Science.gov

Sample records for cosmological simulations effects

  1. Effects of simulated cosmological magnetic fields on the galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the effects of varying the intensity of the primordial magnetic seed field on the global properties of the galaxy population in ideal magnetohydrodynamic cosmological simulations performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. We vary the seed field in our calculations in a range of values still compatible with the current cosmological upper limits. We show that above a critical intensity of ≃10-9 G, the additional pressure arising from the field strongly affects the evolution of gaseous structures, leading to a suppression of the cosmic star formation history, which is stronger for larger seed fields. This directly reflects into a lower total galaxy count above a fixed stellar mass threshold at all redshifts, and a lower galaxy number density at fixed stellar mass and a less massive stellar component at fixed virial mass at all mass scales. These signatures may be used, in addition to the existing methods, to derive tighter constraints on primordial magnetic seed field intensities.

  2. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmo-logical radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative trans-fer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  3. Quantification of discreteness effects in cosmological N-body simulations: Initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.

    2007-03-15

    The relation between the results of cosmological N-body simulations, and the continuum theoretical models they simulate, is currently not understood in a way which allows a quantification of N dependent effects. In this first of a series of papers on this issue, we consider the quantification of such effects in the initial conditions of such simulations. A general formalism developed in [A. Gabrielli, Phys. Rev. E 70, 066131 (2004).] allows us to write down an exact expression for the power spectrum of the point distributions generated by the standard algorithm for generating such initial conditions. Expanded perturbatively in the amplitude of the input (i.e. theoretical, continuum) power spectrum, we obtain at linear order the input power spectrum, plus two terms which arise from discreteness and contribute at large wave numbers. For cosmological type power spectra, one obtains as expected, the input spectrum for wave numbers k smaller than that characteristic of the discreteness. The comparison of real space correlation properties is more subtle because the discreteness corrections are not as strongly localized in real space. For cosmological type spectra the theoretical mass variance in spheres and two-point correlation function are well approximated above a finite distance. For typical initial amplitudes this distance is a few times the interparticle distance, but it diverges as this amplitude (or, equivalently, the initial redshift of the cosmological simulation) goes to zero, at fixed particle density. We discuss briefly the physical significance of these discreteness terms in the initial conditions, in particular, with respect to the definition of the continuum limit of N-body simulations.

  4. Effects of baryons on the dark matter distribution in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    Simulations including solely dark matter performed over the last three decades have delivered an accurate and robust description of the cosmic web and dark matter structures. With the advent of more precise cosmological probes, planned and ongoing, and dark matter detection experiments, this numerical modelling has to be improved to incorporate the complex non-linear and energetic processes taking place during galaxy formation. We use the ``Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environment'' (EAGLE) suite of cosmological simulations to investigate the effects of baryons and astrophysical processes on the underlying dark matter distribution. Many effects are expected and we investigate (i): the modification of the profile of halos from the Navarro-Frenk-White profile shape found in collisionless simulations, including the changes in the dark matter profiles themselves, (ii) the changes of the inner density profiles of rich clusters, where observations have suggested a deviation from the standard cold dark matter paradigm, (iii) the offset created by astrophysical process between the centre of galaxies and the centre of the dark matter halo in which they reside and, (iv) the changes in the shape of the dark matter profile due to baryons in the centre of Milky Way halos and the impact these changes have on the morphology of the annihilation signal that could be observed as an indirect proof of the existence of dark matter. In all cases we find that the baryons play a significant role and change the results found in collisionless simulations dramatically. This highlights the need for more simulations like EAGLE to better understand and analyse future cosmology surveys. We also conduct a thorough study of the hydrodynamics solver parameters used in these simulations, assess their impact on the simulated galaxy population and show how robust some of the EAGLE results are against such variations.

  5. Simulating reionization in numerical cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokasian, Aaron

    2003-11-01

    The incorporation of radiative transfer effects into cosmological hydrodynamical simulations is essential for understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) makes the transition from a neutral medium to one that is almost fully ionized. I present an approximate numerical method designed to study in a statistical sense how a cosmological density field is ionized by various sets of sources. The method requires relatively few time steps and can be employed with simulations of high resolution. First, I explore the reionization history of Helium II by z < 6 quasars. Comparisons between HeII opacities measured observationally and inferred from our analysis reveal that the uncertainties in the empirical luminosity function provide enough leeway to provide a satisfactory match. A property common to all the calculations is that the epoch of Helium II reionization must have occurred between 3≲z≲4 . I extend my analysis to study the constraints that can be placed on the nature of the cosmic ultraviolet (UV) background in the redshift interval 2.5≲z≲5 . I find that in order to simultaneously match observational estimates of the HI and HeII opacities, galaxies and quasars must contribute about equally to the ionizing background in HI at z ≃ 3. Moreover, my analysis requires the stellar component to rise for z > 3 to compensate for the declining contribution from bright quasars at higher redshift. To investigate how stellar source may have reionized the universe at z > 6, I have combined our 3D radiative transfer code with high resolution hydrodynamical simulations to study how population II and III type stars affected the reionization process. The resulting complex reionization histories are presented and comparisons made with observational constraints on the neutral fraction of hydrogen at z ˜ 6 derived from the z = 6.28 SDSS quasar of Becker and coworkers and the recent WMAP measurements of the electron scattering optical depth analysis of Kogut

  6. The entropy core in galaxy clusters: numerical and physical effects in cosmological grid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.

    2011-01-01

    A flat distribution of low gas entropy in the core region of galaxy clusters is a feature commonly found in Eulerian cosmological simulations, at variance with most standard simulations of smoothed particle hydrodynamics fashion. From the literature, it is still unclear whether this difference is entirely due to numerical artefacts (e.g. spurious transfer from gravitational energy to thermal energy), physical mechanisms (e.g. enhanced mixing in Eulerian codes) or a mixture of both. This issue is related to many still open lines of research in the characterization of the dynamical evolution of the baryons in galaxy clusters: the origin of the cool-core/non-cool-core bi-modality, the diffusion of metals within galaxy clusters, the interplay between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the intra-cluster medium, etc. In this work, we aim at constraining to what extent the entropy core is affected by numerical effects, and which are the physical reasons for its production in cosmological runs. To this end, we run a set of 30 high-resolution re-simulations of a ˜3 × 1014 M⊙ h-1 cluster of galaxies with a quiet dynamical history, using modified versions of the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code ENZO and investigating many possible (physical and numerical) details involved in the production of entropy in simulated galaxy clusters. We report that the occurrence of a flat entropy core in the innermost region of a massive cluster is mainly due to hydrodynamical processes resolved by the numerical code (e.g. shocks and mixing motions) and that additional spurious effects of numerical origin (e.g. artificial heating due to softening effects) affect the size and level of the entropy core only in a minor way. Using Lagrangian tracers we show that the entropy profile of non-radiative simulations is produced by a mechanism of `sorting in entropy' which takes place with regularity during the cluster evolution. The evolution of tracers illustrates that the flat entropy core

  7. Effects of Mergers and Dynamical State on Galaxy Clusters in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Katherine L.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological constraints from X-ray and microwave observations of galaxy clusters are subjected to systematic uncertainties. Non-thermal pressure support due to internal gas motions in galaxy clusters is one of the major sources of astrophysical uncertainties, which result in large bias and scatter in the hydrostatic mass estimate. In this work, we analyze a sample of massive galaxy clusters from the Omega500 high-resolution hydrodynamic cosmological simulation to examine the effects of dynamical state on non-thermal pressure. We use the Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code, an Eulerian grid-based adaptive refinement mesh code, which is well suited for modeling shock heating of gas and generation of bulk and turbulent motions from cosmic accretion. We examine the effects of cluster mergers on the hydrostatic mass bias and the evolution of non-thermal pressure. We find that during a major merger about a third of the total pressure support in the system is in non-thermal pressure from random gas motions, which leads to a ~30% bias in the hydrostatic mass estimate. Even after the clusters relax, we find a residual 10% bias due to the residual non-thermal pressure sustained by continuous gas accretion and minor mergers in cluster outskirts. However, when the non-thermal pressure support is accounted for in the mass estimates of relaxed clusters, we are able to recover the true mass to within a few percent. Moreover, by accounting for the additional pressure contribution from gas accelerations, we find that the bias in the HSE can be reduced by about half for our whole cluster sample. We also characterize the non-thermal pressure fraction profile and study its dependence on redshift, mass, and mass accretion rate. We find a universal, redshift-independent fitting formula for describing the fractional pressure support due to bulk motions. Within the relation, we find that the mass accretion rate has a systematic effect on the amount of non-thermal pressure in clusters

  8. Quantification of discreteness effects in cosmological N-body simulations. II. Evolution up to shell crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.

    2007-11-15

    We apply a recently developed perturbative formalism which describes the evolution under their self-gravity of particles displaced from a perfect lattice to quantify precisely, up to shell crossing, the effects of discreteness in dissipationless cosmological N-body simulations. We give simple expressions, explicitly dependent on the particle density, for the evolution of power in each mode as a function of redshift. For typical starting redshifts the effect of finite particle number is to slow down slightly the growth of power compared to that in the fluid limit (e.g., by about 10% at half the Nyquist frequency), and to induce also dispersion in the growth as a function of direction at a comparable level. In the limit that the initial redshift tends to infinity, at fixed particle density, the evolution in fact diverges from that in the fluid limit (described by the Zeldovich approximation). Contrary to widely held belief, this means that a simulation started at a redshift much higher than the redshift of shell crossing actually gives a worse, rather than a better, result. We also study how these effects are modified when there is a small-scale regularization of the gravitational force. We show that such a smoothing may reduce the anisotropy of the discreteness effects, but it then increases their average effect. This behavior illustrates the fact that the discreteness effects described here are distinct from those usually considered in this context, due to two-body collisions. Indeed the characteristic time for divergence from the collisionless limit is proportional to N{sup 2/3}, rather than N/logN in the latter case.

  9. Cosmological Simulations of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsberger, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Dark matter is supposed to be the backbone of structure formation in the universe. It dominates the energy content of the universe together with dark energy. Modern computer simulation allow the detailed prediction of the distribution of dark matter on very large and small scales. The main inputs for these simulations are the initial conditions observed through the cosmic microwave background and gravity as the main force behind structure formation. I will present in my talk recent advances in cosmological simulations and how state-of-the-art simulations lead to virtual universes which agree remarkably well with observations of the real universe. Despite this success the small-scale structure predicted by these simulations does not agree perfectly with observations. I will discuss possible solutions to these problems that might also point to new theories of dark matter.

  10. Machine Learning and Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdar, Harshil; Turk, Matthew; Brunner, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We explore the application of machine learning (ML) to the problem of galaxy formation and evolution in a hierarchical universe. Our motivations are two-fold: (1) presenting a new, promising technique to study galaxy formation, and (2) quantitatively evaluating the extent of the influence of dark matter halo properties on small-scale structure formation. For our analyses, we use both semi-analytical models (Millennium simulation) and N-body + hydrodynamical simulations (Illustris simulation). The ML algorithms are trained on important dark matter halo properties (inputs) and galaxy properties (outputs). The trained models are able to robustly predict the gas mass, stellar mass, black hole mass, star formation rate, $g-r$ color, and stellar metallicity. Moreover, the ML simulated galaxies obey fundamental observational constraints implying that the population of ML predicted galaxies is physically and statistically robust. Next, ML algorithms are trained on an N-body + hydrodynamical simulation and applied to an N-body only simulation (Dark Sky simulation, Illustris Dark), populating this new simulation with galaxies. We can examine how structure formation changes with different cosmological parameters and are able to mimic a full-blown hydrodynamical simulation in a computation time that is orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the set of ML simulated galaxies in Dark Sky obey the same observational constraints, further solidifying ML's place as an intriguing and promising technique in future galaxy formation studies and rapid mock galaxy catalog creation.

  11. TERAPIXEL IMAGING OF COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Yu; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Khandai, Nishikanta; Sargent, Randy; Nourbakhsh, Illah; Dille, Paul; Bartley, Chris; Springel, Volker; Jana, Anirban; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2011-12-01

    The increasing size of cosmological simulations has led to the need for new visualization techniques. We focus on smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations run with the GADGET code and describe methods for visually accessing the entire simulation at full resolution. The simulation snapshots are rastered and processed on supercomputers into images that are ready to be accessed through a Web interface (GigaPan). This allows any scientist with a Web browser to interactively explore simulation data sets in both spatial and temporal dimensions and data sets which in their native format can be hundreds of terabytes in size or more. We present two examples, the first a static terapixel image of the MassiveBlack simulation, a P-GADGET SPH simulation with 65 billion particles, and the second an interactively zoomable animation of a different simulation with more than 1000 frames, each a gigapixel in size. Both are available for public access through the GigaPan Web interface. We also make our imaging software publicly available.

  12. Cosmological memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  13. HYBRID COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH STREAM VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Thacker, Robert J.

    2013-07-10

    In the early universe, substantial relative ''stream'' velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To assess the impact of these velocities on high-redshift structure formation, we carry out a suite of high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations, which use smoothed particle hydrodynamic data sets as initial conditions, converted using a new tool developed for this work. These simulations resolve structures with masses as small as a few 100 M{sub Sun }, and we focus on the 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} ''mini-halos'' in which the first stars formed. At z Almost-Equal-To 17, the presence of stream velocities has only a minor effect on the number density of halos below 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, but it greatly suppresses gas accretion onto all halos and the dark matter structures around them. Stream velocities lead to significantly lower halo gas fractions, especially for Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} objects, an effect that is likely to depend on the orientation of a halo's accretion lanes. This reduction in gas density leads to colder, more compact radial profiles, and it substantially delays the redshift of collapse of the largest halos, leading to delayed star formation and possibly delayed reionization. These many differences suggest that future simulations of early cosmological structure formation should include stream velocities to properly predict gas evolution, star formation, and the epoch of reionization.

  14. Voids in cosmological simulations over cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Powell, Devon; Abel, Tom

    2016-06-01

    We study evolution of voids in cosmological simulations using a new method for tracing voids over cosmic time. The method is based on tracking watershed basins (contiguous regions around density minima) of well-developed voids at low redshift, on a regular grid of density field. It enables us to construct a robust and continuous mapping between voids at different redshifts, from initial conditions to the present time. We discuss how the new approach eliminates strong spurious effects of numerical origin when voids' evolution is traced by matching voids between successive snapshots (by analogy to halo merger trees). We apply the new method to a cosmological simulation of a standard Λ-cold-dark-matter cosmological model and study evolution of basic properties of typical voids (with effective radii 6 h-1 Mpc < Rv < 20 h-1 Mpc at redshift z = 0) such as volumes, shapes, matter density distributions and relative alignments. The final voids at low redshifts appear to retain a significant part of the configuration acquired in initial conditions. Shapes of voids evolve in a collective way which barely modifies the overall distribution of the axial ratios. The evolution appears to have a weak impact on mutual alignments of voids implying that the present state is in large part set up by the primordial density field. We present evolution of dark matter density profiles computed on isodensity surfaces which comply with the actual shapes of voids. Unlike spherical density profiles, this approach enables us to demonstrate development of theoretically predicted bucket-like shape of the final density profiles indicating a wide flat core and a sharp transition to high-density void walls.

  15. Modelling injection and feedback of cosmic rays in grid-based cosmological simulations: effects on cluster outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.; Gheller, C.; Brunetti, G.

    2012-04-01

    We present a numerical scheme, implemented in the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code ENZO, to model the injection of cosmic ray (CR) particles at shocks, their advection and their dynamical feedback on thermal baryonic gas. We give a description of the algorithms and show their tests against analytical and idealized one-dimensional problems. Our implementation is able to track the injection of CR energy, the spatial advection of CR energy and its feedback on the thermal gas in run-time. This method is applied to study CR acceleration and evolution in cosmological volumes, with both fixed and variable mesh resolution. We compare the properties of galaxy clusters with and without CRs for a sample of high-resolution clusters with different dynamical states. At variance with similar simulations based on smoothed particles hydrodynamics, we report that the inclusion of CR feedback in our method decreases the central gas density in clusters, thus reducing the X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect from the clusters centre, while enhancing the gas density and its related observables near the virial radius.

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of Cosmological Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Geoffrey C.

    We examine the epoch of hydrogen reionization using a new numerical method that allows us to self-consistently couple all the relevant physical processes (gas dynamics, dark matter dynamics, self-gravity, star formation/feedback, radiative transfer, ionization, recombination, heating and cooling) and evolve the system of coupled equations on the same high resolution mesh. We refer to this approach as direct numerical simulation, in contrast to existing approaches which decouple and coarse-grain the radiative transfer and ionization balance calculations relative to the underlying dynamical calculation. Our method is scalable with respect to the number of radiation sources, size of the mesh, and the number of computer processors employed, and is described in Chapter 2 of this thesis. This scalability permits us to simulate cosmological reionization in large cosmological volumes (~100 Mpc) while directly modeling the sources and sinks of ionizing radiation, including radiative feedback effects such as photoevaporation of gas from halos, Jeans smoothing of the IGM, and enhanced recombination due to small scale clumping. With our fiducial simulation, we find that roughly 2 ionizing photons per baryon is needed to highly ionize the intergalactic medium. The complicated events during reionization that lead to this number can be generally described as inside-out, but in reality the narrative depends on the level of ionization of the gas one defines as ionized. We have updated the formula observers often use for estimating the ionized volume filling fraction formula with a delta b and trec,eff to get from O(10%) to O(1%) consistency with our simulation results. This improvement comes from not using the traditional clumping factor, but instead, considering the history and local effects which were neglected in formulating the original expression. And finally, we have a new upper limit for the escape fraction of ~0.6 from our simulation, which takes into account the photons in

  17. Cosmological N-body Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, George

    1994-05-01

    .90ex> }}} The ``N'' in N-body calculations has doubled every year for the last two decades. To continue this trend, the UW N-body group is working on algorithms for the fast evaluation of gravitational forces on parallel computers and establishing rigorous standards for the computations. In these algorithms, the computational cost per time step is ~ 10(3) pairwise forces per particle. A new adaptive time integrator enables us to perform high quality integrations that are fully temporally and spatially adaptive. SPH--smoothed particle hydrodynamics will be added to simulate the effects of dissipating gas and magnetic fields. The importance of these calculations is two-fold. First, they determine the nonlinear consequences of theories for the structure of the Universe. Second, they are essential for the interpretation of observations. Every galaxy has six coordinates of velocity and position. Observations determine two sky coordinates and a line of sight velocity that bundles universal expansion (distance) together with a random velocity created by the mass distribution. Simulations are needed to determine the underlying structure and masses. The importance of simulations has moved from ex post facto explanation to an integral part of planning large observational programs. I will show why high quality simulations with ``large N'' are essential to accomplish our scientific goals. This year, our simulations have N >~ 10(7) . This is sufficient to tackle some niche problems, but well short of our 5 year goal--simulating The Sloan Digital Sky Survey using a few Billion particles (a Teraflop-year simulation). Extrapolating past trends, we would have to ``wait'' 7 years for this hundred-fold improvement. Like past gains, significant changes in the computational methods are required for these advances. I will describe new algorithms, algorithmic hacks and a dedicated computer to perform Billion particle simulations. Finally, I will describe research that can be enabled by

  18. Cosmological simulations of multicomponent cold dark matter.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2014-08-15

    The nature of dark matter is unknown. A number of dark matter candidates are quantum flavor-mixed particles but this property has never been accounted for in cosmology. Here we explore this possibility from the first principles via extensive N-body cosmological simulations and demonstrate that the two-component dark matter model agrees with observational data at all scales. Substantial reduction of substructure and flattening of density profiles in the centers of dark matter halos found in simulations can simultaneously resolve several outstanding puzzles of modern cosmology. The model shares the "why now?" fine-tuning caveat pertinent to all self-interacting models. Predictions for direct and indirect detection dark matter experiments are made. PMID:25170698

  19. Implementing the DC Mode in Cosmological Simulations with Supercomoving Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y; Kravtsov, Andrey V; Rudd, Douglas H

    2011-06-02

    As emphasized by previous studies, proper treatment of the density fluctuation on the fundamental scale of a cosmological simulation volume - the 'DC mode' - is critical for accurate modeling of spatial correlations on scales ~> 10% of simulation box size. We provide further illustration of the effects of the DC mode on the abundance of halos in small boxes and show that it is straightforward to incorporate this mode in cosmological codes that use the 'supercomoving' variables. The equations governing evolution of dark matter and baryons recast with these variables are particularly simple and include the expansion factor, and hence the effect of the DC mode, explicitly only in the Poisson equation.

  20. Physical properties of simulated galaxy populations at z = 2 - II. Effects of cosmology, reionization and ISM physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Marcel R.; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Springel, Volker; Theuns, Tom; Wiersma, Robert P. C.

    2013-11-01

    We use hydrodynamical simulations from the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations project to investigate the dependence of the physical properties of galaxy populations at redshift 2 on the assumed star formation law, the equation of state imposed on the unresolved interstellar medium, the stellar initial mass function, the reionization history and the assumed cosmology. This work complements that of Paper I, where we studied the effects of varying models for galactic winds driven by star formation and active galactic nucleus. The normalization of the matter power spectrum strongly affects the galaxy mass function, but has a relatively small effect on the physical properties of galaxies residing in haloes of a fixed mass. Reionization suppresses the stellar masses and gas fractions of low-mass galaxies, but by z = 2 the results are insensitive to the timing of reionization. The stellar initial mass function mainly determines the physical properties of galaxies through its effect on the efficiency of the feedback, while changes in the recycled mass and metal fractions play a smaller role. If we use a recipe for star formation that reproduces the observed star formation law independently of the assumed equation of state of the unresolved interstellar medium, then the latter is unimportant. The star formation law, i.e. the gas consumption time-scale as a function of surface density, determines the mass of dense, star-forming gas in galaxies, but affects neither the star formation rate nor the stellar mass. This can be understood in terms of self-regulation: the gas fraction adjusts until the outflow rate balances the inflow rate.

  1. Cosmological simulations with disformally coupled symmetron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagala, R.; Llinares, C.; Mota, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. We investigate statistical properties of the distribution of matter at redshift zero in disformal gravity by using N-body simulations. The disformal model studied here consists of a conformally coupled symmetron field with an additional exponential disformal term. Aims: We conduct cosmological simulations to discover the impact of the new disformal terms in the matter power spectrum, halo mass function, and radial profile of the scalar field. Methods: We calculated the disformal geodesic equation and the equation of motion for the scalar field. We then implemented these equations into the N-body code Isis, which is a modified gravity version of the code Ramses. Results: The presence of a conformal symmetron field increases both the power spectrum and mass function compared to standard gravity on small scales. Our main finding is that the newly added disformal terms tend to counteract these effects and can make the evolution slightly closer to standard gravity. We finally show that the disformal terms give rise to oscillations of the scalar field in the centre of the dark matter haloes.

  2. Precision Cosmology with Clusters of Galaxies: Insights from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, P. M.; Burns, J. O.; Norman, M. L.

    2004-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies have emerged as powerful and complementary probes in contemporary cosmology. However, the simplifying assumptions used to interpret cluster observations (spherical symmetry, isothermality, hydrostatic equilibrium, etc.) are approximations that are valid to only a certain level. Especially in the new era of precision cosmology, where efforts are underway to investigate the nature and evolution of dark energy, it is crucial to calibrate the approximations used to reduce observations of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect or X-ray emission in clusters of galaxies. We use high-resolution, cosmological, adaptive mesh refinement simulations to quantify the limiting accuracy and potential bias imposed by common assumptions for observables such as the gravitating mass of clusters and the Hubble constant.

  3. Cosmological Effects in Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H. J.; Wilson, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier discussion of the planetary flyby anomaly, a preliminary assessment of cosmological effects upon planetary orbits exhibiting the flyby anomaly was made. A more comprehensive investigation has since been published, although it was directed at the Pioneer anomaly and possible effects of universal rotation. The general subject of Solar System anomalies will be examined here from the point of view of planetary science.

  4. EUNHA: a New Cosmological Hydrodynamic Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Juhan; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Park, Changbom

    2014-06-01

    We develop a parallel cosmological hydrodynamic simulation code designed for the study of formation and evolution of cosmological structures. The gravitational force is calculated using the TreePM method and the hydrodynamics is implemented based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The initial displacement and velocity of simulation particles are calculated according to second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory using the power spectra of dark matter and baryonic matter. The initial background temperature is given by Recfast and the temperature fluctuations at the initial particle position are assigned according to the adiabatic model. We use a time-limiter scheme over the individual time steps to capture shock-fronts and to ease the time-step tension between the shock and preshock particles. We also include the astrophysical gas processes of radiative heating/cooling, star formation, metal enrichment, and supernova feedback. We test the code in several standard cases such as one-dimensional Riemann problems, Kelvin-Helmholtz, and Sedov blast wave instability. Star formation on the galactic disk is investigated to check whether the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation is properly recovered. We also study global star formation history at different simulation resolutions and compare them with observations.

  5. Effective perfect fluids in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Bellazzini, Brando E-mail: brando.bellazzini@pd.infn.it

    2013-04-01

    We describe the cosmological dynamics of perfect fluids within the framework of effective field theories. The effective action is a derivative expansion whose terms are selected by the symmetry requirements on the relevant long-distance degrees of freedom, which are identified with comoving coordinates. The perfect fluid is defined by requiring invariance of the action under internal volume-preserving diffeomorphisms and general covariance. At lowest order in derivatives, the dynamics is encoded in a single function of the entropy density that characterizes the properties of the fluid, such as the equation of state and the speed of sound. This framework allows a neat simultaneous description of fluid and metric perturbations. Longitudinal fluid perturbations are closely related to the adiabatic modes, while the transverse modes mix with vector metric perturbations as a consequence of vorticity conservation. This formalism features a large flexibility which can be of practical use for higher order perturbation theory and cosmological parameter estimation.

  6. Cosmology with Peculiar Velocities: Observational Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, P.; Davis, T. M.; Howlett, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we investigate how observational effects could possibly bias cosmological inferences from peculiar velocity measurements. Specifically, we look at how bulk flow measurements are compared with theoretical predictions. Usually bulk flow calculations try to approximate the flow that would occur in a sphere around the observer. Using the Horizon Run 2 simulation we show that the traditional methods for bulk flow estimation can overestimate the magnitude of the bulk flow for two reasons: when the survey geometry is not spherical (the data do not cover the whole sky), and when the observations undersample the velocity distributions. Our results may explain why several bulk flow measurements found bulk flow velocities that seem larger than those expected in standard ΛCDM cosmologies. We recommend a different approach when comparing bulk flows to cosmological models, in which the theoretical prediction for each bulk flow measurement is calculated specifically for the geometry and sampling rate of that survey. This means that bulk flow values will not be comparable between surveys, but instead they are comparable with cosmological models, which is the more important measure.

  7. Anisotropic thermal conduction in cosmological cluster formation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Parrish, Ian; Brueggen, Marcus

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the role of the magnetothermal instability (MTI) in the cosmological cluster formation simulations. Our simulations self-consistently incorporate the effects of the field amplification by the structure formation (i.e., gravitational collapse and shearing) and by anisotropic thermal conduction, as well as the effects of violent sloshing motions (e.g., due to mergers) that tend to slow down the field growth. We quantify the effects of these processes on the temperature and density profiles, the strength and topology of the magnetic fields as well as the effective thermal conduction in the intarcluster medium.

  8. IMPLEMENTING THE DC MODE IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH SUPERCOMOVING VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Rudd, Douglas H. E-mail: andrey@oddjob.uchicago.edu

    2011-06-01

    As emphasized by previous studies, proper treatment of the density fluctuation on the fundamental scale of a cosmological simulation volume-the {sup D}C mode{sup -}is critical for accurate modeling of spatial correlations on scales {approx}> 10% of simulation box size. We provide further illustration of the effects of the DC mode on the abundance of halos in small boxes and show that it is straightforward to incorporate this mode in cosmological codes that use the 'supercomoving' variables. The equations governing evolution of dark matter and baryons recast with these variables are particularly simple and include the expansion factor, and hence the effect of the DC mode, explicitly only in the Poisson equation.

  9. An improved SPH scheme for cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. M.; Murante, G.; Arth, A.; Remus, R.-S.; Teklu, A. F.; Donnert, J. M. F.; Planelles, S.; Beck, M. C.; Förster, P.; Imgrund, M.; Dolag, K.; Borgani, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present an implementation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) with improved accuracy for simulations of galaxies and the large-scale structure. In particular, we implement and test a vast majority of SPH improvement in the developer version of GADGET-3. We use the Wendland kernel functions, a particle wake-up time-step limiting mechanism and a time-dependent scheme for artificial viscosity including high-order gradient computation and shear flow limiter. Additionally, we include a novel prescription for time-dependent artificial conduction, which corrects for gravitationally induced pressure gradients and improves the SPH performance in capturing the development of gas-dynamical instabilities. We extensively test our new implementation in a wide range of hydrodynamical standard tests including weak and strong shocks as well as shear flows, turbulent spectra, gas mixing, hydrostatic equilibria and self-gravitating gas clouds. We jointly employ all modifications; however, when necessary we study the performance of individual code modules. We approximate hydrodynamical states more accurately and with significantly less noise than standard GADGET-SPH. Furthermore, the new implementation promotes the mixing of entropy between different fluid phases, also within cosmological simulations. Finally, we study the performance of the hydrodynamical solver in the context of radiative galaxy formation and non-radiative galaxy cluster formation. We find galactic discs to be colder and more extended and galaxy clusters showing entropy cores instead of steadily declining entropy profiles. In summary, we demonstrate that our improved SPH implementation overcomes most of the undesirable limitations of standard GADGET-SPH, thus becoming the core of an efficient code for large cosmological simulations.

  10. Precision Constraints from Computational Cosmology and Type Ia Supernova Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Joseph P.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Norris, B.; Biswas, R.

    2011-01-01

    The evidence for dark energy represents one of the greatest mysteries of modern science. The research undertaken probes the implications of dark energy via analysis of large scale structure and detonation-based Type Ia supernova light curve simulations. It is presently an exciting time to be involved in cosmology because planned astronomical surveys will effectively result in dark sector probes becoming systematics-limited, making numerical simulations crucial to the formulation of precision constraints. This work aims to assist in reaching the community goal of 1% constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter. Reaching this goal will require 1) hydrodynamic+N-body simulations with a minimum of a 1 Gpc box size, 20483 hydrodynamic cells, and 1011 dark matter particles, which push the limits of existing codes, and 2) a better understanding of the explosion mechanism(s) for Type Ia supernovae, together with larger, high-quality data sets from present and upcoming supernova surveys. Initial results are discussed from two projects. The first is computational cosmology studies aimed at enabling the large simulations discussed above. The second is radiative transfer calculations drawn from Type Ia supernova explosion simulations aimed at bridging the gap between simulated light curves and those observed from, e.g., the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II and, eventually, the Dark Energy Survey.

  11. Cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxies with cosmic ray feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingjing; Bryan, Greg L.; Salem, Munier

    2016-08-01

    We perform zoom-in cosmological simulations of a suite of dwarf galaxies, examining the impact of cosmic rays (CRs) generated by supernovae, including the effect of diffusion. We first look at the effect of varying the uncertain CR parameters by repeatedly simulating a single galaxy. Then we fix the comic ray model and simulate five dwarf systems with virial masses range from 8 to 30 × 1010 M⊙. We find that including CR feedback (with diffusion) consistently leads to disc-dominated systems with relatively flat rotation curves and constant star formation rates. In contrast, our purely thermal feedback case results in a hot stellar system and bursty star formation. The CR simulations very well match the observed baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, but have a lower gas fraction than in real systems. We also find that the dark matter cores of the CR feedback galaxies are cuspy, while the purely thermal feedback case results in a substantial core.

  12. Cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxies with cosmic ray feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingjing; Bryan, Greg L.; Salem, Munier

    2016-08-01

    We perform zoom-in cosmological simulations of a suite of dwarf galaxies, examining the impact of cosmic-rays generated by supernovae, including the effect of diffusion. We first look at the effect of varying the uncertain cosmic ray parameters by repeatedly simulating a single galaxy. Then we fix the comic ray model and simulate five dwarf systems with virial masses range from 8-30 $\\times 10^{10}$ Msun. We find that including cosmic ray feedback (with diffusion) consistently leads to disk dominated systems with relatively flat rotation curves and constant star formation rates. In contrast, our purely thermal feedback case results in a hot stellar system and bursty star formation. The CR simulations very well match the observed baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, but have a lower gas fraction than in real systems. We also find that the dark matter cores of the CR feedback galaxies are cuspy, while the purely thermal feedback case results in a substantial core.

  13. Cosmological simulations of isotropic conduction in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Britton; O'Shea, Brian W.; Voit, G. Mark; Ventimiglia, David; Skillman, Samuel W.

    2013-12-01

    Simulations of galaxy clusters have a difficult time reproducing the radial gas-property gradients and red central galaxies observed to exist in the cores of galaxy clusters. Thermal conduction has been suggested as a mechanism that can help bring simulations of cluster cores into better alignment with observations by stabilizing the feedback processes that regulate gas cooling, but this idea has not yet been well tested with cosmological numerical simulations. Here we present cosmological simulations of 10 galaxy clusters performed with five different levels of isotropic Spitzer conduction, which alters both the cores and outskirts of clusters, though not dramatically. In the cores, conduction flattens central temperature gradients, making them nearly isothermal and slightly lowering the central density, but failing to prevent a cooling catastrophe there. Conduction has little effect on temperature gradients outside of cluster cores because outward conductive heat flow tends to inflate the outer parts of the intracluster medium (ICM), instead of raising its temperature. In general, conduction tends reduce temperature inhomogeneity in the ICM, but our simulations indicate that those homogenizing effects would be extremely difficult to observe in ∼5 keV clusters. Outside the virial radius, our conduction implementation lowers the gas densities and temperatures because it reduces the Mach numbers of accretion shocks. We conclude that, despite the numerous small ways in which conduction alters the structure of galaxy clusters, none of these effects are significant enough to make the efficiency of conduction easily measurable, unless its effects are more pronounced in clusters hotter than those we have simulated.

  14. Database Architecture for the Indra Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crankshaw, Daniel S.; Falck, B.; Budavari, T.; Dobos, L.; Lemson, G.; Neyrinck, M.; Szalay, A.; Wang, J.; Burns, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Indra Simulation suite is a set of 512 cosmological N-body simulations in a 1Gpc/h-sided box producing over 100 TB of data. We present the data storage strategy developed to efficiently answer the most important questions being asked of this data. Some of these queries involve sampling all of the particle data for a particular snapshot, such as computation of particle topologies like filaments, voids, and clusters. The other queries involve searching a snapshot for information about a few particles, such as tracking halo member particle positions through time. We present a SQL database design to support the dataset by allowing efficient storage and querying. The particle data consists of positions and velocities for each particle, identified by a unique ID throughout the instance, as well as FOF halos and the density field on a power of two grid. In each timestep, the particle data is sorted along a Peano-Hilbert curve, and all particles within a single cell are placed into a single binary array stored in one row in the database using a custom SQL array library. To still allow for fast querying on these arrays, we associate a Bloom filter with each array to test whether a given particle is contained within it. A Bloom filter is a space efficient data structure to test set membership in constant time. Example query code and performance tests will be given. The authors are grateful for support from the Gordon and Betty Moore and the W.M. Keck Foundations.

  15. N-body simulations for coupled scalar-field cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Barrow, John D.

    2011-01-15

    We describe in detail the general methodology and numerical implementation of consistent N-body simulations for coupled-scalar-field models, including background cosmology and the generation of initial conditions (with the different couplings to different matter species taken into account). We perform fully consistent simulations for a class of coupled-scalar-field models with an inverse power-law potential and negative coupling constant, for which the chameleon mechanism does not work. We find that in such cosmological models the scalar-field potential plays a negligible role except in the background expansion, and the fifth force that is produced is proportional to gravity in magnitude, justifying the use of a rescaled gravitational constant G in some earlier N-body simulation works for similar models. We then study the effects of the scalar coupling on the nonlinear matter power spectra and compare with linear perturbation calculations to see the agreement and places where the nonlinear treatment deviates from the linear approximation. We also propose an algorithm to identify gravitationally virialized matter halos, trying to take account of the fact that the virialization itself is also modified by the scalar-field coupling. We use the algorithm to measure the mass function and study the properties of dark-matter halos. We find that the net effect of the scalar coupling helps produce more heavy halos in our simulation boxes and suppresses the inner (but not the outer) density profile of halos compared with the {Lambda}CDM prediction, while the suppression weakens as the coupling between the scalar field and dark-matter particles increases in strength.

  16. Modeling the outskirts of galaxy clusters with cosmological simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, D.

    We present cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters, with focus on the cluster outskirts. We show that large-scale cosmic accretion and mergers produce significant internal gas motions and inhomogeneous gas distribution ("clumpiness") in the intracluster medium (ICM) and introduce biases in measurements of the ICM profiles and the cluster mass. We also show that non-thermal pressure provided by the gas motions is one of the dominant sources of theoretical uncertainties in cosmic microwave background secondary anisotropies. We briefly discuss implications for cluster cosmology and future prospects for understanding the physics of cluster outskirts using computer simulations and multi-wavelength cluster surveys.

  17. Low-mass Galaxy Formation in Cosmological Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations: The Effects of Varying the Sub-grid Physics Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colín, Pedro; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Valenzuela, Octavio; Ceverino, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    We present numerical simulations aimed at exploring the effects of varying the sub-grid physics parameters on the evolution and the properties of the galaxy formed in a low-mass dark matter halo (~7 × 1010 h -1 M sun at redshift z = 0). The simulations are run within a cosmological setting with a nominal resolution of 218 pc comoving and are stopped at z = 0.43. For simulations that cannot resolve individual molecular clouds, we propose the criterion that the threshold density for star formation, n SF, should be chosen such that the column density of the star-forming cells equals the threshold value for molecule formation, N ~ 1021 cm-2, or ~8 M sun pc-2. In all of our simulations, an extended old/intermediate-age stellar halo and a more compact younger stellar disk are formed, and in most cases, the halo's specific angular momentum is slightly larger than that of the galaxy, and sensitive to the SF/feedback parameters. We found that a non-negligible fraction of the halo stars are formed in situ in a spheroidal distribution. Changes in the sub-grid physics parameters affect significantly and in a complex way the evolution and properties of the galaxy: (1) lower threshold densities n SF produce larger stellar effective radii Re , less peaked circular velocity curves Vc (R), and greater amounts of low-density and hot gas in the disk mid-plane; (2) when stellar feedback is modeled by temporarily switching off radiative cooling in the star-forming regions, Re increases (by a factor of ~2 in our particular model), the circular velocity curve becomes flatter, and a complex multi-phase gaseous disk structure develops; (3) a more efficient local conversion of gas mass to stars, measured by a stellar particle mass distribution biased toward larger values, increases the strength of the feedback energy injection—driving outflows and inducing burstier SF histories; (4) if feedback is too strong, gas loss by galactic outflows—which are easier to produce in low

  18. Analyzing and Visualizing Cosmological Simulations with ParaView

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, Jonathan; Heitmann, Katrin; Ahrens, James P; Fasel, Patricia; Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Habib, Salman; Pope, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The advent of large cosmological sky surveys - ushering in the era of precision cosmology - has been accompanied by ever larger cosmological simulations. The analysis of these simulations, which currently encompass tens of billions of particles and up to a trillion particles in the near future, is often as daunting as carrying out the simulations in the first place. Therefore, the development of very efficient analysis tools combining qualitative and quantitative capabilities is a matter of some urgency. In this paper, we introduce new analysis features implemented within ParaView, a fully parallel, open-source visualization toolkit, to analyze large N-body simulations. A major aspect of ParaView is that it can live and operate on the same machines and utilize the same parallel power as the simulation codes themselves. In addition, data movement is in a serious bottleneck now and will become even more of an issue in the future; an interactive visualization and analysis tool that can handle data in situ is fast becoming essential. The new features in ParaView include particle readers and a very efficient halo finder that identifies friends-of-friends halos and determines common halo properties, including spherical overdensity properties. In combination with many other functionalities already existing within ParaView, such as histogram routines or interfaces to programming languages like Python, this enhanced version enables fast, interactive, and convenient analyses of large cosmological simulations. In addition, development paths are available for future extensions.

  19. Simulations of quintessential cold dark matter: beyond the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, E.; Baugh, C. M.; Angulo, R. E.; Pascoli, S.

    2010-02-01

    We study the non-linear growth of cosmic structure in different dark energy models, using large volume N-body simulations. We consider a range of quintessence models which feature both rapidly and slowly varying dark energy equations of state, and compare the growth of structure to that in a universe with a cosmological constant. We use a four-parameter equation of state for the dark energy which accurately reproduces the quintessence dynamics over a wide range of redshifts. The adoption of a quintessence model changes the expansion history of the universe, the form of the linear theory power spectrum and can alter key observables, such as the horizon scale and the distance to last scattering. We incorporate these effects into our simulations in stages to isolate the impact of each on the growth of structure. The difference in structure formation can be explained to first order by the difference in growth factor at a given epoch; this scaling also accounts for the non-linear growth at the 15 per cent level. We find that quintessence models that are different from Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) both today and at high redshifts (z ~ 1000), and which feature late (z < 2), rapid transitions in the equation of state, can have identical baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak positions to those in ΛCDM. We find that these models have higher abundances of dark matter haloes at z > 0 compared to ΛCDM and so measurements of the mass function should allow us to distinguish these quintessence models from a cosmological constant. However, we find that a second class of quintessence models, whose equation of state makes an early (z > 2) rapid transition to w = -1, cannot be distinguished from ΛCDM using measurements of the mass function or the BAO, even if these models have non-negligible amounts of dark energy at early times.

  20. Fueling Supermassive Black Holes in High-Resolution Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Robyn D.; Gnedin, N. Y.; Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the centers of galaxies is a rich and complex problem, spanning a large dynamic range and depending on many physical processes. Simulating the transport of gas and angular momentum from super-galactic scales all the way down to the accretion disk requires sophisticated numerical techniques with extensive treatment of baryonic physics. We use a hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulation to follow the growth and evolution of a typical disk galaxy hosting a SMBH, in a cosmological context. We have adopted a piecemeal approach, focusing our attention on the gas dynamics in the central few hundred parsecs of the simulated galaxy (with boundary conditions provided by the larger cosmological simulation), and beginning with a simplified picture (no mergers or feedback). In this scenario, we find that the circumnuclear disk remains marginally stable against catastrophic fragmentation, allowing stochastic fueling of gas into the vicinity of the SMBH.

  1. Euclid Cosmological Simulations Requirements and Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiessling, Alina

    2012-01-01

    Simulations are essential for the successful undertaking of the Euclid mission. The simulations requirements for the Euclid mission are vast ! It is an enormous undertaking that includes development of software and acquisition of hardware facilities. The simulations requirements are currently being finalised - please contact myself or Elisabetta Semboloni if you would like to add/modify any r equi r ements (or if you would like to be involved in the development of the simulations).

  2. Properties of cosmological filaments extracted from Eulerian simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheller, C.; Vazza, F.; Favre, J.; Brüggen, M.

    2015-10-01

    Using a new parallel algorithm implemented within the VisIt framework, we analysed large cosmological grid simulations to study the properties of baryons in filaments. The procedure allows us to build large catalogues with up to ˜3 × 104 filaments per simulated volume and to investigate the properties of cosmic filaments for very large volumes at high resolution (up to 3003 Mpc3 simulated with 20483 cells). We determined scaling relations for the mass, volume, length and temperature of filaments and compared them to those of galaxy clusters. The longest filaments have a total length of about 200 Mpc with a mass of several 1015 M⊙. We also investigated the effects of different gas physics. Radiative cooling significantly modifies the thermal properties of the warm-hot-intergalactic medium of filaments, mainly by lowering their mean temperature via line cooling. On the other hand, powerful feedback from active galactic nuclei in surrounding haloes can heat up the gas in filaments. The impact of shock-accelerated cosmic rays from diffusive shock acceleration on filaments is small and the ratio between cosmic ray and gas pressure within filaments is of the order of ˜10-20 per cent.

  3. Analyzing and Visualizing Cosmological Simulations with ParaView

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodring, Jonathan; Heitmann, Katrin; Ahrens, James; Fasel, Patricia; Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Habib, Salman; Pope, Adrian

    2011-07-01

    The advent of large cosmological sky surveys—ushering in the era of precision cosmology—has been accompanied by ever larger cosmological simulations. The analysis of these simulations, which currently encompass tens of billions of particles and up to a trillion particles in the near future, is often as daunting as carrying out the simulations in the first place. Therefore, the development of very efficient analysis tools combining qualitative and quantitative capabilities is a matter of some urgency. In this paper, we introduce new analysis features implemented within ParaView, a fully parallel, open-source visualization toolkit, to analyze large N-body simulations. A major aspect of ParaView is that it can live and operate on the same machines and utilize the same parallel power as the simulation codes themselves. In addition, data movement is in a serious bottleneck now and will become even more of an issue in the future; an interactive visualization and analysis tool that can handle data in situ is fast becoming essential. The new features in ParaView include particle readers and a very efficient halo finder that identifies friends-of-friends halos and determines common halo properties, including spherical overdensity properties. In combination with many other functionalities already existing within ParaView, such as histogram routines or interfaces to programming languages like Python, this enhanced version enables fast, interactive, and convenient analyses of large cosmological simulations. In addition, development paths are available for future extensions.

  4. In situ and in-transit analysis of cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Brian; Almgren, Ann; Lukić, Zarija; Weber, Gunther; Morozov, Dmitriy; Beckner, Vincent; Day, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    Modern cosmological simulations have reached the trillion-element scale, rendering data storage and subsequent analysis formidable tasks. To address this circumstance, we present a new MPI-parallel approach for analysis of simulation data while the simulation runs, as an alternative to the traditional workflow consisting of periodically saving large data sets to disk for subsequent `offline' analysis. We demonstrate this approach in the compressible gasdynamics/ N-body code Nyx, a hybrid MPI+OpenMP code based on the BoxLib framework, used for large-scale cosmological simulations. We have enabled on-the-fly workflows in two different ways: one is a straightforward approach consisting of all MPI processes periodically halting the main simulation and analyzing each component of data that they own (` in situ'). The other consists of partitioning processes into disjoint MPI groups, with one performing the simulation and periodically sending data to the other `sidecar' group, which post-processes it while the simulation continues (`in-transit'). The two groups execute their tasks asynchronously, stopping only to synchronize when a new set of simulation data needs to be analyzed. For both the in situ and in-transit approaches, we experiment with two different analysis suites with distinct performance behavior: one which finds dark matter halos in the simulation using merge trees to calculate the mass contained within iso-density contours, and another which calculates probability distribution functions and power spectra of various fields in the simulation. Both are common analysis tasks for cosmology, and both result in summary statistics significantly smaller than the original data set. We study the behavior of each type of analysis in each workflow in order to determine the optimal configuration for the different data analysis algorithms.

  5. COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CLUSTER FORMATION WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ruszkowski, M.; Lee, D.; Parrish, I.; Oh, S. Peng E-mail: dongwook@flash.uchicago.edu E-mail: iparrish@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-10-20

    The intracluster medium (ICM) has been suggested to be buoyantly unstable in the presence of magnetic field and anisotropic thermal conduction. We perform first cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation that simultaneously include magnetic fields, radiative cooling, and anisotropic thermal conduction. In isolated and idealized cluster models, the magnetothermal instability (MTI) tends to reorient the magnetic fields radially whenever the temperature gradient points in the direction opposite to gravitational acceleration. Using cosmological simulations of cluster formation we detect radial bias in the velocity and magnetic fields. Such radial bias is consistent with either the inhomogeneous radial gas flows due to substructures or residual MTI-driven field rearrangements that are expected even in the presence of turbulence. Although disentangling the two scenarios is challenging, we do not detect excess bias in the runs that include anisotropic thermal conduction. The anisotropy effect is potentially detectable via radio polarization measurements with LOFAR and the Square Kilometer Array and future X-ray spectroscopic studies with the International X-ray Observatory. We demonstrate that radiative cooling boosts the amplification of the magnetic field by about two orders of magnitude beyond what is expected in the non-radiative cases. This effect is caused by the compression of the gas and frozen-in magnetic field as it accumulates in the cluster center. At z = 0 the field is amplified by a factor of about 10{sup 6} compared to the uniform magnetic field that evolved due to the universal expansion alone. Interestingly, the runs that include both radiative cooling and thermal conduction exhibit stronger magnetic field amplification than purely radiative runs. In these cases, buoyant restoring forces depend on the temperature gradients rather than the steeper entropy gradients. Thus, the ICM is more easily mixed and the winding up of the frozen-in magnetic

  6. Three-dimensional Visualization of Cosmological and Galaxy Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thooris, Bruno; Pomarède, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Our understanding of the structuring of the Universe from large-scale cosmological structures down to the formation of galaxies now largely benefits from numerical simulations. The RAMSES code, relying on the Adaptive Mesh Refinement technique, is used to perform massively parallel simulations at multiple scales. The interactive, immersive, three-dimensional visualization of such complex simulations is a challenge that is addressed using the SDvision software package. Several rendering techniques are available, including ray-casting and isosurface reconstruction, to explore the simulated volumes at various resolution levels and construct temporal sequences. These techniques are illustrated in the context of different classes of simulations. We first report on the visualization of the HORIZON Galaxy Formation Simulation at MareNostrum, a cosmological simulation with detailed physics at work in the galaxy formation process. We then carry on in the context of an intermediate zoom simulation leading to the formation of a Milky-Way like galaxy. Finally, we present a variety of simulations of interacting galaxies, including a case-study of the Antennae Galaxies interaction.

  7. How to model AGN feedback in cosmological simulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora

    2015-08-01

    Hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are one of the most powerful tools to study the formation and evolution of galaxies in the fully non-linear regime. Despite several recent successes in simulating Milky Way look-alikes, self-consistent, ab-initio models are still a long way off. In this talk I will review numerical and physical uncertainties plaguing current state-of-the-art cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. I will then discuss which feedback mechanisms are needed to reproduce realistic stellar masses and galaxy morphologies in the present day Universe and argue that the black hole feedback is necessary for the quenching of massive galaxies. I will then demonstrate how black hole - host galaxy scaling relations depend on galaxy morphology and colour, highlighting the implications for the co-evolutionary picture between galaxies and their central black holes. In the second part of the talk I will present a novel method that permits to resolve gas flows around black holes all the way from large cosmological scales to the Bondi radii of black holes themselves. I will demonstrate that with this new numerical technique it is possible to estimate much more accurately gas properties in the vicinity of black holes than has been feasible before in galaxy and cosmological simulations, allowing to track reliably gas angular momentum transport from Mpc to pc scales. Finally, I will also discuss if AGN-driven outflows are more likely to be energy- or momentum-driven and what implications this has for the redshift evolution of black hole - host galaxy scaling relations.

  8. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  9. Adding Spice to Vanilla LCDM simulations: Alternative Cosmologies & Lighting up Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan Elahi, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter simulations have formed the backbone of our theoretical understanding of cosmological structure formation. Predictions from the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) cosmology, where the Universe contains two dark components, namely Dark Matter & Dark Energy, are in excellent agreement with the Large-Scale Structures observed, i.e., the distribution of galaxies across cosmic time. However, this paradigm is in tension with observations at small-scales, from the number and properties of satellite galaxies around galaxies such as the Milky Way and Andromeda, to the lensing statistics of massive galaxy clusters. I will present several alternative models of cosmology (from Warm Dark Matter to coupled Dark Matter-Dark Energy models) and how they compare to vanilla LCDM by studying formation of groups and clusters dark matter only and adiabatic hydrodynamical zoom simulations. I will show how modifications to the dark sector can lead to some surprising results. For example, Warm Dark Matter, so often examined on small satellite galaxies scales, can be probed observationally using weak lensing at cluster scales. Coupled dark sectors, where dark matter decays into dark energy and experiences an effective gravitational potential that differs from that experienced by normal matter, is effectively hidden away from direct observations of galaxies. Studies like these are vital if we are to pinpoint observations which can look for unique signatures of the physics that governs the hidden Universe. Finally, I will discuss how all of these predictions are affected by uncertain galaxy formation physics. I will present results from a major comparison study of numerous hydrodynamical codes, the nIFTY cluster comparison project. This comparison aims to understand the code-to-code scatter in the properties of dark matter haloes and the galaxies that reside in them. We find that even in purely adiabatic simulations, different codes form clusters with very different X

  10. Simulating the Nature of Science: Cosmology Distilled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Tim

    2006-12-01

    We will show the latest version of our nature-of-science simulation system, in which students work in groups as researchers to uncover the structure of the (simulated and abstract) universe. They make observations, develop hypotheses, and publish their results. This community of scholars gradually builds up an understanding of their new field of research, as revealed in their journal articles. Along the way, the student-researchers see their hypotheses shattered by new data, and even have to deal with funding issues, since observations are not free. Some teachers are enthusiastic about this as a way to do writing across the curriculum. More important, though, is how experiences like this can help students see how science really works: that it takes teamwork, diverse ideas, and tenacity in addition to plain old smarts. It also helps students distinguish between conjectures that are truly scientific and those that aren't. This work is supported by NSF; we'll show how the system works.

  11. High performance cosmological simulations on a grid of supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, D.; Rieder, S.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2012-06-01

    We present results from our cosmological N-body simulation which consisted of 2048x2048x2048 particles and ran distributed across three supercomputers throughout Europe. The run, which was performed as the concluding phase of the Gravitational Billion Body Problem DEISA project, integrated a 30 Mpc box of dark matter using an optimized Tree/Particle Mesh N-body integrator. We ran the simulation up to the present day (z=0), and obtained an efficiency of about 0.93 over 2048 cores compared to a single supercomputer run. In addition, we share our experiences on using multiple supercomputers for high performance computing and provide several recommendations for future projects.

  12. Lensing effects in inhomogeneous cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghassemi, Sima; Khoeini-Moghaddam, Salomeh; Mansouri, Reza

    2009-05-15

    Concepts developed in the gravitational lensing techniques such as shear, convergence, tangential, and radial arcs maybe used to see how tenable inhomogeneous models proposed to explain the acceleration of the universe models are. We study the widely discussed Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) cosmological models. It turns out that for the observer sitting at origin of a global LTB solution the shear vanishes as in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models, while the value of convergence is different, which may lead to observable cosmological effects. We also consider Swiss-cheese models proposed recently based on LTB with an observer sitting in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker part. It turns out that they have different behavior as far as the formation of radial and tangential arcs are concerned.

  13. Diverse structural evolution at z > 1 in cosmologically simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Lotz, Jennifer; Moody, Christopher; Peth, Michael; Freeman, Peter; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai

    2015-08-01

    From mock Hubble Space Telescope images, we quantify non-parametric statistics of galaxy morphology, thereby predicting the emergence of relationships among stellar mass, star formation, and observed rest-frame optical structure at 1 < z < 3. We measure automated diagnostics of galaxy morphology in cosmological simulations of the formation of 22 central galaxies with 9.3 < log10M*/M⊙ < 10.7. These high-spatial-resolution zoom-in calculations enable accurate modelling of the rest-frame UV and optical morphology. Even with small numbers of galaxies, we find that structural evolution is neither universal nor monotonic: galaxy interactions can trigger either bulge or disc formation, and optically bulge-dominated galaxies at this mass may not remain so forever. Simulated galaxies with M* > 1010M⊙ contain relatively more disc-dominated light profiles than those with lower mass, reflecting significant disc brightening in some haloes at 1 < z < 2. By this epoch, simulated galaxies with specific star formation rates below 10- 9.7 yr- 1 are more likely than normal star-formers to have a broader mix of structural types, especially at M* > 1010 M⊙. We analyse a cosmological major merger at z ˜ 1.5 and find that the newly proposed Multimode-Intensity-Deviation (MID) morphology diagnostics trace later merger stages while Gini-M20 trace earlier ones. MID is sensitive also to clumpy star-forming discs. The observability time of typical MID-enhanced events in our simulation sample is <100 Myr. A larger sample of cosmological assembly histories may be required to calibrate such diagnostics in the face of their sensitivity to viewing angle, segmentation algorithm, and various phenomena such as clumpy star formation and minor mergers.

  14. Low energy effective string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E.J.; Lahiri, A.; Wands, D. )

    1994-10-15

    We give the general analytic solutions derived from the low energy string effective action for four-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models with a dilaton and antisymmetric tensor field, considering both long and short wavelength modes of the [ital H] field. The presence of a homogeneous [ital H] field significantly modifies the evolution of the scale factor and dilaton. In particular it places a lower bound on the allowed value of the dilaton. The scale factor also has a lower bound but our solutions remain singular as they all contain regions where the spacetime curvature diverges signalling a breakdown in the validity of the effective action. We extend our results to the simplest Bianchi type I metric in higher dimensions with only two scale factors. We again give the general analytic solutions for long and short wavelength modes for the [ital H] field restricted to the three-dimensional space, which produces an anisotropic expansion. In the case of [ital H] field radiation (wavelengths within the Hubble length) we obtain the usual four-dimensional radiation-dominated FRW model as the unique late time attractor.

  15. Radion effective potential in brane gas cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young

    2008-09-15

    We consider a cosmological solution which can explain anisotropic evolution of spatial dimensions and the stabilization of extra dimensions in brane gas formalism. We evaluate the effective potentials, induced by brane gas, bulk flux and supergravity particles, which govern the sizes of the observed three and the extra dimensions. It is possible that the wrapped internal volume can oscillate between two turning points or sit at the minimum of the potential while the unwrapped three-dimensional volume can expand monotonically. Including the supergravity particles makes the effective potential steeper as the internal volume shrinks.

  16. Dynamical Casimir effect and quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, I.; Milton, K. A.; Odintsov, S. D.; Osetrin, K. E.

    2000-09-01

    We apply the background field method and the effective action formalism to describe the four-dimensional dynamical Casimir effect. Our picture corresponds to the consideration of quantum cosmology for an expanding FRW universe (the boundary conditions act as a moving mirror) filled by a quantum massless GUT which is conformally invariant. We consider cases in which the static Casimir energy is attractive and repulsive. Inserting the simplest possible inertial term, we find, in the adiabatic (and semiclassical) approximation, the dynamical evolution of the scale factor and the dynamical Casimir stress analytically and numerically [for SU(2) super Yang-Mills theory]. Alternative kinetic energy terms are explored in the Appendix.

  17. Evolution of the gas kinematics of galaxies in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rossi, M. E.; Pedrosa, S. E.

    We studied the evolution of the gas kinematics of galaxies by performing hydrodynamical simulations in a cosmological scenario. We payed special attention to the origin of the scatter of the Tully-Fisher relation and the features which could be associated with mergers and interactions. We extended the study by De Rossi et al. (A&A, 519, A89, 2010) and analysed their whole simulated sample which includes both, gas disc-dominated and spheroid-dominated systems. We found that mergers and interactions can affect the rotation curves directly or indirectly inducing a scatter in the Tully-Fisher Relation larger than the simulated evolution since z ˜ 3. In agreement with previous works, kinematical indicators which combine the rotation velocity and dispersion velocity in their definitions lead to a tighter relation. In addition, when we estimated the rotation velocity at the maximum of the rotation curve, we obtained the best proxy for the potential well regardless of morphology.

  18. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF MASSIVE COMPACT HIGH-z GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer-Larsen, J.; Toft, S. E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.d

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the structure and dynamics of the recently discovered massive (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) compact z {approx} 2 galaxies, cosmological hydrodynamical/N-body simulations of a {approx}50,000 Mpc{sup 3} comoving (Lagrangian), proto-cluster region have been undertaken. At z = 2, the highest resolution simulation contains {approx}5800 resolved galaxies, of which 509, 27, and 5 have M{sub *}>10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, M{sub *}>10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, and M{sub *}>4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, respectively. Total stellar masses, effective radii, and characteristic stellar densities have been determined for all galaxies. At z = 2, for the definitely well-resolved mass range of M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, we fit the relation R{sub eff} = R{sub eff,12} M {sup 1/3}{sub *,12} to the data, where M{sub *,12} is the total stellar mass in units of 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}. This yields R{sub eff,12} = (1.20 {+-} 0.04) kpc, in line with observational findings for compact z {approx} 2 galaxies, though somewhat more compact than the observed average. The only line-of-sight velocity dispersion measured for a z {approx} 2 compact galaxy is very large, {sigma}{sub *,p} = 510{sup +165}{sub -95} km s{sup -1}. This value can be matched at about the 1{sigma} level, although a somewhat larger mass than the estimated M{sub *} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} is indicated. For the above mass range, the galaxies have an average axial ratio (b/a) = 0.64 {+-} 0.02 with a dispersion of 0.1, and an average rotation to one-dimensional velocity-dispersion ratio (v/{sigma}) = 0.46 {+-} 0.06 with a dispersion of 0.3, and a maximum value of v/{sigma} {approx_equal} 1.1. Both rotation and velocity anisotropy contribute significantly in flattening the compact galaxies. Some of the observed compact galaxies appear flatter than any of the simulated galaxies. Finally, it is found that the massive compact galaxies are strongly baryon dominated in their inner

  19. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  20. Formation of galactic building blocks in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Kyungwon; Shin, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-08-01

    We aim to investigate the formation of primordial globular clusters (GCs) and dwarf galaxies as galactic building blocks in the Milky Way-like galaxy with cosmological zoom-in simulations. To accomplish our research goal, we modified cosmological hydrodynamic code, GADGET-2, such that it includes radiative heating and cooling, reionization (z < 8.9) of the Universe, UV shielding (nshield > 0.014cm-3), star formation, and supernova explosion. We first performed a dark matter(DM)-only, low resolution simulation with 32Mpc/h on a side to find the host halo (~10×1012 M⊙), and then resimulated a cubic box of a side length 4Mpc/h with 130 million DM and gas particles from z = 49. The mass of each particle is Mdm = 3.4×104 M⊙ and Mgas = 6.3×103 M⊙, thus the GCs and dwarf galaxies can be resolved with more than hundreds and thousands particles, respectively. Here, we present various properties of the building blocks such as mass function, formation epochs, baryon-to-dark matter ratio, metallicity, spatial distribution, and merger history on the host halo as functions of redshift.

  1. HOW WELL DO COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS REPRODUCE INDIVIDUAL HALO PROPERTIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, Michele; Smith, Britton D.; Hallman, Eric J.; Skillman, Samuel W.; Shull, J. Michael

    2010-03-10

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation often rely on prescriptions for star formation and feedback that depend on halo properties such as halo mass, central overdensity, and virial temperature. In this paper, we address the convergence of individual halo properties, based on their number of particles N, focusing, in particular, on the mass of halos near the resolution limit of a simulation. While it has been established that the halo mass function is sampled on average down to N {approx} 20-30 particles, we show that individual halo properties exhibit significant scatter, and some systematic biases, as one approaches the resolution limit. We carry out a series of cosmological simulations using the Gadget2 and Enzo codes with N{sub p} = 64{sup 3} to N{sub p} = 1024{sup 3} total particles, keeping the same large-scale structure in the simulation box. We consider boxes of small (l{sub box} = 8 Mpc h {sup -1}), medium (l{sub box} = 64 Mpc h {sup -1}), and large (l{sub box} = 512 Mpc h {sup -1}) size to probe different halo masses and formation redshifts. We cross-identify dark matter halos in boxes at different resolutions and measure the scatter in their properties. The uncertainty in the mass of single halos depends on the number of particles (scaling approximately as N {sup -1/3}), but the rarer the density peak, the more robust its identification. The virial radius of halos is very stable and can be measured without bias for halos with N {approx}> 30. In contrast, the average density within a sphere containing 25% of the total halo mass is severely underestimated (by more than a factor 2) and the halo spin is moderately overestimated for N {approx}< 100. If sub-grid physics is implemented upon a cosmological simulation, we recommend that rare halos ({approx}3sigma peaks) be resolved with N {approx}> 100 particles and common halos ({approx}1sigma peaks) with N {approx}> 400 particles to avoid excessive numerical noise and possible systematic biases in the

  2. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF GALAXY FORMATION WITH COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Munier; Bryan, Greg L.; Hummels, Cameron

    2014-12-20

    We investigate the dynamical impact of cosmic rays (CR) in cosmological simulations of galaxy formation using adaptive-mesh refinement simulations of a 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} halo. In agreement with previous work, a run with only our standard thermal energy feedback model results in a massive spheroid and unrealistically peaked rotation curves. However, the addition of a simple two-fluid model for CRs drastically changes the morphology of the forming disk. We include an isotropic diffusive term and a source term tied to star formation due to (unresolved) supernova-driven shocks. Over a wide range of diffusion coefficients, the CRs generate thin, extended disks with a significantly more realistic (although still not flat) rotation curve. We find that the diffusion of CRs is key to this process, as they escape dense star-forming clumps and drive outflows within the more diffuse interstellar medium.

  3. Generalized effective description of loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Gupt, Brajesh

    2015-10-01

    The effective description of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) has proved to be a convenient platform to study phenomenological implications of the quantum bounce that resolves the classical big bang singularity. Originally, this description was derived using Gaussian quantum states with small dispersions. In this paper we present a generalization to incorporate states with large dispersions. Specifically, we derive the generalized effective Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and propose a generalized effective Hamiltonian which are being used in an ongoing study of the phenomenological consequences of a broad class of quantum geometries. We also discuss an interesting interplay between the physics of states with larger dispersions in standard LQC, and of sharply peaked states in (hypothetical) LQC theories with larger area gap.

  4. Machine learning and cosmological simulations - II. Hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdar, Harshil M.; Turk, Matthew J.; Brunner, Robert J.

    2016-04-01

    We extend a machine learning (ML) framework presented previously to model galaxy formation and evolution in a hierarchical universe using N-body + hydrodynamical simulations. In this work, we show that ML is a promising technique to study galaxy formation in the backdrop of a hydrodynamical simulation. We use the Illustris simulation to train and test various sophisticated ML algorithms. By using only essential dark matter halo physical properties and no merger history, our model predicts the gas mass, stellar mass, black hole mass, star formation rate, g - r colour, and stellar metallicity fairly robustly. Our results provide a unique and powerful phenomenological framework to explore the galaxy-halo connection that is built upon a solid hydrodynamical simulation. The promising reproduction of the listed galaxy properties demonstrably place ML as a promising and a significantly more computationally efficient tool to study small-scale structure formation. We find that ML mimics a full-blown hydrodynamical simulation surprisingly well in a computation time of mere minutes. The population of galaxies simulated by ML, while not numerically identical to Illustris, is statistically robust and physically consistent with Illustris galaxies and follows the same fundamental observational constraints. ML offers an intriguing and promising technique to create quick mock galaxy catalogues in the future.

  5. Fast Generation of Ensembles of Cosmological N-Body Simulations via Mode-Resampling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M D; Cole, S; Frenk, C S; Szapudi, I

    2011-02-14

    We present an algorithm for quickly generating multiple realizations of N-body simulations to be used, for example, for cosmological parameter estimation from surveys of large-scale structure. Our algorithm uses a new method to resample the large-scale (Gaussian-distributed) Fourier modes in a periodic N-body simulation box in a manner that properly accounts for the nonlinear mode-coupling between large and small scales. We find that our method for adding new large-scale mode realizations recovers the nonlinear power spectrum to sub-percent accuracy on scales larger than about half the Nyquist frequency of the simulation box. Using 20 N-body simulations, we obtain a power spectrum covariance matrix estimate that matches the estimator from Takahashi et al. (from 5000 simulations) with < 20% errors in all matrix elements. Comparing the rates of convergence, we determine that our algorithm requires {approx}8 times fewer simulations to achieve a given error tolerance in estimates of the power spectrum covariance matrix. The degree of success of our algorithm indicates that we understand the main physical processes that give rise to the correlations in the matter power spectrum. Namely, the large-scale Fourier modes modulate both the degree of structure growth through the variation in the effective local matter density and also the spatial frequency of small-scale perturbations through large-scale displacements. We expect our algorithm to be useful for noise modeling when constraining cosmological parameters from weak lensing (cosmic shear) and galaxy surveys, rescaling summary statistics of N-body simulations for new cosmological parameter values, and any applications where the influence of Fourier modes larger than the simulation size must be accounted for.

  6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Neelima; Trac, Hy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A.R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Barrientos, L.Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J.Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Doriese, W.Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.

    2011-08-18

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zeldovich-selected galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of 9 optically-confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 square degrees of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown cluster astrophysics and cosmology derived from SZ surveys. We describe the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal with a 4-parameter fit. Marginalizing over the values of the parameters in this fit with conservative priors gives {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.851 {+-} 0.115 and w = -1.14 {+-} 0.35 for a spatially-flat wCDM cosmological model with WMAP 7-year priors on cosmological parameters. This gives a modest improvement in statistical uncertainty over WMAP 7-year constraints alone. Fixing the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal to a fiducial relation obtained from numerical simulations and calibrated by X-ray observations, we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.821 {+-} 0.044 and w = -1.05 {+-} 0.20. These results are consistent with constraints from WMAP 7 plus baryon acoustic oscillations plus type Ia supernoava which give {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.802 {+-} 0.038 and w = -0.98 {+-} 0.053. A stacking analysis of the clusters in this sample compared to clusters simulated assuming the fiducial model also shows good agreement. These results suggest that, given the sample of clusters used here, both the astrophysics of massive clusters and the cosmological parameters derived from them are broadly consistent with current models.

  7. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected Via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Trac, Hy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Doriese, W. Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Wollack, Ed

    2010-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-selected galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of 9 optically-confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 square degrees of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148 GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown cluster astrophysics and cosmology derived from SZ surveys. We describe the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal with a 4-parameter fit. Marginalizing over the values of the parameters in this fit with conservative priors gives (sigma)8 = 0.851 +/- 0.115 and w = -1.14 +/- 0.35 for a spatially-flat wCDM cosmological model with WMAP 7-year priors on cosmological parameters. This gives a modest improvement in statistical uncertainty over WMAP 7-year constraints alone. Fixing the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal to a fiducial relation obtained from numerical simulations and calibrated by X-ray observations, we find (sigma)8 + 0.821 +/- 0.044 and w = -1.05 +/- 0.20. These results are consistent with constraints from WMAP 7 plus baryon acoustic oscillations plus type Ia supernova which give (sigma)8 = 0.802 +/- 0.038 and w = -0.98 +/- 0.053. A stacking analysis of the clusters in this sample compared to clusters simulated assuming the fiducial model also shows good agreement. These results suggest that, given the sample of clusters used here, both the astrophysics of massive clusters and the cosmological parameters derived from them are broadly consistent with current models.

  8. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: COSMOLOGY FROM GALAXY CLUSTERS DETECTED VIA THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Neelima; Trac, Hy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Das, Sudeep; Dunkley, Joanna; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Duenner, Rolando; Amiri, Mandana; Battistelli, Elia S.; Burger, Bryce; Appel, John W.; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Bond, J. Richard; Brown, Ben; Chervenak, Jay; Doriese, W. Bertrand

    2011-05-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-selected (SZ-selected) galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of nine optically confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 deg{sup 2} of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148 GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown cluster astrophysics and cosmology derived from SZ surveys. We describe the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal with a four-parameter fit. Marginalizing over the values of the parameters in this fit with conservative priors gives {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.851 {+-} 0.115 and w = -1.14 {+-} 0.35 for a spatially flat wCDM cosmological model with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year priors on cosmological parameters. This gives a modest improvement in statistical uncertainty over WMAP seven-year constraints alone. Fixing the scaling relation between the cluster mass and SZ signal to a fiducial relation obtained from numerical simulations and calibrated by X-ray observations, we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.821 {+-} 0.044 and w = -1.05 {+-} 0.20. These results are consistent with constraints from WMAP7 plus baryon acoustic oscillations plus Type Ia supernova which give {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.802 {+-} 0.038 and w = -0.98 {+-} 0.053. A stacking analysis of the clusters in this sample compared to clusters simulated assuming the fiducial model also shows good agreement. These results suggest that, given the sample of clusters used here, both the astrophysics of massive clusters and the cosmological parameters derived from them are broadly consistent with current models.

  9. Fueling galaxy growth through gas accretion in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Dylan Rubaloff

    Despite significant advances in the numerical modeling of galaxy formation and evolution, it is clear that a satisfactory theoretical picture of how galaxies acquire their baryons across cosmic time remains elusive. In this thesis we present a computational study which seeks to address the question of how galaxies get their gas. We make use of new, more robust simulation techniques and describe the first investigations of cosmological gas accretion using a moving-mesh approach for solving the equations of continuum hydrodynamics. We focus first on a re-examination of past theoretical conclusions as to the relative importance of different accretion modes for galaxy growth. We study the rates and nature of gas accretion at z=2, comparing our new simulations run with the Arepo code to otherwise identical realizations run with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code Gadget. We find significant physical differences in the thermodynamic history of accreted gas, explained in terms of numerical inaccuracies in SPH. In contrast to previous results, we conclude that hot mode accretion generally dominates galaxy growth, while cold gas filaments experience increased heating and disruption. Next, we consider the impact of feedback on our results, including models for galactic-scale outflows driven by stars as well as the energy released from supermassive black holes. We find that feedback strongly suppresses the inflow of "smooth" mode gas at all redshifts, regardless of its temperature history. Although the geometry of accretion at the virial radius is largely unmodified, strong galactic-fountain recycling motions dominate the inner halo. We measure a shift in the characteristic timescale of accretion, and discuss implications for semi-analytical models of hot halo gas cooling. To overcome the resolution limitations of cosmological volumes, we simulate a suite of eight individual 1012 solar mass halos down to z=2. We quantify the thermal and dynamical structure of the gas in

  10. Simulations of Disk Galaxy Formation in their Cosmological Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Simon D. M.

    2009-03-01

    problem was immediately confirmed. Without effective feedback, typical halos produced galaxies which were too massive, too concentrated and had too little disk to be consistent with observation. Simple models for disk formation from the mid 1990's show that the angular momentum predicted for collapsing dark halos is sufficient for them to build a disk population similar to that observed. Direct simulations have repeatedly failed to confirm this picture, however, because nonlinear effects lead to substantial transfer of angular momentum between the various components. In most cases the condensing baryonic material loses angular momentum to the dark matter, and the final galaxy ends up with a disk that is too compact or contains too small a fraction of the stars. These problems have been reduced as successive generations of simulations have dramatically improved the numerical resolution and have introduced “better” implementations of feedback (i.e. more successful at building disks). Despite this, no high-resolution simulation has so far been able to produce a present-day disk galaxy with a bulge-to-disk mass ratio much less than one in a proper ΛCDM context. Such galaxies are common in the real Universe; our own Milky Way is a good example. The variety of results obtained by different groups show that this issue is very sensitive to how star formation and feedback are treated, and all implementations of these processes to date have been much too schematic to be confident of their predictions. The major outstanding issues I see related to disk galaxies and their formation are the following: Do real disk galaxies have the NFW halos predicted by the ΛCDM cosmology? If not, could the deviations have been produced by the formation of the observed baryonic components, or must the basic structure formation picture be changed? How are Sc and later type galaxies made? Why don't our simulations produce them? What determines which galaxies become barred and which not? Can we

  11. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  12. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Springel, Volker

    2014-03-01

    Observationally, magnetic fields reach equipartition with thermal energy and cosmic rays in the interstellar medium of disk galaxies such as the Milky Way. However, thus far cosmological simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxies have usually neglected magnetic fields. We employ the moving-mesh code AREPO to follow for the first time the formation and evolution of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy in its full cosmological context while taking into account magnetic fields. We find that a prescribed tiny magnetic seed field grows exponentially by a small-scale dynamo until it saturates around z = 4 with a magnetic energy of about 10% of the kinetic energy in the center of the galaxy's main progenitor halo. By z = 2, a well-defined gaseous disk forms in which the magnetic field is further amplified by differential rotation, until it saturates at an average field strength of ∼6 μG in the disk plane. In this phase, the magnetic field is transformed from a chaotic small-scale field to an ordered large-scale field coherent on scales comparable to the disk radius. The final magnetic field strength, its radial profile, and the stellar structure of the disk compare well with observational data. A minor merger temporarily increases the magnetic field strength by about a factor of two, before it quickly decays back to its saturation value. Our results are highly insensitive to the initial seed field strength and suggest that the large-scale magnetic field in spiral galaxies can be explained as a result of the cosmic structure formation process.

  13. Formation of compact clusters from high resolution hybrid cosmological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Gray, William J.

    2013-11-20

    The early universe hosted a large population of small dark matter 'minihalos' that were too small to cool and form stars on their own. These existed as static objects around larger galaxies until acted upon by some outside influence. Outflows, which have been observed around a variety of galaxies, can provide this influence in such a way as to collapse, rather than disperse, the minihalo gas. Gray and Scannapieco performed an investigation in which idealized spherically symmetric minihalos were struck by enriched outflows. Here we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations that form realistic minihalos, which we then extract to perform a large suite of simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions including non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In all models, the shocked minihalo forms molecules through non-equilibrium reaction, and then cools to form dense, chemically homogenous clumps of star-forming gas. The formation of these high-redshift clusters may be observable with the next generation of telescopes and the largest of them should survive to the present-day, having properties similar to halo globular clusters.

  14. Adding Spice to Vanilla LCDM simulations: From Alternative Cosmologies to Lighting up Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan Elahi, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter simulations have formed the backbone of our theoretical understanding of cosmological structure formation. Predictions from the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) cosmology, in which the Universe contains two major dark components, namely Dark Matter and Dark Energy, are in excellent agreement with the Large-Scale Structures observed, i.e., the distribution of galaxies across cosmic time. However, this paradigm is in tension with observations at small-scales, from the number and properties of satellite galaxies around galaxies such as the Milky Way and Andromeda, to the lensing statistics of massive galaxy clusters. I will present several alternative models of cosmology (from Warm Dark Matter to coupled Dark Matter-Dark Energy models) and how they compare to vanilla LCDM by studying formation of groups and clusters dark matter only and adiabatic hydrodynamical zoom simulations. I will show how modifications to the dark sector can lead to some surprising results. For example, Warm Dark Matter, so often examined on small satellite galaxies scales, can be probed observationally using weak lensing at cluster scales. Coupled dark sectors, where dark matter decays into dark energy and experiences an effective gravitational potential that differs from that experienced by normal matter, is effectively hidden away from direct observations of galaxies. Studies like these are vital if we are to pinpoint observations which can look for unique signatures of the physics that governs the hidden Universe. Of course, all of these predictions are unfortunately affected by uncertain galaxy formation physics. I will end by presenting results from a comparison study of numerous hydrodynamical codes, the nIFTY cluster comparison project, and how even how purely adiabatic simulations run with different codes give in quite different galaxy populations. The galaxies that form in these simulations, which all attempt to reproduce the observed galaxy population via not

  15. Multi-Scale Initial Conditions For Cosmological Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ZAH, Heidelberg /HITS, Heidelberg

    2011-11-04

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10{sup -4} for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  16. Time Evolution of Galaxy Scaling Relations in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Philip; Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2016-08-01

    We predict the evolution of galaxy scaling relationships from cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations, that reproduce the scaling relations of present-day galaxies. Although we do not assume co-evolution between galaxies and black holes a priori, we are able to reproduce the black hole mass-velocity dispersion relation. This relation does not evolve, and black holes actually grow along the relation from significantly less massive seeds than have previously been used. AGN feedback does not very much affect the chemical evolution of our galaxies. In our predictions, the stellar mass-metallicity relation does not change its shape, but the metallicity significantly increases from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 1, while the gas-phase mass-metallicity relation does change shape, having a steeper slope at higher redshifts (z ≲ 3). Furthermore, AGN feedback is required to reproduce observations of the most massive galaxies at z ≲ 1, specifically their positions on the star formation main sequence and galaxy mass-size relation.

  17. Constraints on Dark Matter and Milky Way Satellite Galaxies from Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Gaso, Miguel Eduardo

    Cosmological simulations describing the non-linear evolution of dark matter structures in the Universe have become an indispensable tool to study the predictions made by our standard model of cosmology, and to confront them with observations. In this thesis I present a new idea for using cosmological simulations to infer the accretion times of Milky Way satellite galaxies from their observed positions and kinematics. We find that Carina, Ursa Minor, and Sculptor were all accreted early, more than 8 Gyr ago. Five other dwarfs, including Sextans and Segue 1, are also probable early accreters, though with larger uncertainties. On the other extreme, Leo T is just falling into the Milky Way for the first time while Leo I fell ~2 Gyr ago and is now climbing out of the Milky Way's potential after its first perigalacticon. The energies of several other dwarfs, including Fornax and Hercules, point to intermediate infall times, 2--8 Gyr ago. Our analysis suggests that the Large Magellanic Cloud crossed inside the Milky Way virial radius recently, within the last ~4 billion years. Also I present new constrains on how strongly dark matter particles can interact with themselves. For this we use a set cosmological simulations that implement a new self-consistent algorithm to treat dark matter self-interactions. We find that self-interacting dark matter models with cross sections in the order sigma/m ≃ 0.5 cm2 /g ≃ 1 barn/GeV would be capable of reproducing the observed core sizes and central densities of dark matter halos in a wide range of scales, from tiny dwarf galaxies to large galaxy clusters, without violating any other observational constraints. Higher resolution simulations over a wider range of masses and properly accounting for the effects of baryonic processes that are not yet included in our simulation will be required to confirm our expectations and place better constraints. I discuss our plans for achieving this goal and show some preliminary results from a new

  18. Physical properties of UDF12 galaxies in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Ikkoh; Inoue, Akio K.; Okamoto, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki

    2014-05-01

    We have performed a large cosmological hydrodynamics simulation tailored to the deep survey with the Hubble Space Telescope made in 2012, the so-called UDF12 campaign. After making a light-cone output, we have applied the same colour-selection criteria as the UDF12 campaign to select galaxies from our simulation, and then, have examined the physical properties of them as a proxy of the real observed UDF12 galaxies at z > 7. As a result, we find that the halo mass is almost linearly proportional to the observed ultraviolet (UV) luminosity (4 × 1011M⊙ at MUV = -21). The dust attenuation and UV slope β well correlates with the observed UV luminosity, which is consistent with observations quantitatively. The star formation rate (SFR) is also linearly proportional to the stellar mass and the specific SFR shows only a weak dependence on the mass. We also find an increasing star formation history with a time-scale of ˜100 Myr in the high-z galaxies. An average metallicity weighted by the Lyman continuum luminosity reaches up to >0.1 Solar even at z ˜ 10, suggesting a rapid metal enrichment. We also expect ≥0.1 mJy at 350 GHz of the dust thermal emission from the galaxies with H160 ≤ 27, which can be detectable with the Atacama Large Millimetre-sub-millimetre Array. The galaxies selected by the UDF12 survey contribute to only 52-12 per cent of the cosmic SFR density from z ˜ 7 to z ˜ 10, respectively. The James Webb Space Telescope will push the detection fraction up to 77-72 per cent.

  19. Modern cosmology: Interactive computer simulations that use recent observational surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldenhauer, Jacob; Engelhardt, Larry; Stone, Keenan M.; Shuler, Ezekiel

    2013-06-01

    We present a collection of new, open-source computational tools for numerically modeling recent large-scale observational data sets using modern cosmology theory. These tools allow both students and researchers to constrain the parameter values in competitive cosmological models, thereby discovering both the accelerated expansion of the universe and its composition (e.g., dark matter and dark energy). These programs have several features to help the non-cosmologist build an understanding of cosmological models and their relation to observational data, including a built-in collection of several real observational data sets. The current list of built-in observations includes several recent supernovae Type-Ia surveys, baryon acoustic oscillations, the cosmic microwave background radiation, gamma-ray bursts, and measurements of the Hubble parameter. In this article, we discuss specific results for testing cosmological models using these observational data.

  20. Simulating the growth of a disk galaxy and its supermassive black hole in a cosmological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Robyn

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are ubiquitous in the centers of galaxies. Their formation and subsequent evolution is inextricably linked to that of their host galaxies, and the study of galaxy formation is incomplete without the inclusion of SMBHs. The present work seeks to understand the growth and evolution of SMBHs through their interaction with the host galaxy and its environment. In the first part of the thesis (Chap. 2 and 3), we combine a simple semi-analytic model of outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a simulated dark matter density distribution to study the impact of SMBH feedback on cosmological scales. We find that constraints can be placed on the kinetic efficiency of such feedback using observations of the filling fraction of the Ly-a forest. We also find that AGN feedback is energetic enough to redistribute baryons over cosmological distances, having potentially significant effects on the interpretation of cosmological data which are sensitive to the total matter density distribution (e.g. weak lensing). However, truly assessing the impact of AGN feedback in the universe necessitates large-dynamic range simulations with extensive treatment of baryonic physics to first model the fueling of SMBHs. In the second part of the thesis (Chap. 4-6) we use a hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulation to follow the growth and evolution of a typical disk galaxy hosting a SMBH, in a cosmological context. The simulation covers a dynamical range of 10 million allowing us to study the transport of matter and angular momentum from super-galactic scales all the way down to the outer edge of the accretion disk around the SMBH. Focusing our attention on the central few hundred parsecs of the galaxy, we find the presence of a cold, self-gravitating, molecular gas disk which is globally unstable. The global instabilities drive super-sonic turbulence, which maintains local stability and allows gas to fuel a SMBH without first fragmenting completely

  1. EFFECT OF MEASUREMENT ERRORS ON PREDICTED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SHEAR PEAK STATISTICS WITH LARGE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; Chang, C.; Kahn, S. M.; Gilmore, K.; Marshall, S.; Kratochvil, J. M.; Huffenberger, K. M.; May, M.; AlSayyad, Y.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R. R.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Lorenz, S.; Haiman, Z.; Jernigan, J. G.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We study the effect of galaxy shape measurement errors on predicted cosmological constraints from the statistics of shear peak counts with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We use the LSST Image Simulator in combination with cosmological N-body simulations to model realistic shear maps for different cosmological models. We include both galaxy shape noise and, for the first time, measurement errors on galaxy shapes. We find that the measurement errors considered have relatively little impact on the constraining power of shear peak counts for LSST.

  2. DISK GALAXIES WITH BROKEN LUMINOSITY PROFILES FROM COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Serrano, F. J.; Serna, A.; Domenech-Moral, M.; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R.

    2009-11-10

    We present smoothed particle hydrodynamics cosmological simulations of the formation of three disk galaxies with a detailed treatment of chemical evolution and cooling. The resulting galaxies have properties compatible with observations: relatively high disk-to-total ratios, thin stellar disks, and good agreement with the Tully-Fisher and the luminosity-size relations. They present a break in the luminosity profile at 3.0 +- 0.5 disk scale lengths while showing an exponential mass profile without any apparent breaks, which is in line with recent observational results. Since the stellar mass profile is exponential, only differences in the stellar populations can be the cause of the luminosity break. Although we find a cutoff for the star formation rate (SFR) imposed by a density threshold in our star formation model, it does not coincide with the luminosity break and is located at 4.3 +- 0.4 disk scale lengths, with star formation going on between both radii. The color profiles and the age profiles are 'U-shaped', with the minimum for both profiles located approximately at the break radius. The SFR to stellar mass ratio increases until the break, explaining the coincidence of the break with the minimum of the age profile. Beyond the break, we find a steep decline in the gas density and, consequently, a decline in the SFR and redder colors. We show that most stars (64%-78%) in the outer disk originate in the inner disk and afterward migrate there. Such stellar migrations are likely the main origin of the U-shaped age profile and, therefore, of the luminosity break.

  3. Emergence of constant curvature spacetimes with an effective charge and cosmological constant in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Anton; Dadhich, Naresh; Singh, Parampreet

    2015-04-01

    The loop quantum dynamics of Kantowski-Sachs and the interior of higher genus black hole spacetimes with cosmological constant has some peculiar features not shared by various other spacetimes in loop quantum cosmolgy. As in the other cases, though the quantum geometric effects resolve the singularity and result in a bounce, after the bounce a spacetime with small spacetime curvature does not emerge at late times. Instead, asymptotically the spacetime has constant spacetime curvature with a product manifold. Interestingly, though the spacetime curvature of these asymptotic spacetimes is very high, the effective metric of these spacetimes is a solution to the Einstein field equations. Analysis of the components of the Ricci tensor shows that after the singularity resolution, the Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes lead to an effective charged Nariai, and, the higher genus black hole interior lead to an anti Bertotti-Robinson spacetime with an effective tachyonic charge. The asymptotic spacetimes have an effective cosmological constant which is different in magnitude, and sometimes even its sign, from the cosmological constant in the Kantwoski-Sachs and higher genus black hole metrics.

  4. Verification of the time evolution of cosmological simulations via hypothesis-driven comparative and quantitative visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Chung-hsing; Ahrens, James P; Heitmann, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    We describe a visualization assisted process for the verification of cosmological simulation codes. The need for code verification stems from the requirement for very accurate predictions in order to interpret observational data confidently. We compare different simulation algorithms in order to reliably predict differences in simulation results and understand their dependence on input parameter settings.

  5. RESIDUAL HUBBLE-BUBBLE EFFECTS ON SUPERNOVA COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Benjamin; Davis, Tamara M.; Haugboelle, Troels

    2010-08-01

    Even in a universe that is homogeneous on large scales, local density fluctuations can imprint a systematic signature on the cosmological inferences we make from distant sources. One example is the effect of a local underdensity on supernova cosmology. Also known as a Hubble-bubble, it has been suggested that a large enough underdensity could account for the supernova magnitude-redshift relation without the need for dark energy or acceleration. Although the size and depth of the underdensity required for such an extreme result is extremely unlikely to be a random fluctuation in an on-average homogeneous universe, even a small underdensity can leave residual effects on our cosmological inferences. It is these small underdensities that we consider here. In this paper, we show that there remain systematic shifts in our cosmological parameter measurements, even after excluding local supernovae that are likely to be within any small Hubble-bubble. We study theoretically the low-redshift cutoff typically imposed by supernova cosmology analyses and show that a low-redshift cut of z {sub 0} {approx} 0.02 may be too low based on the observed inhomogeneity in our local universe. Neglecting to impose any low-redshift cutoff can have a significant effect on the cosmological parameters derived from supernova data. A slight local underdensity, just 30% underdense with scale 70 h {sup -1} Mpc, causes an error in the inferred cosmological constant density {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} of {approx}4%. Imposing a low-redshift cutoff reduces this systematic error but does not remove it entirely. A residual systematic shift of 0.99% remains in the inferred value {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} even when neglecting all data within the currently preferred low-redshift cutoff of 0.02. Given current measurement uncertainties, this shift is not negligible and will need to be accounted for when future measurements yield higher precision.

  6. Covariant effective action for loop quantum cosmology a la Palatini

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Singh, Parampreet E-mail: psingh@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2009-01-15

    In loop quantum cosmology, non-perturbative quantum gravity effects lead to the resolution of the big bang singularity by a quantum bounce without introducing any new degrees of freedom. Though fundamentally discrete, the theory admits a continuum description in terms of an effective Hamiltonian. Here we provide an algorithm to obtain the corresponding effective action, establishing in this way the covariance of the theory for the first time. This result provides new insights on the continuum properties of the discrete structure of quantum geometry and opens new avenues to extract physical predictions such as those related to gauge invariant cosmological perturbations.

  7. VALIDITY OF HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM COSMOLOGICAL HYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Daichi; Suto, Yasushi; Kawahara, Hajime; Sasaki, Shin; Kitayama, Tetsu; Cen, Renyue

    2013-04-10

    We examine the validity of the hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE) assumption for galaxy clusters using one of the highest-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We define and evaluate several effective mass terms corresponding to the Euler equations of gas dynamics, and quantify the degree of the validity of HSE in terms of the mass estimate. We find that the mass estimated under the HSE assumption (the HSE mass) deviates from the true mass by up to {approx}30%. This level of departure from HSE is consistent with the previous claims, but our physical interpretation is rather different. We demonstrate that the inertial term in the Euler equations makes a negligible contribution to the total mass, and the overall gravity of the cluster is balanced by the thermal gas pressure gradient and the gas acceleration term. Indeed, the deviation from the HSE mass is well explained by the acceleration term at almost all radii. We also clarify the confusion of previous work due to the inappropriate application of the Jeans equations in considering the validity of HSE from the gas dynamics extracted from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations.

  8. Effects of a decaying cosmological fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Luca; Finelli, Fabio

    2005-06-10

    We present the initial conditions for a decaying cosmological perturbation and study its signatures in the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and matter power spectra. An adiabatic decaying mode in the presence of components that are not described as perfect fluids (such as collisionless matter) decays slower than in a perfect-fluid dominated Universe and displays super-Hubble oscillations. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe first year data constrain the decaying to growing ratio of scale invariant adiabatic fluctuations at the matter-radiation equality to less than 10%. PMID:16090380

  9. The Effects of Varying Cosmological Parameters on Halo Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Gregory A.; Griffen, Brendan F.; Zukin, Phillip; Ji, Alexander P.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars E.; Frebel, Anna

    2014-05-01

    We investigate how different cosmological parameters, such as those delivered by the WMAP and Planck missions, affect the nature and evolution of the dark matter halo substructure. We use a series of flat Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of structure formation, each with a different power spectrum but with the same initial white noise field. Our fiducial simulation is based on parameters from the WMAP seventh year cosmology. We then systematically vary the spectral index, ns ; matter density, Ω M ; and normalization of the power spectrum, σ8, for seven unique simulations. Across these, we study variations in the subhalo mass function, mass fraction, maximum circular velocity function, spatial distribution, concentration, formation times, accretion times, and peak mass. We eliminate dependence of subhalo properties on host halo mass and average the values over many hosts to reduce variance. While the "same" subhalos from identical initial overdensity peaks in higher σ8, ns , and Ω m simulations accrete earlier and end up less massive and closer to the halo center at z = 0, the process of continuous subhalo accretion and destruction leads to a steady state distribution of these properties across all subhalos in a given host. This steady state mechanism eliminates cosmological dependence on all of the properties listed above except for subhalo concentration and V max, which remain greater for higher σ8, ns , and Ω m simulations, and subhalo formation time, which remains earlier. We also find that the numerical technique for computing the scale radius and the halo finder that were used can significantly affect the concentration-mass relationship as computed for a simulation.

  10. The effects of varying cosmological parameters on halo substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, Gregory A.; Griffen, Brendan F.; Ji, Alexander P.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Frebel, Anna; Zukin, Phillip; Hernquist, Lars E.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate how different cosmological parameters, such as those delivered by the WMAP and Planck missions, affect the nature and evolution of the dark matter halo substructure. We use a series of flat Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of structure formation, each with a different power spectrum but with the same initial white noise field. Our fiducial simulation is based on parameters from the WMAP seventh year cosmology. We then systematically vary the spectral index, n{sub s} ; matter density, Ω {sub M}; and normalization of the power spectrum, σ{sub 8}, for seven unique simulations. Across these, we study variations in the subhalo mass function, mass fraction, maximum circular velocity function, spatial distribution, concentration, formation times, accretion times, and peak mass. We eliminate dependence of subhalo properties on host halo mass and average the values over many hosts to reduce variance. While the 'same' subhalos from identical initial overdensity peaks in higher σ{sub 8}, n{sub s} , and Ω {sub m} simulations accrete earlier and end up less massive and closer to the halo center at z = 0, the process of continuous subhalo accretion and destruction leads to a steady state distribution of these properties across all subhalos in a given host. This steady state mechanism eliminates cosmological dependence on all of the properties listed above except for subhalo concentration and V {sub max}, which remain greater for higher σ{sub 8}, n{sub s} , and Ω {sub m} simulations, and subhalo formation time, which remains earlier. We also find that the numerical technique for computing the scale radius and the halo finder that were used can significantly affect the concentration-mass relationship as computed for a simulation.

  11. Effects of Cosmological Constant on Clustering of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameeda, Mir; Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we analyse the effect of the expansion of the universe on the clustering of galaxies. We evaluate the configurational integral for interacting system of galaxies in an expanding universe by including effects produced by the cosmological constant. The gravitational partition function is obtained using this configuration integral. Thermodynamic quantities, specifically, Helmholtz free energy, entropy, internal energy, pressure and chemical potential are also derived for this system. It is observed that they depend on the modified clustering parameter for this system of galaxies. It is also demonstrated that these thermodynamical quantities get corrected because of the cosmological constant.

  12. Is ΛCDM an effective CCDM cosmology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Santos, R. C.; Cunha, J. V.

    2016-03-01

    We show that a cosmology driven by gravitationally induced particle production of all non-relativistic species existing in the present Universe mimics exactly the observed flat accelerating ΛCDM cosmology with just one dynamical free parameter. This kind of scenario includes the creation cold dark matter (CCDM) model [1] as a particular case and also provides a natural reduction of the dark sector since the vacuum component is not needed to accelerate the Universe. The new cosmic scenario is equivalent to ΛCDM both at the background and perturbative levels and the associated creation process is also in agreement with the universality of the gravitational interaction and equivalence principle. Implicitly, it also suggests that the present day astronomical observations cannot be considered the ultimate proof of cosmic vacuum effects in the evolved Universe because ΛCDM may be only an effective cosmology.

  13. A new parallel P3M code for very large-scale cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarland, Tom; Couchman, H. M. P.; Pearce, F. R.; Pichlmeier, Jakob

    1998-12-01

    We have developed a parallel Particle-Particle, Particle-Mesh (P3M) simulation code for the Cray T3E parallel supercomputer that is well suited to studying the time evolution of systems of particles interacting via gravity and gas forces in cosmological contexts. The parallel code is based upon the public-domain serial Adaptive P3M-SPH (http://coho.astro.uwo.ca/pub/hydra/hydra.html) code of Couchman et al. (1995)[ApJ, 452, 797]. The algorithm resolves gravitational forces into a long-range component computed by discretizing the mass distribution and solving Poisson's equation on a grid using an FFT convolution method, and a short-range component computed by direct force summation for sufficiently close particle pairs. The code consists primarily of a particle-particle computation parallelized by domain decomposition over blocks of neighbour-cells, a more regular mesh calculation distributed in planes along one dimension, and several transformations between the two distributions. The load balancing of the P3M code is static, since this greatly aids the ongoing implementation of parallel adaptive refinements of the particle and mesh systems. Great care was taken throughout to make optimal use of the available memory, so that a version of the current implementation has been used to simulate systems of up to 109 particles with a 10243 mesh for the long-range force computation. These are the largest Cosmological N-body simulations of which we are aware. We discuss these memory optimizations as well as those motivated by computational performance. Performance results are very encouraging, and, even without refinements, the code has been used effectively for simulations in which the particle distribution becomes highly clustered as well as for other non-uniform systems of astrophysical interest.

  14. On the Convergence in Effective Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose Antonio

    2010-07-12

    In Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) there is a discreteness parameter {lambda}, that has been heuristically associated to a fundamental granularity of quantum geometry. It is also possible to consider {lambda} as a regulator in the same spirit as that used in lattice field theory, where it specifies a regular lattice in the real line. A particular quantization of the k = 0 FLRW loop cosmological model yields a completely solvable model, known as solvable loop quantum cosmology(sLQC). In this contribution, we consider effective classical theories motivated by sLQC and study their {lambda}-dependence, with a special interest on the limit {lambda}{yields}0 and the role of the evolution parameter in the convergence of such limit.

  15. Palatini approach to bouncing cosmologies and DSR-like effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.

    2012-05-01

    It is shown that a quadratic gravitational Lagrangian in the Palatini formulation is able to capture different aspects of quantum gravity phenomenology in a single framework. In particular, in this theory field excitations propagating with different energy-densities perceive different background metrics, a fundamental characteristic of the DSR and Rainbow Gravity approaches. This theory, however, avoids the so-called soccer ball problem. Also, the resulting isotropic and anisotropic cosmologies are free from the big bang singularity. This singularity avoidance occurs non-perturbatively and shares some similitudes with the effective dynamics of loop quantum cosmology.

  16. 2HOT: An Improved Parallel Hashed Oct-Tree N-Body Algorithm for Cosmological Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Warren, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    We report on improvements made over the past two decades to our adaptive treecode N-body method (HOT). A mathematical and computational approach to the cosmological N-body problem is described, with performance and scalability measured up to 256k (2 18 ) processors. We present error analysis and scientific application results from a series of more than ten 69 billion (4096 3 ) particle cosmological simulations, accounting for 4×10 20 floating point operations. These results include the first simulations using the new constraints on the standard model of cosmology from the Planck satellite. Our simulations set a new standard for accuracymore » and scientific throughput, while meeting or exceeding the computational efficiency of the latest generation of hybrid TreePM N-body methods.« less

  17. Nonsingular bouncing cosmology: Consistency of the effective description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Michael; Lehners, Jean-Luc; Ovrut, Burt

    2016-05-01

    We explicitly confirm that spatially flat nonsingular bouncing cosmologies make sense as effective theories. The presence of a nonsingular bounce in a spatially flat universe implies a temporary violation of the null energy condition, which can be achieved through a phase of ghost condensation. We calculate the scale of strong coupling and demonstrate that the ghost-condensate bounce remains trustworthy throughout, and that all perturbation modes within the regime of validity of the effective description remain under control. For this purpose we require the perturbed action up to third order in perturbations, which we calculate in both flat and co-moving gauge—since these two gauges allow us to highlight different physical aspects. Our conclusion is that there exist healthy descriptions of nonsingular bouncing cosmologies providing a viable resolution of the big-bang singularities in cosmological models. Our results also suggest a variant of ekpyrotic cosmology, in which entropy perturbations are generated during the contracting phase, but are only converted into curvature perturbations after the bounce.

  18. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM EVOLUTION. I. TEST OF THE SUBGRID CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Côté, Benoit; Martel, Hugo; Drissen, Laurent

    2013-11-10

    We present a one-zone galactic chemical enrichment model that takes into account the contribution of stellar winds from massive stars under the effect of rotation, Type II supernovae, hypernovae, stellar winds from low- and intermediate-mass stars, and Type Ia supernovae. This enrichment model will be implemented in a galactic model designed to be used as a subgrid treatment for galaxy evolution and outflow generation in large-scale cosmological simulations, in order to study the evolution of the intergalactic medium. We test our enrichment prescription by comparing its predictions with the metallicity distribution function and the abundance patterns of 14 chemical elements observed in the Milky Way stars. To do so, we combine the effect of many stellar populations created from the star formation history of the Galaxy in the solar neighborhood. For each stellar population, we keep track of its specific mass, initial metallicity, and age. We follow the time evolution of every population in order to respect the time delay between the various stellar phases. Our model is able to reproduce the observed abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, S, and Ca. For Si, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn, the fits are still reasonable, but improvements are needed. We marginally reproduce the nitrogen abundance in very low metallicity stars. Overall, our results are consistent with the predicted abundance ratios seen in previous studies of the enrichment history of the Milky Way. We have demonstrated that our semi-analytic one-zone model, which cannot deal with spatial information such as the metallicity gradient, can nevertheless successfully reproduce the global Galactic enrichment evolution obtained by more complex models, at a fraction of the computational cost. This model is therefore suitable for a subgrid treatment of chemical enrichment in large-scale cosmological simulations.

  19. Cosmological Simulations of Intergalactic Medium Evolution. I. Test of the Subgrid Chemical Enrichment Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Benoit; Martel, Hugo; Drissen, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    We present a one-zone galactic chemical enrichment model that takes into account the contribution of stellar winds from massive stars under the effect of rotation, Type II supernovae, hypernovae, stellar winds from low- and intermediate-mass stars, and Type Ia supernovae. This enrichment model will be implemented in a galactic model designed to be used as a subgrid treatment for galaxy evolution and outflow generation in large-scale cosmological simulations, in order to study the evolution of the intergalactic medium. We test our enrichment prescription by comparing its predictions with the metallicity distribution function and the abundance patterns of 14 chemical elements observed in the Milky Way stars. To do so, we combine the effect of many stellar populations created from the star formation history of the Galaxy in the solar neighborhood. For each stellar population, we keep track of its specific mass, initial metallicity, and age. We follow the time evolution of every population in order to respect the time delay between the various stellar phases. Our model is able to reproduce the observed abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, S, and Ca. For Si, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn, the fits are still reasonable, but improvements are needed. We marginally reproduce the nitrogen abundance in very low metallicity stars. Overall, our results are consistent with the predicted abundance ratios seen in previous studies of the enrichment history of the Milky Way. We have demonstrated that our semi-analytic one-zone model, which cannot deal with spatial information such as the metallicity gradient, can nevertheless successfully reproduce the global Galactic enrichment evolution obtained by more complex models, at a fraction of the computational cost. This model is therefore suitable for a subgrid treatment of chemical enrichment in large-scale cosmological simulations.

  20. Cluster Structure in Cosmological Simulations. I. Correlation to Observables, Mass Estimates, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeltema, Tesla E.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Motl, Patrick M.

    2008-07-01

    We use Enzo, a hybrid Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement/N-body code including nongravitational heating and cooling, to explore the morphology of the X-ray gas in clusters of galaxies and its evolution in current-generation cosmological simulations. We employ and compare two observationally motivated structure measures: power ratios and centroid shift. Overall, the structure of our simulated clusters compares remarkably well to low-redshift observations, although some differences remain that may point to incomplete gas physics. We find no dependence on cluster structure in the mass-observable scaling relations, TX-M and YX-M, when using the true cluster masses. However, estimates of the total mass based on the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, as assumed in observational studies, are systematically low. We show that the hydrostatic mass bias strongly correlates with cluster structure and, more weakly, with cluster mass. When the hydrostatic masses are used, the mass-observable scaling relations and gas mass fractions depend significantly on cluster morphology, and the true relations are not recovered even if the most relaxed clusters are used. We show that cluster structure, via the power ratios, can be used to effectively correct the hydrostatic mass estimates and mass scaling relations, suggesting that we can calibrate for this systematic effect in cosmological studies. Similar to observational studies, we find that cluster structure, particularly centroid shift, evolves with redshift. This evolution is mild but will lead to additional errors at high redshift. Projection along the line of sight leads to significant uncertainty in the structure of individual clusters: less than 50% of clusters which appear relaxed in projection based on our structure measures are truly relaxed.

  1. Absorption Line Analysis to Interprete and Constrain Cosmological Simulations of Galaxy Evolution with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher

    2011-10-01

    The mammoth challenge for contemporary studies of galaxy formation and evolution are to establish detailed models in the cosmological context in which both the few parsec scale physics within galaxies are self-consistently unified and made consistent with the observed universe of galaxies. They key diagnostics reside with the gas physics, which dictate virtually every aspect of galaxy formation and evolution. The small scale physics includes stellar feedback, gas cooling, heating, and advection and the multiphase interstellar medium; the large scale physics includes intergalactic accretion, local merging, effects of supernovae driven winds, and the development of extended metal-enriched gas halos.Absorption line data have historically proven to be {and shall in the future} virtually the most powerful tool for understanding gas physics on all spatial scales over the majority of the age of the universe- the key to success. Simply stated, absorption lines are one of astronomy's most powerful observational windows on the universe {galaxy formation, galaxy winds, IGM metal enrichment, etc.}. The high quality and vast numbers of absorption line data {obtained with HST and FUSE} probe a broad range of gas structures {ISM, HVCs, halos, IGM} over the full cosmic span when galaxies are actively evolving.We propose to use LCDM hydrodynamic cosmological simulations employing a Eulerian Gasdynamics plus N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree {ART} code to develop and refine our understanding of stellar feedback physics and its role in governing the gas physics that regulates the evolution of galaxies and the IGM. We aim to substantially progress our understanding of all possible gas phases embedded within and extending far from galaxies. Our methodology is to apply a series of quantitative observational constraints from absorption line systems to better understand extended galaxy halos and the influence of the cosmological environment of the simulated galaxies: {1} galaxy halos

  2. Effective cosmological equations of induced f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolopoulos, Pantelis S.; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Brouzakis, Nikolaos E-mail: nbruzak@ifae.es

    2010-08-01

    We expand the study of generalized brane cosmologies by allowing for an f( R-tilde ) gravity term on the brane, with R-tilde the curvature scalar derived from the induced metric. We also include arbitrary matter components on the brane and in the five-dimensional bulk. At low energies, the effect of the bulk on the brane evolution can be described through a mirage component, termed generalized dark radiation, in the effective four-dimensional field equations. Using the covariant formalism, we derive the exact form of these equations. We also derive an effective conservation equation involving the brane matter and the generalized dark radiation. At low energies the coupled brane-bulk system has a purely four-dimensional description. The applications of the formalism include generalizations of the Starobinsky model and the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati cosmology.

  3. Numerical techniques for large cosmological N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Davis, M.; White, S. D. M.; Frenk, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques for carrying out large N-body simulations of the gravitational evolution of clustering in the fundamental cube of an infinite periodic universe are described and compared. The accuracy of the forces derived from several commonly used particle mesh schemes is examined, showing how submesh resolution can be achieved by including short-range forces between particles by direct summation techniques. The time integration of the equations of motion is discussed, and the accuracy of the codes for various choices of 'time' variable and time step is tested by considering energy conservation as well as by direct analysis of particle trajectories. Methods for generating initial particle positions and velocities corresponding to a growing mode representation of a specified power spectrum of linear density fluctuations are described. The effects of force resolution are studied and different simulation schemes are compared. An algorithm is implemented for generating initial conditions by varying the number of particles, the initial amplitude of density fluctuations, and the initial peculiar velocity field.

  4. Cosmological Simulations of Galaxy Formation Including Hydrodynamics (hyper-abridged)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, F. J.

    1994-06-01

    The formation of galaxies in hierarchical cosmogonies is studied using high resolution N-body plus SPH hydrodynamics simulations. The collapse of structure is followed self-consistently from Mpc scale filamentary structures to kpc scale galactic objects. The characteristics and formation processes of the galaxy like objects are studied in detail, along with the aggregation into a poor cluster. Related studies consider the effects of modelling star formation, the reliability of tracing galaxies in simulations, and tests of SPH methods. This submission serves first to notify that the full text and figures of my thesis are available in compressed PostScript form via anonymous ftp from astro.princeton.edu in the directory /summers/thesis (122 files, 19 MB compressed, 65 MB uncompressed). See the README file first. Second, this submission contains the title page, abstract, table of contents, introductory chapter, summary chapter, and references for my thesis. Those who are curious about the work may scan these pages to identify which chapters may be interesting to get via ftp.

  5. The Biermann Battery In Cosmological Mhd Simulations Of Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hao; O' Shea, Brian W; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Norman, Michael L; Collins, David C

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of the first self-consistent three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamical simulations of Population III star formation including the Biermann battery effect. We find that the Population III stellar cores formed including this effect are both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those from hydrodynamics-only (non-MHD) cosmological simulations. We observe peak magnetic fields of {approx_equal} 10{sup -9} G in the center of our star-forming halo at z {approx_equal} 17.55 at a baryon density of n{sub B} {approx} 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. The magnetic fields created by the Biermann battery effect are predominantly formed early in the evolution of the primordial halo at low density and large spatial scales, and then grow through compression and by shear flows. The fields seen in this calculation are never large enough to be dynamically important (with {beta} {ge} 10{sup 15} at all times before the termination of our calculation), and should be considered the minimum possible fields in existence during Population III star formation. The lack of magnetic support lends credibility to assumptions made in previous calculations regarding the lack of importance of magnetic fields in Population III star formation. In addition, these magnetic fields may be seed fields for the stellar dynamo or the magnetorotational instability at higher densities and smaller spatial scales.

  6. The stellar metallicity distribution of disc galaxies and bulges in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calura, F.; Gibson, B. K.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Stinson, G. S.; Cignoni, M.; Dotter, A.; Pilkington, K.; House, E. L.; Brook, C. B.; Few, C. G.; Bailin, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Wadsley, J.

    2012-12-01

    By means of high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way (MW) like disc galaxies, we conduct an analysis of the associated stellar metallicity distribution functions (MDFs). After undertaking a kinematic decomposition of each simulation into spheroid and disc subcomponents, we compare the predicted MDFs to those observed in the solar neighbourhood and the Galactic bulge. The effects of the star formation density threshold are visible in the star formation histories, which show a modulation in their behaviour driven by the threshold. The derived MDFs show median metallicities lower by 0.2-0.3 dex than the MDF observed locally in the disc and in the Galactic bulge. Possible reasons for this apparent discrepancy include the use of low stellar yields and/or centrally concentrated star formation. The dispersions are larger than the one of the observed MDF; this could be due to simulated discs being kinematically hotter relative to the MW. The fraction of low-metallicity stars is largely overestimated, visible from the more negatively skewed MDF with respect to the observational sample. For our fiducial MW analogue, we study the metallicity distribution of the stars born in situ relative to those formed via accretion (from disrupted satellites), and demonstrate that this low-metallicity tail to the MDF is populated primarily by accreted stars. Enhanced supernova and stellar radiation energy feedback to the surrounding interstellar media of these pre-disrupted satellites is suggested as an important regulator of the MDF skewness.

  7. Strongly coupled dark energy cosmologies: preserving ΛCDM success and easing low-scale problems - II. Cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macciò, Andrea V.; Mainini, Roberto; Penzo, Camilla; Bonometto, Silvio A.

    2015-10-01

    In this second paper, we present the first N-body cosmological simulations of strongly coupled Dark Energy (SCDEW) models, a class of models that alleviates theoretical issues related to the nature of dark energy (DE). SCDEW models assume a strong coupling between DE and an ancillary cold dark matter (CDM) component together with the presence of an uncoupled warm dark matter (WDM) component. The strong coupling between CDM and DE allows us to preserve small-scale fluctuations even if the warm particle is quite light (≈100 eV). Our large-scale simulations show that, for 1011 < M/M⊙ < 1014, SCDEW haloes exhibit a number density and distribution similar to a standard lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, even though they have lower concentration parameters. High-resolution simulation of a galactic halo (M ˜ 1012 M⊙) shows ˜60 per cent less substructures than its ΛCDM counterpart, but the same cuspy density profile. On the scale of galactic satellites (M ˜ 109 M⊙), SCDEW haloes dramatically differ from ΛCDM. Due to the high thermal velocities of the WDM component they are almost devoid of any substructures and present strongly cored dark matter density profiles. These density cores extend for several hundreds of parsecs, in very good agreement with Milky Way satellites observations. Strongly coupled models, thanks to their ability to match observations on both large and small scales, might represent a valid alternative to a simple ΛCDM model.

  8. The MultiDark Database: Release of the Bolshoi and MultiDark cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebe, K.; Partl, A. M.; Enke, H.; Forero-Romero, J.; Gottlöber, S.; Klypin, A.; Lemson, G.; Prada, F.; Primack, J. R.; Steinmetz, M.; Turchaninov, V.

    2013-08-01

    We present the online {MultiDark Database} - a Virtual Observatory-oriented, relational database for hosting various cosmological simulations. The data is accessible via an SQL (Structured Query Language) query interface, which also allows users to directly pose scientific questions, as shown in a number of examples in this paper. Further examples for the usage of the database are given in its extensive online documentation. The database is based on the same technology as the Millennium Database, a fact that will greatly facilitate the usage of both suites of cosmological simulations. The first release of the {MultiDark Database} hosts two 8.6 billion particle cosmological N-body simulations: the Bolshoi (250 h-1 Mpc simulation box, 1 h-1 kpc resolution) and MultiDark Run1 simulation (MDR1, or BigBolshoi, 1000 h-1 Mpc simulation box, 7 h-1 kpc resolution). The extraction methods for halos/subhalos from the raw simulation data, and how this data is structured in the database are explained in this paper. With the first data release, users get full access to halo/subhalo catalogs, various profiles of the halos at redshifts z=0-15, and raw dark matter data for one time-step of the Bolshoi and four time-steps of the MultiDark simulation. Later releases will also include galaxy mock catalogs and additional merger trees for both simulations as well as new large volume simulations with high resolution. This project is further proof of the viability to store and present complex data using relational database technology. We encourage other simulators to publish their results in a similar manner.

  9. Cold Galaxies on FIRE: Modeling the Most Luminous Starbursts in the Universe with Cosmological Zoom Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika

    2014-10-01

    As the most luminous, heavily star-forming galaxies in the Universe, Submillimeter Galaxies at z 2-4 are key players in galaxy evolution. Since their discovery, SMGs have received significant attention from HST in characterizing their physical morphology, stellar masses, and star formation histories. Unfortunately, these physical constraints have been difficult for theorists to reconcile with galaxy formation simulations. Previous generations of simulations have all either {a} neglected baryons; {b} neglected radiative transfer {and connecting to observations}; or {c} neglected cosmological conditions. Here, we propose to conduct the first ever cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of Submillimeter Galaxy formation that couple with bona fide 3D dust radiative transfer calculations. These ultra-high resolution simulations {parsec-scale} will be the first to resolve the sites of dust obscuration, the cosmic growth history of SMGs, and their evolutionary destiny. Our proposal has two principle goals: {1} Develop the first ever model for SMG formation from cosmological simulations that include both baryons and dust radiative transfer; {2} Capitalize on our parsec-scale resolution to understand the connection between the physical properties of star-forming regions in high-z starbursts, and recent IMF constraints from present-epoch massive galaxies.

  10. COMPARISONS OF COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER SIMULATIONS TO RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Govoni, Federica; Murgia, Matteo; Norman, Michael L.; Cen Renyue; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele E-mail: hli@lanl.gov E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: matteo@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: lferetti@ira.inaf.it

    2012-11-01

    Radio observations of galaxy clusters show that there are {mu}G magnetic fields permeating the intracluster medium (ICM), but it is hard to accurately constrain the strength and structure of the magnetic fields without the help of advanced computer simulations. We present qualitative comparisons of synthetic Very Large Array observations of simulated galaxy clusters to radio observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) and radio halos. The cluster formation is modeled using adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the assumption that the initial magnetic fields are injected into the ICM by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. In addition to simulated clusters in Xu et al., we present a new simulation with magnetic field injections from multiple AGNs. We find that the cluster with multiple injection sources is magnetized to a similar level as in previous simulations with a single AGN. The RM profiles from simulated clusters, both |RM| and the dispersion of RM ({sigma}{sub RM}), are consistent at a first order with the radial distribution from observations. The correlations between the {sigma}{sub RM} and X-ray surface brightness from simulations are in a broad agreement with the observations, although there is an indication that the simulated clusters could be slightly overdense and less magnetized with respect to those in the observed sample. In addition, the simulated radio halos agree with the observed correlations between the radio power versus the cluster X-ray luminosity and between the radio power versus the radio halo size. These studies show that the cluster-wide magnetic fields that originate from AGNs and are then amplified by the ICM turbulence match observations of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters.

  11. Ly{alpha} RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, Peter; Razoumov, Alexei O.; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper E-mail: razoumov@ap.smu.ca

    2009-05-01

    A numerical code for solving various Ly{alpha} radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Ly{alpha} emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Ly{alpha} RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three different simulated high-resolution 'Lyman-break galaxies', extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Ly{alpha} scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3-6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties of high-redshift galaxies, and in particular a possible physical link between Lyman-break galaxies and regular Ly{alpha} emitters.

  12. Off The Beaten Path: Modeling the Dynamics of Supermassive Black Holes in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremmel, Michael J.; Governato, Fabio; Volonteri, Marta; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological simulations are an essential tool to understand the co-evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. However, the limited resolution of these simulations presents unique challenges to successfully modeling black hole dynamics. We present a novel, physically motivated method for improving the dynamics of black holes in cosmological simulations, by accounting for the unresolved dynamical friction that SMBHs feel from stars and dark matter. We show how this approach, which naturally scales with resolution, is a major step forward compared to more commonly used 'advection' models that often assume SMBHs sink very rapidly toward the center of their host galaxies. Here, we demonstrate that our method is able to prevent numerical heating of SMBHs while allowing for realistic dynamics.Our implementation will allow us to more realistically model SMBH dynamics, accretion, and mergers in cosmological simulations, giving us the ability to better understand how SMBHs grow with their host galaxies. This also provides an opportunity for more detailed studies of SMBHs in dwarf galaxies, which can give crucial insight into constraining black hole seed formation models.

  13. SPOKES: An end-to-end simulation facility for spectroscopic cosmological surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, B.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Gamper, La.; Gamper, Lu.; Hambrecht, B.; Chang, C.; Forero-Romero, J. E.; Serrano, S.; Cunha, C.; Coles, O.; Nicola, A.; Busha, M.; Bauer, A.; Saunders, W.; Jouvel, S.; Kirk, D.; Wechsler, R.

    2016-04-01

    The nature of dark matter, dark energy and large-scale gravity pose some of the most pressing questions in cosmology today. These fundamental questions require highly precise measurements, and a number of wide-field spectroscopic survey instruments are being designed to meet this requirement. A key component in these experiments is the development of a simulation tool to forecast science performance, define requirement flow-downs, optimize implementation, demonstrate feasibility, and prepare for exploitation. We present SPOKES (SPectrOscopic KEn Simulation), an end-to-end simulation facility for spectroscopic cosmological surveys designed to address this challenge. SPOKES is based on an integrated infrastructure, modular function organization, coherent data handling and fast data access. These key features allow reproducibility of pipeline runs, enable ease of use and provide flexibility to update functions within the pipeline. The cyclic nature of the pipeline offers the possibility to make the science output an efficient measure for design optimization and feasibility testing. We present the architecture, first science, and computational performance results of the simulation pipeline. The framework is general, but for the benchmark tests, we use the Dark Energy Spectrometer (DESpec), one of the early concepts for the upcoming project, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). We discuss how the SPOKES framework enables a rigorous process to optimize and exploit spectroscopic survey experiments in order to derive high-precision cosmological measurements optimally.

  14. A High Throughput Workflow Environment for Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Erickson; Evrard, A. E.; Singh, R.; Marru, S.; Pierce, M.; Becker, M. R.; Kravtsov, A.; Busha, M. T.; Wechsler, R. H.; Ricker, P. M.; DES Simulations Working Group

    2013-01-01

    The Simulation Working Group (SimWG) of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) is collaborating with an XSEDE science gateway team to develop a distributed workflow management layer for the production of wide-area synthetic galaxy catalogs from large N-body simulations. We use the suite of tools in Airavata, an Apache Incubator project, to generate and archive multiple 10^10-particle N-body simulations of nested volumes on XSEDE supercomputers. Lightcone outputs are moved via Globus Online to SLAC, where they are transformed into multi-band, catalog-level descriptions of gravitationally lensed galaxies covering 10,000 sq deg to high redshift. We outline the method and discuss efficiency and provenance improvements brought about in N-body production. Plans to automate data movement and post-processing within the workflow are sketched, as are risks associated with working in an environment of constantly evolving services.

  15. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  16. Releasing scalar fields: cosmological simulations of scalar-tensor theories for gravity beyond the static approximation.

    PubMed

    Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F

    2013-04-19

    Several extensions of general relativity and high energy physics include scalar fields as extra degrees of freedom. In the search for predictions in the nonlinear regime of cosmological evolution, the community makes use of numerical simulations in which the quasistatic limit is assumed when solving the equation of motion of the scalar field. In this Letter, we propose a method to solve the full equations of motion for scalar degrees of freedom coupled to matter. We run cosmological simulations which track the full time and space evolution of the scalar field, and find striking differences with respect to the commonly used quasistatic approximation. This novel procedure reveals new physical properties of the scalar field and uncovers concealed astrophysical phenomena which were hidden in the old approach. PMID:23679591

  17. Effect of inhomogeneities on high precision measurements of cosmological distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Austin; Troxel, M. A.; Ishak, Mustapha

    2014-12-01

    We study effects of inhomogeneities on distance measures in an exact relativistic Swiss-cheese model of the Universe, focusing on the distance modulus. The model has Λ CDM background dynamics, and the "holes" are nonsymmetric structures described by the Szekeres metric. The Szekeres exact solution of Einstein's equations, which is inhomogeneous and anisotropic, allows us to capture potentially relevant effects on light propagation due to nontrivial evolution of structures in an exact framework. Light beams traversing a single Szekeres structure in different ways can experience either magnification or demagnification, depending on the particular path. Consistent with expectations, we find a shift in the distance modulus μ to distant sources due to demagnification when the light beam travels primarily through the void regions of our model. Conversely, beams are magnified when they propagate mainly through the overdense regions of the structures, and we explore a small additional effect due to time evolution of the structures. We then study the probability distributions of Δ μ =μΛ CDM-μSC for sources at different redshifts in various Swiss-cheese constructions, where the light beams travel through a large number of randomly oriented Szekeres holes with random impact parameters. We find for Δ μ the dispersions 0.004 ≤σΔ μ≤0.008 mag for sources with redshifts 1.0 ≤z ≤1.5 , which are smaller than the intrinsic dispersion of, for example, magnitudes of type Ia supernovae. The shapes of the distributions we obtain for our Swiss-cheese constructions are peculiar in the sense that they are not consistently skewed toward the demagnification side, as they are in analyses of lensing in cosmological simulations. Depending on the source redshift, the distributions for our models can be skewed to either the demagnification or the magnification side, reflecting a limitation of these constructions. This could be the result of requiring the continuity of Einstein

  18. Simulating the Growth of a Disk Galaxy and its Supermassive Black Hole in a Cosmological Simulating the Growth of a Disk Galaxy and its Supermassive Black Hole in a Cosmological Context

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Robyn Deborah; /JILA, Boulder

    2008-07-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are ubiquitous in the centers of galaxies. Their formation and subsequent evolution is inextricably linked to that of their host galaxies, and the study of galaxy formation is incomplete without the inclusion of SMBHs. The present work seeks to understand the growth and evolution of SMBHs through their interaction with the host galaxy and its environment. In the first part of the thesis (Chap. 2 and 3), we combine a simple semi-analytic model of outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a simulated dark matter density distribution to study the impact of SMBH feedback on cosmological scales. We find that constraints can be placed on the kinetic efficiency of such feedback using observations of the filling fraction of the Ly{alpha} forest. We also find that AGN feedback is energetic enough to redistribute baryons over cosmological distances, having potentially significant effects on the interpretation of cosmological data which are sensitive to the total matter density distribution (e.g. weak lensing). However, truly assessing the impact of AGN feedback in the universe necessitates large-dynamic range simulations with extensive treatment of baryonic physics to first model the fueling of SMBHs. In the second part of the thesis (Chap. 4-6) we use a hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulation to follow the growth and evolution of a typical disk galaxy hosting a SMBH, in a cosmological context. The simulation covers a dynamical range of 10 million allowing us to study the transport of matter and angular momentum from super-galactic scales all the way down to the outer edge of the accretion disk around the SMBH. Focusing our attention on the central few hundred parsecs of the galaxy, we find the presence of a cold, self-gravitating, molecular gas disk which is globally unstable. The global instabilities drive super-sonic turbulence, which maintains local stability and allows gas to fuel a SMBH without first fragmenting

  19. Evolution of dwarf galaxies simulated in the cosmological LCDM scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Colin, Pedro; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Valenzuela, Octavio

    2014-03-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of low-mass galaxies with the aim to explore the way their stellar masses are assembled. We analyze how the mass assembly histories of the parent halo determine the growth of their host galaxy and its implications on the current paradigm of formation and evolution of low-mass structures in the LCDM scenario. We have found that low-mass galaxies simulated in this scenario assemble their stellar masses following roughly the dark matter halo assembly, which seems to be in tension with the downsizing trend suggested by current observational inferences. We show that there is no more room to increase the strength of feedback from astrophysical processes in order to deviate strongly the stellar mass assembly from the dark halo one, as has been recently invoked to solve some of the potential issues faced by CDM-based simulations of dwarf galaxies. Alejandro González acknowledges finacial support from UNAM, Fundacion UNAM, and the APS to attend this meeting.

  20. Cosmology with kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect measurements from ACTPol and future surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bernardis, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    ACTPol is the first polarization receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) that is observing the CMB sky with arcmin resolution over about 2000 sq. deg. Its upgrade, Advanced ACTPol, will observe the CMB in five frequency bands and over a larger area of the sky. These measurements will enable a number of astrophysical and cosmological studies. We focus on the kinematic SZ effect as measured through the mean pairwise momentum of galaxy clusters. The spectroscopic information is particularly valuable for these measurements and ACTPol is in a unique position for this kind of study due to its wide overlap with the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The pairwise kSZ signal is able to probe the growth and expansion history of the universe. Moreover, measurements of the kSZ effect can be used to test advanced hydrodynamical simulations of the Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) and to constrain the baryon content of galaxy clusters. We report the latest kSZ results from ACTPol and BOSS and describe the potential strong constraints on cosmological parameters and practical challenges in the extraction and maximization of the signal-to-noise ratio. We discuss the main sources of systematic uncertainty and the progress towards realistic forecasts for future CMB instruments.

  1. Structure finding in cosmological simulations: the state of affairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebe, Alexander; Pearce, Frazer R.; Lux, Hanni; Ascasibar, Yago; Behroozi, Peter; Casado, Javier; Moran, Christine Corbett; Diemand, Juerg; Dolag, Klaus; Dominguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Elahi, Pascal; Falck, Bridget; Gottlöber, Stefan; Han, Jiaxin; Klypin, Anatoly; Lukić, Zarija; Maciejewski, Michal; McBride, Cameron K.; Merchán, Manuel E.; Muldrew, Stuart I.; Neyrinck, Mark; Onions, Julian; Planelles, Susana; Potter, Doug; Quilis, Vicent; Rasera, Yann; Ricker, Paul M.; Roy, Fabrice; Ruiz, Andrés N.; Sgró, Mario A.; Springel, Volker; Stadel, Joachim; Sutter, P. M.; Tweed, Dylan; Zemp, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    The ever increasing size and complexity of data coming from simulations of cosmic structure formation demand equally sophisticated tools for their analysis. During the past decade, the art of object finding in these simulations has hence developed into an important discipline itself. A multitude of codes based upon a huge variety of methods and techniques have been spawned yet the question remained as to whether or not they will provide the same (physical) information about the structures of interest. Here we summarize and extent previous work of the `halo finder comparison project': we investigate in detail the (possible) origin of any deviations across finders. To this extent, we decipher and discuss differences in halo-finding methods, clearly separating them from the disparity in definitions of halo properties. We observe that different codes not only find different numbers of objects leading to a scatter of up to 20 per cent in the halo mass and Vmax function, but also that the particulars of those objects that are identified by all finders differ. The strength of the variation, however, depends on the property studied, e.g. the scatter in position, bulk velocity, mass and the peak value of the rotation curve is practically below a few per cent, whereas derived quantities such as spin and shape show larger deviations. Our study indicates that the prime contribution to differences in halo properties across codes stems from the distinct particle collection methods and - to a minor extent - the particular aspects of how the procedure for removing unbound particles is implemented. We close with a discussion of the relevance and implications of the scatter across different codes for other fields such as semi-analytical galaxy formation models, gravitational lensing and observables in general.

  2. Clusters of Galaxies as Probes for Precision Cosmology: Exploring the Limits using Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. O.; Motl, P. M.; Norman, M. L.; Hallman, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    We critically analyze the role of clusters of galaxies as probes for precision cosmology. Using synthetic observations of simulated clusters viewed through their X-ray emission and thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE), we reduce the observations to attain measurements of the cluster gas mass and the Hubble constant. We utilize both parametric models such as the isothermal cluster model (and its generalizations to account for varying temperature profiles within the clusters) and non-parametric models that involve the geometric deprojection of the cluster emission assuming spherical symmetry. We are thus able to quantify the possible sources of uncertainty and systematic bias associated with the common simplifying assumptions used in reducing real cluster observations including isothermality and hydrostatic equilibrium. As a specific example, we find that the standard isothermal cluster model yields estimates of the Hubble constant that are systematically biased to low values. When we allow the temperature to vary in space, as in the polytropic cluster model, the X-ray and thermal SZE observations can be combined to produce an unbiased estimator of H0.

  3. Early universe cosmology, effective supergravity, and invariants of algebraic forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Kuver

    2015-09-01

    The presence of light scalars can have profound effects on early universe cosmology, influencing its thermal history as well as paradigms like inflation and baryogenesis. Effective supergravity provides a framework to make quantifiable, model-independent studies of these effects. The Riemannian curvature of the Kähler manifold spanned by scalars belonging to chiral superfields, evaluated along supersymmetry breaking directions, provides an order parameter (in the sense that it must necessarily take certain values) for phenomena as diverse as slow roll modular inflation, nonthermal cosmological histories, and the viability of Affleck-Dine baryogenesis. Within certain classes of UV completions, the order parameter for theories with n scalar moduli is conjectured to be related to invariants of n -ary cubic forms (for example, for models with three moduli, the order parameter is given by a function on the ring of invariants spanned by the Aronhold invariants). Within these completions, and under the caveats spelled out, this may provide an avenue to obtain necessary conditions for the above phenomena that are in principle calculable given nothing but the intersection numbers of a Calabi-Yau compactification geometry. As an additional result, abstract relations between holomorphic sectional and bisectional curvatures are utilized to constrain Affleck-Dine baryogenesis on a wide class of Kähler geometries.

  4. Implications of a Nonzero Cosmological Constant and Luminosity Selection Effects on Cosmological Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachukwu, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the implications of a nonzero cosmological constant Lambda0 on the amount of linear size evolution and the luminosity selection effects usually required in the interpretation of the angular diameter - redshift (Theta - Zeta) test. This is based on3 three typical cases chosen on various plausible assumptions which can be made concerning the contribution of lambda0 to the density of the universe (parametrized by Omega0. The results show a fairly strong linear size evolution will be required to interpret the theta-zeta data of extended steep spectrum quasars for all three cases, if luminosity effects are neglected. However, this evolution is significantly steeper in a matter-dominated universe with Omegam - Omega0 = 1, than in a flat universe, with OmegaLambda = 0.8, OmegaM = 0.2 and an open universe with OmegaM = 0.2, OmegaLambda = 0. Furthermore, when the luminosity selection effects present in the sample are considered, a milder size evolution is obtained for the OmegaM = 1, OmegaLambda = 0 model while little or no size evolution is found for the other two cases. There is therefore no significant difference in our results for a n open low density universe with OmegaLambda = 0 and a flat universe dominated by OmegaLambda predicted by inflation. The present results therefore imply that an open low density universe with OmegaM = 0.2 and OmegaLambda = 0 is compatible with an inflationary model of the universe with OmegaM = 0.2 and OmegaLambda = 0.8. This leads to a contradiction since the universe cannot be open and spatially closed at the same time (the existence of one should preclude the other).

  5. Gravitational lensing effects in a time-variable cosmological 'constant' cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratra, Bharat; Quillen, Alice

    1992-01-01

    A scalar field phi with a potential V(phi) varies as phi exp -alpha(alpha is greater than 0) has an energy density, behaving like that of a time-variable cosmological 'constant', that redshifts less rapidly than the energy densities of radiation and matter, and so might contribute significantly to the present energy density. We compute, in this spatially flat cosmology, the gravitational lensing optical depth, and the expected lens redshift distribution for fixed source redshift. We find, for the values of alpha of about 4 and baryonic density parameter Omega of about 0.2 consistent with the classical cosmological tests, that the optical depth is significantly smaller than that in a constant-Lambda model with the same Omega. We also find that the redshift of the maximum of the lens distribution falls between that in the constant-Lambda model and that in the Einstein-de Sitter model.

  6. Machine learning and cosmological simulations - I. Semi-analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdar, Harshil M.; Turk, Matthew J.; Brunner, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new exploratory framework to model galaxy formation and evolution in a hierarchical Universe by using machine learning (ML). Our motivations are two-fold: (1) presenting a new, promising technique to study galaxy formation, and (2) quantitatively analysing the extent of the influence of dark matter halo properties on galaxies in the backdrop of semi-analytical models (SAMs). We use the influential Millennium Simulation and the corresponding Munich SAM to train and test various sophisticated ML algorithms (k-Nearest Neighbors, decision trees, random forests, and extremely randomized trees). By using only essential dark matter halo physical properties for haloes of M > 1012 M⊙ and a partial merger tree, our model predicts the hot gas mass, cold gas mass, bulge mass, total stellar mass, black hole mass and cooling radius at z = 0 for each central galaxy in a dark matter halo for the Millennium run. Our results provide a unique and powerful phenomenological framework to explore the galaxy-halo connection that is built upon SAMs and demonstrably place ML as a promising and a computationally efficient tool to study small-scale structure formation.

  7. Stellar feedback from high-mass X-ray binaries in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artale, M. C.; Tissera, P. B.; Pellizza, L. J.

    2015-04-01

    We explored the role of X-ray binaries composed by a black hole and a massive stellar companion [black hole X-ray binaries (BHXs)] as sources of kinetic feedback by using hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Following previous results, our BHX model selects metal-poor stars (Z = [0, 10-4]) as possible progenitors. The model that better reproduces observations assumes that an ˜20 per cent fraction of low-metallicity black holes are in binary systems which produces BHXs. These sources are estimated to deposit ˜1052 erg of kinetic energy per event. With these parameters and in the simulated volume, we find that the energy injected by BHXs represents ˜30 per cent of the total energy released by Type II supernova and BHX events at redshift z ˜ 7 and then decreases rapidly as baryons get chemically enriched. Haloes with virial masses smaller than ˜1010 M⊙ (or Tvir ≲ 105 K) are the most directly affected ones by BHX feedback. These haloes host galaxies with stellar masses in the range 107-108 M⊙. Our results show that BHX feedback is able to keep the interstellar medium warm, without removing a significant gas fraction, in agreement with previous analytical calculations. Consequently, the stellar-to-dark matter mass ratio is better reproduced at high redshift. Our model also predicts a stronger evolution of the number of galaxies as a function of the stellar mass with redshift when BHX feedback is considered. These findings support previous claims that the BHXs could be an effective source of feedback in early stages of galaxy evolution.

  8. Shock finding on a moving mesh - I. Shock statistics in non-radiative cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Cosmological shock waves play an important role in hierarchical structure formation by dissipating and thermalizing kinetic energy of gas flows, thereby heating the Universe. Furthermore, identifying shocks in hydrodynamical simulations and measuring their Mach number accurately are critical for calculating the production of non-thermal particle components through diffusive shock acceleration. However, shocks are often significantly broadened in numerical simulations, making it challenging to implement an accurate shock finder. We here introduce a refined methodology for detecting shocks in the moving-mesh code AREPO, and show that results for shock statistics can be sensitive to implementation details. We put special emphasis on filtering against spurious shock detections due to tangential discontinuities and contacts. Both of them are omnipresent in cosmological simulations, for example in the form of shear-induced Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and cold fronts. As an initial application of our new implementation, we analyse shock statistics in non-radiative cosmological simulations of dark matter and baryons. We find that the bulk of energy dissipation at redshift zero occurs in shocks with Mach numbers around M≈ 2.7. Furthermore, almost 40 per cent of the thermalization is contributed by shocks in the warm hot intergalactic medium, whereas ≈60 per cent occurs in clusters, groups, and smaller haloes. Compared to previous studies, these findings revise the characterization of the most important shocks towards higher Mach numbers and lower density structures. Our results also suggest that regions with densities above and below δb = 100 should be roughly equally important for the energetics of cosmic ray acceleration through large-scale structure shocks.

  9. Modified Baryonic Dynamics: two-component cosmological simulations with light sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, G.W.; Gentile, G.; Diaferio, A.; Famaey, B.; Heyden, K.J. van der E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: gianfranco.gentile@ugent.be

    2014-10-01

    In this article we continue to test cosmological models centred on Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) with light sterile neutrinos, which could in principle be a way to solve the fine-tuning problems of the standard model on galaxy scales while preserving successful predictions on larger scales. Due to previous failures of the simple MOND cosmological model, here we test a speculative model where the modified gravitational field is produced only by the baryons and the sterile neutrinos produce a purely Newtonian field (hence Modified Baryonic Dynamics). We use two-component cosmological simulations to separate the baryonic N-body particles from the sterile neutrino ones. The premise is to attenuate the over-production of massive galaxy cluster halos which were prevalent in the original MOND plus light sterile neutrinos scenario. Theoretical issues with such a formulation notwithstanding, the Modified Baryonic Dynamics model fails to produce the correct amplitude for the galaxy cluster mass function for any reasonable value of the primordial power spectrum normalisation.

  10. The formation of Population III stars and their effect on cosmological structure in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Brian William

    2005-11-01

    The first generation of stars to form in the universe have a profound impact on their environment. These stars are responsible for beginning the universe's transition from a "cosmic dark age" where no sources of visible light existed; to the bright universe seen today. Additionally, these stars were believed to be the first sources of all elements heavier than lithium, which strongly affected the ability of gas to cool and permanently changed how star formation occurred. In this dissertation I present results from numerical simulations of the formation of the first generation of stars to form in the universe ("Population III" stars) and their effects on later structure formation. I compare Enzo, the adaptive mesh refinement cosmology code used to perform all of the simulations in this work, to GADGET, a smoothed particle hydrodynamics cosmology code. Nearly identical results can be obtained when using two extremely different numerical methods, which helps to verify the correctness of both codes and strengthen the confidence of predictions made with these tools. I perform high dynamical range calculations of the formation of an ensemble of Population III stars, varying multiple simulation parameters, in a standard cold dark matter cosmology as well as with a soft ultraviolet background and in a generic warm dark matter cosmology. I find that the accretion rates of primordial protostars have been systematically overestimated by previously published work, which has profound implications for later structure formation and the reionization of the universe. Additionally, the presence of a soft ultraviolet background and warm dark matter serves to delay the onset of star formation. I propose limits on the possible mass of a warm dark matter particle. I also present results of simulations which demonstrate the effects of the HII regions and metal enrichment from Population III stars. It appears that HII regions from these stars may hasten the formation of later generations

  11. Escape fraction of ionizing photons from high-redshift galaxies in cosmological SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2011-03-01

    Combing the three-dimensional radiative transfer (RT) calculation and cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we study the escape fraction of ionizing photons (fesc) of high-redshift galaxies at z= 3-6. Our simulations cover the halo mass range of Mh= 109-1012 M⊙. We post-process several hundred simulated galaxies with the Authentic Radiative Transfer (ART) code to study the halo mass dependence of fesc. In this paper, we restrict ourselves to the transfer of stellar radiation from local stellar population in each dark matter halo. We find that the average fesc steeply decreases as the halo mass increases, with a large scatter for the lower-mass haloes. The low-mass haloes with Mh˜ 109 M⊙ have large values of fesc (with an average of ˜0.4), whereas the massive haloes with Mh˜ 1011 M⊙ show small values of fesc (with an average of ˜0.07). This is because in our simulations, the massive haloes show more clumpy structure in gas distribution, and the star-forming regions are embedded inside these clumps, making it more difficult for the ionizing photons to escape. On the other hand, in low-mass haloes, there are often conical regions of highly ionized gas due to the shifted location of young star clusters from the centre of dark matter halo, which allows the ionizing photons to escape more easily than in the high-mass haloes. By counting the number of escaped ionizing photons, we show that the star-forming galaxies can ionize the intergalactic medium at z= 3-6. The main contributor to the ionizing photons is the haloes with Mh≲ 1010 M⊙ owing to their high fesc. The large dispersion in fesc suggests that there may be various sizes of H II bubbles around the haloes even with the same mass in the early stages of reionization. We also examine the effect of UV background radiation field on fesc using simple, four different treatments of UV background.

  12. Nonlinear stochastic biasing of halos: Analysis of cosmological N-body simulations and perturbation theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Matsubara, Takahiko

    2013-06-01

    It is crucial to understand and model a behavior of galaxy biasing for future ambitious galaxy redshift surveys. Using 40 large cosmological N-body simulations for a standard ΛCDM cosmology, we study the cross-correlation coefficient between matter and the halo density field, which is an indicator of the stochasticity of bias, over a wide redshift range 0≤z≤3. The cross-correlation coefficient is important to extract information on the matter density field, e.g., by combining galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements. We compare the simulation results with integrated perturbation theory (iPT) proposed by one of the present authors and standard perturbation theory combined with a phenomenological model of local bias. The cross-correlation coefficient derived from the iPT agrees with N-body simulation results down to r˜15(10)h-1Mpc within 0.5 (1.0)% for all redshifts and halo masses we consider. The standard perturbation theory with local bias does not explain complicated behaviors on quasilinear scales at low redshifts, while roughly reproduces the general behavior of the cross-correlation coefficient on fully nonlinear scales. The iPT is powerful to predict the cross-correlation coefficient down to quasilinear regimes with a high precision.

  13. Effect of bulk Lorentz violation on anisotropic brane cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari-Fard, Malihe

    2012-04-01

    The effect of Lorentz invariance violation in cosmology has attracted a considerable amount of attention. By using a dynamical vector field assumed to point in the bulk direction, with Lorentz invariance holding on the brane, we extend the notation of Lorentz violation in four dimensions Jacobson to a five-dimensional brane-world. We obtain the general solution of the field equations in an exact parametric form for Bianchi type I space-time, with perfect fluid as a matter source. We show that the brane universe evolves from an isotropic/anisotropic state to an isotropic de Sitter inflationary phase at late time. The early time behavior of anisotropic brane universe is largely dependent on the Lorentz violating parameters β{sub i},i = 1,2,3 and the equation of state of the matter, while its late time behavior is independent of these parameters.

  14. The effects of a non-zero cosmological constant on the Veltmann models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi

    2014-10-01

    The Veltmann models, which include the Plummer and Hernquist models as special cases, are studied in the presence of a cosmological constant. Physically relevant quantities such as the velocity dispersion profiles and the anisotropy parameter are computed through the use of the self-consistent approach. The cut-off radii for these models and the mass contained within this volume are also calculated. It is shown that the inclusion of a cosmological constant leads to many observable quantities such as the surface density, dispersion profiles and the anisotropy parameter becoming increasingly modified. In some scenarios, they are easily distinguished from the case where the cosmological constant is absent, as a result of their non-monotonic behaviour. The effects of neighbouring gravitational systems on the central system are also studied, and compared against the effects arising from the cosmological constant. Consequently, it is suggested that the effects of a cosmological constant can prove to be quite important when modelling dilute collisionless systems.

  15. Constraints on the distribution and energetics of fast radio bursts using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolag, K.; Gaensler, B. M.; Beck, A. M.; Beck, M. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present constraints on the origins of fast radio bursts (FRBs) using large cosmological simulations. We calculate contributions to FRB dispersion measures (DMs) from the Milky Way, from the Local Universe, from cosmological large-scale structure, and from potential FRB host galaxies, and then compare these simulations to the DMs of observed FRBs. We find that the Milky Way contribution has previously been underestimated by a factor of ˜2, and that the foreground-subtracted DMs are consistent with a cosmological origin, corresponding to a source population observable to a maximum redshift z ˜ 0.6-0.9. We consider models for the spatial distribution of FRBs in which they are randomly distributed in the Universe, track the star formation rate of their host galaxies, track total stellar mass, or require a central supermassive black hole. Current data do not discriminate between these possibilities, but the predicted DM distributions for different models will differ considerably once we begin detecting FRBs at higher DMs and higher redshifts. We additionally consider the distribution of FRB fluences, and show that the observations are consistent with FRBs being standard candles, each burst producing the same radiated isotropic energy. The data imply a constant isotropic burst energy of ˜7 × 1040 erg if FRBs are embedded in host galaxies, or ˜9 × 1040 erg if FRBs are randomly distributed. These energies are 10-100 times larger than had previously been inferred. Within the constraints of the available small sample of data, our analysis favours FRB mechanisms for which the isotropic radiated energy has a narrow distribution in excess of 1040 erg.

  16. Cosmological zoom simulations of z = 2 galaxies: The impact of galactic outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Anglés-Alcázar, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; Özel, Feryal; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.

    2014-02-20

    We use high-resolution cosmological zoom simulations with ∼200 pc resolution at z = 2 and various prescriptions for galactic outflows in order to explore the impact of winds on the morphological, dynamical, and structural properties of eight individual galaxies with halo masses ∼10{sup 11}-2 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} at z = 2. We present a detailed comparison to spatially and spectrally resolved Hα and other observations of z ≈ 2 galaxies. We find that simulations without winds produce massive, compact galaxies with low gas fractions, super-solar metallicities, high bulge fractions, and much of the star formation concentrated within the inner kiloparsec. Strong winds are required to maintain high gas fractions, redistribute star-forming gas over larger scales, and increase the velocity dispersion of simulated galaxies, more in agreement with the large, extended, turbulent disks typical of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. Winds also suppress early star formation to produce high-redshift cosmic star formation efficiencies in better agreement with observations. Sizes, rotation velocities, and velocity dispersions all scale with stellar mass in accord with observations. Our simulations produce a diversity of morphological characteristics—among our three most massive galaxies, we find a quiescent grand-design spiral, a very compact star-forming galaxy, and a clumpy disk undergoing a minor merger; the clumps are evident in Hα but not in the stars. Rotation curves are generally slowly rising, particularly when calculated using azimuthal velocities rather than enclosed mass. Our results are broadly resolution-converged. These results show that cosmological simulations including outflows can produce disk galaxies similar to those observed during the peak epoch of cosmic galaxy growth.

  17. Confrontation of top-hat spherical collapse against dark halos from cosmological N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Daichi; Kitayama, Tetsu; Osato, Ken; Sasaki, Shin; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    The top-hat spherical collapse model (TSC) is one of the most fundamental analytical frameworks to describe the non-linear growth of cosmic structure. TSC has motivated, and been widely applied in, various investigations even in the current era of precision cosmology. While numerous studies exist to examine its validity against numerical simulations in a statistical fashion, there are few analyses which compare the TSC dynamics in an individual object-wise basis, which is what we attempt in the present paper. We extract 100 halos at z = 0 from a cosmological N-body simulation according to the conventional TSC criterion for the spherical over-density. Then we trace back their spherical counterparts at earlier epochs. Just prior to the turn-around epoch of the halos, their dynamics are well approximated by TSC, but their turn-around epochs are systematically delayed and the virial radii are larger by ˜20% on average relative to the TSC predictions. We find that this systematic deviation can mainly be ascribed to the non-uniformity/inhomogeneity of dark matter density profiles and the non-zero velocity dispersions, both of which are neglected in TSC. In particular, the inside-out collapse and shell-crossing of dark matter halos play an important role in generating the significant velocity dispersion. The implications of the present result are briefly discussed.

  18. Testing X-ray measurements of galaxy cluster outskirts with cosmological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Avestruz, Camille; Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2014-08-20

    The study of galaxy cluster outskirts has emerged as one of the new frontiers in extragalactic astrophysics and cosmology with the advent of new observations in X-ray and microwave. However, the thermodynamic properties and chemical enrichment of this diffuse and azimuthally asymmetric component of the intracluster medium (ICM) are still not well understood. This work, for the first time, systematically explores potential observational biases in these regions. To assess X-ray measurements of galaxy cluster properties at large radii (>R {sub 500c}), we use mock Chandra analyses of cosmological galaxy cluster simulations. The pipeline is identical to that used for Chandra observations, but the biases discussed in this paper are relevant for all X-ray observations outside of R {sub 500c}. We find the following from our analysis: (1) filament regions can contribute as much as 50% at R {sub 200c} to the emission measure; (2) X-ray temperatures and metal abundances from model fitted mock X-ray spectra in a multi-temperature ICM respectively vary to the level of 10% and 50%; (3) resulting density profiles vary to within 10% out to R {sub 200c}, and gas mass, total mass, and baryon fractions all vary to within a few percent; (4) the bias from a metal abundance extrapolated a factor of five higher than the true metal abundance results in total mass measurements biased high by 20% and total gas measurements biased low by 10%; and (5) differences in projection and dynamical state of a cluster can lead to gas density slope measurements that differ by a factor of 15% and 30%, respectively. The presented results can partially account for some of the recent gas profile measurements in cluster outskirts by, e.g., Suzaku. Our findings are pertinent to future X-ray cosmological constraints from cluster outskirts, which are least affected by non-gravitational gas physics, as well as to measurements probing gas properties in filamentary structures.

  19. Nonlinear cosmological consistency relations and effective matter stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Hollenstein, Lukas; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Kunz, Martin E-mail: lukas.hollenstein@unige.ch E-mail: martin.kunz@unige.ch

    2012-05-01

    We propose a fully nonlinear framework to construct consistency relations for testing generic cosmological scenarios using the evolution of large scale structure. It is based on the covariant approach in combination with a frame that is purely given by the metric, the normal frame. As an example, we apply this framework to the ΛCDM model, by extending the usual first order conditions on the metric potentials to second order, where the two potentials start to differ from each other. We argue that working in the normal frame is not only a practical choice but also helps with the physical interpretation of nonlinear dynamics. In this frame, effective pressures and anisotropic stresses appear at second order in perturbation theory, even for ''pressureless'' dust. We quantify their effect and compare them, for illustration, to the pressure of a generic clustering dark energy fluid and the anisotropic stress in the DGP model. Besides, we also discuss the effect of a mismatch of the potentials on the determination of galaxy bias.

  20. Effect of a positive cosmological constant on cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2008-09-15

    We study cosmic Nielsen-Olesen strings in space-times with a positive cosmological constant. For the free cosmic string in a cylindrically symmetric space-time, we calculate the contribution of the cosmological constant to the angle deficit, and to the bending of null geodesics. For a cosmic string in a Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time, we use Kruskal patches around the inner and outer horizons to show that a thin string can pierce them.

  1. The distribution of metals in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, K.; Gibson, B. K.; Brook, C. B.; Calura, F.; Stinson, G. S.; Thacker, R. J.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Bailin, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Wadsley, J.; Quinn, T. R.; Maccio, A.

    2012-09-01

    We examine the chemical properties of five cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of an M33-like disc galaxy which have been shown previously to be consistent with the morphological characteristics and bulk scaling relations expected of late-type spirals. These simulations are part of the Making Galaxies in a Cosmological Context Project, in which stellar feedback is tuned to match the stellar mass-halo mass relationship. Each realization employed identical initial conditions and assembly histories, but differed from one another in their underlying baryonic physics prescriptions, including (a) the efficiency with which each supernova energy couples to the surrounding interstellar medium, (b) the impact of feedback associated with massive star radiation pressure, (c) the role of the minimum shut-off time for radiative cooling of Type II supernovae remnants, (d) the treatment of metal diffusion and (e) varying the initial mass function. Our analysis focusses on the resulting stellar metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in each simulated (analogous) 'solar neighbourhood' (2-3 disc scalelengths from the galactic centre) and central 'bulge' region. We compare and contrast the simulated MDFs' skewness, kurtosis and dispersion (inter-quartile, inter-decile, inter-centile and inter-tenth-percentile regions) with that of the empirical solar neighbourhood MDF and Local Group dwarf galxies. We find that the MDFs of the simulated discs are more negatively skewed, with higher kurtosis, than those observed locally in the Milky Way and Local Group dwarfs. We can trace this difference to the simulations' very tight and correlated age-metallicity relations (compared with that of the Milky Way's solar neighbourhood), suggesting that these relations within 'dwarf' discs might be steeper than in L⋆ discs (consistent with the simulations' star formation histories and extant empirical data), and/or the degree of stellar orbital redistribution and migration inferred locally has

  2. Electromagnetic quantum effects in higher-dimensional cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotanjyan, Anna; Sargsyan, Hayk; Simonyan, David; Saharian, Aram

    2016-07-01

    Among the most interesting directions in quantum field theory on curved spacetimes is the investigation of the influence of the gravitational field on the properties of the quantum vacuum. The corresponding problems are exactly solvable for highly symmetric background geometries only. In particular, the investigations of quantum effects in de Sitter (dS) and anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetimes have attracted a great deal of attention. We consider electromagnetic quantum effects in higher-dimensional cosmological models. The two-point functions of the vector potential and of the field tensor for the electromagnetic field in background of dS and AdS spacetime are evaluated in arbitrary number of spatial dimensions. First we consider the two-point functions in the boundary-free geometry and then generalize the results in the presence of a reflecting boundary, for AdS spacetimes parallel to the AdS horizon. By using the expressions for the two-point functions of the field tensor, we investigate the vacuum expectation values of the electric field squared and of the energy-momentum tensor. Simple asymptotic expressions are provided for both cases, in particular for AdS geometry near the AdS boundary and horizon.

  3. Effective dynamics in Bianchi type II loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2012-05-01

    We numerically investigate the solutions to the effective equations of the Bianchi II model within the “improved” loop quantum cosmology dynamics. The matter source is a massless scalar field. We perform a systematic study of the space of solutions, and focus on the behavior of several geometrical observables. We show that the big bang singularity is replaced by a bounce and the pointlike singularities do not saturate the energy density bound. There are up to three directional bounces in the scale factors, one global bounce in the expansion, the shear presents up to four local maxima and can be zero at the bounce. This allows for solutions with density larger than the maximal density for the isotropic and Bianchi I cases. The asymptotic behavior is shown to behave like that of a Bianchi I model, and the effective solutions connect anisotropic solutions even when the shear is zero at the bounce. All known facts of Bianchi I are reproduced. In the “vacuum limit,” solutions are such that almost all the dynamics is due to the anisotropies. Since Bianchi II plays an important role in the Bianchi IX model and the Belinskii, Khalatnikov, Lifshitz conjecture, our results can provide an intuitive understanding of the behavior in the vicinity of general spacelike singularities, when loop-geometric corrections are present.

  4. Λ effect in the cosmological expansion of void

    SciTech Connect

    Fliche, Henri-Hugues; Triay, Roland E-mail: triay@cpt.univ-mrs.fr

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical effect of the cosmological constant Λ on a single spherical vacuum void evolving in the universe within a global solution of Newton-Friedmann models. As a result, the main characteristic is that the void expands with a huge initial burst up to match asymptotically the Hubble flow. The size of voids increases with Ω{sub o} and with Λ, which is interpreted as respectively by the gravitational attraction of borders from outside regions and by the gravitational repulsion of vacuum from the inner region. The Λ-effect on the kinematics intervenes significantly by amplifying the expansion rate at redshift z ∼ 1.7 for a background density parameter Ω{sub o} ∼ 0.3. For a class of parameters values, which corresponds in GR to spatially closed Friedmann models, it is interesting to note that a test particle in the inner region moves toward the border. Such a peculiar feature shows that the empty regions are swept out; which stands as a stability criterion.

  5. HOT GAS HALOS AROUND DISK GALAXIES: CONFRONTING COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Pedersen, Kristian; Toft, Sune; Grove, Lisbeth F.; Benson, Andrew; Bower, Richard G.

    2009-05-20

    Models of disk galaxy formation commonly predict the existence of an extended reservoir of accreted hot gas surrounding massive spirals at low redshift. As a test of these models, we use X-ray and H{alpha} data of the two massive, quiescent edge-on spirals NGC 5746 and NGC 5170 to investigate the amount and origin of any hot gas in their halos. Contrary to our earlier claim, the Chandra analysis of NGC 5746, employing more recent calibration data, does not reveal any significant evidence for diffuse X-ray emission outside the optical disk, with a 3{sigma} upper limit to the halo X-ray luminosity of 4 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. An identical study of the less massive NGC 5170 also fails to detect any extraplanar X-ray emission. By extracting hot halo properties of disk galaxies formed in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we compare these results to expectations for cosmological accretion of hot gas by spirals. For Milky-Way-sized galaxies, these high-resolution simulations predict hot halo X-ray luminosities which are lower by a factor of {approx}2 compared to our earlier results reported by Toft et al. We find the new simulation predictions to be consistent with our observational constraints for both NGC 5746 and NGC 5170, while also confirming that the hot gas detected so far around more actively star-forming spirals is in general probably associated with stellar activity in the disk. Observational results on quiescent disk galaxies at the high-mass end are nevertheless providing powerful constraints on theoretical predictions, and hence on the assumed input physics in numerical studies of disk galaxy formation and evolution.

  6. Halo Statistics Analysis Within Medium Volume Cosmological N-Body Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinovic, N.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present halo statistics analysis of a Λ CDM N-body cosmological simulation (from first halo formation until z = 0). We study mean major merger rate as a function of time, where for time we consider both per redshift and per Gyr dependence. For latter we find that it scales as the well known power law (1+z)^n for which we obtain n = 2.4. The halo mass function and halo growth function are derived and compared both with analytical and empirical fits. We analyse halo growth through out entire simulation, making it possible to continuously monitor evolution of halo number density within given mass ranges. The halo formation redshift is studied exploring possibility for a new simple preliminary analysis during the simulation run. Visualization of the simulation is portrayed as well. At redshifts z = 0-7 halos from simulation have good statistics for further analysis especially in mass range of 10^{11} - 10^{14} M_{⊙}/h.

  7. FLY. A parallel tree N-body code for cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Becciani, U.; Ferro, D.

    2003-10-01

    FLY is a parallel treecode which makes heavy use of the one-sided communication paradigm to handle the management of the tree structure. In its public version the code implements the equations for cosmological evolution, and can be run for different cosmological models. This reference guide describes the actual implementation of the algorithms of the public version of FLY, and suggests how to modify them to implement other types of equations (for instance, the Newtonian ones). Program summary Title of program: FLY Catalogue identifier: ADSC Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSC Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Cray T3E, Sgi Origin 3000, IBM SP Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: Unicos 2.0.5.40, Irix 6.5.14, Aix 4.3.3 Programming language used: Fortran 90, C Memory required to execute with typical data: about 100 Mwords with 2 million-particles Number of bits in a word: 32 Number of processors used: parallel program. The user can select the number of processors >=1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: parallelized Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4615604 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Parallel tree N-body code for cosmological simulations Nature of physical problem: FLY is a parallel collisionless N-body code for the calculation of the gravitational force. Method of solution: It is based on the hierarchical oct-tree domain decomposition introduced by Barnes and Hut (1986). Restrictions on the complexity of the program: The program uses the leapfrog integrator schema, but could be changed by the user. Typical running time: 50 seconds for each time-step, running a 2-million-particles simulation on an Sgi Origin 3800 system with 8 processors having 512 Mbytes RAM for each processor. Unusual features of the program: FLY

  8. Simulating the universe(s): from cosmic bubble collisions to cosmological observables with numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, Carroll L.; Johnson, Matthew C.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Aguirre, Anthony; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.

    2014-03-01

    The theory of eternal inflation in an inflaton potential with multiple vacua predicts that our universe is one of many bubble universes nucleating and growing inside an ever-expanding false vacuum. The collision of our bubble with another could provide an important observational signature to test this scenario. We develop and implement an algorithm for accurately computing the cosmological observables arising from bubble collisions directly from the Lagrangian of a single scalar field. We first simulate the collision spacetime by solving Einstein's equations, starting from nucleation and ending at reheating. Taking advantage of the collision's hyperbolic symmetry, the simulations are performed with a 1+1-dimensional fully relativistic code that uses adaptive mesh refinement. We then calculate the comoving curvature perturbation in an open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe, which is used to determine the temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. For a fiducial Lagrangian, the anisotropies are well described by a power law in the cosine of the angular distance from the center of the collision signature. For a given form of the Lagrangian, the resulting observational predictions are inherently statistical due to stochastic elements of the bubble nucleation process. Further uncertainties arise due to our imperfect knowledge about inflationary and pre-recombination physics. We characterize observational predictions by computing the probability distributions over four phenomenological parameters which capture these intrinsic and model uncertainties. This represents the first fully-relativistic set of predictions from an ensemble of scalar field models giving rise to eternal inflation, yielding significant differences from previous non-relativistic approximations. Thus, our results provide a basis for a rigorous confrontation of these theories with cosmological data.

  9. Far Sidelobe Effects from Panel Gaps of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fluxa, Pedro R.; Duenner, Rolando; Maurin, Loiec; Choi, Steve K.; Devlin, Mark J.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Shuay-Pwu, P. Ho; Koopman, Brian J.; Louis, Thibaut; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a 6 meter diameter CMB telescope located at 5200 meters in the Chilean desert. ACT has made arc-minute scale maps of the sky at 90 and 150 GHz which have led to precise measurements of the fine angular power spectrum of the CMB fluctuations in temperature and polarization. One of the goals of ACT is to search for the B-mode polarization signal from primordial gravity waves, and thus extending ACT's data analysis to larger angular scales. This goal introduces new challenges in the control of systematic effects, including better understanding of far sidelobe effects that might enter the power spectrum at degree angular scales. Here we study the effects of the gaps between panels of the ACT primary and secondary reflectors in the worst case scenario in which the gaps remain open. We produced numerical simulations of the optics using GRASP up to 8 degrees away from the main beam and simulated timestreams for observations with this beam using real pointing information from ACT data. Maps from these simulated timestreams showed leakage from the sidelobes, indicating that this effect must be taken into consideration at large angular scales.

  10. Analytical model for non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters - II. Comparison with cosmological hydrodynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xun; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Turbulent gas motion inside galaxy clusters provides a non-negligible non-thermal pressure support to the intracluster gas. If not corrected, it leads to a systematic bias in the estimation of cluster masses from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, and affects interpretation of measurements of the SZ power spectrum and observations of cluster outskirts from ongoing and upcoming large cluster surveys. Recently, Shi & Komatsu developed an analytical model for predicting the radius, mass, and redshift dependence of the non-thermal pressure contributed by the kinetic random motions of intracluster gas sourced by the cluster mass growth. In this paper, we compare the predictions of this analytical model to a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamics simulation. As different mass growth histories result in different non-thermal pressure, we perform the comparison on 65 simulated galaxy clusters on a cluster-by-cluster basis. We find an excellent agreement between the modelled and simulated non-thermal pressure profiles. Our results open up the possibility of using the analytical model to correct the systematic bias in the mass estimation of galaxy clusters. We also discuss tests of the physical picture underlying the evolution of intracluster non-thermal gas motions, as well as a way to further improve the analytical modelling, which may help achieve a unified understanding of non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters.

  11. THE PRESSURE OF THE STAR-FORMING INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Munshi, Ferah; Quinn, Thomas R.; Governato, Fabio; Christensen, Charlotte; Wadsley, James; Loebman, Sarah; Shen, Sijing

    2014-01-20

    We examine the pressure of the star-forming interstellar medium (ISM) of Milky-Way-sized disk galaxies using fully cosmological SPH+N-body, high-resolution simulations. These simulations include explicit treatment of metal-line cooling in addition to dust and self-shielding, H{sub 2}-based star formation. The four simulated halos have masses ranging from a few times 10{sup 10} to nearly 10{sup 12} solar masses. Using a kinematic decomposition of these galaxies into present-day bulge and disk components, we find that the typical pressure of the star-forming ISM in the present-day bulge is higher than that in the present-day disk by an order of magnitude. We also find that the pressure of the star-forming ISM at high redshift is, on average, higher than ISM pressures at low redshift. This explains why the bulge forms at higher pressures: the disk assembles at lower redshift when the ISM exhibits lower pressure and the bulge forms at high redshift when the ISM has higher pressure. If ISM pressure and IMF variation are tied together, these results could indicate a time-dependent IMF in Milky-Way-like systems as well as a different IMF in the bulge and the disk.

  12. Initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations of the scalar sector of theories of Newtonian, Relativistic and Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkenburg, Wessel; Hu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    We present a description for setting initial particle displacements and field values for simulations of arbitrary metric theories of gravity, for perfect and imperfect fluids with arbitrary characteristics. We extend the Zel'dovich Approximation to nontrivial theories of gravity, and show how scale dependence implies curved particle paths, even in the entirely linear regime of perturbations. For a viable choice of Effective Field Theory of Modified Gravity, initial conditions set at high redshifts are affected at the level of up to 5% at Mpc scales, which exemplifies the importance of going beyond Λ-Cold Dark Matter initial conditions for modifications of gravity outside of the quasi-static approximation. In addition, we show initial conditions for a simulation where a scalar modification of gravity is modelled in a Lagrangian particle-like description. Our description paves the way for simulations and mock galaxy catalogs under theories of gravity beyond the standard model, crucial for progress towards precision tests of gravity and cosmology.

  13. Cosmological Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourges, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present a self-contained summary of the theory of linear cosmological perturbations. We emphasize the effect of the six parameters of the minimal cosmological model, first, on the spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies, and second, on the linear matter power spectrum. We briefly review at the end the possible impact of a few non-minimal dark matter and dark energy models.

  14. Effective gravitational couplings for cosmological perturbations in generalized Proca theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Mukohyama, Shinji; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Zhang, Ying-li

    2016-08-01

    We consider the finite interactions of the generalized Proca theory including the sixth-order Lagrangian and derive the full linear perturbation equations of motion on the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background in the presence of a matter perfect fluid. By construction, the propagating degrees of freedom (besides the matter perfect fluid) are two transverse vector perturbations, one longitudinal scalar, and two tensor polarizations. The Lagrangians associated with intrinsic vector modes neither affect the background equations of motion nor the second-order action of tensor perturbations, but they do give rise to nontrivial modifications to the no-ghost condition of vector perturbations and to the propagation speeds of vector and scalar perturbations. We derive the effective gravitational coupling Geff with matter density perturbations under a quasistatic approximation on scales deep inside the sound horizon. We find that the existence of intrinsic vector modes allows a possibility for reducing Geff. In fact, within the parameter space, Geff can be even smaller than the Newton gravitational constant G at the late cosmological epoch, with a peculiar phantom dark energy equation of state (without ghosts). The modifications to the slip parameter η and the evolution of the growth rate f σ8 are discussed as well. Thus, dark energy models in the framework of generalized Proca theories can be observationally distinguished from the Λ CDM model according to both cosmic growth and expansion history. Furthermore, we study the evolution of vector perturbations and show that outside the vector sound horizon the perturbations are nearly frozen and start to decay with oscillations after the horizon entry.

  15. Supermassive Black Hole Growth and Merger Rates from Cosmological N-body Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Micic, Miroslav; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Abel, Tom; /SLAC

    2007-10-29

    Understanding how seed black holes grow into intermediate and supermassive black holes (IMBHs and SMBHs, respectively) has important implications for the duty-cycle of active galactic nuclei (AGN), galaxy evolution, and gravitational wave astronomy. Most studies of the cosmological growth and merger history of black holes have used semianalytic models and have concentrated on SMBH growth in luminous galaxies. Using high resolution cosmological N-body simulations, we track the assembly of black holes over a large range of final masses - from seed black holes to SMBHs - over widely varying dynamical histories. We used the dynamics of dark matter halos to track the evolution of seed black holes in three different gas accretion scenarios. We have found that growth of a Sagittarius A* - size SMBH reaches its maximum mass M{sub SMBH}={approx}10{sup 6}M{sub {circle_dot}} at z{approx}6 through early gaseous accretion episodes, after which it stays at near constant mass. At the same redshift, the duty-cycle of the host AGN ends, hence redshift z=6 marks the transition from an AGN to a starburst galaxy which eventually becomes the Milky Way. By tracking black hole growth as a function of time and mass, we estimate that the IMBH merger rate reaches a maximum of R{sub max}=55 yr{sup -1} at z=11. From IMBH merger rates we calculate N{sub ULX}=7 per Milky Way type galaxy per redshift in redshift range 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 6.

  16. Cosmic Microwave Background Fluctuations from the Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect as a Cosmological Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunbae; Shapiro, P.; Komatsu, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a calculation of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect on of the Comic Microwave Background fluctuation. We focus on the scale at the multipole moment of l = 3000 10000 that is currently being probed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. For the post-reionization contribution of the total signal, we use the 3rd order perturbation theory (3PT) to model non-linearity of post-reionization epoch. We evaluate a non-linear expression for momentum powerspectrum in Ma and Fry (2002) with the 3PT density and velocity powerspectrum. And, we use the 3PT momentum powerspectrum to calculate the kSZ signal. We show that the 3PT is a reasonable approximation by comparing our result with previous work by Zhang, Pen and Trac (2004). For reionization contribution, we use our N-body radiative transfer simulations to take patchiness of ionization of intergalactic medium in reionization epoch into account. Using ionized fraction field in the simulation, we calculate the momentum field of the ionized gas. And, we correct for the missing power in finite size boxes of simulations. Finally, we show the kSZ calculation for different simulations with reionization scenarios. With contributions from each epoch, we predict total kSZ signal for different reionization history and put constraint on reionization scenario using an upper bound of the signal from recent SPT measurement.

  17. Cosmological N-body Simulation of Galaxy and Large-Scale Structure Formation: The Gravity Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly

    2015-04-01

    One of the first N-body simulations done almost 50 years ago had only 200 self-gravitating particles. Even this first baby step made substantial impact on understanding how astronomical objects should form. Now powerful supercomputers and new algorithms allow astronomers produce N-body simulations that employ up to a trillion dark matter particles and produce vital theoretical predictions regarding formation, evolution, structure and statistics of objects ranging from dwarf galaxies to clusters and superclusters of galaxies. With only gravity involved in these theoretical models, one would naively expect that by now we should know everything we need about N-body dynamics of cosmological fluctuations. Not the case. It appears that the Universe was not cooperative and gave us divergencies in the initial conditions generated during the Inflation epoch and subsequent expansion of the Universe - the infinite phase-space density and divergent density fluctuations. Ever increasing observational demands on statistics and accuracy of theoretical predictions is another driving force for more realistic and larger N-body simulations. Large current and new planned observational projects such as BOSS, eBOSS, Euclid, LSST will bring information on spatial distribution, motion, and properties of millions of galaxies at different redshifts. Direct simulations of evolution of gas and formation of stars for millions of forming galaxies will not be available for years leaving astronomers with the only option - to develop methods to combine large N-body simulations with models of galaxy formation to produce accurate theoretical predictions. I will discuss the current status of the field and directions of its development.

  18. Mask effects on cosmological studies with weak-lensing peak statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiangkun; Pan, Chuzhong; Fan, Zuhui; Wang, Qiao

    2014-03-20

    With numerical simulations, we analyze in detail how the bad data removal, i.e., the mask effect, can influence the peak statistics of the weak-lensing convergence field reconstructed from the shear measurement of background galaxies. It is found that high peak fractions are systematically enhanced because of the presence of masks; the larger the masked area is, the higher the enhancement is. In the case where the total masked area is about 13% of the survey area, the fraction of peaks with signal-to-noise ratio ν ≥ 3 is ∼11% of the total number of peaks, compared with ∼7% of the mask-free case in our considered cosmological model. This can have significant effects on cosmological studies with weak-lensing convergence peak statistics, inducing a large bias in the parameter constraints if the effects are not taken into account properly. Even for a survey area of 9 deg{sup 2}, the bias in (Ω {sub m}, σ{sub 8}) is already intolerably large and close to 3σ. It is noted that most of the affected peaks are close to the masked regions. Therefore, excluding peaks in those regions in the peak statistics can reduce the bias effect but at the expense of losing usable survey areas. Further investigations find that the enhancement of the number of high peaks around the masked regions can be largely attributed to the smaller number of galaxies usable in the weak-lensing convergence reconstruction, leading to higher noise than that of the areas away from the masks. We thus develop a model in which we exclude only those very large masks with radius larger than 3' but keep all the other masked regions in peak counting statistics. For the remaining part, we treat the areas close to and away from the masked regions separately with different noise levels. It is shown that this two-noise-level model can account for the mask effect on peak statistics very well, and the bias in cosmological parameters is significantly reduced if this model is applied in the parameter fitting.

  19. Effects of kination and scalar-tensor cosmologies on sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Rehagen, Thomas; Gelmini, Graciela B. E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu

    2014-06-01

    We study the effects of kination and scalar-tensor pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmologies on the non-resonant production of sterile neutrinos. We show that if the peak of the production rate of sterile neutrinos occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, the relic number density of sterile neutrinos could be reduced with respect to the number expected in the standard cosmology. Consequently, current bounds on active-sterile neutrino mixing derived from the relic energy density of sterile neutrinos could be greatly relaxed. In particular, we show that the sterile neutrinos which could explain the anomalies found in short-baseline neutrino experiments are compatible with recent joint Planck upper limits on their contribution to the energy density of the Universe in a scalar-tensor or a low-reheating temperature pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmology.

  20. The Effect of Color Choice on Learner Interpretation of a Cosmology Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Zoe

    2013-01-01

    As we turn more and more to high-end computing to understand the Universe at cosmological scales, dynamic visualizations of simulations will take on a vital role as perceptual and cognitive tools. In collaboration with the Adler Planetarium and University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center (UC-HiPACC), I am interested in better…

  1. A First Estimate of Radio Halo Statistics from Large-scale Cosmological Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, P. M.; Ricker, P. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a first estimate based on a cosmological gas dynamics simulation of galaxy cluster radio halo counts to be expected in forthcoming low-frequency radio surveys. Our estimate is based on a FLASH simulation of the ΛCDM model for which we have assigned radio power to clusters via a model that relates radio emissivity to cluster magnetic field strength, intracluster turbulence, and density. We vary several free parameters of this model and find that radio halo number counts vary by up to a factor of two for average magnetic fields ranging from 0.2 to 3.1 μG. However, we predict significantly fewer low-frequency radio halos than expected from previous semi-analytic estimates, although this discrepancy could be explained by frequency-dependent radio halo probabilities as predicted in reacceleration models. We find that upcoming surveys will have difficulty in distinguishing models because of large uncertainties and low number counts. Additionally, according to our modeling we find that expected number counts can be degenerate with both reacceleration and hadronic secondary models of cosmic-ray generation. We find that relations between radio power and mass and X-ray luminosity may be used to distinguish models, and by building mock radio sky maps we demonstrate that surveys such as LOFAR may have sufficient resolution and sensitivity to break this model degeneracy by imaging many individual clusters.

  2. A FIRST ESTIMATE OF RADIO HALO STATISTICS FROM LARGE-SCALE COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, P. M.; Ricker, P. M. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu

    2012-11-10

    We present a first estimate based on a cosmological gas dynamics simulation of galaxy cluster radio halo counts to be expected in forthcoming low-frequency radio surveys. Our estimate is based on a FLASH simulation of the {Lambda}CDM model for which we have assigned radio power to clusters via a model that relates radio emissivity to cluster magnetic field strength, intracluster turbulence, and density. We vary several free parameters of this model and find that radio halo number counts vary by up to a factor of two for average magnetic fields ranging from 0.2 to 3.1 {mu}G. However, we predict significantly fewer low-frequency radio halos than expected from previous semi-analytic estimates, although this discrepancy could be explained by frequency-dependent radio halo probabilities as predicted in reacceleration models. We find that upcoming surveys will have difficulty in distinguishing models because of large uncertainties and low number counts. Additionally, according to our modeling we find that expected number counts can be degenerate with both reacceleration and hadronic secondary models of cosmic-ray generation. We find that relations between radio power and mass and X-ray luminosity may be used to distinguish models, and by building mock radio sky maps we demonstrate that surveys such as LOFAR may have sufficient resolution and sensitivity to break this model degeneracy by imaging many individual clusters.

  3. A THOUSAND SHADOWS OF ANDROMEDA: ROTATING PLANES OF SATELLITES IN THE MILLENNIUM-II COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Neil G.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Conn, Anthony; Elahi, Pascal; Arias, Veronica; Fernando, Nuwanthika

    2014-03-20

    In a recent contribution, Bahl and Baumgardt investigated the incidence of planar alignments of satellite galaxies in the Millennium-II simulation and concluded that vast, thin planes of dwarf galaxies, similar to that observed in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), occur frequently by chance in Λ-cold dark matter cosmology. However, their analysis did not capture the essential fact that the observed alignment is simultaneously radially extended, yet thin, and kinematically unusual. With the caveat that the Millennium-II simulation may not have sufficient mass resolution to identify confidently simulacra of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies, we re-examine that simulation for planar structures, using the same method as employed by Ibata et al. on the real M31 satellites. We find that 0.04% of host galaxies display satellite alignments that are at least as extreme as the observations, when we consider their extent, thickness, and number of members rotating in the same sense. We further investigate the angular momentum properties of the co-planar satellites, and find that the median of the specific angular momentum derived from the line-of-sight velocities in the real M31 structure (1.3 × 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} kpc) is very high compared to systems drawn from the simulations. This analysis confirms that it is highly unlikely that the observed structure around the Andromeda galaxy is due to a chance occurrence. Interestingly, the few extreme systems that are similar to M31 arise from the accretion of a massive sub-halo with its own spatially concentrated entourage of orphan satellites.

  4. A Thousand Shadows of Andromeda: Rotating Planes of Satellites in the Millennium-II Cosmological Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Ibata, Neil G.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Conn, Anthony; Elahi, Pascal; Arias, Veronica; Fernando, Nuwanthika

    2014-03-01

    In a recent contribution, Bahl & Baumgardt investigated the incidence of planar alignments of satellite galaxies in the Millennium-II simulation and concluded that vast, thin planes of dwarf galaxies, similar to that observed in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), occur frequently by chance in Λ-cold dark matter cosmology. However, their analysis did not capture the essential fact that the observed alignment is simultaneously radially extended, yet thin, and kinematically unusual. With the caveat that the Millennium-II simulation may not have sufficient mass resolution to identify confidently simulacra of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies, we re-examine that simulation for planar structures, using the same method as employed by Ibata et al. on the real M31 satellites. We find that 0.04% of host galaxies display satellite alignments that are at least as extreme as the observations, when we consider their extent, thickness, and number of members rotating in the same sense. We further investigate the angular momentum properties of the co-planar satellites, and find that the median of the specific angular momentum derived from the line-of-sight velocities in the real M31 structure (1.3 × 104 km s-1 kpc) is very high compared to systems drawn from the simulations. This analysis confirms that it is highly unlikely that the observed structure around the Andromeda galaxy is due to a chance occurrence. Interestingly, the few extreme systems that are similar to M31 arise from the accretion of a massive sub-halo with its own spatially concentrated entourage of orphan satellites.

  5. The formation of the brightest cluster galaxies in cosmological simulations: the case for active galactic nucleus feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Teyssier, Romain; Moore, Ben

    2012-03-01

    We use 500 pc resolution cosmological simulations of a Virgo-like galaxy cluster to study the properties of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) that forms at the centre of the halo. We compared two simulations; one incorporating only supernova feedback and a second that also includes prescriptions for black hole growth and the resulting active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback from gas accretion. As previous work has shown, with supernova feedback alone we are unable to reproduce any of the observed properties of massive cluster ellipticals. The resulting BCG rotates quickly, has a high Sérsic index, a strong mass excess in the centre and a total central density profile falling more steeply than isothermal. Furthermore, it is far too efficient at converting most of the available baryons into stars which is strongly constrained by abundance matching. With a treatment of black hole dynamics and AGN feedback the BCG properties are in good agreement with data: they rotate slowly, have a cored surface density profile, a flat or rising velocity dispersion profile and a low stellar mass fraction. The AGN provides a new mechanism to create cores in luminous elliptical galaxies; the core expands due to the combined effects of heating from dynamical friction of sinking massive black holes and AGN feedback that ejects gaseous material from the central regions.

  6. Gusty, gaseous flows of FIRE: galactic winds in cosmological simulations with explicit stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the galaxy-scale gaseous outflows from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. This suite of hydrodynamic cosmological zoom simulations resolves formation of star-forming giant molecular clouds to z = 0, and features an explicit stellar feedback model on small scales. Our simulations reveal that high-redshift galaxies undergo bursts of star formation followed by powerful gusts of galactic outflows that eject much of the interstellar medium and temporarily suppress star formation. At low redshift, however, sufficiently massive galaxies corresponding to L* progenitors develop stable discs and switch into a continuous and quiescent mode of star formation that does not drive outflows far into the halo. Mass-loading factors for winds in L* progenitors are η ≈ 10 at high redshift, but decrease to η ≪ 1 at low redshift. Although lower values of η are expected as haloes grow in mass over time, we show that the strong suppression of outflows with decreasing redshift cannot be explained by mass evolution alone. Circumgalactic outflow velocities are variable and broadly distributed, but typically range between one and three times the circular velocity of the halo. Much of the ejected material builds a reservoir of enriched gas within the circumgalactic medium, some of which could be later recycled to fuel further star formation. However, a fraction of the gas that leaves the virial radius through galactic winds is never regained, causing most haloes with mass Mh ≤ 1012 M⊙ to be deficient in baryons compared to the cosmic mean by z = 0.

  7. Diffuse Coronae in Cosmological Simulations of Milky Way-sized Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokołowska, A.; Mayer, L.; Babul, A.; Madau, P.; Shen, S.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the properties of halo gas using three cosmological “zoom-in” simulations of realistic Milky Way-galaxy analogs with varying sub-grid physics. In all three cases, the mass of hot (T > 106 K) halo gas is ˜1% of the host's virial mass. The X-ray luminosity of two of the runs is consistent with observations of the Milky Way, while the third simulation is X-ray bright and resembles more closely a very massive, star-forming spiral. Hot halos extend to 140 kpc from the galactic center and are surrounded by a bubble of warm-hot (T={10}5-{10}6 K) gas that extends to the virial radius. Simulated halos agree well outside 20-30 kpc with the β-model of Miller & Bregman based on O vii absorption and O viii emission measurements. Warm-hot and hot gas contribute up to 80% of the total gas reservoir, and contain nearly the same amount of baryons as the stellar component. The mass of warm-hot and hot components falls into the range estimated for {L}* galaxies. With key observational constraints on the density of the Milky Way corona being satisfied, we show that concealing of the ubiquitous warm-hot baryons, along with the ejection of just 20%-30% of the diffuse gas out of the potential wells by supernova-driven outflows, can solve the “missing baryon problem.” The recovered baryon fraction within 3 virial radii is 90% of the universal value. With a characteristic density of ˜10-4 cm-3 at 50-80 kpc, diffuse coronae meet the requirement for fast and complete ram-pressure stripping of the gas reservoirs in dwarf galaxy satellites.

  8. Why Color Matters: The Effect of Visual Cues on Learner's Interpretation of Dark Matter in a Cosmology Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Z.

    2013-04-01

    As we turn more and more to high-end computing to understand the Universe at cosmological scales, visualizations of simulations will take on a vital role as perceptual and cognitive tools. In collaboration with the Adler Planetarium and University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center (UC-HiPACC), I am interested in better understanding the use of visualizations to mediate astronomy learning across formal and informal settings. The aspect of my research that I present here uses quantitative methods to investigate how learners are relying on color to interpret dark matter in a cosmology visualization. The concept of dark matter is vital to our current understanding of the Universe, and yet we do not know how to effectively present dark matter visually to support learning. I employ an alternative treatment post-test only experimental design, in which members of an equivalent sample are randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups, followed by treatment and a post-test. Results indicate significant correlation (p < .05) between the color of dark matter in the visualization and survey responses, implying that aesthetic variations like color can have a profound effect on audience interpretation of a cosmology visualization.

  9. Growing the first bright quasars in cosmological simulations of structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2009-11-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the growth of massive black holes (BHs) at high redshifts subject to BH merger recoils from gravitational wave emission. As a promising host system of a powerful high-redshift quasar, we select the most massive dark matter halo at z = 6 from the Millennium simulation, and resimulate its formation at much higher resolution including gas physics and a model for BH seeding, growth and feedback. Assuming that the initial BH seeds are relatively massive, of the order of 105Msolar, and that seeding occurs around z ~ 15 in dark matter haloes of mass ~109-1010Msolar, we find that it is possible to build up supermassive BHs (SMBHs) by z = 6 that assemble most of their mass during extended Eddington-limited accretion periods. The properties of the simulated SMBHs are consistent with observations of z = 6 quasars in terms of the estimated BH masses and bolometric luminosities, the amount of star formation occurring within the host halo, and the presence of highly enriched gas in the innermost regions of the host galaxy. After a peak in the BH accretion rate at z = 6, the most massive BH has become sufficiently massive for the growth to enter into a much slower phase of feedback-regulated accretion. We extend our basic BH model by incorporating prescriptions for the BH recoils caused by gravitational wave emission during BH merger events, taking into account the newest numerical relativity simulations of merging BH binaries. In order to explore the full range of expected recoils and radiative efficiencies, we also consider models with spinning BHs. In the most `pessimistic' case where BH spins are initially high, we find that the growth of the SMBHs can be potentially hampered if they grow mostly in isolation and experience only a small number of mergers. On the other hand, whereas BH kicks can expel a substantial fraction of low-mass BHs, they do not significantly affect the build-up of the SMBHs. On the contrary, a

  10. HEAVY DUST OBSCURATION OF z = 7 GALAXIES IN A COSMOLOGICAL HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue

    2013-10-10

    Hubble Space Telescope observations with the Wide Field Camera 3/Infrared reveal that galaxies at z ∼ 7 have very blue ultraviolet (UV) colors, consistent with these systems being dominated by young stellar populations with moderate or little attenuation by dust. We investigate UV and optical properties of the high-z galaxies in the standard cold dark matter model using a high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. For this purpose, we perform panchromatic three-dimensional dust radiative transfer calculations on 198 galaxies of stellar mass 5 × 10{sup 8}-3 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} with three parameters: the dust-to-metal ratio, the extinction curve, and the fraction of directly escaped light from stars (f{sub esc}). Our stellar mass function is found to be in broad agreement with Gonzalez et al., independent of these parameters. We find that our heavily dust-attenuated galaxies (A{sub V} ∼ 1.8) can also reasonably match modest UV-optical colors, blue UV slopes, as well as UV luminosity functions, provided that a significant fraction (∼10%) of light directly escapes from them. The observed UV slope and scatter are better explained with a Small-Magellanic-Cloud-type extinction curve, whereas a Milky-Way-type curve also predicts blue UV colors due to the 2175 Å bump. We expect that upcoming observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array will be able to test this heavily obscured model.

  11. EMMA: an adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulation code with radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Dominique; Deparis, Nicolas; Ocvirk, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    EMMA is a cosmological simulation code aimed at investigating the reionization epoch. It handles simultaneously collisionless and gas dynamics, as well as radiative transfer physics using a moment-based description with the M1 approximation. Field quantities are stored and computed on an adaptive three-dimensional mesh and the spatial resolution can be dynamically modified based on physically motivated criteria. Physical processes can be coupled at all spatial and temporal scales. We also introduce a new and optional approximation to handle radiation: the light is transported at the resolution of the non-refined grid and only once the dynamics has been fully updated, whereas thermo-chemical processes are still tracked on the refined elements. Such an approximation reduces the overheads induced by the treatment of radiation physics. A suite of standard tests are presented and passed by EMMA, providing a validation for its future use in studies of the reionization epoch. The code is parallel and is able to use graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations. Depending on the optimizations and the compilers used to generate the CPU reference, global GPU acceleration factors between ×3.9 and ×16.9 can be obtained. Vectorization and transfer operations currently prevent better GPU performance and we expect that future optimizations and hardware evolution will lead to greater accelerations.

  12. Cosmological and wormhole solutions in low-energy effective string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cadoni, M. INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Via Ada Negri 18, I---09127 Cagliari ); Cavaglia, M. INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Via Ada Negri 18, I-09127 Cagliari )

    1994-11-15

    We derive and study a class of cosmological and wormhole solutions of low-energy effective string field theory. We consider a general four-dimensional string effective action where moduli of the compactified manifold and the electromagnetic field are present. The cosmological solutions of the two-dimensional effective theory obtained by dimensional reduction of the former are discussed. In particular we demonstrate that the two-dimensional theory possesses a scale-factor duality invariance. Eucidean four-dimensional instantons describing the nucleation of the baby universes are found and the probability amplitude for the nucleation process given.

  13. Toward physical cosmology: focus on inhomogeneous geometry and its non-perturbative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    We outline the key steps toward the construction of a physical, fully relativistic cosmology. The influence of inhomogeneities on the effective evolution history of the Universe is encoded in backreaction terms and expressed through spatially averaged geometrical invariants. These are absent and potential candidates for the missing dark sources in the standard model. Since they can be interpreted as energies of an emerging scalar field (the morphon), we are in a position to propose a strategy of how phenomenological scalar field models for dark energy, dark matter and inflation, that are usually added as fundamental sources to a homogeneous-geometry (FLRW) cosmology, can be potentially traced back to the inhomogeneous geometrical properties of space and its embedding into spacetime. We lay down a line of arguments that is—thus far only qualitatively—conclusive, and we address open problems of quantitative nature, related to the interpretation of observations. We discuss within a covariant framework (i) the foliation problem and invariant definitions of backreaction effects; (ii) the background problem and the notion of an effective cosmology; (iii) generalizations of the cosmological principle and generalizations of the cosmological equations; (iv) dark energies as energies of an effective scalar field; (v) the global gravitational instability of the standard model and basins of attraction for effective states; (vi) multiscale cosmological models and volume acceleration; (vii) effective metrics and strategies for effective distance measurements on the light cone, including observational predictions; (viii) examples of non-perturbative models, including explicit backreaction models for the LTB solution, extrapolations of the relativistic Lagrangian perturbation theory and scalar metric inhomogeneities. The role of scalar metric perturbations is critically examined and embedded into the non-perturbative framework.

  14. COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTER RADIO RELICS: INSIGHTS AND WARNINGS FOR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Skillman, Samuel W.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Xu, Hao; Li, Hui; Collins, David C.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Norman, Michael L.

    2013-03-01

    Non-thermal radio emission from cosmic-ray electrons in the vicinity of merging galaxy clusters is an important tracer of cluster merger activity, and is the result of complex physical processes that involve magnetic fields, particle acceleration, gas dynamics, and radiation. In particular, objects known as radio relics are thought to be the result of shock-accelerated electrons that, when embedded in a magnetic field, emit synchrotron radiation in the radio wavelengths. In order to properly model this emission, we utilize the adaptive mesh refinement simulation of the magnetohydrodynamic evolution of a galaxy cluster from cosmological initial conditions. We locate shock fronts and apply models of cosmic-ray electron acceleration that are then input into radio emission models. We have determined the thermodynamic properties of this radio-emitting plasma and constructed synthetic radio observations to compare observed galaxy clusters. We find a significant dependence of the observed morphology and radio relic properties on the viewing angle of the cluster, raising concerns regarding the interpretation of observed radio features in clusters. We also find that a given shock should not be characterized by a single Mach number. We find that the bulk of the radio emission comes from gas with T > 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, {rho} {approx} 10{sup -28}-10{sup -27} g cm{sup -3}, with magnetic field strengths of 0.1-1.0 {mu}G, and shock Mach numbers of M {approx} 3-6. We present an analysis of the radio spectral index which suggests that the spatial variation of the spectral index can mimic synchrotron aging. Finally, we examine the polarization fraction and position angle of the simulated radio features, and compare to observations.

  15. Conducting Effective Simulator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerling, Kenneth D.

    This paper describes the simulator phase of Commonwealth Edison's program for training and licensing operators of nuclear power stations. Topics covered include (1) preparing the students before starting the simulator phase; (2) the simulator schedule and the number of students that can be trained effectively in a class; (3) format and structure…

  16. Sowing Black Hole Seeds: Forming Direct Collapse Black Holes With Realistic Lyman-Werner Radiation Fields in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Dunn, Glenna; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars detected at redshifts z > 6 require that the first black holes form early and grow to ~109 solar masses within one Gyr. Our work uses cosmological simulations to study the formation and early growth of direct collapse black holes. In the pre-reionization epoch, molecular hydrogen (H2) causes gas to fragment and form Population III stars, but Lyman-Werner radiation can suppress H2 formation and allow gas to collapse directly into a massive black hole. The critical flux required to inhibit H2 formation, Jcrit, is hotly debated, largely due to the uncertainties in the source radiation spectrum, H2 self-shielding, and collisional dissociation rates. Here, we test the power of the direct collapse model in a non-uniform Lyman-Werner radiation field, using an updated version of the SPH+N-body tree code Gasoline with H2 non-equilibrium abundance tracking, H2 cooling, and a modern SPH implementation. We vary Jcrit from 30 to 104 J21 to study the effect on seed black holes, focusing on black hole formation as a function of environment, halo mass, metallicity, and proximity of the Lyman-Werner source. We discuss the constraints on massive black hole occupation fraction in the quasar epoch, and implications for reionization, high-redshift X-ray background radiation, and gravitational waves.

  17. A complementary gravitational N-body simulation algorithm for investigation of chaotic advection in astrophysical and cosmological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Reinaldo

    The gravitational N-body simulations have become a powerful tool for testing the theories of structure formation in astrophysical and cosmological systems. In particular, it has been shown that the statistical characterization of dark matter distribution is an important ingredient in the investigation of large-scale structure formation in the Hubble volume simulated from the GADGET-VC algorithm. Recently, an established statistical method was used to demonstrate the importance of considering chaotic advection (or Lagrange Turbulence) [1] in combination with gravitational instabilities in the Λ-CDM simulations performed from the Virgo Consortium (VC) [2]. Working as a complementary tool of the GADGET-VC algorithm, the LAC-INPE and the IC-UFF develop the COsmic LAgrangian TUrbulence Simulator (COLATUS) to perform gravitational N-body simulations allowing the computation of the velocity directional angle of a single particle at every time-step and then the evaluation of its energy power spectrum. To achieve its objective COLATUS compute the gravitational forces by using a direct summation scheme. COLATUS is implemented in a Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) by using the Nvidia graphics processing units (GPUs) to reduce the simulation runtime. We use the simulator for testing a hypothesis of an alternative cosmological scenario where the dark matter is interpreted as spatio-temporal deformations due to an alternative coupled expanding universe [3]. These deformations are included as the action of relativistic potentials. In the present work we show the preliminary simulations including up to 10(6) particles using 1536 cores of NVIDIA GTX680. The respective energy power spectra are shown for several deformation potentials which are discussed into the alternative inhomogeneous cosmological context. [1] Caretta, C.A. et al. Evidence of turbulence-like universality in the formation of galaxy-sized dark matter haloes. Astron. Astrophys 487 (2008) 445-451. [2] Rosa

  18. THE FATE OF DWARF GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AND THE ORIGIN OF INTRACLUSTER STARS. II. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Hugo; Barai, Paramita; Brito, William

    2012-09-20

    We combine an N-body simulation algorithm with a subgrid treatment of galaxy formation, mergers, and tidal destruction, and an observed conditional luminosity function {Phi}(L|M), to study the origin and evolution of galactic and extragalactic light inside a cosmological volume of size (100 Mpc){sup 3}, in a concordance {Lambda}CDM model. This algorithm simulates the growth of large-scale structures and the formation of clusters, the evolution of the galaxy population in clusters, the destruction of galaxies by mergers and tides, and the evolution of the intracluster light (ICL). We find that destruction of galaxies by mergers dominates over destruction by tides by about an order of magnitude at all redshifts. However, tidal destruction is sufficient to produce ICL fractions f{sub ICL} that are sufficiently high to match observations. Our simulation produces 18 massive clusters (M{sub cl} > 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) with values of f{sub ICL} ranging from 1% to 58% at z = 0. There is a weak trend of f{sub ICL} to increase with cluster mass. The bulk of the ICL ({approx}60%) is provided by intermediate galaxies of total masses 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} and stellar masses 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} that were tidally destroyed by even more massive galaxies. The contribution of low-mass galaxies to the ICL is small and the contribution of dwarf galaxies is negligible, even though, by numbers, most galaxies that are tidally destroyed are dwarfs. Tracking clusters back in time, we find that their values of f{sub ICL} tend to increase over time, but can experience sudden changes that are sometimes non-monotonic. These changes occur during major mergers involving clusters of comparable masses but very different intracluster luminosities. Most of the tidal destruction events take place in the central regions of clusters. As a result, the ICL is more centrally concentrated than the galactic light. Our results

  19. A novel approach for accurate radiative transfer in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Margarita; Springel, Volker

    2011-08-01

    accurately deal with non-equilibrium effects. We discuss several tests of the new method, including shadowing configurations in two and three dimensions, ionized sphere expansion in static and dynamic density fields and the ionization of a cosmological density field. The tests agree favourably with analytical expectations and results based on other numerical radiative transfer approximations.

  20. Effects of the cosmological constant on cold dark matter clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membrado, M.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Cold dark matter inhomogeneities are considered in a homogeneous background of matter, radiation, and the cosmological constant in a flat universe. Aims: We investigate the influence of the cosmological constant on the non-linear collapse of cold dark matter clusters. Methods: For simplicity, a spherical infall model has been used to describe the collapse of non-relativistic mass shells; besides, an average distribution of density around a cluster of galaxies has been taken. Boundary conditions are imposed by the solution of the linearized equation for the growth of matter perturbations and by the cold dark matter power spectrum. Results: For an average cluster, the radii of shells and masses enclosed by them have been obtained at their zero proper acceleration (ZA) redshifts, at their turn-around (TA) redshifts and at their virialization (VIR) redshifts. According to our results at present, the shell that reaches its turn-around point shows [rTA] 0 = 6.85 Mpc and [ℳTA] 0 = 6.76 × 1014 ℳ⊙. The virializing shell fulfills [rTA] 0 = 4.57 [rVIR] 0 and [ℳTA] 0 = 1.95 [ℳVIR] 0. These results differ appreciably from those derived from a model with cosmological constant equal to zero in a flat universe: [rTA(Λ = 0)] 0 = 6.62 [rVIR(Λ = 0)] 0 and [ℳTA(Λ = 0)] 0 = 5.26 [ℳVIR(Λ = 0)] 0; this discrepancy could be considered as a new independent proof of the existence of dark energy. The shell with zero proper acceleration presents [rZA] 0 = 1.59 [rTA] 0 and [ℳZA] 0 = 1.63 [ℳTA] 0. We have found that there is a limit to the mass of the average cluster, which is able to virialize; its value is { ℳVIR } MAX = 8.1 × 1014 M⊙. As expected, we found that shells present null proper acceleration at redshift values that are smaller than 0.755. Conclusions: We have noticed that the cosmological constant imposes an upper limit for the mass enclosed by shells, which are able to reach zero proper velocity. Hence, this mass is the maximum mass of the

  1. FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES FROM COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cen Renyue

    2011-12-15

    Utilizing state-of-the-art adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with ultra-high resolution (114 h{sup -1} pc) and a large sample size ({>=}3300 galaxies of stellar mass {>=}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }), we show how the stellar light of Lyman break galaxies at z = 2 is distributed between optical/ultraviolet (UV) and far-infrared (FIR) bands. With a single scalar parameter for dust obscuration we can simultaneously reproduce the observed UV luminosity function for the entire range (3-100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) and extant FIR luminosity function at the bright end ({>=}20 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). We quantify that galaxies more massive or having higher star formation rate (SFR) tend to have larger amounts of dust obscuration mostly due to a trend in column density and in a minor part due to a mass (or SFR)-metallicity relation. It is predicted that the FIR luminosity function in the range SFR = 1-100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} is a power law with a slope of about -1.7. We further predict that there is a 'galaxy desert' at SFR{sub FIR} < 0.02(SFR{sub UV}/10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}){sup 2.1} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} in the SFR{sub UV} - SFR{sub FIR} plane. Detailed distributions of SFR{sub FIR} at a fixed SFR{sub UV} are presented. Upcoming observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array should test this model. If confirmed, it validates the predictions of the standard cold dark matter model and has important implications on the intrinsic SFR function of galaxies at high redshift.

  2. Dimensionless cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, Ali; Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas

    2012-10-01

    Although it is well known that any consideration of the variations of fundamental constants should be restricted to their dimensionless combinations, the literature on variations of the gravitational constant G is entirely dimensionfull. To illustrate applications of this to cosmology, we explicitly give a dimensionless version of the parameters of the standard cosmological model, and describe the physics of both Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and recombination in a dimensionless manner. Rigorously determining how to talk about the model in a way which avoids physical dimensions is a requirement for proceeding with a calculation to constrain time-varying fundamental constants. The issue that appears to have been missed in many studies is that in cosmology the strength of gravity is bound up in the cosmological equations, and the epoch at which we live is a crucial part of the model. We argue that it is useful to consider the hypothetical situation of communicating with another civilization (with entirely different units), comparing only dimensionless constants, in order to decide if we live in a Universe governed by precisely the same physical laws. In this thought experiment, we would also have to compare epochs, which can be defined by giving the value of any one of the evolving cosmological parameters. By setting things up carefully in this way one can avoid inconsistent results when considering variable constants, caused by effectively fixing more than one parameter today. We show examples of this effect by considering microwave background anisotropies, being careful to maintain dimensionlessness throughout. We present Fisher matrix calculations to estimate how well the fine structure constants for electromagnetism and gravity can be determined with future microwave background experiments. We highlight how one can be misled by simply adding G to the usual cosmological parameter set.

  3. Effective matter cosmologies of massive gravity I: non-physical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Yılmaz, Nejat Tevfik

    2014-08-01

    For the massive gravity, after decoupling from the metric equation we find a broad class of solutions of the Stückelberg sector by solving the background metric in the presence of a diagonal physical metric. We then construct the dynamics of the corresponding FLRW cosmologies which inherit effective matter contribution through the decoupling solution mechanism of the scalar sector.

  4. On the origin of the Hubble sequence: I. Insights on galaxy color migration from cosmological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-01-20

    An analysis of more than 3000 galaxies resolved at better than 114 h{sup –1} pc at z = 0.62 in a 'LAOZI' cosmological adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic simulation is performed and insights are gained on star formation quenching and color migration. The vast majority of red galaxies are found to be within three virial radii of a larger galaxy at the onset of quenching, when the specific star formation rate experiences the sharpest decline to fall below ∼10{sup –2}-10{sup –1} Gyr{sup –1} (depending on the redshift). Thus, we shall call this mechanism 'environment quenching', which encompasses satellite quenching. Two physical processes are largely responsible: Ram pressure stripping first disconnects the galaxy from the cold gas supply on large scales, followed by a longer period of cold gas starvation taking place in a high velocity-dispersion environment, in which during the early part of the process, the existing dense cold gas in the central region (≤10 kpc) is consumed by in situ star formation. On average, quenching is found to be more efficient (i.e., a larger fraction of galaxies being quenched) but not faster (i.e., the duration being weakly dependent on the environment) in a denser environment. Throughout this quenching period and the ensuing one in the red sequence, galaxies follow nearly vertical tracks in the color-stellar mass diagram. In contrast, individual galaxies of all masses grow most of their stellar masses in the blue cloud, prior to the onset of quenching, and progressively more massive blue galaxies with already relatively older mean stellar ages continue to enter the red sequence. Consequently, correlations among observables of red galaxies—such as the age-mass relation— are largely inherited from their blue progenitors at the onset of quenching. While the color makeup of the entire galaxy population strongly depends on the environment, which is a direct result of environment quenching, physical properties of blue

  5. On the Origin of the Hubble Sequence: I. Insights on Galaxy Color Migration from Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of more than 3000 galaxies resolved at better than 114 h-1 pc at z = 0.62 in a "LAOZI" cosmological adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic simulation is performed and insights are gained on star formation quenching and color migration. The vast majority of red galaxies are found to be within three virial radii of a larger galaxy at the onset of quenching, when the specific star formation rate experiences the sharpest decline to fall below ~10-2-10-1 Gyr-1 (depending on the redshift). Thus, we shall call this mechanism "environment quenching," which encompasses satellite quenching. Two physical processes are largely responsible: Ram pressure stripping first disconnects the galaxy from the cold gas supply on large scales, followed by a longer period of cold gas starvation taking place in a high velocity-dispersion environment, in which during the early part of the process, the existing dense cold gas in the central region (<=10 kpc) is consumed by in situ star formation. On average, quenching is found to be more efficient (i.e., a larger fraction of galaxies being quenched) but not faster (i.e., the duration being weakly dependent on the environment) in a denser environment. Throughout this quenching period and the ensuing one in the red sequence, galaxies follow nearly vertical tracks in the color-stellar mass diagram. In contrast, individual galaxies of all masses grow most of their stellar masses in the blue cloud, prior to the onset of quenching, and progressively more massive blue galaxies with already relatively older mean stellar ages continue to enter the red sequence. Consequently, correlations among observables of red galaxies—such as the age-mass relation— are largely inherited from their blue progenitors at the onset of quenching. While the color makeup of the entire galaxy population strongly depends on the environment, which is a direct result of environment quenching, physical properties of blue galaxies as a subpopulation show little

  6. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Cosmological Simulations of Cosmic Rays in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Samuel William

    2013-12-01

    Galaxy clusters are unique astrophysical laboratories that contain many thermal and non-thermal phenomena. In particular, they are hosts to cosmic shocks, which propagate through the intracluster medium as a by-product of structure formation. It is believed that at these shock fronts, magnetic field inhomogeneities in a compressing flow may lead to the acceleration of cosmic ray electrons and ions. These relativistic particles decay and radiate through a variety of mechanisms, and have observational signatures in radio, hard X-ray, and Gamma-ray wavelengths. We begin this dissertation by developing a method to find shocks in cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulations of structure formation. After describing the evolution of shock properties through cosmic time, we make estimates for the amount of kinetic energy processed and the total number of cosmic ray protons that could be accelerated at these shocks. We then use this method of shock finding and a model for the acceleration of and radio synchrotron emission from cosmic ray electrons to estimate the radio emission properties in large scale structures. By examining the time-evolution of the radio emission with respect to the X-ray emission during a galaxy cluster merger, we find that the relative timing of the enhancements in each are important consequences of the shock dynamics. By calculating the radio emission expected from a given mass galaxy cluster, we make estimates for future large-area radio surveys. Next, we use a state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamic simulation to follow the electron acceleration in a massive merging galaxy cluster. We use the magnetic field information to calculate not only the total radio emission, but also create radio polarization maps that are compared to recent observations. We find that we can naturally reproduce Mpc-scale radio emission that resemble many of the known double radio relic systems. Finally, motivated by our previous studies, we develop and introduce a

  7. UNDERSTANDING BLACK HOLE MASS ASSEMBLY VIA ACCRETION AND MERGERS AT LATE TIMES IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kulier, Andrea; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Lackner, Claire N.; Cen, Renyue; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2015-02-01

    Accretion is thought to primarily contribute to the mass accumulation history of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) throughout cosmic time. While this may be true at high redshifts, at lower redshifts and for the most massive black holes (BHs) mergers themselves might add significantly to the mass budget. We explore this in two disparate environments—a massive cluster and a void region. We evolve SMBHs from 4 > z > 0 using merger trees derived from hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of these two regions, scaled to the observed value of the stellar mass fraction to account for overcooling. Mass gains from gas accretion proportional to bulge growth and BH-BH mergers are tracked, as are BHs that remain ''orbiting'' due to insufficient dynamical friction in a merger remnant, as well as those that are ejected due to gravitational recoil. We find that gas accretion remains the dominant source of mass accumulation in almost all SMBHs; mergers contribute 2.5% ± 0.1% for all SMBHs in the cluster and 1.0% ± 0.1% in the void since z = 4. However, mergers are significant for massive SMBHs. The fraction of mass accumulated from mergers for central BHs generally increases for larger values of the host bulge mass: in the void, the fraction is 2% at M {sub *,} {sub bul} = 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, increasing to 4% at M {sub *,} {sub bul} ≳ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, and in the cluster it is 4% at M {sub *,} {sub bul} = 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} and 23% at 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}. We also find that the total mass in orbiting SMBHs is negligible in the void, but significant in the cluster, in which a potentially detectable 40% of SMBHs and ≈8% of the total SMBH mass (where the total includes central, orbiting, and ejected SMBHs) is found orbiting at z = 0. The existence of orbiting and ejected SMBHs requires modification of the Soltan argument. We estimate this correction to the integrated accreted mass density of SMBHs to be in the range 6%-21%, with a mean value of 11% ± 3

  8. A statistical representation of the cosmological constant from finite size effects at the apparent horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaggiu, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a statistical description of the cosmological constant in terms of massless bosons (gravitons). To this purpose, we use our recent results implying a non vanishing temperature {T_{Λ }} for the cosmological constant. In particular, we found that a non vanishing T_{Λ } allows us to depict the cosmological constant Λ as composed of elementary oscillations of massless bosons of energy hbar ω by means of the Bose-Einstein distribution. In this context, as happens for photons in a medium, the effective phase velocity v_g of these massless excitations is not given by the speed of light c but it is suppressed by a factor depending on the number of quanta present in the universe at the apparent horizon. We found interesting formulas relating the cosmological constant, the number of quanta N and the mean value overline{λ } of the wavelength of the gravitons. In this context, we study the possibility to look to the gravitons system so obtained as being very near to be a Bose-Einstein condensate. Finally, an attempt is done to write down the Friedmann flat equations in terms of N and overline{λ }.

  9. Cosmological Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wan Yan

    2008-11-01

    In this thesis we focus on studying the physics of cosmological recombination and how the details of recombination affect the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We present a detailed calculation of the spectral line distortions on the CMB spectrum arising from the Lyman-alpha and the lowest two-photon transitions in the recombination of hydrogen (H), and the corresponding lines from helium (He). The peak of these distortions mainly comes from the Lyman-alpha transition and occurs at about 170 microns, which is the Wien part of the CMB. The major theoretical limitation for extracting cosmological parameters from the CMB sky lies in the precision with which we can calculate the cosmological recombination process. With this motivation, we perform a multi-level calculation of the recombination of H and He with the addition of the spin-forbidden transition for neutral helium (He I), plus the higher order two-photon transitions for H and among singlet states of He I. We find that the inclusion of the spin-forbidden transition results in more than a percent change in the ionization fraction, while the other transitions give much smaller effects. Last we modify RECFAST by introducing one more parameter to reproduce recent numerical results for the speed-up of helium recombination. Together with the existing hydrogen `fudge factor', we vary these two parameters to account for the remaining dominant uncertainties in cosmological recombination. By using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method with Planck forecast data, we find that we need to determine the parameters to better than 10% for He I and 1% for H, in order to obtain negligible effects on the cosmological parameters.

  10. EvoL: the new Padova Tree-SPH parallel code for cosmological simulations. I. Basic code: gravity and hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Buonomo, U.; Grassi, T.; Piovan, L.; Chiosi, C.

    2010-04-01

    Context. We present the new release of the Padova N-body code for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation and evolution, EvoL. The basic Tree + SPH code is presented and analysed, together with an overview of the software architectures. Aims: EvoL is a flexible parallel Fortran95 code, specifically designed for simulations of cosmological structure formations on cluster, galactic and sub-galactic scales. Methods: EvoL is a fully Lagrangian self-adaptive code, based on the classical oct-tree by Barnes & Hut (1986, Nature, 324, 446) and on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics algorithm (SPH, Lucy 1977, AJ, 82, 1013). It includes special features like adaptive softening lengths with correcting extra-terms, and modern formulations of SPH and artificial viscosity. It is designed to be run in parallel on multiple CPUs to optimise the performance and save computational time. Results: We describe the code in detail, and present the results of a number of standard hydrodynamical tests.

  11. Non-singular bounce scenarios in loop quantum cosmology and the effective field description

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Wilson-Ewing, Edward E-mail: wilson-ewing@phys.lsu.edu

    2014-03-01

    A non-singular bouncing cosmology is generically obtained in loop quantum cosmology due to non-perturbative quantum gravity effects. A similar picture can be achieved in standard general relativity in the presence of a scalar field with a non-standard kinetic term such that at high energy densities the field evolves into a ghost condensate and causes a non-singular bounce. During the bouncing phase, the perturbations can be stabilized by introducing a Horndeski operator. Taking the matter content to be a dust field and an ekpyrotic scalar field, we compare the dynamics in loop quantum cosmology and in a non-singular bouncing effective field model with a non-standard kinetic term at both the background and perturbative levels. We find that these two settings share many important properties, including the result that they both generate scale-invariant scalar perturbations. This shows that some quantum gravity effects of the very early universe may be mimicked by effective field models.

  12. Unified cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.M. Department of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul )

    1990-04-15

    Recently a unified cosmology was proposed as a higher-dimensional generalization of the standard big-bang cosmology. In this paper we discuss its foundation, characteristics, and possible cosmological solutions in detail. In particular we discuss how the missing-mass problem, the horizon problem, and the flatness problem of the standard model can be resolved within the context of this unified cosmology.

  13. Astrophysical cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe. 47 refs.

  14. Cosmological panspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Hoyle, Fred

    1998-07-01

    The central regions of galaxies could provide the most promising venues for the large-scale synthesis of prebiotic molecules by Miller-Urey type processes.Exploding supermassive stars would produce the basic chemical elements necessary to form molecules in high-density mass flows under near-thermodynamic conditions. Such molecules are then acted upon by X-rays in a manner that simulates the conditions required for Miller-Urey type processing. The Miller-Urey molecular products could initially lead to the origination and dispersal of microbial life on a cosmological scale. Thereafter the continuing production of such molecules would serve as the feedstock of life.

  15. Hořava Gravity in the Effective Field Theory formalism: From cosmology to observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frusciante, Noemi; Raveri, Marco; Vernieri, Daniele; Hu, Bin; Silvestri, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    We consider Hořava gravity within the framework of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark energy and modified gravity. We work out a complete mapping of the theory into the EFT language for an action including all the operators which are relevant for linear perturbations with up to sixth order spatial derivatives. We then employ an updated version of the EFTCAMB/EFTCosmoMC package to study the cosmology of the low-energy limit of Hořava gravity and place constraints on its parameters using several cosmological data sets. In particular we use cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature-temperature and lensing power spectra by Planck 2013, WMAP low- ℓ polarization spectra, WiggleZ galaxy power spectrum, local Hubble measurements, Supernovae data from SNLS, SDSS and HST and the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements from BOSS, SDSS and 6dFGS. We get improved upper bounds, with respect to those from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, on the deviation of the cosmological gravitational constant from the local Newtonian one. At the level of the background phenomenology, we find a relevant rescaling of the Hubble rate at all epoch, which has a strong impact on the cosmological observables; at the level of perturbations, we discuss in details all the relevant effects on the observables and find that in general the quasi-static approximation is not safe to describe the evolution of perturbations. Overall we find that the effects of the modifications induced by the low-energy Hořava gravity action are quite dramatic and current data place tight bounds on the theory parameters.

  16. Large-scale structure and integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in decaying vacuum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velten, H.; Borges, H. A.; Carneiro, S.; Fazolo, R.; Gomes, S.

    2015-09-01

    The concordance particle creation model - a class of Λ(t) Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmologies - is studied using large-scale structure (LSS) formation, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. The evolution of the gravitational potential and the amplitude of the cross-correlation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal with LSS surveys are calculated in detail. We properly include in our analysis the peculiarities involving the baryonic dynamics of the Λ(t)CDM model which were not included in previous works. Although both the Λ(t)CDM and the standard cosmology are in agreement with available data for the CMB-LSS correlation, the former presents a slightly higher signal which can be identified with future data.

  17. Cosmology with galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies are powerful probes to constrain parameters that describe the cosmological models and to distinguish among different models. Since, the evolution of the cluster mass function and large-scale clustering contain the informations about the linear growth rate of perturbations and the expansion history of the Universe, clusters have played an important role in establishing the current cosmological paradigm. It is crucial to know how to determine the cluster mass from observational quantities when using clusters as cosmological tools. For this, numerical simulations are helpful to define and study robust cluster mass proxies that have minimal and well understood scatter across the mass and redshift ranges of interest. Additionally, the bias in cluster mass determination can be constrained via observations of the strong and weak lensing effect, X-ray emission, the Sunyaev- Zel’dovic effect, and the dynamics of galaxies.A major advantage of X-ray surveys is that the observable-mass relation is tight. Moreover, clusters can be easily identified in X-ray as continuous, extended sources. As of today, interesting cosmological constraints have been obtained from relatively small cluster samples (~102), X-ray selected by the ROSAT satellite over a wide redshift range (0105 clusters with photometric redshifts from multi-band optical surveys (e.g. PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST). This will vastly improve upon current cosmological constraints, especially by the synergy with other cluster surveys that

  18. Axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, David J. E.

    2016-07-01

    Axions comprise a broad class of particles that can play a major role in explaining the unknown aspects of cosmology. They are also well-motivated within high energy physics, appearing in theories related to CP-violation in the standard model, supersymmetric theories, and theories with extra-dimensions, including string theory, and so axion cosmology offers us a unique view onto these theories. I review the motivation and models for axions in particle physics and string theory. I then present a comprehensive and pedagogical view on the cosmology and astrophysics of axion-like particles, starting from inflation and progressing via BBN, the CMB, reionization and structure formation, up to the present-day Universe. Topics covered include: axion dark matter (DM); direct and indirect detection of axions, reviewing existing and future experiments; axions as dark radiation; axions and the cosmological constant problem; decays of heavy axions; axions and stellar astrophysics; black hole superradiance; axions and astrophysical magnetic fields; axion inflation, and axion DM as an indirect probe of inflation. A major focus is on the population of ultralight axions created via vacuum realignment, and its role as a DM candidate with distinctive phenomenology. Cosmological observations place robust constraints on the axion mass and relic density in this scenario, and I review where such constraints come from. I next cover aspects of galaxy formation with axion DM, and ways this can be used to further search for evidence of axions. An absolute lower bound on DM particle mass is established. It is ma > 10-24eV from linear observables, extending to ma ≳ 10-22eV from non-linear observables, and has the potential to reach ma ≳ 10-18eV in the future. These bounds are weaker if the axion is not all of the DM, giving rise to limits on the relic density at low mass. This leads to the exciting possibility that the effects of axion DM on structure formation could one day be detected

  19. Spiral-induced velocity and metallicity patterns in a cosmological zoom simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Springel, Volker; Kawata, Daisuke; Minchev, Ivan; Sánchez-Blázquez, Patricia; Gómez, Facundo A.; Marinacci, Federico; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Campbell, David J. R.

    2016-07-01

    We use a high-resolution cosmological zoom simulation of a Milky Way-sized halo to study the observable features in velocity and metallicity space associated with the dynamical influence of spiral arms. For the first time, we demonstrate that spiral arms, that form in a disc in a fully cosmological environment with realistic galaxy formation physics, drive large-scale systematic streaming motions. In particular, on the trailing edge of the spiral arms the peculiar galactocentric radial and azimuthal velocity field is directed radially outward and azimuthally backward, whereas it is radially inward and azimuthally forward on the leading edge. Owing to the negative radial metallicity gradient, this systematic motion drives, at a given radius, an azimuthal variation in the residual metallicity that is characterized by a metal-rich trailing edge and a metal-poor leading edge. We show that these signatures are theoretically observable in external galaxies with integral field unit instruments such as VLT/MUSE, and if detected, would provide evidence for large-scale systematic radial migration driven by spiral arms.

  20. How does our choice of observable influence our estimation of the centre of a galaxy cluster? Insights from cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiguang; Power, Chris; Biffi, Veronica; Borgani, Stefano; Murante, Giuseppe; Fabjan, Dunja; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Poole, Greg B.

    2016-03-01

    Galaxy clusters are an established and powerful test-bed for theories of both galaxy evolution and cosmology. Accurate interpretation of cluster observations often requires robust identification of the location of the centre. Using a statistical sample of clusters drawn from a suite of cosmological simulations in which we have explored a range of galaxy formation models, we investigate how the location of this centre is affected by the choice of observable - stars, hot gas, or the full mass distribution as can be probed by the gravitational potential. We explore several measures of cluster centre: the minimum of the gravitational potential, which would expect to define the centre if the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium; the peak of the density; the centre of brightest cluster galaxy (BCG); and the peak and centroid of X-ray luminosity. We find that the centre of BCG correlates more strongly with the minimum of the gravitational potential than the X-ray defined centres, while active galactic nuclei feedback acts to significantly enhance the offset between the peak X-ray luminosity and minimum gravitational potential. These results highlight the importance of centre identification when interpreting clusters observations, in particular when comparing theoretical predictions and observational data.

  1. Neutrinos in Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2008-01-24

    I give an overview of the effects of neutrinos on cosmology, focussing in particular on the role played by neutrinos in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. I discuss how recent observations of the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale structure of galaxies can probe neutrino masses with greater precision than current laboratory experiments. I describe several new techniques that will be used to probe cosmology in the future.

  2. The velocity field in MOND cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    The recently developed code for N-body/hydrodynamics simulations in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), known as RAYMOND, is used to investigate the consequences of MOND on structure formation in a cosmological context, with a particular focus on the velocity field. This preliminary study investigates the results obtained with the two formulations of MOND implemented in RAYMOND, as well as considering the effects of changing the choice of MOND interpolation function, and the cosmological evolution of the MOND acceleration scale. The simulations are contrived such that structure forms in a background cosmology that is similar to Λcold dark matter, but with a significantly lower matter content. Given this, and the fact that a fully consistent MOND cosmology is still lacking, we compare our results with a standard ΛCDM simulation, rather than observations. As well as demonstrating the effectiveness of using RAYMOND for cosmological simulations, it is shown that a significant enhancement of the velocity field is likely an unavoidable consequence of the gravitational modification implemented in MOND, and may represent a clear observational signature of such a modification. It is further suggested that such a signal may be clearest in intermediate-density regions such as cluster outskirts and filaments.

  3. The velocity field in MOND cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    The recently developed code for N-body/hydrodynamics simulations in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), known as RAyMOND, is used to investigate the consequences of MOND on structure formation in a cosmological context, with a particular focus on the velocity field. This preliminary study investigates the results obtained with the two formulations of MOND implemented in RAyMOND, as well as considering the effects of changing the choice of MOND interpolation function, and the cosmological evolution of the MOND acceleration scale. The simulations are contrived such that structure forms in a background cosmology that is similar to $\\Lambda$CDM, but with a significantly lower matter content. Given this, and the fact that a fully consistent MOND cosmology is still lacking, we compare our results with a standard $\\Lambda$CDM simulation, rather than observations. As well as demonstrating the effectiveness of using RAyMOND for cosmological simulations, it is shown that a significant enhancement of the velocity field is likely an unavoidable consequence of the gravitational modification implemented in MOND, and may represent a clear observational signature of such a modification. It is further suggested that such a signal may be clearest in intermediate density regions such as cluster outskirts and filaments.

  4. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect versus redshift test for the cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantowski, R.; Chen, B.; Dai, X.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a method using the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect caused by individual inhomogeneities to determine the cosmological parameters H0, Ωm , and ΩΛ, etc. This ISW-redshift test requires detailed knowledge of the internal kinematics of a set of individual density perturbations, e.g., galaxy clusters and/or cosmic voids, in particular their density and velocity profiles, and their mass accretion rates. It assumes the density perturbations are isolated and embedded (equivalently compensated) and makes use of the newly found relation between the ISW temperature perturbation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the Fermat potential of the lens. Given measurements of the amplitudes of the temperature variations in the CMB caused by such clusters or voids at various redshifts and estimates of their angular sizes or masses, one can constrain the cosmological parameters. More realistically, the converse is more likely, i.e., if the background cosmology is sufficiently constrained, measurement of ISW profiles of clusters and voids (e.g., hot and cold spots and rings) can constrain dynamical properties of the dark matter, including accretion, associated with such lenses and thus constrain the evolution of these objects with redshift.

  5. Effective Einstein cosmological spaces for non-minimal modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio; Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2015-06-01

    Certain off-diagonal vacuum and nonvacuum configurations in Einstein gravity can mimic physical effects of modified gravitational theories of type. We prove this statement by constructing exact and approximate solutions which encode certain models of covariant Hořava type gravity with dynamical Lorentz symmetry breaking. Off-diagonal generalizations of de Sitter and nonholonomic CDM universes are constructed which are generated through nonlinear gravitational polarization of fundamental physical constants and which model interactions with non-constant exotic fluids and effective matter. The problem of possible matter instability for such off-diagonal deformations in (modified) gravity theories is discussed.

  6. Cosmology of a holographic induced gravity model with curvature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam; Errahmani, Ahmed; Ouali, Taoufiq

    2011-10-15

    We present a holographic model of the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati scenario with a Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk. We concentrate on the solution that generalizes the normal Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati branch. It is well known that this branch cannot describe the late-time acceleration of the universe even with the inclusion of a Gauss-Bonnet term. Here, we show that this branch in the presence of a Gauss-Bonnet curvature effect and a holographic dark energy with the Hubble scale as the infrared cutoff can describe the late-time acceleration of the universe. It is worthwhile to stress that such an energy density component cannot do the same job on the normal Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati branch (without Gauss-Bonnet modifications) nor in a standard four-dimensional relativistic model. The acceleration on the brane is also presented as being induced through an effective dark energy which corresponds to a balance between the holographic one and geometrical effects encoded through the Hubble parameter.

  7. Sociology of Modern Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.

    2009-08-01

    Certain results of observational cosmology cast critical doubt on the foundations of standard cosmology but leave most cosmologists untroubled. Alternative cosmological models that differ from the Big Bang have been published and defended by heterodox scientists; however, most cosmologists do not heed these. This may be because standard theory is correct and all other ideas and criticisms are incorrect, but it is also to a great extent due to sociological phenomena such as the ``snowball effect'' or ``groupthink''. We might wonder whether cosmology, the study of the Universe as a whole, is a science like other branches of physics or just a dominant ideology.

  8. Planck CMB anomalies: astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects and the curse of masking

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Paykari, P.; Sureau, F.; Bobin, J. E-mail: jstarck@cea.fr E-mail: florent.sureau@cea.fr

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes will be made available for download here http://www.cosmostat.org/anomaliesCMB.html.

  9. Planck CMB Anomalies: Astrophysical and Cosmological Secondary Effects and the Curse of Masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes are available online.

  10. The Impact of Galaxy Cluster Mergers on Cosmological Parameter Estimation from Surveys of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Ricker, Paul M.; Randall, Scott W.

    2008-06-01

    Sensitive surveys of the cosmic microwave background will detect thousands of galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Two SZ observables, the central or maximum and integrated Comptonization parameters ymax and Y, relate in a simple way to the total cluster mass, which allows the construction of mass functions (MFs) that can be used to estimate cosmological parameters such as ΩM, σ8, and the dark energy parameter w. However, clusters form from the mergers of smaller structures, events that can disrupt the equilibrium of intracluster gas on which SZ- M relations rely. From a set of N-body/hydrodynamical simulations of binary cluster mergers, we calculate the evolution of Y and ymax over the course of merger events and find that both parameters are transiently "boosted," primarily during the first core passage. We then use a semianalytic technique developed by Randall et al. to estimate the effect of merger boosts on the distribution functions YF and yF of Y and ymax, respectively, via cluster merger histories determined from extended Press-Schechter (PS) merger trees. We find that boosts do not induce an overall systematic effect on YFs, and the values of ΩM, σ8, and w were returned to within 2% of values expected from the nonboosted YFs. The boosted yFs are significantly biased, however, causing ΩM to be underestimated by 15%-45%, σ8 to be overestimated by 10%-25%, and w to be pushed to more negative values by 25%-45%. We confirm that the integrated SZ effect, Y, is far more robust to mergers than ymax, as previously reported by Motl et al. and similarly found for the X-ray equivalent YX, and we conclude that Y is the superior choice for constraining cosmological parameters.

  11. Cosmological Implications of the Effects of X-Ray Clusters on the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, William R.

    1996-01-01

    We have been carrying forward a program to confront X-ray observations of clusters and their evolution as derived from X-ray observatories with observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition to the material covered in our previous reports (including three published papers), most recently we have explored the effects of a cosmological constant on the predicted Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from the ensemble of clusters. In this report we summarize that work from which a paper will be prepared.

  12. The Specific Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass Fraction of Low-mass Central Galaxies in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Reese, V.; Colín, P.; González-Samaniego, A.; Valenzuela, O.; Firmani, C.; Velázquez, H.; Ceverino, D.

    2011-08-01

    By means of cosmological N-body + hydrodynamics simulations of galaxies in the context of the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario we explore the specific star formation rates (SSFR = SFR/Ms , Ms is the stellar mass) and stellar mass fractions (Fs ≡ Ms /Mh , Mh is the halo mass) for sub-M* field galaxies at different redshifts (0 <~ z <~ 1.5). Distinct low-mass halos (2.5 <~ Mh /1010 M sun <~ 50 at z = 0) were selected for the high-resolution re-simulations. The Hydrodynamics Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code was used and some variations of the sub-grid parameters were explored. Most simulated galaxies, specially those with the highest resolutions, have significant disk components and their structural and dynamical properties are in reasonable agreement with observations of sub-M* field galaxies. However, the SSFRs are 5-10 times smaller than the averages of several (compiled and homogenized here) observational determinations for field blue/star-forming galaxies at z < 0.3 (at low masses, most observed field galaxies are actually blue/star forming). This inconsistency seems to remain even at z ~ 1-1.5, although it is less drastic. The Fs of simulated galaxies increases with Mh as semi-empirical inferences show. However, the values of Fs at z ≈ 0 are ~5-10 times larger in the simulations than in the inferences; these differences increases probably to larger factors at z ~ 1-1.5. The inconsistencies reported here imply that simulated low-mass galaxies (0.2 <~ Ms /109 M sun <~ 30 at z = 0) assembled their stellar masses much earlier than observations suggest. Our results confirm the predictions found by means of ΛCDM-based models of disk galaxy formation and evolution for isolated low-mass galaxies, and highlight that our understanding and implementation of astrophysics into simulations and models are still lacking vital ingredients.

  13. Cosmological simulations of decaying dark matter: implications for small-scale structure of dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Peter, Annika H. G.; Strigari, Louis E.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Arant, Bryan; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Rocha, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    We present a set of N-body simulations of a class of models in which an unstable dark matter particle decays into a stable dark matter particle and a non-interacting light particle with decay lifetime comparable to the Hubble time. We study the effects of the recoil kick velocity (Vk) received by the stable dark matter on the structures of dark matter haloes ranging from galaxy-cluster to Milky Way-mass scales. For Milky Way-mass haloes, we use high-resolution, zoom-in simulations to explore the effects of decays on Galactic substructure. In general, haloes with circular velocities comparable to the magnitude of kick velocity are most strongly affected by decays. We show that models with lifetimes Γ-1 ˜ H_0^{-1} and recoil speeds Vk ˜ 20-40 km s-1 can significantly reduce both the abundance of Galactic subhaloes and their internal densities. We find that decaying dark matter models that do not violate current astrophysical constraints can significantly mitigate both the `missing satellites problem' and the more recent `too big to fail problem'. These decaying models predict significant time evolution of haloes, and this implies that at high redshifts decaying models exhibit the similar sequence of structure formation as cold dark matter. Thus, decaying dark matter models are significantly less constrained by high-redshift phenomena than warm dark matter models. We conclude that models of decaying dark matter make predictions that are relevant for the interpretation of small galaxies observations in the Local Group and can be tested as well as by forthcoming large-scale surveys.

  14. Chaos in string cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, T.

    2003-10-01

    We briefly review two aspects of string cosmology: 1) the presence of chaos in the generic cosmological solutions of the tree-level low-energy effective actions coming out of string theory, and 2) the remarkable link between the latter chaos and the Weyl groups of some hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras.

  15. String Cosmology and Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault

    We briefly review two aspects of string cosmology: (1) the presence of chaos in the generic cosmological solutions of the tree-level low-energy effective actions coming out of string theory, and (2) the remarkable link between the latter chaos and the Weyl groups of some hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras.

  16. Large N Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    2001-09-01

    The large N approximation should hold in cosmology even at the origin of the universe. I use ADS-CFT to calculate the effective action and obtain a cosmological model in which inflation is driven by the trace anomaly. Despite having ghosts, this model can agree with observations.

  17. A Hydrodynamic Approach to Cosmology: Nonlinear Effects on Cosmic Backgrounds in the Cold Dark Matter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaramella, Roberto; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1993-10-01

    Using the CDM model as a testbed, we produce and analyze sky maps of fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation field due to Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, as well as those seen in X-ray background at 1 keV and at 2 keV. These effects are due to the shock heating of baryons in the nonlinear phases of cosmic collapses. Comparing observations with computations provides a powerful tool to constrain cosmological models. We use a highly developed Eulerian mesh code with 1283 cells and 2 × 106 particles. Most of our information comes from simulations with box size 64 h-1 Mpc, but other calculations were made with L = 16 h-1 and L = 4 h-1 Mpc. A standard CDM input spectrum was used with amplitude defined by the requirement (ΔM/M)rms = 1/1.5 on 8 h-1 Mpc scales (lower than the COBE normalization by a factor of 1.6±0.4), with H0 = 50 km s-1 Mpc-1 and Ωb = 0.05. For statistical validity a large number of independent simulations must be run. In all, over 60 simulations were run from z = 20 to z = 0. We produce maps of 50' x 50' with 1' effective resolution by randomly stacking along the past light cone for 0.02 ≤ z ≤ 10 appropriate combinations of computational boxes of different comoving lengths, which are picked from among different realizations of initial conditions. We also compute time evolution, present intensity pixel distributions, and the autocorrelation function of sky fluctuations as a function of angular scale. Our most reliable results are obtained after deletion of bright sources having 1 keV intensity greater than 0.1 keV cm-2 sr-1 s-1 keV-1. Then for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich parameter γ the mean and dispersion are [barγ, σ(γ)] = (4, 3) × 10-7 with a lognormal distribution providing a good fit for values of y greater than average. The angular correlation function (less secure) is roughly exponential with scale length ˜2'.5. For the X-ray intensity fluctuations, in units of keV s-1 sr-1 cm-2 keV-1 we find barIX1, X2 = (0.02, 0.006) and σX1, X2 = (0

  18. Keeping it real: revisiting a real-space approach to running ensembles of cosmological N-body simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, Chris

    2013-05-01

    In setting up initial conditions for ensembles of cosmological N-body simulations there are, fundamentally, two choices: either maximizing the correspondence of the initial density field to the assumed fourier-space clustering or, instead, matching to real-space statistics and allowing the DC mode (i.e. overdensity) to vary from box to box as it would in the real universe. As a stringent test of both approaches, I perform ensembles of simulations using power law and a ''powerlaw times a bump'' model inspired by baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), exploiting the self-similarity of these initial conditions to quantify the accuracy of the matter-matter two-point correlation results. The real-space method, which was originally proposed by Pen 1997 [1] and implemented by Sirko 2005 [2], performed well in producing the expected self-similar behavior and corroborated the non-linear evolution of the BAO feature observed in conventional simulations, even in the strongly-clustered regime (σ{sub 8}∼>1). In revisiting the real-space method championed by [2], it was also noticed that this earlier study overlooked an important integral constraint correction to the correlation function in results from the conventional approach that can be important in ΛCDM simulations with L{sub box}∼<1 h{sup −1}Gpc and on scales r∼>L{sub box}/10. Rectifying this issue shows that the fourier space and real space methods are about equally accurate and efficient for modeling the evolution and growth of the correlation function, contrary to previous claims. An appendix provides a useful independent-of-epoch analytic formula for estimating the importance of the integral constraint bias on correlation function measurements in ΛCDM simulations.

  19. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: A Measurement of the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Using the Skewness of the CMB Temperature Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael J.; Sherwin, Blake D.; Hill, J. Collin; Addison, Graeme; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Duenner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gralla, Megan, B.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Wollack, Ed

    2012-01-01

    We present a detection of the unnormalized skewness (T(sup )(sup 2)(n(circumflex)) induced by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect in filtered Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) 148 GHz cosmic microwave background temperature maps. Contamination due to infrared and radio sources is minimized by template subtraction of resolved sources and by constructing a mask using outlying values in the 218 GHz (tSZ-null) ACT maps. We measure (T(sup )(sup 3) (n(circumflex)) = -31 plus or minus 6 micro-K(sup 3) (measurement error only) or plus or minus 14 micro-K(sup 3) (including cosmic variance error) in the filtered ACT data, a 5sigma detection. We show that the skewness is a sensitive probe of sigma(sub 8), and use analytic calculations and tSZ simulations to obtain cosmological constraints from this measurement. From this signal alone we infer a value of sigma(sub 8) = 0.78 sup +0.03 sub -0.04 (68% C.L.) sup +0.05 sub -0.16. Our results demonstrate that measurements of nonGaussianity can be a useful method for characterizing the tSZ effect and extracting the underlying cosmological information.

  20. Atacama Cosmology Telescope: A measurement of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect using the skewness of the CMB temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael J.; Sherwin, Blake D.; Hill, J. Colin; Addison, Graeme; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gralla, Megan B.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Nolta, Michael R.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Reese, Erik D.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Switzer, Eric R.; Trac, Hy; Wollack, Ed

    2012-12-01

    We present a detection of the unnormalized skewness ⟨T˜3(n^)⟩ induced by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (tSZ) effect in filtered Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) 148 GHz cosmic microwave background temperature maps. Contamination due to infrared and radio sources is minimized by template subtraction of resolved sources and by constructing a mask using outlying values in the 218 GHz (tSZ-null) ACT maps. We measure ⟨T˜3(n^)⟩=-31±6μK3 (Gaussian statistics assumed) or ±14μK3 (including non-Gaussian corrections) in the filtered ACT data, a 5σ detection. We show that the skewness is a sensitive probe of σ8, and use analytic calculations and tSZ simulations to obtain cosmological constraints from this measurement. From this signal alone we infer a value of σ8=0.79-0.03+0.03 (68% C.L.) ​-0.06+0.06 (95% C.L.). Our results demonstrate that measurements of non-Gaussianity can be a useful method for characterizing the tSZ effect and extracting the underlying cosmological information.

  1. NIHAO project - I. Reproducing the inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time with a large sample of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Dutton, Aaron A.; Stinson, Gregory S.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2015-11-01

    We introduce project NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of a Hundred Astrophysical Objects), a set of 100 cosmological zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations performed using the GASOLINE code, with an improved implementation of the SPH algorithm. The haloes in our study range from dwarf (M200 ˜ 5 × 109 M⊙) to Milky Way (M200 ˜ 2 × 1012 M⊙) masses, and represent an unbiased sampling of merger histories, concentrations and spin parameters. The particle masses and force softenings are chosen to resolve the mass profile to below 1 per cent of the virial radius at all masses, ensuring that galaxy half-light radii are well resolved. Using the same treatment of star formation and stellar feedback for every object, the simulated galaxies reproduce the observed inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time as expressed through the stellar mass versus halo mass relation, and the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation. We thus conclude that stellar feedback is the chief piece of physics required to limit the efficiency of star formation in galaxies less massive than the Milky Way.

  2. Cosmological effects of scalar-photon couplings: dark energy and varying-α Models

    SciTech Connect

    Avgoustidis, A.; Martins, C.J.A.P.; Monteiro, A.M.R.V.L.; Vielzeuf, P.E.; Luzzi, G. E-mail: Carlos.Martins@astro.up.pt E-mail: up110370652@alunos.fc.up.pt

    2014-06-01

    We study cosmological models involving scalar fields coupled to radiation and discuss their effect on the redshift evolution of the cosmic microwave background temperature, focusing on links with varying fundamental constants and dynamical dark energy. We quantify how allowing for the coupling of scalar fields to photons, and its important effect on luminosity distances, weakens current and future constraints on cosmological parameters. In particular, for evolving dark energy models, joint constraints on the dark energy equation of state combining BAO radial distance and SN luminosity distance determinations, will be strongly dominated by BAO. Thus, to fully exploit future SN data one must also independently constrain photon number non-conservation arising from the possible coupling of SN photons to the dark energy scalar field. We discuss how observational determinations of the background temperature at different redshifts can, in combination with distance measures data, set tight constraints on interactions between scalar fields and photons, thus breaking this degeneracy. We also discuss prospects for future improvements, particularly in the context of Euclid and the E-ELT and show that Euclid can, even on its own, provide useful dark energy constraints while allowing for photon number non-conservation.

  3. The effects of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature uncertainties on cosmological parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y Y E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-03-15

    We estimate the effect of the experimental uncertainty in the measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the extraction of cosmological parameters from future CMB surveys. We find that even for an ideal experiment limited only by cosmic variance up to l=2500 for both the temperature and polarization measurements, the projected cosmological parameter errors are remarkably robust against the uncertainty of 1 mK in the firas CMB temperature monopole measurement. The maximum degradation in sensitivity is 20%, for the baryon density estimate, relative to the case in which the monopole is known infinitely well. While this degradation is acceptable, we note that reducing the uncertainty in the current temperature measurement by a factor of five will bring it down to {approx}1%. We also estimate the effect of the uncertainty in the dipole temperature measurement. Assuming the overall calibration of the data to be dominated by the dipole error of 0.2% from firas, the sensitivity degradation is insignificant and does not exceed 10% in any parameter direction.

  4. The effect of foreground subtraction on cosmological measurements from intensity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, L.; Abdalla, F. B.; Blake, C.; Shaw, J. R.; Chapman, E.; Rawlings, S.

    2014-07-01

    We model a 21-cm intensity mapping survey in the redshift range 0.01 < z < 1.5 designed to simulate the skies as seen by future radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array, including instrumental noise and Galactic foregrounds. In our pipeline, we remove the Galactic foregrounds with a fast independent component analysis technique. We present the power spectrum of the large-scale matter distribution, C(ℓ), before and after the application of this foreground removal method and calculate the systematic errors. Our simulations show a certain level of bias remains in the power spectrum at all scales ℓ < 400. At large-scales ℓ < 30 this bias is particularly significant. We measure the impact of these systematics in two ways: first we fit cosmological parameters to the broad-band shape of the C(ℓ) where we find that the best fit is significantly shifted at the 2-3σ level depending on masking and noise levels. However, secondly, we recover cosmic distances without biases at all simulated redshifts by fitting the baryon acoustic oscillations in the C(ℓ). We conclude that further advances in foreground removal are needed in order to recover unbiased information from the broad-band shape of the C(ℓ), however, intensity mapping experiments will be a powerful tool for mapping cosmic distances across a wide redshift range.

  5. The effective two-dimensional phase space of cosmological scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David C.

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown by Remmen and Carroll [1] that, for a model universe which contains only a kinetically canonical scalar field minimally coupled to gravity it is possible to choose `special coordinates' to describe a two-dimensional effective phase space. The special, non-canonical, coordinates are phi,dot phi and the ability to describe an effective phase space with these coordinates empowers the common usage of phi‑dot phi as the space to define inflationary initial conditions. This paper extends the result to the full Horndeski action. The existence of a two-dimensional effective phase space is shown for the general case. Subsets of the Horndeski action, relevant to cosmology are considered as particular examples to highlight important aspects of the procedure.

  6. Origin and properties of dual and offset active galactic nuclei in a cosmological simulation at z=2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinborn, Lisa K.; Dolag, Klaus; Comerford, Julia M.; Hirschmann, Michaela; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Teklu, Adelheid F.

    2016-05-01

    In the last few years, it became possible to observationally resolve galaxies with two distinct nuclei in their centre. For separations smaller than 10 kpc, dual and offset active galactic nuclei (AGN) are distinguished: in dual AGN, both nuclei are active, whereas in offset AGN only one nucleus is active. To study the origin of such AGN pairs, we employ a cosmological, hydrodynamic simulation with a large volume of (182 Mpc)3 from the set of Magneticum Pathfinder Simulations. The simulation self-consistently produces 35 resolved black hole (BH) pairs at redshift z = 2, with a comoving distance smaller than 10 kpc. 14 of them are offset AGN and nine are dual AGN, resulting in a fraction of (1.2 ± 0.3) per cent AGN pairs with respect to the total number of AGN. In this paper, we discuss fundamental differences between the BH and galaxy properties of dual AGN, offset AGN and inactive BH pairs and investigate their different triggering mechanisms. We find that in dual AGN the BHs have similar masses and the corresponding BH from the less massive progenitor galaxy always accretes with a higher Eddington ratio. In contrast, in offset AGN the active BH is typically more massive than its non-active counterpart. Furthermore, dual AGN in general accrete more gas from the intergalactic medium than offset AGN and non-active BH pairs. This highlights that merger events, particularly minor mergers, do not necessarily lead to strong gas inflows and thus, do not always drive strong nuclear activity.

  7. FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of experiments to explore the generation of cosmological magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Ravasio, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of the experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation de Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. The simulations show that the result of the laser illuminating the target is a series of complex hydrodynamic phenomena.

  8. THE RELATION BETWEEN GAS DENSITY AND VELOCITY POWER SPECTRA IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: QUALITATIVE TREATMENT AND COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, I.; Allen, S. W.; Churazov, E. M.; Gaspari, M.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Lau, E. T.; Nagai, D.; Nelson, K.; Parrish, I. J.

    2014-06-10

    We address the problem of evaluating the power spectrum of the velocity field of the intracluster medium using only information on the plasma density fluctuations, which can be measured today by Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. We argue that for relaxed clusters there is a linear relation between the rms density and velocity fluctuations across a range of scales, from the largest ones, where motions are dominated by buoyancy, down to small, turbulent scales: (δρ{sub k}/ρ){sup 2}=η{sub 1}{sup 2}(V{sub 1,k}/c{sub s}){sup 2}, where δρ {sub k}/ρ is the spectral amplitude of the density perturbations at wavenumber k, V{sub 1,k}{sup 2}=V{sub k}{sup 2}/3 is the mean square component of the velocity field, c{sub s} is the sound speed, and η{sub 1} is a dimensionless constant of the order of unity. Using cosmological simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters, we calibrate this relation and find η{sub 1} ≈ 1 ± 0.3. We argue that this value is set at large scales by buoyancy physics, while at small scales the density and velocity power spectra are proportional because the former are a passive scalar advected by the latter. This opens an interesting possibility to use gas density power spectra as a proxy for the velocity power spectra in relaxed clusters across a wide range of scales.

  9. Statistical Analysis of Fly-by Encounters between Milky Way-sized Dark Matter Halos in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jeonghwan; Yun, Kiyun; Kim, Juhan; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    We present a statistical analysis of gravitational interactions between two Milky Way-sized halos (0.3 - 2.0 MMW) by performing cosmological N-body simulations. We take the total energy (E12) of two halos as the classifier of the halo pairs into mergers (E12 < 0) and flyby encounters (E12 > 0). The relative velocity distribution of galaxy pairs in clusters show that, regardless of redshift, the mean relative velocity is as high as ~600 km s-1 with a long high-velocity tail (up to ~ 1500 km s-1). The mean relative velocity in fields is, regardless of redshift, ~ 300 km s-1 with relatively narrow spread (100 ~ 500 km s-1). This leads to the flyby fraction in clusters being as high as the merger fraction and to the flyby fractions in fields being lower than the merger fraction. On the other hand, the statistics of the redshift evolution show that the number of flybys is, regardless of the environment, comparable to that of mergers at z ~ 1, yet N(flyby)/N(merger) decreases till z ~ 0. It is concluded that the flyby interactions have played a critical role in evolution of Milky Way-sized galaxies, particularly in clusters and at high redshift (z ~ 1).

  10. The Impact of Baryonic Physics on the Structure of Dark Matter Halos: the View from the FIRE Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keung Chan, Tsang; Keres, Dusan; Oñorbe, Jose; Hopkins, Philip F.; Muratov, Alexander; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-06-01

    We study the distribution of cold dark matter (CDM) in cosmological simulations from the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project, which incorporates explicit stellar feedback in the multi-phase ISM, with energetics from stellar population models. We find that stellar feedback, without ``fine-tuned'' parameters, greatly alleviates small-scale problems in CDM. Feedback causes bursts of star formation and outflows, altering the DM distribution. As a result, the inner slope of the DM halo profile (α) shows a strong mass dependence: profiles are shallow at Mh ∼ 1010-1011 M⊙ and steepen at higher/lower masses. The resulting core sizes and slopes are consistent with observations. Because the star formation efficiency, Ms/Mh is strongly halo mass dependent, a rapid change in α occurs around Mh ∼1010M⊙, (Ms∼106-107M⊙) as sufficient feedback energy becomes available to perturb the DM. Large cores are not established during the period of rapid growth of halos because of ongoing DM mass accumulation. Instead, cores require several bursts of star formation after the rapid buildup has completed. Stellar feedback dramatically reduces circular velocities in the inner kpc of massive dwarfs; this could be sufficient to explain the ``Too Big To Fail'' problem without invoking non-standard DM. Finally, feedback and baryonic contraction in Milky Way-mass halos produce DM profiles slightly shallower than the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, consistent with the normalization of the observed Tully-Fisher relation.

  11. An adaptively refined phase-space element method for cosmological simulations and collisionless dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Oliver; Angulo, Raul E.

    2016-01-01

    N-body simulations are essential for understanding the formation and evolution of structure in the Universe. However, the discrete nature of these simulations affects their accuracy when modelling collisionless systems. We introduce a new approach to simulate the gravitational evolution of cold collisionless fluids by solving the Vlasov-Poisson equations in terms of adaptively refineable `Lagrangian phase-space elements'. These geometrical elements are piecewise smooth maps between Lagrangian space and Eulerian phase-space and approximate the continuum structure of the distribution function. They allow for dynamical adaptive splitting to accurately follow the evolution even in regions of very strong mixing. We discuss in detail various one-, two- and three-dimensional test problems to demonstrate the performance of our method. Its advantages compared to N-body algorithms are: (i) explicit tracking of the fine-grained distribution function, (ii) natural representation of caustics, (iii) intrinsically smooth gravitational potential fields, thus (iv) eliminating the need for any type of ad hoc force softening. We show the potential of our method by simulating structure formation in a warm dark matter scenario. We discuss how spurious collisionality and large-scale discreteness noise of N-body methods are both strongly suppressed, which eliminates the artificial fragmentation of filaments. Therefore, we argue that our new approach improves on the N-body method when simulating self-gravitating cold and collisionless fluids, and is the first method that allows us to explicitly follow the fine-grained evolution in six-dimensional phase-space.

  12. Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    I discuss the classical cosmological tests, i.e., angular size-redshift, flux-redshift, and galaxy number counts, in the light of the cosmology prescribed by the interpretation of the CMB anisotropies. The discussion is somewhat of a primer for physicists, with emphasis upon the possible systematic uncertainties in the observations and their interpretation. Given the curious composition of the Universe inherent in the emerging cosmological model, I stress the value of searching for inconsistencies rather than concordance, and suggest that the prevailing mood of triumphalism in cosmology is premature.

  13. BMS in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehagias, A.; Riotto, A.

    2016-05-01

    Symmetries play an interesting role in cosmology. They are useful in characterizing the cosmological perturbations generated during inflation and lead to consistency relations involving the soft limit of the statistical correlators of large-scale structure dark matter and galaxies overdensities. On the other hand, in observational cosmology the carriers of the information about these large-scale statistical distributions are light rays traveling on null geodesics. Motivated by this simple consideration, we study the structure of null infinity and the associated BMS symmetry in a cosmological setting. For decelerating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds, for which future null infinity exists, we find that the BMS transformations which leaves the asymptotic metric invariant to leading order. Contrary to the asymptotic flat case, the BMS transformations in cosmology generate Goldstone modes corresponding to scalar, vector and tensor degrees of freedom which may exist at null infinity and perturb the asymptotic data. Therefore, BMS transformations generate physically inequivalent vacua as they populate the universe at null infinity with these physical degrees of freedom. We also discuss the gravitational memory effect when cosmological expansion is taken into account. In this case, there are extra contribution to the gravitational memory due to the tail of the retarded Green functions which are supported not only on the light-cone, but also in its interior. The gravitational memory effect can be understood also from an asymptotic point of view as a transition among cosmological BMS-related vacua.

  14. THE DISTRIBUTION OF SATELLITES AROUND CENTRAL GALAXIES IN A COSMOLOGICAL HYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X. C.; Lin, W. P.; Wang, Yang Ocean; Kang, X.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Macciò, Andrea V. E-mail: kangxi@pmo.ac.cn

    2014-08-20

    Observations have shown that the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies is not random, but rather is aligned with the major axes of central galaxies (CGs). The strength of the alignment is dependent on the properties of both the satellites and centrals. Theoretical studies using dissipationless N-body simulations are limited by their inability to directly predict the shape of CGs. Using hydrodynamical simulations including gas cooling, star formation, and feedback, we carry out a study of galaxy alignment and its dependence on the galaxy properties predicted directly from the simulations. We found that the observed alignment signal is well produced, as is the color dependence: red satellites and red centrals both show stronger alignments than their blue counterparts. The reason for the stronger alignment of red satellites is that most of them stay in the inner region of the dark matter halo where the shape of the CG better traces the dark matter distribution. The dependence of alignment on the color of CGs arises from the halo mass dependence, since the alignment between the shape of the central stellar component and the inner halo increases with halo mass. We also find that the alignment of satellites is most strongly dependent on their metallicity, suggesting that the metallicity of satellites, rather than color, is a better tracer of galaxy alignment on small scales. This could be tested in future observational studies.

  15. Investigations in theoretical cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Michael James

    This report is a compilation of research I have done in the field of cosmology while at the University of California, Davis. The topics are all closely linked to the physics of scalar fields in General Relativity. This thesis contains the text of two papers, both of which deal with the goals and motivations of future projects in observational cosmology. The first is an evaluation of the effect of future observations on constraints on the parameter space of the Albrecht- Skordis model of dark energy. These future data sets were found to be able of constraining the scalar field model parameters in ways consistent with the constraints on the phenomenological equation of state parameters used by the Dark Energy Task Force. The second paper used principle component analysis of the equation of state parameter on simulated future data sets to construct parameter spaces. Distributions of dark energy quintessence models were then projected into these parameter spaces; it was found that there is structure in the separation of these models that is marginally detectable by so called "Stage 4" experiments. Also included are a review of the derivation of the scale invariant primordial power spectrum and an evaluation of a model of open inflation as the cause of the low CMB quadrupole.

  16. Cosmological Constraints from Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect and X-ray data for 37 Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Moy, Marshall; LaRoque, Samuel; Carlstrom, John; Reese, Erik

    2005-01-01

    We present a sample of 37 clusters of galaxies (0.14<=z<=0.89) for which we have Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect data and Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy. We use a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique to determine the spatial properties and surface brightness of the X-ray emitting gas, the X-ray temperature and abundance, and the SZE decrement for each cluster. From these observables, we infer each cluster's total mass, gas mass fraction, and angular diameter distance. The sample properties are used to constrain the Hubble parameter and Omega Matter, and scaling relations between integrated SZE flux and cluster mass and temperature are constructed. We also investigate the cosmological constraints that could be obtained if the X-ray/SZE sample were extended to a redshift of z approximately 2.

  17. Cosmology in a petri dish? Simulation of collective of colloids at fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleibel, J.

    2014-04-01

    Interfacially trapped, micrometer-sized colloidal particles interact via ranged capillary attraction which is analogous to two-dimensional screened Newtonian gravity with the capillary length λ as the tuneable screening length. Using Brownian namics simulations and density functional theory, we study the dynamics of an initially prepared distribution of colloids, either a random homogeneous distribution, or a finitely- sized patch of colloids. Whereas the limit λ → ∞ corresponds to the global collapse self-gravitating fluid, for smaller λ the dynamics crosses over to spinodal decomposition showing a coarsening of regions of enhanced density which emerge from initial fluctuations. For the finite patch of colloids and intermediate λ we predict theoretically and serve in simulations a ringlike density peak at the outer rim of the disclike patch, moving as an inbound shock wave. Experimental realizations of this crossover scenario appear be well possible for colloids trapped at water interfaces and having a radius of around micrometer. Finally, the influence of hydrodynamic interactions on this capillary collapse will be discussed briefly.

  18. Physical Properties and Evolution of Gravitationally Bound Halo Structures in Cosmological Dark Matter Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, David; Rocha, Miguel E.; Primack, Joel R.

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter halos existing around visible galaxies are important for studies of galaxy formation and evolution. Since dark matter does not interact with light and cannot be observed directly, studies of dark matter halos are advanced by computer simulations. Normally, halos are defined by their virialized regions; however, regions that are non-virialized can still be gravitationally bound, like the collision-bound Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies. Our project is the first comprehensive characterization of gravitationally bound halo structures, their properties, and their evolution. This study found the bound regions surrounding every dark matter halo from a 100 Mpc cube of the Bolshoi Simulation at redshifts 0, 1, and 2. We optimized computation by removing subhalos, implementing a search radius, and parallelizing code across 160 supercomputer cores. Then, we created a mass function, circular velocity function, and correlation function to describe these regions. The evolution of these properties was consistent with predictions from a ΛCDM universe model. We characterized the sizes and shapes of these bound regions across different mass intervals and redshifts. Most bound regions are elongated, although they become more spheroidal with time. The results enable astronomers to predict how dark matter halos behave in non-virialized regions of space and deepen our understanding of galaxy formation.

  19. Simulations of solitonic core mergers in ultralight axion dark matter cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, Bodo; Niemeyer, Jens C.; Engels, Jan F.

    2016-08-01

    Using three-dimensional simulations, we study the dynamics and final structure of merging solitonic cores predicted to form in ultralight axion dark matter halos. The classical, Newtonian equations of motion of a self-gravitating scalar field are described by the Schrödinger-Poisson equations. We investigate mergers of ground state (boson star) configurations with varying mass ratios, relative phases, orbital angular momenta and initial separation with the primary goal to understand the mass loss of the emerging core by gravitational cooling. Previous results showing that the final density profiles have solitonic cores and Navarro-Frenk-White-like tails are confirmed. In binary mergers, the final core mass does not depend on initial phase difference or angular momentum and only depends on mass ratio, total initial mass, and total energy of the system. For nonzero angular momenta, the otherwise spherical cores become rotating ellipsoids. The results for mergers of multiple cores are qualitatively identical.

  20. Evolution of galaxy properties across the peak of cosmic activity in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devriendt, Julien

    2015-08-01

    In this talk I will review how numerical hydrodynamics simulations predict galaxies evolve in the redshift range 1

  1. Direct Insights Into Observational Absorption Line Analysis Methods of the Circumgalactic Medium Using Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Vander Vliet, Jacob R.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Klypin, Anatoly

    2015-03-01

    We study the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of a z = 0.54 simulated dwarf galaxy using hydroART simulations. We present our analysis methods, which emulate observations, including objective absorption line detection, apparent optical depth (AOD) measurements, Voigt profile (VP) decomposition, and ionization modeling. By comparing the inferred CGM gas properties from the absorption lines directly to the gas selected by low ionization H i and Mg ii, and by higher ionization C iv and O vi absorption, we examine how well observational analysis methods recover the “true” properties of CGM gas. In this dwarf galaxy, low ionization gas arises in sub-kiloparsec “cloud” structures, but high ionization gas arises in multiple extended structures spread over 100 kpc; due to complex velocity fields, highly separated structures give rise to absorption at similar velocities. We show that AOD and VP analysis fails to accurately characterize the spatial, kinematic, and thermal conditions of high ionization gas. We find that H i absorption selected gas and O vi absorption gas arise in totally distinct physical gas structures, calling into question current observational techniques employed to infer metallicities and the total mass of “warm-hot” CGM gas. We present a method to determine whether C iv and O vi absorbing gas is photo or collisionally ionized and whether the assumption of ionization equilibrium is sound. As we discuss, these and additional findings have strong implications for how accurately currently employed observational absorption line methods recover the true gas properties, and ultimately, our ability to understand the CGM and its role in galaxy evolution.

  2. The impact of baryonic physics on the structure of dark matter haloes: the view from the FIRE cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. K.; Kereš, D.; Oñorbe, J.; Hopkins, P. F.; Muratov, A. L.; Faucher-Giguère, C.-A.; Quataert, E.

    2015-12-01

    We study the distribution of cold dark matter (CDM) in cosmological simulations from the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project, for M* ˜ 104-11 M⊙ galaxies in Mh ˜ 109-12 M⊙ haloes. FIRE incorporates explicit stellar feedback in the multiphase interstellar medium, with energetics from stellar population models. We find that stellar feedback, without `fine-tuned' parameters, greatly alleviates small-scale problems in CDM. Feedback causes bursts of star formation and outflows, altering the DM distribution. As a result, the inner slope of the DM halo profile (α) shows a strong mass dependence: profiles are shallow at Mh ˜ 1010-1011 M⊙ and steepen at higher/lower masses. The resulting core sizes and slopes are consistent with observations. This is broadly consistent with previous work using simpler feedback schemes, but we find steeper mass dependence of α, and relatively late growth of cores. Because the star formation efficiency M*/Mh is strongly halo mass dependent, a rapid change in α occurs around Mh ˜ 1010 M⊙ (M* ˜ 106-107 M⊙), as sufficient feedback energy becomes available to perturb the DM. Large cores are not established during the period of rapid growth of haloes because of ongoing DM mass accumulation. Instead, cores require several bursts of star formation after the rapid build-up has completed. Stellar feedback dramatically reduces circular velocities in the inner kpc of massive dwarfs; this could be sufficient to explain the `Too Big To Fail' problem without invoking non-standard DM. Finally, feedback and baryonic contraction in Milky Way-mass haloes produce DM profiles slightly shallower than the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, consistent with the normalization of the observed Tully-Fisher relation.

  3. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  4. The Galaxies Hubble Sequence Through CosmicTimes: Applying Parameter Optimization And Constraints From The Abundance Matching Technique To The 'Next Generation' of Large Cosmological Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Governato, Fabio

    The physical processes shaping the galaxies 'Hubble Sequence' are still poorly understood. Are gas outflows generated by Supernovae the main mechanism responsible for regulating star formation and the establishing the stellar mass - metallicity relation? What fraction of stars now in spheroids was originated in mergers? How does the environment of groups and clusters affect the evolution of galaxy satellites? The PI will study these problems analyzing a new set of state of the art hydro simulations of uniform cosmological volumes. This project has already been awarded a computational budget of 200 million CPU hours (but has only limited seed funding for science, hence this proposal). The best simulations will match the force and spatial resolution of the current best 'zoomed in' runs, as 'Eris' and will yield the first large statistical sample (1500+) of internally resolved galaxy systems with stellar masses ranging from from 10^7 to 10^10.5 solar masses. These simulations will allow us, for the very first time on such a large statistical set, to fully map the thermodynamical history of the baryons of internally resolved galaxies and identify the relative importance of the processes that shape their evolution as a function of stellar mass and cosmic time. As a novel, significant improvement over previous works we will introduce a new, unbiased statistical approach to the exploration of parameter space to optimize the model for star formation (SF) and feedback from supernovae and super massive back holes. This approach will also be used to evaluate the effects of resolution. The simulations will be run using ChaNGa, an improved version of Gasoline. Our flagship run will model a large volume of space (15.6k cubic Mpc) using 25 billion resolution elements. ChaNGa currently scales up to 35,000 cores and include a new version of the SPH implementation that drastically improves the description of temperature/density discontinuities and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (and

  5. Effective dynamics, big bounces, and scaling symmetry in Bianchi type I loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, D.-W.

    2007-12-15

    The detailed formulation for loop quantum cosmology (LQC) in the Bianchi I model with a scalar massless field has been constructed. In this paper, its effective dynamics is studied in two improved strategies for implementing the LQC discreteness corrections. Both schemes show that the big bang is replaced by the big bounces, which take place up to 3 times, once in each diagonal direction, when the area or volume scale factor approaches the critical values in the Planck regime measured by the reference of the scalar field momentum. These two strategies give different evolutions: In one scheme, the effective dynamics is independent of the choice of the finite sized cell prescribed to make Hamiltonian finite; in the other, the effective dynamics reacts to the macroscopic scales introduced by the boundary conditions. Both schemes reveal interesting symmetries of scaling, which are reminiscent of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics and also suggest that the fundamental spatial scale (area gap) may give rise to a temporal scale.

  6. The Convergence of Particle-in-Cell Schemes for Cosmological Dark Matter Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Andrew; Colella, Phillip; Van Straalen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Particle methods are a ubiquitous tool for solving the Vlasov-Poisson equation in comoving coordinates, which is used to model the gravitational evolution of dark matter (DM) in an expanding universe. However, these methods are known to produce poor results on idealized test problems, particularly at late times, after the particle trajectories have crossed. To investigate this, we have performed a series of one- and two-dimensional “Zel’dovich pancake” calculations using the popular particle-in-cell (PIC) method. We find that PIC can indeed converge on these problems provided that the following modifications are made. The first modification is to regularize the singular initial distribution function by introducing a small but finite artificial velocity dispersion. This process is analogous to artificial viscosity in compressible gas dynamics, and, as with artificial viscosity, the amount of regularization can be tailored so that its effect outside of a well-defined region—in this case, the high-density caustics—is small. The second modification is the introduction of a particle remapping procedure that periodically reexpresses the DM distribution function using a new set of particles. We describe a remapping algorithm that is third-order accurate and adaptive in phase space. This procedure prevents the accumulation of numerical errors in integrating the particle trajectories from growing large enough to significantly degrade the solution. Once both of these changes are made, PIC converges at second order on the Zel’dovich pancake problem, even at late times, after many caustics have formed. Furthermore, the resulting scheme does not suffer from the unphysical, small-scale “clumping” phenomenon known to occur on the pancake problem when the perturbation wavevector is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinate axes.

  7. Cosmological antigravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    The long-derided cosmological constant - a contrivance of Albert Einstein's that represents a bizarre form of energy inherent in space itself - is one of two contenders for explaining changes in the expansion rate of the Universe.

  8. Modular cosmology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, T.

    This talk is a summary of work done in collaboration with Micha Berkooz, Greg Moore, Steve Shenker and Paul Steinhardt on a cosmology whose early history is described in terms of the moduli fields of string theory.

  9. Challenges for Precision Cosmology with X-Ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Gas Mass Measurements of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallman, Eric J.; Motl, Patrick M.; Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael L.

    2006-09-01

    We critically analyze the measurement of galaxy cluster gas masses, which is central to cosmological studies that rely on the galaxy cluster gas mass fraction. Using synthetic observations of numerically simulated clusters viewed through their X-ray emission and thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE), we reduce the observations to obtain measurements of the cluster gas mass. We quantify the possible sources of uncertainty and systematic bias associated with the common simplifying assumptions used in reducing real cluster observations, including isothermality and hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that intrinsic variations in clusters limit the precision of observational gas mass estimation to ~10% to 1 σ confidence, excluding instrumental effects. Gas mass estimates show surprisingly little trending in the scatter as a function of cluster redshift. For the full cluster sample, methods that use SZE profiles out to roughly the virial radius are the simplest, most accurate, and unbiased way to estimate cluster mass. X-ray methods are systematically more precise mass estimators than are SZE methods if merger and cool-core systems are removed, but slightly overestimate (5%-10%) the cluster gas mass on average. We find that cool-core clusters in our samples are particularly poor candidates for observational mass estimation, even when excluding emission from the core region. The effects of cooling in the cluster gas alter the radial profile of the X-ray and SZE surface brightness even outside the cool-core region. Finally, we find that methods using a universal temperature profile estimate cluster masses to higher precision than those assuming isothermality.

  10. Emergent cosmology revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, Satadru; Sahni, Varun; Shtanov, Yuri; Unnikrishnan, Sanil E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in E-mail: sanil@lnmiit.ac.in

    2014-07-01

    We explore the possibility of emergent cosmology using the effective potential formalism. We discover new models of emergent cosmology which satisfy the constraints posed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We demonstrate that, within the framework of modified gravity, the emergent scenario can arise in a universe which is spatially open/closed. By contrast, in general relativity (GR) emergent cosmology arises from a spatially closed past-eternal Einstein Static Universe (ESU). In GR the ESU is unstable, which creates fine tuning problems for emergent cosmology. However, modified gravity models including Braneworld models, Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Asymptotically Free Gravity result in a stable ESU. Consequently, in these models emergent cosmology arises from a larger class of initial conditions including those in which the universe eternally oscillates about the ESU fixed point. We demonstrate that such an oscillating universe is necessarily accompanied by graviton production. For a large region in parameter space graviton production is enhanced through a parametric resonance, casting serious doubts as to whether this emergent scenario can be past-eternal.