energies, and spectral functions. We use the exactly solvable Hubbard dimer at 1/4 and 1/2 fillings as test systems. This allows us to analyze the underlying physics and to elucidate the origin of the observed trends. For comparison, we also report the results of the GW approximation, where the self-energy functional is approximated, but no further hypothesis is made concerning the approximations of the observables. In particular, we focus on the atomic limit, where the two sites of the dimer are pulled apart and electrons localize on either site with equal probability, unless a small perturbation is present: this is the regime of strong electron correlation. In this limit, using the Hubbard dimer at 1/2 filling with or without a spin-symmetry-broken ground state allows us to explore how degeneracies and spin-symmetry breaking are treated in RDMFT. We find that, within the used approximations, neither in RDMFT nor in GW, the signature of strong correlation is present, when looking at the removal/addition energies and spectral function from the spin-singlet ground state, whereas both give the exact result for the spin-symmetry broken case. Moreover, we show how the spectroscopic properties change from one spin structure to the other.

  17. Isospin effects in two-particle correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzl, Vladimir; Henzlova, D.; Famiano, M.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W.; Coupland, D.; Elson, J.; Herlitzius, C.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Rogers, A.; Sanetullaev, A.; de Souza, R.; Sobotka, L.; Sun, Z.; Tsang, B.; Vander Molen, A.; Verde, G.; Wallace, M.; Youngs, M.

    2008-04-01

    Dynamical and thermal properties of excited nuclear system produced during heavy ion collisions at intermediate incident energies can be studied by means of the intensity interferometry, which when applied to both charged particles (light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments) provide information about space-time properties of nuclear reactions. The shape of 2-particle correlation functions reflects the nature of the final state interaction and possible presence of a collective motion driven by the nuclear EoS. BUU simulations predict that the symmetry term of the EoS will affect the 2-proton correlation function, reflecting a more pronounced pre-equilibrium emission and shorter emission times when stiffer density dependence of the symmetry term is assumed. We will present preliminary results on the isospin effect on the 2-proton correlations measured in reactions ^40,48Ca+^40,48Ca at 80A MeV. The experiment was performed at the NSCL/MSU using High Resolution Array (HiRA) in coincidence with the 4pi array. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-0606007 and PHY-9977707.

  18. The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

  19. Correlation between physical function, cognitive function, and health-related quality of life in elderly persons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, DeokJu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the quality of life of elderly people related to physical function, cognitive function, and health, and devised methods to enhance their health-related quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted from November 2014 to January 2015 in 140 people over 65 registered at welfare centers. Those with a functional psychological disorder or difficulty communicating were excluded. Data were collected for physical function, cognitive function, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using an assessment tool and questionnaire for healthy elderly people over 65. Physical function was measured using muscle strength muscle endurance, reaction time, and balance. [Results] Correlations were observed between cognitive function and endurance, reaction time, and balance. Physical HRQOL showed correlations with all domains of physical function; mental HRQOL showed correlations with all items of physical function except muscle strength. Among factors that influence HRQOL, all items except educational background were significant variables. Educational background had no influence on HRQOL. [Conclusion] Interventions will correct factors with a negative influence on HRQOL, utilizing regular checks on physical, cognitive, and other functions of elderly people, with early detection and intervention to enhance HRQOL. Cognitive intervention related to physical and other functions will be applied. PMID:27390430

  20. Model updating using correlation analysis of strain frequency response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ning; Yang, Zhichun; Jia, You; Wang, Le

    2016-03-01

    A method is proposed to modify the structural parameters of a dynamic finite element (FE) model by using the correlation analysis for strain frequency response function (SFRF). Sensitivity analysis of correlation coefficients is used to establish the linear algebraic equations for model updating. In order to improve the accuracy of updated model, the regularization technique is used to solve the ill-posed problem in model updating procedure. Finally, a numerical study and a model updating experiment are performed to verify the feasibility and robustness of the proposed method. The results show that the updated SFRFs and experimental SFRFs agree well, especially in resonance regions. Meanwhile, the proposed method has good robustness to noise ability and remains good feasibility even the number of measurement locations reduced significantly.

  1. Phagocytic function in cyclists: correlation with catecholamines and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Ortega Rincón, E; Marchena, J M; García, J J; Schmidt, A; Schulz, T; Malpica, I; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C; Michna, H; Lötzerich, H

    2001-09-01

    Flow cytometer measurements were made of the basal variations in peripheral blood functional monocytes and granulocytes over the course of a training season (January to November) of a cycling team. Parallel determinations were made of plasma concentration of catecholamines (chromatography) and cortisol (RIA) in a search for neuroendocrine markers. The results showed the greatest phagocytic capacity to occur in the central months (March, May, and July), coinciding with the greatest number and highest level of competitive events with good correlation with a peak in epinephrine during these months (r(2) = 0.998 for monocytes and r(2) = 0.674 for granulocytes). No good correlations were found between phagocytosis and norepinephrine or cortisol. The highest values for phagocytosis and epinephrine concentration were found in May. These results suggest that blood epinephrine concentration could be a good neuroendocrine marker of sportspeople's phagocytic response. PMID:11509500

  2. Self-interaction-free nonlocal correlation energy functional associated with a Jastrow function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Naoto; Austin, Brian; Lester, William A., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    We propose a self-interaction-free nonlocal correlation energy functional based on the transcorrelated method [1]. An effective Hamiltonian, Heff=1F H F, is derived from a similarity transformation with respect to a `Jastrow' correlation factor, F. The total energy is given by the expectation value of Heff with respect to a single Slater determinant. If a two-body Jastrow function is adopted, the resulting method resembles a Kohn-Sham density functional theory in which the correlation energy functional consists of two- and three-body interactions [2]. To simplify our calculations, we exclude the three-body terms and instead multiply the two-body term by an adjustable parameter that ensures convergence of the correlation energy to the exact limit for the homogeneous electron gas. The computational cost of the proposed method is comparable to the Hartree-Fock method. Moreover, the present correlation functional does not include self-interaction terms. The performance of this functional for various atoms and molecules will be presented. [1]S. F. Boys and N. C. Handy, Proc. Roy. Soc. A, 309, 209; 310, 43; 310, 63; 311, 309 (1969). [2] N. Umezawa and T. Chikyow, Phys. Rev. A 73, 062116 (2006).

  3. Nonlocal density-functional description constructed from a correlated many-body wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Naoto; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2004-03-01

    We suggest a new approach to the nonlocal density-functional theory. In our method, the nonlocal correlation functional is derived from a correlated many-body wave function using the transcorrelated similarity transformation [1,2]. Our formalism is rigorous in principle if the v-representable density is assumed. In practice, Jastrow-Slater-type wave function is adopted and the correlation functional consists of many-body interactions originated from the Jastrow factor. Instead of struggling with these higher order interactions, we retain only 2-body interactions multiplying an adjusting parameter so that it can reproduce the exact correlation energy for the homogeneous electron gas. Therefore, the computational cost is comparable to the exact exchange method. Moreover, parameters in the Jastrow factor are determined by the two conditions: the cusp conditions and the random-phase approximation without empirical fitting. We found that our correlation functional gives fairly good results for small atoms and ions (He, Li^+, Be^2+, Li, and Be). [1]S. F. Boys and N. C. Handy, Proc. Roy. Soc. A, 309, 209; 310, 43; 310, 63; 311, 309. [2] N. Umezawa and S. Tsuneyuki, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 10015 (2003).

  4. Vector theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-15

    This article provides a general study of the Hamiltonian stability and the hyperbolicity of vector field models involving both a general function of the Faraday tensor and its dual, f(F{sup 2},FF-tilde), as well as a Proca potential for the vector field, V(A{sup 2}). In particular it is demonstrated that theories involving only f(F{sup 2}) do not satisfy the hyperbolicity conditions. It is then shown that in this class of models, the cosmological dynamics always dilutes the vector field. In the case of a nonminimal coupling to gravity, it is established that theories involving Rf(A{sup 2}) or Rf(F{sup 2}) are generically pathologic. To finish, we exhibit a model where the vector field is not diluted during the cosmological evolution, because of a nonminimal vector field-curvature coupling which maintains second-order field equations. The relevance of such models for cosmology is discussed.

  5. Noise cross correlation functions in a noisy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudot, I.; Beucler, E.; Mocquet, A.; Schimmel, M.; Le Feuvre, M.; Leparoux, D.; Côte, P.

    2013-12-01

    The geology of the western France can be roughly split into two main domains: the Armorican massif that contains imprints of the old Cadomian and Variscan orogens; and the Bay of Biscay which present signatures of more recent tectonic events closely related to the opening of North Atlantic ocean. Due to the lack of seismic stations deployment, it exists very few pictures of the deep structures below the Armorican Massif and the Bay of Biscay. Recently, a broadband array of seismometers has been deployed over the south and west of France, providing a good opportunity to get reliable images at depth. Since the region is surrounded by the seas, the seismic ambient noise tomography technique has been proposed to reveal the crustal and uppermost mantle features beneath this area. The first step consists in the computation of noise correlation functions (NCFs) between each station pairs. The ability to obtain empirical Green's functions from NCFs relies on the efficiency of the randomization. Classic ambient noise tomography studies use long-time series (typically several months) to help the randomization including all the scattering effects due to Earth's heterogeneities. However, additionnal signal processing steps such as temporal and/or spectral whitening are most often required for the signals to be representative of a random wavefield. These techniques rely on nonlinear operations which corrupt the integrity of the original record. In the literature, alternatives have been proposed to avoid, at least partially, such non linear operations. One of them is the instantaneous phase cross correlation (PCC). This correlation technique is intrinsically little sensitive to large amplitude transient signals. Using a set of data from a temporary broad band array, we explore the features of the PCC as compared to the time domain geometrically normalized cross correlation (CCGN). In the 0.02Hz-1Hz frequency band, different time series are extracted to investigate the effects of

  6. Adiabatic Approximation of the Correlation Function in the Density-Functional Treatment of Ionization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilken, F.; Bauer, D.

    2006-11-17

    The ionization of a one-dimensional model helium atom in short laser pulses using time-dependent density-functional theory is investigated. We calculate ionization probabilities as a function of laser intensity by approximating the correlation function of the system adiabatically with an explicit dependence on the fractional number of bound electrons. For the correlation potential we take the derivative discontinuity at integer numbers of bound electrons explicitly into account. This approach reproduces ionization probabilities from the solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, in particular, the so-called knee due to nonsequential ionization.

  7. Dimensionless cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, Ali; Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas

    2012-10-01

    Although it is well known that any consideration of the variations of fundamental constants should be restricted to their dimensionless combinations, the literature on variations of the gravitational constant G is entirely dimensionfull. To illustrate applications of this to cosmology, we explicitly give a dimensionless version of the parameters of the standard cosmological model, and describe the physics of both Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and recombination in a dimensionless manner. Rigorously determining how to talk about the model in a way which avoids physical dimensions is a requirement for proceeding with a calculation to constrain time-varying fundamental constants. The issue that appears to have been missed in many studies is that in cosmology the strength of gravity is bound up in the cosmological equations, and the epoch at which we live is a crucial part of the model. We argue that it is useful to consider the hypothetical situation of communicating with another civilization (with entirely different units), comparing only dimensionless constants, in order to decide if we live in a Universe governed by precisely the same physical laws. In this thought experiment, we would also have to compare epochs, which can be defined by giving the value of any one of the evolving cosmological parameters. By setting things up carefully in this way one can avoid inconsistent results when considering variable constants, caused by effectively fixing more than one parameter today. We show examples of this effect by considering microwave background anisotropies, being careful to maintain dimensionlessness throughout. We present Fisher matrix calculations to estimate how well the fine structure constants for electromagnetism and gravity can be determined with future microwave background experiments. We highlight how one can be misled by simply adding G to the usual cosmological parameter set.

  8. Pain threshold correlates with functional scores in osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuni, Benita; Wang, Haili; Rickert, Markus; Ewerbeck, Volker; Schiltenwolf, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Pain sensitization may be one of the reasons for persistent pain after technically successful joint replacement. We analyzed how pain sensitization, as measured by quantitative sensory testing, relates preoperatively to joint function in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) scheduled for joint replacement. Patients and methods We included 50 patients with knee OA and 49 with hip OA who were scheduled for joint replacement, and 15 control participants. Hip/knee scores, thermal and pressure detection, and pain thresholds were examined. Results Median pressure pain thresholds were lower in patients than in control subjects: 4.0 (range: 0–10) vs. 7.8 (4–10) (p = 0.003) for the affected knee; 4.5 (2–10) vs. 6.8 (4–10) (p = 0.03) for the affected hip. Lower pressure pain threshold values were found at the affected joint in 26 of the 50 patients with knee OA and in 17 of the 49 patients with hip OA. The American Knee Society score 1 and 2, the Oxford knee score, and functional questionnaire of Hannover for osteoarthritis score correlated with the pressure pain thresholds in patients with knee OA. Also, Harris hip score and the functional questionnaire of Hannover for osteoarthritis score correlated with the cold detection threshold in patients with hip OA. Interpretation Quantitative sensory testing appeared to identify patients with sensory changes indicative of mechanisms of central sensitization. These patients may require additional pain treatment in order to profit fully from surgery. There were correlations between the clinical scores and the level of sensitization. PMID:25323797

  9. Statistical Issues in Galaxy Cluster Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantz, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The number and growth of massive galaxy clusters are sensitive probes of cosmological structure formation. Surveys at various wavelengths can detect clusters to high redshift, but the fact that cluster mass is not directly observable complicates matters, requiring us to simultaneously constrain scaling relations of observable signals with mass. The problem can be cast as one of regression, in which the data set is truncated, the (cosmology-dependent) underlying population must be modeled, and strong, complex correlations between measurements often exist. Simulations of cosmological structure formation provide a robust prediction for the number of clusters in the Universe as a function of mass and redshift (the mass function), but they cannot reliably predict the observables used to detect clusters in sky surveys (e.g. X-ray luminosity). Consequently, observers must constrain observable-mass scaling relations using additional data, and use the scaling relation model in conjunction with the mass function to predict the number of clusters as a function of redshift and luminosity.

  10. Functional connectivity correlates of response inhibition impairment in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Collantoni, Enrico; Michelon, Silvia; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Titton, Francesca; Manara, Renzo; Clementi, Maurizio; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by high levels of cognitive control and behavioral perseveration. The present study aims at exploring inhibitory control abilities and their functional connectivity correlates in patients with AN. Inhibitory control - an executive function that allows the realization of adaptive behavior according to environmental contingencies - has been assessed by means of the Stop-Signal paradigm. The study involved 155 patients with lifetime AN and 102 healthy women. A subsample underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and was genotyped for COMT and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. AN patients showed an impaired response inhibition and a disruption of the functional connectivity of the ventral attention circuit, a neural network implicated in behavioral response when a stimulus occurs unexpected. The 5-HTTLPR genotype appears to significantly interact with the functional connectivity of ventral attention network in explaining task performance in both patients and controls, suggesting a role of the serotoninergic system in mechanisms of response selection. The disruption of the ventral attention network in patients with AN suggests lower efficiency of bottom-up signal filtering, which might be involved in difficulties to adapt behavioral responses to environmental needs. Our findings deserve further research to confirm their scientific and therapeutic implications. PMID:26655584

  11. Analytical correlation functions for motion through diffusivity landscapes.

    PubMed

    Roosen-Runge, Felix; Bicout, Dominique J; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2016-05-28

    Diffusion of a particle through an energy and diffusivity landscape is a very general phenomenon in numerous systems of soft and condensed matter. On the one hand, theoretical frameworks such as Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations present valuable accounts to understand these motions in great detail, and numerous studies have exploited these approaches. On the other hand, analytical solutions for correlation functions, as, e.g., desired by experimentalists for data fitting, are only available for special cases. We explore the possibility to use different theoretical methods in the specific picture of time-dependent switching between diffusive states to derive analytical functions that allow to link experimental and simulation results to theoretical calculations. In particular, we present a closed formula for diffusion switching between two states, as well as a general recipe of how to generalize the formula to multiple states. PMID:27250281

  12. Analytical correlation functions for motion through diffusivity landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roosen-Runge, Felix; Bicout, Dominique J.; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2016-05-01

    Diffusion of a particle through an energy and diffusivity landscape is a very general phenomenon in numerous systems of soft and condensed matter. On the one hand, theoretical frameworks such as Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations present valuable accounts to understand these motions in great detail, and numerous studies have exploited these approaches. On the other hand, analytical solutions for correlation functions, as, e.g., desired by experimentalists for data fitting, are only available for special cases. We explore the possibility to use different theoretical methods in the specific picture of time-dependent switching between diffusive states to derive analytical functions that allow to link experimental and simulation results to theoretical calculations. In particular, we present a closed formula for diffusion switching between two states, as well as a general recipe of how to generalize the formula to multiple states.

  13. Hydrodynamic waves and correlation functions in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1997-11-01

    A hydrodynamic description of strongly coupled dusty plasmas is given when physical quantities vary slowly in space and time and the system can be assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The linear waves in such a system are analyzed. In particular, a dispersion equation is derived for low-frequency dust acoustic waves, including collisional damping effects, and compared with experimental results. The linear response of the system is calculated from the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the hydrodynamic equations. The requirement that these two calculations coincide constrains the particle correlation function for slowly varying perturbations. It is shown that in the presence of weakly damped, long-wavelength dust-acoustic waves, the dust autocorrelation function is of the Debye{endash}H{umlt u}ckel form and the characteristic shielding distance is the dust Debye length. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Cosmological implications of a stellar initial mass function that varies with the Jeans mass in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika; Davé, Romeel

    2012-07-01

    Observations of star-forming galaxies at high z have suggested discrepancies in the inferred star formation rates (SFRs) either between data and models or between complementary measures of the SFR. These putative discrepancies could all be alleviated if the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is systematically weighted towards more high-mass star formation in rapidly star-forming galaxies. Here, we explore how the IMF might vary under the central assumption that the turnover mass in the IMF, ?, scales with the Jeans mass in giant molecular clouds (GMCs), ?. We employ hydrodynamic simulations of galaxies coupled with radiative transfer models to predict how the typical GMC Jeans mass, and hence the IMF, varies with galaxy properties. We then study the impact of such an IMF on the star formation law, the SFR-M* relation, sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) and the cosmic SFR density. Our main results are: the H2 mass-weighted Jeans mass in a galaxy scales well with the SFR when the SFR is greater than a few M⊙ yr-1. Stellar population synthesis modelling shows that this results in a non-linear relation between SFR and Lbol, such that SFR ?. Using this model relation, the inferred SFR of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies decreases by a factor of ˜2, and that of high-z SMGs decreases by a factor of ˜3-5. At z˜ 2, this results in a lowered normalization of the SFR-M* relation in better agreement with models, a reduced discrepancy between the observed cosmic SFR density and stellar mass density evolution, and SMG SFRs that are easier to accommodate in current hierarchical structure formation models. It further results in a Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law with a slope of ˜1.6 when utilizing a physically motivated form for the CO-H2 conversion factor that varies with galaxy physical property. While each of the discrepancies considered here could be alleviated without appealing to a varying IMF, the modest variation implied by assuming ? is a plausible solution

  15. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Sakaie, Ken; Takahashi, Masaya; Remington, Gina; Wang, Xiaofeng; Conger, Amy; Conger, Darrel; Dimitrov, Ivan; Jones, Stephen; Frohman, Ashley; Frohman, Teresa; Sagiyama, Koji; Togao, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO). Methods 40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD), transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI). Results LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03). FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004). LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05) as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02). Conclusions This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity. PMID:26800522

  16. Subsystem density functional theory with meta-generalized gradient approximation exchange-correlation functionals.

    PubMed

    Śmiga, Szymon; Fabiano, Eduardo; Laricchia, Savio; Constantin, Lucian A; Della Sala, Fabio

    2015-04-21

    We analyze the methodology and the performance of subsystem density functional theory (DFT) with meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) exchange-correlation functionals for non-bonded molecular systems. Meta-GGA functionals depend on the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy density (KED), which is not known as an explicit functional of the density. Therefore, they cannot be directly applied in subsystem DFT calculations. We propose a Laplacian-level approximation to the KED which overcomes this limitation and provides a simple and accurate way to apply meta-GGA exchange-correlation functionals in subsystem DFT calculations. The so obtained density and energy errors, with respect to the corresponding supermolecular calculations, are comparable with conventional approaches, depending almost exclusively on the approximations in the non-additive kinetic embedding term. An embedding energy error decomposition explains the accuracy of our method. PMID:25903880

  17. Correlation functions from a unified variational principle: Trial Lie groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balian, R.; Vénéroni, M.

    2015-11-01

    Time-dependent expectation values and correlation functions for many-body quantum systems are evaluated by means of a unified variational principle. It optimizes a generating functional depending on sources associated with the observables of interest. It is built by imposing through Lagrange multipliers constraints that account for the initial state (at equilibrium or off equilibrium) and for the backward Heisenberg evolution of the observables. The trial objects are respectively akin to a density operator and to an operator involving the observables of interest and the sources. We work out here the case where trial spaces constitute Lie groups. This choice reduces the original degrees of freedom to those of the underlying Lie algebra, consisting of simple observables; the resulting objects are labeled by the indices of a basis of this algebra. Explicit results are obtained by expanding in powers of the sources. Zeroth and first orders provide thermodynamic quantities and expectation values in the form of mean-field approximations, with dynamical equations having a classical Lie-Poisson structure. At second order, the variational expression for two-time correlation functions separates-as does its exact counterpart-the approximate dynamics of the observables from the approximate correlations in the initial state. Two building blocks are involved: (i) a commutation matrix which stems from the structure constants of the Lie algebra; and (ii) the second-derivative matrix of a free-energy function. The diagonalization of both matrices, required for practical calculations, is worked out, in a way analogous to the standard RPA. The ensuing structure of the variational formulae is the same as for a system of non-interacting bosons (or of harmonic oscillators) plus, at non-zero temperature, classical Gaussian variables. This property is explained by mapping the original Lie algebra onto a simpler Lie algebra. The results, valid for any trial Lie group, fulfill consistency

  18. Timelike information broadcasting in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, Ana; Garay, Luis J.; Martín-Benito, Mercedes; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We study the transmission of information and correlations through quantum fields in cosmological backgrounds. With this aim, we make use of quantum information tools to quantify the classical and quantum correlations induced by a quantum massless scalar field in two particle detectors, one located in the early universe (Alice's) and the other located at a later time (Bob's). In particular, we focus on two phenomena: (a) the consequences on the transmission of information of the violations of the strong Huygens principle for quantum fields, and (b) the analysis of the field vacuum correlations via correlation harvesting from Alice to Bob. We will study a standard cosmological model first and then assess whether these results also hold if we use other than the general relativistic dynamics. As a particular example, we will study the transmission of information through the big bounce, that replaces the big bang, in the effective dynamics of loop quantum cosmology.

  19. Cosmological Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wan Yan

    2008-11-01

    In this thesis we focus on studying the physics of cosmological recombination and how the details of recombination affect the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We present a detailed calculation of the spectral line distortions on the CMB spectrum arising from the Lyman-alpha and the lowest two-photon transitions in the recombination of hydrogen (H), and the corresponding lines from helium (He). The peak of these distortions mainly comes from the Lyman-alpha transition and occurs at about 170 microns, which is the Wien part of the CMB. The major theoretical limitation for extracting cosmological parameters from the CMB sky lies in the precision with which we can calculate the cosmological recombination process. With this motivation, we perform a multi-level calculation of the recombination of H and He with the addition of the spin-forbidden transition for neutral helium (He I), plus the higher order two-photon transitions for H and among singlet states of He I. We find that the inclusion of the spin-forbidden transition results in more than a percent change in the ionization fraction, while the other transitions give much smaller effects. Last we modify RECFAST by introducing one more parameter to reproduce recent numerical results for the speed-up of helium recombination. Together with the existing hydrogen `fudge factor', we vary these two parameters to account for the remaining dominant uncertainties in cosmological recombination. By using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method with Planck forecast data, we find that we need to determine the parameters to better than 10% for He I and 1% for H, in order to obtain negligible effects on the cosmological parameters.

  20. Cosmology and the Bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; Crocce, Martin; Pueblas, Sebastian; Scoccimarro, Roman; /CCPP, New York

    2006-04-01

    The present spatial distribution of galaxies in the Universe is non-Gaussian, with 40% skewness in 50 h{sup -1} Mpc spheres, and remarkably little is known about the information encoded in it about cosmological parameters beyond the power spectrum. In this work they present an attempt to bridge this gap by studying the bispectrum, paying particular attention to a joint analysis with the power spectrum and their combination with CMB data. They address the covariance properties of the power spectrum and bispectrum including the effects of beat coupling that lead to interesting cross-correlations, and discuss how baryon acoustic oscillations break degeneracies. They show that the bispectrum has significant information on cosmological parameters well beyond its power in constraining galaxy bias, and when combined with the power spectrum is more complementary than combining power spectra of different samples of galaxies, since non-Gaussianity provides a somewhat different direction in parameter space. In the framework of flat cosmological models they show that most of the improvement of adding bispectrum information corresponds to parameters related to the amplitude and effective spectral index of perturbations, which can be improved by almost a factor of two. Moreover, they demonstrate that the expected statistical uncertainties in {sigma}s of a few percent are robust to relaxing the dark energy beyond a cosmological constant.

  1. Cosmological ``Truths''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothun, Greg

    2011-10-01

    Ever since Aristotle placed us, with certainty, in the Center of the Cosmos, Cosmological models have more or less operated from a position of known truths for some time. As early as 1963, for instance, it was ``known'' that the Universe had to be 15-17 billion years old due to the suspected ages of globular clusters. For many years, attempts to determine the expansion age of the Universe (the inverse of the Hubble constant) were done against this preconceived and biased notion. Not surprisingly when more precise observations indicated a Hubble expansion age of 11-13 billion years, stellar models suddenly changed to produce a new age for globular cluster stars, consistent with 11-13 billion years. Then in 1980, to solve a variety of standard big bang problems, inflation was introduced in a fairly ad hoc manner. Inflation makes the simple prediction that the net curvature of spacetime is zero (i.e. spacetime is flat). The consequence of introducing inflation is now the necessary existence of a dark matter dominated Universe since the known baryonic material could comprise no more than 1% of the necessary energy density to make spacetime flat. As a result of this new cosmological ``truth'' a significant world wide effort was launched to detect the dark matter (which obviously also has particle physics implications). To date, no such cosmological component has been detected. Moreover, all available dynamical inferences of the mass density of the Universe showed in to be about 20% of that required for closure. This again was inconsistent with the truth that the real density of the Universe was the closure density (e.g. Omega = 1), that the observations were biased, and that 99% of the mass density had to be in the form of dark matter. That is, we know the universe is two component -- baryons and dark matter. Another prevailing cosmological truth during this time was that all the baryonic matter was known to be in galaxies that populated our galaxy catalogs. Subsequent

  2. Galaxy Clusters as Probes of Cosmology and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, August E.

    Clusters of galaxies emerge as nodes in the gravitationally evolving cosmic web of dark matter and baryons that defines the large-scale structure of the Universe. X-ray and optical observations offer plentiful evidence of clusters' dynamical youth, yet bulk measures derived from these observations are tightly correlated, indicating a high degree of structural regularity that makes the population an attractive probe of cosmology. Accurate constraints on cosmological parameters require a precise and unbiased model relating observables to total mass, as well as a statistical characterization of the massive halo population within a given cosmology. In this contribution, I focus on the latter by providing evidence from simulations for cal O(10%) calibration of the space density as a function of mass and for cal O(1%) calibration of the dark matter virial relation. Matching the observed space density as a function of X-ray temperature for a Λ CDM world model is presented as an example of astrophysical/cosmological confusion. The resulting constraint β σ8-5/3 !=! (1.10 ± 0.07) combines β, the ratio of specific energies in dark matter and intracluster gas, with σ8-5/3, the normalization of the mass fluctuation spectrum. Disentangling astrophysical and cosmological factors for upcoming large statistical surveys is the main challenge in the quest to use galaxy clusters as sensitive probes of dark matter and dark energy.

  3. Constructing a bivariate distribution function with given marginals and correlation: application to the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2010-08-01

    We provide an analytic method to construct a bivariate distribution function (DF) with given marginal distributions and correlation coefficient. We introduce a convenient mathematical tool, called a copula, to connect two DFs with any prescribed dependence structure. If the correlation of two variables is weak (Pearson's correlation coefficient |ρ| < 1/3), the Farlie-Gumbel-Morgenstern (FGM) copula provides an intuitive and natural way to construct such a bivariate DF. When the linear correlation is stronger, the FGM copula cannot work anymore. In this case, we propose using a Gaussian copula, which connects two given marginals and is directly related to the linear correlation coefficient between two variables. Using the copulas, we construct the bivariate luminosity function (BLF) and discuss its statistical properties. We focus especially on the far-infrared-far-ulatraviolet (FUV-FIR) BLF, since these two wavelength regions are related to star-formation (SF) activity. Though both the FUV and FIR are related to SF activity, the univariate LFs have a very different functional form: the former is well described by the Schechter function whilst the latter has a much more extended power-law-like luminous end. We construct the FUV-FIR BLFs using the FGM and Gaussian copulas with different strengths of correlation, and examine their statistical properties. We then discuss some further possible applications of the BLF: the problem of a multiband flux-limited sample selection, the construction of the star-formation rate (SFR) function, and the construction of the stellar mass of galaxies (M*)-specific SFR (SFR/M*) relation. The copulas turn out to be a very useful tool to investigate all these issues, especially for including complicated selection effects.

  4. Measuring the Scatter of the Mass-Richness Relation in Galaxy Clusters in Photometric Imaging Surveys by Means of Their Correlation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Campa, Julia; Flaugher, Brenna; Estrada, Juan

    2015-12-04

    The knowledge of the scatter in the mass-observable relation is a key ingredient for a cosmological analysis based on galaxy clusters in a photometric survey. We demonstrate here how the linear bias measured in the correlation function for clusters can be used to determine the value of the scatter. The new method is tested in simulations of a 5.000 square degrees optical survey up to z~1, similar to the ongoing Dark Energy Survey. The results indicate that the scatter can be measured with a precision of 5% using this technique.

  5. Axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, David J. E.

    2016-07-01

    Axions comprise a broad class of particles that can play a major role in explaining the unknown aspects of cosmology. They are also well-motivated within high energy physics, appearing in theories related to CP-violation in the standard model, supersymmetric theories, and theories with extra-dimensions, including string theory, and so axion cosmology offers us a unique view onto these theories. I review the motivation and models for axions in particle physics and string theory. I then present a comprehensive and pedagogical view on the cosmology and astrophysics of axion-like particles, starting from inflation and progressing via BBN, the CMB, reionization and structure formation, up to the present-day Universe. Topics covered include: axion dark matter (DM); direct and indirect detection of axions, reviewing existing and future experiments; axions as dark radiation; axions and the cosmological constant problem; decays of heavy axions; axions and stellar astrophysics; black hole superradiance; axions and astrophysical magnetic fields; axion inflation, and axion DM as an indirect probe of inflation. A major focus is on the population of ultralight axions created via vacuum realignment, and its role as a DM candidate with distinctive phenomenology. Cosmological observations place robust constraints on the axion mass and relic density in this scenario, and I review where such constraints come from. I next cover aspects of galaxy formation with axion DM, and ways this can be used to further search for evidence of axions. An absolute lower bound on DM particle mass is established. It is ma > 10-24eV from linear observables, extending to ma ≳ 10-22eV from non-linear observables, and has the potential to reach ma ≳ 10-18eV in the future. These bounds are weaker if the axion is not all of the DM, giving rise to limits on the relic density at low mass. This leads to the exciting possibility that the effects of axion DM on structure formation could one day be detected

  6. A maximum likelihood approach to estimating correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Eric Jones; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-12-10

    We define a maximum likelihood (ML for short) estimator for the correlation function, ξ, that uses the same pair counting observables (D, R, DD, DR, RR) as the standard Landy and Szalay (LS for short) estimator. The ML estimator outperforms the LS estimator in that it results in smaller measurement errors at any fixed random point density. Put another way, the ML estimator can reach the same precision as the LS estimator with a significantly smaller random point catalog. Moreover, these gains are achieved without significantly increasing the computational requirements for estimating ξ. We quantify the relative improvement of the ML estimator over the LS estimator and discuss the regimes under which these improvements are most significant. We present a short guide on how to implement the ML estimator and emphasize that the code alterations required to switch from an LS to an ML estimator are minimal.

  7. Analog computation of auto and cross-correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    For analysis of the data obtained from the cross beam systems it was deemed desirable to compute the auto- and cross-correlation functions by both digital and analog methods to provide a cross-check of the analysis methods and an indication as to which of the two methods would be most suitable for routine use in the analysis of such data. It is the purpose of this appendix to provide a concise description of the equipment and procedures used for the electronic analog analysis of the cross beam data. A block diagram showing the signal processing and computation set-up used for most of the analog data analysis is provided. The data obtained at the field test sites were recorded on magnetic tape using wide-band FM recording techniques. The data as recorded were band-pass filtered by electronic signal processing in the data acquisition systems.

  8. The partial pair correlation functions of dense supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassaing, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Guillot, B.; Guissani, Y.

    1998-05-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements of heavy water and of two isotopic H2O/D2O mixtures at supercritical state (T = 380 °C and ρD2O = 0.73 g/cm3) are presented. In combining the set of neutron diffraction data with previous X-rays measurements of Yamanaka et al. (J. Chem. Phys., 101 (1994) 9830), it has been possible by using a Monte Carlo method to reach the partial pair correlation functions gOH(r), gHH(r) and gOO(r). The results are compared with molecular-dynamics simulations using the SPCE pair potential for water. These new results confirm that hydrogen bonding is still present in dense supercritical water.

  9. Functional Cortical Network in Alpha Band Correlates with Social Bargaining

    PubMed Central

    Billeke, Pablo; Zamorano, Francisco; Chavez, Mario; Cosmelli, Diego; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Solving demanding tasks requires fast and flexible coordination among different brain areas. Everyday examples of this are the social dilemmas in which goals tend to clash, requiring one to weigh alternative courses of action in limited time. In spite of this fact, there are few studies that directly address the dynamics of flexible brain network integration during social interaction. To study the preceding, we carried out EEG recordings while subjects played a repeated version of the Ultimatum Game in both human (social) and computer (non-social) conditions. We found phase synchrony (inter-site-phase-clustering) modulation in alpha band that was specific to the human condition and independent of power modulation. The strength and patterns of the inter-site-phase-clustering of the cortical networks were also modulated, and these modulations were mainly in frontal and parietal regions. Moreover, changes in the individuals’ alpha network structure correlated with the risk of the offers made only in social conditions. This correlation was independent of changes in power and inter-site-phase-clustering strength. Our results indicate that, when subjects believe they are participating in a social interaction, a specific modulation of functional cortical networks in alpha band takes place, suggesting that phase synchrony of alpha oscillations could serve as a mechanism by which different brain areas flexibly interact in order to adapt ongoing behavior in socially demanding contexts. PMID:25286240

  10. A density functional for core-valence correlation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Frisch, Michael J.; Petersson, George A.

    2015-12-01

    A density functional, ɛCV-DFT(ρc, ρv), describing the core-valence correlation energy has been constructed as a linear combination of ɛLY Pcorr(ρc), ɛV WN5corr(ρc, ρv), ɛPBEcorr(ρc, ρv), ɛSlaterex(ρc, ρv), ɛHCTHex(ρc, ρv), ɛHFex(ρc, ρv), and F CV -DFT (" separators=" N i , Z i ) , a function of the nuclear charges. This functional, with 6 adjustable parameters, reproduces (±0.27 kcal/mol rms error) a benchmark set of 194 chemical energy changes including 9 electron affinities, 18 ionization potentials, and 167 total atomization energies covering the first- and second-rows of the periodic table. This is almost twice the rms error (±0.16 kcal/mol) obtained with CCSD(T)/MTsmall calculations, but less than half the rms error (±0.65 kcal/mol) obtained with MP2/GTlargeXP calculations, and somewhat smaller than the rms error (±0.39 kcal/mol) obtained with CCSD/MTsmall calculations. The largest positive and negative errors from ɛCV-DFT(ρc, ρv) were 0.88 and -0.75 kcal/mol with the set of 194 core-valence energy changes ranging from +3.76 kcal/mol for the total atomization energy of propyne to -9.05 kcal/mol for the double ionization of Mg. Evaluation of the ɛCV-DFT(ρc, ρv) functional requires less time than a single SCF iteration, and the accuracy is adequate for any model chemistry based on the CCSD(T) level of theory.

  11. A density functional for core-valence correlation energy.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Duminda S; Frisch, Michael J; Petersson, George A

    2015-12-01

    A density functional, εCV-DFT(ρc, ρv), describing the core-valence correlation energy has been constructed as a linear combination of εLY P (corr)(ρc), εV WN5 (corr)(ρc, ρv), εPBE (corr)(ρc, ρv), εSlater (ex)(ρc, ρv), εHCTH (ex)(ρc, ρv), εHF (ex)(ρc, ρv), and FCV-DFTNi,Zi, a function of the nuclear charges. This functional, with 6 adjustable parameters, reproduces (±0.27 kcal/mol rms error) a benchmark set of 194 chemical energy changes including 9 electron affinities, 18 ionization potentials, and 167 total atomization energies covering the first- and second-rows of the periodic table. This is almost twice the rms error (±0.16 kcal/mol) obtained with CCSD(T)/MTsmall calculations, but less than half the rms error (±0.65 kcal/mol) obtained with MP2/GTlargeXP calculations, and somewhat smaller than the rms error (±0.39 kcal/mol) obtained with CCSD/MTsmall calculations. The largest positive and negative errors from εCV-DFT(ρc, ρv) were 0.88 and -0.75 kcal/mol with the set of 194 core-valence energy changes ranging from +3.76 kcal/mol for the total atomization energy of propyne to -9.05 kcal/mol for the double ionization of Mg. Evaluation of the εCV-DFT(ρc, ρv) functional requires less time than a single SCF iteration, and the accuracy is adequate for any model chemistry based on the CCSD(T) level of theory. PMID:26646873

  12. Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clusters and Clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    I will present constraints on cosmological parameters from a combination of cluster mass to galaxy number ratios combined with halo occupation analysis of the galaxy autocorrelation function. In two-point clustering, cosmology an bias are degenerate; good fits to the correlation function can be obtained for a wide variety of comologies. However, in order to match the observed level of clustering, each cosmology predicts a different number of galaxies per unit mass at the cluster mass scale. A combination of DR7 galaxy clustering results and M/N data from the weak lensing analysis of the maxBCG catalog break the degeneracy between cosmology and bias, leading to constraints on \\Omega_m and \\sigma_8 that are competitive with current CMB results.

  13. Construction of exchange-correlation functionals through interpolation between the non-interacting and the strong-correlation limit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongxi; Bahmann, Hilke; Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2015-09-28

    Drawing on the adiabatic connection of density functional theory, exchange-correlation functionals of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are constructed which interpolate between the extreme limits of the electron-electron interaction strength. The first limit is the non-interacting one, where there is only exchange. The second limit is the strong correlated one, characterized as the minimum of the electron-electron repulsion energy. The exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit is approximated through a model for the exchange-correlation hole that is referred to as nonlocal-radius model [L. O. Wagner and P. Gori-Giorgi, Phys. Rev. A 90, 052512 (2014)]. Using the non-interacting and strong-correlated extremes, various interpolation schemes are presented that yield new approximations to the adiabatic connection and thus to the exchange-correlation energy. Some of them rely on empiricism while others do not. Several of the proposed approximations yield the exact exchange-correlation energy for one-electron systems where local and semi-local approximations often fail badly. Other proposed approximations generalize existing global hybrids by using a fraction of the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit to replace an equal fraction of the semi-local approximation to the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit. The performance of the proposed approximations is evaluated for molecular atomization energies, total atomic energies, and ionization potentials. PMID:26428992

  14. Construction of exchange-correlation functionals through interpolation between the non-interacting and the strong-correlation limit

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yongxi; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Bahmann, Hilke

    2015-09-28

    Drawing on the adiabatic connection of density functional theory, exchange-correlation functionals of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are constructed which interpolate between the extreme limits of the electron-electron interaction strength. The first limit is the non-interacting one, where there is only exchange. The second limit is the strong correlated one, characterized as the minimum of the electron-electron repulsion energy. The exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit is approximated through a model for the exchange-correlation hole that is referred to as nonlocal-radius model [L. O. Wagner and P. Gori-Giorgi, Phys. Rev. A 90, 052512 (2014)]. Using the non-interacting and strong-correlated extremes, various interpolation schemes are presented that yield new approximations to the adiabatic connection and thus to the exchange-correlation energy. Some of them rely on empiricism while others do not. Several of the proposed approximations yield the exact exchange-correlation energy for one-electron systems where local and semi-local approximations often fail badly. Other proposed approximations generalize existing global hybrids by using a fraction of the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit to replace an equal fraction of the semi-local approximation to the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit. The performance of the proposed approximations is evaluated for molecular atomization energies, total atomic energies, and ionization potentials.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Cosmology has a special status as a science, as it strives to combine the quantitative statistical rigour of observational astronomy with a theoretical framework emerging from rather speculative ideas about fundamental physics. It also has wider repercussions too, as the quest for an understanding of the origin of the Universe sometimes strays into territory traditionally associated with religious modes of enquiry. The Oxford Companion to Cosmology aims to provide a 'comprehensive but accessible overview' of this 'enduringly popular subject' suitable for students, teachers and others with a serious interest in cosmology. It consists of an introductory overview about the big bang cosmological model, followed by an encyclopedia-like section containing over 300 entries of varying length and technical level. One of the authors (Liddle) is a theorist and the other (Loveday) an observer, so between them they have sufficient authority to cover all aspects of the vigorous interplay between these two facets of the discipline. This is not the sort of volume that can easily be read from cover to cover. The best way to test its effectiveness is to dip into it randomly. In my sampling of the entries I found most to be well-written and informative. The first entry I looked at ('correlation function') had an incorrect formula in it, but I didn't find any further significant errors, which says something about the limitations of statistical inference! The only criticisms I have are very minor. Some of the figures are so small as to be virtually invisible to an oldie like me. I also think the book would have benefitted from more references, and am not sure the web links given in their place will prove very useful as these tend to be rather ephemeral. Overall, though, I would say that the book succeeds admirably in its aims. About ten years ago, I was involved in compiling a similar volume, which ended up as The Routledge Companion to the New Cosmology. I will refrain from trying to

  16. Cosmological wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, A. A.; Savelova, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    We describe in details the procedure how the Lobachevsky space can be factorized to a space of the constant negative curvature filled with a gas of wormholes. We show that such wormholes have throat sections in the form of tori and are traversable and stable in the cosmological context. The relation of such wormholes to the dark matter phenomenon is briefly described. We also discuss the possibility of the existence of analogous factorizations for all types of homogeneous spaces.

  17. Medieval Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    During the early Middle Ages (ca 500 to ca 1130) scholars with an interest in cosmology had little useful and dependable literature. They relied heavily on a partial Latin translation of PLATO's Timaeus by Chalcidius (4th century AD), and on a series of encyclopedic treatises associated with the names of Pliny the Elder (ca AD 23-79), Seneca (4 BC-AD 65), Macrobius (fl 5th century AD), Martianus ...

  18. Cognitive function in acromegaly: description and brain volumetric correlates.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Caroline; Sämann, P G; Pfister, H; Dimopoulou, C; Czisch, M; Roemmler, J; Schopohl, J; Stalla, G K; Zihl, J

    2012-09-01

    In acromegaly, we reported on increased rates of affective disorders such as dysthymia and depression, as well as structural brain changes. Objective of this study was to determine if cognitive impairments in patients with acromegaly exist and whether such impairments are associated with structural brain alterations defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 55 patients with biochemically confirmed acromegaly were enrolled. MRI data were compared with 87 control subjects. Main outcome measures were performance levels in 13 cognitive tests covering the domains of attention, memory and executive function, with performance below the cut-off level of the 16th percentile rated as impaired. In addition, individual global and hippocampal volume changes were defined for each patient in reference to a normative sample. We found that up to 33.3% of the patients were impaired in the attention, up to 24.1% in the memory, and up to 16.7% in the executive function domain. 67.3% of the patients failed to reach the cut-off level in at least one subtest. MRI demonstrated increased global, left and right hippocampal grey matter and white matter, particularly early in the disease course. Rather few positive than expected negative correlations could be established between the hippocampal grey matter gain and cognitive performance. Cognitive dysfunction, particularly attentional deficits, are common in acromegaly, rendering neuropsychological testing essential in the diagnostic work-up. PMID:21735089

  19. Recovering refractive index correlation function from measurement of tissue scattering phase function (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jeremy D.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous methods have been developed to quantify the light scattering properties of tissue. These properties are of interest in diagnostic and screening applications due to sensitivity to changes in tissue ultrastructure and changes associated with disease such as cancer. Tissue is considered a weak scatterer because that the mean free path is much larger than the correlation length. When this is the case, all scattering properties can be calculated from the refractive index correlation function Bn(r). Direct measurement of Bn(r) is challenging because it requires refractive index measurement at high resolution over a large tissue volume. Instead, a model is usually assumed. One particularly useful model, the Whittle-Matern function includes several realistic function types such as mass fractal and exponential. Optical scattering properties for weakly scattering media can be determined analytically from Bn(r) by applying the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) or Born Approximation, and so measured scattering properties are used to fit parameters of the model function. Direct measurement of Bn(r) would provide confirmation that the function is a good representation of tissue or help in identifying the length scale at which changes occur. The RGD approximation relates the scattering phase function to the refractive index correlation function through a Fourier transform. This can be inverted without approximation, so goniometric measurement of the scattering can be converted to Bn(r). However, geometric constraints of the measurement of the phase function, angular resolution, and wavelength result in a band limited measurement of Bn(r). These limits are discussed and example measurements are described.

  20. Cytology and Functionally Correlated Circuits of Human Posterior Cingulate Areas

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Brent A.; Vogt, Leslie; Laureys, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Human posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) form the posterior cingulate gyrus, however, monkey connection and human imaging studies suggest that PCC area 23 is not uniform and atlases mislocate RSC. We histologically assessed these regions in 6 postmortem cases, plotted a flat map, and characterized differences in dorsal (d) and ventral (v) area 23. Subsequently, functional connectivity of histologically guided regions of interest (ROI) were assessed in 163 [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose human cases with PET. Compared to area d23, area v23 had a higher density and larger pyramids in layers II, IIIc, and Vb and more intermediate neurofilament-expressing neurons in layer Va. Coregisrtration of each case to standard coordinates showed that the ventral branch of the splenial sulci coincided with the border between d/v PCC at −5.4±0.17 cm from the vertical plane and +1.97±0.08 cm from the bi-commissural line. Correlation analysis of glucose metabolism using histologically guided ROIs suggested important circuit differences including dorsal and ventral visual stream inputs, interactions between the vPCC and subgenual cingulate cortex, and preferential relations between dPCC and the cingulate motor region. The RSC, in contrast, had restricted correlated activity with pericallosal cortex and thalamus. Visual information may be processed with an orbitofrontal link for synthesis of signals to drive premotor activity through dPCC. Review of the literature in terms of a PCC duality suggests that interactions of dPCC, including area 23d, orients the body in space via the cingulate motor areas, while vPCC interacts with subgenual cortex to process self-relevant emotional and non-emotional information and objects and self reflection. PMID:16140550

  1. Supersymmetric quantum cosmological billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschmidt, Axel; Koehn, Michael; Nicolai, Hermann

    2009-09-01

    D=11 supergravity near a spacelike singularity admits a cosmological billiard description based on the hyperbolic Kac-Moody group E10. The quantization of this system via the supersymmetry constraint is shown to lead to wave functions involving automorphic (Maass wave) forms under the modular group W+(E10)≅PSL2(O) with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the billiard domain. A general inequality for the Laplace eigenvalues of these automorphic forms implies that the wave function of the Universe is generically complex and always tends to zero when approaching the initial singularity. We discuss possible implications of this result for the question of singularity resolution in quantum cosmology and comment on the differences with other approaches.

  2. Cosmological model dependence of the galaxy luminosity function: far-infrared results in the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A.; Andreani, P.; Gruppioni, C.; February, S.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Berta, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: This is the first paper of a series aiming at investigating galaxy formation and evolution in the giant-void class of the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models that best fits current cosmological observations. Here we investigate the luminosity function (LF) methodology, and how its estimates would be affected by a change on the cosmological model assumed in its computation. Are the current observational constraints on the allowed cosmology enough to yield robust LF results? Methods: We used the far-infrared source catalogues built on the observations performed with the Herschel/PACS instrument and selected as part of the PACS evolutionary probe (PEP) survey. Schechter profiles were obtained in redshift bins up to z ≈ 4, assuming comoving volumes in both the standard model, that is, the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker metric with a perfect fluid energy-momentum tensor, and non-homogeneous LTB dust models, parametrized to fit the current combination of results stemming from the observations of supernovae Ia, the cosmic microwave background, and baryonic acoustic oscillations. Results: We find that the luminosity functions computed assuming both the standard model and LTB void models show in general good agreement. However, the faint-end slope in the void models shows a significant departure from the standard model up to redshift 0.4. We demonstrate that this result is not artificially caused by the used LF estimator which turns out to be robust under the differences in matter-energy density profiles of the models. Conclusions: The differences found in the LF slopes at the faint end are due to variation in the luminosities of the sources that depend on the geometrical part of the model. It follows that either the standard model is over-estimating the number density of faint sources or the void models are under-estimating it.

  3. Proton-Λ correlation functions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider taking into account residual correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, V. M.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Naboka, V. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    The theoretical analysis of the p ¯-Λ ⊕p -Λ ¯ correlation function in 10% most central Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy √{sNN}=200 GeV shows that the contribution of residual correlations is a necessary factor for obtaining a satisfactory description of the experimental data. Neglecting the residual correlation effect leads to an unrealistically low source radius, about 2 times smaller than the corresponding value for p -Λ ⊕p ¯-Λ ¯ case, when one fits the experimental correlation function within Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model. Recently an approach that accounts effectively for residual correlations for the baryon-antibaryon correlation function was proposed, and a good RHIC data description was reached with the source radius extracted from the hydrokinetic model (HKM). The p ¯-Λ scattering length, as well as the parameters characterizing the residual correlation effect—annihilation dip amplitude and its inverse width—were extracted from the corresponding fit. In this paper we use these extracted values and simulated in HKM source functions for Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC energy √{sNN}=2.76 TeV to predict the corresponding p Λ and p Λ ¯ correlation functions.

  4. Universal microscopic correlation functions for products of truncated unitary matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemann, Gernot; Burda, Zdzislaw; Kieburg, Mario; Nagao, Taro

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the spectral properties of the product of M complex non-Hermitian random matrices that are obtained by removing L rows and columns of larger unitary random matrices uniformly distributed on the group U(N + L). Such matrices are called truncated unitary matrices or random contractions. We first derive the joint probability distribution for the complex eigenvalues of the product matrix for fixed N, L, and M, given by a standard determinantal point process in the complex plane. The weight however is non-standard and can be expressed in terms of the Meijer G-function. The explicit knowledge of all eigenvalue correlation functions and the corresponding kernel allows us to take various large N (and L) limits at fixed M. At strong non-unitarity, with L/N finite, the eigenvalues condense on a domain inside the unit circle. At the edge and in the bulk we find the same universal microscopic kernel as for a single complex non-Hermitian matrix from the Ginibre ensemble. At the origin we find the same new universality classes labeled by M as for the product of M matrices from the Ginibre ensemble. Keeping a fixed size of truncation, L, when N goes to infinity leads to weak non-unitarity, with most eigenvalues on the unit circle as for unitary matrices. Here we find a new microscopic edge kernel that generalizes the known results for M = 1. We briefly comment on the case when each product matrix results from a truncation of different size Lj.

  5. Bianchi Type V Cosmological Models with Varying Cosmological Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R. K.; Singh, Rameshwar

    2015-05-01

    We have analyzed a new class of spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-V cosmological models with perfect fluid distribution in presence of time varying cosmological and gravitational constants in the framework of general relativity. Exact solutions of Einstein's field equations are obtained for two types of cosmologies viz. m ≠ 3 and m = 3 respectively. We propose an alternate variation law in which the anisotropy ( σ/ 𝜃) per unit expansion scalar ( 𝜃) is proportional to a function of scale factor R i.e. (where σ is a shear scalar) Tiwari (The African Review of Physics, 8, 437-447 2013). Physical properties of the models are discussed in detail. The models isotropize at late times. Some cosmological distance parameters for both the models have also been presented. We also discussed state finder parameters and observe that our solutions favor Λ C D M model.

  6. Atlas-based diffusion tensor imaging correlates of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Nowrangi, Milap A.; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Lyketsos, Constantine; Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Albert, Marilyn; Mielke, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment in executive function (EF) is commonly found in Alzheimer’s Dementia (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Atlas-based Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) methods may be useful in relating regional integrity to EF measures in MCI and AD. 66 participants (25 NC, 22 MCI, and 19 AD) received DTI scans and clinical evaluation. DTI scans were applied to a pre-segmented atlas and fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated. ANOVA was used to assess group differences in frontal, parietal, and cerebellar regions. For regions differing between groups (p<0.01), linear regression examined the relationship between EF scores and regional FA and MD. Anisotropy and diffusivity in frontal and parietal lobe white matter (WM) structures were associated with EF scores in MCI and only frontal lobe structures in AD. EF was more strongly associated with FA than MD. The relationship between EF and anisotropy and diffusivity was strongest in MCI. These results suggest that regional WM integrity is compromised in MCI and AD and that FA may be a better correlate of EF than MD. PMID:25318544

  7. Cosmological probes of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais Marie Melanie

    This Thesis is concerned with two cosmological probes of linear gravity. The first relates to Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the Universe, probed by galaxy surveys. The second to temperature anisotropics of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), probed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Map (WMAP). Both probe the matter and dark energy distributions in the Universe and can be used to test general relativity. The first part of this Thesis (Chapters 2 to 4) is concerned with the analysis of galaxy clustering in redshift space. The second part (Chapters 5 to 7) is concerned with the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect using LSS-CMB cross-correlations. Chapter 1 introduces the cosmological theory and overviews the subsequent chapters. Chapter 2 gives a review of recent results from the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and its Redshift Survey (2MRS). It includes work published in Erdogdu (a) et al. (2006) and Erdogdu (b) et al. (2006). Chapter 3 quantifies the clustering of 2MRS galaxies in redshift space. Chapter 4 uses results from Chapter 3 to constrain cosmological parameters. A selection of work from Chapters 3 and 4 will shortly become available in Rassat et al. (2008), entitled 'Redshift Space Analysis of 2MRS'. Chapter 5 overviews the late-time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) and cross- correlations between the LSS and the CMB. Chapter 6 is also published in Rassat et al. (2007), entitled "Cross-correlation of 2MASS and WMAP3: Implications for the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect". It investigates a detection of the ISW effect and correlations which may affect statistical isotropy in the CMB ('Axis of Evil'). Chapter 7 uses the ISW effect to forecast constraints on dark energy parameters and general modifications of general relativity for the next generation of galaxy surveys, particularly the Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Chapter 8 presents the overall conclusions of this Thesis. Chapter 9 discusses possible extensions to

  8. Astrophysical cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe. 47 refs.

  9. Cosmological panspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Hoyle, Fred

    1998-07-01

    The central regions of galaxies could provide the most promising venues for the large-scale synthesis of prebiotic molecules by Miller-Urey type processes.Exploding supermassive stars would produce the basic chemical elements necessary to form molecules in high-density mass flows under near-thermodynamic conditions. Such molecules are then acted upon by X-rays in a manner that simulates the conditions required for Miller-Urey type processing. The Miller-Urey molecular products could initially lead to the origination and dispersal of microbial life on a cosmological scale. Thereafter the continuing production of such molecules would serve as the feedstock of life.

  10. Towards a Density Functional Theory Exchange-Correlation Functional able to describe localization/delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wills, John M.

    2013-03-01

    The inability to computationally describe the physics governing the properties of actinides and their alloys is the poster child of failure of existing Density Functional Theory exchange-correlation functionals. The intricate competition between localization and delocalization of the electrons, present in these materials, exposes the limitations of functionals only designed to properly describe one or the other situation. We will discuss the manifestation of this competition in real materials and propositions on how to construct a functional able to accurately describe properties of these materials. I addition we will discuss both the importance of using the Dirac equation to describe the relativistic effects in these materials, and the connection to the physics of transition metal oxides. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.